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Sample records for mammographic imaging screening

  1. Journal club: molecular breast imaging at reduced radiation dose for supplemental screening in mammographically dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Deborah J; Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Maxwell, Robert W; Jones, Katie N; Toledano, Alicia Y; O'Connor, Michael K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of supplemental screening molecular breast imaging (MBI) in women with mammographically dense breasts after system modifications to permit radiation dose reduction. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A total of 1651 asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breasts on prior mammography underwent screening mammography and adjunct MBI performed with 300-MBq (99m)Tc-sestamibi and a direct-conversion (cadmium zinc telluride) gamma camera, both interpreted independently. The cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsies performed (PPV3) were determined. RESULTS. In 1585 participants with a complete reference standard, 21 were diagnosed with cancer: two detected by mammography only, 14 by MBI only, three by both modalities, and two by neither. Of 14 participants with cancers detected only by MBI, 11 had invasive disease (median size, 0.9 cm; range, 0.5-4.1 cm). Nine of 11 (82%) were node negative, and two had bilateral cancers. With the addition of MBI to mammography, the overall cancer detection rate (per 1000 screened) increased from 3.2 to 12.0 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 8.8). The invasive cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 8.8 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 6.9), a relative increase of 363%, while the change in DCIS detection was not statistically significant (from 1.3 to 3.2, p =0.250). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 24%; specificity, 89%; and PPV3, 25%. For the combination, sensitivity was 91% (p < 0.001); specificity, 83% (p < 0.001); and PPV3, 28% (p = 0.70). The recall rate increased from 11.0% with mammography alone to 17.6% (p < 0.001) for the combination; the biopsy rate increased from 1.3% for mammography alone to 4.2% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION. When added to screening mammography, MBI performed using a radiopharmaceutical activity acceptable for screening (effective dose 2.4 mSv) yielded a supplemental cancer detection rate

  2. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p<0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  3. 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x rays with application to breast CT and mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uytven, Eric Peter

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal tissue. Commercial Computed Tomography (CT) produces a true 3D image yet has a limited role in mammography due to relatively low resolution and contrast. With the intent of enhancing mammography and breast CT, we have developed an algorithm which can produce 3D electron density images using a single projection. Imaging an object with x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at the detector plane. A known incident beam spectrum, beam shape, and arbitrary 3D matrix of electron density values enable a theoretical scattered photon distribution to be calculated. An iterative minimization algorithm is used to make changes to the electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the theoretical and the experimentally measured distributions. The object is characterized by the converged electron density image. This technique has been validated in simulation using data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. At both mammographic and CT energies, a scanning polychromatic pencil beam was used to image breast tissue phantoms containing lesion-like inhomogeneities. The resulting Monte Carlo data is processed using a Nelder-Mead iterative algorithm (MATLAB) to produce the 3D matrix of electron density values. Resulting images have confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect various 1x1x2.5 mm3 lesions with calcification content as low as 0.5% (p<0.005) at a dose comparable to mammography.

  4. Breast image pre-processing for mammographic tissue segmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Wenda; Hogg, Peter; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R E; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-12-01

    During mammographic image acquisition, a compression paddle is used to even the breast thickness in order to obtain optimal image quality. Clinical observation has indicated that some mammograms may exhibit abrupt intensity change and low visibility of tissue structures in the breast peripheral areas. Such appearance discrepancies can affect image interpretation and may not be desirable for computer aided mammography, leading to incorrect diagnosis and/or detection which can have a negative impact on sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography. This paper describes a novel mammographic image pre-processing method to improve image quality for analysis. An image selection process is incorporated to better target problematic images. The processed images show improved mammographic appearances not only in the breast periphery but also across the mammograms. Mammographic segmentation and risk/density classification were performed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative evaluation. When using the processed images, the results indicated more anatomically correct segmentation in tissue specific areas, and subsequently better classification accuracies were achieved. Visual assessments were conducted in a clinical environment to determine the quality of the processed images and the resultant segmentation. The developed method has shown promising results. It is expected to be useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment.

  5. Study of digital mammographic equipments by phantom image quality.

    PubMed

    Mayo, P; Rodenas, F; Verdú, G; Campayo, J M; Villaescusa, J I

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, the digital radiographic equipments are replacing the traditional film-screen equipments and it is necessary to update the parameters to guarantee the quality of the process. Contrast-detail phantoms are applied to digital radiography to study the threshold contrast-detail sensitivity at operation conditions of the equipment. The phantom that is studied in this work is CDMAM 3.4. One of the most extended indexes to measure the image quality in an objective way is the image quality figure (IQF). The aim of this work is to study the image quality of different images contrast-detail phantom CDMAM 3.4, carrying out the automatic detection of the contrast-detail combination and to establish a parameter which characterize in an objective way the mammographic image quality. This is useful to compare images obtained at different digital mammographic equipments to study the functioning of the equipments that facilitates the evaluation of image contrast and detail resolution.

  6. A new detection algorithm for microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Ma, Yide; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach for microcalcification clusters detection is proposed. At the first time, we make a short analysis of mammographic images with microcalcification lesions to confirm these lesions have much greater gray values than normal regions. After summarizing the specific feature of microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening, we make more focus on preprocessing step including eliminating the background, image enhancement and eliminating the pectoral muscle. In detail, Chan-Vese Model is used for eliminating background. Then, we do the application of combining morphology method and edge detection method. After the AND operation and Sobel filter, we use Hough Transform, it can be seen that the result have outperformed for eliminating the pectoral muscle which is approximately the gray of microcalcification. Additionally, the enhancement step is achieved by morphology. We make effort on mammographic image preprocessing to achieve lower computational complexity. As well known, it is difficult to robustly achieve mammograms analysis due to low contrast between normal and lesion tissues, there are also much noise in such images. After a serious preprocessing algorithm, a method based on blob detection is performed to microcalcification clusters according their specific features. The proposed algorithm has employed Laplace operator to improve Difference of Gaussians (DoG) function in terms of low contrast images. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed method performs on a known public database namely MIAS, rather than synthetic images. The comparison experiments and Cohen's kappa coefficients all demonstrate that our proposed approach can potentially obtain better microcalcification clusters detection results in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  8. Breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, S; Anderman, C; Grothaus, L

    1989-01-01

    Within the context of an organized breast cancer screening program we conducted a prospective evaluation of the relation between breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening. The influence on participation of known breast cancer risk factors, as well as a summary risk label, (i.e. "high", or "moderate") were examined. The overall participation rate was 71 percent among 2,422 women, 50 to 79 years of age, invited to a centralized clinic. Multivariate analyses showed participation to be somewhat decreased among women with late menopause and definitely increased among women with any of the following factors: 1) increased age; 2) a family history of breast cancer; and 3) a previous breast biopsy. Women in the high-risk group were most likely to participate but the effect of the label was stronger among women ages 50 to 59 compared to women ages 60 to 79. The study results are generally consistent with previous findings that participants in screening programs have higher rates of breast cancer. The results also suggest the possibility that providing breast cancer risk information may encourage participation in screening. PMID:2817159

  9. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  10. The relative effect of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Ripping, Theodora M; van der Waal, Danielle; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are higher in women with a high socioeconomic status (SES). The potential to prevent death from breast cancer is therefore greater in the high SES group. This does, however, require that the effectiveness of screening in the high SES group is equal to or greater than the effectiveness in the low SES group. The aim of this study is to assess the relative effectiveness of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by SES.In Nijmegen, the Netherlands, women are invited to participate in biennial mammographic screening since 1975. Postal code is collected at each round and is used to calculate the SES of each woman based on the SES indicator of the Netherlands Institute for Social Research. The Dutch average was used to classify the SES score of each woman as either high or low. We designed a case-control study to investigate the effect of mammographic screening in women aged 50 to 75, 40 to 75, and 50 to 69 years, and calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Among the women invited to the mammographic screening program in Nijmegen, 10% had a high SES. In women aged 50 to 75 years, the breast cancer death rate was 38% lower in screened women than in unscreened women. The ORs for women with high SES (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.31-2.19) and low SES did not differ significantly (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47-0.78).Mammographic screening reduces breast cancer mortality, but we did not observe a significant difference in the relative effectiveness of screening by SES. If the effectiveness of mammographic screening is indeed not dependent on SES status, the absolute number of breast cancer deaths prevented by mammographic screening will be greater in the high SES than low SES group, because women with a high SES have a greater risk of breast cancer death.

  11. Association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Leader, Joseph K.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We recently investigated a new mammographic image feature based risk factor to predict near-term breast cancer risk after a woman has a negative mammographic screening. We hypothesized that unlike the conventional epidemiology-based long-term (or lifetime) risk factors, the mammographic image feature based risk factor value will increase as the time lag between the negative and positive mammography screening decreases. The purpose of this study is to test this hypothesis. From a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database with 1278 cases, we collected all available sequential FFDM examinations for each case including the "current" and 1 to 3 most recently "prior" examinations. All "prior" examinations were interpreted negative, and "current" ones were either malignant or recalled negative/benign. We computed 92 global mammographic texture and density based features, and included three clinical risk factors (woman's age, family history and subjective breast density BIRADS ratings). On this initial feature set, we applied a fast and accurate Sequential Forward Floating Selection (SFFS) feature selection algorithm to reduce feature dimensionality. The features computed on both mammographic views were individually/ separately trained using two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. The classification scores of the two ANNs were then merged with a sequential ANN. The results show that the maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.59, 7.98, and 15.77 for using the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st "prior" FFDM examinations, respectively, which demonstrates a higher association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer in the near-term after a negative screening.

  12. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  13. Computerized quantitative evaluation of mammographic accreditation phantom images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Shinohara, Norimitsu

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The objective was to develop and investigate an automated scoring scheme of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic accreditation phantom (RMI 156, Middleton, WI) images. Methods: The developed method consisted of background subtraction, determination of region of interest, classification of fiber and mass objects by Mahalanobis distance, detection of specks by template matching, and rule-based scoring. Fifty-one phantom images were collected from 51 facilities for this study (one facility provided one image). A medical physicist and two radiologic technologists also scored the images. The human and computerized scores were compared. Results: In terms of meeting the ACR's criteria, the accuracies of the developed method for computerized evaluation of fiber, mass, and speck were 90%, 80%, and 98%, respectively. Contingency table analysis revealed significant association between observer and computer scores for microcalcifications (p<5%) but not for masses and fibers. Conclusions: The developed method may achieve a stable assessment of visibility for test objects in mammographic accreditation phantom image in whether the phantom image meets the ACR's criteria in the evaluation test, although there is room left for improvement in the approach for fiber and mass objects.

  14. Characterizing mammographic images by using generic texture features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer, its use is limited in clinical practice because of a lack of automated and standardized measurement methods. The aims of this study were to evaluate a variety of automated texture features in mammograms as risk factors for breast cancer and to compare them with the percentage mammographic density (PMD) by using a case-control study design. Methods A case-control study including 864 cases and 418 controls was analyzed automatically. Four hundred seventy features were explored as possible risk factors for breast cancer. These included statistical features, moment-based features, spectral-energy features, and form-based features. An elaborate variable selection process using logistic regression analyses was performed to identify those features that were associated with case-control status. In addition, PMD was assessed and included in the regression model. Results Of the 470 image-analysis features explored, 46 remained in the final logistic regression model. An area under the curve of 0.79, with an odds ratio per standard deviation change of 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.65), was obtained with validation data. Adding the PMD did not improve the final model. Conclusions Using texture features to predict the risk of breast cancer appears feasible. PMD did not show any additional value in this study. With regard to the features assessed, most of the analysis tools appeared to reflect mammographic density, although some features did not correlate with PMD. It remains to be investigated in larger case-control studies whether these features can contribute to increased prediction accuracy. PMID:22490545

  15. Mammographic images segmentation using texture descriptors.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Angelica A; Mello, Carlos A B; Santos, Wellington P; Cavalcanti, George D C

    2009-01-01

    Tissue classification in mammography can help the diagnosis of breast cancer by separating healthy tissue from lesions. We present herein the use of three texture descriptors for breast tissue segmentation purposes: the Sum Histogram, the Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Local Binary Pattern (LBP). A modification of the LBP is also proposed for a better distinction of the tissues. In order to segment the image into its tissues, these descriptors are compared using a fidelity index and two clustering algorithms: k-Means and SOM (Self-Organizing Maps).

  16. Statistical Segmentation of Regions of Interest on a Mammographic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Mouloud; Rasigni, Monique; Bourennane, Salah; Juhan, Valerie

    2007-12-01

    This paper deals with segmentation of breast anatomical regions, pectoral muscle, fatty and fibroglandular regions, using a Bayesian approach. This work is a part of a computer aided diagnosis project aiming at evaluating breast cancer risk and its association with characteristics (density, texture, etc.) of regions of interest on digitized mammograms. Novelty in this paper consists in applying and adapting Markov random field for detecting breast anatomical regions on digitized mammograms whereas most of previous works were focused on masses and microcalcifications. The developed method was tested on 50 digitized mammograms of the mini-MIAS database. Computer segmentation is compared to manual one made by a radiologist. A good agreement is obtained on 68% of the mini-MIAS mammographic image database used in this study. Given obtained segmentation results, the proposed method could be considered as a satisfying first approach for segmenting regions of interest in a breast.

  17. Characterization of mammographic masses based on level set segmentation with new image features and patient information

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan Heangping; Ge Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Nees, Alexis; Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Zhou Chuan; Zhang Yiheng; Cui Jing

    2008-01-15

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for characterization of mammographic masses as malignant or benign has the potential to assist radiologists in reducing the biopsy rate without increasing false negatives. The purpose of this study was to develop an automated method for mammographic mass segmentation and explore new image based features in combination with patient information in order to improve the performance of mass characterization. The authors' previous CAD system, which used the active contour segmentation, and morphological, textural, and spiculation features, has achieved promising results in mass characterization. The new CAD system is based on the level set method and includes two new types of image features related to the presence of microcalcifications with the mass and abruptness of the mass margin, and patient age. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was used to merge the extracted features into a classification score. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The authors' primary data set consisted of 427 biopsy-proven masses (200 malignant and 227 benign) in 909 regions of interest (ROIs) (451 malignant and 458 benign) from multiple mammographic views. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used for training and testing. The new CAD system based on the level set segmentation and the new mammographic feature space achieved a view-based A{sub z} value of 0.83{+-}0.01. The improvement compared to the previous CAD system was statistically significant (p=0.02). When patient age was included in the new CAD system, view-based and case-based A{sub z} values were 0.85{+-}0.01 and 0.87{+-}0.02, respectively. The study also demonstrated the consistency of the newly developed CAD system by evaluating the statistics of the weights of the LDA classifiers in leave-one-case-out classification. Finally, an independent test on the publicly available digital database

  18. Spectral analysis of mammographic images using a multitaper method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Power spectral analysis in radiographic images is conventionally performed using a windowed overlapping averaging periodogram. This study describes an alternative approach using a multitaper technique and compares its performance with that of the standard method. This tool will be valuable in power spectrum estimation of images, whose content deviates significantly from uniform white noise. The performance of the multitaper approach will be evaluated in terms of spectral stability, variance reduction, bias, and frequency precision. The ultimate goal is the development of a useful tool for image quality assurance. Methods: A multitaper approach uses successive data windows of increasing order. This mitigates spectral leakage allowing one to calculate a reduced-variance power spectrum. The multitaper approach will be compared with the conventional power spectrum method in several typical situations, including the noise power spectra (NPS) measurements of simulated projection images of a uniform phantom, NPS measurement of real detector images of a uniform phantom for two clinical digital mammography systems, and the estimation of the anatomic noise in mammographic images (simulated images and clinical mammograms). Results: Examination of spectrum variance versus frequency resolution and bias indicates that the multitaper approach is superior to the conventional single taper methods in the prevention of spectrum leakage and variance reduction. More than four times finer frequency precision can be achieved with equivalent or less variance and bias. Conclusions: Without any shortening of the image data length, the bias is smaller and the frequency resolution is higher with the multitaper method, and the need to compromise in the choice of regions of interest size to balance between the reduction of variance and the loss of frequency resolution is largely eliminated.

  19. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-Ray Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2002-06-01

    Monochromatic imaging is typically done with synchrotron sources. These sources are expensive and not practical for clinical settings. However, conventional laboratory sources normally have insufficient intensity. Polycapillary x-ray optics can be used to efficiently produce an intense parallel beam, which can be diffracted from a crystal to create monochromatic radiation. Monochromatic parallel beam imaging produces high subject contrast, high resolution, and low patient dose. Contrast, resolution, and intensity measurements were performed with both high and low angular acceptance crystals. Testing was first done at 8 keV with an intense copper rotating anode source. Preliminary l7.5 kev measurements were then made with a molybdenum source. At 8 keV, contrast enhancement was a factor of five relative to the polychromatic case, in good agreement with theoretical values. At l7.5 kev, monochromatic subject contrast was a factor of two times greater than the conventional polychromatic contrast. The measured angular resolution with a silicon crystal is 0.6 mrad at 8 keV, and 0.2 - 0.3 mrad at 17.5 keV. For a 50-mm thick patient, this angle corresponds to 50 lp/mm with an ideal detector. The use of polychromatic collimating optics allow monochromatic mammographic imaging measurements with a conventional x-ray source in a practical clinical setting.

  20. Time-frequency analysis of functional optical mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Randall L.; Graber, Harry L.; Schmitz, Christoph H.; Tarantini, Frank; Khoury, Georges; Naar, David J.; Panetta, Thomas F.; Lewis, Theophilus; Pei, Yaling

    2003-07-01

    We have introduced working technology that provides for time-series imaging of the hemoglobin signal in large tissue structures. In this study we have explored our ability to detect aberrant time-frequency responses of breast vasculature for subjects with Stage II breast cancer at rest and in response to simple provocations. The hypothesis being explored is that time-series imaging will be sensitive to the known structural and functional malformations of the tumor vasculature. Mammographic studies were conducted using an adjustable hemisheric measuring head containing 21 source and 21 detector locations (441 source-detector pairs). Simultaneous dual-wavelength studies were performed at 760 and 830 nm at a framing rate of ~2.7 Hz. Optical measures were performed on women lying prone with the breast hanging in a pendant position. Two class of measures were performed: (1) 20- minute baseline measure wherein the subject was at rest; (2) provocation studies wherein the subject was asked to perform some simple breathing maneuvers. Collected data were analyzed to identify the time-frequency structure and central tendencies of the detector responses and those of the image time series. Imaging data were generated using the Normalized Difference Method (Pei et al., Appl. Opt. 40, 5755-5769, 2001). Results obtained clearly document three classes of anomalies when compared to the normal contralateral breast. 1) Breast tumors exhibit altered oxygen supply/demand imbalance in response to an oxidative challenge (breath hold). 2) The vasomotor response of the tumor vasculature is mainly depressed and exhibits an altered modulation. 3) The affected area of the breast wherein the altered vasomotor signature is seen extends well beyond the limits of the tumor itself.

  1. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  2. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  3. Mammographic screening debate on study design: a need to move the field forward.

    PubMed

    Ursin, Giske

    2012-12-12

    The mammographic screening debate has been running for decades. The temperature of this debate is unusually high, and all participants, regardless of viewpoint, seem to have a conflict of interest. Another unusual aspect of this debate is the focus on study design, and in particular on designs that some think exceeded their usefulness decades ago. What are the questions that remain to be answered in this debate? Are there methodological issues that have not been adequately addressed? Do we have the right tools to provide up-to-date answers to how women can best protect themselves against dying from breast cancer? This commentary discusses some of the current issues.See related Opinion articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/106 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/163.

  4. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  5. Assessment of a Four-View Mammographic Image Feature Based Fusion Model to Predict Near-Term Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and assess a new quantitative four-view mammographic image feature based fusion model to predict the near-term breast cancer risk of the individual women after a negative screening mammography examination of interest. The dataset included fully-anonymized mammograms acquired on 870 women with two sequential full-field digital mammography examinations. For each woman, the first "prior" examination in the series was interpreted as negative (not recalled) during the original image reading. In the second "current" examination, 430 women were diagnosed with pathology verified cancers and 440 remained negative ("cancer-free"). For each of four bilateral craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique view images of left and right breasts, we computed and analyzed eight groups of global mammographic texture and tissue density image features. A risk prediction model based on three artificial neural networks was developed to fuse image features computed from two bilateral views of four images. The risk model performance was tested using a ten-fold cross-validation method and a number of performance evaluation indices including the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and odds ratio (OR). The highest AUC = 0.725 ± 0.026 was obtained when the model was trained by gray-level run length statistics texture features computed on dense breast regions, which was significantly higher than the AUC values achieved using the model trained by only two bilateral one-view images (p < 0.02). The adjustable OR values monotonically increased from 1.0 to 11.8 as model-generated risk score increased. The regression analysis of OR values also showed a significant increase trend in slope (p < 0.01). As a result, this preliminary study demonstrated that a new four-view mammographic image feature based risk model could provide useful and supplementary image information to help predict the near-term breast cancer risk.

  6. Mammographic Imaging Studies Using the Monte Carlo Image Simulation-Differential Sampling (MCMIS-DS) Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 1-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of certain design changes in the Fisher Senoscan mammography system and in the degree of breast compression on the discernability of microcalcifications in calcification clusters often observed in mammograms with tumor lesions. The most important design change that one can contemplate in a digital mammography system to improve resolution of calcifications is the reduction of pixel dimensions of the digital detector. Breast compression is painful to the patient and is though to be a deterrent to women to get routine mammographic screening. Calcification clusters often serve as markers (indicators ) of breast cancer.

  7. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  8. Combined photoacoustic and acoustic imaging of human breast specimens in the mammographic geometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    A photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of near-infrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photoacoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression.

  9. Associated factors with mammographic changes in women undergoing breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    de Sant'Ana, Ricardo Soares; Mattos, Jacó Saraiva de Castro; da Silva, Anderson Soares; de Mello, Luanes Marques; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate association of sociodemographic, anthropometric, and epidemiological factors with result of mammogram in women undergoing breast cancer screening. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study with data obtained through interviews, anthropometric measurements, and mammography of 600 women aged 40 to 69 years at the Preventive Medicine Department of Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Brazil, in 2014. The results of these examinations in the BI-RADS categories 1 and 2 were grouped and classified in this study as normal mammogram outcome, and those of BI-RADS categories 3, 4A, 4B, 4C, and 5 were grouped and classified as altered mammogram outcome. The statistical analysis included the Student's t-test to compare means, as well as odds ratios (OR), with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), to verify an association by means of the multivariate analysis. Results: Of 600 women evaluated, 45% belonged to the age group of 40–49 years-old and 60.2% were classified as BI-RADS category 2. The multivariate analysis showed that women with blood hypertension (OR: 2.64; 95%CI: 1.07–6.49; p<0.05) were more likely to present changes in the mammography, while physical activity was associated with lower chances (OR: 0.30; 95%CI: 0.11–0.81; p<0.05). Conclusion: Hypertensive women undergoing screening mammography are more likely to present mammographic changes, whereas women practicing physical activity have lower chances (70%) of presenting changes in the breast compared with sedentary individuals. PMID:27759819

  10. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  11. Development of a Mammographic Image Processing Environment Using MATLAB.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Rogers, Steven K, Dennis W. Ruck, and Matthew Kabrisky. " Artificial Neural Networks for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Cancer ," Cancer Letters, 77 : 79...variables, like compressed breast thickness, may provide risk estimates that could dictate the frequency and type of screening procedures performed...just entering this field. [Rogers and others, 1994] Rogers, Steven K., Dennis W. Ruck, and Matthew Kabrisky. " Artificial Neural Networks for Early

  12. Feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic image based on multiscale analysis and morphology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibin; Yu, Shaode; Yang, Yuhan; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII).

  13. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  14. Automatic detection of regions of interest in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Erkang; Ling, Haibin; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2011-03-01

    This work is a part of our ongoing study aimed at comparing the topology of anatomical branching structures with the underlying image texture. Detection of regions of interest (ROIs) in clinical breast images serves as the first step in development of an automated system for image analysis and breast cancer diagnosis. In this paper, we have investigated machine learning approaches for the task of identifying ROIs with visible breast ductal trees in a given galactographic image. Specifically, we have developed boosting based framework using the AdaBoost algorithm in combination with Haar wavelet features for the ROI detection. Twenty-eight clinical galactograms with expert annotated ROIs were used for training. Positive samples were generated by resampling near the annotated ROIs, and negative samples were generated randomly by image decomposition. Each detected ROI candidate was given a confidences core. Candidate ROIs with spatial overlap were merged and their confidence scores combined. We have compared three strategies for elimination of false positives. The strategies differed in their approach to combining confidence scores by summation, averaging, or selecting the maximum score.. The strategies were compared based upon the spatial overlap with annotated ROIs. Using a 4-fold cross-validation with the annotated clinical galactographic images, the summation strategy showed the best performance with 75% detection rate. When combining the top two candidates, the selection of maximum score showed the best performance with 96% detection rate.

  15. Assessment of change in breast density: reader performance using synthetic mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Sue; Swayamprakasam, Chitra; Berks, Michael; Sergeant, Jamie; Morris, Julie; Wilson, Mary; Barr, Nicky; Boggis, Caroline

    2012-02-01

    A recent study has shown that breast cancer risk can be reduced by taking Tamoxifen, but only if this results in at least a 10% point reduction in mammographic density. When mammographic density is quantified visually, it is impossible to assess reader accuracy using clinical images as the ground truth is unknown. Our aim was to compare three models of assessing density change and to determine reader accuracy in identifying reductions of 10% points or more. We created 100 synthetic, mammogram-like images comprising 50 pairs designed to simulate natural reduction in density within each pair. Model I: individual images were presented to readers and density assessed. Model II: pairs of images were displayed together, with readers assessing density for each image. Model III: pairs of images were displayed together, and readers asked whether there was at least a 10% point reduction in density. Ten expert readers participated. Readers' estimates of percentage density were significantly closer to the truth (6.8%-26.4%) when images were assessed individually rather than in pairs (9.6%-29.8%). Measurement of change was significantly more accurate in Model II than Model I (p<0.005). Detecting density changes of at least 10% points in image pairs, mean accuracy was significantly (p<0.005) lower (58%-88%) when change was calculated from density assessments than in Model III (74%-92%). Our results suggest that where readers need to identify change in density, images should be displayed alongside one another. In our study, less accurate assessors performed better when asked directly about the magnitude of the change.

  16. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  17. Mammographic microcalcifications: detection with xerography, screen-film, and digitized film display.

    PubMed

    Smathers, R L; Bush, E; Drace, J; Stevens, M; Sommer, F G; Brown, B W; Karras, B

    1986-06-01

    Pulverized bone specks and aluminum oxide specks were measured by hand into sizes ranging from 0.2 mm to 1.0 mm and then arranged in clusters. These clusters were superimposed on a human breast tissue phantom, and xeromammograms and screen-film mammograms of the clusters were made. The screen-film mammograms were digitized using a high-resolution laser scanner and then displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Six radiologists independently counted the microcalcifications on the xeromammograms, the screen-film mammograms, and the digitized-film mammograms. The xeromammograms were examined with a magnifying glass; the screen-film images were examined with a magnifying glass and by hot light; and the digitized-film images were examined by electronic magnification and image processing. The bone speck size that corresponded to a mean 50% detectability level for each technique was as follows: xeromammography, 0.550 mm; digitized film, 0.573 mm; and screen-film, 0.661 mm. We postulate that electronic magnification and image processing with edge enhancement can improve the capability of screen-film mammography to enhance the detection of microcalcifications.

  18. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Dontchos, Brian N.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Korde, Larissa A.; Lam, Diana L.; Scheel, John R.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Results Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Conclusion Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. © RSNA

  19. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  20. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes; Seta, Marismary Horsth De; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Delamarque, Elizabete Vianna; de Azevedo, Ana Cecília Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%), films development (72.7%), film response (72.7%), low contrast fine detail (92.2%), tumor mass visualization (76.5%), absence of image artifacts (94.1%), mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%). On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8%) and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%). Conclusion The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval. PMID:25987749

  1. Similarity of fibroglandular breast tissue content measured from magnetic resonance and mammographic images and by a mathematical algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nayeem, Fatima; Ju, Hyunsu; Brunder, Donald G; Nagamani, Manubai; Anderson, Karl E; Khamapirad, Tuenchit; Lu, Lee-Jane W

    2014-01-01

    Women with high breast density (BD) have a 4- to 6-fold greater risk for breast cancer than women with low BD. We found that BD can be easily computed from a mathematical algorithm using routine mammographic imaging data or by a curve-fitting algorithm using fat and nonfat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. These BD measures in a strictly defined group of premenopausal women providing both mammographic and breast MRI images were predicted as well by the same set of strong predictor variables as were measures from a published laborious histogram segmentation method and a full field digital mammographic unit in multivariate regression models. We also found that the number of completed pregnancies, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, and progesterone were more strongly associated with amounts of glandular tissue than adipose tissue, while fat body mass, alanine aminotransferase, and insulin like growth factor-II appear to be more associated with the amount of breast adipose tissue. Our results show that methods of breast imaging and modalities for estimating the amount of glandular tissue have no effects on the strength of these predictors of BD. Thus, the more convenient mathematical algorithm and the safer MRI protocols may facilitate prospective measurements of BD.

  2. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  3. Optimizing quality of digital mammographic imaging using Taguchi analysis with an ACR accreditation phantom.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yuan; Pan, Lung-Fa; Chiang, Fu-Tsai; Yeh, Da-Ming; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2016-07-03

    This work demonstrated the improvement of the visualization of lesions by modulating the factors of an X-ray mammography imaging system using Taguchi analysis. Optimal combinations of X-ray operating factors in each group of level combination were determined using the Taguchi method, in which all factors were organized into only 18 groups, yielding analytical results with the same confidence as if each factor had been examined independently. The 4 considered operating factors of the X-ray machine were (1) anode material (target), (2) kVp, (3) mAs and (4) field of view (FOV). Each of these factors had 2 or 3 levels. Therefore, 54 (2×3×3×3 = 54) combinations were generated. The optimal settings were Rh as the target, 28 kVp, 80 mAs and 19×23 cm(2) FOV. The grade of exposed mammographic phantom image increased from the automatic exposure control (AEC) setting 70.92 to 72.00 under the optimal setting, meeting the minimum standard (70.00) set by Taiwan's Department of Health. The average glandular dose (AGD) of the exposed phantom, 0.182 cGy, was lower than that, 0.203 cGy, under the AEC setting. The Taguchi method was extremely promising for the design of imaging protocols in clinical diagnosis.

  4. A Review on Automatic Mammographic Density and Parenchymal Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R. E.; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. However, the exact cause(s) of breast cancer still remains unknown. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective way to tackle breast cancer. There are more than 70 common genetic susceptibility factors included in the current non-image-based risk prediction models (e.g., the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick models). Image-based risk factors, such as mammographic densities and parenchymal patterns, have been established as biomarkers but have not been fully incorporated in the risk prediction models used for risk stratification in screening and/or measuring responsiveness to preventive approaches. Within computer aided mammography, automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methods have been developed for estimation of breast tissue composition to facilitate mammographic risk assessment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methodologies developed over the past two decades and the evidence for risk assessment/density classification using segmentation. The aim of this review is to analyse how engineering advances have progressed and the impact automatic mammographic tissue segmentation has in a clinical environment, as well as to understand the current research gaps with respect to the incorporation of image-based risk factors in non-image-based risk prediction models. PMID:26171249

  5. A probabilistic framework for image information fusion with an application to mammographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Marina; Lucas, Peter J F; Samulski, Maurice; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2012-05-01

    The recent increased interest in information fusion methods for solving complex problem, such as in image analysis, is motivated by the wish to better exploit the multitude of information, available from different sources, to enhance decision-making. In this paper, we propose a novel method, that advances the state of the art of fusing image information from different views, based on a special class of probabilistic graphical models, called causal independence models. The strength of this method is its ability to systematically and naturally capture uncertain domain knowledge, while performing information fusion in a computationally efficient way. We examine the value of the method for mammographic analysis and demonstrate its advantages in terms of explicit knowledge representation and accuracy (increase of at least 6.3% and 5.2% of true positive detection rates at 5% and 10% false positive rates) in comparison with previous single-view and multi-view systems, and benchmark fusion methods such as naïve Bayes and logistic regression.

  6. Paget disease of the breast: mammographic, US, and MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Paget disease is a rare malignancy of the breast characterized by infiltration of the nipple epidermis by adenocarcinoma cells. The clinical features of Paget disease are characteristic and should increase the likelihood of the diagnosis being made. An important point is that more than 90% of cases of Paget disease are associated with an additional underlying breast malignancy. Paget disease is frequently associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the underlying lactiferous ducts of the nipple-areolar complex; it may even be associated with DCIS or invasive breast cancer elsewhere in the breast, at least 2 cm from the nipple-areolar complex. Nevertheless, mammographic findings may be negative in up to 50% of cases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in patients with Paget disease for evaluation of the nipple-areolar complex and identification of an additional underlying malignancy in the breast. The appropriate surgical treatment must be carefully selected and individualized on the basis of radiologic findings, especially those obtained with breast MR imaging.

  7. Effect on biopsy technique of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) for nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Butchart, Michael; MacFarlane, John K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine if the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) defines a group of patients with mammographic abnormalities in whom stereotactic core needle biopsy (SCNB) is appropriate. Design A blinded retrospective validation sample. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Patients One hundred and nine consecutive patients who underwent fine-wire localization breast biopsy (FWLB) between Jan. 1, 1994, and June 1, 1999, with a known final pathological diagnosis. Intervention Blinded mammographic review and classification using the BI-RADS; review of corresponding pathological findings from FWLBs. Outcome measures Correlation of pathological findings with each BI-RADS category and analysis of the predictive value of clinical and radiologic features. Results BI-RADS findings were as follows: 0 malignant lesions in 10 category 3 cases, 18 malignant lesions (3 in situ, 15 invasive) in 68 category 4 cases and 24 malignant lesions (8 in situ and 16 invasive) in 31 category 5 cases. There was 1 malignant lesion in 22 category 4 cases in women younger than 50 years. Conclusions SCNB should be applied to BI-RADS categories 3 and 4 (< 50 yr of age). FWLB should be reserved for category 4 (> 50 yr of age) and category 5 cases. This algorithm will reduce the morbidity and cost of breast biopsies in patients with nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities. PMID:12174979

  8. Disentangling the roles of mammographic screening and HRT in recent breast cancer incidence trends in italy by analyses based on calendar time and time since screening activation.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Falcini, Fabio; Cortesi, Laura; De Lisi, Vincenzo; Ferretti, Stefano; Tumino, Rosario; Russo, Antonio; Paci, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the roles of screening activation and hormone replacement therapy discontinuation on the recent declining breast cancer incidence trends in Italy. We analyzed 41,358 invasive female breast cancers incident during 1991-2004 in six Italian population-based cancer registries. Overall and age-specific incidence trends were evaluated using Joinpoint analysis. In addition to calendar years, data were analyzed on a years-since-screening-activation basis. Annual percentage change of standardized rates was computed. There were statistically significant increasing trends for women 40-44 and 45-49 years that did not change after screening activation. On the contrary, for women 50-69 years old and for those 70+ years, the increasing trends flattened around 2 years after screening activation. The prevalence of hormone replacement therapy use in Italy is and was rather low. In conclusion, the recent tendency toward stabilization observed in Italy for female breast cancer incidence rates in women aged 50 years or more follows the introduction of mammographic screening.

  9. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  10. Misclassification of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) Mammographic Density and Implications for Breast Density Reporting Legislation.

    PubMed

    Gard, Charlotte C; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Miglioretti, Diana L; Taplin, Stephen H; Rutter, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    USA states have begun legislating mammographic breast density reporting to women, requiring that women undergoing screening mammography who have dense breast tissue (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] density c or d) receive written notification of their breast density; however, the impact that misclassification of breast density will have on this reporting remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility of the four-category BI-RADS density measure and examine its relationship with a continuous measure of percent density. We enrolled 19 radiologists, experienced in breast imaging, from a single integrated health care system. Radiologists interpreted 341 screening mammograms at two points in time 6 months apart. We assessed intra- and interobserver agreement in radiologists'; interpretations of BI-RADS density and explored whether agreement depended upon radiologist characteristics. We examined the relationship between BI-RADS density and percent density in a subset of 282 examinations. Intraradiologist agreement was moderate to substantial, with kappa varying across radiologists from 0.50 to 0.81 (mean = 0.69, 95% CI [0.63, 0.73]). Intraradiologist agreement was higher for radiologists with ≥10 years experience interpreting mammograms (difference in mean kappa = 0.10, 95% CI [0.01, 0.24]). Interradiologist agreement varied widely across radiologist pairs from slight to substantial, with kappa ranging from 0.02 to 0.72 (mean = 0.46, 95% CI [0.36, 0.55]). Of 145 examinations interpreted as "nondense" (BI-RADS density a or b) by the majority of radiologists, 82.8% were interpreted as "dense" (BI-RADS density c or d) by at least one radiologist. Of 187 examinations interpreted as "dense" by the majority of radiologists, 47.1% were interpreted as "nondense" by at least one radiologist. While the examinations of almost half of the women in our study were interpreted clinically as having BI-RADS density c or d, only about 10% of

  11. Mammographically screen-detected asymmetric densities with architectural distortion and normal ultrasound at assessment: Value of MRI as a problem-solving tool.

    PubMed

    Price, Jeremy; Chen, Suet Wan

    2015-06-01

    Four cases are presented in which asymptomatic clients from an Australian mammography screening programme (BreastScreen ACT) were recalled for assessment of an asymmetric density with possible architectural distortion. In all four women, mammographic work-up was equivocal and ultrasound showed no suspicious correlate for biopsy. It was then doubtful as to whether any significant lesion was present. In all four cases, MRI revealed the presence of malignancy. Breast MRI can be a useful problem-solving tool in the work-up of such cases.

  12. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  13. Volume and tissue composition preserving deformation of breast CT images to simulate breast compression in mammographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Chen, Lingyun; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Images of mastectomy breast specimens have been acquired with a bench top experimental Cone beam CT (CBCT) system. The resulting images have been segmented to model an uncompressed breast for simulation of various CBCT techniques. To further simulate conventional or tomosynthesis mammographic imaging for comparison with the CBCT technique, a deformation technique was developed to convert the CT data for an uncompressed breast to a compressed breast without altering the breast volume or regional breast density. With this technique, 3D breast deformation is separated into two 2D deformations in coronal and axial views. To preserve the total breast volume and regional tissue composition, each 2D deformation step was achieved by altering the square pixels into rectangular ones with the pixel areas unchanged and resampling with the original square pixels using bilinear interpolation. The compression was modeled by first stretching the breast in the superior-inferior direction in the coronal view. The image data were first deformed by distorting the voxels with a uniform distortion ratio. These deformed data were then deformed again using distortion ratios varying with the breast thickness and re-sampled. The deformation procedures were applied in the axial view to stretch the breast in the chest wall to nipple direction while shrinking it in the mediolateral to lateral direction re-sampled and converted into data for uniform cubic voxels. Threshold segmentation was applied to the final deformed image data to obtain the 3D compressed breast model. Our results show that the original segmented CBCT image data were successfully converted into those for a compressed breast with the same volume and regional density preserved. Using this compressed breast model, conventional and tomosynthesis mammograms were simulated for comparison with CBCT.

  14. Concordance of computer-extracted image features with BI-RADS descriptors for mammographic mass margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Nees, Alexis; Helvie, Mark; Shi, Jiazheng

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate computer-extracted features for characterizing mammographic mass margins according to BI-RADS spiculated and circumscribed categories. The mass was automatically segmented using an active contour model. A spiculation measure for a pixel on the mass boundary was defined by using the angular difference between the image gradient vector and the normal to the mass, averaged over pixels in a spiculation search region. For the circumscribed margin feature, the angular difference between the principal eigenvector of the Hessian matrix and the normal to the mass was estimated in a band of pixels centered at each point on the boundary, and the feature was extracted from the resulting profile along the boundary. Three MQSA radiologists provided BI-RADS margin ratings for a data set of 198 regions of interest containing breast masses. The features were evaluated with respect to the individual radiologists' characterization using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, as well as with respect to that from the majority rule, in which a mass was labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) if it was characterized as such by 2 or 3 radiologists, and non-spiculated (non-circumscribed) otherwise. We also investigated the performance of the features for consensus masses, defined as those labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) or nonspiculated (non-circumscribed) by all three radiologists. When masses were labeled according to radiologists R1, R2, and R3 individually, the spiculation feature had an area A z under the ROC curve of 0.90+/-0.04, 0.90+/-0.03, 0.88+/-0.03, respectively, while the circumscribed margin feature had an A z value of 0.77+/-0.04, 0.74+/-0.04, and 0.80+/-0.03, respectively. When masses were labeled according to the majority rule, the A z values for the spiculation and the circumscribed margin features were 0.92+/-0.03 and 0.80+/-+/-0.03, respectively. When only the consensus masses were considered, the A z

  15. In newly diagnosed breast cancer, screening MRI of the contralateral breast detects mammographically occult cancer, even in elderly women: the mayo clinic in Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Vallow, Laura A; DePeri, Elizabeth R; McNeil, Rebecca B; Feigel, Deborah G; Amar, Surabhi; Buskirk, Steven J; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer is somewhat controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of synchronous, occult contralateral breast cancer detected by MRI but not by mammography or clinical breast examination in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, including those aged 70 years or older at our institution. MRI results for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent bilateral breast MRI after negative mammography and clinical examination between February 2003 and November 2007 at Mayo Clinic in Florida were reviewed. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed contralateral carcinoma diagnosed solely by MRI was determined and analyzed in the context of age, family history, menopausal status, breast density, and primary-tumor characteristics. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between contralateral carcinoma and potential patient risk factors. A total of 425 women were evaluated, of whom 129 (30%) were aged 70 years or older. A contralateral biopsy was recommended and performed solely on the basis of MRI in 72 of the 425 women (17%). Sixteen of these 72 women (22%) had pathologically confirmed carcinoma, including seven in the older subgroup. The prevalence of clinically and mammographically occult contralateral carcinoma detected by MRI was 3.8% (16/425) overall and 5.4% (7/129) in the group of older women. When potential risk factors for contralateral breast cancer were evaluated, postmenopausal status was the only significant predictor of contralateral cancer detected by MRI (p = 0.016). We concluded that contralateral breast screening with MRI should be considered in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, even those aged 70 years or older at diagnosis.

  16. Early detection of breast cancer through population-based mammographic screening in Asian women: a comparison study between screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Chuwa, Esther W L; Yeo, Allen W Y; Koong, Heng Nung; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Tan, Puay Hoon; Ho, Juliana T S; Wong, Jill S L; Ho, Gay Hui

    2009-01-01

    The first nation-wide mammographic screening program in Asia, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS), was launched in Singapore in January 2002. This study compared the presentation and results of screen-detected breast cancers with symptomatic breast cancers in two affiliated high-volume institutions, one of which was an assessment centre for BSS. The medical records of patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital and the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore, during the period January 2002 to December 2003 were reviewed. Clinical and pathological comparisons were made between screen-detected lesions and symptomatic lesions. Of a total of 767 cases, 640 (83.4%) were invasive carcinomas and 127 (16.6%) were ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) lesions. Only 13.4% of them were screen-detected. Compared to symptomatic cancers, screen-detected lesions were of smaller size (median size 18 versus 23 mm), a lower stage (stages 0-2, 95 versus 83.2%) and histologic grade (grade 1-2, 71 versus 60%), with a higher incidence of DCIS (31.0 versus 14.3%) and had higher rates of breast conservation (45.6 versus 28.2%) (all p-values <0.05). By multivariate analysis, tumor palpability, tumor size >20 mm, nodal involvement, cerbB2 overexpression, and advanced disease stage were independent poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival, whereas nodal involvement, advanced disease, and recurrence predicted poor cancer-specific survival. However, there was no statistically significant difference in disease-free survival or cancer-specific survival between the two groups at a median follow-up of 38 months. Screening mammography has allowed the detection of smaller and hence oncologically more favorable lesions in Asian women. Although no significant survival benefit was demonstrated in our study, a longer period of follow-up is essential before the benefit of mortality reduction, as a result of

  17. [Customer satisfaction analysis in women attending an organized mammographic screening. Pilot study at Trento].

    PubMed

    Della Sala, W; Tognotti, F; Pellegrini, M; Bernardi, D; Gentilini, M; Piffer, S

    2005-01-01

    Present paper reports on the results of a pilot customer satisfaction study carried out on 1.720 consecutive women (18.7 with spontaneous access) attended senology department (Trento and Borgo) in the context of a organized mammography screening programme, started in October 2000. Data were collected by a questionnarie filled by the women after mammography. 4.3% of the invited women reported the receiving the letter late, 0.9% considered it inaccurate, 7.2% had some problems for getting a new date for test, 1.8% of the whole sample reported some problems for external access and 2.2% for internal access to health facilities; 1.9% perceived waiting room as not friendly. The welcoming by the personnel is judged quite well, only 0.6% complained about it. Trento centre, is more efficient than Borgo. In 21.7% of the cases the mammography has been performed within next 30 minutes of the fixed time and in 7.9% besides that. 36.8% of the whole sample perceived mammography as tiresome and 4.1% as painful. The percentage of women reporting mammography disconforting increase, in Trento sample, according the education level as previously reported. The data about perceived quality are satisfactory, on the whole. Anyway it would be opportune to contain the waiting time.

  18. Validation of no-reference image quality index for the assessment of digital mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Borges, Lucas R.; Gabarda, Salvador; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-03-01

    To ensure optimal clinical performance of digital mammography, it is necessary to obtain images with high spatial resolution and low noise, keeping radiation exposure as low as possible. These requirements directly affect the interpretation of radiologists. The quality of a digital image should be assessed using objective measurements. In general, these methods measure the similarity between a degraded image and an ideal image without degradation (ground-truth), used as a reference. These methods are called Full-Reference Image Quality Assessment (FR-IQA). However, for digital mammography, an image without degradation is not available in clinical practice; thus, an objective method to assess the quality of mammograms must be performed without reference. The purpose of this study is to present a Normalized Anisotropic Quality Index (NAQI), based on the Rényi entropy in the pseudo-Wigner domain, to assess mammography images in terms of spatial resolution and noise without any reference. The method was validated using synthetic images acquired through an anthropomorphic breast software phantom, and the clinical exposures on anthropomorphic breast physical phantoms and patient's mammograms. The results reported by this noreference index follow the same behavior as other well-established full-reference metrics, e.g., the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Reductions of 50% on the radiation dose in phantom images were translated as a decrease of 4dB on the PSNR, 25% on the SSIM and 33% on the NAQI, evidencing that the proposed metric is sensitive to the noise resulted from dose reduction. The clinical results showed that images reduced to 53% and 30% of the standard radiation dose reported reductions of 15% and 25% on the NAQI, respectively. Thus, this index may be used in clinical practice as an image quality indicator to improve the quality assurance programs in mammography; hence, the proposed method reduces the subjectivity

  19. Image quality and breast dose of 24 screen-film combinations for mammography.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulou, A D; Tsalafoutas, I A; Georgiou, E K; Yakoumakis, E N

    2006-02-01

    In this study the effect of different mammographic screen-film combinations on image quality and breast dose, and the correlation between the various image quality parameters, breast dose and the sensitometric parameters of a film were investigated. Three Agfa (MR5-II, HDR, HT), two Kodak (Min-R M, Min-R 2000), one Fuji (AD-M), one Konica (CM-H) and one Ferrania (HM plus) single emulsion mammographic films were combined with three intensifying screens (Agfa HDS, Kodak Min-R 2190 and Fuji AD-MA). The film characteristics were determined by sensitometry, while the image quality and the dose to the breast of the resulting 24 screen-film combinations were assessed using a mammography quality control phantom. For each combination, three images of the phantom were acquired with optical density within three different ranges. Two observers assessed the quality of the 72 phantom images obtained, while the breast dose was calculated from the exposure data required for each image. Large differences among screen-film combinations in terms of image quality and breast dose were identified however, that, could not be correlated with the film's sensitometric characteristics. All films presented the best resolution when combined with the HDS screen at the expense of speed, and the largest speed when combined with the AD-MA screen, without degradation of the overall image quality. However, an ideal screen-film combination presenting the best image quality with the least dose was not identified. It is also worth mentioning that the best performance for a film was not necessarily obtained when this was combined with the screen provided by the same manufacturer. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that comparison of films based on their sensitometric characteristics are of limited value for clinical practice, as their performance is strongly affected by the screens with which they are combined.

  20. Diagnosis of breast cancer in light microscopic and mammographic images textures using relative entropy via kernel estimation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevcan Aytac; Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Poyraz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to provide early detection of breast cancer by using both mammography and histopathology images of the same patient. When the studies in the literature are examined, it is seen that the mammography and histopathology images of the same patient are not used together for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Mammographic and microscopic images can be limited when using only one of them for the early detection of the breast cancer. Therefore, multi-modality solutions that give more accuracy results than single solutions have been realized in this paper. 3 × 50 microscopic (histopathology) and 3 × 50 mammography image sets have been taken from Firat University Medicine Faculty Pathology and Radiology Laboratories, respectively. Optimum feature space has been obtained by minimum redundancy and maximum relevance via mutual information method applying to the 3 × 50 microscopic and mammography images. Then, probabilistic values of suspicious lesions in the image for selected features have been found by exponential curve fitting. Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measurements have been used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. It has been proved that these measures have been related to each other. Weight values for selected each feature have been found using these measures. These weight values have been used in object function. Afterward, histopathology and mammography images have been classified as normal, malign, and benign utilizing object function. In the result of this classifier, the accuracy of diagnosis of breast cancer has been estimated probabilistically. Furthermore, classifications have been probabilistically visualized on a pie chart. Consequently, the performances of Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measures have been compared with ROC analysis using histopathology and mammography test images. It has been observed that Jensen Shannon measure has higher performance than Hellinger and Triangle measures. Accuracy rates of

  1. Assessment of two mammographic density related features in predicting near-term breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    In order to establish a personalized breast cancer screening program, it is important to develop risk models that have high discriminatory power in predicting the likelihood of a woman developing an imaging detectable breast cancer in near-term (e.g., <3 years after a negative examination in question). In epidemiology-based breast cancer risk models, mammographic density is considered the second highest breast cancer risk factor (second to woman's age). In this study we explored a new feature, namely bilateral mammographic density asymmetry, and investigated the feasibility of predicting near-term screening outcome. The database consisted of 343 negative examinations, of which 187 depicted cancers that were detected during the subsequent screening examination and 155 that remained negative. We computed the average pixel value of the segmented breast areas depicted on each cranio-caudal view of the initial negative examinations. We then computed the mean and difference mammographic density for paired bilateral images. Using woman's age, subjectively rated density (BIRADS), and computed mammographic density related features we compared classification performance in estimating the likelihood of detecting cancer during the subsequent examination using areas under the ROC curves (AUC). The AUCs were 0.63+/-0.03, 0.54+/-0.04, 0.57+/-0.03, 0.68+/-0.03 when using woman's age, BIRADS rating, computed mean density and difference in computed bilateral mammographic density, respectively. Performance increased to 0.62+/-0.03 and 0.72+/-0.03 when we fused mean and difference in density with woman's age. The results suggest that, in this study, bilateral mammographic tissue density is a significantly stronger (p<0.01) risk indicator than both woman's age and mean breast density.

  2. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  3. Modeling error in assessment of mammographic image features for improved computer-aided mammography training: initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2011-03-01

    In this study we investigate the hypothesis that there exist patterns in erroneous assessment of BI-RADS image features among radiology trainees when performing diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. We also investigate whether these error making patterns can be captured by individual user models. To test our hypothesis we propose a user modeling algorithm that uses the previous readings of a trainee to identify whether certain BI-RADS feature values (e.g. "spiculated" value for "margin" feature) are associated with higher than usual likelihood that the feature will be assessed incorrectly. In our experiments we used readings of 3 radiology residents and 7 breast imaging experts for 33 breast masses for the following BI-RADS features: parenchyma density, mass margin, mass shape and mass density. The expert readings were considered as the gold standard. Rule-based individual user models were developed and tested using the leave one-one-out crossvalidation scheme. Our experimental evaluation showed that the individual user models are accurate in identifying cases for which errors are more likely to be made. The user models captured regularities in error making for all 3 residents. This finding supports our hypothesis about existence of individual error making patterns in assessment of mammographic image features using the BI-RADS lexicon. Explicit user models identifying the weaknesses of each resident could be of great use when developing and adapting a personalized training plan to meet the resident's individual needs. Such approach fits well with the framework of adaptive computer-aided educational systems in mammography we have proposed before.

  4. Evaluation of a new mammographic film: methods and considerations.

    PubMed

    Tsalafoutas, Oannis A; Kolovos, Christos A; Tsapaki, Virginia; Betsou, Sofia; Koliakou, Eleni; Maniatis, Petros N; Xenofos, Stelios

    2008-04-01

    In this study the performance of a new mammographic film, the XMA (Retina), was evaluated in comparison with HT (Agfa). The comparison was made in terms of sensitometric characteristics and in terms of image quality and speed when combined with four different cassettes-HDS (Agfa), Min-R 2000 and Min-R 2190 (Kodak), and AD-MA (Fuji)-using the Leeds TOR(MAX) Mammographic Quality Control phantom. The entrance surface air kerma was calculated from exposure factors and the relative speed of each screen-film combination was determined. These tests revealed that XMA requires about 40% less dose than HT when combined with the same intensifying screen, at a penalty of less than 8% in image quality. When combined with AD-MA the XMA presents the greatest speed, whereas the Min-R 2190 is the best compromise between image quality and breast dose. The above values are indicative of the dilemma that medical physicists and radiologists face when it comes to the selection of a screen-film combination for mammography. Both image quality and breast dose should be considered, but strict instructions on what weight should be assigned to each parameter have not been established yet. Health Phys. 94(4):338-344; 2008.

  5. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  6. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  7. Investigation of diagnostic and image quality attributes: comparison of screen-film to CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn; Richards, Anne; Ryan-Kron, Susan

    2006-03-01

    Digital mammography is advancing into an arena where analog has long been the gold standard. Direct digital systems may not be the favored solution for a particular site while computed radiography (CR) mammography, remains unproven worldwide. This pilot study responds to the growing desire to acquire and display digital mammographic images by exploring the acceptability of CR mammography. Images representing a range of breast tissue types were collected from 49 subjects (17 screening; 32 diagnostic) at four clinical sites. Comparison views were collected on the same breast, under the same compression, using automatic exposure control on state-of-the-art film systems followed by CR. CR images were processed and printed to a mammography printer for hard copy feature comparison. Each image pair in the study was evaluated according to 13 image quality attributes covering noise, contrast, sharpness, and image quality in the overall captured images as well as in each of several particular breast regions (periphery and skin-line, parenchyma and fatty tissue). A rating scale from 1 to 5 was used (strong preference for film=1, strong preference for CR=5). Twelve experienced mammographers at four clinical sites scored a subset of the 49 cases for a total of 64 image pair readings. There were 64 ratings for each of 13 image quality attributes for all cases and, an additional series of scores (four or five attribute ratings) for each abnormality in the category of mass, architectural distortion and microcalcification, for a total of 1069 scores. Based on the pilot study results, it was suggested that CR was equivalent or preferred to conventional screen-film for overall image quality (38% scored 3; 46% scored >3), image contrast (27% scored 3; 59% scored >3) and sharpness (28% scored 3; 50% scored >3). No preference was found when assessing noise. This pilot study also suggested that diagnostic quality was maintained in assessing abnormalities for attributes necessary to

  8. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  9. Development of active matrix flat panel imagers incorporating thin layers of polycrystalline HgI(2) for mammographic x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Qihua; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Gupta, Tapan

    2013-02-07

    Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) offer many advantages and have become ubiquitous across a wide variety of medical x-ray imaging applications. However, for mammography, the imaging performance of conventional AMFPIs incorporating CsI:Tl scintillators or a-Se photoconductors is limited by their relatively modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), particularly at low x-ray exposures or high spatial resolution. One strategy for overcoming this limitation involves the use of a high gain photoconductor such as mercuric iodide (HgI(2)) which has the potential to improve the SNR by virtue of its low effective work function (W(EFF)). In this study, the performance of direct-detection AMFPI prototypes employing relatively thin layers of polycrystalline HgI(2) operated under mammographic irradiation conditions over a range of 0.5 to 16.0 mR is presented. High x-ray sensitivity (corresponding to W(EFF) values of ∼19 eV), low dark current (<0.1 pA mm(-2)) and good spatial resolution, largely limited by the size of the pixel pitch, were observed. For one prototype, a detective quantum efficiency of ∼70% was observed at an x-ray exposure of ∼0.5 mR at 26 kVp.

  10. Quantification of mammographic masking risk with volumetric breast density maps: how to select women for supplemental screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Katharina; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna OP; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of mammograms is low for women with dense breasts, since cancers may be masked by dense tissue. In this study, we investigated methods to identify women with density patterns associated with a high masking risk. Risk measures are derived from volumetric breast density maps. We used the last negative screening mammograms of 93 women who subsequently presented with an interval cancer (IC), and, as controls, 930 randomly selected normal screening exams from women without cancer. Volumetric breast density maps were computed from the mammograms, which provide the dense tissue thickness at each location. These were used to compute absolute and percentage glandular tissue volume. We modeled the masking risk for each pixel location using the absolute and percentage dense tissue thickness and we investigated the effect of taking the cancer location probability distribution (CLPD) into account. For each method, we selected cases with the highest masking measure (by thresholding) and computed the fraction of ICs as a function of the fraction of controls selected. The latter can be interpreted as the negative supplemental screening rate (NSSR). Between the models, when incorporating CLPD, no significant differences were found. In general, the methods performed better when CLPD was included. At higher NSSRs some of the investigated masking measures had a significantly higher performance than volumetric breast density. These measures may therefore serve as an alternative to identify women with a high risk for a masked cancer.

  11. New mammography screen/film combinations: Imaging characteristics and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Zheutlin, J.; Gornbein, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3{degrees}C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

  12. New mammography screen/film combinations: imaging characteristics and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Zheutlin, J; Gornbein, J A

    1990-04-01

    Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3 degrees C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

  13. Barriers Against Mammographic Screening in a Socioeconomically Underdeveloped Population: A Population-based, Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Yüce, Salih; Güler, Tekin; Ulun, Canan; Özaydın, Nilufer; Pruthi, Sandhya; Akkapulu, Nezih; Karabulut, Koray; Soran, Atilla; Özmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mammography-screening (MS) rates remain low in underdeveloped populations. We aimed to find the barriers against MS in a low socioeconomic population. Materials and Methods Women aged 40–69 years who lived in the least developed city in Turkey (Mus), were targeted. A survey was used to question breast cancer (BC) knowledge and health practices. Results In total, 2054 women were surveyed (participation rate: 85%). The MS rate was 35%. Women aged 50–59 years (42%, p<0.001), having annual Obstetric-Gynecology (OB-GYN) visits (42%, p<0.001), reading daily newspaper (44%, p=0.003), having Social Security (39%, p=0.006) had increased MS rates. The most common source of information about BC was TV/radio (36%). Having doctors as main source of information (42%, p<0.001), knowing BC as the most common cancer in females (36%, p=0.024), knowing that BC is curable if detected early (36%, p=0.016), knowing that MS is free (42%, p<0.001) and agreeing to the phrase “I would get mammography (MG), if my doctor referred me” (36%, p=0.015) increased MS rates. Agreeing that MG exposes women to unnecessary radiation decreased MS rate (32%, p=0.002). Conclusion To increase the MS rate in low socioeconomic populations, clear messages about BC being the most common cancer in women, MS after 40 years of age not causing unnecessary radiation but saving lives through enabling early detection, and MS being free of charge should be given frequently on audiovisual media. Uninsured women and women aged 40–49 years should be especially targeted. Physicians from all specialties should inform their patients about BC.

  14. Modeling resident error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses using computer-extracted image features: preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Zhang, Jing; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora

    2014-03-01

    Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, as good interpretation skills potentially ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. We have previously proposed a computer-aided education system that utilizes trainee models, which relate human-assessed image characteristics to interpretation error. We proposed that these models be used to identify the most difficult and therefore the most educationally useful cases for each trainee. In this study, as a next step in our research, we propose to build trainee models that utilize features that are automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms. To predict error, we used a logistic regression which accepts imaging features as input and returns error as output. Reader data from 3 experts and 3 trainees were used. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to evaluate the proposed trainee models. Our experiments showed that, for three trainees, our models were able to predict error better than chance. This is an important step in the development of adaptive computer-aided education systems since computer-extracted features will allow for faster and more extensive search of imaging databases in order to identify the most educationally beneficial cases.

  15. Consistency of visual assessments of mammographic breast density from vendor-specific “for presentation” images

    PubMed Central

    Abdolell, Mohamed; Tsuruda, Kaitlyn; Lightfoot, Christopher B.; Barkova, Eva; McQuaid, Melanie; Caines, Judy; Iles, Sian E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Discussions of percent breast density (PD) and breast cancer risk implicitly assume that visual assessments of PD are comparable between vendors despite differences in technology and display algorithms. This study examines the extent to which visual assessments of PD differ between mammograms acquired from two vendors. Pairs of “for presentation” digital mammography images were obtained from two mammography units for 146 women who had a screening mammogram on one vendor unit followed by a diagnostic mammogram on a different vendor unit. Four radiologists independently visually assessed PD from single left mediolateral oblique view images from the two vendors. Analysis of variance, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), scatter plots, and Bland–Altman plots were used to evaluate PD assessments between vendors. The mean radiologist PD for each image was used as a consensus PD measure. Overall agreement of the PD assessments was excellent between the two vendors with an ICC of 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.93 to 0.97). Bland–Altman plots demonstrated narrow upper and lower limits of agreement between the vendors with only a small bias (2.3 percentage points). The results of this study support the assumption that visual assessment of PD is consistent across mammography vendors despite vendor-specific appearances of “for presentation” images. PMID:26870747

  16. Mammographic resolution: influence of focal spot intensity distribution and geometry.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, E L; Donnelly, E; Eve, L; Atherton, J V; Asch, T

    1990-01-01

    The influence of focal spot intensity distribution and geometry upon mammographic image quality were evaluated. The modulation transfer functions (MTF's) for eight different intensity distributions were determined and plotted in a manner to eliminate the effects of magnification and focal spot dimension. The results indicated that the total cross-sectional area is important for focal spots with uniform intensity distributions and equivalent diameters. For equivalent focal spot dimensions, intensity distributions with edge bands were shown to have less spatial resolution than uniform intensity distributions. Focal spots with greater intensities towards their centers provided better resolution than either uniform intensity distributions or distributions with edge bands for equivalent sizes. The type of intensity distribution was also shown to affect the accuracy of star pattern measurements of focal spot size; this method of measurement is only precise for a uniform square intensity distribution. Errors obtained with several other intensity distributions were tabulated. The variations of the effective focal spot size with position along the anode-cathode axis were shown to be of a factor of approximately two to three. The combined effects of geometric blur and film/screen blur were present for various heights above the cassette tray on several different mammographic systems.

  17. Detection of lesions in mammographic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper is a report on very surprising results from recent work on detection of real lesions in digitized mammograms. The experiments were done using a novel experimental procedure with hybrid images. The lesions (signals) were real tumor masses extracted from breast tissue specimen radiographs. In the detection experiments, the tumors were added to digitized normal mammographic backgrounds. The results of this new work have been both novel and very surprising. Contrast thresholds increased with increasing lesion size for lesions larger than approximately 1 mm in diameter. Earlier work with white noise, radiographic image noise, computed tomography (CT) noise and some types of patient structure have accustomed us to a particular relationship between lesion size and contrast for constant detectability. All previous contrast/detail (CD) diagrams have been similar, the contrast threshold decreases as lesion size increases and flattens at large lesion sizes. The CD diagram for lesion detection in mammographic structure is completely different. It will be shown that this is a consequence of the power-law dependence of the projected breast tissue structure spectral density on spatial frequency. Mammographic tissue structure power spectra have the form P(f) equals B/f(beta ), with an average exponent of approximately 3 (range from 2 to 4), and are approximately isotropic (small angular dependence). Results for two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) signal detection experiments using 4 tumor lesions and one mathematically generated signal will be presented. These results are for an unbiased selection of mammographic backgrounds. It is possible that an additional understanding of the effects of breast structure on lesion detectability can be obtained by investigating detectability in various classes of mammographic backgrounds. This will be the subject of future research.

  18. Development of terminology for mammographic techniques for radiological technologists.

    PubMed

    Yagahara, Ayako; Yokooka, Yuki; Tsuji, Shintaro; Nishimoto, Naoki; Uesugi, Masahito; Muto, Hiroshi; Ohba, Hisateru; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2011-07-01

    We are developing a mammographic ontology to share knowledge of the mammographic domain for radiologic technologists, with the aim of improving mammographic techniques. As a first step in constructing the ontology, we used mammography reference books to establish mammographic terminology for identifying currently available knowledge. This study proceeded in three steps: (1) determination of the domain and scope of the terminology, (2) lexical extraction, and (3) construction of hierarchical structures. We extracted terms mainly from three reference books and constructed the hierarchical structures manually. We compared features of the terms extracted from the three reference books. We constructed a terminology consisting of 440 subclasses grouped into 19 top-level classes: anatomic entity, image quality factor, findings, material, risk, breast, histological classification of breast tumors, role, foreign body, mammographic technique, physics, purpose of mammography examination, explanation of mammography examination, image development, abbreviation, quality control, equipment, interpretation, and evaluation of clinical imaging. The number of terms that occurred in the subclasses varied depending on which reference book was used. We developed a terminology of mammographic techniques for radiologic technologists consisting of 440 terms.

  19. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Branderhorst, W. Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  20. Shapelet analysis of pupil dilation for modeling visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamudun, Folami; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hammond, Tracy; Hudson, Kathy; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Tourassi, Georgia

    2016-03-01

    Our objective is to improve understanding of visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography under clinically equivalent experimental conditions. To this end, we examined pupillometric data, acquired using a head-mounted eye-tracking device, from 10 image readers (three breast-imaging radiologists and seven Radiology residents), and their corresponding diagnostic decisions for 100 screening mammograms. The corpus of mammograms comprised cases of varied pathology and breast parenchymal density. We investigated the relationship between pupillometric fluctuations, experienced by an image reader during mammographic screening, indicative of changes in mental workload, the pathological characteristics of a mammographic case, and the image readers' diagnostic decision and overall task performance. To answer these questions, we extract features from pupillometric data, and additionally applied time series shapelet analysis to extract discriminative patterns in changes in pupil dilation. Our results show that pupillometric measures are adequate predictors of mammographic case pathology, and image readers' diagnostic decision and performance with an average accuracy of 80%.

  1. Evaluation of Doses and Image Quality in Mammography with Screen-Film, CR, and DR Detectors – Application of the ACR Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Skrzyński, Witold; Fabiszewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Different methods of image quality evaluation are routinely used for analogue and digital mammography systems in Poland. In the present study, image quality for several screen-film (SF), computed radiography (CR), and fully digital (DR) mammography systems was compared directly with the use of the ACR mammography accreditation phantom. Material/Methods Image quality and mean glandular doses were measured and compared for 47 mammography systems in the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland, including 26 SF systems, 12 CR systems, and 9 DR systems. The mean glandular dose for the breast simulated by 4.5 cm of PMMA was calculated with methods described in the “European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis”. Visibility of the structures in the image (fibers, microcalcifications, and masses) was evaluated with the mammographic accreditation ACR phantom. Results Image quality for DR systems was significantly higher than for SF and CR systems. Several SF systems failed to pass the image quality tests because of artifacts. The doses were within acceptable limits for all of the systems, but the doses for the CR systems were significantly higher than for the SF and DR systems. Conclusions The best image quality, at a reasonably low dose, was observed for the DR systems. The CR systems are capable of obtaining the same image quality as the SF systems, but only at a significantly higher dose. The ACR phantom can be routinely used to evaluate image quality for all types of mammographic systems. PMID:27617048

  2. Comparison of Mammographic Density Assessed as Volumes and Areas among Women Undergoing Diagnostic Image-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Geller, Berta M.; Shepherd, John A.; Patel, Deesha A.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Johnson, Jason M.; Herschorn, Sally D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD), the area of non-fatty appearing tissue divided by total breast area, is a strong breast cancer risk factor. Most MD analyses have employed visual categorizations or computer-assisted quantification, which ignore breast thickness. We explored MD volume and area, using a volumetric approach previously validated as predictive of breast cancer risk, in relation to risk factors among women undergoing breast biopsy. Methods Among 413 primarily white women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies between 2007–2010 at an academic facility in Vermont, MD volume (cm3) was quantified in cranio-caudal views of the breast contralateral to the biopsy target using a density phantom, while MD area (cm2) was measured on the same digital mammograms using thresholding software. Risk factor associations with continuous MD measurements were evaluated using linear regression. Results Percent MD volume and area were correlated (r=0.81) and strongly and inversely associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and menopause. Both measures were inversely associated with smoking and positively associated with breast biopsy history. Absolute MD measures were correlated (r=0.46) and inversely related to age and menopause. Whereas absolute dense area was inversely associated with BMI, absolute dense volume was positively associated. Conclusions Volume and area MD measures exhibit some overlap in risk factor associations, but divergence as well, particularly for BMI. Impact Findings suggest that volume and area density measures differ in subsets of women; notably, among obese women, absolute density was higher with volumetric methods, suggesting that breast cancer risk assessments may vary for these techniques. PMID:25139935

  3. Task-Specific Optimization of Mammographic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    by the equation: SNR Actual2 = DQE(O) . SNRI, i,,,i (1) where SNRIdeal was computed using a program by Boone to generate x-ray spectra2 and DQE(0...masses and microcalcifications. We have generated four image sets using the mammographic data obtained in 1.1. The first set was obtained at full dose...resolution and noise properties of the combined display and detector system using the generalized curve-fitting algorithm. After obtaining the

  4. Childhood factors associated with mammographic density in adult women.

    PubMed

    Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Moreno, María Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Ascunce, Nieves; Román, Isabel González; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, María Carmen; Carrete, Jose Antonio Vázquez; Collado-García, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ederra, María; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Peris, Mercé; Abad, Soledad; Cabanes, Anna; Pollán, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Growth and development factors could contribute to the development of breast cancer associated with an increase in mammographic density. This study examines the influence of certain childhood-related, socio-demographic and anthropometric variables on mammographic density in adult woman. The study covered 3574 women aged 45-68 years, participating in breast cancer-screening programmes in seven Spanish cities. Based on a craniocaudal mammogram, blind, anonymous measurement of mammographic density was made by a single radiologist, using Boyd's semiquantitative scale. Data associated with the early stages of life were obtained from a direct survey. Ordinal logistic regression and generalised linear models were employed to estimate the association between mammographic density and the variables covered by the questionnaire. Screening programme was introduced as a random effects term. Age, number of children, body mass index (BMI) and other childhood-related variables were used as adjustment variables, and stratified by menopausal status. A total of 811 women (23%) presented mammographic density of over 50%, and 5% of densities exceeded 75%. Our results show a greater prevalence of high mammographic density in women with low prepubertal weight (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.02-1.36); marked prepubertal height (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 0.97-1.60) and advanced age of their mothers at their birth (>39 years: OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.03-1.60); and a lower prevalence of high mammographic density in women with higher prepubertal weight, low birth weight and earlier menarche. The influence of these early-life factors may be explained by greater exposure to hormones and growth factors during the development of the breast gland, when breast tissue would be particularly susceptible to proliferative and carcinogenic stimulus.

  5. Breast cancer screening controversies: who, when, why, and how?

    PubMed

    Chetlen, Alison; Mack, Julie; Chan, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic screening is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The issue is not whether mammography is effective, but whether the false positive rate and false negative rates can be reduced. This review will discuss controversies including the reduction in breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, the ideal screening candidate, and the optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. The article will compare and contrast screening mammography, tomosynthesis, whole-breast screening ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging. Though supplemental imaging modalities are being utilized to improve breast cancer diagnosis, mammography still remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening.

  6. [Analysis of Cost-effectiveness of screening for breast cancer with conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Peregrino, Antonio Augusto de Freitas; Vianna, Cid Manso de Mello; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso; Gonzáles, Gabriela Bittencourt; Machado, Samara Cristina Ferreira; Costa e Silva, Frances Valéria; Rodrigues, Marcus Paulo da Silva

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in screening for breast cancer. The use of conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging were compared with natural disease history as a baseline. A Markov model projected breast cancer in a group of 100,000 women for a 30 year period, with screening every two years. Four distinct scenarios were modeled: (1) the natural history of breast cancer, as a baseline, (2) conventional film mammography, (3) digital mammography and (4) magnetic resonance imaging. The costs of the scenarios modeled ranged from R$ 194.216,68 for natural history, to R$ 48.614.338,31, for screening with magnetic resonance imaging. The difference in effectiveness between the interventions ranged from 300 to 78.000 years of life gained in the cohort. The ratio of incremental cost-effectiveness in terms of cost per life-year gains, conventional mammographic screening has produced an extra year for R$ 13.573,07. The ICER of magnetic resonance imaging was R$ 2.904.328,88, compared to no screening. In conclusion, it is more cost-effective to perform the screening with conventional mammography than other technological interventions.

  7. Commentary on the Canadian National Breast Screening study.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Kimberly J; Hansen, Nora M; Barrio, Andrea V; Connor, Carol S; Danforth, David N; Euhus, David M; Kulkarni, Swati A; McCready, David R; McLaughlin, Sarah; Wilke, Lee G

    2014-12-01

    In the setting of the 25-year follow-up of the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, the Society of Surgical Oncology continues to endorse mammographic screening for women beginning at 40 years of age, while acknowledging that mammography has both risks and benefits. Further investigation is warranted to develop better screening methods and to determine optimal screening schedules for women based on their risk of future breast cancer and their imaging characteristics.

  8. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  9. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  10. Personnel screening with advanced multistatic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sherif S.

    2013-05-01

    Personnel screening is demanded nowadays for securing air traffic as well as critical infrastructures. The millimeter-waves are able to penetrate clothes and detect concealed objects, making them an attractive choice for security screening. Imaging methods based on multistatic architecture can ensure high quality imagery in terms of resolution and dynamic range. Following the advances in semiconductor technology, fully electronic solutions delivering real-time imaging are becoming feasible. Furthermore, the continuously increasing capabilities of digital signal processing units allow for the utilization of digital-beamforming techniques for image reconstruction, thus offering new opportunities for imaging systems to use sophisticated operation modes. Based on these modern technologies, an advanced realization addressing personnel screening in E-band with planar multistatic sparse array design is demonstrated.

  11. Alcohol intake over the life course and mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Flom, Julie D; Ferris, Jennifer S; Tehranifar, Parisa; Terry, Mary Beth

    2009-10-01

    Alcohol intake is one of the few modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. Current alcohol intake has been associated with mammographic density, a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, though few studies have examined the effect of both current and average lifetime alcohol intake. We interviewed 262 participants from a New York birth cohort (born 1959-1963) and obtained mammograms from 163 (71.5% of participants with a mammogram). We collected information on alcohol intake by beverage type separately for each decade of life. We used multivariable linear models to assess the associations between current and average lifetime alcohol intake and mammographic density using a quantitative measure of density from digitized images. Overall, current alcohol intake was more strongly associated with mammographic density than average lifetime alcohol intake; compared with nondrinkers, those with current intake of seven or more servings per week had on average 12.3% (95% CI: 4.3, 20.4) higher density, adjusted for average lifetime alcohol intake, age, and body mass index. We observed a consistent inverse association for red wine intake and mammographic density, suggesting that the positive association between mammographic density and overall alcohol intake was driven by other types of alcoholic beverages. Our findings support an association between current alcohol intake and increased mammographic density independent of the effect of average lifetime alcohol intake. If replicated, our study suggests that reducing current alcohol consumption, particularly beer and white wine intake, may be a means of reducing mammographic density regardless of intake earlier in life.

  12. Use of border information in the classification of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, C.; Timp, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a new method to characterize the margin of a mammographic mass lesion to improve the classification of benign and malignant masses. Towards this goal, we designed features that measure the degree of sharpness and microlobulation of mass margins. We calculated these features in a border region of the mass defined as a thin band along the mass contour. The importance of these features in the classification of benign and malignant masses was studied in relation to existing features used for mammographic mass detection. Features were divided into three groups, each representing a different mass segment: the interior region of a mass, the border and the outer area. The interior and the outer area of a mass were characterized using contrast and spiculation measures. Classification was done in two steps. First, features representing each of the three mass segments were merged into a neural network classifier resulting in a single regional classification score for each segment. Secondly, a classifier combined the three single scores into a final output to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. We compared the classification performance of each regional classifier and the combined classifier on a data set of 1076 biopsy proved masses (590 malignant and 486 benign) from 481 women included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the classifiers. The area under the ROC curve (Az) was 0.69 for the interior mass segment, 0.76 for the border segment and 0.75 for the outer mass segment. The performance of the combined classifier was 0.81 for image-based and 0.83 for case-based evaluation. These results show that the combination of information from different mass segments is an effective approach for computer-aided characterization of mammographic masses. An advantage of this approach is that it allows the assessment of the contribution of regions rather

  13. Intagliated phosphor screen image tube project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzel, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production and evaluation of a magnetic focus image tube for astronomical photography that has an intagliated phosphor screen is described. The modulation transfer function of such a tube was measured by electronic means and by film tests, and the results compared with tubes of more conventional construction. The physical properties of the image tube and film combination, the analytical model of the optical interface, and the salient features of the intagliated screen tube are described. The results of electronic MTF tests of the intagliated image tube and of the densitometry of the tube and film test samples are presented. It is concluded that the intagliated screen is a help, but that the thickness of the photographic film is also important.

  14. Factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Cannas; Cant, Rosemary; Sullivan, Gerard

    2005-12-01

    BreastScreen (a free breast cancer screening service) has been implemented in Australia since 1991. Surveys conducted overseas consistently report that women of Chinese ancestry have low participation rates in breast cancer screening. Although Chinese women's use of breast cancer screening services has been investigated abroad, to date there are few studies of mammographic screening behavior among Chinese-Australian women. The purpose of this study is to explore and investigate the factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women. Using a qualitative approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Chinese-Australian women. These were augmented by additional data from ethnographic observations. The findings show two facilitators: organizational factors (an invitation letter from BreastScreen and seniors' clubs arrangements) and the influence of 'significant others'. Barriers identified were fear perceptions of mammography, modesty and fear of stigmatization. This study provides a useful framework for designing and implementing mammographic screening services for Chinese-Australian women that may improve their participation rates.

  15. Mammographic imaging with a small format CCD-based digital cassette: Physical characteristics of a clinical systema

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Levis, Ilias; Sayag, Michel; Kleehammer, Robert; Heidsieck, Robert; D’Orsi, Carl J.

    2008-01-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical charge coupled device (CCD)-based imager (Senovision, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) for small-field digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a MinR 2000™ (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) scintillator coupled by a 1:1 optical fiber to a front-illuminated 61×61 mm CCD operating at a pixel pitch of 30 microns. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were employed for this evaluation. The results demonstrated a limiting spatial resolution (10% MTF) of 10 cy/mm. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo–Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is ~40% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 8.2 mR, and decreases to ~28% at a low exposure of 1.1 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions. PMID:10984230

  16. Polychromatic image noise in rear projection screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Matthew Brian

    This dissertation studies rear projection diffusing screens. We provide a methodology, a theoretical background, metrics, and experimental results to aid in the understanding and design of such screens. For this work, a theoretical model has been developed to predict local fluctuations of measured color that appear as image noise in projection screens. This predictive model is based on Fraunhofer diffraction along with Huygens' wavelet analysis and linear systems theory. Of importance are the figures of merit that have been defined and used to compare the theoretical predictions and experimental results. The range of validity of the model has also been determined. We set up an experiment to test the theoretical model. By experimentally varying the numerical aperture of the input illumination, color variations on screens have been measured and characterized. The results of both the experiment and the model show a strong relationship between the polychromatic image noise and the size of the illumination cone. As the size of the illumination cone was decreased from 6 to less than 0.1 millisteradians, there was more than a threefold increase in the figures of merit. Our model shows insight, validates and augments a common rule of thumb. It is often assumed that making the screen structure significantly larger than the coherence length of the source will result in a system with minimal noise. The model shows that this is correct, but it also provides predictions in the cross over region. This allows one to understand how the image noise in a projection system will change as screen designs are changed. Ultimately, this allows screen solutions to be assessed before they are reduced to practice.

  17. An approach for tissue density classification in mammographic images using artificial neural network based on wavelet and curvelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, Hüseyin; Ceylan, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the types of cancer which is most commonly seen in women. Density of breast is an important indicator for the risk of cancer. In addition, densities of tissue may harden the diagnosis by hiding the abnormalities occurring on the breast. For this reason, during the process of diagnosis, the process of automatic classification of breast density has a significant importance. In this study, a new system with the base of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and multiple resolution analysis is suggested. Wavelet and curvelet analyses having the most common use have been used as multi resolution analysis. 4 pieces of statistics which are minimum value, maximum value, mean value and standard deviation have been extracted from the images which have been eluted to their sub-bands via multi resolution analysis. For the purpose of testing the success of the system, 322 pieces of images which are in MIAS database have been used. The obtained results for different backgrounds are so satisfying; and the highest classification values have been obtained as 97.16 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty background and 79.80 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty-glanduar background. The same results have been obtained using Wavelet transform and ANN and Curvelet transform and ANN for dense background and accuracy rate of 84.82 % have been reached. The results of mean classification have been obtained, for three pieces of tissue types (fatty, fatty-glanduar, dense), in sequence as 84.47 % with the use of ANN, 85.71 % with the use of curvelet analysis and ANN; and 87.26 % with the use of wavelet analysis and ANN.

  18. Local mammographic density as a predictor of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Mayu; Harkness, Elaine F.; Chen, Xin; Moschidis, Emmanouil; Bydder, Megan; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, Gareth D.; Howell, Anthony; Stavrinos, Paula; Wilson, Mary; Astley, Susan M.

    2015-03-01

    High overall mammographic density is associated with both an increased risk of developing breast cancer and the risk of cancer being masked. We compared local density at cancer sites in diagnostic images with corresponding previous screening mammograms (priors), and matched controls. VolparaTM density maps were obtained for 54 mammograms showing unilateral breast cancer and their priors which had been previously read as normal. These were each matched to 3 controls on age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy usage, body mass index and year of prior. Local percent density was computed in 15mm square regions at lesion sites and similar locations in the corresponding images. Conditional logistic regression was used to predict case-control status. In diagnostic and prior images, local density was increased at the lesion site compared with the opposite breast (medians 21.58%, 9.18%, p<0.001 diagnostic; 18.82%, 9.45%, p <0.001 prior). Women in the highest tertile of local density in priors were more likely to develop cancer than those in the lowest tertile (OR 42.09, 95% CI 5.37-329.94). Those in the highest tertile of VolparaTM gland volume were also more likely to develop cancer (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.30-6.42). Local density is increased where cancer will develop compared with corresponding regions in the opposite breast and matched controls, and its measurement could enhance computer-aided mammography.

  19. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake.

  20. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  1. Clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions: detection and classification with high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Niehoff, A; Obrist, P; DeKoekkoek-Doll, P; Dünser, M

    2000-08-01

    With recent significant advances in ultrasound technology, the potential of high-resolution sonography to improve the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis in women with dense breasts has become a matter of interest for breast imagers. To determine how often physician-performed high-resolution sonography can detect nonpalpable breast cancers that are not revealed by mammography, 8,970 women with breast density grades 2 through 4 underwent high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography. All sonographically detected, clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions that were not simple cysts were prospectively classified into benign, indeterminate, or malignant categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, core-needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy. In 8,103 women with normal findings at mammography and physical examination, 32 cancers and 330 benign lesions were detected in 273 patients with sonography only. Eight additional cancers were found in 867 patients with a malignant (n = 5) or a benign (n = 3) palpable or mammographically detected index lesion. The overall prevalence of cancers detected with screening sonography was 0.41%, and the proportion of sonographically detected cancers to the total number of nonpalpable cancers was 22%. The mean size of invasive cancers detected only by sonography was 9.1 mm, and was not statistically different from the mean size of invasive cancers detected by mammography. The sensitivity of prospective sonographic classification for malignancy was 100%, and the specificity was 31%. In conclusion, the use of high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography in women with dense breasts may lead to detection of a significant number of otherwise occult cancers that are no different in size from nonpalpable mammographically detected cancers. Prospective classification of these lesions based on sonographic characteristics resulted in an acceptable benign-to-malignant biopsy rate of 6.3:1.

  2. Prenatal smoke exposure and mammographic density in mid-life

    PubMed Central

    Terry, M. B.; Schaefer, C. A.; Flom, J. D.; Wei, Y.; Tehranifar, P.; Liao, Y.; Buka, S.; Michels, K. B.

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoke has both carcinogenic effects and anti-estrogenic properties and its inconsistent association with breast cancer risk in observational studies may be because of these competing effects across the lifecourse. We conducted a prospective study of prenatal smoke exposure, childhood household smoke exposure, and adult active smoke exposure and mammographic density, a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, in an adult follow-up of existing US birth cohorts. Specifically, we followed up women who were born between 1959 and 1967 and whose mothers participated in either the Collaborative Perinatal Project (Boston and Providence sites) or the Childhood Health and Development Study in California. Of the 1134 women interviewed in adulthood (ranging in age from 39 to 49 years at interview), 79% had a screening mammogram. Cigarette smoking was reported by mothers at the time of their pregnancy; 40% of mothers smoked while pregnant. Women whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had a 3.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) = −6.0%, −0.2%) lower mammographic density than women whose mothers did not smoke during pregnancy. When we further accounted for adult body mass index and adult smoking status, the association remained (β = −2.7, 95% CI = −5.0, −0.3).When we examined patterns of smoking, prenatal smoke exposure without adult smoke exposure was associated with a 5.6% decrease in mammographic density (β = −5.6, 95% CI = −9.6, −1.6). Given the strength of mammographic density as an intermediate marker for breast cancer, the inverse associations between mammographic density and smoking patterns across the lifecourse may help explain the complex association between cigarette smoking and breast cancer risk. PMID:23378890

  3. Level set-based core segmentation of mammographic masses facilitating three stage (core, periphery, spiculation) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, John E; Bruce, Lori Mann

    2007-01-01

    We present mammographic mass core segmentation, based on the Chan-Vese level set method. The proposed method is analyzed via resulting feature efficacies. Additionally, the core segmentation method is used to investigate the idea of a three stage segmentation approach, i.e. segment the mass core, periphery, and spiculations (if any exist) and use features from these three segmentations to classify the mass as either benign or malignant. The proposed core segmentation method and a proposed end-to-end computer aided detection (CAD) system using a three stage segmentation are implemented and experimentally tested with a set of 60 mammographic images from the Digital Database of Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve AZ values for morphological and texture features extracted from the core segmentation are shown to be on par, or better, than those extracted from a periphery segmentation. The efficacy of the core segmentation features when combined with the periphery and spiculation segmentation features are shown to be feature set dependent. The proposed end-to-end system uses stepwise linear discriminant analysis for feature selection and a maximum likelihood classifier. Using all three stages (core + periphery + spiculations) results in an overall accuracy (OA) of 90% with 2 false negatives (FN). Since many CAD systems only perform a periphery analysis, adding core features could be a benefit to potentially increase OA and reduce FN cases.

  4. Impedance mammograph 3D phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wtorek, J; Stelter, J; Nowakowski, A

    1999-04-20

    The results obtained using the Technical University of Gdansk Electroimpedance Mammograph (TUGEM) of a 3D phantom study are presented. The TUGEM system is briefly described. The hardware contains the measurement head and DSP-based identification modules controlled by a PC computer. A specially developed reconstruction algorithm, Regulated Correction Frequency Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (RCFART), is used to obtain 3D images. To visualize results, the Advance Visualization System (AVS) is used. It allows a powerful image processing on a fast workstation or on a high-performance computer. Results of three types of 3D conductivity perturbations used in the study (aluminum, Plexiglas, and cucumber) are shown. The relative volumes of perturbations less than 2% of the measurement chamber are easily evidenced.

  5. Ghosted images: old lesbians on screen.

    PubMed

    Krainitzki, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Screen images of old lesbians combine modes of representing female gender, lesbian sexuality, and old age, all of which contain layers of otherness within a hetero-patriarchal and youth-centered society. Analyzing a range of films, from independent to mainstream cinema, this article explores how the ghosted lesbian paradigm intersects with narratives of aging as decline in representations of lesbian characters who are over the age of sixty. The spectral matters of illness, death, mourning, and widowhood inevitably culminate in an unhappy ending. Removed from a lesbian community context, intergenerational continuity vanishes and the old lesbian emerges as the cultural other.

  6. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Catarious, David M. Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number of

  7. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions.

    PubMed

    Catarious, David M; Baydush, Alan H; Floyd, Carey E

    2006-11-01

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions, (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number

  8. Perceptual Quality Assessment of Screen Content Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Fang, Yuming; Lin, Weisi

    2015-11-01

    Research on screen content images (SCIs) becomes important as they are increasingly used in multi-device communication applications. In this paper, we present a study on perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs subjectively and objectively. We construct a large-scale screen image quality assessment database (SIQAD) consisting of 20 source and 980 distorted SCIs. In order to get the subjective quality scores and investigate, which part (text or picture) contributes more to the overall visual quality, the single stimulus methodology with 11 point numerical scale is employed to obtain three kinds of subjective scores corresponding to the entire, textual, and pictorial regions, respectively. According to the analysis of subjective data, we propose a weighting strategy to account for the correlation among these three kinds of subjective scores. Furthermore, we design an objective metric to measure the visual quality of distorted SCIs by considering the visual difference of textual and pictorial regions. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SCI perceptual quality assessment scheme, consisting of the objective metric and the weighting strategy, can achieve better performance than 11 state-of-the-art IQA methods. To the best of our knowledge, the SIQAD is the first large-scale database published for quality evaluation of SCIs, and this research is the first attempt to explore the perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs.

  9. Grid-enabled mammographic auditing and training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    Effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing secure grid-enabled healthcare provision. In the UK, a large-scale collaborative research project (GIMI: Generic Infrastructures for Medical Informatics), which is concerned with the development of a secure IT infrastructure to support very widespread medical research across the country, is underway. In the UK, there are some 109 breast screening centers and a growing number of individuals (circa 650) nationally performing approximately 1.5 million screening examinations per year. At the same, there is a serious, and ongoing, national workforce issue in screening which has seen a loss of consultant mammographers and a growth in specially trained technologists and other non-radiologists. Thus there is a need to offer effective and efficient mammographic training so as to maintain high levels of screening skills. Consequently, a grid based system has been proposed which has the benefit of offering very large volumes of training cases that the mammographers can access anytime and anywhere. A database, spread geographically across three university systems, of screening cases is used as a test set of known cases. The GIMI mammography training system first audits these cases to ensure that they are appropriately described and annotated. Subsequently, the cases are utilized for training in a grid-based system which has been developed. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of such a grid based approach.

  10. Mammographic density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D, which influences cellular proliferation and breast tissue characteristics, has been inversely correlated with breast cancer risk. Dietary vitamin D intake has been associated with lower mammographic density (MD), a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk. Findings We examined the relationship between MD and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], an integrated measure of vitamin D status from dietary sources and sunlight exposure, in a multi-ethnic cohort of women undergoing screening mammography. We recruited women age 40–60 years without a history of breast cancer at the time of their routine screening mammogram, and conducted in-person interviews and collected blood specimens. We enrolled 195 women from 2007–2008, 120 gave blood, and 114 were evaluable, including 25% white, 41% African American, 18% African Caribbean, and 16% Hispanic. We digitized mammograms and calculated percent density, dense area, and non-dense area on cranial-caudal images. We measured serum 25(OH)D in batched, archived specimens. Median serum 25(OH)D was 22 ng/ml (range, 8–66 ng/ml). In univariable analysis, higher serum 25(OH)D was associated with white race, higher educational level, ever breast feeding, and blood draw during the summer. After adjusting for body mass index and other confounders, we found no association between serum 25(OH)D and different measures of MD. However, when stratified by season, 25(OH)D was inversely associated with dense area during July-December (p = 0.034). Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that circulating vitamin D, a potentially modifiable breast cancer risk factor, is not associated with MD; the seasonal effects we observed need to be replicated in larger cohorts. PMID:24742098

  11. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document.

  12. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  14. Developing a new case based computer-aided detection scheme and an adaptive cueing method to improve performance in detecting mammographic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new method to improve performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of screening mammograms with two approaches. In the first approach, we developed a new case based CAD scheme using a set of optimally selected global mammographic density, texture, spiculation, and structural similarity features computed from all four full-field digital mammography images of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views by using a modified fast and accurate sequential floating forward selection feature selection algorithm. Selected features were then applied to a ‘scoring fusion’ artificial neural network classification scheme to produce a final case based risk score. In the second approach, we combined the case based risk score with the conventional lesion based scores of a conventional lesion based CAD scheme using a new adaptive cueing method that is integrated with the case based risk scores. We evaluated our methods using a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on 924 cases (476 cancer and 448 recalled or negative), whereby each case had all four images from the CC and MLO views. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC  =  0.793  ±  0.015 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 37.21 as CAD-generated case based detection scores increased. Using the new adaptive cueing method, the region based and case based sensitivities of the conventional CAD scheme at a false positive rate of 0.71 per image increased by 2.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The study demonstrated that supplementary information can be derived by computing global mammographic density image features to improve CAD-cueing performance on the suspicious mammographic lesions.

  15. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  16. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  17. Analysis of confidence level scores from an ROC study: comparison of three mammographic systems for detection of simulated calcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the detection performance of three different mammography systems: screen/film (SF) combination, a-Si/CsI flat-panel (FP-), and charge-coupled device (CCD-) based systems. A 5-cm thick 50% adipose/50% glandular breast tissue equivalent slab phantom was used to provide an uniform background. Calcium carbonate grains of three different size groups were used to simulate microcalcifications (MCs): 112-125, 125-140, and 140-150 μm overlapping with the uniform background. Calcification images were acquired with the three mammography systems. Digital images were printed on hardcopy films. All film images were displayed on a mammographic viewer and reviewed by 5 mammographers. The visibility of the MC was rated with a 5-point confidence rating scale for each detection task, including the negative controls. Scores were averaged over all readers for various detectors and size groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the areas under the ROC curves (Az"s) were computed for various imaging conditions. The results shows that (1) the FP-based system performed significantly better than the SF and CCD-based systems for individual size groups using ROC analysis (2) the FP-based system also performed significantly better than the SF and CCD-based systems for individual size groups using averaged confidence scale, and (3) the results obtained from the Az"s were largely correlated with these from confidence level scores. However, the correlation varied slightly among different imaging conditions.

  18. The influence of mammogram acquisition on the mammographic density and breast cancer association in the mayo mammography health study cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Image acquisition technique varies across mammograms to limit radiation and produce a clinically useful image. We examined whether acquisition technique parameters at the time of mammography were associated with mammographic density and whether the acquisition parameters confounded the density and breast cancer association. Methods We examined this question within the Mayo Mammography Health Study (MMHS) cohort, comprised of 19,924 women (51.2% of eligible) seen in the Mayo Clinic mammography screening practice from 2003 to 2006. A case-cohort design, comprising 318 incident breast cancers diagnosed through December 2009 and a random subcohort of 2,259, was used to examine potential confounding of mammogram acquisition technique parameters (x-ray tube voltage peak (kVp), milliampere-seconds (mAs), thickness and compression force) on the density and breast cancer association. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System four-category tissue composition measure (BI-RADS) and percent density (PD) (Cumulus program) were estimated from screen-film mammograms at time of enrollment. Spearman correlation coefficients (r) and means (standard deviations) were used to examine the relationship of density measures with acquisition parameters. Hazard ratios (HR) and C-statistics were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for age, menopausal status, body mass index and postmenopausal hormones. A change in the HR of at least 15% indicated confounding. Results Adjusted PD and BI-RADS density were associated with breast cancer (p-trends < 0.001), with a 3 to 4-fold increased risk in the extremely dense vs. fatty BI-RADS categories (HR: 3.0, 95% CI, 1.7 - 5.1) and the ≥ 25% vs. ≤ 5% PD categories (HR: 3.8, 95% CI, 2.5 - 5.9). Of the acquisition parameters, kVp was not correlated with PD (r = 0.04, p = 0.07). Although thickness (r = -0.27, p < 0.001), compression force (r = -0

  19. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Methods: Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was

  20. No Effect of Aspirin on Mammographic Density in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, Anne; Wang, CY; Sorensen, Bess; Xiao, Liren; Buist, Diana S. M.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; White, Emily; Rossing, Mary Anne; Potter, John; Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer among women who regularly use aspirin; a plausible mechanism is through aspirin effect on mammographic breast density, a breast cancer risk factor, possibly mediated through aspirin interference with estrogen synthesis. Methods: In a 2-arm randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of 6-months administration of 325 mg/day aspirin on total mammographic breast dense area and percent of the mammographic breast image occupied by dense areas (% density) in 143 postmenopausal women. Eligible women, recruited 2005-7, were healthy, not taking hormone therapy, with elevated mammographic breast density (American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) density category 2, 3 or 4) within 6 months prior to enrollment. Results: Women were a mean (s.d.) 59.5 (5.5) years. Geometric mean baseline percent density was 17.6% (95% CI 14.8, 20.9) in women randomized to aspirin and 19.2% (95% CI 16.3, 22.7) in women randomized to placebo. Percent density decreased in women randomized to aspirin by an absolute 0.8% vs. an absolute decrease of 1.2% in controls (p = 0.84). Total breast area and dense area decreased to a similar degree in women assigned to aspirin and in those assigned to placebo, with no differences statistically significantly different between trial arms. Conclusions: A single daily administration of adult-dose aspirin for 6 months had no effect on mammographic density in postmenopausal women. If aspirin affects breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, it may do so through alternative pathways than mammographic breast density. PMID:19423529

  1. Preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma on screening mammograms.

    PubMed

    Borecky, N; Rickard, M

    2008-02-01

    Three cases of fibroadenoma associated with carcinoma are reported. These cases were diagnosed within a screening programme as a result of suspicious mammographic findings, and the diagnosis of malignancy was confirmed preoperatively by core biopsy in all cases. The mammographic findings suggestive of carcinoma within fibroadenoma were irregularity of margins in one case and associated new suspicious pleomorphic and linear calcifications in the two other cases. The preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma was provided by ultrasound-guided core biopsy in two cases and core biopsy under stereotactic guidance in one case. Whereas asymptomatic fibroadenoma with benign imaging appearances usually does not require further investigation, fibroadenoma with atypical imaging features requires a triple test investigation.

  2. Mammographic Breast Density Response to Aromatase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, Celine M.; Suman, Vera J.; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Buzdar, Aman U.; Olson, Janet E.; Wu, Fang-Fang; Flickinger, Lynn M.; Ursin, Giske; Elliott, Catherine R.; Shepherd, Lois; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Goss, Paul E.; Ingle, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mammographic breast density (MBD) is decreased by tamoxifen, but the effect of aromatase inhibitors (AI) is less clear. Experimental Design We enrolled early stage postmenopausal breast cancer patients initiating adjuvant AI therapy and ascertained mammograms before and at an average 10 months of AI therapy. We matched cases to healthy postmenopausal women (controls) from a large mammography screening cohort on age, baseline body mass index, baseline MBD and interval between mammograms. We estimated change in MBD using a computer-assisted thresholding program (Cumulus) and compared differences between cases and matched controls. Results In predominantly white women (96%), we found 14% of the 387 eligible cases had a MBD reduction of at least 5% after an average of 10 months of AI therapy. MBD reductions were associated with higher baseline MBD, AI use for more than 12 months and prior postmenopausal hormone use. Comparing each case to her matched control, there was no evidence of an association of change in MBD with AI therapy (median case-control difference among 369 pairs was −0.1% (10th and 90th percentile: −5.9%, 5.2%) p=0.51). Case-control differences were similar by type of AI (p’s 0.41 and 0.56); prior use of postmenopausal hormones (p=0.85); baseline MBD (p=0.55); or length of AI therapy (p=0.08). Conclusions In postmenopausal women treated with AIs, 14% of cases had a MBD reduction of >5%, but these decreases did not differ from matched controls. These data suggest that MBD is not a clinically useful biomarker for predicting the value of AI therapy in white postmenopausal women. PMID:23468058

  3. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in White and African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Troester, Melissa A.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but limited data are available in African American (AA) women. We examined the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk in AA and white women. Cases (n = 491) and controls (n = 528) were from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). Mammographic density was reported to CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories. Increasing mammographic density was associated with increased breast cancer risk among all women. After adjusting for potential confounders, a monotonically increasing risk of breast cancer was observed between the highest versus the lowest BI-RADS density categories [OR = 2.45, (95 % confidence interval: 0.99, 6.09)]. The association was stronger in whites, with ~40 % higher risk among those with extremely dense breasts compared to those with scattered fibroglandular densities [1.39, (0.75, 2.55)]. In AA women, the same comparison suggested lower risk [0.75, (0.30, 1.91)]. Because age, obesity, and exogenous hormones have strong associations with breast cancer risk, mammographic density, and race in the CBCS, effect measure modification by these factors was considered. Consistent with previous literature, density-associated risk was greatest among those with BMI > 30 and current hormone users (P value = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In the CBCS, mammographic density is associated with increased breast cancer risk, with some suggestion of effect measure modification by race, although results were not statistically significant. However, exposures such as BMI and hormone therapy may be important modifiers of this association and merit further investigation. PMID:22864770

  4. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in White and African American Women.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hilda; Troester, Melissa A; Gierach, Gretchen L; Olshan, Andrew F; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Millikan, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but limited data are available in African American (AA) women. We examined the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk in AA and white women. Cases (n = 491) and controls (n = 528) were from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). Mammographic density was reported to CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories. Increasing mammographic density was associated with increased breast cancer risk among all women. After adjusting for potential confounders, a monotonically increasing risk of breast cancer was observed between the highest versus the lowest BI-RADS density categories [OR = 2.45, (95 % confidence interval: 0.99, 6.09)]. The association was stronger in whites, with ~40 % higher risk among those with extremely dense breasts compared to those with scattered fibroglandular densities [1.39, (0.75, 2.55)]. In AA women, the same comparison suggested lower risk [0.75, (0.30, 1.91)]. Because age, obesity, and exogenous hormones have strong associations with breast cancer risk, mammographic density, and race in the CBCS, effect measure modification by these factors was considered. Consistent with previous literature, density-associated risk was greatest among those with BMI > 30 and current hormone users (P value = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In the CBCS, mammographic density is associated with increased breast cancer risk, with some suggestion of effect measure modification by race, although results were not statistically significant. However, exposures such as BMI and hormone therapy may be important modifiers of this association and merit further investigation.

  5. Improving CAD performance by fusion of the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Xu, Weidong; Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry could be an important factor in assessing risk of developing breast cancer and improving the detection of the suspicious lesions. This study aims to assess whether fusion of the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical information into a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme could improve CAD performance in detecting mass-like breast cancers. A testing dataset involving 1352 full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) acquired from 338 cases was used. In this dataset, half (169) cases are positive containing malignant masses and half are negative. Two computerized schemes were first independently applied to process FFDM images of each case. The first single-image based CAD scheme detected suspicious mass regions on each image. The second scheme detected and computed the bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry for each case. A fusion method was then applied to combine the output scores of the two schemes. The CAD performance levels using the original CAD-generated detection scores and the new fusion scores were evaluated and compared using a free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) type data analysis method. By fusion with the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical scores, the case-based CAD sensitivity was increased from 79.2% to 84.6% at a false-positive rate of 0.3 per image. CAD also cued more "difficult" masses with lower CAD-generated detection scores while discarded some "easy" cases. The study indicated that fusion between the scores generated by a single-image based CAD scheme and the computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry scores enabled to increase mass detection sensitivity in particular to detect more subtle masses.

  6. Epidemiologic studies of isoflavones & mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Verheus, Martijn; Tice, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  7. Fundus autofluorescence imaging in an ocular screening program.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, A M; Nayak, N V; Szirth, B C; Khouri, A S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe integration of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging into an ocular screening program. Methods. Fifty consecutive screening participants were included in this prospective pilot imaging study. Color and FAF (530/640 nm exciter/barrier filters) images were obtained with a 15.1MP Canon nonmydriatic hybrid camera. A clinician evaluated the images on site to determine need for referral. Visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), and ocular pathology detected by color fundus and FAF imaging modalities were recorded. Results. Mean ± SD age was 47.4 ± 17.3 years. Fifty-two percent were female and 58% African American. Twenty-seven percent had a comprehensive ocular examination within the past year. Mean VA was 20/39 in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Mean IOP was 15 mmHg bilaterally. Positive color and/or FAF findings were identified in nine (18%) individuals with diabetic retinopathy or macular edema (n = 4), focal RPE defects (n = 2), age-related macular degeneration (n = 1), central serous retinopathy (n = 1), and ocular trauma (n = 1). Conclusions. FAF was successfully integrated in our ocular screening program and aided in the identification of ocular pathology. Larger studies examining the utility of this technology in screening programs may be warranted.

  8. Vision 20/20: Mammographic breast density and its clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong Lau, Susie

    2015-12-15

    Breast density is a strong predictor of the failure of mammography screening to detect breast cancer and is a strong predictor of the risk of developing breast cancer. The many imaging options that are now available for imaging dense breasts show great promise, but there is still the question of determining which women are “dense” and what imaging modality is suitable for individual women. To date, mammographic breast density has been classified according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories from visual assessment, but this is known to be very subjective. Despite many research reports, the authors believe there has been a lack of physics-led and evidence-based arguments about what breast density actually is, how it should be measured, and how it should be used. In this paper, the authors attempt to start correcting this situation by reviewing the history of breast density research and the debates generated by the advocacy movement. The authors review the development of breast density estimation from pattern analysis to area-based analysis, and the current automated volumetric breast density (VBD) analysis. This is followed by a discussion on seeking the ground truth of VBD and mapping volumetric methods to BI-RADS density categories. The authors expect great improvement in VBD measurements that will satisfy the needs of radiologists, epidemiologists, surgeons, and physicists. The authors believe that they are now witnessing a paradigm shift toward personalized breast screening, which is going to see many more cancers being detected early, with the use of automated density measurement tools as an important component.

  9. From Planetary Imaging to Enzyme Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Based in San Diego, KAIROS Scientific develops molecular biology methods, instrumentation, and computer algorithms to create solutions to challenging problems in the medical and chemical industries. company s pioneering efforts in digital imaging spectroscopy (DIS) enable researchers to obtain spectral and/or time-dependent information for each pixel or group of pixels in a two-dimensional scene. In addition to having Yang s NASA experience at its foundation, KAIROS Scientific was established with the support of many government grants and contracts. Its first was a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, from Ames Research Center, to develop HIRIM, a high-resolution imaging microscope embodying both novel hardware and software that can be used to simultaneously acquire hundreds of individual absorbance spectra from microscopic features. Using HIRIM s graphical user interface, MicroDIS, scientists and engineers are presented with a revolutionary new tool which enables them to point to a feature in an image and recall its associated spectrum in real time.

  10. Vitamin D and Mammographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, J.; Straub, L.; Wissing, J.; Artmann, A.; Schmidmayr, M.; Kiechle, M.; Seifert-Klauss, V. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleiotropic immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative effects of vitamin D and hopes to stop cancerogenesis have led to an increased interest in possible reduction of breast cancer with higher vitamin D levels. Mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer risk, and its association with serum vitamin D is complex, as recent studies have shown. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1103 participants were recruited in the breast diagnostic unit of the Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU Munich. A standardised questionnaire and blood samples for 25-OH-vitamin D were taken on the day of mammography. Histologic results of biopsies in suspicious mammographies were documented. Results: In the 1090 data-sets analysed, vitamin D-deficiency was common among women under 40. Highest vitamin D values were observed in participants aged 60–69 years, but average values for all age cohorts were below 20 ng/ml of vitamin D. 15.6 % of all participants had very low vitamin D values (< 10 ng/ml), 51.3 % were vitamin D-deficient (10–19 ng/ml) and only 5.7 % were above 30 ng/ml, i.e. showed sufficient vitamin D. Patients with malignant results had vitamin D < 10 ng/ml more often (16.9 %; p = 0.61), and only 3.4 % in this group had sufficient vitamin D supply (> 30 ng/ml). There were no significant differences in vitamin D-levels between density groups according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Conclusion: Vitamin D values were lower than in comparable US women. Up to now, there is no direct clinical evidence for a relationship between the risk for breast cancer and a specific vitamin D value. PMID:27239067

  11. Diabetic Rethinopathy Screening by Bright Lesions Extraction from Fundus Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanđsková, Veronika; Pavlovičova, Jarmila; Oravec, Miloš; Blaško, Radoslav

    2013-09-01

    Retinal images are nowadays widely used to diagnose many diseases, for example diabetic retinopathy. In our work, we propose the algorithm for the screening application, which identifies the patients with such severe diabetic complication as diabetic retinopathy is, in early phase. In the application we use the patient's fundus photography without any additional examination by an ophtalmologist. After this screening identification, other examination methods should be considered and the patient's follow-up by a doctor is necessary. Our application is composed of three principal modules including fundus image preprocessing, feature extraction and feature classification. Image preprocessing module has the role of luminance normalization, contrast enhancement and optical disk masking. Feature extraction module includes two stages: bright lesions candidates localization and candidates feature extraction. We selected 16 statistical and structural features. For feature classification, we use multilayer perceptron (MLP) with one hidden layer. We classify images into two classes. Feature classification efficiency is about 93 percent.

  12. [Follow-up of surgical biopsies in microcalcifications of the breast. Comparative analysis of patients submitted to mammography and digitalization of mammographic images].

    PubMed

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Vento, A R; Naninato, P; Zanetti, A; Carli, L

    1997-01-01

    Improvements in the techniques of preoperative needle localization of nonpalpable breast lesions that have been detected at mammography, coupled with surgical biopsy of smaller volumes of breast tissue and the use of local anesthesia have produced a more aggressive attitude toward early biopsy of lesions that are suspected of malignancy. The authors report the follow-up in 92 cases, who underwent breast biopsy for microcalcifications with no palpable lesions. In 46 women the presence of microcalcifications was evaluated through a computerized instrument which allows digitalization of the image.

  13. Development of a sampling strategy and sample size calculation to estimate the distribution of mammographic breast density in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Kwan; Kim, Mi Jin; Choi, Kui Son; Suh, Mina; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2012-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is a known risk factor for breast cancer. To conduct a survey to estimate the distribution of mammographic breast density in Korean women, appropriate sampling strategies for representative and efficient sampling design were evaluated through simulation. Using the target population from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP) for breast cancer in 2009, we verified the distribution estimate by repeating the simulation 1,000 times using stratified random sampling to investigate the distribution of breast density of 1,340,362 women. According to the simulation results, using a sampling design stratifying the nation into three groups (metropolitan, urban, and rural), with a total sample size of 4,000, we estimated the distribution of breast density in Korean women at a level of 0.01% tolerance. Based on the results of our study, a nationwide survey for estimating the distribution of mammographic breast density among Korean women can be conducted efficiently.

  14. An investigation of mammographic density and gene variants in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Lurie, Galina; Williams, Andrew E; Le Marchand, Loic

    2004-11-20

    This cross-sectional study examined if polymorphisms in genes that code for enzymes involved in the production and metabolism of estrogens are associated with mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. The study included 328 healthy women of different ethnicities who underwent mammographic screening and donated a blood or mouthwash sample for DNA analysis. After digitizing cranio-caudal views of the mammograms, we performed computer-assisted mammographic density assessment. Following DNA extraction, samples were analyzed for polymorphisms in the COMT (Val158Met), CYP1A1 (Ile462Val), CYP1B1 (Val432Leu), CYP1A2 (*1F) and CYP17 (T27C) genes using PCR-RFLP. Breast density was lower in Caucasians than in Asians. Caucasian women were less likely to carry the CYP1A1 variant allele and more likely to carry the variant alleles for CYP1B1 and COMT than women with Asian or Hawaiian ancestry. The low-activity COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles were weakly related to lower percent mammographic density after adjustment for age, ethnicity, body mass index and reproductive variables (p for gene-dosage =0.08 and 0.05, respectively). These relations were observed in premenopausal women only and were similar in direction and magnitude after stratification by ethnicity. We found no significant associations between breast density and the variant alleles for CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP17. Our data suggest lower mammographic density for women carrying the COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles than for women carrying the common alleles, though this is the opposite of what is commonly hypothesized from the enzyme function.

  15. An Investigation into the Consistency in Mammographic Density Identification by Radiologists: Effect of Radiologist Expertise and Mammographic Appearance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W; Ryan, Elaine A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate how radiologist expertise and image appearance may have an impact on inter-reader variability of mammographic density (MD) identification. Seventeen radiologists, divided into three expertise groups, were asked to manually segment the areas they consider to be MD in 40 clinical images. The variation in identification of MD for each image was quantified by finding the range of segmentation areas. The impact of radiologist expertise and image appearance on this variation was explored. The range of areas chosen by participating radiologists varied from 7 to 73% across the 40 images, with a mean range of 35 ± 13%. Participants with high expertise were more likely to choose similar areas to one another, compared to participants with medium and low expertise levels (mean range were 19 ± 10%, 29 ± 13% and 25 ± 14 %, respectively, p < 0.0001). There was a significantly higher average grey level for the area segmented by all radiologists as MD compared to the area of variation, with mean grey level value for 8-bit images being 146 ± 19 vs. 99 ± 14, respectively. MD segmentation borders were consistent in areas where there was a sharp intensity change within a short distance. In conclusion, radiologists with high expertise tend to have a higher agreement when identifying MD. Tissues which have a lower contrast and a less visually sharp gradient change at the interface between high density tissue and adipose background lead to inter-reader variation in choosing mammographic density.

  16. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  17. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  18. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  19. Robust estimation of mammographic breast density: a patient-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Harald S.; Erhard, Klaus; Gooßen, Andre; Bulow, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Breast density has become an established risk indicator for developing breast cancer. Current clinical practice reflects this by grading mammograms patient-wise as entirely fat, scattered fibroglandular, heterogeneously dense, or extremely dense based on visual perception. Existing (semi-) automated methods work on a per-image basis and mimic clinical practice by calculating an area fraction of fibroglandular tissue (mammographic percent density). We suggest a method that follows clinical practice more strictly by segmenting the fibroglandular tissue portion directly from the joint data of all four available mammographic views (cranio-caudal and medio-lateral oblique, left and right), and by subsequently calculating a consistently patient-based mammographic percent density estimate. In particular, each mammographic view is first processed separately to determine a region of interest (ROI) for segmentation into fibroglandular and adipose tissue. ROI determination includes breast outline detection via edge-based methods, peripheral tissue suppression via geometric breast height modeling, and - for medio-lateral oblique views only - pectoral muscle outline detection based on optimizing a three-parameter analytic curve with respect to local appearance. Intensity harmonization based on separately acquired calibration data is performed with respect to compression height and tube voltage to facilitate joint segmentation of available mammographic views. A Gaussian mixture model (GMM) on the joint histogram data with a posteriori calibration guided plausibility correction is finally employed for tissue separation. The proposed method was tested on patient data from 82 subjects. Results show excellent correlation (r = 0.86) to radiologist's grading with deviations ranging between -28%, (q = 0.025) and +16%, (q = 0.975).

  20. Evaluation of mammographic density patterns: reproducibility and concordance among scales

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    this percentage was lower for the quantitative scales (21.89% for BI-RADS and 21.86% for Boyd). Conclusions Visual scales of mammographic density show a high reproducibility when appropriate training is provided. Their ability to distinguish between high and low risk render them useful for routine use by breast cancer screening programs. Quantitative-based scales are more specific than pattern-based scales in classifying populations in the high-risk group. PMID:20836850

  1. Circularly Polarized Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Personnel Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-08-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  2. Computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using the deep learning technology: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although mammography is the only clinically acceptable imaging modality used in the population-based breast cancer screening, its efficacy is quite controversy. One of the major challenges is how to help radiologists more accurately classify between benign and malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to investigate a new mammographic mass classification scheme based on a deep learning method. In this study, we used an image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms, which includes 280 malignant and 280 benign mass ROIs, respectively. An eight layer deep learning network was applied, which employs three pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perception (MLP) classifier for feature categorization. In order to improve robustness of selected features, each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer. A number of 20, 10, and 5 feature maps were utilized for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd convolution layer, respectively. The convolution networks are followed by a MLP classifier, which generates a classification score to predict likelihood of a ROI depicting a malignant mass. Among 560 ROIs, 420 ROIs were used as a training dataset and the remaining 140 ROIs were used as a validation dataset. The result shows that the new deep learning based classifier yielded an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.810+/-0.036. This study demonstrated the potential superiority of using a deep learning based classifier to distinguish malignant and benign breast masses without segmenting the lesions and extracting the pre-defined image features.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  4. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  5. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  6. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  7. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  8. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  9. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  10. No ‘cure’ within 12 years of diagnosis among breast cancer patients who are diagnosed via mammographic screening: women diagnosed in the West Midlands region of England 1989–2011

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L. M.; Morris, M.; Rachet, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that there is little evidence of population ‘cure’ among two populations of women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. ‘Cure’ has not yet been examined in the context of screen-detection. Patients and methods We examined cancer registry data on 19 800 women aged 50–70, diagnosed with a primary, invasive, non-metastatic breast cancer between 1 April 1989 and 31 March 2011 in the West Midlands region of England, linked to Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and the National Breast Screening Service (NBSS). Follow-up was complete on all women up to 31 July 2012. Analyses were stratified by screening status, age, tumour stage, deprivation and ethnicity. We estimated net survival for the whole cohort and each subgroup. Population ‘cure’ was evaluated by fitting flexible parametric log-cumulative excess hazard regression models in which the excess hazard of breast cancer death was assumed to be equal to zero after a given follow-up time. Results There was an overall lack of evidence for ‘cure’. Across all subgroups examined, the general pattern was that of a continuous decrease in net survival over time, with no obvious asymptotic tendency within 12 years of follow-up. Model-based analyses confirmed this observation. Conclusions Despite dramatic improvements in survival over past decades, diagnosis with breast cancer remains associated with a small but persistent increased risk of death for all groups of women, including those whose cancer is detected asymptomatically. These findings are unlikely to be due to methodological inadequacies. Communication of these long-term consequences of breast cancer among women recently diagnosed and to those considering undergoing screening should take due consideration of these patterns. PMID:27573567

  11. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns on a large clinical dataset of full-field digital mammograms: robustness study with two high-risk datasets.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L; Lan, Li; Bancroft Brown, Jeremy; MacMahon, Aoife; Mussman, Mary; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Sennett, Charlene

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the robustness of our prior computerized texture analysis method for breast cancer risk assessment, which was developed initially on a limited dataset of screen-film mammograms. This current study investigated the robustness by (1) evaluating on a large clinical dataset, (2) using full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) as opposed to screen-film mammography, and (3) incorporating analyses over two types of high-risk patient sets, as well as patients at low risk for breast cancer. The evaluation included the analyses on the parenchymal patterns of women at high risk of developing of breast cancer, including both BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and unilateral cancer patients, and of women at low risk of developing breast cancer. A total of 456 cases, including 53 women with BRCA1/2 gene mutations, 75 women with unilateral cancer, and 328 low-risk women, were retrospectively collected under an institutional review board approved protocol. Regions-of-interest (ROIs), were manually selected from the central breast region immediately behind the nipple. These ROIs were subsequently used in computerized feature extraction to characterize the mammographic parenchymal patterns in the images. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized texture features in the task of distinguishing between high-risk and low-risk subjects. In a round robin evaluation on the FFDM dataset with Bayesian artificial neural network analysis, AUC values of 0.82 (95% confidence interval [0.75, 0.88]) and 0.73 (95% confidence interval [0.67, 0.78]) were obtained between BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and low-risk women, and between unilateral cancer and low-risk women, respectively. These results from computerized texture analysis on digital mammograms demonstrated that high-risk and low-risk women have different mammographic parenchymal patterns. On this large clinical dataset, we validated our methods for

  12. Objective Quality Assessment and Perceptual Compression of Screen Content Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiqi; Gu, Ke; Zeng, Kai; Wang, Zhou; Lin, Weisi

    2016-05-25

    Screen content image (SCI) has recently emerged as an active topic due to the rapidly increasing demand in many graphically rich services such as wireless displays and virtual desktops. Image quality models play an important role in measuring and optimizing user experience of SCI compression and transmission systems, but are currently lacking. SCIs are often composed of pictorial regions and computer generated textual/graphical content, which exhibit different statistical properties that often lead to different viewer behaviors. Inspired by this, we propose an objective quality assessment approach for SCIs that incorporates both visual field adaptation and information content weighting into structural similarity based local quality assessment. Furthermore, we develop a perceptual screen content coding scheme based on the newly proposed quality assessment measure, targeting at further improving the SCI compression performance. Experimental results show that the proposed quality assessment method not only better predicts the perceptual quality of SCIs, but also demonstrates great potentials in the design of perceptually optimal SCI compression schemes.

  13. Rapid combinatorial screening by synchrotron X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eba, Hiromi; Sakurai, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    An X-ray imaging system, which does not require any scans of the sample or an X-ray beam and which, therefore, dramatically reduces the amount of time required, was employed to evaluate combinatorial libraries efficiently. Two-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) images of an 8 mm × 8 mm area were observed for combinatorial substrates of manganese-cobalt spinel MnCo 2O 4 and lithium ferrite LiFeO 2 via an exposure time of 1-3 s using synchrotron X-rays. Thus, XRF signals from a whole substrate could be observed at once in a short space of time. In order to observe the chemical environment simultaneously for all materials arranged on the substrate, the fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) was measured by repeating the imaging during the monochromator scans across the absorption edge for metals. This is extremely efficient because XAFS spectra for all materials placed on the common substrate are obtained from only a single energy scan. One can determine the valence numbers, as well as other aspects of the chemical environment of the metal included in each material, from the differences in spectral features and the energy shifts. Hence, combinatorial libraries can be screened very rapidly, and therefore efficiently, using the X-ray imaging system.

  14. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and population diversity captured across 22 countries.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Valerie A; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Lee, Charmaine Pei Ling; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H; Wanders, Johanna O P; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Won Lee, Jong; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna M; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F

    2016-02-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses.

  15. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and Population Diversity captured across 22 Countries

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Valerie A.; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H.; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Ling Lee, Charmaine Pei; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna O.P.; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J.; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD by a core team to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses. PMID:26724463

  16. Imaging tilted transversely isotropic media with a generalised screen propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Il; Byun, Joongmoo; Seol, Soon Jee

    2015-01-01

    One-way wave equation migration is computationally efficient compared with reverse time migration, and it provides a better subsurface image than ray-based migration algorithms when imaging complex structures. Among many one-way wave-based migration algorithms, we adopted the generalised screen propagator (GSP) to build the migration algorithm. When the wavefield propagates through the large velocity variation in lateral or steeply dipping structures, GSP increases the accuracy of the wavefield in wide angle by adopting higher-order terms induced from expansion of the vertical slowness in Taylor series with each perturbation term. To apply the migration algorithm to a more realistic geological structure, we considered tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. The new GSP, which contains the tilting angle as a symmetric axis of the anisotropic media, was derived by modifying the GSP designed for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. To verify the developed TTI-GSP, we analysed the accuracy of wave propagation, especially for the new perturbation parameters and the tilting angle; the results clearly showed that the perturbation term of the tilting angle in TTI media has considerable effects on proper propagation. In addition, through numerical tests, we demonstrated that the developed TTI-GS migration algorithm could successfully image a steeply dipping salt flank with high velocity variation around anisotropic layers.

  17. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  18. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  19. Thermal image measurement and analysis under obscured IR smoke screen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zeying; Chen, Zhigang; Chen, Wenjian; Li, Li; You, Mingjun

    1998-08-01

    Under the condition of laying artificial smoke screen, studying transmission property of IR, laser and visible light, especially studying the effect of smoke screen on transmission of thermal image of target is of theoretical and practical significance. The paper is based on a field- testing during which artificial IR smoke screen was produced. In the course of testing, typical motor vehicle in operating condition was chosen as target. By combing the change of typical thermal image which was taken by AGEMA-880 thermovision before and after IR smoke screen producing with a large amount of data concerned, the nature and law are studied and analyzed that different types of IR smoke screen have an effect on thermal image of target and image quality of thermovision. Therefore, we further have put forward that the change of thermal image quality is reflected under the influence of smoke screen by fractal fitting error.

  20. An infrared image based methodology for breast lesions screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, K. C. C.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Reisemberger, G. G.; Freitas, F. N. P.; Oliari, S. H.; Brioschi, M. L.; Louveira, M. H.; Spautz, C.; Dias, F. G.; Gasperin, P.; Budel, V. M.; Cordeiro, R. A. G.; Schittini, A. P. P.; Neto, C. D.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of utilizing a structured methodology for breast lesions screening, based on infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges, and of breast cancer patients, previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. An analysis of the systematic error of the infrared camera skin temperature measurements was conducted in several different regions of the body, by direct comparison to high precision thermistor temperature measurements, showing that infrared camera temperatures are consistently around 2 °C above the thermistor temperatures. Therefore, a method of conjugated gradients is proposed to eliminate the infrared camera direct temperature measurement imprecision, by calculating the temperature difference between two points to cancel out the error. The method takes into account the human body approximate bilateral symmetry, and compares measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ bar) between two symmetric regions of the patient's breast, that takes into account the breast region, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures, and doing so, the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and non subjective. The range of normal whole breast average dimensionless temperature differences for 101 healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the breasts temperatures exhibit a unimodal normal distribution, the healthy normal range for each region was considered to be the dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements, Δ θ bar ‾ + 2σ Δ θ bar ‾ , in order to represent 95% of the population. Forty-seven patients with previously diagnosed breast cancer through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting breast abnormalities in 45 cases (96%). Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective

  1. Change descriptors for determining nodule malignancy in national lung screening trial CT screening images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Benjamin; Hawkins, Samuel; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodules are effectively diagnosed in CT scans, but determining their malignancy has been a challenge. The rate of change of the volume of a pulmonary nodule is known to be a prognostic factor for cancer development. In this study, we propose that other changes in imaging characteristics are similarly informative. We examined the combination of image features across multiple CT scans, taken from the National Lung Screening Trial, with individual scans of the same patient separated by approximately one year. By subtracting the values of existing features in multiple scans for the same patient, we were able to improve the ability of existing classification algorithms to determine whether a nodule will become malignant. We trained each classifier on 83 nodules determined to be malignant by biopsy and 172 nodules determined to be benign by their clinical stability through two years of no change; classifiers were tested on 77 malignant and 144 benign nodules, using a set of features that in a test-retest experiment were shown to be stable. An accuracy of 83.71% and AUC of 0.814 were achieved with the Random Forests classifier on a subset of features determined to be stable via test-retest reproducibility analysis, further reduced with the Correlation-based Feature Selection algorithm.

  2. Mammographic density, lobular involution, and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, O M; Martin, L J; Boyd, N F

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we propose that age-related changes in mammographic density and breast tissue involution are closely related phenomena, and consider their potential relevance to the aetiology of breast cancer. We propose that the reduction in mammographic density that occurs with increasing age, parity and menopause reflects the involution of breast tissue. We further propose that age-related changes in both mammographic density and breast tissue composition are observable and measurable phenomena that resemble Pike's theoretical construct of ‘breast tissue ageing'. Extensive mammographic density and delayed breast involution are both associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and are consistent with the hypothesis of the Pike model that cumulative exposure of breast tissue to hormones and growth factors that stimulate cell division, as well as the accumulation of genetic damage in breast cells, are major determinants of breast cancer incidence. PMID:18781174

  3. Breast cancer CAD{sub x} based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from two mammographic views

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shalini; Chyn, Priscilla F.; Markey, Mia K.

    2006-06-15

    In this study we compared the performance of computer aided diagnosis (CAD{sub x}) algorithms based on Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS trade mark sign ) descriptors from one or two views. To select cases for the study with different mediolateral (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC) view descriptors, we assessed the agreement in BI-RADS trade mark sign lesion descriptors, BI-RADS trade mark sign assessment, and subtlety ratings for 1626 cases from the Digital Database for Screening Mammogrpahy (DDSM) using kappa statistics. We used 115 mass cases with different descriptors for the two views to design linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based CAD{sub x} algorithms. The CAD{sub x} algorithms used BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors and patient age as features. The algorithms based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from both the views performed marginally better than algorithms based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from a single view. A system that averaged the results of two classifiers trained separately on the MLO and CC views displayed the best performance (A{sub z}=0.920{+-}0.027). Thus, some improvement in performance of BI-RADS trade mark sign based CAD{sub x} algorithms may be achieved by combining information from two mammographic views.

  4. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  5. Higher alcohol intake may modify the association between mammographic density and breast cancer: an analysis of three case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Shannon M; Koga, Karin; Woolcott, Christy G; Dahl, Timothy; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Yaffe, Martin J; Vachon, Celine M; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and mammographic density are established risk factors for breast cancer. This study examined whether the association of mammographic density with breast cancer varies by alcohol intake. Mammographic density was assessed in digitized images for 1207 cases and 1663 controls from three populations (Japan, Hawaii, California) using a computer-assisted method. Associations were estimated by logistic regression. When comparing ever to never drinking, mean density was similar and consumption was not associated with breast cancer risk. However, within the Hawaii/Japan subset, women consuming >1 drink/day had a non-significantly elevated relative risk compared to never drinkers. Also in the Hawaii/Japan population, alcohol intake only modified the association between mammographic density and breast cancer in women consuming >1 drink/day (p(interaction)=0.05) with significant risk estimates of 3.65 and 6.58 for the 2nd and 3rd density tertiles as compared to 1.57 and 1.61 for never drinkers in Hawaii/Japan. Although these findings suggest a stronger association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk for alcohol consumers, the small number of cases requires caution in interpreting the results.

  6. Mammographic density and intake of selected nutrients and vitamins in Norwegian women.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Samera Azeem; Couto, Elisabeth; Hilsen, Marit; Hofvind, Solveig; Wu, Anna H; Ursin, Giske

    2011-01-01

    Investigating the association between dietary factors and mammographic density (MD) could shed light on the relationship between diet and breast cancer risk. We took advantage of a national mammographic screening program to study the association between intake of nutrients and MD. In this study, we analyzed data of 2,252 postmenopausal women aged 50-69 yr who participated in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program in 2004. MD was assessed on digitized mammograms using a computer-assisted method. We used multivariate linear regression models to determine least square means of percent and absolute MD. Overall, we observed no associations between MD and intake of total calories, protein, carbohydrates, cholesterol, and dietary fiber. There was a positive borderline statistically significant association between absolute MD and total fat intake (P = 0.10) and between percent MD and intake of saturated fat (P = 0.06). There was no association between MD and intake of calcium, retinol, vitamins A, B12, C, or D, or combined intake of vitamin D and calcium. This study provides some evidence of an association between MD and dietary intake. Our study highlights the importance of adequate adjustments for BMI in studies of diet and MD.

  7. Simultaneous image reproduction on CRT screen: Moves ultrasonic sectional view and electrocardiogram curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A method for simultaneous reproduction of images, requiring different amounts of time to reproduce, on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen is disclosed. Ultrasonic sectional views and electrocardiogram curves are simultaneously reproduced on the CRT screen by producing the images on different areas of a screen with two phosphors having different persistence times and luminous colors, within the times required for the appearance of the images. In front of the area on which is produced the image requiring the shorter time is a color filter which is permeable to the color of the phosphor with the shorter persistence time by which absorbs the color of the other phosphor.

  8. Exploratory survey of image quality on CR digital mammography imaging systems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Arreola, M; Franco, J; Molina, N; Alvarez, B; Azorín, C G; Casian, G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of image quality and dose in computed radiographic digital mammography (CRDM) systems. Studies included CRDM systems of various models and manufacturers which dose and image quality comparisons were performed. Due to the recent rise in the use of digital radiographic systems in Mexico, CRDM systems are rapidly replacing conventional film-screen systems without any regard to quality control or image quality standards. Study was conducted in 65 mammography facilities which use CRDM systems in the Mexico City and surrounding States. The systems were tested as used clinically. This means that the dose and beam qualities were selected using the automatic beam selection and photo-timed features. All systems surveyed generate laser film hardcopies for the radiologist to read on a scope or mammographic high luminance light box. It was found that 51 of CRDM systems presented a variety of image artefacts and non-uniformities arising from inadequate acquisition and processing, as well as from the laser printer itself. Undisciplined alteration of image processing settings by the technologist was found to be a serious prevalent problem in 42 facilities. Only four of them showed an image QC program which is periodically monitored by a medical physicist. The Average Glandular Dose (AGD) in the surveyed systems was estimated to have a mean value of 2.4 mGy. To improve image quality in mammography and make more efficient screening mammographic in early detection of breast cancer is required new legislation.

  9. Quality Imaging — Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, E.; Azorín Nieto, J.; Irán Díaz Góngora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigón Castañeda, G. M.; Franco Enríquez, J. G.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film.

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Mammography Screening

    PubMed Central

    Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H.; Hacker, Astrid; Sedlacek, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mammography screening is the only method presently considered appropriate for mass screening of asymptomatic women. Its frequent use, however, warrants diligent analysis of potential side effects. Radiation risk is far below the natural yearly risk of breast cancer and should not be used as an argument against screening. False-positive calls lead to additional imaging or histopathological assessment, mainly percutaneous breast biopsy. These measures are tolerated and accepted fairly well. Their number is limited by strict quality assurance and constant training. Interval cancers represent a limitation of breast screening that should prompt further research for optimization. Evaluation of overdiagnosis is a highly debated topic in the literature. According to the probably most realistic available calculations, overdiagnosis is acceptable as it is compensated by the potential mortality reduction. Nonetheless, this potential side effect warrants optimal adjustment of therapy to the patient's individual risk. The mortality reduction seen in randomized studies was confirmed by results from national screening programs. A recent case referent study indicated that improvements in mortality reduction run parallel to improved mammographic techniques. Use of less aggressive therapies is another valuable effect of screening. Awareness of potential problems, strict quality assurance, and further research should help to further develop screening programs. PMID:21779225

  11. Status of the fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1993-11-01

    Ten fluorescent screens and cameras determine the relative position and image profile of the beam in both the electron and positron linacs at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The timing techniques used to capture the beam image allow direct synchronization to the electron gun trigger to minimize timing uncertainties. This paper discusses the design and status of the APS linac fluorescent screen assemblies and imaging system.

  12. Evaluation Of Digital Unsharp-Mask Filtering For The Detection Of Subtle Mammographic Microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Vyborny, Carl J.; MacMahon, Heber; Metz, Charles E.; Doi, Kunio; Sickles, Edward A.

    1986-06-01

    We have conducted a study to assess the effects of digitization and unsharp-mask filtering on the ability of observers to detect subtle microcalcifications in mammograms. Thirty-two conventional screen-film mammograms were selected from patient files by two experienced mammographers. Twelve of the mammograms contained a suspicious cluster of microcalcifications in patients who subsequently underwent biopsy. Twenty of the mammograms were normal cases which were initially interpreted as being free of clustered microcalcifications and did not demonstrate such on careful review. The mammograms were digitized with a high-quality Fuji image processing/simulation system. The system consists of two drum scanners with which an original radiograph can be digitized, processed by a minicomputer, and reconstituted on film. In this study, we employed a sampling aperture of 0.1 mm X 0.1 mm and a sampling distance of 0.1 mm. The density range from 0.2 to 2.75 was digitized to 1024 grey levels per pixel. The digitized images were printed on a single emulsion film with a display aperture having the same size as the sampling aperture. The system was carefully calibrated so that the density and contrast of a digitized image were closely matched to those of the original radiograph. Initially, we evaluated the effects of the weighting factor and the mask size of a unsharp-mask filter on the appearance of mammograms for various types of breasts. Subjective visual comparisons suggested that a mask size of 91 X 91 pixels (9.1 mm X 9.1 mm) enhances the visibility of microcalcifications without excessively increasing the high-frequency noise. Further, a density-dependent weighting factor that increases linearly from 1.5 to 3.0 in the density range of 0.2 to 2.5 enhances the contrast of microcalcifications without introducing many potentially confusing artifacts in the low-density areas. An unsharp-mask filter with these parameters was used to process the digitized mammograms. We conducted

  13. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and mammographic density in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ahn, Jiin; Jung, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Chan-Won; Yun, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Min-Jung; Suh, Byung-Seong; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Ryu, Seungho

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance (IR) with mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to evaluate these associations in pre- and postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study was performed in 73,974 adult women who underwent a comprehensive health screening examination that included a mammogram between 2011 and 2013 (mean age 42.6 years). MetS was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. IR was assessed with the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dense breast were estimated using logistic regression models after adjustment for potential confounders. In premenopausal women, MetS and all its components except waist circumference were associated with dense breast. After adjustment for potential confounders, the OR (95% CI) for dense breast in women with MetS compared with those without MetS was 1.22 (1.06-1.39). In postmenopausal women, however, there was positive but non-significant association between MetS and dense breast. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, high blood glucose and IR were positively associated with dense breast. The OR (95% CI) for dense breast between the highest and lowest quartiles of HOMA-IR was 1.29 (1.20-1.39) for premenopausal women and 1.44 (1.05-1.97) for postmenopausal women. In a large sample of Korean women, MetS and IR were associated with mammographic dense breast, demonstrating that IR, a potentially modifiable risk factor, may increase breast cancer risk, possibly through high mammographic density.

  14. Development and application of a segmentation routine in a mammographic mass CAD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarious, David M., Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new segmentation routine developed for mammographic masses. We previously developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that employed a simple but imprecise segmentation procedure. To improve the systems performance, an iterative, linear segmentation routine was developed. The routine begins by employing a linear discriminant function to determine the optimal threshold between estimates of an objects interior and exterior pixels. After applying the threshold and identifying the objects outline, two constraints are applied to minimize the influence of extraneous background structures. Each iteration further refines the outline until the stopping criterion is reached. The segmentation algorithm was tested on a database of 181 mammographic images that contained forty-nine malignant and fifty benign masses. A set of suspicious regions of interest (ROIs) was found using the previous CAD system. Twenty features were measured from the regions before and after applying the new segmentation routine. The difference in the features discriminatory ability was examined via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A significant performance difference was observed in many features, particularly those describing the object border. Free-response ROC (FROC) curves were utilized to examine how the overall CAD system performance changed with the inclusion of the segmentation routine. The FROC performance appeared to be improved, especially for malignant masses. When detecting 90% of the malignant masses, the previous system achieved 4.4 false positives per image (FPpI) compared to the post-segmentation systems 3.7 FPpI. At 85%, the respective FPpI are 4.1 and 2.1.

  15. Enhanced imaging process for xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, William D.; Zanrosso, Eddie M.

    1993-09-01

    An enhanced mammographic imaging process has been developed which is based on the conventional powder-toner selenium technology used in the Xerox 125/126 x-ray imaging system. The process is derived from improvements in the amorphous selenium x-ray photoconductor, the blue powder toner and the aerosol powder dispersion process. Comparisons of image quality and x-ray dose using the Xerox aluminum-wedge breast phantom and the Radiation Measurements Model 152D breast phantom have been made between the new Enhanced Process, the standard Xerox 125/126 System and screen-film at mammographic x-ray exposure parameters typical for each modality. When comparing the Enhanced Xeromammographic Process with the standard 125/126 System, a distinct advantage is seen for the Enhanced equivalent mass detection and superior fiber and speck detection. The broader imaging latitude of enhanced and standard Xeroradiography, in comparison to film, is illustrated in images made using the aluminum-wedge breast phantom.

  16. Large-scale image-based screening and profiling of cellular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bougen-Zhukov, Nicola; Loh, Sheng Yang; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Loo, Lit-Hsin

    2017-02-01

    Cellular phenotypes are observable characteristics of cells resulting from the interactions of intrinsic and extrinsic chemical or biochemical factors. Image-based phenotypic screens under large numbers of basal or perturbed conditions can be used to study the influences of these factors on cellular phenotypes. Hundreds to thousands of phenotypic descriptors can also be quantified from the images of cells under each of these experimental conditions. Therefore, huge amounts of data can be generated, and the analysis of these data has become a major bottleneck in large-scale phenotypic screens. Here, we review current experimental and computational methods for large-scale image-based phenotypic screens. Our focus is on phenotypic profiling, a computational procedure for constructing quantitative and compact representations of cellular phenotypes based on the images collected in these screens. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  18. Personnel screening with terahertz opto-mechanical scanning imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Liu, Xin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2014-11-01

    We presented a passive THz opto-mechnical scanning imaging method using a single detector and a trihedral scanning mirror. The system improved the imaging speed through employing two flapping mirrors. Also the trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror were adopted. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 2.2m with the image range of 1.6m (W) ×1.6m (H), the imaging time was 2s, and the resolution was 3cm. We imaged human body with different objects concealed under their clothes, such as buckle, ceramic chip, etc.

  19. A Clinicopathologic Correlation of Mammographic Parenchymal Patterns and Associated Risk Factors for Human Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Kirby I.; Kuhns, James G.; Buchanan, Jerry B.; Dwyer, Patricia A.; Heuser, Louis F.; O'Connor, Carol A.; Gray, Laman A.; Polk, Hiram C.

    1982-01-01

    The five-year screening experience for 10,131 asymptomatic women evaluated at the Louisville Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (LBCDDP) disclosed 144 breast carcinomas in 1,209 patients (12%) aged 35 to 74 years in whom 904 biopsies and 305 aspirations were performed. This study included 44,711 high-quality xeromammograms (XM) prospectively classified by the modified Wolfe mammographic parenchymal patterns into low-risk (N1, P1) versus high-risk (P2, DY) groups, with expansion of the P2 cohort into three additional categories. Using BMDP computer-program analysis, each XM pattern was collated with 21 nonneoplastic and 18 malignant pathologic variables and commonly associated risk factors. A separate analysis of epithelial proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast (FCDB) was performed. The histopathology for each biopsy, with distinction of FCDB and neoplasms, was analyzed with regard to the statistical probability of influencing the XM pattern. An average of 1.05 biopsies per patient were performed in women with findings suggestive of carcinoma at clinical and/or XM examinations. An equal distribution of the N1, P1, and P2 DYXM patterns was observed in the 10,131 screenees. Of 8.5% of the screened population having biopsies, 623 were observed to have nonproliferative FCDB and 137, proliferative FCDB. For women 50 years of age or younger, these pathologic variables were seen more frequently in the P2 DY patterns (p < 0.001), whereas no difference in XM pattern distribution was observed for the screenee 50 years of age or older for proliferative FCDB (p = 0.65). Sixteen percent of the biopsied/aspirated lesions were carcinomas, yielding a biopsy/cancer ratio of 6.25:1. These in situ and invasive neoplasms were more commonly (p < 0.04) observed in 55% of the P2 (P2f, P2n, P2c) categories, while 64% of all cancers appeared more frequently in the P2 DY subgroup (p <0.001), compared with this pattern in the screened population. An

  20. Stereoscopic representation of the breast from two mammographic view with external markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Manohar, Anand

    2003-05-01

    A new breast imaging technique has been develoepd and tested for the stereoscopic representation of the breast. The method uses markers at specific locations on the breast surface and standard mammographic projections and was tested with an anthropomorphic phantom containing five mass-like objects at locations determined by a CT scan. The phantom was imaged with a GE Senographe 2000D digital system with and without the markers. The algorithm's modules included: 1) Breast area segmentation; 2) Pectoral muscle segmentation; 3) Registration and alignment of the mammographic projections based on selected reference points; 4) Breast volume estimation basdd on volume conservation principle during compression and shape definition using surface points; 5) 3D lesion(s) localization and representation. An interactive, ILD-based, graphical interface was also developed for the stereoscopic display of the breast. The reconstruction algorithm assumed that the breast shrinks and stretches uniformly when compression is applied and removed. The relative movement of the markers after compression allowed more accurate estimation of the shrinking and stretching of the surface offering a relatively simple and practical way to improve volume estimation and surface reconstruction. Such stereoscopic representation of the breast and associated findings may improve radiological interpretation and physical examinations for breast cancer diagnosis.

  1. Thermography is not a feasible method for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Brkljacić, Boris; Miletić, Damir; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy causing high mortality in women especially in developed countries. Due to the contribution of mammographic screening and improvements in therapy, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased considerably. An imaging-based early detection of breast cancer improves the treatment outcome. Mammography is generally established not only as diagnostic but also as screening tool, while breast ultrasound plays a major role in the diagnostic setting in distinguishing solid lesions from cysts and in guiding tissue sampling. Several indications are established for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Thermography was not validated as a screening tool and the only study performed long ago for evaluating this technology in the screening setting demonstrated very poor results. The conclusion that thermography might be feasible for screening cannot be derived from studies with small sample size, unclear selection of patients, and in which mammography and thermography were not blindly compared as screening modalities. Thermography can not be used to aspirate, biopsy or localize lesions preoperatively since no method so far was described to accurately transpose the thermographic location of the lesion to the mammogram or ultrasound and to surgical specimen. Thermography cannot be proclaimed as a screening method, without any evidence whatsoever.

  2. Clinical comparison of CR and screen film for imaging the critically ill neonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Brasch, Robert C.; Gooding, Charles A.; Gould, Robert G.; Cohen, Pierre A.; Rencken, Ingo R.; Huang, H. K.

    1996-05-01

    A clinical comparison of computed radiography (CR) versus screen-film for imaging the critically-ill neonate is performed, utilizing a modified (hybrid) film cassette containing a CR (standard ST-V) imaging plate, a conventional screen and film, allowing simultaneous acquisition of perfectly matched CR and plain film images. For 100 portable neonatal chest and abdominal projection radiographs, plain film was subjectively compared to CR hardcopy. Three pediatric radiologists graded overall image quality on a scale of one (poor) to five (excellent), as well as visualization of various anatomic structures (i.e., lung parenchyma, pulmonary vasculature, tubes/lines) and pathological findings (i.e., pulmonary interstitial emphysema, pleural effusion, pneumothorax). Results analyzed using a combined kappa statistic of the differences between scores from each matched set, combined over the three readers showed no statistically significant difference in overall image quality between screen- film and CR (p equals 0.19). Similarly, no statistically significant difference was seen between screen-film and CR for anatomic structure visualization and for visualization of pathological findings. These results indicate that the image quality of CR is comparable to plain film, and that CR may be a suitable alternative to screen-film imaging for portable neonatal chest and abdominal examinations.

  3. The Shrinking Breast: An Unusual Mammographic Finding of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Nazia F; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2007-01-01

    We report two cases of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that were initially missed on first mammographic interpretation because of an uncommon, easily overlooked, and unreported imaging presentation. The abnormality in the cases manifested as an apparent decrease in breast glandular tissue volume when compared with the patients' previous mammograms, observed as "shrinking" of the breast on mammography. Invasive lobular carcinoma is considered one of the most difficult subtypes of breast cancer to identify on mammography because the changes that occur are often nonspecific and subtle. Microcalcifications that are usually associated with breast masses on imaging are rarely seen in this subtype of breast cancer. Although magnetic resonance imaging and computer-aided detection have somewhat improved the detection of invasive lobular carcinoma, radiologic and clinical detection remains a challenge.

  4. Fractal Analysis of Radiologists Visual Scanning Pattern in Screening Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Alamudun, Folami T; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hudson, Kathy; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Tourassi, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators have investigated radiologists visual scanning patterns with respect to features such as total time examining a case, time to initially hit true lesions, number of hits, etc. The purpose of this study was to examine the complexity of the radiologists visual scanning pattern when viewing 4-view mammographic cases, as they typically do in clinical practice. Gaze data were collected from 10 readers (3 breast imaging experts and 7 radiology residents) while reviewing 100 screening mammograms (24 normal, 26 benign, 50 malignant). The radiologists scanpaths across the 4 mammographic views were mapped to a single 2-D image plane. Then, fractal analysis was applied on the derived scanpaths using the box counting method. For each case, the complexity of each radiologist s scanpath was estimated using fractal dimension. The association between gaze complexity, case pathology, case density, and radiologist experience was evaluated using 3 factor fixed effects ANOVA. ANOVA showed that case pathology, breast density, and experience level are all independent predictors of the visual scanning pattern complexity. Visual scanning patterns are significantly different for benign and malignant cases than for normal cases as well as when breast parenchyma density changes.

  5. Sclerosing adenosis: Ultrasonographic and mammographic findings and correlation with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Chen, Jia-Jian; Chang, Cai; Gao, Yi; Wu, Jiong; Yang, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiological findings, particularly the ultrasonographic (US) characteristics of sclerosing adenosis (SA), and their correlation with histopathological results. A retrospective review identified 191 patients with a total of 200 lesions histopathologically confirmed as SA following breast surgery between July 2009 and December 2012. Of the 191 patients, 145 (151 lesions) with SA as the major component were included for US and mammographic (MG) analysis. All 145 patients analyzed were female, with a mean age ± standard deviation of 46.8±7.8 years (range, 25–71 years). All 145 patients underwent US examination and the imaging findings included heterogeneously echogenic areas in 9.3% (14/151), masses in 51.7% (78/151), masses with calcifications in 13.9% (21/151), focal acoustic shadowing in 4.0% (6/151) and were negative in 21.2% (32/151) patients. Among the 119 lesions with visible abnormalities, 87.4% (104/119) were hypoechoic, 58.0% (69/119) were irregular in shape, 52.1% (62/119) had an ill-defined margin, calcifications were found in 17.6% (21/119) and 7.6% (9/119) were hypervascular, while none of the characteristics mentioned above were significantly correlated with histopathology. A total of 136 patients underwent MG at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, and the imaging findings included microcalcifications in 31.6% (43/136), masses in 23.5% (32/136), asymmetric focal density in 14.7% (20/136), focal architectural distortion in 22.8% (31/136), and were negative in 7.4% (10/136). The mass lesions were fewer on MG compared with US (23.5 vs. 65.6%, respectively). The area under the curve of US distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions was significantly larger compared with that of MG (0.547 vs. 0.497, respectively; P=0.036). In the 60 lesions that were overestimated by Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System US category, one or more characteristics of malignancy were found on US imaging. The

  6. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-08-15

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A{sub z}=0.783{+-}0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity.

  7. Digital imaging biomarkers feed machine learning for melanoma screening.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Daniel S; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Yagerman, Sarah; Carucci, John A; Gulati, Nicholas; Hueto, Ferran; DeFazio, Jennifer L; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Krueger, James G

    2016-10-26

    We developed an automated approach for generating quantitative image analysis metrics (imaging biomarkers) that are then analysed with a set of 13 machine learning algorithms to generate an overall risk score that is called a Q-score. These methods were applied to a set of 120 "difficult" dermoscopy images of dysplastic nevi and melanomas that were subsequently excised/classified. This approach yielded 98% sensitivity and 36% specificity for melanoma detection, approaching sensitivity/specificity of expert lesion evaluation. Importantly, we found strong spectral dependence of many imaging biomarkers in blue or red colour channels, suggesting the need to optimize spectral evaluation of pigmented lesions.

  8. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  9. Use of digital retinal imaging in screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Yogavijayan; Smith, Roger; Wright, Ian; Hartley, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of premature births is increasing world-wide. This factor, combined with improved survival and revised screening criteria, is resulting in an increased workload in screening for retinopathy of prematurity. Digital retinal imaging is emerging as an important alternative tool for diagnosing retinopathy of prematurity, and its use has even been extended to developing countries. Neonatal nurses and technicians can be trained to use digital imaging devices effectively. This is important in areas that do not have ready access to paediatric ophthalmologists. The ability to transfer images electronically makes it a valuable tool in telemedicine, while the ability to store and retrieve images is also advantageous from a medico-legal perspective. Image analysis software can further improve the accuracy of diagnosis. The main limitation of this technology is its high capital cost.

  10. Towards Rapid Screening of Tagged MR Images of the Heart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    tag line from above of the infracted human cardiac image. The exaggerated curvature is because of zooming on the tag and unequal scaling of both axis...National Magnetic Resonance Conference, Izmir 2000 [9]. Goksel D., Ozkan M. ve Ozturk C., “MR Tag Analysis using Harmonic Phase Method”, 9. Signal Processing Conference, Northern Cyprus 2000

  11. A Multi-Functional Imaging Approach to High-Content Protein Interaction Screening

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Daniel R.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O.; Weitsman, Gregory; Carlin, Leo M.; Ofo, Enyinnaya; Keppler, Melanie; Barber, Paul R.; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.

    2012-01-01

    Functional imaging can provide a level of quantification that is not possible in what might be termed traditional high-content screening. This is due to the fact that the current state-of-the-art high-content screening systems take the approach of scaling-up single cell assays, and are therefore based on essentially pictorial measures as assay indicators. Such phenotypic analyses have become extremely sophisticated, advancing screening enormously, but this approach can still be somewhat subjective. We describe the development, and validation, of a prototype high-content screening platform that combines steady-state fluorescence anisotropy imaging with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). This functional approach allows objective, quantitative screening of small molecule libraries in protein-protein interaction assays. We discuss the development of the instrumentation, the process by which information on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be extracted from wide-field, acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging and cross-checking of this modality using lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting. Imaging of cells expressing protein constructs where eGFP and mRFP1 are linked with amino-acid chains of various lengths (7, 19 and 32 amino acids) shows the two methodologies to be highly correlated. We validate our approach using a small-scale inhibitor screen of a Cdc42 FRET biosensor probe expressed in epidermoid cancer cells (A431) in a 96 microwell-plate format. We also show that acceptor fluorescence anisotropy can be used to measure variations in hetero-FRET in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate this using a screen of inhibitors of internalization of the transmembrane receptor, CXCR4. These assays enable us to demonstrate all the capabilities of the instrument, image processing and analytical techniques that have been developed. Direct correlation between acceptor anisotropy and donor FLIM is observed for FRET assays, providing

  12. A Picture You Can Handle: Infants Treat Touch-Screen Images More Like Photographs than Objects

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, Christine J.; Snyder, Makenna

    2016-01-01

    Infants actively explore their world in order to determine the different ways in which they can interact with various objects. Although research on infant perception has focused on how infants understand the differences between 2- and 3-dimensional objects, today’s infants increasingly encounter 2D images with interactive qualities on smart-phone screens, tablets, and laptops. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the types of manual behaviors infants direct toward tablet images and to compare these actions to those evoked by 2D photographs or 3D when tactile feedback is controlled. Infants between the ages of 7–10 months sat on their parent’s lap in front of a table with a built-in well covered by a clear, plastic sheet while the three types of displays (photographs, objects, and screen images on a tablet) were presented for 30 s each. Infants saw three examples of each type of display presented in the built-in well so that tactile feedback information from the different displays was controlled. Coders noted the proportion of trials in which infants grasped, scratched, rubbed, or patted the display. Results indicate that infants direct significantly more grasps, scratches, and rubs toward 3D objects than 2D photographs. Infants also direct more grasps to objects compared to screen images. Our data suggests that infants are treating screen images more similarly to 2D photographs than 3D objects. PMID:27597837

  13. A Picture You Can Handle: Infants Treat Touch-Screen Images More Like Photographs than Objects.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Christine J; Snyder, Makenna

    2016-01-01

    Infants actively explore their world in order to determine the different ways in which they can interact with various objects. Although research on infant perception has focused on how infants understand the differences between 2- and 3-dimensional objects, today's infants increasingly encounter 2D images with interactive qualities on smart-phone screens, tablets, and laptops. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the types of manual behaviors infants direct toward tablet images and to compare these actions to those evoked by 2D photographs or 3D when tactile feedback is controlled. Infants between the ages of 7-10 months sat on their parent's lap in front of a table with a built-in well covered by a clear, plastic sheet while the three types of displays (photographs, objects, and screen images on a tablet) were presented for 30 s each. Infants saw three examples of each type of display presented in the built-in well so that tactile feedback information from the different displays was controlled. Coders noted the proportion of trials in which infants grasped, scratched, rubbed, or patted the display. Results indicate that infants direct significantly more grasps, scratches, and rubs toward 3D objects than 2D photographs. Infants also direct more grasps to objects compared to screen images. Our data suggests that infants are treating screen images more similarly to 2D photographs than 3D objects.

  14. Automatic screening and classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy using fuzzy image processing.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Sarni Suhaila; Palade, Vasile; Shuttleworth, James; Jayne, Chrisina

    2016-12-01

    Digital retinal imaging is a challenging screening method for which effective, robust and cost-effective approaches are still to be developed. Regular screening for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy diseases is necessary in order to identify the group at risk of visual impairment. This paper presents a novel automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in eye fundus images by employing fuzzy image processing techniques. The paper first introduces the existing systems for diabetic retinopathy screening, with an emphasis on the maculopathy detection methods. The proposed medical decision support system consists of four parts, namely: image acquisition, image preprocessing including four retinal structures localisation, feature extraction and the classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy. A combination of fuzzy image processing techniques, the Circular Hough Transform and several feature extraction methods are implemented in the proposed system. The paper also presents a novel technique for the macula region localisation in order to detect the maculopathy. In addition to the proposed detection system, the paper highlights a novel online dataset and it presents the dataset collection, the expert diagnosis process and the advantages of our online database compared to other public eye fundus image databases for diabetic retinopathy purposes.

  15. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 3 Lesions Detected on Whole-Breast Screening Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sang Yu; Ko, Eun Young; Han, Boo-Kyung; Shin, Jung Hee; Hahn, Soo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the incidence and cancer rate of probably benign lesions detected on bilateral whole-breast screening ultrasound (US), which corresponded to US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, and evaluated the proper management of those lesions. Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board in our institution, which waived informed patient consent. We retrospectively reviewed US images of 1,666 patients who underwent bilateral whole-breast screening US as a supplemental screening test to negative screening mammography or screening US only. The incidence, clinical course, and cancer rate of screening US-detected probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were investigated, and the size and multiplicity of screening US-detected category 3 lesions were evaluated. Results Probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were detected in 689 of 1,666 patients (41.4%) who underwent screening US. Among them, 653 had follow-up US images for at least 24 months, and among these 653, 190 (29.1%) had multiple bilateral category 3 lesions. Moreover, 539 of 1,666 patients (32.4%) had lesions ≤1 cm in size and 114 of 1,666 (6.8%) had lesions >1 cm (median, 0.82 cm; range, 0.3–4.2 cm). Four of the 653 patients (0.6%) showed suspicious interval changes and were categorized into BI-RADS category 4. Biopsy analysis confirmed only one lesion as invasive ductal carcinoma at the 6-month follow-up; another lesion was an intraductal papilloma and the remaining two were fibroadenomas. Overall cancer rate of the screening US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions was 0.2%. Conclusion The incidence of category 3 lesions detected on screening US only was very high, but the cancer rate was very low. Therefore, in an average-risk population, routine screening US is preferable over short-term follow-up for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected on whole-breast screening US. PMID:27721880

  16. Centroids evaluation of the images obtained with the conical null-screen corneal topographer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio-Infante, Arturo I.; Armengol-Cruz, Victor de Emanuel; Campos-García, Manuel; Cossio-Guerrero, Cesar; Marquez-Flores, Jorge; Díaz-Uribe, José Rufino

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose some algorithms to recover the centroids of the resultant image obtained by a conical nullscreen based corneal topographer. With these algorithms, we obtain the region of interest (roi) of the original image and using an image-processing algorithm, we calculate the geometric centroid of each roi. In order to improve our algorithm performance, we use different settings of null-screen targets, changing their size and number. We also improved the illumination system to avoid inhomogeneous zones in the corneal images. Finally, we report some corneal topographic measurements with the best setting we found.

  17. History, evolution, and current status of radiologic imaging tests for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Yee, Judy

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is thought to be an effective tool with which to reduce the mortality from colorectal cancer through early detection and removal of colonic adenomas and early colon cancers. In this article, we review the history, evolution, and current status of imaging tests of the colon-including single-contrast barium enema, double-contrast barium enema, computed tomographic (CT) colonography, and magnetic resonance (MR) colonography-for colorectal cancer screening. Despite its documented value in the detection of colonic polyps, the double-contrast barium enema has largely disappeared as a screening test because it is widely perceived as a labor-intensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding procedure. In the past decade, the barium enema has been supplanted by CT colonography as the major imaging test in colorectal cancer screening in the United States, with MR colonography emerging as another viable option in Europe. Although MR colonography does not require ionizing radiation, the radiation dose for CT colonography has decreased substantially, and regular screening with this technique has a high benefit-to-risk ratio. In recent years, CT colonography has been validated as an effective tool for use in colorectal cancer screening that is increasingly being disseminated.

  18. Enhancement of Mammographic Density Measures in Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cheddad, Abbas; Czene, Kamila; Shepherd, John A.; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Humphreys, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Methods We present a novel approach to enhance area density measures that takes advantage of the relative density of the pectoral muscle that appears in lateral mammographic views. We hypothesized that the grey scale of film mammograms is normalized to volume breast density but not pectoral density and thus pectoral density becomes an independent marker of volumetric density. Results From analysis of data from a Swedish case–control study (1,286 breast cancer cases and 1,391 control subjects, ages 50–75 years), we found that the mean intensity of the pectoral muscle (MIP) was highly associated with breast cancer risk [per SD: OR = 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75–0.88; P = 6 × 10−7] after adjusting for a validated computer-assisted measure of percent density (PD), Cumulus. The area under curve (AUC) changed from 0.600 to 0.618 due to using PD with the pectoral muscle as reference instead of a standard area-based PD measure. We showed that MIP is associated with a genetic variant known to be associated with mammographic density and breast cancer risk, rs10995190, in a subset of women with genetic data. We further replicated the association between MIP and rs10995190 in an additional cohort of 2,655 breast cancer cases (combined P = 0.0002). Conclusions MIP is a marker of volumetric density that can be used to complement area PD in mammographic density studies and breast cancer risk assessment. Impact Inclusion of MIP in risk models should be considered for studies using area PD from analog films. PMID:24722754

  19. Mammographic Breast Density in a Cohort of Medically Underserved Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    newsletter (Appendix). Results of our diabetes and mammographic breast density manuscript indicated that after adjustment for confounding variables...the mean percent breast density among premenopausal women with type 2 diabetes ( ̂ 13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6-15.9) was non...significantly lower than that of women without type 2 diabetes ( ̂ 15.9%, 95% CI 15.0-16.8) (p=0.07); however, there was no association among

  20. Combined use of backscattered and transmitted images in x-ray personnel screening systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, B.; Schiefele, Markus; Alvino, Christopher; Miller, Eric; Al-Kofani, Omar

    2012-06-01

    Current aviation security relies heavily on personnel screening using X-ray backscatter systems or other advanced imaging technologies. Passenger privacy concerns and screening times can be reduced through the use of low-dose twosided X-ray backscatter (Bx) systems, which also have the ability to collect transmission (Tx) X-ray. Bx images reveal objects placed on the body, such as contraband and security threats, as well as anatomical features at or close to the surface, such as lungs cavities and bones. While the quality of the transmission images is lower than medical imagery due to the low X-ray dose, Tx images can be of significant value in interpreting features in the Bx images, such as lung cavities, which can cause false alarms in automated threat detection (ATD) algorithms. Here we demonstrate an ATD processing chain fusing both Tx and BX images. The approach employs automatically extracted fiducial points on the body and localized active contour methods to segments lungs in acquired Tx and Bx images. Additionally, we derive metrics from the Tx image can be related to the probability of observing internal body structure in the Bx image. The combined use of Tx and Bx data can enable improved overall system performance.

  1. Evaluation of radiographers’ mammography screen-reading accuracy in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Debono, Josephine C; Poulos, Ann E; Houssami, Nehmat; Turner, Robin M; Boyages, John

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of radiographers’ screen-reading mammograms. Currently, radiologist workforce shortages may be compromising the BreastScreen Australia screening program goal to detect early breast cancer. The solution to a similar problem in the United Kingdom has successfully encouraged radiographers to take on the role as one of two screen-readers. Prior to consideration of this strategy in Australia, educational and experiential differences between radiographers in the United Kingdom and Australia emphasise the need for an investigation of Australian radiographers’ screen-reading accuracy. Ten radiographers employed by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute with a range of radiographic (median = 28 years), mammographic (median = 13 years) and BreastScreen (median = 8 years) experience were recruited to blindly and independently screen-read an image test set of 500 mammograms, without formal training. The radiographers indicated the presence of an abnormality using BI-RADS®. Accuracy was determined by comparison with the gold standard of known outcomes of pathology results, interval matching and client 6-year follow-up. Individual sensitivity and specificity levels ranged between 76.0% and 92.0%, and 74.8% and 96.2% respectively. Pooled screen-reader accuracy across the radiographers estimated sensitivity as 82.2% and specificity as 89.5%. Areas under the reading operating characteristic curve ranged between 0.842 and 0.923. This sample of radiographers in an Australian setting have adequate accuracy levels when screen-reading mammograms. It is expected that with formal screen-reading training, accuracy levels will improve, and with support, radiographers have the potential to be one of the two screen-readers in the BreastScreen Australia program, contributing to timeliness and improved program outcomes.

  2. Tolerability of magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy for esophageal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takenaka, Ryuta; Hori, Keisuke; Takemoto, Koji; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the tolerability of magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy for esophageal cancer screening with that of lugol chromoendoscopy. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled and analyzed 51 patients who were at high risk for esophageal cancer. All patients were divided into two groups: a magnifying narrow band imaging group, and a lugol chromoendoscopy group, for comparison of adverse symptoms. Esophageal cancer screening was performed on withdrawal of the endoscope. The primary endpoint was a score on a visual analogue scale for heartburn after the examination. The secondary endpoints were scale scores for retrosternal pain and dyspnea after the examinations, change in vital signs, total procedure time, and esophageal observation time. RESULTS: The scores for heartburn and retrosternal pain in the magnifying narrow band imaging group were significantly better than those in the lugol chromoendoscopy group (P = 0.004, 0.024, respectively, ANOVA for repeated measures). The increase in heart rate after the procedure was significantly greater in the lugol chromoendoscopy group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to other vital sign. The total procedure time and esophageal observation time in the magnifying narrow band imaging group were significantly shorter than those in the lugol chromoendoscopy group (450 ± 116 vs 565 ± 174, P = 0.004, 44 ± 26 vs 151 ± 72, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy reduced the adverse symptoms compared with lugol chromoendoscopy. Narrow band imaging endoscopy is useful and suitable for esophageal cancer screening periodically. PMID:25759551

  3. Retinal Image Classification for the Screening of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, Mohd Hanafi Ahmad; Coenen, Frans; Zheng, Yalin

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in old-age. Early identification of AMD can allow for mitigation (but not cure). One of the fist symptoms of AMD is the presence of fatty deposits, called drusen, on the retina. The presence of drusen may be identified through inspection of retina images. Given the aging global population, the prevalence of AMD is increasing. Many health authorities therefore run screening programmes. The automation, or at least partial automation, of retina image screening is therefore seen as beneficial. This paper describes a Case Based Reasoning (CBR) approach to retina image classification to provide support for AMD screening programmes. In the proposed approach images are represented in the form of spatial-histograms that store both colour and spatial image information. Each retina image is represented using a series of histograms each encapsulated as a time series curve. The Case Base (CB) is populated with a labelled set of such curves. New cases are classified by finding the most similar case (curve) in the CB. Similarity checking is achieved using the Dynamic Time warping (DTW).

  4. Imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations for narcotics and explosives screening

    SciTech Connect

    Trower, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    The author describes a nuclear technique for imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations with surface densities characteristics of bulk narcotics and concealed explosives, the Carbon and the Nitrogen Camera. The physics is rooted in the tightly bound carbon-12 nucleus to which its neighboring isobars, nitrogen-12 and boron-12, decay rapidly (11 and 20 ms), mostly to its ground state, by emitting energetic beta particles (E{sub {beta}}{sup max} {approximately} 13 and 17 MeV) all of which produce bremsstrahlung and some yield annihilate radiation. The signal, photons detected in the multiscalar mode, results from the reactions {sup 13}C({gamma},p){sup 12}{Beta} for the bulk narcotics application and {sup 14}N({gamma},2n){sup 12}N and 14N({gamma},2p){sup 12}{Beta} for explosives detection and are initiated by a stepped pulsed electron beam with energy of {approximately} 30 and {approximately} 50 MeV, respectively. Images of 180 {approximately} 5 cm{sup 2} pixels taken in {approximately} 7 seconds will be presented of the carbon in a kilo of cocaine and the nitrogen in 125 grams of SEMTEX.

  5. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High

  6. IDIOS: An innovative index for evaluating dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices

    PubMed Central

    Halboub, Esam; Almashraqi, Abeer Abdulkareem; Khattab, Razan; Al Haffar, Iyad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop a new index as an objective reference for evaluating current and newly developed indices used for osteoporosis screening based on dental images. Its name; IDIOS, stands for Index of Dental-imaging Indices of Osteoporosis Screening. Materials and Methods A comprehensive PubMed search was conducted to retrieve studies on dental imaging-based indices for osteoporosis screening. The results of the eligible studies, along with other relevant criteria, were used to develop IDIOS, which has scores ranging from 0 (0%) to 15 (100%). The indices presented in the studies we included were then evaluated using IDIOS. Results The 104 studies that were included utilized 24, 4, and 9 indices derived from panoramic, periapical, and computed tomographic/cone-beam computed tomographic techniques, respectively. The IDIOS scores for these indices ranged from 0 (0%) to 11.75 (78.32%). Conclusion IDIOS is a valuable reference index that facilitates the evaluation of other dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices. Furthermore, IDIOS can be utilized to evaluate the accuracy of newly developed indices. PMID:27672615

  7. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-04-25

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5-20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1-40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as "long distance observation and short distance operation" and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery.

  8. An assessment of reference exposure in analogic and digital mammographic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, J. G.; Miguel, C.; Schelin, H. R.; Porto, L. E.; Paschuk, S.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the incident air kerma (Ki,a), half-value layer (HVL), output and voltage accuracy for 28 mammography services were evaluated. All mammographs had high frequency rectification, a focus-film distance greater than 60 cm, automatic exposure control, a Mo-Mo anode-filter combination, and compression system. Twenty-three evaluations were made of analogic imaging systems and 21 of digital imaging systems, two of which were full field digital mammography units. The Ki,a was measured in the beam radiation with a 6 cm3 ionization chamber, calibrated for a mammography range of energy. A standard American College of Radiology mammographic phantom simulated a skull caudal incidence. The average, minimum, and maximum Ki,a values were 10.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 30.41 mGy, respectively. However, when the analogic and digital systems are analyzed separately in two subsets, the values were 8.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 11.78 mGy for the analogic systems and 12.33 mGy, 5.21 mGy, and 30.41 mGy for the digital systems, respectively. The results show that the Ki,a values found in digital systems were higher than those in analogic systems, highlighting the differences between these acquisition systems. All HVL values, measured in the primary beam at 28 kV were found between 0.33 mm Al and 0.43 mm Al. Although the manufacture time of the equipment was approximately 146 months (~12 years) prior, the variation in output was between 0.071 mGy/mAs and 0.164 mGy/mAs for the entire sample.

  9. Graph cut and image intensity-based splitting improves nuclei segmentation in high-content screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, Muhammad; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämö, Pauli; Yli-Harja, Olli; Dehio, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Quantification of phenotypes in high-content screening experiments depends on the accuracy of single cell analysis. In such analysis workflows, cell nuclei segmentation is typically the first step and is followed by cell body segmentation, feature extraction, and subsequent data analysis workflows. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the first steps of high-content analysis are done accurately in order to guarantee correctness of the final analysis results. In this paper, we present a novel cell nuclei image segmentation framework which exploits robustness of graph cut to obtain initial segmentation for image intensity-based clump splitting method to deliver the accurate overall segmentation. By using quantitative benchmarks and qualitative comparison with real images from high-content screening experiments with complicated multinucleate cells, we show that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art nuclei segmentation methods. Moreover, we provide a modular and easy-to-use implementation of the method for a widely used platform.

  10. Evaluation of the Accuracy of Grading Indirect Ophthalmoscopy Video Images for Retinopathy of Prematurity Screening

    PubMed Central

    Prakalapakorn, Sasapin G.; Wallace, David K.; Dolland, Riana S.; Freedman, Sharon F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether digital retinal images obtained using a video indirect ophthalmoscopy system (Keeler) can be accurately graded for zone, stage, and plus or pre-plus disease and used to screen for type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 114 infants who had retinal video images acquired using the Keeler system during routine ROP examinations. Two masked ophthalmologists (1 expert and 1 non-expert in ROP screening) graded these videos for image quality, zone, stage, and pre-plus or plus disease. We compared the ophthalmologists’ grades of the videos against the clinical examination results, which served as the reference standard. We then determined the sensitivity/specificity of 2 predefined criteria for referral in detecting disease requiring treatment (i.e. type 1 ROP). Results Of images the expert considered fair or good quality (n=68), the expert and non-expert correctly identified zone (75% vs. 74%, respectively), stage (75% vs. 40%, respectively), and the presence of pre-plus or plus disease in 79% of images. Expert and non-expert judgment of prethreshold disease, pre-plus or plus disease had 100% sensitivity and 75% vs. 79% specificity, respectively, for detecting type 1 ROP. Expert and non-expert judgment of pre-plus or plus disease had 92% vs. 100% sensitivity and 77% vs. 82% specificity, respectively, for detecting type 1 ROP. Conclusions High-quality retinal video images can be read with high sensitivity and acceptable specificity to screen for type 1 ROP. Grading for pre-plus or plus disease alone may be sufficient for the purpose of ROP screening. PMID:25608280

  11. Enhanced Images for Checked and Carry-on Baggage and Cargo Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glen; Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Hines, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    The current X-ray systems used by airport security personnel for the detection of contraband, and objects such as knives and guns that can impact the security of a flight, have limited effect because of the limited display quality of the X-ray images. Since the displayed images do not possess optimal contrast and sharpness, it is possible for the security personnel to miss potentially hazardous objects. This problem is also common to other disciplines such as medical X-rays, and can be mitigated, to a large extent, by the use of state-of-the-art image processing techniques to enhance the contrast and sharpness of the displayed image. The NASA Langley Research Centers Visual Information Processing Group has developed an image enhancement technology that has direct applications to this problem of inadequate display quality. Airport security X-ray imaging systems would benefit considerably by using this novel technology, making the task of the personnel who have to interpret the X-ray images considerably easier, faster, and more reliable. This improvement would translate into more accurate screening as well as minimizing the screening time delays to airline passengers. This technology, Retinex, has been optimized for consumer applications but has been applied to medical X-rays on a very preliminary basis. The resultant technology could be incorporated into a new breed of commercial x-ray imaging systems which would be transparent to the screener yet allow them to see subtle detail much more easily, reducing the amount of time needed for screening while greatly increasing the effectiveness of contraband detection and thus public safety.

  12. Enhanced Images for Checked and Carry-on Baggage and Cargo Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Hines, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    The current X-ray systems used by airport security personnel for the detection of contraband, and objects such as knives and guns that can impact the security of a flight, have limited effect because of the limited display quality of the X-ray images. Since the displayed images do not possess optimal contrast and sharpness, it is possible for the security personnel to miss potentially hazardous objects. This problem is also common to other disciplines such as medical Xrays, and can be mitigated, to a large extent, by the use of state-of-the-art image processing techniques to enhance the contrast and sharpness of the displayed image. The NASA Langley Research Center's Visual Information Processing Group has developed an image enhancement technology that has direct applications to this problem of inadequate display quality. Airport security X-ray imaging systems would benefit considerably by using this novel technology, making the task of the personnel who have to interpret the X-ray images considerably easier, faster, and more reliable. This improvement would translate into more accurate screening as well as minimizing the screening time delays to airline passengers. This technology, Retinex, has been optimized for consumer applications but has been applied to medical X-rays on a very preliminary basis. The resultant technology could be incorporated into a new breed of commercial x-ray imaging systems which would be transparent to the screener yet allow them to see subtle detail much more easily, reducing the amount of time needed for screening while greatly increasing the effectiveness of contraband detection and thus public safety.

  13. [Population-based breast cancer screening: certainties, controversies, and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Apesteguía Ciriza, Luis; Pina Insausti, Luis Javier

    2014-01-01

    Population-based breast cancer screening programs based on mammography must maintain a high level of quality, so the results must be constantly monitored. Although most authors consider that these programs have decreased the mortality due to breast cancer by about 30%, others claim that the mortality has decreased by only about 12% due to errors in the randomization of patients, because the rate of advanced tumors has hardly decreased and because adjuvant treatment also improves survival. Other criticisms focus on overdiagnosis and overtreatment. We believe that despite the unquestionable value of mammographic screening, we should be open to certain changes such as the stratification of patients by their level of risk and the introduction of complementary techniques like tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging in selected cases.

  14. A review of automated image understanding within 3D baggage computed tomography security screening.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Andre; Breckon, Toby P

    2015-01-01

    Baggage inspection is the principal safeguard against the transportation of prohibited and potentially dangerous materials at airport security checkpoints. Although traditionally performed by 2D X-ray based scanning, increasingly stringent security regulations have led to a growing demand for more advanced imaging technologies. The role of X-ray Computed Tomography is thus rapidly expanding beyond the traditional materials-based detection of explosives. The development of computer vision and image processing techniques for the automated understanding of 3D baggage-CT imagery is however, complicated by poor image resolutions, image clutter and high levels of noise and artefacts. We discuss the recent and most pertinent advancements and identify topics for future research within the challenging domain of automated image understanding for baggage security screening CT.

  15. Cost and detection rate of glaucoma screening with imaging devices in a primary care center

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Alfonso; Fallon, Monica; Cots, Francesc; Sebastian, María A; Morilla-Grasa, Antonio; Mojal, Sergi; Castells, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the cost and detection rate of a screening program for detecting glaucoma with imaging devices. Materials and methods In this cross-sectional study, a glaucoma screening program was applied in a population-based sample randomly selected from a population of 23,527. Screening targeted the population at risk of glaucoma. Examinations included optic disk tomography (Heidelberg retina tomograph [HRT]), nerve fiber analysis, and tonometry. Subjects who met at least 2 of 3 endpoints (HRT outside normal limits, nerve fiber index ≥30, or tonometry ≥21 mmHg) were referred for glaucoma consultation. The currently established (“conventional”) detection method was evaluated by recording data from primary care and ophthalmic consultations in the same population. The direct costs of screening and conventional detection were calculated by adding the unit costs generated during the diagnostic process. The detection rate of new glaucoma cases was assessed. Results The screening program evaluated 414 subjects; 32 cases were referred for glaucoma consultation, 7 had glaucoma, and 10 had probable glaucoma. The current detection method assessed 677 glaucoma suspects in the population, of whom 29 were diagnosed with glaucoma or probable glaucoma. Glaucoma screening and the conventional detection method had detection rates of 4.1% and 3.1%, respectively, and the cost per case detected was 1,410 and 1,435€, respectively. The cost of screening 1 million inhabitants would be 5.1 million euros and would allow the detection of 4,715 new cases. Conclusion The proposed screening method directed at population at risk allows a detection rate of 4.1% and a cost of 1,410 per case detected. PMID:28243057

  16. Patterns of nonmasslike enhancement at screening breast MR imaging of high-risk premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Raza, Sughra; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Current U.S. recommendations for breast cancer screening of women with at least a 20%-25% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer include contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the breasts. The cancer detection rate in high-risk women undergoing screening MR imaging is approximately 10 times higher than that in normal-risk women undergoing screening mammography. Many of these high-risk women commence MR imaging screening while they are premenopausal, when the breasts are most influenced by cyclical hormonal changes. Healthy premenopausal breast tissue enhances in a cyclical and variable manner. This enhancement is described as background enhancement. Typically, enhancement of normal breast tissue occurs in a symmetric and diffuse pattern, and there is little diagnostic difficulty in classifying it as normal background parenchymal enhancement. However, sometimes the pattern is more focal, asymmetric, or regional. It may then be described as nonmasslike enhancement, an observation associated with both benign and malignant breast pathologic conditions. A review of the morphologic features and internal enhancement patterns in normal but nondiffuse background enhancement and abnormal nonmasslike enhancement in high-risk premenopausal women can help improve interpretive specificity and decrease false-positive interpretations. MR imaging pitfalls and interpretation strategies for localized background enhancement and pathologic nonmasslike enhancement in this high-risk population are highlighted. In evaluating nonmasslike enhancement, the use of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon to perform careful analysis of morphologic features, along with an understanding of the role and limitations of kinetic information, will help balance early breast cancer detection against false-positive interpretation.

  17. Sex steroid metabolism polymorphisms and mammographic density in pre- and early perimenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J; Sehl, Mary E; Crawford, Sybil L; Gold, Ellen B; Habel, Laurel A; Butler, Lesley M; Sowers, MaryFran R; Greendale, Gail A; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We examined the association between mammographic density and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding CYP1A1, CYP1B1, aromatase, 17β-HSD, ESR1, and ESR2 in pre- and early perimenopausal white, African-American, Chinese, and Japanese women. Methods The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation is a longitudinal community-based cohort study. We analyzed data from 451 pre- and early perimenopausal participants of the ancillary SWAN Mammographic Density study for whom we had complete information regarding mammographic density, genotypes, and covariates. With multivariate linear regression, we examined the relation between percentage mammographic breast density (outcome) and each SNP (primary predictor), adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, parity, cigarette smoking, and body mass index (BMI). Results After multivariate adjustment, the CYP1B1 rs162555 CC genotype was associated with a 9.4% higher mammographic density than the TC/TT genotype (P = 0.04). The CYP19A1 rs936306 TT genotype was associated with 6.2% lower mammographic density than the TC/CC genotype (P = 0.02). The positive association between CYP1A1 rs2606345 and mammographic density was significantly stronger among participants with BMI greater than 30 kg/m2 than among those with BMI less than 25 kg/m2 (Pinteraction = 0.05). Among white participants, the ESR1 rs2234693 CC genotype was associated with a 7.0% higher mammographic density than the CT/TT genotype (P = 0.01). Conclusions SNPs in certain genes encoding sex steroid metabolism enzymes and ESRs were associated with mammographic density. Because the encoded enzymes and ESR1 are expressed in breast tissue, these SNPs may influence breast cancer risk by altering mammographic density. PMID:19630952

  18. Task-Specific Optimization of Mammographic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    contrast detail experiments with a CDMAM 3.4 phantom . They found similar contrast detail performance for a 5 mega-pixel standard LCD and a CRT.50...quantitative evaluation of imaging systems using images of phantoms ," Med. Phys. 33, 83-95 (2006). 52. H. Roehrig, E. A. Krupinski and T. Yu, "Physical...MD5mp). The device was calibrated to the DICOM grayscale standard display function (21) within 0.52-371 cd/m2 luminance range (22). All readings

  19. Inter-observer variability within BI-RADS and RANZCR mammographic density assessment schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damases, Christine N.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; McEntee, Mark F.

    2016-03-01

    This study compares variability associated with two visual mammographic density (MD) assessment methods using two separate samples of radiologists. The image test-set comprised of images obtained from 20 women (age 42-89 years). The images were assessed for their MD by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners and twenty-six radiologists registered with the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). Images were assessed using the same technology and conditions, however the ABR radiologists used the BI-RADS and the RANZCR radiologists used the RANZCR breast density synoptic. Both scales use a 4-point assessment. The images were then grouped as low- and high-density; low including BIRADS 1 and 2 or RANZCR 1 and 2 and high including BI-RADS 3 and 4 or RANZCR 3 and 4. Four-point BI-RADS and RANZCR showed no or negligible correlation (ρ=-0.029 p<0.859). The average inter-observer agreement on the BI-RADS scale had a Kappa of 0.565; [95% CI = 0.519 - 0.610], and ranged between 0.328-0.669 while the inter-observer agreement using the RANZCR scale had a Kappa of 0.360; [95% CI = 0.308 - 0.412] and a range of 0.078-0.499. Our findings show a wider range of inter-observer variability among RANZCR registered radiologists than the ABR examiners.

  20. Digital mammographic tumor classification using transfer learning from deep convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Benjamin Q; Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-07-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) show potential for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) by learning features directly from the image data instead of using analytically extracted features. However, CNNs are difficult to train from scratch for medical images due to small sample sizes and variations in tumor presentations. Instead, transfer learning can be used to extract tumor information from medical images via CNNs originally pretrained for nonmedical tasks, alleviating the need for large datasets. Our database includes 219 breast lesions (607 full-field digital mammographic images). We compared support vector machine classifiers based on the CNN-extracted image features and our prior computer-extracted tumor features in the task of distinguishing between benign and malignant breast lesions. Five-fold cross validation (by lesion) was conducted with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve as the performance metric. Results show that classifiers based on CNN-extracted features (with transfer learning) perform comparably to those using analytically extracted features [area under the ROC curve [Formula: see text

  1. Variation in Inflammatory Cytokine/Growth-Factor Genes and Mammographic Density in Premenopausal Women Aged 50–55

    PubMed Central

    Ozhand, Ali; Lee, Eunjung; Wu, Anna H.; Ellingjord-Dale, Merete; Akslen, Lars A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Ursin, Giske

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) has been found to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Although data from twin studies suggest that MD has a strong genetic component, the exact genes involved remain to be identified. Alterations in stromal composition and the number of epithelial cells are the most predominant histopathological determinants of mammographic density. Interactions between the breast stroma and epithelium are critically important in the maturation and development of the mammary gland and the cross-talk between these cells are mediated by paracrine growth factors and cytokines. The potential impact of genetic variation in growth factors and cytokines on MD is largely unknown. Methods We investigated the association between 89 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 cytokine/growth-factor genes (FGFR2, IGFBP1, IGFBP3, TGFB1, TNF, VEGF, IL6) and percent MD in 301 premenopausal women (aged 50 to 55 years) participating in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. We evaluated the suggestive associations in 216 premenopausal Singapore Chinese Women of the same age. Results We found statistically significant associations between 9 tagging SNPs in the IL6 gene and MD in Norwegian women; the effect ranged from 3–5% in MD per variant allele (p-values = 0.02 to 0.0002). One SNP in the IL6 (rs10242595) significantly influenced MD in Singapore Chinese women. Conclusion Genetic variations in IL6 may be associated with MD and therefore may be an indicator of breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. PMID:23762340

  2. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  3. Proximal surface caries detection with direct-exposure and rare earth screen/film imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, R.C.; McDavid, W.D.; Barnwell, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    This laboratory study compared five imaging systems for their diagnostic accuracy in detection of proximal surface dental caries. Ten viewers provided data on radiographic detectability of carious lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of each system was determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves by comparing viewer data with the true state of the teeth as determined microscopically. D-speed film marginally outperformed the other four systems, but the three screen/film systems matched the diagnostic accuracy of E-speed film. Radiation reductions between 62% and 92% were achieved with the screen/film systems when compared to the two conventional dental films. The feasibility of designing a screen/film bite-wing cassette was shown, but the poor diagnostic accuracy of the present bite-wing system indicated a need for a new technology in caries detection.

  4. Reasons Women at Elevated Risk of Breast Cancer Refuse Breast MR Imaging Screening: ACRIN 66661

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Jeffrey D.; Adams, Amanda M.; Jong, Roberta A.; Barr, Richard G.; Lehrer, Daniel E.; Pisano, Etta D.; Evans, W. Phil; Mahoney, Mary C.; Hovanessian Larsen, Linda; Gabrielli, Glenna J.; Mendelson, Ellen B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine reasons for nonparticipation in a trial of supplemental screening with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after mammography and ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods: Women(n = 2809) at elevated risk of breast cancer were enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6666 US Screening Protocol at 21 institutions. Fourteen institutions met technical and experience requirements for this institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant substudy of supplemental screening with MR imaging. Those women who had completed 0-, 12-, and 24-month screenings with mammography combined with US were considered for a single contrast material–enhanced MR examination within 8 weeks after completing the 24-month mammography-US screening. A total of 1593 women had complete MR substudy registration data: 378 of them were ineligible for the study, and 1215 had analyzable data. Reasons for nonparticipation were determined. Demographic data were compared between study participants and nonparticipants. Results: Of 1215 women with analyzable data, 703 (57.9%), with a mean age of 54.8 years, were enrolled in the MR substudy and 512 (42.1%) declined participation. Women with a 25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer were more likely to participate (odds ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 2.12). Of 512 nonparticipants, 130 (25.4%) refused owing to claustrophobia; 93 (18.2%), owing to time constraints; 62 (12.1%), owing to financial concerns; 47 (9.2%), because their physician would not provide a referral and/or did not believe MR imaging was indicated; 40 (7.8%), because they were not interested; 39 (7.6%), because they were medically intolerant to MR imaging; 29 (5.7%), because they did not want to undergo intravenous injection; 27 (5.3%), owing to additional biopsy or other procedures that might be required subsequently; 21 (4.1%), owing to MR imaging scheduling constraints; 11 (2.2%), because of the travel required; seven (1

  5. Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging Recommendations and Outcomes in Patients at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sima; Strigel, Roberta M; Pettke, Erica; Wilke, Lee; Tevaarwerk, Amye J; DeMartini, Wendy; Wisinski, Kari B

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine MRI screening recommendations and the subsequent outcomes in women with increased risk for breast cancer evaluated by oncology subspecialists at an academic center. Patients and Methods Patients evaluated between 1/1/2007– 3/1/2011 under diagnosis codes for family history of breast or ovarian cancer, genetic syndromes, lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical hyperplasia were included. Patients with a history of breast cancer were excluded. Retrospective review of prospectively acquired demographics, lifetime risk of breast cancer and screening recommendations were obtained from the medical record. Retrospective review of the results of prospectively interpreted breast imaging examinations and image-guided biopsies were analyzed. Results 282 women were included. The majority of patients were premenopausal with a median age of 43. Most (69%) were referred due to a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. MRI was recommended for 84% of patients based on a documented lifetime risk > 20%. Most women referred for MRI screening (88%) were compliant with this recommendation. A total of 299 breast MRI examinations were performed in 146 patients. Biopsy was performed for 32 (11%) exams and 10 cancers were detected for a PPV of 31% (based on biopsy performed) and an overall per exam cancer yield of 3.3%. Three cancers were detected in patients who did not undergo screening MRI. The 13 cancers were Stage 0-II; all patients were without evidence of disease with a median follow-up of 22 months. Conclusion In a cohort of women seen by breast subspecialty providers, screening breast MRI was recommended according to guidelines, and used primarily premenopausal women with a family history or genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Adherence to MRI screening recommendations was high and cancer yield from breast MRI was similar to that in clinical trials. PMID:25789917

  6. Development of an Automated Modality-Independent Elastographic Image Analysis System for Tumor Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    increased computational complexity, developing and testing metrics for the evaluation of reconstructions, and the fabrication of a compression chamber... tested on a tissue-like polymer phantom. elastography, breast cancer screening, image processing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...design and a share of 100 CPUs on the Vanderbilt University Advanced Computing Center for Research and 5 Education cluster, this has been tested to be

  7. Task-Specific Optimization of Mammographic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    calibrated to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine DICOM standard according to the display manufacturer before measurements. All experiments...to form a model of a direct flat-panel mammography system. This model, as shown in Figure 1, consisted of an anode, breast phantom , and a selenium...Phys 13, 490-495 (1986). 22 H. P. Chan and K. Doi,"Some properties of photon scattering in water phantoms in diagnostic radiology," Med Phys 13

  8. Acquisition of Diagnostic Screen and Synchrotron Radiation Images Using IEEE1394 Digital Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, G.

    2004-11-01

    In the LINAC, booster synchrotron and transfer lines of DIAMOND a number of screens (YAG:Ce and OTR) as well as synchrotron radiation ports will be used to acquire information about the transverse beam distribution. Digital IEEE1394 cameras have been selected for their range of sensor sizes and resolutions available, their easy triggering to single events, and their noise-free transmission of the images into the control system. Their suitability for use under influence of high-energy radiation has been verified. Images from preliminary tests at the SRS Daresbury are presented.

  9. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  10. Potential use of a large-screen display for interpreting radiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth; Roehrig, Hans; Berger, William; Dalal, Sandeep; Stanton, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    Radiology has readily made the transition to the digital reading room. One commodity left behind when moving to digital displays however is display real estate. Even with multiple monitors radiologists cannot display numerous images as they did on a film alternator. We evaluated a large-screen rear-projection display (Philips Electronics) for potential use in radiology. Resolution was 1920 x 1080 with a 44-inch diagonal size and it was a color display. For comparison we used the IBM 9 Mpixel color display (22-inch diagonal) set to a comparable resolution and maximum luminance. Diagnostic accuracy with a series of bone images with subtle fractures and six observers was comparable (F = 0.3170, p = 0.5743) to traditional computer monitor. Viewing time, however, was significantly shorter (t = 6.723, p < 0.0001) with the large display for both normal and fracture images. On average, readers sat significantly closer (t = 5.578, p = 0.0026) to the small display than the large display. Four of the 6 radiologists preferred the smaller display, judging it to yield a sharper image. Half of the readers thought the black level was better with the large display and half with the small display. Most of the radiologists thought the large-screen display has potential for use in conferencing situations or those in which multiple viewers need to see images simultaneously.

  11. Development of x-ray imaging technique for liquid screening at airport

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, Nurhani binti Srisatit, Somyot

    2016-01-22

    X-ray imaging technology is a viable option to recognize flammable liquids for the purposes of aviation security. In this study, an X-ray imaging technology was developed whereby, the image viewing system was built with the use of a digital camera coupled with a gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) fluorescent screen. The camera was equipped with a software for remote control setting of the camera via a USB cable which allows the images to be captured. The image was analysed to determine the average grey level using a software designed by Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0. The data was obtained for various densities of liquid thickness of 4.5 cm, 6.0 cm and 7.5 cm respectively for X-ray energies ranging from 70 to 200 kVp. In order to verify the reliability of the constructed calibration data, the system was tested with a few types of unknown liquids. The developed system could be conveniently employed for security screening in order to discriminate between a threat and an innocuous liquid.

  12. Development of x-ray imaging technique for liquid screening at airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Nurhani binti; Srisatit, Somyot

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging technology is a viable option to recognize flammable liquids for the purposes of aviation security. In this study, an X-ray imaging technology was developed whereby, the image viewing system was built with the use of a digital camera coupled with a gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) fluorescent screen. The camera was equipped with a software for remote control setting of the camera via a USB cable which allows the images to be captured. The image was analysed to determine the average grey level using a software designed by Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0. The data was obtained for various densities of liquid thickness of 4.5 cm, 6.0 cm and 7.5 cm respectively for X-ray energies ranging from 70 to 200 kVp. In order to verify the reliability of the constructed calibration data, the system was tested with a few types of unknown liquids. The developed system could be conveniently employed for security screening in order to discriminate between a threat and an innocuous liquid.

  13. Thermographic image analysis as a pre-screening tool for the detection of canine bone cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Samrat; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Fu, Jiyuan; Marino, Dominic J.; Loughin, Catherine A.; Sackman, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Canine bone cancer is a common type of cancer that grows fast and may be fatal. It usually appears in the limbs which is called "appendicular bone cancer." Diagnostic imaging methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT scan), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more common methods in bone cancer detection than invasive physical examination such as biopsy. These imaging methods have some disadvantages; including high expense, high dose of radiation, and keeping the patient (canine) motionless during the imaging procedures. This project study identifies the possibility of using thermographic images as a pre-screening tool for diagnosis of bone cancer in dogs. Experiments were performed with thermographic images from 40 dogs exhibiting the disease bone cancer. Experiments were performed with color normalization using temperature data provided by the Long Island Veterinary Specialists. The images were first divided into four groups according to body parts (Elbow/Knee, Full Limb, Shoulder/Hip and Wrist). Each of the groups was then further divided into three sub-groups according to views (Anterior, Lateral and Posterior). Thermographic pattern of normal and abnormal dogs were analyzed using feature extraction and pattern classification tools. Texture features, spectral feature and histogram features were extracted from the thermograms and were used for pattern classification. The best classification success rate in canine bone cancer detection is 90% with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 80% produced by anterior view of full-limb region with nearest neighbor classification method and normRGB-lum color normalization method. Our results show that it is possible to use thermographic imaging as a pre-screening tool for detection of canine bone cancer.

  14. Mammographically Detectable Breast Arterial Calcification and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj; Chainani, Vinod; Delafontaine, Patrice; Abdo, Abir; Lafferty, James; Rafeh, Nidal Abi

    2014-01-01

    Breast arterial calcification (BAC), observed as an incidental finding on screening mammograms, represents degenerative calcific changes occurring in the mammary arteries, with increasing age. The aim of this review is to discuss relevant literature examining relation between BAC and atherosclerosis. After a thorough literature search, in OVID and PubMed, 199 studies were identified, of which 25 were relevant to our review. Data were abstracted from each study and statistical analysis was done, including calculation of odds ratios and construction of forest plots. A total of 35,542 patients were enrolled across 25 studies looking at an association between BAC and coronary artery disease, cardiovascular disease, stroke, cerebral artery disease, carotid and peripheral artery diseases, and coronary artery calcification. A majority of the studies showed a statistically significant relation between BAC and presence of coronary artery disease cardiovascular disease and associated mortality. Sensitivity of BAC in predicting cardiovascular events was low, but specificity was high. BAC was predictive of incident and prevalent stroke but not mortality of stroke. Similarly, BAC was predictive of cerebral, carotid, and peripheral artery diseases. The role of BAC as a surrogate marker of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis is currently uncertain. Its role may be further elucidated by more large-scale prospective studies and clinical experience. PMID:23584424

  15. Adolescent intake of animal fat and red meat in relation to premenopausal mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Kimberly A; Burian, Rosemarie A; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is hypothesized to be a time period of particular susceptibility to breast cancer risk factors. Red meat and fat intake during high school was positively associated with risk of breast cancer among premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII). High mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer risk but there is limited research on dietary factors associated with breast density. To test the hypothesis that high intake of animal fat or red meat during adolescence is associated with mammographic density, we analyzed data from premenopausal women in the NHSII. Participants recalled adolescent diet on a high school food frequency questionnaire. We assessed absolute and percent mammographic density on digitized analog film mammograms for 687 premenopausal women with no history of cancer. We used generalized linear regression to quantify associations of adolescent animal fat and red meat intake with mammographic density, adjusting for age, body mass index, and other predictors of mammographic density. Adolescent animal fat intake was significantly positively associated with premenopausal mammographic density, with a mean percent density of 39.2 % in the lowest quartile of adolescent animal fat intake versus 43.1 % in the highest quartile (p trend: 0.03). A non-significant positive association was also observed for adolescent red meat intake (p trend: 0.14). These findings suggest that higher adolescent animal fat intake is weakly associated with percent mammographic density in premenopausal women.

  16. Cyclic endogenous estrogen and progesterone vary by mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Anita; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Flote, Vidar G.; Finstad, Sissi Espetvedt; McTiernan, Anne; Ursin, Giske; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ellison, Peter T.; Jasienska, Grazyna; Thune, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and progesterone are key factors in the development of breast cancer, but it remains unclear whether these hormones are associated with mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women. We measured percent mammographic density, nondense area, and absolute mammographic density using computer-assisted breast density readings (Madena) from digitized mammograms taken on a scheduled day of the menstrual cycle (day 7–12) among 202 healthy, premenopausal women (Energy Balance and Breast cancer Aspects Study-I). Daily salivary concentrations of 17β-estradiol and progesterone throughout an entire menstrual cycle and fasting morning serum concentrations of hormones on 3 specific days of the menstrual cycle were assessed. Salivary and serum 17β-estradiol and progesterone were positively associated with percent mammographic density, we observed by 1 SD increase in overall salivary estradiol (β-value equal to 2.07, P=0.044), luteal salivary progesterone (β-value equal to 2.40, P=0.020). Women with above-median percent mammographic density had a 20% higher mean salivary 17β-estradiol level throughout the menstrual cycle. The odds ratio for having above-median percent mammographic density (>28.5%) per 1 SD increase in overall salivary 17β-estradiol was 1.66 (95% confidence interval 1.13–2.45). Women in the top tertile of the overall average daily 17β-estradiol concentrations had an odds ratio of 2.54 (confidence interval 1.05–6.16) of above-median percent mammographic density compared with women in the bottom tertile. Our finding of a relationship between estrogen, progesterone, and percent mammographic density and not with other mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women is biologically plausible, but needs to be replicated in larger studies. PMID:25714648

  17. BAXSTER: an image quality tester for x-ray baggage screening systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Valeton, J. Mathieu; de Ruiter, C. Jaap

    2003-09-01

    TNO Human Factors in the Netherlands developed a prototype apparatus for testing the image quality of X-ray Baggage Screening Systems: BAXSTER. BAXSTER stands for BAggage X-ray Screening TesteR. The test has a variety of applications, e.g. support by the choice of optimal screening systems for airport security, comparison of competing X-ray systems, delivery tests and routine tests. Advantages over existing tests are (1) a strong relationship with real object recognition, (2) accurate and objective test results, and (3) ease of use: performing a test is almost as easy as doing an eye test at the optometrist. BAXSTER is based on the patented TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination) test method, which is well-suited for standardization, and development of the test apparatus was funded by the US FAA/TSA (Transportation Security Administration). The apparatus consists of two parts. The first part is a set of test charts containing triangular test patterns of various metals of different sizes and thicknesses. These charts are placed in a frame that is scanned by the X-ray system like a regular baggage item. The operator has to judge the orientation of these patterns on the X-ray image. The second part is a laptop with peripherals and software that controls and analyses the test. The result of a test is a set of performance indicators (relating to detection, resolution, penetration, wire detection and wire penetration) for the entire system, including the display, the operator and the effect of environmental conditions. No (electronic) connection with the X-ray system is required. The effectiveness of automatic object detection and material discrimination through dual-energy X-ray analysis cannot be tested with BAXSTER. In conclusion: with BAXSTER the image quality of X-ray Baggage Screening Systems can be tested easily and objectively.

  18. Evaluation of four mammographic density measures on HRT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Pettersen, Paola; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relation between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. These studies indicate that women with dense breasts have a four to six fold risk increase. There is currently no gold standard for automatic assessment of mammographic density. In previous work two different automated methods for measuring the effect of HRT w.r.t. changes in breast density have been presented. One is a percentage density based on an adaptive global threshold, and the other is an intensity invariant measure, which provides structural information orthogonal to intensity-based methods. In this article we investigate the ability to detect density changes induced by HRT for these measures and compare to a radiologist's BI-RADS rating and interactive threshold percentage density. In the experiments, two sets of mammograms of 80 patients from a double blind, placebo controlled HRT experiment are used. The p-values for the statistical significance of the separation of density means, for the HRT group and the placebo group at end of study, are 0.2, 0.1, 0.02 and 0.02 for the automatic threshold, BI-RADS, the stripyness and the interactive threshold respectively.

  19. Exudate detection in color retinal images for mass screening of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiwei; Thibault, Guillaume; Decencière, Etienne; Marcotegui, Beatriz; Laÿ, Bruno; Danno, Ronan; Cazuguel, Guy; Quellec, Gwénolé; Lamard, Mathieu; Massin, Pascale; Chabouis, Agnès; Victor, Zeynep; Erginay, Ali

    2014-10-01

    The automatic detection of exudates in color eye fundus images is an important task in applications such as diabetic retinopathy screening. The presented work has been undertaken in the framework of the TeleOphta project, whose main objective is to automatically detect normal exams in a tele-ophthalmology network, thus reducing the burden on the readers. A new clinical database, e-ophtha EX, containing precisely manually contoured exudates, is introduced. As opposed to previously available databases, e-ophtha EX is very heterogeneous. It contains images gathered within the OPHDIAT telemedicine network for diabetic retinopathy screening. Image definition, quality, as well as patients condition or the retinograph used for the acquisition, for example, are subject to important changes between different examinations. The proposed exudate detection method has been designed for this complex situation. We propose new preprocessing methods, which perform not only normalization and denoising tasks, but also detect reflections and artifacts in the image. A new candidates segmentation method, based on mathematical morphology, is proposed. These candidates are characterized using classical features, but also novel contextual features. Finally, a random forest algorithm is used to detect the exudates among the candidates. The method has been validated on the e-ophtha EX database, obtaining an AUC of 0.95. It has been also validated on other databases, obtaining an AUC between 0.93 and 0.95, outperforming state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Reliability of Breast Ultrasound BI-RADS Final Assessment in Mammographically Negative Patients with Nipple Discharge and Radiologic Predictors of Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chae Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the reliability of breast ultrasound (US) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) final assessment in mammographically negative patients with pathologic nipple discharge, and to determine the clinical and ultrasonographic variables associated with malignancy in this group of patients. Methods A total of 65 patients with 67 mammographically negative breast lesions that were pathologically confirmed through US-guided biopsy were included. Results Of the 53 BI-RADS category 4 and 5 lesions, eight (15.1%) were malignant (six ductal carcinomas in situ, one invasive ductal carcinoma, and one solid papillary carcinoma). There was no malignancy among the remaining 14 category 3 lesions. Malignant lesions more frequently displayed a round or irregular shape (75.0%, 6/8; p=0.030) and nonparallel orientation (33.3%, 4/12; p=0.029) compared to the benign lesions. The increase in the BI-RADS category corresponded with a rise in the malignancy rate (p=0.004). Conclusion The BI-RADS lexicon and final assessment of breast US reliably detect and characterize malignancy in mammographically negative patients with pathologic nipple discharge. PMID:27721881

  1. A Population-Wide Screening and Tailored Intervention Platform for Eating Disorders on College Campuses: The Healthy Body Image Program

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan; Kass, Andrea E.; Trockel, Mickey; Glass, Alan I.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper presents a new approach to intervention for eating disorders and body image concerns on college campuses, using a model of integrated eating disorder screening and intervention. Formative data on implementation feasibility are presented. Participants College students enrolled at two universities between 2011–2012. Methods The Healthy Body Image program is an evidence-based screening and intervention platform, enacted via community and online resources. An online screen was used to identify students at varying levels of risk or eating disorder symptom status; responses were used to direct students to universal or targeted online interventions or further evaluation. Universal prevention programs to improve healthy weight regulation and body image culture were offered to all students. Results Formative data from 1,551 students illustrates the application of this model. Conclusions The Healthy Body Image program is feasible to deliver and provides a comprehensive system of screening, evidence-based intervention, and community culture change. PMID:24621000

  2. High-throughput screening of high Monascus pigment-producing strain based on digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Xia, Meng-lei; Wang, Lan; Yang, Zhi-xia; Chen, Hong-zhang

    2016-04-01

    This work proposed a new method which applied image processing and support vector machine (SVM) for screening of mold strains. Taking Monascus as example, morphological characteristics of Monascus colony were quantified by image processing. And the association between the characteristics and pigment production capability was determined by SVM. On this basis, a highly automated screening strategy was achieved. The accuracy of the proposed strategy is 80.6 %, which is compatible with the existing methods (81.1 % for microplate and 85.4 % for flask). Meanwhile, the screening of 500 colonies only takes 20-30 min, which is the highest rate among all published results. By applying this automated method, 13 strains with high-predicted production were obtained and the best one produced as 2.8-fold (226 U/mL) of pigment and 1.9-fold (51 mg/L) of lovastatin compared with the parent strain. The current study provides us with an effective and promising method for strain improvement.

  3. Screening vehicles for stowaways using aperture synthesis passive millimetre wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Neil A.; Bowring, Nick

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents part of a feasibility study into the use of the aperture synthesis passive imaging technique to screen vehicles for persons. The aperture synthesis technique is introduced and shown how in the near-field regime of a vehicle screening scenario that a three-dimensional imaging capability is possible. A suggested antenna receiver array is presented and the three-dimensional point spread function which this enables is calculated by simulation. This shows that over the majority of the inside of the vehicle the spatial resolution in all three spatial dimensions is of or less than the radiation wavelength, which at the suggested operational radiation frequency of 20 GHz is 1.5 cm. A radiation transport model that estimates the radiation temperatures of persons and backgrounds when viewing the vehicle either from the side or the top is presented, such a model being useful in the design of vehicle screening systems and as a basis for interpretation codes to assist operators in recognising persons in vehicles.

  4. Portable retinal imaging for eye disease screening using a consumer-grade digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Simon; Larichev, Andrey; Zamora, Gilberto; Soliz, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The development of affordable means to image the retina is an important step toward the implementation of eye disease screening programs. In this paper we present the i-RxCam, a low-cost, hand-held, retinal camera for widespread applications such as tele-retinal screening for eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, and age-related ocular diseases. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities. The i-RxCam uses a Nikon D3100 digital camera body. The camera has a CMOS sensor with 14.8 million pixels. We use a 50mm focal lens that gives a retinal field of view of 45 degrees. The internal autofocus can compensate for about 2D (diopters) of focusing error. The light source is an LED produced by Philips with a linear emitting area that is transformed using a light pipe to the optimal shape at the eye pupil, an annulus. To eliminate corneal reflex we use a polarization technique in which the light passes through a nano-wire polarizer plate. This is a novel type of polarizer featuring high polarization separation (contrast ratio of more than 1000) and very large acceptance angle (>45 degrees). The i-RxCam approach will yield a significantly more economical retinal imaging device that would allow mass screening of the at-risk population.

  5. Computer-aided diagnostics of screening mammography using content-based image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Soiron, Michael; de Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; de A. Araújo, Arnaldo

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of death among women in occidental countries. In the last years, screening mammography has been established worldwide for early detection of breast cancer, and computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) is being developed to assist physicians reading mammograms. A promising method for CAD is content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Recently, we have developed a classification scheme of suspicious tissue pattern based on the support vector machine (SVM). In this paper, we continue moving towards automatic CAD of screening mammography. The experiments are based on in total 10,509 radiographs that have been collected from different sources. From this, 3,375 images are provided with one and 430 radiographs with more than one chain code annotation of cancerous regions. In different experiments, this data is divided into 12 and 20 classes, distinguishing between four categories of tissue density, three categories of pathology and in the 20 class problem two categories of different types of lesions. Balancing the number of images in each class yields 233 and 45 images remaining in each of the 12 and 20 classes, respectively. Using a two-dimensional principal component analysis, features are extracted from small patches of 128 x 128 pixels and classified by means of a SVM. Overall, the accuracy of the raw classification was 61.6 % and 52.1 % for the 12 and the 20 class problem, respectively. The confusion matrices are assessed for detailed analysis. Furthermore, an implementation of a SVM-based CBIR system for CADx in screening mammography is presented. In conclusion, with a smarter patch extraction, the CBIR approach might reach precision rates that are helpful for the physicians. This, however, needs more comprehensive evaluation on clinical data.

  6. Can laptops be left inside passenger bags if motion imaging is used in X-ray security screening?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Marcia; Schwaninger, Adrian; Michel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study where a new X-ray machine for security screening featuring motion imaging (i.e., 5 views of a bag are shown as an image sequence) was evaluated and compared to single view imaging available on conventional X-ray screening systems. More specifically, it was investigated whether with this new technology X-ray screening of passenger bags could be enhanced to such an extent that laptops could be left inside passenger bags, without causing a significant impairment in threat detection performance. An X-ray image interpretation test was created in four different versions, manipulating the factors packing condition (laptop and bag separate vs. laptop in bag) and display condition (single vs. motion imaging). There was a highly significant and large main effect of packing condition. When laptops and bags were screened separately, threat item detection was substantially higher. For display condition, a medium effect was observed. Detection could be slightly enhanced through the application of motion imaging. There was no interaction between display and packing condition, implying that the high negative effect of leaving laptops in passenger bags could not be fully compensated by motion imaging. Additional analyses were carried out to examine effects depending on different threat categories (guns, improvised explosive devices, knives, others), the placement of the threat items (in bag vs. in laptop) and viewpoint (easy vs. difficult view). In summary, although motion imaging provides an enhancement, it is not strong enough to allow leaving laptops in bags for security screening. PMID:24151457

  7. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis versus Supplemental Diagnostic Mammographic Views for Evaluation of Noncalcified Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bandos, Andriy I.; Ganott, Marie A.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Catullo, Victor J.; Rathfon, Grace Y.; Lu, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of breast tomosynthesis versus supplemental mammography views in classification of masses, distortions, and asymmetries. Materials and Methods: Eight radiologists who specialized in breast imaging retrospectively reviewed 217 consecutively accrued lesions by using protocols that were HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved in 182 patients aged 31–60 years (mean, 50 years) who underwent diagnostic mammography and tomosynthesis. The lesions in the cohort included 33% (72 of 217) cancers and 67% (145 of 217) benign lesions. Eighty-four percent (182 of 217) of the lesions were masses, 11% (25 of 217) were asymmetries, and 5% (10 of 217) were distortions that were initially detected at clinical examination in 8% (17 of 217), at mammography in 80% (173 of 217), at ultrasonography (US) in 11% (25 of 217), or at magnetic resonance imaging in 1% (2 of 217). Histopathologic examination established truth in 191 lesions, US revealed a cyst in 12 lesions, and 14 lesions had a normal follow-up. Each lesion was interpreted once with tomosynthesis and once with supplemental mammographic views; both modes included the mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views in a fully crossed and balanced design by using a five-category Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and a probability-of-malignancy score. Differences between modes were analyzed with a generalized linear mixed model for BI-RADS–based sensitivity and specificity and with modified Obuchowski-Rockette approach for probability-of-malignancy–based area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Average probability-of-malignancy–based area under the ROC curve was 0.87 for tomosynthesis versus 0.83 for supplemental views (P < .001). With tomosynthesis, the false-positive rate decreased from 85% (989 of 1160) to 74% (864 of 1160) (P < .01) for cases that were rated BI-RADS category 3 or higher and from 57% (663 of

  8. Classification of mammographic microcalcifications using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitre, Yateen S.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Moskowitz, Myron; Sarwal, Alok; Bonasso, Christine; Narayan, Suresh B.

    1995-05-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death among women. Breast cancer can be detected earlier by mammography than any other non-invasive examination. About 30% to 50% of breast cancers demonstrate tiny granulelike deposits of calcium called microcalcifications. It is difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant cases based on an examination of calcification regions, especially in hard-to-diagnose cases. We investigate the potential of using energy and entropy features computed from wavelet packets for their correlation with malignancy. Two types of Daubechies discrete filters were used as prototype wavelets. The energy and entropy features were computed for 128 benign and 63 malignant cases and analyzed using a multivariate cluster analysis and a univariate statistical analysis to reduce the feature set to a `five best set of features.' The efficacy of the reduced feature set to discriminate between the malignant and benign categories was evaluated using different multilayer perceptron architectures. The multilayer perceptron was trained using the backpropagation algorithm for various training and test set sizes. For each case 40 partitions of the data set were used to set up the training and test sets. The performance of the features was evaluated by computing the best area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the average area under the ROC curve. The performance of the features computed from the wavelet packets was compared to a second set of features consisting of the wavelet packet features, image structure features and cluster features. The classification results are encouraging and indicate the potential of using features derived from wavelet packets in discriminating microcalcification regions into benign and malignant categories.

  9. Blue-enhanced thin-film photodiode for dual-screen x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vygranenko, Y.; Vieira, M.; Sazonov, A.; Heiler, G.; Tredwell, T.; Nathan, A.

    2009-12-28

    This article reports on a-Si:H-based low-leakage blue-enhanced photodiodes for dual-screen x-ray imaging detectors. Doped nanocrystalline silicon was incorporated in both the n- and p-type regions to reduce absorption losses for light incoming from the top and bottom screens. The photodiode exhibits a dark current density of 900 pA/cm{sup 2} and an external quantum efficiency up to 90% at a reverse bias of 5 V. In the case of illumination through the tailored p-layer, the quantum efficiency of 60% at a 400 nm wavelength is almost double that for the conventional a-Si:H n-i-p photodiode.

  10. Increased vitamin D and calcium intake associated with reduced mammographic breast density among premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fair, Alecia Malin; Lewis, Toni J; Sanderson, Maureen; Dupont, William D; Fletcher, Sarah; Egan, Kathleen M; Disher, Anthony C

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D has been identified as a weak protective factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (relative risk, ~0.9), whereas high breast density has been identified as a strong risk factor (relative risk, ~4-6). To test the hypothesis that there is an association between vitamin D intake, but not circulating vitamin D levels, and mammographic breast density among women in our study, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 165 screening mammography patients at Nashville General Hospital's Breast Health Center, a public facility serving medically indigent and underserved women. Dietary and total (dietary plus supplements) vitamin D and calcium intakes were estimated by the Harvard African American Food Frequency Questionnaire, and blood samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Average percent breast density for the left and right breasts combined was estimated from digitized films using an interactive thresholding method available through Cumulus software. After statistical adjustment for age, race, and body mass index, the results revealed that there were significant trends of decreasing breast density with increasing vitamin D and calcium intake among premenopausal but not among postmenopausal women. There was no association between serum vitamin D and breast density in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. Confirmation of our findings in larger studies may assist in clarifying the role of vitamin D in breast density.

  11. Pocket-size imaging devices allow for reliable bedside screening for femoral artery access site complications.

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Strzecka, Dominika; Michalski, Błażej; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Lipiec, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate pocket-size imaging devices (PSIDs) as a fast screening tool for detecting complications after femoral artery puncture. Forty patients undergoing femoral artery puncture for arterial access related to percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Twenty-four hours after percutaneous coronary intervention, the involved inguinal region was assessed with PSIDs enabling 2-D gray-scale and color Doppler imaging. Subsequently, examination with a stationary high-end ultrasound system was performed to verify the findings of bedside examination in all patients. In 37 patients, PSID imaging had good diagnostic quality. False aneurysms (one asymptomatic) occurred in four patients, and all were recognized during bedside screening with PSID. One case of femoral artery thrombosis was confirmed with PSID and during standard ultrasonographic examination. Physical examination augmented with the quick bedside PSID examination had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 91%. PSID facilitated rapid bedside detection of serious access site complications in the vast majority of patients, including asymptomatic cases.

  12. Mammographic density and risk of breast cancer according to tumor characteristics and mode of detection: a Spanish population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It is not clear whether high mammographic density (MD) is equally associated with all subtypes of breast cancer (BC). We investigated the association between MD and subsequent BC, considering invasiveness, means of detection, pathologic subtype, and the time elapsed since mammographic exploration and BC diagnosis. Methods BC cases occurring in the population of women who attended screening from 1997 through 2004 in Navarre, a Spanish region with a fully consolidated screening program, were identified via record linkage with the Navarre Cancer Registry (n = 1,172). Information was extracted from the records of their first attendance at screening in that period. For each case, we randomly selected four controls, matched by screening round, year of birth, and place of residence. Cases were classified according to invasiveness (ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) versus invasive tumors), pathologic subtype (considering hormonal receptors and HER2), and type of diagnosis (screen-detected versus interval cases). MD was evaluated by a single, experienced radiologist by using a semiquantitative scale. Data on BC risk factors were obtained by the screening program in the corresponding round. The association between MD and tumor subtype was assessed by using conditional logistic regression. Results MD was clearly associated with subsequent BC. The odds ratio (OR) for the highest MD category (MD >75%) compared with the reference category (MD <10%) was similar for DCIS (OR = 3.47; 95% CI = 1.46 to 8.27) and invasive tumors (OR = 2.95; 95% CI = 2.01 to 4.35). The excess risk was particularly high for interval cases (OR = 7.72; 95% CI = 4.02 to 14.81) in comparison with screened detected tumors (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.36). Sensitivity analyses excluding interval cases diagnosed in the first year after MD assessment or immediately after an early recall to screening yielded similar results. No differences were seen regarding pathologic subtypes. The excess risk

  13. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    PubMed

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes.

  14. Terahertz imaging for early screening of diabetic foot syndrome: A proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Cardoso, G. G.; Rojas-Landeros, S. C.; Alfaro-Gomez, M.; Hernandez-Serrano, A. I.; Salas-Gutierrez, I.; Lemus-Bedolla, E.; Castillo-Guzman, A. R.; Lopez-Lemus, H. L.; Castro-Camus, E.

    2017-01-01

    Most people with diabetes suffer some deterioration of the feet. Diabetic foot syndrome causes ulceration in about 15% of cases and such deterioration leads to amputation in about 2.5% of diabetic patients, diminishing their quality of life and generating extraordinary costs for patients and public health systems. Currently, there is no objective method for the detection of diabetic foot syndrome in its early stages. We propose terahertz imaging as a method for the evaluation of such deterioration. This screening method could aid the prevention and medical treatment of this condition in the future. PMID:28165050

  15. On-Chip Peptide Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Protein Kinase Inhibitor Screening.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Lai; Kim, Young-Pil; Son, Jin Gyeong; Son, Miyoung; Lee, Tae Geol

    2017-01-03

    Protein kinases are enzymes that are important targets for drug discovery because of their involvement in regulating the essential cellular processes. For this reason, the changes in protein kinase activity induced by each drug candidate (the inhibitor in this case) need to be accurately determined. Here, an on-chip secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging technique of the peptides was developed for determining protein kinase activity and inhibitor screening without a matrix. In our method, cysteine-tethered peptides adsorbed onto a gold surface produced changes in the relative peak intensities of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated substrate peptides, which were quantitatively dependent on protein kinase activity. Using mass spectrometry imaging of multiple compartments on the gold surface in the presence of a peptide substrate, we screened 13,727 inhibitors, of which seven were initially found to have inhibitor efficiencies that surpassed 50%. Of these, we were able to identify a new breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL)(T315I) kinase inhibitor, henceforth referred to as KR135861. KR135861 showed no cytotoxicity and was subsequently confirmed to be superior to imatinib, a commercial drug marketed as Gleevec. Moreover, KR135861 exhibited a greater inhibitory effect on the BCR-ABL(T315I) tyrosine kinase, with an IC50 value as low as 1.3 μM. In in vitro experiments, KR135861 reduced the viability of both Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL(T315I), in contrast to imatinib's inhibitory effects only on Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL. Due to the surface sensitivity and selectivity of SIMS imaging, it is anticipated that our approach will make it easier to validate the small modifications of a substrate in relation to enzyme activity as well as for drug discovery. This mass spectrometry imaging analysis enables efficient screening for protein kinase inhibitors, thus permitting high-throughput drug screening with high accuracy

  16. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario.

    PubMed

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Ergene, Lale Tükenmez; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-07

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  17. Terahertz imaging for early screening of diabetic foot syndrome: A proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Cardoso, G. G.; Rojas-Landeros, S. C.; Alfaro-Gomez, M.; Hernandez-Serrano, A. I.; Salas-Gutierrez, I.; Lemus-Bedolla, E.; Castillo-Guzman, A. R.; Lopez-Lemus, H. L.; Castro-Camus, E.

    2017-02-01

    Most people with diabetes suffer some deterioration of the feet. Diabetic foot syndrome causes ulceration in about 15% of cases and such deterioration leads to amputation in about 2.5% of diabetic patients, diminishing their quality of life and generating extraordinary costs for patients and public health systems. Currently, there is no objective method for the detection of diabetic foot syndrome in its early stages. We propose terahertz imaging as a method for the evaluation of such deterioration. This screening method could aid the prevention and medical treatment of this condition in the future.

  18. Terahertz imaging for early screening of diabetic foot syndrome: A proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Cardoso, G G; Rojas-Landeros, S C; Alfaro-Gomez, M; Hernandez-Serrano, A I; Salas-Gutierrez, I; Lemus-Bedolla, E; Castillo-Guzman, A R; Lopez-Lemus, H L; Castro-Camus, E

    2017-02-06

    Most people with diabetes suffer some deterioration of the feet. Diabetic foot syndrome causes ulceration in about 15% of cases and such deterioration leads to amputation in about 2.5% of diabetic patients, diminishing their quality of life and generating extraordinary costs for patients and public health systems. Currently, there is no objective method for the detection of diabetic foot syndrome in its early stages. We propose terahertz imaging as a method for the evaluation of such deterioration. This screening method could aid the prevention and medical treatment of this condition in the future.

  19. Predictive modeling of human perception subjectivity: feasibility study of mammographic lesion similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songhua; Hudson, Kathleen; Bradley, Yong; Daley, Brian J.; Frederick-Dyer, Katherine; Tourassi, Georgia

    2012-02-01

    The majority of clinical content-based image retrieval (CBIR) studies disregard human perception subjectivity, aiming to duplicate the consensus expert assessment of the visual similarity on example cases. The purpose of our study is twofold: i) discern better the extent of human perception subjectivity when assessing the visual similarity of two images with similar semantic content, and (ii) explore the feasibility of personalized predictive modeling of visual similarity. We conducted a human observer study in which five observers of various expertise were shown ninety-nine triplets of mammographic masses with similar BI-RADS descriptors and were asked to select the two masses with the highest visual relevance. Pairwise agreement ranged between poor and fair among the five observers, as assessed by the kappa statistic. The observers' self-consistency rate was remarkably low, based on repeated questions where either the orientation or the presentation order of a mass was changed. Various machine learning algorithms were explored to determine whether they can predict each observer's personalized selection using textural features. Many algorithms performed with accuracy that exceeded each observer's self-consistency rate, as determined using a cross-validation scheme. This accuracy was statistically significantly higher than would be expected by chance alone (two-tailed p-value ranged between 0.001 and 0.01 for all five personalized models). The study confirmed that human perception subjectivity should be taken into account when developing CBIR-based medical applications.

  20. Predictive Modeling of Human Perception Subjectivity: Feasibility Study of Mammographic Lesion Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua; Tourassi, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    The majority of clinical content-based image retrieval (CBIR) studies disregard human perception subjectivity, aiming to duplicate the consensus expert assessment of the visual similarity on example cases. The purpose of our study is twofold: (i) discern better the extent of human perception subjectivity when assessing the visual similarity of two images with similar semantic content, and (ii) explore the feasibility of personalized predictive modeling of visual similarity. We conducted a human observer study in which five observers of various expertise were shown ninety-nine triplets of mammographic masses with similar BI-RADS descriptors and were asked to select the two masses with the highest visual relevance. Pairwise agreement ranged between poor and fair among the five observers, as assessed by the kappa statistic. The observers' self-consistency rate was remarkably low, based on repeated questions where either the orientation or the presentation order of a mass was changed. Various machine learning algorithms were explored to determine whether they can predict each observer's personalized selection using textural features. Many algorithms performed with accuracy that exceeded each observer's self-consistency rate, as determined using a cross-validation scheme. This accuracy was statistically significantly higher than would be expected by chance alone (two-tailed p-value ranged between 0.001 and 0.01 for all five personalized models). The study confirmed that human perception subjectivity should be taken into account when developing CBIR-based medical applications.

  1. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  2. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, G; Chmeissani, M; Uzun, D; Kolstein, M; Ozsahin, I; Mikhaylova, E; Arce, P; Cañadas, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  3. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events. PMID:23750176

  4. Relationship of serum estrogens and metabolites with area and volume mammographic densities.

    PubMed

    Gierach, Gretchen L; Patel, Deesha A; Falk, Roni T; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Geller, Berta M; Vacek, Pamela M; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael E; Shepherd, John A; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Fan, Bo; Herschorn, Sally D; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy; Fuhrman, Barbara; Sherman, Mark E; Brinton, Louise A

    2015-06-01

    Elevated mammographic density is a breast cancer risk factor, which has a suggestive, but unproven, relationship with increased exposure to sex steroid hormones. We examined associations of serum estrogens and estrogen metabolites with area and novel volume mammographic density measures among 187 women, ages 40-65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies at an academic facility in Vermont. Serum parent estrogens, estrone and estradiol, and their 2-, 4-, and 16-hydroxylated metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Area mammographic density was measured in the breast contralateral to the biopsy using thresholding software; volume mammographic density was quantified using a density phantom. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of estrogens with mammographic densities, adjusted for age and body mass index, and stratified by menopausal status and menstrual cycle phase. Weak, positive associations between estrogens, estrogen metabolites, and mammographic density were observed, primarily among postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal luteal phase women, the 16-pathway metabolite estriol was associated with percent area (p = 0.04) and volume (p = 0.05) mammographic densities and absolute area (p = 0.02) and volume (p = 0.05) densities. Among postmenopausal women, levels of total estrogens, the sum of parent estrogens, and 2-, 4- and 16-hydroxylation pathway metabolites were positively associated with area density measures (percent: p = 0.03, p = 0.04, p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.07; absolute: p = 0.02, p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.03, respectively) but not volume density measures. Our data suggest that serum estrogen profiles are weak determinants of mammographic density and that analysis of different density metrics may provide complementary information about relationships of estrogen exposure to breast tissue composition.

  5. Relationship of Serum Estrogens and Metabolites with Area and Volume Mammographic Densities

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Patel, Deesha A.; Falk, Roni T.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Geller, Berta M.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Shepherd, John A.; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Fan, Bo; Herschorn, Sally D.; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy; Fuhrman, Barbara; Sherman, Mark E.; Brinton, Louise A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated mammographic density is a breast cancer risk factor, which has a suggestive, but unproven, relationship with increased exposure to sex-steroid hormones. We examined associations of serum estrogens and estrogen metabolites with area and novel volume mammographic density measures among 187 women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies at an academic facility in Vermont. Methods Serum parent estrogens, estrone and estradiol, and their 2-, 4-, and 16-hydroxylated metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Area mammographic density was measured in the breast contralateral to the biopsy using thresholding software; volume mammographic density was quantified using a density phantom. Linear regression was used to estimate associations of estrogens with mammographic densities, adjusted for age and body mass index, and stratified by menopausal status and menstrual cycle phase. Results Weak, positive associations between estrogens, estrogen metabolites and mammographic density were observed, primarily among postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal luteal phase women, the 16-pathway metabolite estriol was associated with percent area (p=0.04) and volume (p=0.05) mammographic densities and absolute area (p=0.02) and volume (p=0.05) densities. Among postmenopausal women, levels of total estrogens, the sum of parent estrogens, and 2-, 4- and 16-hydroxylation pathway metabolites were positively associated with area density measures (percent: p=0.03, p=0.04, p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.07; absolute: p=0.02, p=0.02, p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.03, respectively), but not volume density measures. Conclusions Our data suggest that serum estrogen profiles are weak determinants of mammographic density and that analysis of different density metrics may provide complementary information about relationships of exposures to breast tissue composition. PMID:25757805

  6. Common variants in ZNF365 are associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Vachon, Celine M; Li, Jingmei; Varghese, Jajini; Thompson, Deborah; Warren, Ruth; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Audley, Tina; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna; Waggott, Darryl; Martin, Lisa J; Scott, Christopher G; Pankratz, V Shane; Hankinson, Susan E; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Chanock, Stephen J; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Liu, JianJun; Eriksson, Louise; Couch, Fergus J; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Czene, Kamila; Kraft, Peter; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2011-03-01

    High-percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. We conducted a meta analysis of five genome-wide association studies of percent mammographic density and report an association with rs10995190 in ZNF365 (combined P = 9.6 × 10(-10)). Common variants in ZNF365 have also recently been associated with susceptibility to breast cancer.

  7. Mammographic mass detection based on extended concentric morphology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfeng; Chen, Houjin

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer occurs with high frequency among women. In most cases, the main early signs appear as mass and calcification. Distinguishing masses from normal tissues is still a challenging work as mass varies with shapes, margins and sizes. In this paper, a novel method for mass detection in mammograms was presented. First, morphology operators are employed to locate mass candidates. Then anisotropic diffusion was applied to make mass region display better multiple concentric layers (MCL). Finally an extended concentric morphology model (ECMM) criterion combining MCL criterion and template matching was proposed to detect masses. This method was examined on 170 images from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) database. The detection rate is 93.92% at 1.88 false positives per image (FPs/I), demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Huo, Zhimin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Chinander, Michael R.; Lan, Li; Bonta, Ioana R.

    2003-05-01

    Mammographic parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk. Fractal-based texture analyses, including box-counting methods and Minkowski dimension, were performed within parenchymal regions of normal mammograms of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation carriers and within those of women at low risk for developing breast cancer. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized radiographic markers in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. A multifractal phenomenon was observed with the fractal analyses. The high frequency component of fractal dimension from the conventional box-counting technique yielded an Az value of 0.84 in differentiating between two groups, while using the LDA to estimate the fractal dimension yielded an Az value of 0.91 for the high frequency component. An Az value of 0.82 was obtained with fractal dimensions extracted using the Minkowski algorithm.

  9. Quantitative low-energy ion beam characterization by beam profiling and imaging via scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, S.; Pietag, F.; Polak, J.; Arnold, T.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the imaging and characterization of low-current ion beams in the neutralized state monitored via single crystal YAG:Ce (Y3Al5O12) scintillators. To validate the presented beam diagnostic tool, Faraday cup measurements and test etchings were performed. Argon ions with a typical energy of 1.0 keV were emitted from an inductively coupled radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) ion beam source with total currents of some mA. Different beam properties, such as, lateral ion current density, beam divergence angle, and current density in pulsed ion beams have been studied to obtain information about the spatial beam profile and the material removal rate distribution. We observed excellent imaging properties with the scintillation screen and achieved a detailed characterization of the neutralized ion beam. A strong correlation between the scintillator light output, the ion current density, and the material removal rate could be observed.

  10. Reconstruction of burst activity from calcium imaging of neuronal population via Lq minimization and interval screening

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Tingwei; Lv, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium imaging is becoming an increasingly popular technology to indirectly measure activity patterns in local neuronal networks. Based on the dependence of calcium fluorescence on neuronal spiking, two-photon calcium imaging affords single-cell resolution of neuronal population activity. However, it is still difficult to reconstruct neuronal activity from complex calcium fluorescence traces, particularly for traces contaminated by noise. Here, we describe a robust and efficient neuronal-activity reconstruction method that utilizes Lq minimization and interval screening (IS), which we refer to as LqIS. The simulation results show that LqIS performs satisfactorily in terms of both accuracy and speed of reconstruction. Reconstruction of simulation and experimental data also shows that LqIS has advantages in terms of the recall rate, precision rate, and timing error. Finally, LqIS is demonstrated to effectively reconstruct neuronal burst activity from calcium fluorescence traces recorded from large-size neuronal population. PMID:27375930

  11. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Michał; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and mammographic density in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Rice, Megan S; Biessy, Carine; Lajous, Martin; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Tamimi, Rulla M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; López-Ridaura, Ruy; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer; however, little is known about the association between metabolic syndrome and percent mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 789 premenopausal and 322 postmenopausal women in the Mexican Teacher's Cohort (ESMaestras). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the harmonized definition. We measured percent density on mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the association between density and metabolic syndrome, as well as its components by state (Jalisco, Veracruz) and menopausal status (premenopausal, postmenopausal). Among premenopausal women in Jalisco, women with metabolic syndrome had higher percent density than those without after adjusting for potential confounders including BMI [difference = 4.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.72-7.81]. Among the metabolic syndrome components, only low high-density lipoprotein levels (<50 mg/dL) were associated with significantly higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco (difference = 4.62; 95% CI, 1.73-7.52). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz (difference = -2.91; 95% CI, -7.19 to 1.38), nor among postmenopausal women in either state. Metabolic syndrome was associated with higher percent density among premenopausal women in Jalisco, Mexico, but was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in Veracruz, Mexico, or among postmenopausal women in either Jalisco or Veracruz. These findings provide some support for a possible role of metabolic syndrome in mammographic density among premenopausal women; however, results were inconsistent across states and require further confirmation in larger studies.

  13. Clinical value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in health screening of general adult population

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Richter, Antje; Karlinger, Kinga; Berczi, Viktor; Pickuth, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) and angiography (WB-MRA) has become increasingly popular in population-based research. We evaluated retrospectively the frequency of potentially relevant incidental findings throughout the body. Materials and methods 22 highly health-conscious managers (18 men, mean age 47±9 years) underwent WB-MRI and WB-MRA between March 2012 and September 2013 on a Discovery MR750w wide bore 3 Tesla device (GE Healthcare) using T1 weighted, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) acquisitions according to a standardized protocol. Results A suspicious (pararectal) malignancy was detected in one patient which was confirmed by an endorectal sonography. Incidental findings were described in 20 subjects, including hydrocele (11 patients), benign bony lesion (7 patients) and non-specific lymph nodes (5 patients). Further investigations were recommended in 68% (ultrasound: 36%, computed tomography: 28%, mammography: 9%, additional MRI: 9%). WB-MRA were negative in 16 subjects. Vascular normal variations were reported in 23%, and a 40% left proximal common carotid artery stenosis were described in one subject. Conclusions WB-MRI and MRA lead to the detection of clinically relevant diseases and unexpected findings in a cohort of healthy adults that require further imaging or surveillance in 68%. WB-MR imaging may play a paramount role in health screening, especially in the future generation of (epi)genetic based screening of malignant and atherosclerotic disorders. Our study is the first which involved a highly selected patient group using a high field 3-T wide bore magnet system with T1, STIR, MRA and whole-body DWI acquisitions as well. PMID:25810696

  14. An image-based software tool for screening retinal fundus images using vascular morphology and network transport analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Richard D.; Dickrell, Daniel J.; Meadows, David L.

    2014-03-01

    As the number of digital retinal fundus images taken each year grows at an increasing rate, there exists a similarly increasing need for automatic eye disease detection through image-based analysis. A new method has been developed for classifying standard color fundus photographs into both healthy and diseased categories. This classification was based on the calculated network fluid conductance, a function of the geometry and connectivity of the vascular segments. To evaluate the network resistance, the retinal vasculature was first manually separated from the background to ensure an accurate representation of the geometry and connectivity. The arterial and venous networks were then semi-automatically separated into two separate binary images. The connectivity of the arterial network was then determined through a series of morphological image operations. The network comprised of segments of vasculature and points of bifurcation, with each segment having a characteristic geometric and fluid properties. Based on the connectivity and fluid resistance of each vascular segment, an arterial network flow conductance was calculated, which described the ease with which blood can pass through a vascular system. In this work, 27 eyes (13 healthy and 14 diabetic) from patients roughly 65 years in age were evaluated using this methodology. Healthy arterial networks exhibited an average fluid conductance of 419 ± 89 μm3/mPa-s while the average network fluid conductance of the diabetic set was 165 ± 87 μm3/mPa-s (p < 0.001). The results of this new image-based software demonstrated an ability to automatically, quantitatively and efficiently screen diseased eyes from color fundus imagery.

  15. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  16. An integrated microfluidic biosensor for the rapid screening of foodborne pathogens by surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Leary, James F.

    2011-03-01

    The rapid detection of foodborne pathogens is of vital importance to keep the food supply rid of contamination. Previously we have demonstrated the design of a hybrid optical device that performs real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and epi-fluorescence imaging. Additionally we have developed a biosensor array chip that is able to specifically detect the presence of two known pathogens. This biosensor detects the presence of the pathogen strains by the selective capture of whole pathogens by peptide ligands functionalized to the spots of the array. We have incorporated this biosensor array into a self contained PDMS microfluidic chip. The enclosure of the biosensor array by a PDMS microfluidic chip allows for a sample to be screened for many strains of pathogens simultaneously in a safe one time use biochip. This disposable optical biochip is inserted into with the hybrid SPR/epi-fluorescence imaging device to form an integrated system for the detection of foodborne pathogens. Using this integrated system, we can selectively detect the presence of E. coli 0157:H7 or S. enterica in a simultaneously in real-time. Additionally, we have modeled the mechanical properties of the microfluidic biochip in order to manipulate the flow conditions to achieve optimal pathogen capture by the biosensor array. We have developed an integrated system that is able to screen a sample for multiple foodborne pathogens simultaneously in a safe, rapid and label-free manner.

  17. Women's features and inter-/intra-rater agreement on mammographic density assessment in full-field digital mammograms (DDM-SPAIN).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Ruiz, Franciso; Martínez, Inmaculada; Casals, María; Miranda, Josefa; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Vidal, Carmen; Llobet, Rafael; Pollán, Marina; Salas, Dolores

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of mammographic density (MD), one of the leading risk factors for breast cancer, still relies on subjective assessment. However, the consistency of MD measurement in full-digital mammograms has yet to be evaluated. We studied inter- and intra-rater agreement with respect to estimation of breast density in full-digital mammograms, and tested whether any of the women's characteristics might have some influence on them. After an initial training period, three experienced radiologists estimated MD using Boyd scale in a left breast cranio-caudal mammogram of 1,431 women, recruited at three Spanish screening centres. A subgroup of 50 randomly selected images was read twice to estimate short-term intra-rater agreement. In addition, a reading of 1,428 of the images, performed 2 years before by one rater, was used to estimate long-term intra-rater agreement. Pair-wise weighted kappas with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals were calculated. Dichotomous variables were defined to identify mammograms in which any rater disagreed with other raters or with his/her own assessment, respectively. The association between disagreement and women's characteristics was tested using multivariate mixed logistic models, including centre as a random-effects term, and taking into account repeated measures when required. All quadratic-weighted kappa values for inter- and intra-rater agreement were excellent (higher than 0.80). None of the studied women's features, i.e. body mass index, brassiere size, menopause, nulliparity, lactation or current hormonal therapy, was associated with higher risk of inter- or intra-rater disagreement. However, raters differed significantly more in images that were classified in the higher-density MD categories, and disagreement in intra-rater assessment was also lower in low-density mammograms. The reliability of MD assessment in full-field digital mammograms is comparable to that for original or digitised images. The reassuring lack of association

  18. Automatic Screening and Grading of Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Texture Analysis of Fundus Images

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thanh Vân; Seoud, Lama; Chakor, Hadi; Cheriet, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease which causes visual deficiency and irreversible blindness to the elderly. In this paper, an automatic classification method for AMD is proposed to perform robust and reproducible assessments in a telemedicine context. First, a study was carried out to highlight the most relevant features for AMD characterization based on texture, color, and visual context in fundus images. A support vector machine and a random forest were used to classify images according to the different AMD stages following the AREDS protocol and to evaluate the features' relevance. Experiments were conducted on a database of 279 fundus images coming from a telemedicine platform. The results demonstrate that local binary patterns in multiresolution are the most relevant for AMD classification, regardless of the classifier used. Depending on the classification task, our method achieves promising performances with areas under the ROC curve between 0.739 and 0.874 for screening and between 0.469 and 0.685 for grading. Moreover, the proposed automatic AMD classification system is robust with respect to image quality. PMID:27190636

  19. Development of a screening tool for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Bency, Mayur Joseph; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bansal, Reema; Gupta, Amod

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a condition of the eye of diabetic patients where the retina is damaged because of long-term diabetes. The condition deteriorates towards irreversible blindness in extreme cases of diabetic retinopathy. Hence, early detection of diabetic retinopathy is important to prevent blindness. Regular screening of fundus images of diabetic patients could be helpful in preventing blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we propose techniques for staging of diabetic retinopathy in fundus images using several shape and texture features computed from detected microaneurysms, exudates, and hemorrhages. The classification accuracy is reported in terms of the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve using 200 fundus images from the MESSIDOR database. The value of Az for classifying normal images versus mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is 0:9106. The value of Az for classification of mild NPDR versus moderate and severe NPDR is 0:8372. The Az value for classification of moderate NPDR and severe NPDR is 0:9750.

  20. Museum as an integrated imaging device: visualization of ancient Kyoto cityscape from folding screen artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Oyabu, Umi; Kojima, Michihiro

    2012-03-01

    Museums hold cultural resources such as artworks, historical artifacts, and folklore materials. The National Museum of Japanese History holds over 200,000 of the cultural resources. A role of museum is to exhibit the cultural resources, therefore a museum could be referred to as a visualization device for the information society. In this research, visualization of a history image from cultural resources with interactive user interface will be mentioned. The material focused on is the oldest extant version of a genre of folding screen paintings that depict the thriving city of Kyoto in the four seasons, named Rekihaku's "Scenes In and Around Kyoto" designated as a nationally important cultural property in Japan. Over 1,400 people and a lot of residences, temples, and houses are drawn, and those are also information resource telling us about city scenes and people's life in Kyoto at that time. Historical researches were done by using a high resolution digital image obtained by a large scaled scanner, and scanned images are used for computer programs to visualize a history image of ancient Kyoto. Combinations between real materials and information provided by using the computer programs are also described in this research.

  1. Split-screen display system and standardized methods for ultrasound image acquisition and multi-frame data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H. (Inventor); Hodis, Howard N. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A standardized acquisition methodology assists operators to accurately replicate high resolution B-mode ultrasound images obtained over several spaced-apart examinations utilizing a split-screen display in which the arterial ultrasound image from an earlier examination is displayed on one side of the screen while a real-time "live" ultrasound image from a current examination is displayed next to the earlier image on the opposite side of the screen. By viewing both images, whether simultaneously or alternately, while manually adjusting the ultrasound transducer, an operator is able to bring into view the real-time image that best matches a selected image from the earlier ultrasound examination. Utilizing this methodology, dynamic material properties of arterial structures, such as IMT and diameter, are measured in a standard region over successive image frames. Each frame of the sequence has its echo edge boundaries automatically determined by using the immediately prior frame's true echo edge coordinates as initial boundary conditions. Computerized echo edge recognition and tracking over multiple successive image frames enhances measurement of arterial diameter and IMT and allows for improved vascular dimension measurements, including vascular stiffness and IMT determinations.

  2. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  3. The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shihying; Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Packard, Nathan J.

    2008-04-15

    The effect of breast skin thickness on dosimetry in mammography was investigated. Breast computed tomography (CT) acquisition techniques, combined with algorithms designed for determining specific breast metrics, were useful for estimating skin thickness. A radial-geometry edge detection scheme was implemented on coronal reconstructed breast CT (bCT) images to measure the breast skin thickness. Skin thickness of bilateral bCT volume data from 49 women and unilateral bCT volume data from 2 women (10 healthy women and 41 women with BIRADS 4 and 5 diagnoses) was robustly measured with the edge detection scheme. The mean breast skin thickness ({+-}inter-breast standard deviation) was found to be 1.45{+-}0.30 mm. Since most current published normalized glandular dose (D{sub gN}) coefficients are based on the assumption of a 4-mm breast skin thickness, the D{sub gN} values computed with Monte Carlo techniques will increase up to 18% due to the thinner skin layers (e.g., 6-cm 50% glandular breast, 28 kVp Mo-Mo spectrum). The thinner skin dimensions found in this study suggest that the current D{sub gN} values used for mammographic dosimetry lead to a slight underestimate in glandular dose.

  4. Fluorescence imaging technology (FI) for high-throughput screening of selenide-modified nano-TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Lee, Jianchao; Zhang, Meijuan; Duan, Qiannan; Zhang, Jiarui; Qi, Hailang

    2016-02-18

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on fluorescence imaging (FI) was implemented to evaluate the catalytic performance of selenide-modified nano-TiO2. Chemical ink-jet printing (IJP) technology was reformed to fabricate a catalyst library comprising 1405 (Ni(a)Cu(b)Cd(c)Ce(d)In(e)Y(f))Se(x)/TiO2 (M6Se/Ti) composite photocatalysts. Nineteen M6Se/Tis were screened out from the 1405 candidates efficiently.

  5. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  6. Photorealistic image generation of molecular structure on PC screen using the ray-tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Yoon, C W; Mhin, B J; Kim, H S; Kim, K S

    1992-12-01

    A PC version of three-dimensional molecular graphics package has been developed to run under MS-DOS environment on IBM PC-compatible computers equipped with a VGA graphics board. The program consists of two parts: a menu-driven interactive system module in EGA mode, and a ray-tracing module in VGA mode. In the 256-color VGA mode, ray-tracing images are represented with a 4-color map, with 64 levels for each color: 32 levels of illuminance and 32 levels of saturation. Molecular structure can be analyzed along various directions with various light sources. Ray-tracing images are also represented in a 16-color EGA mode with the half-toning method, which can display 76 gray levels for each color. To obtain good photo-realistic images in an efficient way, we have used two light sources, with an intensity ratio of 7:3, which are located in front of the top right and bottom left corners of the screen.

  7. Towards a nanoscale mammographic contrast agent: development of a modular pre-clinical dual optical/x-ray agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Niroui, Farnaz; Levitin, Ronald B.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Rowlands, J. A.; Matsuura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) can provide improved breast cancer detection and characterization compared to conventional mammography by imaging the effects of tumour angiogenesis. Current small-molecule contrast agents used for CEDM are limited by a short plasma half-life and rapid extravasation into tissue interstitial space. To address these limitations, nanoscale agents that can remain intravascular except at sites of tumour angiogenesis can be used. For CEDM, this agent must be both biocompatible and strongly attenuate mammographic energy x-rays. Nanoscale perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) droplets have good x-ray attenuation and have been used in patients for other applications. However, the macroscopic scale of x-ray imaging (50-100 µm) is inadequate for direct verification that PFOB droplets localize at sites of breast tumour angiogenesis. For efficient pre-clinical optimization for CEDM, we integrated an optical marker into PFOB droplets for microscopic assessment (≪50 µm). To develop PFOB droplets as a new nanoscale mammographic contrast agent, PFOB droplets were labelled with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The droplets had mean diameters of 160 nm, fluoresced at 635 nm and attenuated x-ray spectra at 30.5 keV mean energy with a relative attenuation of 5.6 ± 0.3 Hounsfield units (HU) mg-1 mL-1 QD-PFOB. With the agent loaded into tissue phantoms, good correlation between x-ray attenuation and optical fluorescence was found (R2 = 0.96), confirming co-localization of the QDs with PFOB for quantitative assessment using x-ray or optical methods. Furthermore, the QDs can be removed from the PFOB agent without affecting its x-ray attenuation or structural properties for expedited translation of optimized PFOB droplet formulations into patients.

  8. Image-based siRNA screen to identify kinases regulating Weibel-Palade body size control using electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Ketteler, Robin; Freeman, Jamie; Ferraro, Francesco; Bata, Nicole; Cutler, Dan F.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos

    2017-01-01

    High-content screening of kinase inhibitors is important in order to identify biogenesis and function mechanisms of subcellular organelles. Here, we present a human kinome siRNA high-content screen on primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells, that were transfected by electroporation. The data descriptor contains a confocal fluorescence, microscopic image dataset. We also describe an open source, automated image analysis workflow that can be reused to perform high-content analysis of other organelles. This dataset is suitable for analysis of morphological parameters that are linked to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) biology. PMID:28248923

  9. Image-based siRNA screen to identify kinases regulating Weibel-Palade body size control using electroporation.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Robin; Freeman, Jamie; Ferraro, Francesco; Bata, Nicole; Cutler, Dan F; Kriston-Vizi, Janos

    2017-03-01

    High-content screening of kinase inhibitors is important in order to identify biogenesis and function mechanisms of subcellular organelles. Here, we present a human kinome siRNA high-content screen on primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells, that were transfected by electroporation. The data descriptor contains a confocal fluorescence, microscopic image dataset. We also describe an open source, automated image analysis workflow that can be reused to perform high-content analysis of other organelles. This dataset is suitable for analysis of morphological parameters that are linked to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) biology.

  10. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  11. Assessment of stereoscopic optic disc images using an autostereoscopic screen – experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Maged S; Lowell, James A; Holliman, Nick S; Hunter, Andrew; Vaideanu, Daniella; Hildreth, Anthony; Steel, David HW

    2008-01-01

    Background Stereoscopic assessment of the optic disc morphology is an important part of the care of patients with glaucoma. The aim of this study was to assess stereoviewing of stereoscopic optic disc images using an example of the new technology of autostereoscopic screens compared to the liquid shutter goggles. Methods Independent assessment of glaucomatous disc characteristics and measurement of optic disc and cup parameters whilst using either an autostereoscopic screen or liquid crystal shutter goggles synchronized with a view switching display. The main outcome measures were inter-modality agreements between the two used modalities as evaluated by the weighted kappa test and Bland Altman plots. Results Inter-modality agreement for measuring optic disc parameters was good [Average kappa coefficient for vertical Cup/Disc ratio was 0.78 (95% CI 0.62–0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI 0.6–0.92) for observer 1 and 2 respectively]. Agreement between modalities for assessing optic disc characteristics for glaucoma on a five-point scale was very good with a kappa value of 0.97. Conclusion This study compared two different methods of stereo viewing. The results of assessment of the different optic disc and cup parameters were comparable using an example of the newly developing autostereoscopic display technologies as compared to the shutter goggles system used. The Inter-modality agreement was high. This new technology carries potential clinical usability benefits in different areas of ophthalmic practice. PMID:18651983

  12. An image-based screen identifies a small molecule regulator of megakaryopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Boitano, Anthony E.; de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Snead, Jennifer L.; Cooke, Michael P.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Molecules that control the lineage commitment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) may allow the expansion of enriched progenitor populations for both research and therapeutic uses. In an effort to better understand and control the differentiation of HSCs to megakaryocytes, we carried out an image-based screen of a library of 50,000 heterocycles using primary human CD34+ cells. A class of naphthyridinone derivatives was identified that induces the differentiation of common myeloid progenitors (CMP) to megakaryocytes. Kinase profiling and subsequent functional assays revealed that these compounds act through inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling in CMPs. Such molecules may ultimately have clinical utility in the treatment of thrombocytopenia. PMID:22891346

  13. Analysis of thermal images from diode lasers: Temperature profiling and reliability screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowska, Anna; Latoszek, Mateusz; Tomm, Jens W.; Weik, Fritz; Elsaesser, Thomas; Zbroszczyk, Mariusz; Bugajski, Maciej; Spellenberg, B.; Bassler, M.

    2005-05-01

    Imaging thermography in the 3-5μm wavelength range is applied to the analysis of thermal properties of high-power diode lasers. We investigate these devices by inspecting their front facets as well as their active regions along the resonator. The latter is done through top windows within the substrate. Raw data are found to be mostly interfered by thermal radiation traveling through the substrate, which is transparent for infrared light. Substracting this contribution and recalibration allows for obtaining realistic temperature profiles along laser structures. Facet heating is analyzed complementary by micro-Raman spectroscopy. We show how hot spots at the front facet, in the substrate, or even in the active region within the substrate are discovered. Our approach paves the way for an advanced methodology of device screening.

  14. Point of care cutaneous imaging technology in melanoma screening and mole mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kachiu C.; Leffell, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy of melanocytes or pigment-producing cells located predominantly in the skin. It is less common than other skin cancers but causes the greatest number of skin cancer-related deaths worldwide. The incidence of melanoma continues to increase and early detection is the most promising means of decreasing morbidity and mortality. Currently, physicians perform routine skin cancer screenings for melanoma without the benefit of imaging devices more advanced than handheld magnifiers or dermatoscopes. However, it is possible that the diagnosis of melanoma may be improved with technology that provides diagnostic discrimination beyond what is possible on routine inspection. This article reviews current and emerging technologies to aid in the diagnosis of melanoma. Ultimately, these advances may enhance the early diagnosis of melanoma. PMID:24860656

  15. Analysis of thermal images from diode lasers: Temperature profiling and reliability screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowska, Anna; Latoszek, Mateusz; Tomm, Jens W.; Weik, Fritz; Elsaesser, Thomas; Zbroszczyk, Mariusz; Bugajski, Maciej; Spellenberg, B.; Bassler, M.

    2005-05-16

    Imaging thermography in the 3-5 {mu}m wavelength range is applied to the analysis of thermal properties of high-power diode lasers. We investigate these devices by inspecting their front facets as well as their active regions along the resonator. The latter is done through top windows within the substrate. Raw data are found to be mostly interfered by thermal radiation traveling through the substrate, which is transparent for infrared light. Substracting this contribution and recalibration allows for obtaining realistic temperature profiles along laser structures. Facet heating is analyzed complementary by micro-Raman spectroscopy. We show how hot spots at the front facet, in the substrate, or even in the active region within the substrate are discovered. Our approach paves the way for an advanced methodology of device screening.

  16. Factors Associated with Mammographic Decisions of Chinese-Australian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Cannas; Cant, Rosemary; Sullivan, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    BreastScreen (a free breast cancer screening service) has been implemented in Australia since 1991. Surveys conducted overseas consistently report that women of Chinese ancestry have low participation rates in breast cancer screening. Although Chinese women's use of breast cancer screening services has been investigated abroad, to date there are…

  17. High-quality and small-capacity e-learning video featuring lecturer-superimposing PC screen images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yoshihiko; Murakami, Michinobu; Sakamoto, Ryota; Sugiura, Tokuhiro; Matsui, Hirokazu; Kato, Norihiko

    2006-10-01

    Information processing and communication technology are progressing quickly, and are prevailing throughout various technological fields. Therefore, the development of such technology should respond to the needs for improvement of quality in the e-learning education system. The authors propose a new video-image compression processing system that ingeniously employs the features of the lecturing scene. While dynamic lecturing scene is shot by a digital video camera, screen images are electronically stored by a PC screen image capturing software in relatively long period at a practical class. Then, a lecturer and a lecture stick are extracted from the digital video images by pattern recognition techniques, and the extracted images are superimposed on the appropriate PC screen images by off-line processing. Thus, we have succeeded to create a high-quality and small-capacity (HQ/SC) video-on-demand educational content featuring the advantages: the high quality of image sharpness, the small electronic file capacity, and the realistic lecturer motion.

  18. Novel Associations between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants and Risk-Predicting Mammographic Density Measures.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer; Thompson, Deborah J; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Scott, Christopher; Tamimi, Rulla M; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hazra, Aditi; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Jensen, Matt; Cunningham, Julie; Olson, Janet E; Purrington, Kristen; Couch, Fergus J; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M L; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith, Paula; Wareham, Nicholas J; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Douglas, Julie A; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Ursin, Giske; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela N; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gram, Inger Torhild; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Fasching, Peter A; Pankratz, V Shane; Hopper, John L; Vachon, Celine M

    2015-06-15

    Mammographic density measures adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) are heritable predictors of breast cancer risk, but few mammographic density-associated genetic variants have been identified. Using data for 10,727 women from two international consortia, we estimated associations between 77 common breast cancer susceptibility variants and absolute dense area, percent dense area and absolute nondense area adjusted for study, age, and BMI using mixed linear modeling. We found strong support for established associations between rs10995190 (in the region of ZNF365), rs2046210 (ESR1), and rs3817198 (LSP1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas (all P < 10(-5)). Of 41 recently discovered breast cancer susceptibility variants, associations were found between rs1432679 (EBF1), rs17817449 (MIR1972-2: FTO), rs12710696 (2p24.1), and rs3757318 (ESR1) and adjusted absolute and percent dense areas, respectively. There were associations between rs6001930 (MKL1) and both adjusted absolute dense and nondense areas, and between rs17356907 (NTN4) and adjusted absolute nondense area. Trends in all but two associations were consistent with those for breast cancer risk. Results suggested that 18% of breast cancer susceptibility variants were associated with at least one mammographic density measure. Genetic variants at multiple loci were associated with both breast cancer risk and the mammographic density measures. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms at these loci could help identify etiologic pathways implicated in how mammographic density predicts breast cancer risk.

  19. Stress signaling from human mammary epithelial cells contributes to phenotypes of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Fordyce, Colleen; Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-09-15

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared with epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g., activin A and CD36) to prevent breast cancer.

  20. Stress Signaling from Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Contributes to Phenotypes of Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared to epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g. activin A, CD36) to prevent breast cancer. PMID:25172842

  1. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  2. Calorie intake, olive oil consumption and mammographic density among Spanish women

    PubMed Central

    García-Arenzana, Nicolás; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva María; Lope, Virginia; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Laso-Pablos, Soledad; Ascunce, Nieves; Casanova-Gómez, Francisco; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Aragonés, Nuria; Gómez, Beatriz Pérez; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2014-01-01

    High mammographic density (MD) is one of the main risk factors for development of breast cancer. To date, however, relatively few studies have evaluated the association between MD and diet. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the association between MD (measured using Boyd's semiquantitative scale with five categories: <10%, 10–25%, 25–50%, 50–75% and >75%) and diet (measured using a food frequency questionnaire validated in a Spanish population) among 3,548 peri- and postmenopausal women drawn from seven breast cancer screening programs in Spain. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models, adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), energy intake and protein consumption as well as other confounders, showed an association between greater calorie intake and greater MD [odds ratio (OR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.38, for every increase of 500 cal/day], yet high consumption of olive oil was nevertheless found to reduce the prevalence of high MD (OR = 0.86;95% CI = 0.76-0.96, for every increase of 22 g/day in olive oil consumption); and, while greater intake of whole milk was likewise associated with higher MD (OR = 1.10; 95%CI 1.00-1.20, for every increase of 200 g/day), higher consumption of protein (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.80-1.00, for every increase of 30 g/day) and white meat (p for trend 0.041) was found to be inversely associated with MD. Our study, the largest to date to assess the association between diet and MD, suggests that MD is associated with modifiable dietary factors, such as calorie intake and olive oil consumption. These foods could thus modulate the prevalence of high MD, and important risk marker for breast cancer. PMID:24254818

  3. Hormone metabolism genes and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Su, Yu-Chen; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Hsu, Chris; Van den Berg, David; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Female steroid hormone levels and exogenous hormone use influence breast cancer risk. We investigated the association between genetic variation in the hormone metabolism and signaling pathway and mammographic density (MD), a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. Methods We genotyped 161 SNPs in 15 hormone metabolism pathway gene regions and evaluated MD in 2,038 Singapore Chinese women. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate SNP-MD association. An overall pathway summary was obtained using the adaptive ranked truncated product test. Results We did not find any of the individually tested SNPs to be associated with MD after a multiple testing correction. There was no evidence of an overall effect on MD of genetic variation in the hormone metabolism pathway. Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, genetic variation in hormone metabolism pathway was not associated with MD in Singapore Chinese women. Impact Consistent with existing data from Caucasian populations, polymorphisms in hormone pathway genes are not likely to be strong predictors of MD in Asian women. PMID:23429186

  4. Mammographic density and risk of breast cancer in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Nguyen, Tuong L; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Hopper, John L; Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-09-01

    We carried out this study to evaluate the association between mammographic density adjusted for age and BMI and early-onset breast cancer in Asian women. We recruited 213 Korean patients with breast cancer (45% diagnosed before the age of 50 years) and 630 controls matched for age, menopausal status, and examination date. The percentage and absolute size of dense areas on digital mammograms were measured using a computer-assisted thresholding technique (Cumulus). We carried out an analysis using the conditional logistic regression model with adjustment for covariates. An increase by 1 SD in age and BMI-adjusted absolute dense area and percentage dense area was associated with a 1.15-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.29) and 1.20-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.37) increased risk of breast cancer, respectively. These associations were stronger for premenopausal disease (P=0.07 and 0.01, respectively) and for disease diagnosed before age 50 (P=0.07 and 0.02, respectively) than for postmenopausal disease (P=0.16 and 0.23, respectively) or later onset disease (P=0.10 and 0.10, respectively). There was no difference in the associations with premenopausal versus postmenopausal and early-onset versus late-onset disease. After adjusting for age and BMI, both a greater absolute dense area and a greater percentage dense area were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, particularly at a young age.

  5. Multiple metabolic risk factors and mammographic breast density

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Reynolds, Diane; Fan, Xiaozhou; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Engmann, Natalie J.; Flom, Julie D.; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether obesity and a history of diabetes, hypertension, and elevated cholesterol, individually and in combination, are associated with breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Methods We measured percent density and dense area using a computer-assisted method (n=191; age range=40-61 years). We used linear regression models to examine the associations of each metabolic condition and the number of metabolic conditions (0, 1, 2, and 3 or 4 conditions) with breast density. Results Among individual metabolic conditions, only high blood cholesterol was inversely associated with percent density (β=-5.4, 95% CI: -8.5, -2.2) and dense area (β= -6.7, 95% CI=-11.1, -2.4). Having multiple metabolic conditions was also associated with lower breast density, with 2 conditions and 3 or 4 conditions vs. 0 conditions associated with 6.4% (95% CI:-11.2, -1.6) and 7.4% (95% CI:-12.9, -1.9) reduction in percent density and with 6.5 cm2 (95% CI: -13.1, -0.1) and 9.5 cm2 (95% CI: -17.1, -1.9) smaller dense area. Conclusions A history of high blood cholesterol and multiple metabolic conditions were associated with lower relative and absolute measures of breast density. The positive association between metabolic abnormalities and breast cancer risk may be driven by pathways unrelated to mammographic breast density. PMID:24698111

  6. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  7. A Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe for lipid droplets and its application in image-based high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunha; Lee, Sanghee; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-02-25

    We developed a novel fluorescent bioprobe (SF44) that can specifically visualize the cellular lipid droplets in in vitro and in vivo systems and illustrated the mechanistic rationale of its fluorogenic property. Its application to image-based high throughput screening led us to the identification of a new small-molecule modulator of lipid droplet formation.

  8. Bioreactor System Using Noninvasive Imaging and Mechanical Stretch for Biomaterial Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Jonathan A.; Leisk, Gary G.; Cardwell, Robyn S.; Fernandes, Alexander P.; House, Michael; Ward, Andrew; Dorfmann, A. Luis; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Screening biomaterial and tissue systems in vitro, for guidance of performance in vivo, remains a major requirement in the field of tissue engineering. It is critical to understand how culture stimulation affects both tissue construct maturation and function, with the goal of eliminating resource-intensive trial-and-error screening and better matching specifications for various in vivo needs. We present a multifunctional and robust bioreactor design that addresses this need. The design enables a range of mechanical inputs, durations, and frequencies to be applied in coordination with noninvasive optical assessments. A variety of biomaterial systems, including micro- and nano-fiber and porous sponge biomaterials, as well as cell-laden tissue engineering constructs were used in validation studies in order to demonstrate the versatility and utility of this new bioreactor design. The silk-based biomaterials highlighted in these studies offered several unique optical signatures for use in label-free nondestructive imaging that allowed for sequential profiling. Both short- and long-term culture studies were conducted to evaluate several practical scenarios of usage: on a short-term basis, we demonstrate that construct cellularity can be monitored by usage of nonpermanent dyes; on a more long-term basis, we show that cell ingrowth can be monitored by GFP-labeling and construct integrity probed with concurrent load/displacement data. The ability to nondestructively track cells, biomaterials, and new matrix formation without harvesting designated samples at each time point will lead to less resource-intensive studies and should enhance our understanding and the discovery of biomaterial designs related to functional tissue engineering. PMID:21298345

  9. Does sensitivity measured from screening test-sets predict clinical performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Ryan, John; Hung, Wai Tak; Thompson, Graham J.; Heard, Rob; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2014-03-01

    Aim: To examine the relationship between sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set and clinical performance. Background: Although the UK and Australia national breast screening programs have regarded PERFORMS and BREAST test-set strategies as possible methods of estimating readers' clinical efficacy, the relationship between test-set and real life performance results has never been satisfactorily understood. Methods: Forty-one radiologists from BreastScreen New South Wales participated in this study. Each reader interpreted a BREAST test-set which comprised sixty de-identified mammographic examinations sourced from the BreastScreen Digital Imaging Library. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to compare the sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set with screen readers' clinical audit data. Results: Results shown statistically significant positive moderate correlations between test-set sensitivity and each of the following metrics: rate of invasive cancer per 10 000 reads (r=0.495; p < 0.01); rate of small invasive cancer per 10 000 reads (r=0.546; p < 0.001); detection rate of all invasive cancers and DCIS per 10 000 reads (r=0.444; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Comparison between sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set and real life detection rate demonstrated statistically significant positive moderate correlations which validated that such test-set strategies can reflect readers' clinical performance and be used as a quality assurance tool. The strength of correlation demonstrated in this study was higher than previously found by others.

  10. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  11. Potential of near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging for screening of farm feed contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Paliwal, Jitendra

    2005-09-01

    With the outbreak of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) (commonly known as mad cow disease) in 1987 in the United Kingdom and a recent case discovered in Alberta, more and more emphasis is placed on food and farm feed quality and safety issues internationally. The disease is believed to be spread through farm feed contamination by animal byproducts in the form of meat-and-bone-meal (MBM). The paper reviewed the available techniques necessary to the enforcement of legislation concerning the feed safety issues. The standard microscopy method, although highly sensitive, is laborious and costly. A method to routinely screen farm feed contamination certainly helps to reduce the complexity of safety inspection. A hyperspectral imaging system working in the near-infrared wavelength region of 1100-1600 nm was used to study the possibility of detection of ground broiler feed contamination by ground pork. Hyperspectral images of raw broiler feed, ground broiler feed, ground pork, and contaminated feed samples were acquired. Raw broiler feed samples were found to possess comparatively large spectral variations due to light scattering effect. Ground feed adulterated with 1%, 3%, 5%, and 10% of ground pork was tested to identify feed contamination. Discriminant analysis using Mahalanobis distance showed that the model trained using pure ground feed samples and pure ground pork samples resulted in 100% false negative errors for all test replicates of contaminated samples. A discriminant model trained with pure ground feed samples and 10% contamination level samples resulted in 12.5% false positive error and 0% false negative error.

  12. A new CAD approach for improving efficacy of cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Qian, Wei; Li, Lihua; Pu, Jiantao; Kang, Yan; Lure, Fleming; Tan, Maxine; Qiu, Yuchen

    2015-03-01

    Since performance and clinical utility of current computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of detecting and classifying soft tissue lesions (e.g., breast masses and lung nodules) is not satisfactory, many researchers in CAD field call for new CAD research ideas and approaches. The purpose of presenting this opinion paper is to share our vision and stimulate more discussions of how to overcome or compensate the limitation of current lesion-detection based CAD schemes in the CAD research community. Since based on our observation that analyzing global image information plays an important role in radiologists' decision making, we hypothesized that using the targeted quantitative image features computed from global images could also provide highly discriminatory power, which are supplementary to the lesion-based information. To test our hypothesis, we recently performed a number of independent studies. Based on our published preliminary study results, we demonstrated that global mammographic image features and background parenchymal enhancement of breast MR images carried useful information to (1) predict near-term breast cancer risk based on negative screening mammograms, (2) distinguish between true- and false-positive recalls in mammography screening examinations, and (3) classify between malignant and benign breast MR examinations. The global case-based CAD scheme only warns a risk level of the cases without cueing a large number of false-positive lesions. It can also be applied to guide lesion-based CAD cueing to reduce false-positives but enhance clinically relevant true-positive cueing. However, before such a new CAD approach is clinically acceptable, more work is needed to optimize not only the scheme performance but also how to integrate with lesion-based CAD schemes in the clinical practice.

  13. Association between the Adherence to the International Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Adela; Prieto, Leandro; Ederra, María; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Vidal, Carmen; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Pedraz, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Lope, Virginia; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density (MD) is considered a strong predictor of Breast Cancer (BC). The objective of the present study is to explore the association between MD and the compliance with the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations for cancer prevention. Methods Data of 3584 women attending screening from a population-based multicenter cross-sectional study (DDM-Spain) collected from October 7, 2007 through July 14, 2008, was used to calculate a score that measures the level of compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations: R1)Maintain adequate body weight; R2)Be physically active; 3R)Limit the intake of high density foods; R4)Eat mostly plant foods; R5)Limit the intake of animal foods; R6)Limit alcohol intake; R7)Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; R8)Meet nutritional needs through diet. The association between the score and MD (assessed by a single radiologist using a semi-quantitative scale) was evaluated using ordinal logistic models with random center-specific intercepts adjusted for the main determinants of MD. Stratified analyses by menopausal status and smoking status were also carried out. Results A higher compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with lower MD (OR1-unit increase = 0.93 95%CI:0.86;0.99). The association was stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.91 95%CI:0.84;0.99) and nonsmokers (OR = 0.87;95%CI:0.80;0.96 for nonsmokers, OR = 1.01 95%CI:0.91;1.12 for smokers, P-interaction = 0.042). Among nonsmokers, maintaining adequate body weight (OR = 0.81 95%CI:0.65;1.01), practicing physical activity (OR = 0.68 95%CI:0.48;0.96) and moderating the intake of high-density foods (OR = 0.58 95%CI:0.40;0.86) and alcoholic beverages (OR = 0.76 95%CI:0.55;1.05) were the recommendations showing the strongest associations with MD. Conclusions postmenopausal women and non-smokers with greater compliance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines have lower MD. These results may

  14. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development.

  15. A single-cell imaging screen reveals multiple effects of secreted small molecules on bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Salje, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria cells exist in close proximity to other cells of both the same and different species. Bacteria secrete a large number of different chemical species, and the local concentrations of these compounds at the surfaces of nearby cells may reach very high levels. It is fascinating to imagine how individual cells might sense and respond to the complex mix of signals at their surface. However, it is difficult to measure exactly what the local environmental composition looks like, or what the effects of individual compounds on nearby cells are. Here, an electron microscopy imaging screen was designed that would detect morphological changes induced by secreted small molecules. This differs from conventional approaches by detecting structural changes in individual cells rather than gene expression or growth rate changes at the population level. For example, one of the changes detected here was an increase in outer membrane vesicle production, which does not necessarily correspond to a change in gene expression. This initial study focussed on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Burkholderia dolosa, and revealed an intriguing range of effects of secreted small molecules on cells both within and between species. PMID:24910069

  16. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection

    PubMed Central

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development. PMID:25514497

  17. Current and Future Clinical Applications for Optical Imaging of Cancer: From Intraoperative Surgical Guidance to Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Jiang, Huabei; Roberts, David W.; Yang, Lily

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging is an inexpensive, fast, and sensitive imaging approach for the non-invasive detection of human cancers in locations that are accessible by an optical imaging device. Light is used to probe cellular and molecular function in the context of cancer in the living body. Recent advances in the development of optical instrumentation make it possible to detect optical signals produced at a tissue depth of several centimeters. The optical signals can be endogenous contrasts that capture the heterogeneity and biological status of different tissues including tumors, or extrinsic optical contrasts that selectively accumulate in tumors to be imaged after local or systemic delivery. The use of optical imaging is now being applied in the clinic and operating room for the localization and resection of malignant tumors in addition to screening for cancer. PMID:21362519

  18. Breast cancer screening: controversy of impact.

    PubMed

    Berry, Donald A

    2013-08-01

    Few medical issues have been as controversial--or as political, at least in the United States-as the role of mammographic screening for breast cancer. The advantages of finding a cancer early seem obvious. Indeed, randomized trials evaluating screening mammography demonstrate a reduction in breast cancer mortality, but the benefits are less than one would hope. Moreover, the randomized trials are themselves subject to criticism, including that they are irrelevant in the modern era because most were conducted before chemotherapy and hormonal therapy became widely used. In this article I chronicle the evidence and controversies regarding mammographic screening, including attempts to assess the relative contributions of screening and therapy in the substantial decreases in breast cancer mortality that have been observed in many countries over the last 20-25 years. I emphasize the trade-off between harms and benefits depending on the woman's age and other risk factors. I also discuss ways for communicating the associated risks to women who have to decide whether screening (and what screening strategy) is right for them.

  19. Breast cancer screening with imaging: recommendations from the Society of Breast Imaging and the ACR on the use of mammography, breast MRI, breast ultrasound, and other technologies for the detection of clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol H; Dershaw, D David; Kopans, Daniel; Evans, Phil; Monsees, Barbara; Monticciolo, Debra; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence; Berg, Wendie; Feig, Stephen; Hendrick, Edward; Mendelson, Ellen; D'Orsi, Carl; Sickles, Edward; Burhenne, Linda Warren

    2010-01-01

    Screening for breast cancer with mammography has been shown to decrease mortality from breast cancer, and mammography is the mainstay of screening for clinically occult disease. Mammography, however, has well-recognized limitations, and recently, other imaging including ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have been used as adjunctive screening tools, mainly for women who may be at increased risk for the development of breast cancer. The Society of Breast Imaging and the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR are issuing these recommendations to provide guidance to patients and clinicians on the use of imaging to screen for breast cancer. Wherever possible, the recommendations are based on available evidence. Where evidence is lacking, the recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the fellows and executive committee of the Society of Breast Imaging and the members of the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR.

  20. Readability of cervical spine imaging: digital versus film/screen radiographs.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Silver, D I; Tarver, R D; Braunstein, E M

    1990-01-01

    In 109 trauma patients, both film/screen and digital lateral cervical spine radiographs were obtained. These films were compared for adequate visualization ("readability") of bone, soft tissue, and airway, and lowest visualized cervical vertebra. With viewbox alone, digital adequately demonstrated bone, soft tissue, and airway more often than film/screen. With a hotlight, there was no significant difference between digital and film/screen in adequately demonstrating bone, but for soft tissue and airway definition, digital was significantly better. There was less interobserver and intraobserver variation on digital than in film/screen. There was no significant difference in lowest vertebra identified.

  1. Thermography--a feasible method for screening breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Kolarić, Darko; Herceg, Zeljko; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Ramljak, Vesna; Kulis, Tomislav; Holjevac, Jadranka Katancić; Deutsch, Judith A; Antonini, Svetlana

    2013-06-01

    Potential use of thermography for more effective detection of breast carcinoma was evaluated on 26 patients scheduled for breast carcinoma surgery. Ultrasonographic scan, mammography and thermography were performed at the University Hospital for Tumors. Thermographic imaging was performed using a new generation of digital thermal cameras with high sensitivity and resolution (ThermoTracer TH7102WL, NEC). Five images for each patient were recorded: front, right semi-oblique, right oblique, left- semi oblique and left oblique. While mammography detected 31 changes in 26 patients, thermography was more sensitive and detected 6 more changes in the same patients. All 37 changes were subjected to the cytological analysis and it was found that 16 of samples were malignant, 8 were suspected malignant and 11 were benign with atypia or proliferation while only 2 samples had benign findings. The pathohistological method (PHD) recorded 75.75% malignant changes within the total number of samples. Statistical analysis of the data has shown a probability of a correct mammographic finding in 85% of the cases (sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 84%) and a probability of a correct thermographic finding in 92% of the cases (sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 79%). As breast cancer remains the most prevalent cancer in women and thermography exhibited superior sensitivity, we believe that thermography should immediately find its place in the screening programs for early detection of breast carcinoma, in order to reduce the sufferings from this devastating disease.

  2. An Image-Based High-Content Screening Assay for Compounds Targeting Intracellular Leishmania donovani Amastigotes in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gyongseon; Lee, Changbok; Moon, Hong Kee; Chatelain, Eric; Genovesio, Auguste; Cechetto, Jonathan; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a tropical disease threatening 350 million people from endemic regions. The available drugs for treatment are inadequate, with limitations such as serious side effects, parasite resistance or high cost. Driven by this need for new drugs, we developed a high-content, high-throughput image-based screening assay targeting the intracellular amastigote stage of different species of Leishmania in infected human macrophages. The in vitro infection protocol was adapted to a 384-well-plate format, enabling acquisition of a large amount of readouts by automated confocal microscopy. The reading method was based on DNA staining and required the development of a customized algorithm to analyze the images, which enabled the use of non-modified parasites. The automated analysis generated parameters used to quantify compound activity, including infection ratio as well as the number of intracellular amastigote parasites and yielded cytotoxicity information based on the number of host cells. Comparison of this assay with one that used the promastigote form to screen 26,500 compounds showed that 50% of the hits selected against the intracellular amastigote were not selected in the promastigote screening. These data corroborate the idea that the intracellular amastigote form of the parasite is the most appropriate to be used in primary screening assay for Leishmania. PMID:22720099

  3. A multi-image approach to CADx of breast cancer with integration into PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Matthias; Wittenberg, Thomas; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2009-02-01

    While screening mammography is accepted as the most adequate technique for the early detection of breast cancer, its low positive predictive value leads to many breast biopsies performed on benign lesions. Therefore, we have previously developed a knowledge-based system for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of mammographic lesions. It supports the radiologist in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. So far, our approach operates on the lesion level and employs the paradigm of content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Similar lesions with known diagnosis are retrieved automatically from a library of references. However, radiologists base their diagnostic decisions on additional resources, such as related mammographic projections, other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, MRI), and clinical data. Nonetheless, most CADx systems disregard the relation between the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views of conventional mammography. Therefore, we extend our approach to the full case level: (i) Multi-frame features are developed that jointly describe a lesion in different views of mammography. Taking into account the geometric relation between different images, these features can also be extracted from multi-modal data; (ii) the CADx system architecture is extended appropriately; (iii) the CADx system is integrated into the radiology information system (RIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Here, the framework for image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) is used to support access to the patient's health care record. Of particular interest is the application of the proposed CADx system to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which has the potential to succeed digital mammography as the standard technique for breast cancer screening. The proposed system is a natural extension of CADx approaches that integrate only two modalities. However, we are still collecting a large enough database of breast lesions with images from

  4. Rapid contrast evaluation method based on affinity beads and backscattered electron imaging for the screening of electron stains.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroki; Inoue, Kanako; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Park, Pyoyun; Ikeda, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl salts are toxic and radioactive; therefore, several studies have been conducted to screen for substitutes of electron stains. In this regard, the contrast evaluation process is time consuming and the results obtained are inconsistent. In this study, we developed a novel contrast evaluation method using affinity beads and a backscattered electron image (BSEI), obtained using scanning electron microscopy. The contrast ratios of BSEI in each electron stain treatment were correlated with those of transmission electron microscopic images. The affinity beads bound to cell components independently. Protein and DNA samples were enhanced by image contrast treated with electron stains; however, this was not observed for sugars. Protein-conjugated beads showed an additive effect of image contrast when double-stained with lead. However, additive effect of double staining was not observed in DNA-conjugated beads. The varying chemical properties of oligopeptides showed differences in image contrast when treated with each electron stain. This BSEI-based evaluation method not only enables screening for alternate electron stains, but also helps analyze the underlying mechanisms of electron staining of cellular structures.

  5. Development and Optimization of a Novel 384-Well Anti-Malarial Imaging Assay Validated for High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5–0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12. PMID:22232455

  6. Image information transfer properties of x-ray intensifying screens in the energy range from 17 to 320 keV.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, A; Dick, C E

    1993-01-01

    The image information transfer properties of a number of x-ray fluorescent screens have been measured for x-ray energies from 17 to 320 keV. The detective quantum efficiency of the screens at each x-ray energy has been determined by separate measurements of the x-ray absorption efficiency and the statistical factor associated with the emission of optical photons upon absorption of an incident x-ray. Data have been recorded for both rare-earth phosphor screens and calcium tungstate screens. The value of the statistical factor for optical photon emission tends toward a constant value as the incident energy increases. Comparisons of the image information transfer properties are presented for several screens, which have been measured over a ten year interval. The utility of the screens for high-energy radiography is discussed.

  7. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Lars J. Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  8. Screening of a virtual mirror-image library of natural products.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Taro; Oishi, Shinya; Honda, Kaori; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Tamio; Ohno, Hiroaki; Osada, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2016-06-08

    We established a facile access to an unexplored mirror-image library of chiral natural product derivatives using d-protein technology. In this process, two chemical syntheses of mirror-image substances including a target protein and hit compound(s) allow the lead discovery from a virtual mirror-image library without the synthesis of numerous mirror-image compounds.

  9. [Comparison of film-screen combination in a contrast detail diagram and with interactive image analysis. 1: Contrast detail diagram].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, G; Eichbaum, G

    1997-07-01

    The following three film-screen combinations were compared: a) a combination of anticrossover film and UV-light emitting screens, b) a combination of blue-light emitting screens and film, and c) a conventional green fluorescing screen film combination. Radiographs of a specially designed plexiglass phantom (0.2 x 0.2 x 0.12 m3) were obtained that contained bar patterns of lead and plaster (calcium sulfate) to test high and intermediate contrast resolution and bar patterns of air to test low contrast resolution, respectively. An aluminum step wedge was integrated to evaluate dose-density curves of the radiographs. The dose values for the various step thicknesses were measured as percentage of the dose value in air for 60, 81, and 117 kV. Exposure conditions were the following: 12 pulse generator, 0.6 mm focus size, 4.7 mm aluminum prefilter, a grid with 40 lines/cm (12:1), and a focus-detector distance of 1.15 m. The thresholds of visible bars of the various pattern materials were assessed by seven radiologists, one technician, and the authors. The resulting contrast detail diagram could not prove any significant differences between the three tested screen film combinations. The pairwise comparison, however, found 8 of the 18 paired differences to be statistically significant between the conventional and the two new screen-film combinations. The authors concluded that subjective visual assessment of the threshold in a contrast detail study alone is of only limited value to grade image quality if no well-defined criteria are used (BIR report 20 [1989] 137-139). The statistical approach of paired differences of the estimated means appeared to be more appropriate.

  10. XRIndex: a brief screening tool for individual differences in security threat detection in x-ray images

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Elena; Ferri, Francesca; Viding, Essi; Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging is a cost-effective technique at security checkpoints that typically require the presence of human operators. We have previously shown that self-reported attention to detail can predict threat detection performance with small-vehicle x-ray images (Rusconi et al., 2012). Here, we provide evidence for the generality of such a link by having a large sample of naïve participants screen more typical dual-energy x-ray images of hand luggage. The results show that the Attention to Detail score from the autism-spectrum quotient (AQ) questionnaire (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001) is a linear predictor of threat detection accuracy. We then develop and fine-tune a novel self-report scale for security screening: the XRIndex, which improves on the Attention to Detail scale for predictive power and opacity to interpretation. The XRIndex is not redundant with any of the Big Five personality traits. We validate the XRIndex against security x-ray images with an independent sample of untrained participants and suggest that the XRIndex may be a useful aid for the identification of suitable candidates for professional security training with a focus on x-ray threat detection. Further studies are needed to determine whether this can also apply to trained professionals. PMID:26321935

  11. XRIndex: a brief screening tool for individual differences in security threat detection in x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Ferri, Francesca; Viding, Essi; Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging is a cost-effective technique at security checkpoints that typically require the presence of human operators. We have previously shown that self-reported attention to detail can predict threat detection performance with small-vehicle x-ray images (Rusconi et al., 2012). Here, we provide evidence for the generality of such a link by having a large sample of naïve participants screen more typical dual-energy x-ray images of hand luggage. The results show that the Attention to Detail score from the autism-spectrum quotient (AQ) questionnaire (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001) is a linear predictor of threat detection accuracy. We then develop and fine-tune a novel self-report scale for security screening: the XRIndex, which improves on the Attention to Detail scale for predictive power and opacity to interpretation. The XRIndex is not redundant with any of the Big Five personality traits. We validate the XRIndex against security x-ray images with an independent sample of untrained participants and suggest that the XRIndex may be a useful aid for the identification of suitable candidates for professional security training with a focus on x-ray threat detection. Further studies are needed to determine whether this can also apply to trained professionals.

  12. Paired image- and FACS-based toxicity assays for high content screening of spheroid-type tumor cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Trumpi, Kari; Egan, David A; Vellinga, Thomas T; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kranenburg, Onno

    2015-01-01

    Novel spheroid-type tumor cell cultures directly isolated from patients' tumors preserve tumor characteristics better than traditionally grown cell lines. However, such cultures are not generally used for high-throughput toxicity drug screens. In addition, the assays that are commonly used to assess drug-induced toxicity in such screens usually measure a proxy for cell viability such as mitochondrial activity or ATP-content per culture well, rather than actual cell death. This generates considerable assay-dependent differences in the measured toxicity values. To address this problem we developed a robust method that documents drug-induced toxicity on a per-cell, rather than on a per-well basis. The method involves automated drug dispensing followed by paired image- and FACS-based analysis of cell death and cell cycle changes. We show that the two methods generate toxicity data in 96-well format which are highly concordant. By contrast, the concordance of these methods with frequently used well-based assays was generally poor. The reported method can be implemented on standard automated microscopes and provides a low-cost approach for accurate and reproducible high-throughput toxicity screens in spheroid type cell cultures. Furthermore, the high versatility of both the imaging and FACS platforms allows straightforward adaptation of the high-throughput experimental setup to include fluorescence-based measurement of additional cell biological parameters.

  13. Fabrication of Large-Scale Microlens Arrays Based on Screen Printing for Integral Imaging 3D Display.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiongtu; Peng, Yuyan; Peng, Rong; Zeng, Xiangyao; Zhang, Yong-Ai; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-09-14

    The low-cost large-scale fabrication of microlens arrays (MLAs) with precise alignment, great uniformity of focusing, and good converging performance are of great importance for integral imaging 3D display. In this work, a simple and effective method for large-scale polymer microlens arrays using screen printing has been successfully presented. The results show that the MLAs possess high-quality surface morphology and excellent optical performances. Furthermore, the microlens' shape and size, i.e., the diameter, the height, and the distance between two adjacent microlenses of the MLAs can be easily controlled by modifying the reflowing time and the size of open apertures of the screen. MLAs with the neighboring microlenses almost tangent can be achieved under suitable size of open apertures of the screen and reflowing time, which can remarkably reduce the color moiré patterns caused by the stray light between the blank areas of the MLAs in the integral imaging 3D display system, exhibiting much better reconstruction performance.

  14. Remote Patient Management in a Mammographic Screening Environment in Underserved Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    year (2005). Published reports acknowledging this award, to date, Include: 13 1. Zheng B, Ganott MA, Britton CA, Hakim CM, Hardesty LA, Chang TS...Leader JK, Sumkin JH, Drescher JM, Maitz GS, Zheng B, Wallace L, Hakim C, Hertzberg TM, Hardesty L, Shah R, Clearfield R, Sneddon C, Lindeman S...Hertzberg TM, Hardesty LA, Sumkin JH, Cohen C, Sneddon C, Lindeman S, Craig D, and Drescher JM. Preliminary clinical evaluation of a multi-site

  15. Association Between Time Spent Interpreting, Level of Confidence and Accuracy of Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Bogart, Andy; Geller, Berta M.; Haneuse, Sebastian; Kerlikowske, Karla; Buist, Diana SM; Smith, Robert; Rosenberg, Robert; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Onega, Tracy; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of time spent viewing images and level of confidence on a screening mammography test set on interpretive performance. Materials and Methods Radiologists from six mammography registries participated in the study and were randomized to interpret one of four test sets and complete 12 survey questions. Each test set had 109 cases of digitized four-view screening film-screen mammograms with prior comparison screening views. Viewing time for each case was defined as the cumulative time spent viewing all mammographic images before recording which visible feature, if any, was the “most significant finding”. Log-linear regression fit via GEE was used to test the effect of viewing time and level of confidence in the interpretation on test set sensitivity and false-positive rate. Results 119 radiologists completed a test set and contributed data on 11,484 interpretations. Radiologists spent more time viewing cases that had significant findings or for which they had less confidence in interpretation. Each additional minute of viewing time increased the probability of a true positive interpretation among cancer cases by 1.12 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.19, p<0.001), regardless of confidence in the assessment. Among radiologists who were ‘very confident’ in their assessment, each additional minute of viewing time increased the adjusted risk of a false positive interpretation among non-cancer cases by 1.42 (95% CI 1.21, 1.68), and this viewing-time effect diminished with decreasing confidence. Conclusions Longer interpretation times and higher levels of confidence in the interpretation are both associated with higher sensitivity and false positive rates in mammography screening. PMID:22451568

  16. Randomized controlled trial of stereotactic 11-G vacuum-assisted core biopsy for the diagnosis and management of mammographic microcalcification

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Morris, Julie; Lim, Yit Y; Harake, MD Janick; Whiteside, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of 11-G vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) with 14-G core needle biopsy (CNB) to diagnose mammographic microcalcification (MM) and effect on surgical outcomes. Methods: Following ethical approval, VAB and CNB (control) were compared in a randomized prospective study for first-line diagnosis of MM and subsequent surgical outcomes in two breast-screening units. Participants gave written informed consent. Exclusions included comorbidity precluding surgery, prior ipsilateral breast cancer and lesions >40 mm requiring mastectomy as first surgical procedure. The final pathological diagnosis was compared with the initial biopsy result. Quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaires were administered at baseline, 2, 6 and 12 months. 110 participants were required to show a 25% improvement in diagnosis with VAB compared with CNB (90% power). Results: Eligibility was assessed for 787 cases; 129 females recalled from the National Health Service breast screening programme were randomized. Diagnostic accuracy of VAB was 86% and that of CNB was 84%. Using VAB, 2/14 (14.3%) cases upgraded from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasion at surgery and 3/19 (15.8%) using CNB. Following VAB 7/16 (44%) cases required repeat surgery vs 7/24 (29%) after CNB. Both groups recorded significant worsening of functional QOL measures and increased breast pain at follow-up. Conclusion: VAB and CNB were equally accurate at diagnosing MM, and no significant differences in surgical outcomes were observed. Advances in knowledge: The first randomized controlled study of VAB for diagnosis of microcalcification using digital mammography showed no difference in diagnostic accuracy of VAB and CNB, or in the proportion of participants needing repeat non-operative biopsy or second therapeutic operation to treat malignancy. PMID:26654214

  17. Library Synthesis, Screening, and Discovery of Modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probe for Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging. PMID:24575875

  18. ‘Function-first’ Lead Discovery: Mode of Action Profiling of Natural Product Libraries Using Image-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christopher J.; Bray, Walter M.; Woerhmann, Marcos H.; Stuart, Joshua; Lokey, R. Scott; Linington, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cytological profiling is a high-content image-based screening technology that provides insight into the mode of action (MOA) for test compounds by directly measuring hundreds of phenotypic cellular features. We have extended this recently reported technology to the mechanistic characterization of unknown natural products libraries for the direct prediction of compound MOAs at the primary screening stage. By analyzing a training set of commercial compounds of known mechanism and comparing these profiles to those obtained from natural product library members, we have successfully annotated extracts based on mode of action, dereplicated known compounds based on biological similarity to the training set, and identified and predicted the MOA of a family of new iron siderophores. Coupled with traditional analytical techniques, cytological profiling provides a new avenue for the creation of ‘function-first’ platforms for natural products discovery. PMID:23438757

  19. Sensitivity of F-106B Leading-Edge-Vortex Images to Flight and Vapor-Screen Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Johnson, Thomas D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A flight test was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center with vapor-screen and image-enhancement techniques to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about near-field vortex flows above the wings of fighter aircraft. In particular, the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on the vortex system over an angle-of-attack range were sought. The relevance of these flows stems from their present and future use at many points in the flight envelope, especially during transonic maneuvers. The aircraft used in this flight program was the F-106B because it was available and had sufficient wing sweep (60 deg) to generate a significant leading-edge vortex system. The sensitivity of the visual results to vapor screen hardware and to onset flow changes is discussed.

  20. A high-content imaging-based screening pipeline for the systematic identification of anti-progeroid compounds.

    PubMed

    Kubben, Nard; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Donegan, Megan; Li, Zhuyin; Misteli, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an early onset lethal premature aging disorder caused by constitutive production of progerin, a mutant form of the nuclear architectural protein lamin A. The presence of progerin causes extensive morphological, epigenetic and DNA damage related nuclear defects that ultimately disrupt tissue and organismal functions. Hypothesis-driven approaches focused on HGPS affected pathways have been used in attempts to identify druggable targets with anti-progeroid effects. Here, we report an unbiased discovery approach to HGPS by implementation of a high-throughput, high-content imaging based screening method that enables systematic identification of small molecules that prevent the formation of multiple progerin-induced aging defects. Screening a library of 2816 FDA approved drugs, we identified retinoids as a novel class of compounds that reverses aging defects in HGPS patient skin fibroblasts. These findings establish a novel approach to anti-progeroid drug discovery.

  1. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  2. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-01: Accuracy of Radiologists Interpretation of Mammographic Breast Density

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, S; Shi, L; Karellas, A; O’Connell, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Several commercial and non-commercial software and techniques are available for determining breast density from mammograms. However, where mandated by law the breast density information communicated to the subject/patient is based on radiologist’s interpretation of breast density from mammograms. Several studies have reported on the concordance among radiologists in interpreting mammographic breast density. In this work, we investigated the accuracy of radiologist’s interpretation of breast density. Methods: Volumetric breast density (VBD) determined from 134 unilateral dedicated breast CT scans from 134 subjects was considered the truth. An MQSA-qualified study radiologist with more than 20 years of breast imaging experience reviewed the DICOM “for presentation” standard 2-view mammograms of the corresponding breasts and assigned BIRADS breast density categories. For statistical analysis, the breast density categories were dichotomized in two ways; fatty vs. dense breasts where “fatty” corresponds to BIRADS breast density categories A/B, and “dense” corresponds to BIRADS breast density categories C/D, and extremely dense vs. fatty to heterogeneously dense breasts, where extremely dense corresponds to BIRADS breast density category D and BIRADS breast density categories A through C were grouped as fatty to heterogeneously dense breasts. Logistic regression models (SAS 9.3) were used to determine the association between radiologist’s interpretation of breast density and VBD from breast CT, from which the area under the ROC (AUC) was determined. Results: Both logistic regression models were statistically significant (Likelihood Ratio test, p<0.0001). The accuracy (AUC) of the study radiologist for classification of fatty vs. dense breasts was 88.4% (95% CI: 83–94%) and for classification of extremely dense breast was 94.3% (95% CI: 90–98%). Conclusion: The accuracy of the radiologist in classifying dense and extremely dense breasts is

  3. Ultra-wide field imaging system and traditional retinal examinations for screening fundus changes after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Hai-Ying; Lu, Wu-Yi; Zhao, Pei-Quan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the results of non-mydriatic ultra-wide field imaging system, mydriatic slit-lamp lens (Volk +90 D) and mydriatic Goldmann three-mirror contact lens examinations in screening fundus lesions among patients after cataract surgery. METHODS Non-mydriatic images were obtained with an Optomap panoramic 200Tx (Optomap 200Tx) 3d after surgery and graded by a blinded ophthalmologist. A mydriatic slit-lamp lens examination was performed by another blinded retinal specialist on the same day. A third blinded retinal specialist examined patients two weeks after surgery using a Goldmann three-mirror contact lens. RESULTS In total, 160 patients (184 eyes) were examined, and 66, 69, and 75 cases of retinal lesion(s) were identified using the Optomap 200Tx, slit-lamp lens, and Goldmann three-mirror contact lens, respectively. In 13 cases, fundus changes were sight-threatening. The results obtained by Optomap 200Tx examination and by mydriatic slit-lamp lens examination have good consistency (P=0.375, Kappa=0.942). The mydriatic Goldmann three-mirror lens examination revealed more fundus lesions but are consistent with Optomap 200Tx (P=0.004, Kappa=0.897) and mydriatic slit-lamp lens examination (P=0.031, Kappa=0.932). CONCLUSION Early post-operative fundus screening in cataract patients is extremely important and necessary to prevent further vision loss. Wide-field imaging is a feasible and convenient tool for fundus examination that can be used as a primary screening method among patients after cataract surgery. PMID:27672595

  4. High-content screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity using quantitative single cell imaging cytometry on microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Su Chul; Pal, Sukdeb; Han, Eunyoung; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-01-07

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity or cytotoxicity followed by cell death in cardiac muscle is one of the major concerns in drug development. Herein, we report a high-content quantitative multicolor single cell imaging tool for automatic screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity in an intact cell. A tunable multicolor imaging system coupled with a miniaturized sample platform was destined to elucidate drug-induced cardiotoxicity via simultaneous quantitative monitoring of intracellular sodium ion concentration, potassium ion channel permeability and apoptosis/necrosis in H9c2(2-1) cell line. Cells were treated with cisapride (a human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel blocker), digoxin (Na(+)/K(+)-pump blocker), camptothecin (anticancer agent) and a newly synthesized anti-cancer drug candidate (SH-03). Decrease in potassium channel permeability in cisapride-treated cells indicated that it can also inhibit the trafficking of the hERG channel. Digoxin treatment resulted in an increase of intracellular [Na(+)]. However, it did not affect potassium channel permeability. Camptothecin and SH-03 did not show any cytotoxic effect at normal use (≤300 nM and 10 μM, respectively). This result clearly indicates the potential of SH-03 as a new anticancer drug candidate. The developed method was also used to correlate the cell death pathway with alterations in intracellular [Na(+)]. The developed protocol can directly depict and quantitate targeted cellular responses, subsequently enabling an automated, easy to operate tool that is applicable to drug-induced cytotoxicity monitoring with special reference to next generation drug discovery screening. This multicolor imaging based system has great potential as a complementary system to the conventional patch clamp technique and flow cytometric measurement for the screening of drug cardiotoxicity.

  5. Reproductive and menstrual factors in relation to mammographic parenchymal patterns among perimenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Gram, I. T.; Funkhouser, E.; Tabar, L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between mammographic patterns and reproductive and menstrual factors was examined in 3640 Norwegian women, aged 40-56 years, participating in the Third Tromsö study conducted in 1986-87. Epidemiological data were obtained from questionnaires. The mammograms were categorised into five groups. This categorisation is based on anatomic-mammographic correlations, following three-dimensional (thick slice technique) histopathologic-mammographic comparisons, rather than simple pattern reading. Patterns 1-3 were combined into a low-risk group and patterns 4 and 5 into a high-risk group for analysis. Women who had more than four children were 90% less likely to have a high-risk pattern than nulliparous women (OR = 0.09, 95% CI 0.04-0.16) controlling for age, weight, height and menopausal status. Furthermore, those who first gave birth over 34 years of age were more than twice as likely to have a high-risk pattern than those giving birth in their teens (OR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.23-4.56) adjusting for parity. Among post-menopausal women, age at menarche was negatively (P for trend = 0.015) and late age at menopause positively (P for trend = 0.072) related to high-risk patterns. Among premenopausal women, age at menarche was positively related to high-risk patterns (P for trend = 0.001). Also, menopausal status rather than age was associated with high-risk patterns. These findings support the opinion that reproductive and menstrual factors are involved in determining the mammographic parenchymal pattern among perimenopausal women. PMID:7880753

  6. Novel method for screening of enteric film coatings properties with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dorożyński, Przemysław; Jamróz, Witold; Niwiński, Krzysztof; Kurek, Mateusz; Węglarz, Władysław P; Jachowicz, Renata; Kulinowski, Piotr

    2013-11-18

    The aim of the study is to present the concept of novel method for fast screening of enteric coating compositions properties without the need of preparation of tablets batches for fluid bed coating. Proposed method involves evaluation of enteric coated model tablets in specially designed testing cell with application of MRI technique. The results obtained in the testing cell were compared with results of dissolution studies of mini-tablets coated in fluid bed apparatus. The method could be useful in early stage of formulation development for screening of film coating properties that will shorten and simplify the development works.

  7. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  8. Live Cell Bioluminescence Imaging in Temporal Reaction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor for High-Throughput Screening and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are notable targets of basic therapeutics. Many screening methods have been established to identify novel agents for GPCR signaling in a high-throughput manner. However, information related to the temporal reaction of GPCR with specific ligands remains poor. We recently developed a bioluminescence method for the quantitative detection of the interaction between GPCR and β-arrestin using split luciferase complementation. To monitor time-course variation of the interactions, a new imaging system contributes to the accurate evaluation of drugs for GPCRs in a high-throughput manner.

  9. Subscale Ship Airwake Studies Using Novel Vortex Flow Devices with Smoke, Laser-Vapor-Screen and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Landman, Drew; Swift, Russell S.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    2007-01-01

    Ships produce vortices and air-wakes while either underway or stationary in a wind. These flow fields can be detrimental to the conduction of air operations in that they can adversely impact the air vehicles and flight crews. There are potential solutions to these problems for both frigates/destroyers and carriers through the use of novel vortex flow or flow control devices. This appendix highlights several devices which may have application and points out that traditional wind-tunnel testing using smoke, laser-vapor screen, and Particle Image Velocimetry can be useful in sorting out the effectiveness of different devices.

  10. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis of mammographic patterns in assessing breast cancer risk related to HRT treated population: a longitudinal and cross-sectional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-02-01

    Structural texture measures are used to address the aspect of breast cancer risk assessment in screening mammograms. The current study investigates whether texture properties characterized by local Fractal Dimension (FD) and Lacunarity contribute to asses breast cancer risk. FD represents the complexity while the Lacunarity characterize the gappiness of a fractal. Our cross-sectional case-control study includes mammograms of 50 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the subsequent 2-4 years and 50 matched controls. The longitudinal double blind placebo controlled HRT study includes 39 placebo and 36 HRT treated volunteers for two years. ROIs with same dimension (250*150 pixels) were created behind the nipple region on these radiographs. Box counting method was used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) and the Lacunarity. Paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated. It was found that there were no differences between cancer and control group for FD (P=0.8) and Lacunarity (P=0.8) in crosssectional study whereas earlier published heterogeneity examination of radiographs (BC-HER) breast cancer risk score separated groups (p=0.002). In the longitudinal study, FD decreased significantly (P<0.05) in the HRT treated population while Lacunarity remained insignificant (P=0.2). FD is negatively correlated to Lacunarity (-0.74, P<0.001), BIRADS (-0.34, P<0.001) and Percentage Density (-0.41, P<0.001). FD is invariant to the mammographic texture change from control to cancer population but marginally varying in HRT treated population. This study yields no evidence that lacunarity or FD are suitable surrogate markers of mammographic heterogeneity as they neither pick up breast cancer risk, nor show good sensitivity to HRT.

  11. Stereoscopic uncooled thermal imaging with autostereoscopic 3D flat-screen display in military driving enhancement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, H.; Münzberg, M.; Schwarzkopf, U.; de la Barré, R.; Jurk, S.; Duckstein, B.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal cameras are widely used in driver vision enhancement systems. However, in pathless terrain, driving becomes challenging without having a stereoscopic perception. Stereoscopic imaging is a well-known technique already for a long time with understood physical and physiological parameters. Recently, a commercial hype has been observed, especially in display techniques. The commercial market is already flooded with systems based on goggle-aided 3D-viewing techniques. However, their use is limited for military applications since goggles are not accepted by military users for several reasons. The proposed uncooled thermal imaging stereoscopic camera with a geometrical resolution of 640x480 pixel perfectly fits to the autostereoscopic display with a 1280x768 pixels. An eye tracker detects the position of the observer's eyes and computes the pixel positions for the left and the right eye. The pixels of the flat panel are located directly behind a slanted lenticular screen and the computed thermal images are projected into the left and the right eye of the observer. This allows a stereoscopic perception of the thermal image without any viewing aids. The complete system including camera and display is ruggedized. The paper discusses the interface and performance requirements for the thermal imager as well as for the display.

  12. Automated grid handling and image acquisition for two-dimensional crystal screening.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Anchi

    2013-01-01

    Routine large-scale two-dimensional (2D) crystallization trials are good candidates for automation. For imaging the large number of grids prepared from 2D crystallization trials, a two-pass imaging protocol using Leginon and a grid handling robot is described. A manual target selection bridges the two imaging passes. The two passes can be combined into one if objects of interests at different stages of trials can be reliably found using automated methods.

  13. Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    cases in the context of resident training: preliminary experimental data” submitted and accepted to SPIE Medical Imaging 2013 conference. 2012...extended abstract) accepted for oral presentation at SPIE Medical Imaging : o M. A. Mazurowski, J. Zhang, J. Y. Lo, C. M. Kuzmiak, S. V. Ghate, S. Yoon...experiments’, SPIE Medical Imaging 2014, in press  Oral presentation given at SPIE Medical Imaging 2013: o M. A. Mazurowski, ‘Difficulty of mammographic

  14. Real-time terahertz imaging of nonmetallic objects for security screening and anti-counterfeiting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnken, Barry N.; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2008-10-01

    We report the use of a 160×120 pixel microbolometer camera, under illumination by a milliwatt-scale 3.6 THz quantum cascade laser, for real-time imaging of materials which are exclusively nonmetallic in character. By minimizing diffraction effects suffered by the camera system and operating the laser at bias currents approaching saturation values, an imaging scheme was developed in which overlapping samples of nonmetallic materials can be imaged with high fidelity and long persistence times. Furthermore, an examination of various security features embedded within domestic and foreign currency notes suggests that this imaging scheme could serve a future role in detection of assorted counterfeiting practices.

  15. FRET-based calcium imaging: a tool for high-throughput/content phenotypic drug screening in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Honarnejad, Kamran; Kirsch, Achim K; Daschner, Alexander; Szybinska, Aleksandra; Kuznicki, Jacek; Herms, Jochen

    2013-12-01

    Perturbed intracellular store calcium homeostasis is suggested to play a major role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). A number of mechanisms have been suggested to underlie the impairment of endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis associated with familial AD-linked presenilin 1 mutations (FAD-PS1). Without aiming at specifically targeting any of those pathophysiological mechanisms in particular, we rather performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify compounds that can reverse the exaggerated agonist-evoked endoplasmic reticulum calcium release phenotype in HEK293 cells expressing FAD-PS1. For that purpose, we developed a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based calcium indicator at single-cell resolution. This novel robust assay offers a number of advantages compared with the conventional calcium measurement screening technologies. The assay was employed in a large-scale screen with a library of diverse compounds comprising 20,000 low-molecular-weight molecules, which resulted in the identification of 52 primary hits and 4 lead structures. In a secondary assay, several hits were found to alter the amyloid β (Aβ) production. In view of the recent failure of AD drug candidates identified by target-based approaches, such a phenotypic drug discovery paradigm may present an attractive alternative for the identification of novel AD therapeutics.

  16. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  17. Improvement of mammographic lesion detection by fusion of information from different views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquerault, Sophie; Petrick, Nicholas; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman

    2001-07-01

    In screening mammography, two standard views, craniocaudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO), are commonly taken, and radiologists use information from the two views for lesion detection and diagnosis. Current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are designed to detect lesions on each view separately. We are developing a CAD method that utilizes information from the two views to reduce false-positives (FPs). Our two-view detection scheme consists of two main stages, a one-view pre-screening stage and a two-view correspondence stage. The one-view and two-view scores are then fused to estimate the likelihood that an object is a true mass. In this study, we analyzed the effectiveness of the proposed fusion scheme for FP reduction and its dependence on the number of objects per image in the pre-screening stage. The preliminary results demonstrate that the fusion of information from the CC and MLO views significantly reduced the FP rate in comparison to the one-view scheme. When the pre-screening stage produced 10 objects per image, the two-view fusion technique reduced the FP rate from an average of 2.1 FPs/image in our current one-view CAD scheme to 1.2 FPs/image at a sensitivity of 80%. The results also indicate that the improvement in the detection accuracy was essentially independent of the number of initial objects per image obtained at the pre-screening stage for this data set.

  18. Obstetric history and mammographic density: a population-based cross-sectional study in Spain (DDM-Spain).

    PubMed

    Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, María Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Laso, Maria Soledad; Ederra, Maria; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; González-Román, Isabel; García-López, Milagros; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Peris, Mercé; Moreno, María Pilar; Vázquez-Carrete, Jose Antonio; Collado, Francisca; Aragonés, Nuria; Pollán, Marina

    2012-04-01

    High mammographic density (MD) is used as a phenotype risk marker for developing breast cancer. During pregnancy and lactation the breast attains full development, with a cellular-proliferation followed by a lobular-differentiation stage. This study investigates the influence of obstetric factors on MD among pre- and post-menopausal women. We enrolled 3,574 women aged 45-68 years who were participating in breast cancer screening programmes in seven screening centers. To measure MD, blind anonymous readings were taken by an experienced radiologist, using craniocaudal mammography and Boyd's semiquantitative scale. Demographic and reproductive data were directly surveyed by purpose-trained staff at the date of screening. The association between MD and obstetric variables was quantified by ordinal logistic regression, with screening centre introduced as a random effect term. We adjusted for age, number of children and body mass index, and stratified by menopausal status. Parity was inversely associated with density, the probability of having high MD decreased by 16% for each new birth (P value < 0.001). Among parous women, a positive association was detected with duration of lactation [>9 months: odds ratio (OR) = 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.72] and weight of first child (>3,500 g: OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.12-1.54). Age at first birth showed a different effect in pre- and post-menopausal women (P value for interaction = 0.030). No association was found among pre-menopausal women. However, in post-menopausal women the probability of having high MD increased in women who had their first child after the age of 30 (OR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.17-2.00). A higher risk associated with birth of twins was also mainly observed in post-menopausal women (OR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.18-3.46). Our study shows a greater prevalence of high MD in mothers of advanced age at first birth, those who had twins, those who have breastfed for longer periods, and mothers whose first child had

  19. Label-free cardiac contractility monitoring for drug screening applications based on compact high-speed lens-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwelyn, Thomas; Reumers, Veerle; Vanmeerbeeck, Geert; Stahl, Richard; Janssens, Stefan; Lagae, Liesbet; Braeken, Dries; Lambrechts, Andy

    2015-03-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the major cause of drug withdrawal from the market, despite rigorous toxicity testing during the drug development process. Existing safety screening techniques, some of which are based on simplified cellular assays, others on electrical (impedance) or optical (fluorescent microscopy) measurements, are either too limited in throughput or offer too poor predictability of toxicity to be applied on large numbers of compounds in the early stage of drug development. We present a compact optical system for direct (label-free) monitoring of fast cellular movements that enable low cost and high throughput drug screening. Our system is based on a high-speed lens-free in-line holographic microscope. When compared to a conventional microscope, the system can combine adequate imaging resolution (5.5 μm pixel pitch) with a large field-of-view (63.4 mm2) and high speed (170 fps) to capture physical cell motion in real-time. This combination enables registration of cardiac contractility parameters such as cell contraction frequency, total duration, and rate and duration of both contraction and relaxation. The system also quantifies conduction velocity, which is challenging in existing techniques. Additionally, to complement the imaging hardware we have developed image processing software that extracts all the contractility parameters directly from the raw interference images. The system was tested with varying concentration of the drug verapamil and at 100 nM, showed a decrease in: contraction frequency (-23.3% +/- 13%), total duration (-21% +/- 5%), contraction duration (-19% +/- 6%) and relaxation duration (-21% +/- 8%). Moreover, contraction displacement ceased at higher concentrations.

  20. HCS-Neurons: identifying phenotypic changes in multi-neuron images upon drug treatments of high-content screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-content screening (HCS) has become a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, the discovery of drugs targeting neurons is still hampered by the inability to accurately identify and quantify the phenotypic changes of multiple neurons in a single image (named multi-neuron image) of a high-content screen. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an automated image analysis method for analyzing multi-neuron images. Results We propose an automated analysis method with novel descriptors of neuromorphology features for analyzing HCS-based multi-neuron images, called HCS-neurons. To observe multiple phenotypic changes of neurons, we propose two kinds of descriptors which are neuron feature descriptor (NFD) of 13 neuromorphology features, e.g., neurite length, and generic feature descriptors (GFDs), e.g., Haralick texture. HCS-neurons can 1) automatically extract all quantitative phenotype features in both NFD and GFDs, 2) identify statistically significant phenotypic changes upon drug treatments using ANOVA and regression analysis, and 3) generate an accurate classifier to group neurons treated by different drug concentrations using support vector machine and an intelligent feature selection method. To evaluate HCS-neurons, we treated P19 neurons with nocodazole (a microtubule depolymerizing drug which has been shown to impair neurite development) at six concentrations ranging from 0 to 1000 ng/mL. The experimental results show that all the 13 features of NFD have statistically significant difference with respect to changes in various levels of nocodazole drug concentrations (NDC) and the phenotypic changes of neurites were consistent to the known effect of nocodazole in promoting neurite retraction. Three identified features, total neurite length, average neurite length, and average neurite area were able to achieve an independent test accuracy of 90.28% for the six-dosage classification problem. This NFD module and neuron image datasets are provided as a

  1. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in the range of 102–2865 wavenumber from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants eac...

  2. Mammographic Breast Density in a Cohort of Medically Underserved Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    standardized body measures; weight, height, skinfold thickness, and waist and hip circumference (months 7-42). 3d. Collect blood samples and transport to...thresholding program in premenopausal and postmenopausal women combined. This association disappeared after adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and waist ...obtained, women provided a fasting blood sample, underwent body measurements (height, weight, waist , hips, percent body fat) and a digital screening

  3. Monochrome Image Presentation and Segmentation Based on the Pseudo-Color and PCT Transformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    image classification and pattern recognition, and has received extensive attention in medical image such as MRI brain image segmentation [6]. FCM is...in pseudo color image segmentation, and comparisons were made using mammograph and MRI brain images. Finally, an image edge detection has also been...methods. (a) MRI T1 image; (b) MRI T2 image; (c) PCT- guided segmentation; (d) FCM -based segmentation (NK=4, NC=2). D. Edge detection in MRI image It

  4. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  5. Electro- and photoluminescence imaging as fast screening technique of the layer uniformity and device degradation in planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soufiani, Arman Mahboubi; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Meyer, Steffen; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Sung Yun, Jae; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Spiccia, Leone; Green, Martin A.; Hameiri, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we provide insights into planar structure methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells (PSCs) using electroluminescence and photoluminescence imaging techniques. We demonstrate the strength of these techniques in screening relatively large area PSCs, correlating the solar cell electrical parameters to the images and visualizing the features which contribute to the variation of the parameters extracted from current density-voltage characterizations. It is further used to investigate one of the major concerns about perovskite solar cells, their long term stability and aging. Upon storage under dark in dry glovebox condition for more than two months, the major parameter found to have deteriorated in electrical performance measurements was the fill factor; this was elucidated via electroluminescence image comparisons which revealed that the contacts' quality degrades. Interestingly, by deploying electroluminescence imaging, the significance of having a pin-hole free active layer is demonstrated. Pin-holes can grow over time and can cause degradation of the active layer surrounding them.

  6. Collection of sequential imaging events for research in breast cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Young, K.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the huge amount of research involving medical images, there is a widely accepted need for comprehensive collections of medical images to be made available for research. This demand led to the design and implementation of a flexible image repository, which retrospectively collects images and data from multiple sites throughout the UK. The OPTIMAM Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) was created to provide a centralized, fully annotated dataset for research. The database contains both processed and unprocessed images, associated data, annotations and expert-determined ground truths. Collection has been ongoing for over three years, providing the opportunity to collect sequential imaging events. Extensive alterations to the identification, collection, processing and storage arms of the system have been undertaken to support the introduction of sequential events, including interval cancers. These updates to the collection systems allow the acquisition of many more images, but more importantly, allow one to build on the existing high-dimensional data stored in the OMI-DB. A research dataset of this scale, which includes original normal and subsequent malignant cases along with expert derived and clinical annotations, is currently unique. These data provide a powerful resource for future research and has initiated new research projects, amongst which, is the quantification of normal cases by applying a large number of quantitative imaging features, with a priori knowledge that eventually these cases develop a malignancy. This paper describes, extensions to the OMI-DB collection systems and tools and discusses the prospective applications of having such a rich dataset for future research applications.

  7. A method to determine the mammographic regions that show early changes due to the development of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads; Karssemeijer, Nico; Brandt, Sami S.

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood nowadays that changes in the mammographic parenchymal pattern are an indicator of a risk of breast cancer and we have developed a statistical method that estimates the mammogram regions where the parenchymal changes, due to breast cancer, occur. This region of interest is computed from a score map by utilising the anatomical breast coordinate system developed in our previous work. The method also makes an automatic scale selection to avoid overfitting while the region estimates are computed by a nested cross-validation scheme. In this way, it is possible to recover those mammogram regions that show a significant difference in classification scores between the cancer and the control group. Our experiments suggested that the most significant mammogram region is the region behind the nipple and that can be justified by previous findings from other research groups. This result was conducted on the basis of the cross-validation experiments on independent training, validation and testing sets from the case-control study of 490 women, of which 245 women were diagnosed with breast cancer within a period of 2-4 years after the baseline mammograms. We additionally generalised the estimated region to another, mini-MIAS study and showed that the transferred region estimate gives at least a similar classification result when compared to the case where the whole breast region is used. In all, by following our method, one most likely improves both preclinical and follow-up breast cancer screening, but a larger study population will be required to test this hypothesis.

  8. Dense and Non-dense Mammographic Area and Risk of Breast Cancer by Age and Tumor Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Scott, Christopher G.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Jensen, Matthew R.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Norman, Aaron D.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Couch, Fergus J.; Shepherd, John; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Fan, Bo; Wu, Fang-Fang; Ma, Lin; Beck, Andrew H.; Cummings, Steven R.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) is a strong breast cancer risk factor. We previously reported associations of percent MD with larger and node-positive tumors across all ages, and estrogen receptor (ER)-negative status among women ages <55 years. To provide insight into these associations, we examined the components of percent MD (dense area (DA) and non-dense area (NDA) with breast cancer subtypes. Methods Data were pooled from six studies including 4095 breast cancers and 8558 controls. DA and NDA were assessed from digitized film-screen mammograms and standardized across studies. Breast cancer odds by density phenotypes and age according to histopathological characteristics and receptor status were calculated using polytomous logistic regression. Results DA was associated with increased breast cancer risk [odds ratios (OR) for quartiles: 0.65, 1.00(Ref), 1.22, 1.55; p-trend <0.001] and NDA was associated with decreased risk [ORs for quartiles: 1.39, 1.00(Ref), 0.88, 0.72; p-trend <0.001] across all ages and invasive tumor characteristics. There were significant trends in the magnitude of associations of both DA and NDA with breast cancer by increasing tumor size (p-trend<0.001) but no differences by nodal status. Among women <55 years, DA was more strongly associated with increased risk of ER+ vs. ER− tumors [p-heterogeneity (het) = 0.02] while NDA was more strongly associated with decreased risk of ER− vs. ER+ tumors [p-het = 0.03]. Conclusions DA and NDA have differential associations with ER+ vs. ER− tumors that vary by age. Impact DA and NDA are important to consider when developing age- and subtype-specific risk models. PMID:25716949

  9. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 102-2865 cm-1 from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants with a concentration of 0.5%, including milk and melamine, flour and benzoyl peroxide, and starch and maleic anhydride. An acoustic mixer was used to create food adulterant mixtures. All the mixed samples were placed in sample holders with a surface area of 50 mm×50 mm. Spectral and image processing algorithms were developed based on single-band images at unique Raman peaks of the individual adulterants. Chemical images were created to show identification, spatial distribution, and morphological features of the adulterant particles mixed in the food powders. The potential of estimating mass concentrations of the adulterants using the percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images was also demonstrated.

  10. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  11. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features.

    PubMed

    Kaddi, Chanchala D; Bennett, Rachel V; Paine, Martin R L; Banks, Mitchel D; Weber, Arthur L; Fernández, Facundo M; Wang, May D

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis.

  13. A genome-wide imaging-based screening to identify genes involved in synphilin-1 inclusion formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qian; Zheng, Ju; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hao, Xinxin; Song, Jia; Lebacq, Tom; Franssens, Vanessa; Winderickx, Joris; Nystrom, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2016-01-01

    Synphilin-1 is a major component of Parkinson’s disease (PD) inclusion bodies implicated in PD pathogenesis. However, the machinery controlling synphilin-1 inclusion formation remains unclear. Here, we investigated synphilin-1 inclusion formation using a systematic genome-wide, high-content imaging based screening approach (HCI) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining with a secondary screening for mutants showing significant changes on fluorescence signal intensity, we filtered out hits that significantly decreased the expression level of synphilin-1. We found 133 yeast genes that didn’t affect synphilin-1 expression but that were required for the formation of synphilin-1 inclusions. Functional enrichment and physical interaction network analysis revealed these genes to encode for functions involved in cytoskeleton organization, histone modification, sister chromatid segregation, glycolipid biosynthetic process, DNA repair and replication. All hits were confirmed by conventional microscopy. Complementation assays were performed with a selected group of mutants, results indicated that the observed phenotypic changes in synphilin-1 inclusion formation were directly caused by the loss of corresponding genes of the deletion mutants. Further growth assays of these mutants showed a significant synthetic sick effect upon synphilin-1 expression, which supports the hypothesis that matured inclusions represent an end stage of several events meant to protect cells against the synphilin-1 cytotoxicity. PMID:27440388

  14. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in thermal therapy monitoring and screening: Localization and imaging (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A method termed magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion (MSB) was developed to interrogate in vivo the microscopic environment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles. We can monitor several effects that are important in thermal therapy and screening including temperature measurement and the bound state distribution. Here we report on simulations of nanoparticle localization. Measuring the spatial distribution of nanoparticles would allow us to identify ovarian cancer much earlier when it is still curable or monitor thermal therapies more accurately. We demonstrate that with well-designed equipment superior signal to noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved using only two harmonics rather than using all the harmonics containing signal. Alternatively, smaller magnetic field amplitudes can be used to achieve the same SNR. The SNR is improved using fewer harmonics because the noise is limited.

  15. Genetic variation in Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 and mammographic density in Singapore Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Van den Berg, David; Hsu, Chris; Ursin, Giske; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Stram, Daniel O.; Yu, Mimi C.; Wu, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) plays a critical role in normal mammary development and morphogenesis. Decreased TGF-β signaling has been associated with increased mammographic density. Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor and predictor of breast cancer risk. PMD is highly heritable, but few genetic determinants have been identified. We investigated the association between genetic variation in TGFB1 and PMD using a cross-sectional study of 2,038 women who were members of the population-based Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort. We assessed PMD using a computer-assisted method. We used linear regression to examine the association between 9 tagging SNPs of TGFB1 and PMD and their interaction with parity, adjusting for age, BMI, and dialect group. We calculated ‘P-values adjusted for correlated tests’ (PACT) to account for multiple testing. The strongest association was observed for rs2241716. Adjusted PMD was higher by 1.5% per minor allele (PACT =0.04). When stratifying by parity, this association was limited to nulliparous women. For nulliparous women, adjusted PMD was higher by 8.6% per minor allele (PACT=0.003; P for interaction with parity=0.002). Three additional TGFB1 tagging SNPs, which were in linkage disequilibrium with rs2241716, were statistically significantly associated with adjusted PMD (PACT<0.05) for nulliparous women. However, none of these three SNPs showed statistically significant association after adjusting for rs2241716. Our data support that TGFB1 genetic variation may be an important genetic determinant of mammographic density measure that predicts breast cancer risk, particularly in nulliparous women. PMID:23333936

  16. Investigating the Link Between Radiologists Gaze, Diagnostic Decision, and Image Content

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Voisin, Sophie; Paquit, Vincent C; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate machine learning for linking image content, human perception, cognition, and error in the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. Methods: Gaze data and diagnostic decisions were collected from six radiologists who reviewed 20 screening mammograms while wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker. Texture analysis was performed in mammographic regions that attracted radiologists attention and in all abnormal regions. Machine learning algorithms were investigated to develop predictive models that link: (i) image content with gaze, (ii) image content and gaze with cognition, and (iii) image content, gaze, and cognition with diagnostic error. Both group-based and individualized models were explored. Results: By pooling the data from all radiologists machine learning produced highly accurate predictive models linking image content, gaze, cognition, and error. Merging radiologists gaze metrics and cognitive opinions with computer-extracted image features identified 59% of the radiologists diagnostic errors while confirming 96.2% of their correct diagnoses. The radiologists individual errors could be adequately predicted by modeling the behavior of their peers. However, personalized tuning appears to be beneficial in many cases to capture more accurately individual behavior. Conclusions: Machine learning algorithms combining image features with radiologists gaze data and diagnostic decisions can be effectively developed to recognize cognitive and perceptual errors associated with the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms.

  17. Computed tomographic mammography. Diagnosis of mammographically and clinically occult carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sibala, J L; Chang, C H; Lin, F; Jewell, W R

    1981-01-01

    If breast cancer can be detected early, while it is still localized and before it can be palpated, the prognosis for cure is excellent. Heretofore, conventional mammography has been the only means available to detect cancer at such an early stage. Two cases of minimal breast carcinoma measuring less than 5 mm in diameter have been detected and correctly diagnosed using computed tomographic mammography (CT/M). Both cases occurred in fatty breasts and were clinically and mammographically occult. These cases demonstrate the value of CT/M in the diagnosis of minimal breast carcinoma that would have been missed otherwise.

  18. Imaging of the thoracic and lumbar spine in a high volume level 1 trauma center: are reformatted images of the spine essential for screening in blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, Aleksandr; Weinstein, Jonathan C; Flanders, Adam E; Sharma, Pranshu

    2017-02-01

    Reformatted CTs of the thoracic and lumbar spine (CT T/L) from CTs of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (CT body) may be performed for screening the thoracolumbar spine in patients sustaining blunt trauma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in the rate of detection of spinal fractures on CTs of the body compared to the reformatted T/L spine. A secondary endpoint was to evaluate whether cases dictated by trainees improved fracture detection rate. We reviewed the records of 250 consecutive blunt trauma patients that received CTs of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (CT body) with concurrent CT T/L reformats. Each report was reviewed to determine if there was a thoracolumbar fracture and whether a trainee had been involved in interpreting the CT body. If a fracture was identified on either report, then the number, type, and location of each fracture was documented. Sixty-nine fractures, from a total of 38 patients, were identified on either the CT of the body or the CT T/L. Sensitivity for CT body interpretations was 94 % (95 % CI: 86-98 %) compared to a 97 % (95 % CI: 89-100 %) sensitivity for the CT T/L (p > 0.5). Although the sensitivity was 97 % (95 % CI: 88-100 %) when a trainee was involved in interpreting the body CT, there was no statistically significant improvement. The results suggest that with careful scrutiny most spine fractures can be diagnosed on body CT images without the addition of spine reformats. The most commonly missed finding is an isolated non-displaced transverse process fracture, which does not require surgical intervention and does not alter clinical management. The results suggest that thin section reformats do not need to be routinely ordered in screening blunt trauma patients, unless a bony abnormality is identified on the thicker section body CT images.

  19. Automatic detection of hidden threats in the TeraSCREEN passive millimeter-wave imaging subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhogaria, Satish; Schikora, Marek

    2015-05-01

    Passive millimeter-wave imaging systems can play a significant role in security applications. Especially, the detection of hidden threats for border security is a growing field. In this paper we propose a novel approach for automatic threat detection using multiple 94 GHz passive millimeter-wave images. Herein, we discuss four steps essential to solving the task: pre-processing, region-of-interest extraction, threat extraction in each frame and, finally, intelligent fusion of the results from all frames. Besides, showing that the proposed method works reliably for the data-set at hand, we also discuss the advantages of using this method in contrast to state-of-the-art methods.

  20. How I report breast magnetic resonance imaging studies for breast cancer staging and screening.

    PubMed

    Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2016-07-25

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is the most sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis and local staging of primary breast cancer and yet, despite the fact that it has been in use for 20 years, there is little evidence that its widespread uncritical adoption has had a positive impact on patient-related outcomes.This has been attributed previously to the low specificity that might be expected with such a sensitive modality, but with modern techniques and protocols, the specificity and positive predictive value for malignancy can exceed that of breast ultrasound and mammography. A more likely explanation is that historically, clinicians have acted on MRI findings and altered surgical plans without prior histological confirmation. Furthermore, modern adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has improved so much that it has become a very tall order to show a an improvement in outcomes such as local recurrence rates.In order to obtain clinically useful information, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the technique and the physiological processes reflected in breast MRI. An appropriate indication for the scan, proper patient preparation and good scan technique, with rigorous quality assurance, are all essential prerequisites for a diagnostically relevant study.The use of recognised descriptors from a standardised lexicon is helpful, since assessment can then dictate subsequent recommendations for management, as in the American College of Radiology BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) lexicon (Morris et al., ACR BI-RADS® Atlas, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 2013). It also enables audit of the service. However, perhaps the most critical factor in the generation of a meaningful report is for the reporting radiologist to have a thorough understanding of the clinical question and of the findings that will influence management. This has never been more important than at present, when we are in the throes of a

  1. Magnetic induction imaging with optical atomic magnetometers: towards applications to screening and surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach, based on optical atomic magnetometers and magnetic induction tomography (MIT), for remote and non-invasive detection of conductive targets. Atomic magnetometers overcome the main limitations of conventional MIT instrumentation, in particular their poor low-frequency sensitivity, their large size and their limited scalability. Moreover, atomic magnetometers have been proven to reach extremely high sensitivities, with an improvement of up to 7 orders of magnitude in the 50 MHz to DC band, with respect to a standard pick-up coil of the same size. In the present scheme, an oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in a conductive target and laser-pumped atomic magnetometers, either stand-alone or in an array, detect the response of the objects. A phase-sensitive detection scheme rejects the background, allowing remote detection of the secondary field and, thus, mapping of objects, hidden in cargos, underwater or underground. The potential for extreme sensitivity, miniaturization, dynamic range and array operation paves the way to a new generation of non-invasive, active detectors for surveillance, as well as for real-time cargo screening.

  2. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  3. Stereo display of CT images for lung cancer screening: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao Hui; Durick, Janet E.; Herbert, David L.; Lu, Amy; Golla, Sarawathi K.; Shinde, Dilip D.; Piracha, Samaia; Foley, Kristin; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Shindel, Betty E.; Leader, J. Ken; Good, Walter F.

    2007-03-01

    To improve radiologist's performance in lesion detection and diagnosis on 3D medical image dataset, we have conducted a pilot study to test viability and efficiency of the stereo display for lung nodule detection and classification. Using our previously developed stereo compositing methods, stereo image pairs were prestaged and precalculated from CT slices for real-time interactive display. Three display modes (i.e., stereoscopic 3D, orthogonal MIP and slice-by-slice) were compared for lung nodule detection and total of eight radiologists have participated this pilot study to interpret the images. The performance of lung nodule detection was analyzed and compared between the modes using FROC analysis. Subjective assessment indicates that stereo display was well accepted by the radiologists, despite some uncertainty of beneficial results due to the novelty of the display. The FROC analysis indicates a trend that, among the three display modes, stereo display resulted in the best performance of nodule detection followed by slice-based display, although no statistically significant difference was shown between the three modes. The stereo display of a stack of thin CT slices has the potential to clarify three-dimensional structures, while avoiding ambiguities due to tissue superposition. Few studies, however, have addressed actual utility of stereo display for medical diagnosis. Our preliminary results suggest a potential role of stereo display for improving radiologists' performance in medical detection and diagnosis, and also indicate some factors likely affect the performance with new display, such as novelty of the display, training effect from projected radiography interpretation and confidence with the new technology.

  4. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  5. Bismuth sulfide nanoflowers for detection of X-rays in the mammographic energy range.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K; Yeow, John T W

    2015-03-24

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale "flower-like" structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials - 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber.

  6. Mammographic density measured as changes in tissue structure caused by HRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raundahl, Jakob; Loog, Marco; Nielsen, Mads

    2006-03-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relation between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. These studies indicate that women with high breast density have a four to six fold risk increase. An investigation of whether or not this relation is causal is important for, e.g., hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which has been shown to actually increase the density. No gold standard for automatic assessment of mammographic density exists. Manual methods such as Wolfe patterns and BI-RADS are helpful for communication of diagnostic sensitivity, but they are both time consuming and crude. They may be sufficient in certain cases and for single measurements, but for serial, temporal analysis it is necessary to be able to detect more subtle changes and, in addition, to be more reproducible. In this work an automated method for measuring the effect of HRT w.r.t. changes in biological density in the breast is presented. This measure is a novel measure, which provides structural information orthogonal to intensity-based methods. Hessian eigenvalues at different scales are used as features and a clustering of these is employed to divide a mammogram into four structurally different areas. Subsequently, based on the relative size of the areas, a density score is determined. In the experiments, two sets of mammograms of 50 patients from a double blind, placebo controlled HRT experiment were used. The change in density for the HRT group, measured with the new method, was significantly higher (p = 0.0002) than the change in the control group.

  7. Identification of a novel percent mammographic density locus at 12q24.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristen N; Lindstrom, Sara; Scott, Christopher G; Thompson, Deborah; Sellers, Thomas A; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Alice; Atkinson, Elizabeth; Rider, David N; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Varghese, Jajini S; Audley, Tina; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Luben, Robert N; Warren, Ruth M L; Loos, Ruth J F; Wareham, Nicholas J; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Olson, Janet E; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B; Lee, Adam M; Heit, John A; DeAndrade, Mariza; Goode, Ellen L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Armasu, Sebastian M; Weinshilboum, Richard; Fridley, Brooke L; Batzler, Anthony; Ingle, James N; Boyd, Norman F; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna; Martin, Lisa J; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-07-15

    Percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and has a heritable component that remains largely unidentified. We performed a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of percent mammographic density to identify novel genetic loci associated with this trait. In stage 1, we combined three GWASs of percent density comprised of 1241 women from studies at the Mayo Clinic and identified the top 48 loci (99 single nucleotide polymorphisms). We attempted replication of these loci in 7018 women from seven additional studies (stage 2). The meta-analysis of stage 1 and 2 data identified a novel locus, rs1265507 on 12q24, associated with percent density, adjusting for age and BMI (P = 4.43 × 10(-8)). We refined the 12q24 locus with 459 additional variants (stage 3) in a combined analysis of all three stages (n = 10 377) and confirmed that rs1265507 has the strongest association in the 12q24 region (P = 1.03 × 10(-8)). Rs1265507 is located between the genes TBX5 and TBX3, which are members of the phylogenetically conserved T-box gene family and encode transcription factors involved in developmental regulation. Understanding the mechanism underlying this association will provide insight into the genetics of breast tissue composition.

  8. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale “flower-like” structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials – 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber. PMID:25801531

  9. Body image dissatisfaction, physical activity and screen-time in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Añez, Elizabeth; Fornieles-Deu, Albert; Fauquet-Ars, Jordi; López-Guimerà, Gemma; Puntí-Vidal, Joaquim; Sánchez Carracedo, David

    2016-08-24

    This cross-sectional study contributes to the literature on whether body dissatisfaction is a barrier/facilitator to engaging in physical activity and to investigate the impact of mass-media messages via computer-time on body dissatisfaction. High-school students (N = 1501) reported their physical activity, computer-time (homework/leisure) and body dissatisfaction. Researchers measured students' weight and height. Analyses revealed that body dissatisfaction was negatively associated with physical activity on both genders, whereas computer-time was associated only with girls' body dissatisfaction. Specifically, as computer-homework increased, body dissatisfaction decreased; as computer-leisure increased, body dissatisfaction increased. Weight-related interventions should improve body image and physical activity simultaneously, while critical consumption of mass-media interventions should include a computer component.

  10. The Role of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Assessment and Surgical Treatment of Interval and Screen-Detected Breast Cancer in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Martha E; Weiss, Julie; Onega, Tracy; Balch, Steve L; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Henderson, Louise M; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-11-01

    We describe the relationship between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the utilization of additional imaging, biopsy, and primary surgical treatment for subgroups of women with interval versus screen-detected breast cancer. We determined the proportion of women receiving additional breast imaging or biopsy and type of primary surgical treatment, stratified by use of preoperative MRI, separately for both groups. Using Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) data, we identified a cohort of women age 66 and older with an interval or screen-detected breast cancer diagnosis between 2005 and 2010. Using logistic regression, we explored associations between primary surgical treatment type and preoperative MRI use for interval and screen-detected cancers. There were 204 women with an interval cancer and 1,254 with a screen-detected cancer. The interval cancer group was more likely to receive preoperative MRI (21% versus 13%). In both groups, women receiving MRI were more likely to receive additional imaging and/or biopsy. Receipt of MRI was not associated with increased odds of mastectomy (OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.67-1.50), while interval cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly higher odds of mastectomy (OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.11-2.42). Older women with interval cancer were more likely than women with a screen-detected cancer to have preoperative MRI, however, those with an interval cancer had 64% higher odds of mastectomy regardless of receipt of MRI. Given women with interval cancer are reported to have a worse prognosis, more research is needed to understand effectiveness of imaging modalities and treatment consequences within this group.

  11. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor ReceptorTyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom,Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor,Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standingdrug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteendialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emittingisotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitroassays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. Thesecharacteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schemato identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of thecompounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFRtyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFRtyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimatedoctanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline aswell as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the bestcombination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling andfurther evaluation in tumor-bearing mice.

  12. Tactile imaging of an imbedded palpable structure for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Chieu; Saraf, Ravi F

    2014-09-24

    Apart from texture, the human finger can sense palpation. The detection of an imbedded structure is a fine balance between the relative stiffness of the matrix, the object, and the device. If the device is too soft, its high responsiveness will limit the depth to which the imbedded structure can be detected. The sensation of palpation is an effective procedure for a physician to examine irregularities. In a clinical breast examination (CBE), by pressing over 1 cm(2) area, at a contact pressure in the 70-90 kPa range, the physician feels cancerous lumps that are 8- to 18-fold stiffer than surrounding tissue. Early detection of a lump in the 5-10 mm range leads to an excellent prognosis. We describe a thin-film tactile device that emulates human touch to quantify CBE by imaging the size and shape of 5-10 mm objects at 20 mm depth in a breast model using ∼80 kPa pressure. The linear response of the device allows quantification where the greyscale corresponds to the relative local stiffness. The (background) signal from <2.5-fold stiffer objects at a size below 2 mm is minimal.

  13. Automated analysis of siRNA screens of cells infected by hepatitis C and dengue viruses based on immunofluorescence microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Petr; Kumar, Anil; Wörz, Ilka; Harder, Nathalie; Erfle, Holger; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We present an image analysis approach as part of a high-throughput microscopy siRNA-based screening system using cell arrays for the identification of cellular genes involved in hepatitis C and dengue virus replication. Our approach comprises: cell nucleus segmentation, quantification of virus replication level in the neighborhood of segmented cell nuclei, localization of regions with transfected cells, cell classification by infection status, and quality assessment of an experiment and single images. In particular, we propose a novel approach for the localization of regions of transfected cells within cell array images, which combines model-based circle fitting and grid fitting. By this scheme we integrate information from single cell array images and knowledge from the complete cell arrays. The approach is fully automatic and has been successfully applied to a large number of cell array images from screening experiments. The experimental results show a good agreement with the expected behaviour of positive as well as negative controls and encourage the application to screens from further high-throughput experiments.

  14. Reproductive factors related to childbearing and mammographic breast density.

    PubMed

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Colditz, Graham A; Rosner, Bernard; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the associations of reproductive factors related to childbearing with percent breast density, absolute dense and nondense areas, by menopausal status. This study included 4110 cancer-free women within the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II cohorts. Percent breast density, absolute dense and nondense areas were measured from digitized mammography film images with computerized techniques. All density measures were square root-transformed in all the analyses to improve normality. The data on reproductive variables and other breast cancer risk factors were obtained from biennial questionnaires, at the time of the mammogram date. As compared to nulliparous women, parous postmenopausal women had lower percent density (β = -0.60, 95 % CI -0.84; -0.37), smaller absolute dense area (β = -0.66, 95 % CI -1.03; -0.29), and greater nondense area (β = 0.72, 95 % CI 0.27; 1.16). Among parous women, number of children was inversely associated with percent density in pre- (β per one child = -0.12, 95 % CI -0.20; -0.05) and postmenopausal women (β per one child = -0.07, 95 % CI -0.12; -0.02). The positive associations of breastfeeding with absolute dense and nondense areas were limited to premenopausal women, while the positive association of the age at first child's birth with percent density and the inverse association with nondense area were limited to postmenopausal women. Women with greater number of children and younger age at first child's birth have more favorable breast density patterns that could explain subsequent breast cancer risk reduction.

  15. Performance comparison of an active matrix flat panel imager, computed radiography system, and a screen-film system at four standard radiation qualities.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Gutierrez, D; Bulling, S; Lepori, D; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2005-02-01

    Four standard radiation qualities (from RQA 3 to RQA 9) were used to compare the imaging performance of a computed radiography (CR) system (general purpose and high resolution phosphor plates of a Kodak CR 9000 system), a selenium-based direct flat panel detector (Kodak Direct View DR 9000), and a conventional screen-film system (Kodak T-MAT L/RA film with a 3M Trimax Regular screen of speed 400) in conventional radiography. Reference exposure levels were chosen according to the manufacturer's recommendations to be representative of clinical practice (exposure index of 1700 for digital systems and a film optical density of 1.4). With the exception of the RQA 3 beam quality, the exposure levels needed to produce a mean digital signal of 1700 were higher than those needed to obtain a mean film optical density of 1.4. In spite of intense developments in the field of digital detectors, screen-film systems are still very efficient detectors for most of the beam qualities used in radiology. An important outcome of this study is the behavior of the detective quantum efficiency of the digital radiography (DR) system as a function of beam energy. The practice of users to increase beam energy when switching from a screen-film system to a CR system, in order to improve the compromise between patient dose and image quality, might not be appropriate when switching from screen-film to selenium-based DR systems.

  16. Development of an image-based screening system for inhibitors of the plastidial MEP pathway and of protein geranylgeranylation

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Michael; Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Hemmerlin, Andrea; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In a preceding study we have recently established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, which involves expressing a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the prenylable, carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL). By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was there demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway with oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of protein geranylgeranyl transferase type 1 (PGGT-1), shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway with mevinolin did not affect this localization. Furthermore, in this initial study complementation assays with pathway-specific intermediates confirmed that the precursors for the cytosolic isoprenylation of this fusion protein are predominantly provided by the MEP pathway. In order to optimize this visualization system from a more qualitative assay to a statistically trustable medium or a high-throughput screening system, we established now new conditions that permit culture and analysis in 96-well microtiter plates, followed by fluorescence microscopy. For further refinement, the existing GFP-BD-CVIL cell line was transformed with an estradiol-inducible vector driving the expression of a RFP protein, C-terminally fused to a nuclear localization signal (NLS-RFP). We are thus able to quantify the total number of viable cells versus the number of inhibited cells after various treatments. This approach also includes a semi-automatic counting system, based on the freely available image processing software. As a result, the time of image analysis as well as the risk of user-generated bias is reduced to a minimum. Moreover, there is no cross-induction of gene expression by dexamethasone and estradiol, which is an

  17. High-Throughput Screening for Internalizing Antibodies by Homogeneous Fluorescence Imaging of a pH-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Thilo; van Boxtel, Egon; Bosch, Martijn; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Gerritsen, Arnout F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a rapidly growing class of biotherapeutics that deliver drugs specifically to target cells by binding of the antibody component to surface receptors. The majority of ADCs require receptor internalization depending on intrinsic features of the specific ADC-antigen interaction. The development of potent ADCs would greatly benefit from the identification of efficiently internalizing antibodies at early stages of discovery. We developed a highly sensitive and rapid antibody internalization assay using an indirect Cypher5E label. The pH-activated CypHer5E label becomes fluorescent upon internalization into the acidic environment of endocytic organelles, whereas background fluorescence of noninternalized CypHer5E is minimal. The pH-dependency of the CypHer5E signal enables robust discrimination of antibody internalization from surface binding. The favorable signal-over-background ratio allows a homogeneous assay design with high-throughput fluorescence imaging in 384- and 1536-well formats. The biophysical readout of the primary internalization event substantially shortens incubation times compared to killing assays using toxin internalization. The assay was validated with tumor-relevant targets, including receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR and HER2) and a class II cytokine receptor (TF) expressed by A431, AU565, and SKOV-3 cells and transient expression systems (CHO-S). Our method enables functional screening of large antibody libraries to identify therapeutic antibody candidates with internalization characteristics favorable for the development of ADCs. PMID:26518032

  18. Adult weight gain, fat distribution and mammographic density in Spanish pre- and post-menopausal women (DDM-Spain).

    PubMed

    Pollán, Marina; Lope, Virginia; Miranda-García, Josefa; García, Milagros; Casanova, Francisco; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Peris, Mercé; Moreno, María Pilar; Vázquez-Carrete, José Antonio; Collado, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ascunce, Nieves; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    High mammographic density (MD) is a phenotype risk marker for breast cancer. Body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with MD, with the breast being a fat storage site. We investigated the influence of abdominal fat distribution and adult weight gain on MD, taking age, BMI and other confounders into account. Because visceral adiposity and BMI are associated with breast cancer only after menopause, differences in pre- and post-menopausal women were also explored. We recruited 3,584 women aged 45-68 years within the Spanish breast cancer screening network. Demographic, reproductive, family and personal history data were collected by purpose-trained staff, who measured current weight, height, waist and hip circumferences under the same protocol and with the same tools. MD was assessed in the left craniocaudal view using Boyd's Semiquantitative Scale. Association between waist-to-hip ratio, adult weight gain (difference between current weight and self-reported weight at 18 years) and MD was quantified by ordinal logistic regression, with random center-specific intercepts. Models were adjusted for age, BMI, breast size, time since menopause, parity, family history of breast cancer and hormonal replacement therapy use. Natural splines were used to describe the shape of the relationship between these two variables and MD. Waist-to-hip ratio was inversely associated with MD, and the effect was more pronounced in pre-menopausal (OR = 0.53 per 0.1 units; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.66) than in post-menopausal women (OR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.82) (P of heterogeneity = 0.010). In contrast, adult weight gain displayed a positive association with MD, which was similar in both groups (OR = 1.17 per 6 kg; 95 % CI = 1.11-1.23). Women who had gained more than 24 kg displayed higher MD (OR = 2.05; 95 % CI = 1.53-2.73). MD was also evaluated using Wolfe's and Tabár's classifications, with similar results being obtained. Once BMI, fat distribution and other confounders were considered

  19. Relating image-based features to mammogram interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Nodine, Calvin F.; Kundel, Harold L.

    2002-04-01

    Mammography is a widely used technique to screen for breast cancer. However, due to the complexity of the breast tissue and to the low prevalence of cancer in the screening population, between 10-30% of retrospectively visible cancers are not reported. Faulty visual search, that is, not examining the area where the cancer is located, is responsible for a third of these misses, but all other unreported cancers attract some amount of visual attention, as indicated by the duration of visual gaze in the location of the lesion. Thus, perceptual and decision making mechanisms must be understood, in order to aid radiologists to detect cancer at earlier stages. We have been working on modeling these mechanisms by using spatial frequency analysis, in a process that is inspired by the rules and complexity of the eye-brain system. In this paper we analyze the different decision outcomes of experienced mammographers and less experienced radiology residents, undergoing a mammography rotation, when examining a case set of 40 two-view mammogram cases. We also characterize the interplay between local factors, which are related to the area of the image that attracts visual attention, and global factors, which are related to breast sampling, as they affect decision outcome for each group.

  20. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p < 0.0001) of high compared with low MD breast tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening in Women at Less Than High Risk for Breast Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic-Jokic, Milica; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening with mammography can detect breast cancer early, before clinical symptoms appear. Some cancers, however, are not captured with mammography screening alone. Among women at high risk for breast cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as a safe adjunct (supplemental) screening tool that can detect breast cancers missed on screening mammography, potentially reducing the number of deaths associated with the disease. However, the use of adjunct screening tests may also increase the number of false-positive test results, which may lead to unnecessary follow-up testing, as well as patient stress and anxiety. We investigated the benefits and harms of MRI as an adjunct to mammography compared with mammography alone for screening women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) Health Technology Assessment Database, and National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database, from January 2002 to January 2016, for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and diagnostic accuracy. Only studies evaluating the use of screening breast MRI as an adjunct to mammography in the specified populations were included. Results No studies in women at less than high risk for breast cancer met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions It remains uncertain if the use of adjunct screening breast MRI in women at less than high risk (average or higher than average risk) for breast cancer will reduce breast cancer–related mortality without significant increases in unnecessary follow-up testing and treatment. PMID:27990198

  2. Mammographic density, parity and age at first birth, and risk of breast cancer: an analysis of four case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Woolcott, Christy G; Koga, Karin; Conroy, Shannon M; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Vachon, Celine M; Yaffe, Martin J; Pagano, Ian; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2012-04-01

    Mammographic density is strongly and consistently associated with breast cancer risk. To determine if this association was modified by reproductive factors (parity and age at first birth), data were combined from four case-control studies conducted in the United States and Japan. To overcome the issue of variation in mammographic density assessment among the studies, a single observer re-read all the mammograms using one type of interactive thresholding software. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) while adjusting for other known breast cancer risk factors. Included were 1,699 breast cancer cases and 2,422 controls, 74% of whom were postmenopausal. A positive association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk was evident in every group defined by parity and age at first birth (OR per doubling of percent mammographic density ranged between 1.20 and 1.39). Nonetheless, the association appeared to be stronger among nulliparous than parous women (OR per doubling of percent mammographic density = 1.39 vs. 1.24; P interaction = 0.054). However, when examined by study location, the effect modification by parity was apparent only in women from Hawaii and when examined by menopausal status, it was apparent in postmenopausal, but not premenopausal, women. Effect modification by parity was not significant in subgroups defined by body mass index or ethnicity. Adjusting for mammographic density did not attenuate the OR for the association between parity and breast cancer risk by more than 16.4%, suggesting that mammographic density explains only a small proportion of the reduction in breast cancer risk associated with parity. In conclusion, this study did not support the hypothesis that parity modifies the breast cancer risk attributed to mammographic density. Even though an effect modification was found in Hawaiian women, no such thing was found in women from the other three locations.

  3. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  4. Association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging screening for syringomyelia in asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels and observation of clinical signs consistent with syringomyelia in later life.

    PubMed

    Ives, E J; Doyle, L; Holmes, M; Williams, T L; Vanhaesebrouck, A E

    2015-01-01

    A questionnaire-based study was used to investigate the association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for syringomyelia (SM) in 79 asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS) and the subsequent development of clinical signs consistent with SM in later life. Owners reported clinical signs consistent with SM in 13/79 (16%) dogs at the time of the questionnaire. A significantly greater proportion of CKCS with a syrinx visible on MRI screening showed clinical signs in later life (9/25, 36%) than dogs without a visible syrinx (4/54, 7%; odds ratio 6.9). Whether the findings of MRI screening can be used to indicate the likelihood of an asymptomatic CKCS developing clinical signs consistent with SM in later life warrants further prospective study in a larger cohort of dogs.

  5. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  6. Classification of mammographic masses: influence of regions used for feature extraction on the classification performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Florian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Elter, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Computer-assisted diagnosis (CADx) for the characterization of mammographic masses as benign or malignant has a very high potential to help radiologists during the critical process of diagnostic decision making. By default, the characterization of mammographic masses is performed by extracting features from a region of interest (ROI) depicting the mass. To investigate the influence of the region on the classification performance, textural, morphological, frequency- as well as moment-based features are calculated in subregions of the ROI, which has been delineated manually by an expert. The investigated subregions are (a) the semi-automatically segmented area which includes only the core of the mass, (b) the outer border region of the mass, and (c) the combination of the outer and the inner border region, referred to as mass margin. To extract the border region and the margin of a mass an extended version of the rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was developed. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the features extracted from the RBST transformed border region and mass margin is compared to the effectiveness of the same features extracted from the untransformed regions. After the feature extraction process a preferably optimal feature subset is selected for each feature extractor. Classification is done using a k-NN classifier. The classification performance was evaluated using the area Az under the receiver operating characteristic curve. A publicly available mammography database was used as data set. Results showed that the manually drawn ROI lead to superior classification performances for the morphological feature extractors and that the transformed outer border region and the mass margin are not suitable for moment-based features but yield to promising results for textural and frequency-based features. Beyond that the mass margin, which combines the inner and the outer border region, leads to better classification performances compared to the outer border

  7. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations.

  8. Implementation of 3D prostrate ring-scanning mechanism for NIR diffuse optical imaging phantom validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jhao-Ming; Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Cheng; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Pan, Min-Chun

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) providing functional information of tissues has drawn great attention for the last two decades. Near infrared (NIR) DOI systems composed of scanning bench, opt-electrical measurement module, system control, and data processing and image reconstruction schemes are developed for the screening and diagnosis of breast tumors. Mostly, the scanning bench belonging to fixed source-and-detector configuration limits computed image resolution to an extent. To cope with the issue, we propose, design and implement a 3D prostrate ring-scanning equipment for NIR DOI with flexible combinations of illumination and detection, and with the function of radial, circular and vertical movement without hard compression of breast tissue like the imaging system using or incorporating with X-ray mammographic bench. Especially, a rotation-sliding-and-moving mechanism was designed for the guidance of source- and detection-channel movement. Following the previous justification for synthesized image reconstruction, in the paper the validation using varied phantoms is further conducted and 3D image reconstruction for their absorption and scattering coefficients is illustrated through the computation of our in-house coded schemes. The source and detection NIR data are acquired to reconstruct the 3D images through the operation of scanning bench in the movement of vertical, radial and circular directions. Rather than the fixed configuration, the addressed screening/diagnosing equipment has the flexibility for optical-channel expansion with a compromise among construction cost, operation time, and spatial resolution of reconstructed μa and μs' images.

  9. More misinformation on breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Unfortunately, a great deal of misinformation has accumulated in the breast cancer screening literature that is based on flawed analyses in an effort to reduce access to screening. Quite remarkably, much of this has come from publications in previously highly respected medical journals. In several papers the intervention (mammography screening) is faulted yet the analyses provided no data on who participated in mammography screening, and which cancers were detected by mammography screening. It is remarkable that a highly respected journal can fault an intervention with no data on the intervention. Claims of massive over diagnosis of invasive breast cancer due to breast cancer screening have been made using “guesses” that have no scientific basis. No one has ever seen a mammographically detected, invasive breast cancer, disappear on its own, yet analysts have claimed that this occurs thousands of times each year. In fact, the” miraculous” resolution, without intervention, of a handful of breast cancers have all been palpable cancers, yet there is no suggestion to stop treating palpable cancers. A review of several publications in the New England Journal of Medicine shows some of the flaws in these analyses. There is clearly a problem with peer review that is allowing scientifically unsupportable material, which is misleading women and their physicians, to be published in prestigious journals. PMID:28210564

  10. Development of a cell-based assay for measurement of c-Met phosphorylation using AlphaScreen technology and high-content imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Smotrov, Nadya; Mathur, Anjili; Kariv, Ilona; Moxham, Christopher M; Bays, Nathan

    2009-04-01

    c-Met is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) with a critical role in many fundamental cellular processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. Deregulated c-Met signaling has been implicated in both the initiation and progression of human cancers and therefore represents an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Monitoring the phosphorylation status of relevant tyrosine residues provides an important method of assessing c-Met kinase activity. This report describes a novel assay to monitor c-Met phosphorylation in cells using Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay (AlphaScreen) technology. Using AlphaScreen, the authors were able to detect both global and site-specific phosphorylation of c-Met in transformed cell lines. Data obtained from the AlphaScreen assay were compared to data obtained from a high-content imaging (HCI) method developed in parallel to monitor c-Met phosphorylation at the single cell level. The AlphaScreen assay was miniaturized to a 384-well format with acceptable signal-to-background ratio (S/B) and Z' statistics and was employed to measure c-Met kinase activity in situ after treatment with potent c-Met-specific kinase inhibitors. The authors discuss the utility of quantifying endogenous cellular c-Met phosphorylation in lead optimization and how the modular design of the AlphaScreen assay allows its adaptation to measure cellular activity of other kinases.

  11. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  12. The classification of normal screening mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Zoey Z. Y.; Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick C.; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2016-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: To understand how breast screen readers classify the difficulty of normal screening mammograms using common lexicon describing normal appearances. Cases were also assessed on their suitability for a single reader strategy. Materials and Methods: 15 breast readers were asked to interpret a test set of 29 normal screening mammogram cases and classify them by rating the difficulty of the case on a five-point Likert scale, identifying the salient features and assessing their suitability for single reading. Using the False Positive Fractions from a previous study, the 29 cases were classified into 10 "low", 10 "medium" and nine "high" difficulties. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistics. Spearman's correlation was used to test the strength of association between the difficulty of the cases and the readers' recommendation for single reading strategy. Results: The ratings from readers in this study corresponded to the known difficulty level of cases for the 'low' and 'high' difficulty cases. Uniform ductal pattern and density, symmetrical mammographic features and the absence of micro-calcifications were the main reasons associated with 'low' difficulty cases. The 'high' difficulty cases were described as having `dense breasts'. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between the difficulty of the cases and readers' recommendation for single reading (r = -0.475, P = 0.009). Conclusion: The findings demonstrated potential relationships between certain mammographic features and the difficulty for readers to classify mammograms as 'normal'. The standard Australian practice of double reading was deemed more suitable for most cases. There was an inverse moderate association between the difficulty of the cases and the recommendations for single reading.

  13. Comparison of the image quality of a high-resolution screen-film system and a digital flat panel detector system in avian radiography.

    PubMed

    Bochmann, Monika; Ludewig, Eberhard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film system was compared with a digital detector system. A total of 20 birds (14 pigeons and six psittacine birds) with an average body mass of 533g were examined in dorsoventral as well as lateral projections. Digital radiographs were acquired with the same mAs as well as half the mAs used for the conventional radiographs. Three criteria and one overall assessment were defined for each of four anatomic regions and assessed by five veterinarians using a score system. Comparison of the ratings was done by visual grading analysis. For the majority of criteria, there was no significant difference regarding image quality between the digital and screen-film projections. However, for certain criteria the quality of the digital images was significantly superior. Using the same mAs as for the conventional radiographs, the humeral joint surfaces and the honeycomb structure of the lung were assessed as superior with the digital imaging system. The tracheal rings and the delineation of the trachea from the surrounding tissue were also superior with the digital system. Assessment of the trabecular structure of the humerus was superior when the full mAs was used compared with the reduced mAs. In conclusion the digital technique is equal or superior to the conventional screen-film high-resolution system for pet birds of a medium size. With some limitations, a dose reduction is possible with the digital system.

  14. Comparison of a digital flat-panel x-ray image intensifier and conventional film-screen system for radiostereometric analysis (RSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xunhua; Drangova, Maria; Pollmann, Steve; Miron, Ricky; Bourne, Robert; Holdsworth, David W.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, the accuracy and precision of RSA analysis using a GE InnovaTM 4100 digital flat panel and a Siemens Multistar x-ray image intensifier (XRII) were evaluated and compared with that of a conventional film-screen system, in order to explore the possibility of real-time kinematic and dynamic RSA study. A phantom, having two rigid body segments with no movement, was constructed and imaged by the digital flat panel, XRII and conventional screen-film systems, respectively. The acquired images were measured and motions were derived. The mean and standard deviation of the repeated results were analyzed to determine the accuracy and precision, respectively. Comparing all three axes, the lowest rotational accuracy and precision were 0.008 +/- 0.011°, 0.013 +/- 0.015° and 0.006 +/- 0.05° while the lowest translational accuracy and precision were 25 +/- 28 mm, 17 +/- 37 mm and 4 +/- 6 mm for the film-screen, XRII and digital flat panel, respectively. The evaluation of the accuracy and precision of the RSA in this study confirms its place as a highly accurate method. The study shows that both digital flat panel and XRII systems have potential application to the kinematics and dynamics joint study.

  15. A Novel Multiparametric Drug-Scoring Method for High-Throughput Screening of 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids Using the Celigo Image Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Cribbes, Scott; Kessel, Sarah; McMenemy, Scott; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor models have been increasingly used to investigate and characterize cancer drug compounds. The ability to perform high-throughput screening of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) can highly improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of discovering potential cancer drug candidates. Previously, the Celigo Image Cytometer has demonstrated a novel method for high-throughput screening of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. In this work, we employed the Celigo Image Cytometer to examine the effects of 14 cancer drug compounds on 3D MCTS of the glioblastoma cell line U87MG in 384-well plates. Using parameters such as MCTS diameter and invasion area, growth and invasion were monitored for 9 and 3 d, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescent staining with calcein AM, propidium iodide, Hoechst 33342, and caspase 3/7 was performed at day 9 posttreatment to measure viability and apoptosis. Using the kinetic and endpoint data generated, we created a novel multiparametric drug-scoring system for 3D MCTS that can be used to identify and classify potential drug candidates earlier in the drug discovery process. Furthermore, the combination of quantitative and qualitative image data can be used to delineate differences between drugs that induce cytotoxic and cytostatic effects. The 3D MCTS-based multiparametric scoring method described here can provide an alternative screening method to better qualify tested drug compounds.

  16. Computer-aided screening system for cervical precancerous cells based on field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray images and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusman, Yessi; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Hasikin, Khairunnisa; Kurnia, Rahmadi; Osman, Noor Azuan Bin Abu; Teoh, Kean Hooi

    2016-10-01

    The capability of field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDX) to scan material structures at the microlevel and characterize the material with its elemental properties has inspired this research, which has developed an FE-SEM/EDX-based cervical cancer screening system. The developed computer-aided screening system consisted of two parts, which were the automatic features of extraction and classification. For the automatic features extraction algorithm, the image and spectra of cervical cells features extraction algorithm for extracting the discriminant features of FE-SEM/EDX data was introduced. The system automatically extracted two types of features based on FE-SEM/EDX images and FE-SEM/EDX spectra. Textural features were extracted from the FE-SEM/EDX image using a gray level co-occurrence matrix technique, while the FE-SEM/EDX spectra features were calculated based on peak heights and corrected area under the peaks using an algorithm. A discriminant analysis technique was employed to predict the cervical precancerous stage into three classes: normal, low-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (LSIL), and high-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (HSIL). The capability of the developed screening system was tested using 700 FE-SEM/EDX spectra (300 normal, 200 LSIL, and 200 HSIL cases). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity performances were 98.2%, 99.0%, and 98.0%, respectively.

  17. Is carpal tunnel syndrome present in acute stroke patients? An investigative study using clinical and imaging screening tools.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Loochtan, Aaron I; Dresser, Brian; Chang, Jianhong; Farjat, Alfredo E; Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobson-Webb, Lisa D

    2017-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is known to develop post-stroke. Median nerve ultrasound (US) is an inexpensive, effective means of screening. In this prospective feasibility study, we compared the ability of the physical exam, the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and median nerve US to screen for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) within 72hours of stroke onset. We enrolled 24 consecutive patients. Using US, 19 (79%, p=0.0386) of the 24 patients screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 20 (83%, p=0.0042) on the nonparetic side. With clinical examination, only 11 out of 24 (46%) screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 8 (33%) on the nonparetic side. The BCTQ did not predict CTS. US can be an effective screening tool post-stroke. Further research is needed to determine specificity and efficacy compared to electrodiagnostic testing in this population.

  18. X-ray tube-based diffraction enhanced imaging prototype images of full-thickness breast specimens: reader study evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulconer, L. S.; Parham, C.; Connor, D. J.; Koomen, M.; Kuzmiak, C.; Pavic, D.; Livasy, C. A.; Kim, E.; Zeng, D.; Cole, E. B.; Zhong, Z.; Pisano, E. D.

    2009-02-01

    Conventional mammographic image contrast is derived from x-ray absorption, resulting in breast structure visualization due to density gradients that attenuate radiation without distinction between transmitted and scattered or refracted x-rays. This leads to image blurring and contrast reduction, hindering the early detection of small or otherwise occult cancers. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) allows for dramatically increased contrast with decreased radiation dose compared to conventional mammographic imaging due to monochromatic x-rays, its unique refraction-based contrast mechanism and excellent scatter rejection. However, a lingering drawback to the clinical translation of DEI has been the requirement for synchrotron radiation. Our laboratory developed a DEI prototype (DEI-PR) utilizing a readily available Tungsten xray tube source and traditional DEI crystal optics, providing soft tissue images at 60keV. To demonstrate the clinical utility of our DEI-PR, we acquired images of full-thickness human breast tissue specimens on synchrotron-based DEI, DEI-PR and digital mammography systems. A reader study was designed to allow unbiased assessment of system performance when analyzing three systems with dissimilar imaging parameters and requiring analysis of images unfamiliar to radiologists. A panel of expert radiologists evaluated lesion feature visibility and histopathology correlation after receiving training on the interpretation of refraction contrast mammographic images. Preliminary data analysis suggests that our DEI system performed roughly equivalently with the traditional DEI system, demonstrating a significant step toward clinical translation of this modality for breast cancer applications.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J; Paterson, Andrew D; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Heit, John A; Pankratz, V Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Beck, Andrew H; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D; Couch, Fergus J; Hopper, John L; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Vachon, Celine M; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2014-10-24

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B and SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23 and TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci.

  20. Composite x-ray image assembly for large-field digital mammography with one- and two-dimensional positioning of a focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halama, G.; McAdoo, J.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel large-field digital mammography technique, a 1024 x 1024 pixel Loral charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane array (FPA) was positioned in a mammographic field with one- and two-dimensional scan sequences to obtain 950 x 1800 pixel and 3600 x 3600 pixel composite images, respectively. These experiments verify that precise positioning of FPAs produced seamless composites and that the CCD mosaic concept has potential for high-resolution, large-field imaging. The proposed CCD mosaic concept resembles a checkerboard pattern with spacing left between the CCDs for the driver and readout electronics. To obtain a complete x-ray image, the mosaic must be repositioned four times, with an x-ray exposure at each position. To reduce the patient dose, a lead shield with appropriately patterned holes is placed between the x-ray source and the patient. The high-precision motorized translation stages and the fiber-coupled-scintillating-screen-CCD sensor assembly were placed in the position usually occupied by the film cassette. Because of the high mechanical precision, seamless composites were constructed from the subimages. This paper discusses the positioning, image alignment procedure, and composite image results. The paper only addresses the formation of a seamless composite image from subimages and will not consider the effects of the lead shield, multiple CCDs, or the speed of motion.

  1. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activities Importance of Newborn Screening Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources ...

  2. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  3. Adulteration screening of botanical materials by a sensitive and model-free approach using infrared spectroscopic imaging and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-11-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is often used as a simple, fast, and green method for the adulteration screening of botanical materials for foods and herbs. However, the overlapping of absorption signals of various substances significantly decrease the sensitivity and specificity of IR spectroscopy in the detection of adulterated samples. In this research, a model-free approach is proposed for the sensitive and non-targeted screening of botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials. First, the spectra of the entities in the test sample are collected by near-infrared spectroscopic imaging and clustered by unsupervised pattern recognition methods. The sample may be adulterated if there are two or more clusters of the entities. Next, the entities of different clusters are characterized by mid-infrared spectroscopy to interpret the chemical compositions to determine the clustering is caused whether by adulteration or other reasons. Second derivative spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy are often needed to resolve the overlapped bands mathematically or experimentally to find the characteristic signals to identify the authentic and adulterant entities. The feasibility of this approach was proved by the simulated adulterated sample of saffron. In conclusion, botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials can be detected by a simple, fast, sensitive, and green screening approach using IR spectroscopic imaging, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, and necessary chemometrics techniques.

  4. Age as a factor in breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and screening behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Z; Bryant, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there are age-related differences in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with respect to breast cancer and whether the differences reflect the age-specific Canadian recommendations on breast cancer screening. DESIGN: Telephone survey. SETTING: Two cities and five towns and their surrounding areas in Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: The age-specific, randomly selected sample comprised 1284 women aged 40 to 75 years who did not have breast cancer. Of the 1741 eligible women who were contacted, 1350 (78%) agreed to participate; 66 were excluded because of age ineligibility or a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Frequency of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with respect to breast cancer, by age group. RESULTS: Knowledge of breast cancer risk factors was generally low and decreased with age. Few women were aware of the Canadian recommendations on breast self-examination, physical examination of the breasts by a health care practitioner and mammographic screening. Older women believed they were less susceptible to breast cancer than younger women and were less likely to have positive attitudes toward screening. Self-examination was performed 9 to 15 times per year by 424 women (33%), and 810 (63%) had been examined by a health care professional in the past year. Although 664 (52%) had undergone mammography, the proportion decreased with age after age 59. The main barriers to mammography were lack of physician referral and the woman's belief that the procedure is unnecessary if she is healthy. CONCLUSIONS: Education is needed to increase breast cancer knowledge, promote the Canadian recommendations for early detection of breast cancer and decrease negative beliefs about the disease. Changes in the behaviour of women and physicians are needed to increase the use of breast self-examination, clinical breast examination by a health care professional and mammographic screening. Reaching women in the upper range (60 to 69 years) of the

  5. The vitamin D pathway and mammographic breast density among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Buist, Diana S. M.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Sisney, Gale S.; Skinner, Halcyon G.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory studies have demonstrated that vitamin D has a number of chemopreventive properties, and that these properties may be mediated or modified by other molecules in the vitamin D pathway, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) or calcium. However, there is little epidemiologic data exploring the effects of vitamin D on breast cancer risk in the context of these other molecules. We examined a panel of molecules in the vitamin D pathway in relation to mammographic breast density, a marker of breast cancer risk, in the Wisconsin Breast Density Study. A total of 238 postmenopausal women (ages 55-70, with no history of postmenopausal hormone use) were enrolled from mammography clinics in Madison, Wisconsin. Subjects provided blood samples that were analyzed for levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], PTH, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), retinol, and calcium. Percent breast density was measured using Cumulus software. In age-adjusted analyses there was a positive association between 25(OH)D and percent breast density (P=0.05; mean percent density=11.3% vs. 15.6% for 1st vs. 4th quartile of 25(OH)D). Breast density was inversely associated with PTH (P=0.05; 16.0% vs. 11.4% for Q1 vs. Q4) and positively associated with the IGF-1:IGFBP-3 molar ratio (P=0.02; 11.9% vs. 15.6% for Q1 vs. Q4). However, these associations were all null after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI; P>0.25). The independent relation between 25(OH)D and breast density remained null among subgroups defined by BMI and serum levels of retinol, calcium, and estradiol. These results suggest no strong independent associations between the circulating molecules of the vitamin D pathway and mammographic breast density in postmenopausal women. While it remains possible that vitamin D could influence breast cancer risk, our results suggest that such an effect would be mediated through pathways other than breast density. PMID:21847642

  6. A Novel Automated Mammographic Density Measure and Breast 
Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammographic breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor but is not used in the clinical setting, partly because of a lack of standardization and automation. We developed an automated and objective measurement of the grayscale value variation within a mammogram, evaluated its association with breast cancer, and compared its performance with that of percent density (PD). Methods Three clinic-based studies were included: a case–cohort study of 217 breast cancer case subjects and 2094 non-case subjects and two case–control studies comprising 928 case subjects and 1039 control subjects and 246 case subjects and 516 control subjects, respectively. Percent density was estimated from digitized mammograms using the computer-assisted Cumulus thresholding program, and variation was estimated from an automated algorithm. We estimated hazards ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards models for the cohort and logistic regression for case–control studies, with adjustment for age and body mass index. We performed a meta-analysis using random study effects to obtain pooled estimates of the associations between the two mammographic measures and breast cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The variation measure was statistically significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer in all three studies (highest vs lowest quartile: HR = 7.0 [95% CI = 4.6 to 10.4]; OR = 10.7 [95% CI = 7.5 to 15.3]; OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.6 to 4.2]; all P trend < .001). In two studies, the risk estimates and AUCs for the variation measure were greater than those for percent density (AUCs for variation = 0.71 and 0.76; AUCs for percent density = 0.65 and 0.65), whereas in the third study, these estimates were similar (AUC for variation = 0.60 and AUC for percent density = 0.61). A meta-analysis of the three studies demonstrated a stronger

  7. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the estrogen pathway and mammographic density

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the estrogen pathway appear to be associated with breast cancer risk and possibly with mammographic density (MD), but little is known of these associations among premenopausal women. This study examines the association of 11 polymorphisms in five estrogen-related genes (estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα, ERβ), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1)) with premenopausal MD. Effect modification of four estrogen-related factors (parity, age at menarche, hormonal derivatives use and body mass index (BMI)) on this relation is also assessed. Methods Polymorphisms were genotyped in 741 premenopausal Caucasian women whose MD was measured in absolute density (AD, cm2) and percent density using a computer-assisted method. Multivariate linear models were used to examine the associations (Ptrend) and interactions (Pi). Results None of the SNPs showed a statistically significant association with AD. However, each additional rare allele of rs1056836 CYP1B1 was associated with a reduction in AD among nulliparous women (Ptrend = 0.004), while no association was observed among parous women (Ptrend = 0.62; Pi = 0.02). An increase in the number of rare alleles of the HSD17B1 SNP (rs598126 and rs2010750) was associated with an increase in AD among women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.06 and Ptrend = 0.04, respectively), but with a decrease in AD among past hormonal derivatives users (Ptrend = 0.04; Pi = 0.02 and Ptrend = 0.08; Pi = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, a negative association of rs598126 HSD17B1 SNP with AD was observed among women with higher BMI (>median) (Ptrend = 0.01; Pi = 0.02). A negative association between an increased number of rare alleles of COMT rs4680 SNP and AD was limited to women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.02; Pi = 0.03) or with late age at menarche (>median) (Ptrend = 0

  8. Feasibility study of automating breast phantom scoring using image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Mouloud; Guis, Vincente H.; Rasigni, Monique; Bourennane, Salah

    2005-03-01

    Quality control in mammographic facilities has to be done periodically in order to ensure that the mammographic chain works properly. In particular global image quality is evaluated from a mammographic phantom film. A phantom is an object with the same anatomic shape and radiological response as an average dense-fleshed breast in which are embedded structures that mimic clinically relevant features such as microcalcifications, masses and fibers. This evaluation is done by visual observation of a phantom film and a global score is given depending on the number of objects seen by several observers. This paper presents the main results of a feasibility study of breast phantom scoring using digital image processing. First breast phantom films were digitized. For each category of structures, subimages were extracted from the digitized phantom. A noise reduction method was used as a pre-processing step. A local contrast enhancement was then applied. At last image segmentation was done. Noise reduction and contrast enhancement steps were both based on a direct contrast modification technique. Segmentation step was adapted to each embedded object. Nine digitized phantom films were studied and results show that an evaluation of mammographic facilities could be done using digital image processing.

  9. Comparison of the imaging physics performance of a prototype flat-panel detector with a 400-speed screen-film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Rush, Charles

    2001-06-01

    The performance of a digital radiography system that included a prototype flat panel detector (StingRay) was compared with a 400 speed screen-film system. The flat panel detector consisted of a 500 micrometers thick CsI scintillator with an image matrix size of 3k2. The limiting spatial resolution of screen-film (approximately 4 line pairs/mm) was superior to that of the flat panel detector (approximately 2.5 line pairs/mm). The digital detector had an excellent linearity response (r2 equals 0.997), a dynamic range of 20,000:1, and saturated at a radiation exposure of 60 mR.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting a desired behavior in digital image data

    DOEpatents

    Kegelmeyer, Jr., W. Philip

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting stellate lesions in digitized mammographic image data includes the steps of prestoring a plurality of reference images, calculating a plurality of features for each of the pixels of the reference images, and creating a binary decision tree from features of randomly sampled pixels from each of the reference images. Once the binary decision tree has been created, a plurality of features, preferably including an ALOE feature (analysis of local oriented edges), are calculated for each of the pixels of the digitized mammographic data. Each of these plurality of features of each pixel are input into the binary decision tree and a probability is determined, for each of the pixels, corresponding to the likelihood of the presence of a stellate lesion, to create a probability image. Finally, the probability image is spacially filtered to enforce local consensus among neighboring pixels and the spacially filtered image is output.

  11. Method and apparatus for detecting a desired behavior in digital image data

    DOEpatents

    Kegelmeyer, Jr., W. Philip

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting stellate lesions in digitized mammographic image data includes the steps of prestoring a plurality of reference images, calculating a plurality of features for each of the pixels of the reference images, and creating a binary decision tree from features of randomly sampled pixels from each of the reference images. Once the binary decision tree has been created, a plurality of features, preferably including an ALOE feature (analysis of local oriented edges), are calculated for each of the pixels of the digitized mammographic data. Each of these plurality of features of each pixel are input into the binary decision tree and a probability is determined, for each of the pixels, corresponding to the likelihood of the presence of a stellate lesion, to create a probability image. Finally, the probability image is spatially filtered to enforce local consensus among neighboring pixels and the spatially filtered image is output.

  12. Imaging of fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve (OJIP) parameters, applied in a screening study with wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) genotypes under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Jedmowski, Christoph; Brüggemann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    We quantified the influence of heat stress (HS) on PSII by imaging of parameters of the fast chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) induction (OJIP) kinetic of 20 genotypes of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) covering a broad geographical spectrum. We developed a standardised screening procedure, allowing a repetitive fluorescence measurement of leaf segments. The impact of HS was quantified by calculating a Heat Resistance Index (HRI), derived from the decrease of the Performance Index (PI) caused by HS treatment and following recovery. For the genotype showing the lowest HRI, reduced maximum quantum yield (φP0) and increased relative variable fluorescence of the O-J phase (K-Peak) were detected after HS, whereas the basal fluorescence (F0) remained stable. An additional feature was a lowered fraction of active (QA-reducing) reaction centres (RCs). The disturbances disappeared after one day of recovery. Spatial heterogeneities of fluorescence parameters were detected, as the negative effect of HS was stronger in the leaf areas close to the leaf tip. The results of this study prove that chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) is suitable for the detection of HS symptoms and that imaging of JIP-Test parameters should be considered in future screening and phenotyping studies aiming for the characterisation of plant genotypes.

  13. Ineffectiveness of dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging as a screening technique for coronary artery disease in patients with end-stage renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Marwick, T.H.; Steinmuller, D.R.; Underwood, D.A.; Hobbs, R.E.; Go, R.T.; Swift, C.; Braun, W.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of dipyridamole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium as a screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD), was studied in 45 patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing evaluation for renal transplantation. Coronary arteriography, dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging and clinical follow-up were performed in all patients. Nineteen patients (42%) had an obstruction of 50% or more in at least one coronary artery. Fourteen patients had a positive thallium scan, but 7 of these were false-positives (sensitivity 37%, specificity 73%). The sensitivity was considerably lower than that quoted for non-ESRF patients in the literature, and significantly lower than a control group of 19 patients without ESRF having comparable severity and distribution of CAD. Five of the 6 patients who died of cardiac causes over a mean follow-up period of 25 months had normal thallium imaging, but all had significant coronary artery disease at cardiac catheterization. Dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging has not proved a useful screening test for angiographically significant CAD, and does not predict cardiac prognosis in this population.

  14. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening.

  15. Classification of mammographic masses: comparison between Backpropagation Neural Network (BNN) and human readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbach, Lina; Bennett, Darus L.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Fallouh, Ghassan

    2003-05-01

    PURPOSE: We compare mammographic mass classification performance between a backpropagation neural network (BNN), expert radiologists, and residents. Our goal is to reduce false negatives during routine reading of mammograms. METHODS: 160 cases from 3 different institutions were used. Each case contained at least one mass and had an accompanying biopsy result. Masses were extracted using region growing with seed locations identified by an expert radiologist. 10 texture and shape based features (area, perimeter, compactness, radial length, spiculation, mean/standard deviation of radial length, minimum/maximum axis, and boundary roughness) were used as inputs to a three-layer BNN. Shape features were computed on the boundary of the mass region; texture features were computed from the pixel values inside the mass. 140 cases were used for training the BNN and the remaining 20 cases were used for testing. The testing set was diagnosed by three expert radiologists, three residents, and the BNN. We evaluated the human readers and the BNN by computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). RESULTS: The AUC was 0.923 for the BNN, 0.846 for the expert radiologists, and 0.648 for the residents. These results illustrate the promise of using BNN as a physician"s assistant for breast mass classification.

  16. Hemodynamic signature of breast cancer under fractional mammographic compression using a dynamic diffuse optical tomography system

    PubMed Central

    Carp, Stefan A.; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Wanyo, Christy M.; Fang, Qianqian; Specht, Michelle C.; Schapira, Lidia; Moy, Beverly; Bardia, Aditya; Boas, David A.; Isakoff, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Near infrared dynamic diffuse optical tomography measurements of breast hemodynamics during fractional mammographic compression offer a novel contrast mechanism for detecting breast cancer and monitoring chemotherapy. Tissue viscoelastic relaxation during the compression period leads to a slow reduction in the compression force and reveals biomechanical and metabolic differences between healthy and lesion tissue. We measured both the absolute values and the temporal evolution of hemoglobin concentration during 25-35 N of compression for 22 stage II and III breast cancer patients scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy. 17 patients were included in the group analysis (average tumor size 3.2 cm, range: 1.3-5.7 cm). We observed a statistically significant differential decrease in total and oxy-hemoglobin, as well as in hemoglobin oxygen saturation in tumor areas vs. healthy tissue, as early as 30 seconds into the compression period. The hemodynamic contrast is likely driven by the higher tumor stiffness and different viscoelastic relaxation rate, as well as the higher tumor oxygen metabolism rate. PMID:24409390

  17. Mammographic findings after breast cancer treatment with local excision and definitive irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dershaw, D.D.; Shank, B.; Reisinger, S.

    1987-08-01

    Following local excision and definitive irradiation of 163 breast cancers in 160 women, alterations in mammographic patterns were observed for up to 7 years. Skin thickening was observed in 96% of mammograms obtained within 1 year of completing therapy and was most pronounced in women treated with iridium implant, chemotherapy, or axillary dissection. In 76% of mammograms, alterations in the parenchymal pattern, including coarsening of stroma and increased breast density, were seen at 1 year. Neither skin nor parenchymal changes progressed after 1 year. Within 3 years of treatment the parenchymal density, which usually regressed, did not change in all patients. At 3 years skin thickness and the parenchymal pattern had returned to normal in less than 50% of the breasts of these women. Scars developed in approximately one-quarter of women. They were present on the initial post-treatment mammogram and remained unchanged on serial studies. Coarse, benign calcifications also developed in the breasts of about one-quarter of women. Microcalcifications developed in 11 breasts; biopsy specimens of six were benign. Benign microcalcifications may be related to therapy.

  18. Optimal Breast Biopsy Decision-Making Based on Mammographic Features and Demographic Factors.

    PubMed

    Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Burnside, Elizabeth S

    2010-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer affecting women in the United States, where every year more than 20 million mammograms are performed. Breast biopsy is commonly performed on the suspicious findings on mammograms to confirm the presence of cancer. Currently, 700,000 biopsies are performed annually in the U.S.; 55%-85% of these biopsies ultimately are found to be benign breast lesions, resulting in unnecessary treatments, patient anxiety, and expenditures. This paper addresses the decision problem faced by radiologists: When should a woman be sent for biopsy based on her mammographic features and demographic factors? This problem is formulated as a finite-horizon discrete-time Markov decision process. The optimal policy of our model shows that the decision to biopsy should take the age of patient into account; particularly, an older patient's risk threshold for biopsy should be higher than that of a younger patient. When applied to the clinical data, our model outperforms radiologists in the biopsy decision-making problem. This study also derives structural properties of the model, including sufficiency conditions that ensure the existence of a control-limit type policy and nondecreasing control-limits with age.

  19. Applying Statistical Models to Mammographic Screening Data to Understand Growth and Progression of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    size with time); 2. Constant rate of doubling (exponential dependence of size on time); 3. Decreasing rate of growth with size ( Gompertz model). These...Exponential 720.4 -xoeta .0 .0rpet 0.3 203- Gompertz ോ -Gompez 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0 , 0 0.1 1 10 0.1 1 10 Lesion Size Lesion Size Progressive Weakening...Models 0.8 0.7 0.6- Z,0.5 5Linear . 0.4 - -Exponential 72.4 0. •0.3 - Gompertz 0.2 0.1 0 0.1 1 10 Lesion Size Task 4: Manuscript preparation We have

  20. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients.

  1. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  2. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  3. Experience in reading digital images may decrease observer accuracy in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Lewis, Sarah J.; Lee, Warwick; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Reed, Warren M.; McEntee, Mark; Tapia, Kriscia; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Rationale and Objectives: To identify parameters linked to higher levels of performance in screening mammography. In particular we explored whether experience in reading digital cases enhances radiologists' performance. Methods: A total of 60 cases were presented to the readers, of which 20 contained cancers and 40 showed no abnormality. Each case comprised of four images and 129 breast readers participated in the study. Each reader was asked to identify and locate any malignancies using a 1-5 confidence scale. All images were displayed using 5MP monitors, supported by radiology workstations with full image manipulation capabilities. A jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic, figure of merit (JAFROC, FOM) methodology was employed to assess reader performance. Details were obtained from each reader regarding their experience, qualifications and breast reading activities. Spearman and Mann Whitney U techniques were used for statistical analysis. Results: Higher performance was positively related to numbers of years professionally qualified (r= 0.18; P<0.05), number of years reading breast images (r= 0.24; P<0.01), number of mammography images read per year (r= 0.28; P<0.001) and number of hours reading mammographic images per week (r= 0.19; P<0.04). Unexpectedly, higher performance was inversely linked to previous experience with digital images (r= - 0.17; p<0.05) and further analysis, demonstrated that this finding was due to changes in specificity. Conclusion: This study suggests suggestion that readers with experience in digital images reporting may exhibit a reduced ability to correctly identify normal appearances requires further investigation. Higher performance is linked to number of cases read per year.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3, growth hormone, and mammographic density in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Rice, Megan S; Tworoger, Shelley S; Rosner, Bernard A; Pollak, Michael N; Hankinson, Susan E; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2012-12-01

    Higher circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels have been associated with higher mammographic density among women in some, but not all studies. Also, few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and circulating growth hormone (GH) in premenopausal women. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 783 premenopausal women and 436 postmenopausal women who were controls in breast cancer case-control studies nested in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII. Participants provided blood samples in 1989-1990 (NHS) or in 1996-1999 (NHSII), and mammograms were obtained near the time of blood draw. Generalized linear models were used to assess the associations of IGF-1, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio, and GH with percent mammographic density, total dense area, and total non-dense area. Models were adjusted for potential confounders including age and body mass index (BMI), among others. We also assessed whether the associations varied by age or BMI. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, percent mammographic density was not associated with plasma levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, or the IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio. In addition, GH was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in the NHSII. Similarly, total dense area and non-dense area were not significantly associated with any of these analytes. In postmenopausal women, IGF-1 was associated with higher percent mammographic density among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2), but not among overweight/obese women. Overall, plasma IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and GH levels were not associated with mammographic density in a sample of premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  5. [Comparison of film-screen combinations in contrast-detail diagram and with interactive image analysis. 3: Trimodal histograms of gray scale distribution in bar groups of lead pattern images].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, G; Eichbaum, G; Stamm, G

    1998-05-01

    The following four screen film combinations were compared: a) a combination of anticrossover film and UV-light emitting screens, b) a combination of blue-light emitting screens and film and c) two conventional green fluorescing screen film combinations. Radiographs of a specially designed plexiglass phantom (0.2 x 0.2 x 0.12 m3) with bar patterns of lead and plaster and of air, respectively were obtained using the following parameters: 12 pulse generator, 0.6 mm focus size, 4.7 mm aluminum prefilter, a grid with 40 lines/cm (12:1) and a focus-detector distance of 1.15 m. Image analysis was performed using an Ibas system and a Zeiss Kontron computer. Display conditions were the following: display distance 0.12 m, a vario film objective 35/70 (Zeiss), a video camera tube with a PbO photocathode, 625 lines (Siemens Heimann), an Ibas image matrix of 512 x 512 pixels with a spatial resolution of ca. 7 cycles/mm, the projected matrix area was 5000 micron 2. Maxima in the histograms of a grouped bar pattern were estimated as mean values from the bar and gap regions ("mean value method"). They were used to calculate signal contrast, standard deviations of the means and scatter fraction. Comparing the histograms with respect to spatial resolution and kV setting a clear advantage of the UVR system becomes obvious. The quantitative analysis yielded a maximum spatial resolution of approx. 3 cycles/mm for the UVR system at 60 kV which decreased to half of this value at 117 kV caused by the increasing influence of scattered radiation. A ranking of screen-film systems with respect to image quality and dose requirement is presented. For its evaluation an interactive image analysis using the mean value method was found to be superior to signal/noise ratio measurements and visual analysis in respect to diagnostic relevance and saving of time.

  6. Measurement of the radiation dose and assessment of the risk in mammography screening for early detection of cancer of the breast, in Israel.

    PubMed

    Broisman, A; Schlesinger, T; Alfassi, Z B

    2011-01-01

    The mean glandular doses to samples of women attending for mammographic screening are measured routinely at screening centres in Israel. As at present, no detailed and systematic data have been collected regarding the average glandular dose in mammography screening procedures carried out in Israel for the last 20 y. Especially data are lacking related to the glandular dose (GD) involved in mammography with the new digital mammography systems. In this work, partial results of the measurements are presented to asses the radiation dose to the breast and to the glandular tissue within the Israeli national mammography programme updated to year 2009.

  7. Special historical reprint: An assortment of image quality indexes for radiographic film-screen combinations-can they be resolved?

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Robert F. Wagner wrote his first SPIE paper(1) in 1972, within the first year of his joining the Bureau of Radiological Health, the precursor to the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He had been hired to build a laboratory and develop methodologies for assessing the performance of diagnostic x-ray systems, in support of the passage of the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act. In that first year, Bob met with leading scientists in medical imaging as well as other specialties including vision, communications, and television. He formulated a risk-benefit approach to his work, recognizing that the patient exposure associated with the creation of a medical image needed to be considered in light of the usefulness of that image. Bob's manuscript, reprinted in this special section of the Journal of Medical Imaging, provided an insightful review of the image quantification field, including modulation transfer functions, Wiener spectra, and the basis for receiver operating characteristic curves, along with a bold statement that laid the foundation for the entire field of medical imaging assessment to follow, that image quality "must be defined in terms of the task that the image is destined to perform."

  8. Effect of a low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary intervention on change in mammographic density over menopause.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lisa J; Greenberg, Carolyn V; Kriukov, Valentina; Minkin, Salomon; Jenkins, David J A; Yaffe, Martin; Hislop, Gregory; Boyd, Norman F

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that a low-fat dietary intervention for 2 years in women with extensive mammographic density decreased mammographic density to a greater extent than in the control group. Post-hoc analysis indicated that this effect was strongest in women who became postmenopausal during the follow-up period. The purpose of the present study was to determine if this potentially important finding could be confirmed in a new and larger group of subjects with a longer follow-up time. Participants in a low-fat dietary intervention trial who were premenopausal at entry and became postmenopausal during follow-up were examined. Total breast, dense, and non-dense area and percent density were measured in baseline and postmenopause mammograms using a computer-assisted method. Total breast and non dense area increased more in the control group compared to the intervention group (for breast area 2.6 and 0.2 cm(2), respectively; P=0.05, and for non-dense area 10.9 and 8.1 cm(2), respectively; P=0.06). Dense area decreased to a similar degree in both groups (-8.2 and -8.0 cm(2), respectively; P=0.84). Percent density decreased to a slightly greater degree in the control compared to intervention group (-9.4 and -7.8%, respectively, P=0.11). There were no significant differences between study groups after adjustment for weight change. Menopause reduced density to a similar extent in the low-fat diet and control groups. If a low-fat diet reduces breast cancer risk, the effect is unlikely to be through changes in mammographic density at menopause.

  9. Children's accuracy of portion size estimation usin