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Sample records for mammographic imaging screening

  1. Molecular Breast Imaging at Reduced Radiation Dose for Supplemental Screening in Mammographically Dense Breasts

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy Lynn; Tortorelli, Cindy L.; Maxwell, Robert W.; Jones, Katie N.; Toledano, Alicia Y.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of supplemental screening molecular breast imaging (MBI) in women with mammographically dense breasts after system modifications to permit radiation dose reduction. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 1651 asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breasts on prior mammography underwent screening mammography and adjunct MBI performed with 300-MBq 99mTc-sestamibi and a direct-conversion (cadmium zinc telluride) gamma camera, both interpreted independently. The cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsies performed (PPV3) were determined. RESULTS In 1585 participants with a complete reference standard, 21 were diagnosed with cancer: two detected by mammography only, 14 by MBI only, three by both modalities, and two by neither. Of 14 participants with cancers detected only by MBI, 11 had invasive disease (median size, 0.9 cm; range, 0.5–4.1 cm). Nine of 11 (82%) were node negative, and two had bilateral cancers. With the addition of MBI to mammography, the overall cancer detection rate (per 1000 screened) increased from 3.2 to 12.0 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 8.8). The invasive cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 8.8 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 6.9), a relative increase of 363%, while the change in DCIS detection was not statistically significant (from 1.3 to 3.2, p =0.250). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 24%; specificity, 89%; and PPV3, 25%. For the combination, sensitivity was 91% (p < 0.001); specificity, 83% (p < 0.001); and PPV3, 28% (p = 0.70). The recall rate increased from 11.0% with mammography alone to 17.6% (p < 0.001) for the combination; the biopsy rate increased from 1.3% for mammography alone to 4.2% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION When added to screening mammography, MBI performed using a radiopharmaceutical activity acceptable for screening (effective dose 2.4 mSv) yielded a supplemental cancer detection rate of

  2. Journal club: molecular breast imaging at reduced radiation dose for supplemental screening in mammographically dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Deborah J; Hruska, Carrie B; Conners, Amy Lynn; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Maxwell, Robert W; Jones, Katie N; Toledano, Alicia Y; O'Connor, Michael K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of supplemental screening molecular breast imaging (MBI) in women with mammographically dense breasts after system modifications to permit radiation dose reduction. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A total of 1651 asymptomatic women with mammographically dense breasts on prior mammography underwent screening mammography and adjunct MBI performed with 300-MBq (99m)Tc-sestamibi and a direct-conversion (cadmium zinc telluride) gamma camera, both interpreted independently. The cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsies performed (PPV3) were determined. RESULTS. In 1585 participants with a complete reference standard, 21 were diagnosed with cancer: two detected by mammography only, 14 by MBI only, three by both modalities, and two by neither. Of 14 participants with cancers detected only by MBI, 11 had invasive disease (median size, 0.9 cm; range, 0.5-4.1 cm). Nine of 11 (82%) were node negative, and two had bilateral cancers. With the addition of MBI to mammography, the overall cancer detection rate (per 1000 screened) increased from 3.2 to 12.0 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 8.8). The invasive cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 8.8 (p < 0.001) (supplemental yield 6.9), a relative increase of 363%, while the change in DCIS detection was not statistically significant (from 1.3 to 3.2, p =0.250). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 24%; specificity, 89%; and PPV3, 25%. For the combination, sensitivity was 91% (p < 0.001); specificity, 83% (p < 0.001); and PPV3, 28% (p = 0.70). The recall rate increased from 11.0% with mammography alone to 17.6% (p < 0.001) for the combination; the biopsy rate increased from 1.3% for mammography alone to 4.2% (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION. When added to screening mammography, MBI performed using a radiopharmaceutical activity acceptable for screening (effective dose 2.4 mSv) yielded a supplemental cancer detection rate

  3. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p<0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  4. Novel mammographic image features differentiate between interval and screen-detected breast cancer: a case-case study.

    PubMed

    Strand, Fredrik; Humphreys, Keith; Cheddad, Abbas; Törnberg, Sven; Azavedo, Edward; Shepherd, John; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-10-05

    Interval breast cancers are often diagnosed at a more advanced stage than screen-detected cancers. Our aim was to identify features in screening mammograms of the normal breast that would differentiate between future interval cancers and screen-detected cancers, and to understand how each feature affects tumor detectability. From a population-based cohort of invasive breast cancer cases in Stockholm-Gotland, Sweden, diagnosed from 2001 to 2008, we analyzed the contralateral mammogram at the preceding negative screening of 394 interval cancer cases and 1009 screen-detected cancers. We examined 32 different image features in digitized film mammograms, based on three alternative dense area identification methods, by a set of logistic regression models adjusted for percent density with interval cancer versus screen-detected cancer as the outcome. Features were forward-selected into a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for mammographic percent density, age, BMI and use of hormone replacement therapy. The associations of the identified features were assessed also in a sample from an independent cohort. Two image features, 'skewness of the intensity gradient' and 'eccentricity', were associated with the risk of interval compared with screen-detected cancer. For the first feature, the per-standard deviation odds ratios were 1.32 (95 % CI: 1.12 to 1.56) and 1.21 (95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.41) in the primary and validation cohort respectively. For the second feature, they were 1.20 (95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.39) and 1.17 (95%CI: 0.98 to 1.39) respectively. The first feature was associated with the tumor size at screen detection, while the second feature was associated with the tumor size at interval detection. We identified two novel mammographic features in screening mammograms of the normal breast that differentiated between future interval cancers and screen-detected cancers. We present a starting point for further research into features beyond percent density that might be

  5. 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x rays with application to breast CT and mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uytven, Eric Peter

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal tissue. Commercial Computed Tomography (CT) produces a true 3D image yet has a limited role in mammography due to relatively low resolution and contrast. With the intent of enhancing mammography and breast CT, we have developed an algorithm which can produce 3D electron density images using a single projection. Imaging an object with x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at the detector plane. A known incident beam spectrum, beam shape, and arbitrary 3D matrix of electron density values enable a theoretical scattered photon distribution to be calculated. An iterative minimization algorithm is used to make changes to the electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the theoretical and the experimentally measured distributions. The object is characterized by the converged electron density image. This technique has been validated in simulation using data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. At both mammographic and CT energies, a scanning polychromatic pencil beam was used to image breast tissue phantoms containing lesion-like inhomogeneities. The resulting Monte Carlo data is processed using a Nelder-Mead iterative algorithm (MATLAB) to produce the 3D matrix of electron density values. Resulting images have confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect various 1x1x2.5 mm3 lesions with calcification content as low as 0.5% (p<0.005) at a dose comparable to mammography.

  6. Adaptive feature enhancement for mammographic images with wavelet multiresolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lulin; Chen, Chang W.; Parker, Kevin J.

    1997-10-01

    A novel and computationally efficient approach to an adaptive mammographic image feature enhancement using wavelet-based multiresolution analysis is presented. On wavelet decomposition applied to a given mammographic image, we integrate the information of the tree-structured zero crossings of wavelet coefficients and the information of the low-pass-filtered subimage to enhance the desired image features. A discrete wavelet transform with pyramidal structure is employed to speedup the computation for wavelet decomposition and reconstruction. The spatiofrequency localization property of the wavelet transform is exploited based on the spatial coherence of image and the principle of human psycho-visual mechanism. Preliminary results show that the proposed approach is able to adaptively enhance local edge features, suppress noise, and improve global visualization of mammographic image features. This wavelet- based multiresolution analysis is therefore promising for computerized mass screening of mammograms.

  7. Breast image pre-processing for mammographic tissue segmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Wenda; Hogg, Peter; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R E; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-12-01

    During mammographic image acquisition, a compression paddle is used to even the breast thickness in order to obtain optimal image quality. Clinical observation has indicated that some mammograms may exhibit abrupt intensity change and low visibility of tissue structures in the breast peripheral areas. Such appearance discrepancies can affect image interpretation and may not be desirable for computer aided mammography, leading to incorrect diagnosis and/or detection which can have a negative impact on sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography. This paper describes a novel mammographic image pre-processing method to improve image quality for analysis. An image selection process is incorporated to better target problematic images. The processed images show improved mammographic appearances not only in the breast periphery but also across the mammograms. Mammographic segmentation and risk/density classification were performed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative evaluation. When using the processed images, the results indicated more anatomically correct segmentation in tissue specific areas, and subsequently better classification accuracies were achieved. Visual assessments were conducted in a clinical environment to determine the quality of the processed images and the resultant segmentation. The developed method has shown promising results. It is expected to be useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mammographic density assessed on paired raw and processed digital images and on paired screen-film and digital images across three mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Burton, Anya; Byrnes, Graham; Stone, Jennifer; Tamimi, Rulla M; Heine, John; Vachon, Celine; Ozmen, Vahit; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Scott, Christopher; Hipwell, John H; Dickens, Caroline; Schüz, Joachim; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Bertrand, Kimberly; Kwong, Ava; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John; Pérez Gómez, Beatriz; Pollán, Marina; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Jisun; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee-Seng; Nagata, Chisato; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; van Gils, Carla H; Wanders, Johanna O P; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Chiarelli, Anna M; Linton, Linda; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Yaffe, Martin J; Boyd, Norman F; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; McCormack, Valerie A

    2016-12-19

    Inter-women and intra-women comparisons of mammographic density (MD) are needed in research, clinical and screening applications; however, MD measurements are influenced by mammography modality (screen film/digital) and digital image format (raw/processed). We aimed to examine differences in MD assessed on these image types. We obtained 1294 pairs of images saved in both raw and processed formats from Hologic and General Electric (GE) direct digital systems and a Fuji computed radiography (CR) system, and 128 screen-film and processed CR-digital pairs from consecutive screening rounds. Four readers performed Cumulus-based MD measurements (n = 3441), with each image pair read by the same reader. Multi-level models of square-root percent MD were fitted, with a random intercept for woman, to estimate processed-raw MD differences. Breast area did not differ in processed images compared with that in raw images, but the percent MD was higher, due to a larger dense area (median 28.5 and 25.4 cm(2) respectively, mean √dense area difference 0.44 cm (95% CI: 0.36, 0.52)). This difference in √dense area was significant for direct digital systems (Hologic 0.50 cm (95% CI: 0.39, 0.61), GE 0.56 cm (95% CI: 0.42, 0.69)) but not for Fuji CR (0.06 cm (95% CI: -0.10, 0.23)). Additionally, within each system, reader-specific differences varied in magnitude and direction (p < 0.001). Conversion equations revealed differences converged to zero with increasing dense area. MD differences between screen-film and processed digital on the subsequent screening round were consistent with expected time-related MD declines. MD was slightly higher when measured on processed than on raw direct digital mammograms. Comparisons of MD on these image formats should ideally control for this non-constant and reader-specific difference.

  9. Tumor location and detectability in mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, E.L.; Threatt, B.

    1982-10-01

    The adequacy of a film mammogram that does not visualize the retromammary space or ribs has concerned radiologists. The 79 prevalent cancers detected in the 10,000 self-referred woman at the University of Michigan Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project were analyzed for number of films required to detect the cancer, relationship of the cancer to the posterior edge of the film, number of occult lesions, tumor size, histologic type, sensitivity of detection method, and number of interval carcinomas. The mammograms were obtained using a dedicated mammographic machine and the upright position, with visualization of the anterior axillary fold on the mediolateral view. The ribs were not imaged. Of the 79 cancers, 76 were detectable on the mammogram. All were visualized on the mediolateral view, while three were not imaged on the craniocaudal view. Twelve percent of the cancers were within 1 cm of the posterior edge of the film. Only six ''interval'' carcinomas were found in the 10,000 patients within the year of the initial examinations; these women had dense P2 or DY mammographic parenchymal patterns. The detected cancers were smaller and had a significantly higher percentage of noninvasive cancers than in a symptomatic clinical population. Thus, properly exposed film mammograms using vigorous breast compression examine the breast adequately without visualizing the ribs.

  10. Use of BI-RADS 3-probably benign category in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Baum, Janet K; Hanna, Lucy G; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Mahoney, Mary C; Conant, Emily F; Bassett, Lawrence W; Pisano, Etta D

    2011-07-01

    To determine (a) how often the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3 was used in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), either at the time of screening mammography or after work-up, (b) how often subjects actually returned for the recommended follow-up examination, and (c) the rate and stages of any malignancies subsequently found in subjects for whom short-term interval follow-up was recommended. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at all institutions where subjects were enrolled. All subjects participating in DMIST gave informed consent and the study was HIPAA-compliant. A total of 47,599 DMIST-eligible and evaluable subjects, all of whom consented to undergo both digital and screen-film mammography, were included in this analysis. Cases referred for short-term interval follow-up based on digital, screen-film, or both imaging examinations were determined. Compliance with the recommendations and the final outcome (malignancy diagnosis at biopsy or no malignancy confirmed through follow-up) of each evaluable case were determined. A total of 1114 of the 47,599 (2.34%) subjects had tumors assigned a BI-RADS 3 category and were recommended to undergo short-interval follow-up. In this study, 791 of 1114 (71%) of the subjects were compliant with the recommendation and returned for short-interval follow-up. Of the women who did not return for short-interval follow-up, 70% (226 of 323) did return for their next annual mammography. Among all subjects whose tumors were assigned a BI-RADS 3 category either at screening mammography or after additional work-up, nine of 1114 (0.81%) were found to have cancer. Of the nine biopsy-proved cancers, six were invasive cancers and three were ductal carcinoma in situ stage Tis-T1c. The invasive cancers were all less than 2 cm in size. In DMIST, radiologists used the BI-RADS 3 classification infrequently (2.3% of

  11. Study of digital mammographic equipments by phantom image quality.

    PubMed

    Mayo, P; Rodenas, F; Verdú, G; Campayo, J M; Villaescusa, J I

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, the digital radiographic equipments are replacing the traditional film-screen equipments and it is necessary to update the parameters to guarantee the quality of the process. Contrast-detail phantoms are applied to digital radiography to study the threshold contrast-detail sensitivity at operation conditions of the equipment. The phantom that is studied in this work is CDMAM 3.4. One of the most extended indexes to measure the image quality in an objective way is the image quality figure (IQF). The aim of this work is to study the image quality of different images contrast-detail phantom CDMAM 3.4, carrying out the automatic detection of the contrast-detail combination and to establish a parameter which characterize in an objective way the mammographic image quality. This is useful to compare images obtained at different digital mammographic equipments to study the functioning of the equipments that facilitates the evaluation of image contrast and detail resolution.

  12. A new detection algorithm for microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Ma, Yide; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach for microcalcification clusters detection is proposed. At the first time, we make a short analysis of mammographic images with microcalcification lesions to confirm these lesions have much greater gray values than normal regions. After summarizing the specific feature of microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening, we make more focus on preprocessing step including eliminating the background, image enhancement and eliminating the pectoral muscle. In detail, Chan-Vese Model is used for eliminating background. Then, we do the application of combining morphology method and edge detection method. After the AND operation and Sobel filter, we use Hough Transform, it can be seen that the result have outperformed for eliminating the pectoral muscle which is approximately the gray of microcalcification. Additionally, the enhancement step is achieved by morphology. We make effort on mammographic image preprocessing to achieve lower computational complexity. As well known, it is difficult to robustly achieve mammograms analysis due to low contrast between normal and lesion tissues, there are also much noise in such images. After a serious preprocessing algorithm, a method based on blob detection is performed to microcalcification clusters according their specific features. The proposed algorithm has employed Laplace operator to improve Difference of Gaussians (DoG) function in terms of low contrast images. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed method performs on a known public database namely MIAS, rather than synthetic images. The comparison experiments and Cohen's kappa coefficients all demonstrate that our proposed approach can potentially obtain better microcalcification clusters detection results in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Reported Mammographic Density: Film-Screen versus Digital Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Charlotte C.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Buist, Diana S. M.; Geller, Berta A.; Onega, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories for breast density reported by radiologists are lower when digital mammography is used than those reported when film-screen (FS) mammography is used. Materials and Methods: This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Demographic data, risk factors, and BI-RADS breast density categories were collected from five mammography registries that were part of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. Active, passive, or waiver of consent was obtained for all participants. Women aged 40 years and older who underwent at least two screening mammographic examinations less than 36 months apart between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2009, were included. Women with prior breast cancer, augmentation, or use of agents known to affect density were excluded. The main sample included 89 639 women with both FS and digital mammograms. The comparison group included 259 046 women with two FS mammograms and 87 066 women with two digital mammograms. BI-RADS density was cross-tabulated according to the order in which the two types of mammogram were acquired and by the first versus second interpretation. Results: Regardless of acquisition method, the percentage of women with a change in density from one reading to the next was similar. Breast density was lower in 19.8% of the women who underwent FS before digital mammography and 17.1% of those who underwent digital before FS mammography. Similarly, lower density classifications were reported on the basis of the second mammographic examination regardless of acquisition method (15.8%–19.8%). The percentage of agreement between density readings was similar regardless of mammographic types paired (67.3%–71.0%). Conclusion: The study results showed no difference in reported BI-RADS breast density categories according to acquisition method. Reported BI-RADS density categories may be

  14. Mammographic screening in asymptomatic women aged 40 years and older

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-05

    Currently, age-specific recommendations for screening mammograms in asymptomatic women that have been developed by professional, voluntary, and governmental organizations differ. While there is strong epidemiologic evidence that mammographic screening in asymptomatic women aged 50 years or older reduces breast cancer mortality, the evidence for mortality reduction is not as clear for women aged 40 to 49 years. However, as described in this report, findings of further mortality and survival follow-up of subjects in earlier studies, as well as observations from more recent studies, suggest reductions in mortality and better survival in younger women as well. While mammography is currently the most effective method for detecting early breast cancers, some breast cancers may develop during the intervals between screening mammograms. The costs of mammographic screening also require consideration in the process of making national screening recommendations.

  15. Fractal analysis of visual search activity for mass detection during mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Alamudun, Folami; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hudson, Kathleen B; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hammond, Tracy; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the complexity of human visual search activity during mammographic screening using fractal analysis and to investigate its relationship with case and reader characteristics. The study was performed for the task of mammographic screening with simultaneous viewing of four coordinated breast views as typically done in clinical practice. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions collected for 100 mammographic cases (25 normal, 25 benign, 50 malignant) from 10 readers (three board certified radiologists and seven Radiology residents), formed the corpus for this study. The fractal dimension of the readers' visual scanning pattern was computed with the Minkowski-Bouligand box-counting method and used as a measure of gaze complexity. Individual factor and group-based interaction ANOVA analysis was performed to study the association between fractal dimension, case pathology, breast density, and reader experience level. The consistency of the observed trends depending on gaze data representation was also examined. Case pathology, breast density, reader experience level, and individual reader differences are all independent predictors of the complexity of visual scanning pattern when screening for breast cancer. No higher order effects were found to be significant. Fractal characterization of visual search behavior during mammographic screening is dependent on case properties and image reader characteristics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Fractal Analysis of Visual Search Activity for Mass Detection During Mammographic Screening

    DOE PAGES

    Alamudun, Folami T.; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hudson, Kathy; ...

    2017-02-21

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the complexity of human visual search activity during mammographic screening using fractal analysis and to investigate its relationship with case and reader characteristics. Methods: The study was performed for the task of mammographic screening with simultaneous viewing of four coordinated breast views as typically done in clinical practice. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions collected for 100 mammographic cases (25 normal, 25 benign, 50 malignant) and 10 readers (three board certified radiologists and seven radiology residents), formed the corpus data for this study. The fractal dimension of the readers’ visual scanning patternsmore » was computed with the Minkowski–Bouligand box-counting method and used as a measure of gaze complexity. Individual factor and group-based interaction ANOVA analysis was performed to study the association between fractal dimension, case pathology, breast density, and reader experience level. The consistency of the observed trends depending on gaze data representation was also examined. Results: Case pathology, breast density, reader experience level, and individual reader differences are all independent predictors of the visual scanning pattern complexity when screening for breast cancer. No higher order effects were found to be significant. Conclusions: Fractal characterization of visual search behavior during mammographic screening is dependent on case properties and image reader characteristics.« less

  17. Mammographic density and urbanization: a population-based screening study.

    PubMed

    Viel, Jean-François; Rymzhanova, Raouchan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence of female breast cancer that has been consistently reported in urban areas could be mediated by breast density, which is considered to reflect the cumulative exposure of breast tissues to hormones. The aim of this study was to assess how mammographic density varies by the degree of urbanization. The population consisted of 55,597 cancer-free women, aged 50-59 years, who participated in a French breast cancer screening programme (Franche-Comté region) between 2005 and 2009. Ordered logistic regression was run with mammographic density as the outcome, and degree of urbanization as the independent variable, while adjusting for some known confounding factors. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data. A significant positive linear trend with urbanization was found in a univariate approach (P trend <10(-3)), and after adjusting for risk factors (P trend = 10(-3)). A negative and highly significant association with mammographic density was highlighted both for age at the time of mammography (odds ratio (OR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.43, per 10 years), and for low socioeconomic status (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.67-0.75). The OR for hormone replacement therapy use was 1.51 (95% CI 1.43-1.58). Knowledge of this urbanization gradient in density (whatever its mechanism) may help to identify women who may require full-field digital mammography for the early detection of breast cancer, and could assist primary care providers in recommending the best screening strategy in a risk factor-based approach.

  18. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  19. Analysis of mammographic breast density in a group of screening chinese women and breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Pei-Fang; Li, Jun-Nan; Qing, Chun; Ji, Yu; Hao, Xi-Shan; Zhang, Xue-Ning

    2014-01-01

    A dense breast not only reduces the sensitivity of mammography but also is a moderate independent risk factor for breast cancer. The percentage of Western women with fat breast tissue is higher aged 40 years or older. To a certain extent, mammography as a first choice of screening imaging method for Western women of this group is reasonable. Hitherto, the frequency and age distribution of mammographic breast density patterns among Chinese women had not been characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and age distribution of mammographic breast density patterns among a group of Chinese screening women and breast cancer patients in order to provide useful information for age-specific guidelines for breast cancer screening in Chinese women. A retrospective review of a total of 3,394 screening women between August and December 2009 and 2,527 breast cancer patients between July 2011 and June 2012 was conducted. Descriptive analyses were used to examine the association between age and breast density. The significance of differences of breast density between the screening women and the breast cancer patients was examined using nonparametric tests. There was a significant inverse relationship between age and breast density overall (r=-0.37, p<0.01). Breast density of the breast cancer patients in the subgroups of 40-49 years old was greater compared with that of the screening women, the same in those aged 50-54 years and in those 55 years old or older, less than in the screening group. With regard to the Chinese women younger than 55 years old, the diagnostic efficiency of breast cancer screening imaging examinations may be potentially improved by combining screening mammography with ultrasound.

  20. Breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, S; Anderman, C; Grothaus, L

    1989-01-01

    Within the context of an organized breast cancer screening program we conducted a prospective evaluation of the relation between breast cancer risk and participation in mammographic screening. The influence on participation of known breast cancer risk factors, as well as a summary risk label, (i.e. "high", or "moderate") were examined. The overall participation rate was 71 percent among 2,422 women, 50 to 79 years of age, invited to a centralized clinic. Multivariate analyses showed participation to be somewhat decreased among women with late menopause and definitely increased among women with any of the following factors: 1) increased age; 2) a family history of breast cancer; and 3) a previous breast biopsy. Women in the high-risk group were most likely to participate but the effect of the label was stronger among women ages 50 to 59 compared to women ages 60 to 79. The study results are generally consistent with previous findings that participants in screening programs have higher rates of breast cancer. The results also suggest the possibility that providing breast cancer risk information may encourage participation in screening. PMID:2817159

  1. Mammographic screening programmes in Europe: organization, coverage and participation.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; von Karsa, Lawrence; Tomatis, Mariano; Majek, Ondrej; de Wolf, Chris; Lancucki, Lesz; Hofvind, Solveig; Nyström, Lennarth; Segnan, Nereo; Ponti, Antonio; Van Hal, G; Martens, P; Májek, O; Danes, J; von Euler-Chelpin, M; Aasmaa, A; Anttila, A; Becker, N; Péntek, Z; Budai, A; Mádai, S; Fitzpatrick, P; Mooney, T; Zappa, M; Ventura, L; Scharpantgen, A; Hofvind, S; Seroczynski, P; Morais, A; Rodrigues, V; Bento, M J; Gomes de Carvalho, J; Natal, C; Prieto, M; Sánchez-Contador Escudero, C; Zubizarreta Alberti, R; Fernández Llanes, S B; Ascunce, N; Ederra Sanza, M; Sarriugarte Irigoien, G; Salas Trejo, D; Ibáñez Cabanell, J; Wiege, M; Ohlsson, G; Törnberg, S; Korzeniewska, M; de Wolf, C; Fracheboud, J; Patnick J, J; Lancucki, L; Ducarroz, S; Suonio, E

    2012-01-01

    To summarize participation and coverage rates in population mammographic screening programmes for breast cancer in Europe. We used the European Network for Information on Cancer (EUNICE), a web-based data warehouse (EUNICE Breast Cancer Screening Monitoring, EBCSM) for breast cancer screening, to obtain information on programme characteristics, coverage and participation from its initial application in 10 national and 16 regional programmes in 18 European countries. The total population targeted by the screening programme services covered in the report comprised 26.9 million women predominantly aged 50-69. Most of the collected data relates to 2005, 2006 and/or 2007. The average participation rate across all programmes was 53.4% (range 19.4-88.9% of personally invited); or 66.4% excluding Poland, a large programme that initiated personal invitations in 2007. Thirteen of the 26 programmes achieved the European Union benchmark of acceptable participation (>70%), nine achieved the desirable level (>75%). Despite considerable invitation coverage across all programmes (79.3%, range 50.9-115.2%) only 48.2% (range 28.4-92.1%) of the target population were actually screened. The overall invitation and examination coverage excluding Poland was 70.9% and 50.3%, respectively. The results demonstrate the feasibility of European-wide screening monitoring using the EBCSM data warehouse, although further efforts to refine the system and to harmonize standards and data collection practices will be required, to fully integrate all European countries. The more than three-fold difference in the examination coverage should be taken into account in the evaluation of service screening programmes.

  2. The importance of mammographic screening relative to the treatment of women with carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Solin, L J; Legorreta, A; Schultz, D J; Zatz, S; Goodman, R L

    1994-04-11

    The use of mammographic screening for the early detection of breast cancer has been shown to reduce the mortality from breast cancer. However, the impact of mammographic screening relative to the local treatment of the breast (ie, breast-conservation treatment vs mastectomy) is not well established. An analysis was performed of 206 newly diagnosed and treated breast cancers in 201 women identified in 1989 from a health maintenance organization (US Healthcare, Blue Bell, Pa). The 206 breast cancers were evaluated for eligibility for and actual local treatment of the breast with breast-conserving surgery and definitive breast irradiation as a function of mammographic screening for the early detection of breast cancer. Eligibility for local treatment of the breast with breast-conserving surgery and definitive breast irradiation was significantly increased for the breast cancers detected in women who had undergone mammographic screening compared with the breast cancers detected in women who had not undergone mammographic screening (88% vs 60%, respectively; P < .0001). For the breast cancers that were eligible on chart review for treatment with breast-conserving surgery and definitive breast irradiation, there was no significant difference in the actual local treatment of the breast with breast-conserving surgery and definitive breast irradiation for the eligible breast cancers detected in women who had undergone mammographic screening compared with the eligible breast cancers detected in women who had not undergone mammographic screening (44% vs 37%, respectively; P = .40); however, there was a statistically significant difference for the subgroup of women aged 50 years or more (49% vs 21%, respectively; P = .016). These results show that breast cancers detected in women who had undergone mammographic screening were more likely to be eligible for breast-conserving surgery and definitive breast irradiation compared with breast cancers detected in women who had not

  3. Detection of mammographically occult architectural distortion on digital breast tomosynthesis screening: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Luke; Lourenco, Ana P; Mainiero, Martha B

    2014-07-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve the sensitivity of screening mammography. DBT may have the most potential impact in cases of subtle mammographic findings such as architectural distortion (AD). The objective of our study was to determine whether DBT provides better visualization of AD than digital mammography (DM) and whether sensitivity for cancer detection is increased by the addition of DBT as it relates to cases of mammographically occult AD. Retrospective review of BI-RADS category 0 reports from 9982 screening DM examinations with adjunct DBT were searched for the term "architectural distortion" and were reviewed in consensus by three radiologists. ADs were classified by whether they were seen better on DM or DBT, were seen equally well on both, or were occult on either modality. The electronic medical record was reviewed to identify additional imaging studies, biopsy results, and surgical excision pathology results. Review identified 26 cases of AD, 19 (73%) of which were seen only on the DBT images. Of the remaining seven ADs, six were seen better on DBT than DM. On diagnostic workup, nine lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4 or 5. Surgical pathology revealed two invasive carcinomas, two ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, three radial scars, and two lesions showing atypia. The cancer detection rate of DBT in mammographically occult AD was 21% (4/19). The positive predictive value of biopsy was 44%. DBT provides better visualization of AD than DM and identifies a subset of ADs that are occult on DM. Identification of additional ADs on DBT increases the cancer detection rate.

  4. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  5. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  6. The relative effect of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Ripping, Theodora M; van der Waal, Danielle; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are higher in women with a high socioeconomic status (SES). The potential to prevent death from breast cancer is therefore greater in the high SES group. This does, however, require that the effectiveness of screening in the high SES group is equal to or greater than the effectiveness in the low SES group. The aim of this study is to assess the relative effectiveness of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality by SES.In Nijmegen, the Netherlands, women are invited to participate in biennial mammographic screening since 1975. Postal code is collected at each round and is used to calculate the SES of each woman based on the SES indicator of the Netherlands Institute for Social Research. The Dutch average was used to classify the SES score of each woman as either high or low. We designed a case-control study to investigate the effect of mammographic screening in women aged 50 to 75, 40 to 75, and 50 to 69 years, and calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Among the women invited to the mammographic screening program in Nijmegen, 10% had a high SES. In women aged 50 to 75 years, the breast cancer death rate was 38% lower in screened women than in unscreened women. The ORs for women with high SES (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.31-2.19) and low SES did not differ significantly (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47-0.78).Mammographic screening reduces breast cancer mortality, but we did not observe a significant difference in the relative effectiveness of screening by SES. If the effectiveness of mammographic screening is indeed not dependent on SES status, the absolute number of breast cancer deaths prevented by mammographic screening will be greater in the high SES than low SES group, because women with a high SES have a greater risk of breast cancer death.

  7. Mammographic images segmentation based on chaotic map clustering algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work investigates the applicability of a novel clustering approach to the segmentation of mammographic digital images. The chaotic map clustering algorithm is used to group together similar subsets of image pixels resulting in a medically meaningful partition of the mammography. Methods The image is divided into pixels subsets characterized by a set of conveniently chosen features and each of the corresponding points in the feature space is associated to a map. A mutual coupling strength between the maps depending on the associated distance between feature space points is subsequently introduced. On the system of maps, the simulated evolution through chaotic dynamics leads to its natural partitioning, which corresponds to a particular segmentation scheme of the initial mammographic image. Results The system provides a high recognition rate for small mass lesions (about 94% correctly segmented inside the breast) and the reproduction of the shape of regions with denser micro-calcifications in about 2/3 of the cases, while being less effective on identification of larger mass lesions. Conclusions We can summarize our analysis by asserting that due to the particularities of the mammographic images, the chaotic map clustering algorithm should not be used as the sole method of segmentation. It is rather the joint use of this method along with other segmentation techniques that could be successfully used for increasing the segmentation performance and for providing extra information for the subsequent analysis stages such as the classification of the segmented ROI. PMID:24666766

  8. Mammographic images segmentation based on chaotic map clustering algorithm.

    PubMed

    Iacomi, Marius; Cascio, Donato; Fauci, Francesco; Raso, Giuseppe

    2014-03-25

    This work investigates the applicability of a novel clustering approach to the segmentation of mammographic digital images. The chaotic map clustering algorithm is used to group together similar subsets of image pixels resulting in a medically meaningful partition of the mammography. The image is divided into pixels subsets characterized by a set of conveniently chosen features and each of the corresponding points in the feature space is associated to a map. A mutual coupling strength between the maps depending on the associated distance between feature space points is subsequently introduced. On the system of maps, the simulated evolution through chaotic dynamics leads to its natural partitioning, which corresponds to a particular segmentation scheme of the initial mammographic image. The system provides a high recognition rate for small mass lesions (about 94% correctly segmented inside the breast) and the reproduction of the shape of regions with denser micro-calcifications in about 2/3 of the cases, while being less effective on identification of larger mass lesions. We can summarize our analysis by asserting that due to the particularities of the mammographic images, the chaotic map clustering algorithm should not be used as the sole method of segmentation. It is rather the joint use of this method along with other segmentation techniques that could be successfully used for increasing the segmentation performance and for providing extra information for the subsequent analysis stages such as the classification of the segmented ROI.

  9. Association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Leader, Joseph K.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We recently investigated a new mammographic image feature based risk factor to predict near-term breast cancer risk after a woman has a negative mammographic screening. We hypothesized that unlike the conventional epidemiology-based long-term (or lifetime) risk factors, the mammographic image feature based risk factor value will increase as the time lag between the negative and positive mammography screening decreases. The purpose of this study is to test this hypothesis. From a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database with 1278 cases, we collected all available sequential FFDM examinations for each case including the "current" and 1 to 3 most recently "prior" examinations. All "prior" examinations were interpreted negative, and "current" ones were either malignant or recalled negative/benign. We computed 92 global mammographic texture and density based features, and included three clinical risk factors (woman's age, family history and subjective breast density BIRADS ratings). On this initial feature set, we applied a fast and accurate Sequential Forward Floating Selection (SFFS) feature selection algorithm to reduce feature dimensionality. The features computed on both mammographic views were individually/ separately trained using two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers. The classification scores of the two ANNs were then merged with a sequential ANN. The results show that the maximum adjusted odds ratios were 5.59, 7.98, and 15.77 for using the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st "prior" FFDM examinations, respectively, which demonstrates a higher association of mammographic image feature change and an increasing risk trend of developing breast cancer in the near-term after a negative screening.

  10. Results of a pilot programme of mammographic breast cancer screening in the Western Cape.

    PubMed

    Apffelstaedt, J P; Hattingh, R; Baatjes, K; Wessels, N

    2014-04-01

    Mammographic screening programmes are now established in developing countries. We present an analysis of the first screening programme in sub-Saharan Africa. Women aged > or = 40 years were identified at three primary healthcare centres in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, and after giving informed consent underwent mammography at a mobile unit. After a single reading, patients with American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) 3 - 5 lesions were referred to a tertiary centre for further management. Between 1 February 2011 and 31 August 2012, 2 712 screening mammograms were performed. A total of 261 screening mammograms were reported as BIRADS 3 - 5 (recall rate 9.6%). Upon review of the 250 available screening mammograms, 58 (23%) were rated benign or no abnormalities (BIRADS 1 and 2) and no further action was taken. In 32 women, tissue was acquired (biopsy rate for the series 1.2%); 10 cancers were diagnosed (biopsy malignancy rate 31%). For the entire series of 2 712 screening mammograms, the cancer diagnosis rate was 3.7/1 000 examinations. Of 10 cancers diagnosed at screening, 5 were TNM clinical stage 0, 2 stage I and 3 stage II. The low cancer detection rate achieved, and the technical and multiple administrative problems experienced do not justify installation of a screening programme using the model utilised in this series.

  11. Performance of a subsidised mammographic screening programme in Malaysia, a middle-income Asian country.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marianne; Mariapun, Shivaani; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2017-01-28

    The incidence of breast cancer in Asia is increasing because of urbanization and lifestyle changes. In the developing countries in Asia, women present at late stages, and mortality is high. Mammographic screening is the only evidence-based screening modality that reduces breast cancer mortality. To date, only opportunistic screening is offered in the majority of Asian countries because of the lack of justification and funding. Nevertheless, there have been few reports on the effectiveness of such programmes. In this study, we describe the cancer detection rate and challenges experienced in an opportunistic mammographic screening programme in Malaysia. From October 2011 to June 2015, 1,778 asymptomatic women, aged 40-74 years, underwent subsidised mammographic screening. All patients had a clinical breast examination before mammographic screening, and women with mammographic abnormalities were referred to a surgeon. The cancer detection rate and variables associated with a recommendation for adjunct ultrasonography were determined. The mean age for screening was 50.8 years and seven cancers (0.39%) were detected. The detection rate was 0.64% in women aged 50 years and above, and 0.12% in women below 50 years old. Adjunct ultrasonography was recommended in 30.7% of women, and was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, mammographic density and radiologist's experience. The main reasons cited for recommendation of an adjunct ultrasound was dense breasts and mammographic abnormalities. The cancer detection rate is similar to population-based screening mammography programmes in high-income Asian countries. Unlike population-based screening programmes in Caucasian populations where the adjunct ultrasonography rate is 2-4%, we report that 3 out of 10 women attending screening mammography were recommended for adjunct ultrasonography. This could be because Asian women attending screening are likely premenopausal and hence have denser breasts. Radiologists who

  12. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  13. Mammographic screening for breast cancer in a resource-restricted environment.

    PubMed

    Apffelstaedt, S P; Dalmayer, L; Baatjes, K

    2014-04-01

    Mammographic screening is carried out at public sector hospitals as part of clinical practice. We report the experience of such screening at Tygerberg Academic Hospital (TBAH), a tertiary referral hospital in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. All mammograms performed between 2003 and 2012 at TBAH were analysed regarding patient demographics, clinical data, indication and outcome according to the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Screening mammography was offered to patients > 40 years of age and mammograms were read by experienced breast surgeons. Patients with BIRADS 3 and 4 lesions were recalled for short-term follow-up, further imaging or tissue acquisition. Patients with BIRADS 5 lesions were recalled for tissue acquisition. Further imaging, method of tissue acquisition, histology results and use of neo-adjuvant therapy were also recorded. Of 16 105 mammograms, 3 774 (23.4%) were carried out for screening purposes. The median age of patients undergoing screening was 54 years. Of 407 women with mammograms that were reported as BIRADS 3 - 5 (10.8% of screening mammograms), 187 (46% of recalled women) went on to have further imaging only. Tissue was acquired in 175 patients (43% of recalled women), comprising a biopsy rate of 4.6% of the total series. The malignancy rate in cases in which tissue acquisition was done was 25%. Forty-three breast cancers were diagnosed (11.4/1 000 examinations). Of the cancers, nine (31%) were ductal carcinomas in situ. Of 20 invasive cancers, nine (45%) were < 10 mm in size. Of the invasive cancers, 40% were node-positive. The cancer diagnosis rate indicates a high breast cancer load in an urbanised population.

  14. Does raloxifene therapy affect mammographic breast cancer screening in postmenopausal patients?

    PubMed

    Cirpan, T; Akercan, F; Itil, I M; Gundem, G; Bilgen, I; Yucebilgin, M S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine mammographic breast density changes during raloxifene therapy in postmenopausal patients Fifty-five cases who were using raloxifen therapy were included in this retrospective analysis. Raloxifene was given for osteopenia and osteoporosis according to low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). None of the patients were using hormone replacement therapy 12 months before the initiation of raloxifene treatment or during the study. Mammographic breast density was determined by mammography before the initiation of raloxifene treatment (baseline) and after 12 to 16 months of therapy. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density score was used for the evaluation of mammographic density. There was no change in mammographic breast density when the baseline and the first mammography taken after the initiation of therapy were compared (p = 0.32). There was no significant correlation between the duration of raloxifene treatment and mammographic density measured after raloxifene treatment (r = -0.158, p = 0.25). Only in one patient did the BI-RADS classification of 2 change to 3 after 12 months of therapy. In conclusion, raloxifene therapy for 12 to 16 months does not increase mammographic breast density in postmenopausal women with low bone mass.

  15. Adaptation and visual search in mammographic images

    PubMed Central

    Kompaniez-Dunigan, Elysse; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.; Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiologists face the visually challenging task of detecting suspicious features within the complex and noisy backgrounds characteristic of medical images. We used a search task to examine whether salience of target features in x-ray mammograms could be enhanced by prior adaptation to the spatial structure of the images. Observers were not radiologists and thus had no diagnostic training with the images. Stimuli were randomly selected sections from normal mammograms previously classified with BIRADS Density scores of “fatty” vs. “dense,” corresponding to differences in the relative quantities of fat vs. fibroglandular tissue. These categories reflect conspicuous differences in visual texture, with dense tissue being more likely to obscure lesion detection. Targets were simulated masses corresponding to bright Gaussian spots (sd = .18 deg), superimposed by adding the luminance to the background. A single target was added to each image at random locations, with contrast varied over 5 levels so that they varied from difficult to easy to detect. Reaction times were measured for detecting the target location (left or right side), before or after adapting to a gray field or random sequences of a different set of dense or fatty images. Observers were faster at detecting the targets in either dense or fatty images after adapting to the specific background type (dense or fatty) they were searching within. Thus the adaptation led to a facilitation of search performance that was selective for the background texture. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptation allows observers to more effectively suppress the specific structure of the background, thereby heightening visual salience and search efficiency. PMID:25720760

  16. Adaptation and visual search in mammographic images.

    PubMed

    Kompaniez-Dunigan, Elysse; Abbey, Craig K; Boone, John M; Webster, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Radiologists face the visually challenging task of detecting suspicious features within the complex and noisy backgrounds characteristic of medical images. We used a search task to examine whether the salience of target features in x-ray mammograms could be enhanced by prior adaptation to the spatial structure of the images. The observers were not radiologists, and thus had no diagnostic training with the images. The stimuli were randomly selected sections from normal mammograms previously classified with BIRADS Density scores of "fatty" versus "dense," corresponding to differences in the relative quantities of fat versus fibroglandular tissue. These categories reflect conspicuous differences in visual texture, with dense tissue being more likely to obscure lesion detection. The targets were simulated masses corresponding to bright Gaussian spots, superimposed by adding the luminance to the background. A single target was randomly added to each image, with contrast varied over five levels so that they varied from difficult to easy to detect. Reaction times were measured for detecting the target location, before or after adapting to a gray field or to random sequences of a different set of dense or fatty images. Observers were faster at detecting the targets in either dense or fatty images after adapting to the specific background type (dense or fatty) that they were searching within. Thus, the adaptation led to a facilitation of search performance that was selective for the background texture. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptation allows observers to more effectively suppress the specific structure of the background, thereby heightening visual salience and search efficiency.

  17. Characterizing mammographic images by using generic texture features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer, its use is limited in clinical practice because of a lack of automated and standardized measurement methods. The aims of this study were to evaluate a variety of automated texture features in mammograms as risk factors for breast cancer and to compare them with the percentage mammographic density (PMD) by using a case-control study design. Methods A case-control study including 864 cases and 418 controls was analyzed automatically. Four hundred seventy features were explored as possible risk factors for breast cancer. These included statistical features, moment-based features, spectral-energy features, and form-based features. An elaborate variable selection process using logistic regression analyses was performed to identify those features that were associated with case-control status. In addition, PMD was assessed and included in the regression model. Results Of the 470 image-analysis features explored, 46 remained in the final logistic regression model. An area under the curve of 0.79, with an odds ratio per standard deviation change of 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.65), was obtained with validation data. Adding the PMD did not improve the final model. Conclusions Using texture features to predict the risk of breast cancer appears feasible. PMD did not show any additional value in this study. With regard to the features assessed, most of the analysis tools appeared to reflect mammographic density, although some features did not correlate with PMD. It remains to be investigated in larger case-control studies whether these features can contribute to increased prediction accuracy. PMID:22490545

  18. Mammographic images segmentation using texture descriptors.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Angelica A; Mello, Carlos A B; Santos, Wellington P; Cavalcanti, George D C

    2009-01-01

    Tissue classification in mammography can help the diagnosis of breast cancer by separating healthy tissue from lesions. We present herein the use of three texture descriptors for breast tissue segmentation purposes: the Sum Histogram, the Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Local Binary Pattern (LBP). A modification of the LBP is also proposed for a better distinction of the tissues. In order to segment the image into its tissues, these descriptors are compared using a fidelity index and two clustering algorithms: k-Means and SOM (Self-Organizing Maps).

  19. Breast-Specific γ-Imaging for the Detection of Mammographically Occult Breast Cancer in Women at Increased Risk.

    PubMed

    Brem, Rachel F; Ruda, Rachel C; Yang, Jialu L; Coffey, Caitrín M; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A

    2016-05-01

    Breast-specific γ-imaging (BSGI) is a physiologic imaging modality that can detect subcentimeter and mammographically occult breast cancer, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the incremental increase in breast cancer detection when BSGI is used as an adjunct to mammography in women at increased risk for breast cancer. All patients undergoing BSGI from April 2010 through January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Eligible patients were identified as women at increased risk for breast cancer and whose most recent mammogram was benign. Examinations exhibiting focally increased radiotracer uptake were considered positive. Incremental increase in cancer detection was calculated as the percentage of mammographically occult BSGI-detected breast cancer and the number of mammographically occult breast cancers detected per 1,000 women screened. Included in this study were 849 patients in whom 14 BSGI examinations detected mammographically occult breast cancer. Patients ranged in age from 26 to 83 y, with a mean age of 57 y. Eleven of 14 cancers were detected in women with dense breasts. The addition of BSGI to the annual breast screen of asymptomatic women at increased risk for breast cancer yields 16.5 cancers per 1,000 women screened. When high-risk lesions and cancers were combined, BSGI detected 33.0 high-risk lesions and cancers per 1,000 women screened. BSGI is a reliable adjunct modality to screening mammography that increases breast cancer detection by 1.7% (14/849) in women at increased risk for breast cancer, comparable to results reported for breast MRI. BSGI is beneficial in breast cancer detection in women at increased risk, particularly in those with dense breasts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Statistical Segmentation of Regions of Interest on a Mammographic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Mouloud; Rasigni, Monique; Bourennane, Salah; Juhan, Valerie

    2007-12-01

    This paper deals with segmentation of breast anatomical regions, pectoral muscle, fatty and fibroglandular regions, using a Bayesian approach. This work is a part of a computer aided diagnosis project aiming at evaluating breast cancer risk and its association with characteristics (density, texture, etc.) of regions of interest on digitized mammograms. Novelty in this paper consists in applying and adapting Markov random field for detecting breast anatomical regions on digitized mammograms whereas most of previous works were focused on masses and microcalcifications. The developed method was tested on 50 digitized mammograms of the mini-MIAS database. Computer segmentation is compared to manual one made by a radiologist. A good agreement is obtained on 68% of the mini-MIAS mammographic image database used in this study. Given obtained segmentation results, the proposed method could be considered as a satisfying first approach for segmenting regions of interest in a breast.

  1. Mammographic screening of women aged 40-49 years. Benefit, risk, and cost considerations.

    PubMed

    Feig, S A

    1995-11-15

    A recently published meta-analysis of seven randomized trials showed a statistically significant 24% reduction in mortality rate with the use of mammographic screening for women age 40-49 years. The benefit would have been even greater if screening had been performed at shorter annual intervals with the most up-to-date mammographic equipment. Additionally, these trials underestimated benefit due to inclusion of breast cancer deaths among study group women who refused to undergo screening. In contrast to these documented benefits, no woman has ever been shown to have developed breast cancer as a result of mammography, even with multiple examinations at doses many times higher than the current 0.25 cGy from a two-view-per-breast examination. The possibility of low dose risk has been theorized based on excess rates of cancer among populations that have received doses of 100 to more than 1000 cGy, such as atomic-bomb survivors. If there is a risk, it is negligible or nonexistent compared with the screening benefit. The total cost of screening is a summation of the following costs: (1) screening mammogram plus down-stream costs of supplementary mammographic views and/or ultrasound for further evaluation of some screenees; (2) mammographic follow-up; and (3) core or excisional biopsy for those women in whom a suspicious abnormality persists after workup. Based on a range of procedural costs, a 30% reduction in breast cancer deaths due to incidence screening of women age 40-49 will cost $6,930.00-$13,413.00 per year of life expectancy gained.

  2. [Clinical and mammographic screening in a district of Milan: organization, social influence and results].

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, A; Cescon, S; Moro, G; Verga, M; Saibene, F; Micheli, A

    1993-12-01

    A reduction in the mortality rate for breast cancer in women over 50 years undergoing mammographic screening has been reported in many studies. Since the first experience in Florence in 1970, mammographic screenings on a population from different areas of Italy began. We report the experience carried out in the 16th District of Milan among women from 50 to 60 years of age. A promotional activity with the use of local media supported the program. The screening was based on two-view conventional mammography and clinical examination. Immediate response was given to the women. The compliance was 60%. Mainly immigrants, with only primary school education, mothers of several children and freelancers seem to be the main features of the women in the non-attenders group.

  3. The influence of mammographic technologists on radiologists’ ability to interpret screening mammograms in community practice

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Louise M.; Benefield, Thad; Marsh, Mary W.; Schroeder, Bruce F.; Durham, Danielle; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Bowling, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the mammographic technologist has an effect on the radiologists’ interpretative performance of screening mammography in community practice. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board approved retrospective cohort study, we included Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR) data from 372 radiologists and 356 mammographic technologists from 1994 to 2009 who performed 1,003,276 screening mammograms. Measures of interpretative performance (recall rate, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV1), and cancer detection rate (CDR)) were ascertained prospectively with cancer outcomes collected from the state cancer registry and pathology reports. To determine if the mammographic technologist influenced the radiologists’ performance, we employed mixed effects logistic regression models, including a radiologist-specific random effect and taking into account the clustering of examinations across women, separately for screen-film mammography (SFM) and full field digital mammography (FFDM). Results Of the 356 mammographic technologists included, 343 performed 889,347 SFM examinations and 51 performed 113,929 FFDM examinations, and 38 performed both SFM and FFDM. A total of 4,328 cancers were reported for SFM and 564 cancers for FFDM. The technologists had a statistically significant effect on the radiologists’ recall rate, sensitivity, specificity and CDR for both SFM and FFDM (p-values<0.01). For PPV1, variability by technologist was observed for SFM (p-value<0.0001) but not for FFDM (p-value=0.088). Conclusion The interpretative performance of radiologists in screening mammography varies substantially by the technologist performing the examination. Additional studies should aim to identify technologist characteristics that may explain this variation. PMID:25435185

  4. The influence of mammographic technologists on radiologists' ability to interpret screening mammograms in community practice.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Benefield, Thad; Marsh, Mary W; Schroeder, Bruce F; Durham, Danielle D; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Bowling, J Michael

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether the mammographic technologist has an effect on the radiologists' interpretative performance of screening mammography in community practice. In this institutional review board-approved retrospective cohort study, we included Carolina Mammography Registry data from 372 radiologists and 356 mammographic technologists from 1994 to 2009 who performed 1,003,276 screening mammograms. Measures of interpretative performance (recall rate, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV1], and cancer detection rate [CDR]) were ascertained prospectively with cancer outcomes collected from the state cancer registry and pathology reports. To determine if the mammographic technologist influenced the radiologists' performance, we used mixed effects logistic regression models, including a radiologist-specific random effect and taking into account the clustering of examinations across women, separately for screen-film mammography (SFM) and full-field digital mammography (FFDM). Of the 356 mammographic technologists included, 343 performed 889,347 SFM examinations, 51 performed 113,929 FFDM examinations, and 38 performed both SFM and FFDM examinations. A total of 4328 cancers were reported for SFM and 564 cancers for FFDM. The technologists had a statistically significant effect on the radiologists' recall rate, sensitivity, specificity, and CDR for both SFM and FFDM (P values <.01). For PPV1, variability by technologist was observed for SFM (P value <.0001) but not for FFDM (P value = .088). The interpretative performance of radiologists in screening mammography varies substantially by the technologist performing the examination. Additional studies should aim to identify technologist characteristics that may explain this variation. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of mammographic masses based on level set segmentation with new image features and patient information

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan Heangping; Ge Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Nees, Alexis; Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Zhou Chuan; Zhang Yiheng; Cui Jing

    2008-01-15

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for characterization of mammographic masses as malignant or benign has the potential to assist radiologists in reducing the biopsy rate without increasing false negatives. The purpose of this study was to develop an automated method for mammographic mass segmentation and explore new image based features in combination with patient information in order to improve the performance of mass characterization. The authors' previous CAD system, which used the active contour segmentation, and morphological, textural, and spiculation features, has achieved promising results in mass characterization. The new CAD system is based on the level set method and includes two new types of image features related to the presence of microcalcifications with the mass and abruptness of the mass margin, and patient age. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was used to merge the extracted features into a classification score. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The authors' primary data set consisted of 427 biopsy-proven masses (200 malignant and 227 benign) in 909 regions of interest (ROIs) (451 malignant and 458 benign) from multiple mammographic views. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used for training and testing. The new CAD system based on the level set segmentation and the new mammographic feature space achieved a view-based A{sub z} value of 0.83{+-}0.01. The improvement compared to the previous CAD system was statistically significant (p=0.02). When patient age was included in the new CAD system, view-based and case-based A{sub z} values were 0.85{+-}0.01 and 0.87{+-}0.02, respectively. The study also demonstrated the consistency of the newly developed CAD system by evaluating the statistics of the weights of the LDA classifiers in leave-one-case-out classification. Finally, an independent test on the publicly available digital database

  6. Spectral analysis of mammographic images using a multitaper method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Gang; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Power spectral analysis in radiographic images is conventionally performed using a windowed overlapping averaging periodogram. This study describes an alternative approach using a multitaper technique and compares its performance with that of the standard method. This tool will be valuable in power spectrum estimation of images, whose content deviates significantly from uniform white noise. The performance of the multitaper approach will be evaluated in terms of spectral stability, variance reduction, bias, and frequency precision. The ultimate goal is the development of a useful tool for image quality assurance. Methods: A multitaper approach uses successive data windows of increasing order. This mitigates spectral leakage allowing one to calculate a reduced-variance power spectrum. The multitaper approach will be compared with the conventional power spectrum method in several typical situations, including the noise power spectra (NPS) measurements of simulated projection images of a uniform phantom, NPS measurement of real detector images of a uniform phantom for two clinical digital mammography systems, and the estimation of the anatomic noise in mammographic images (simulated images and clinical mammograms). Results: Examination of spectrum variance versus frequency resolution and bias indicates that the multitaper approach is superior to the conventional single taper methods in the prevention of spectrum leakage and variance reduction. More than four times finer frequency precision can be achieved with equivalent or less variance and bias. Conclusions: Without any shortening of the image data length, the bias is smaller and the frequency resolution is higher with the multitaper method, and the need to compromise in the choice of regions of interest size to balance between the reduction of variance and the loss of frequency resolution is largely eliminated.

  7. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-Ray Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2002-06-01

    Monochromatic imaging is typically done with synchrotron sources. These sources are expensive and not practical for clinical settings. However, conventional laboratory sources normally have insufficient intensity. Polycapillary x-ray optics can be used to efficiently produce an intense parallel beam, which can be diffracted from a crystal to create monochromatic radiation. Monochromatic parallel beam imaging produces high subject contrast, high resolution, and low patient dose. Contrast, resolution, and intensity measurements were performed with both high and low angular acceptance crystals. Testing was first done at 8 keV with an intense copper rotating anode source. Preliminary l7.5 kev measurements were then made with a molybdenum source. At 8 keV, contrast enhancement was a factor of five relative to the polychromatic case, in good agreement with theoretical values. At l7.5 kev, monochromatic subject contrast was a factor of two times greater than the conventional polychromatic contrast. The measured angular resolution with a silicon crystal is 0.6 mrad at 8 keV, and 0.2 - 0.3 mrad at 17.5 keV. For a 50-mm thick patient, this angle corresponds to 50 lp/mm with an ideal detector. The use of polychromatic collimating optics allow monochromatic mammographic imaging measurements with a conventional x-ray source in a practical clinical setting.

  8. Demographic changes in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis and age associated with population-based mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Verdial, Francys C; Etzioni, Ruth; Duggan, Catherine; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are influenced by early-detection methods, including mammographic screening. Demographic changes in US statistics serve as a model for changes that can be anticipated in countries where mammographic screening has not been implemented. SEER statistics (1973-2013) for breast cancer mortality, incidence, stage at diagnosis, and age at diagnosis were examined. Temporal associations between screening changes and breast cancer demographics in the US were documented. Before 1982 (pre-screening), breast cancer incidence in the US remained stable, with similar incidence of localized and regional cancers, and with in-situ disease comprising <2% of diagnosed disease.(1) During the transitional phase of mammographic screening, breast cancer incidence increased. In 1991, breast cancer age-adjusted mortality rates began decreasing and have continued to decrease. In the post-screening phase, stage distribution stabilized, but now with localized and in-situ disease representing the majority of diagnosed cases. The median age at diagnosis has increased to 61 years. Mammographic screening increases breast cancer incidence, shifts the stage distribution toward earlier stage disease, and in high-income countries, is associated with improved survival. Whether similar improvement in breast cancer survival can be achieved in the absence of mammographic screening has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Time-frequency analysis of functional optical mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Randall L.; Graber, Harry L.; Schmitz, Christoph H.; Tarantini, Frank; Khoury, Georges; Naar, David J.; Panetta, Thomas F.; Lewis, Theophilus; Pei, Yaling

    2003-07-01

    We have introduced working technology that provides for time-series imaging of the hemoglobin signal in large tissue structures. In this study we have explored our ability to detect aberrant time-frequency responses of breast vasculature for subjects with Stage II breast cancer at rest and in response to simple provocations. The hypothesis being explored is that time-series imaging will be sensitive to the known structural and functional malformations of the tumor vasculature. Mammographic studies were conducted using an adjustable hemisheric measuring head containing 21 source and 21 detector locations (441 source-detector pairs). Simultaneous dual-wavelength studies were performed at 760 and 830 nm at a framing rate of ~2.7 Hz. Optical measures were performed on women lying prone with the breast hanging in a pendant position. Two class of measures were performed: (1) 20- minute baseline measure wherein the subject was at rest; (2) provocation studies wherein the subject was asked to perform some simple breathing maneuvers. Collected data were analyzed to identify the time-frequency structure and central tendencies of the detector responses and those of the image time series. Imaging data were generated using the Normalized Difference Method (Pei et al., Appl. Opt. 40, 5755-5769, 2001). Results obtained clearly document three classes of anomalies when compared to the normal contralateral breast. 1) Breast tumors exhibit altered oxygen supply/demand imbalance in response to an oxidative challenge (breath hold). 2) The vasomotor response of the tumor vasculature is mainly depressed and exhibits an altered modulation. 3) The affected area of the breast wherein the altered vasomotor signature is seen extends well beyond the limits of the tumor itself.

  10. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.; Flowers, Chris I.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  11. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  12. Breast density changes associated with hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. Effects on the specificity and sensitivity of mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Patella, A; Marziani, R; Schippa, A; Benedetti, S; Mossa, S; Mossa, B

    2005-01-01

    Postmenopausal HRT use is associated with an increase of mammographic density and reduction of sensitivity and specificity of mammography results and an increase of false-positive and false-negative outcomes. The increased density does not allow a good evaluation of the exam. Mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer, but the link between changes in breast density and difference in breast cancer risk, remain uncertain. On the other hand, today specific guidelines and protocols to optimize the screening of neoplastic breast pathology in HRT users do not exist and it is unknown if short-term suspension of therapy improves mammographic sensitivity. More information is required to define this important risk factor.

  13. [Complex evaluation of film mammographic imaging systems. 2. Comparison of 18 systems using a signal-noise matrix].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, M; Weskamp, P

    1984-06-01

    The concept of the signal-noise matrix with physiological optical noise measurements for defining visibility thresholds provides a quantitative means for comparing film mammographic systems (9). Eighteen such systems were compared. A graded list can be produced relating the integrated signal-noise ratio to area and detail contrast (image quality) and to the required radiation dose (dose efficiency). For this, maximal dose (industrial film) and minimal image quality can be taken into consideration. In this list, in agreement with other publications (12) high resolution film-screen combinations, using industrial film (eg. Cronex 70/screen) come top. In combination with a grid technique, this system achieves a greatly superior image quality. Amongst commercial film-screen systems, only the Trimax mammography system with high resolution screens is comparable. All other commercial systems (single or double coated films) are unsatisfactory with respect to their dose efficiency and image quality. Some industrial films without screens (Mamoray M4) are intermediate between high definition and other commercial systems. Ninety-second, screenless films offered for mammography appear unsuitable for this purpose, both in view of their dose efficiency and image quality.

  14. Mammographic screening debate on study design: a need to move the field forward.

    PubMed

    Ursin, Giske

    2012-12-12

    The mammographic screening debate has been running for decades. The temperature of this debate is unusually high, and all participants, regardless of viewpoint, seem to have a conflict of interest. Another unusual aspect of this debate is the focus on study design, and in particular on designs that some think exceeded their usefulness decades ago. What are the questions that remain to be answered in this debate? Are there methodological issues that have not been adequately addressed? Do we have the right tools to provide up-to-date answers to how women can best protect themselves against dying from breast cancer? This commentary discusses some of the current issues.See related Opinion articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/106 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/163.

  15. Using component technologies for web based wavelet enhanced mammographic image visualization.

    PubMed

    Sakellaropoulos, P; Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G

    2000-01-01

    The poor contrast detectability of mammography can be dealt with by domain specific software visualization tools. Remote desktop client access and time performance limitations of a previously reported visualization tool are addressed, aiming at more efficient visualization of mammographic image resources existing in web or PACS image servers. This effort is also motivated by the fact that at present, web browsers do not support domain-specific medical image visualization. To deal with desktop client access the tool was redesigned by exploring component technologies, enabling the integration of stand alone domain specific mammographic image functionality in a web browsing environment (web adaptation). The integration method is based on ActiveX Document Server technology. ActiveX Document is a part of Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) extensible systems object technology, offering new services in existing applications. The standard DICOM 3.0 part 10 compatible image-format specification Papyrus 3.0 is supported, in addition to standard digitization formats such as TIFF. The visualization functionality of the tool has been enhanced by including a fast wavelet transform implementation, which allows for real time wavelet based contrast enhancement and denoising operations. Initial use of the tool with mammograms of various breast structures demonstrated its potential in improving visualization of diagnostic mammographic features. Web adaptation and real time wavelet processing enhance the potential of the previously reported tool in remote diagnosis and education in mammography.

  16. Mammographic Imaging Studies Using the Monte Carlo Image Simulation-Differential Sampling (MCMIS-DS) Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 1-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of certain design changes in the Fisher Senoscan mammography system and in the degree of breast compression on the discernability of microcalcifications in calcification clusters often observed in mammograms with tumor lesions. The most important design change that one can contemplate in a digital mammography system to improve resolution of calcifications is the reduction of pixel dimensions of the digital detector. Breast compression is painful to the patient and is though to be a deterrent to women to get routine mammographic screening. Calcification clusters often serve as markers (indicators ) of breast cancer.

  17. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  18. Assessment of a Four-View Mammographic Image Feature Based Fusion Model to Predict Near-Term Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and assess a new quantitative four-view mammographic image feature based fusion model to predict the near-term breast cancer risk of the individual women after a negative screening mammography examination of interest. The dataset included fully-anonymized mammograms acquired on 870 women with two sequential full-field digital mammography examinations. For each woman, the first "prior" examination in the series was interpreted as negative (not recalled) during the original image reading. In the second "current" examination, 430 women were diagnosed with pathology verified cancers and 440 remained negative ("cancer-free"). For each of four bilateral craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique view images of left and right breasts, we computed and analyzed eight groups of global mammographic texture and tissue density image features. A risk prediction model based on three artificial neural networks was developed to fuse image features computed from two bilateral views of four images. The risk model performance was tested using a ten-fold cross-validation method and a number of performance evaluation indices including the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and odds ratio (OR). The highest AUC = 0.725 ± 0.026 was obtained when the model was trained by gray-level run length statistics texture features computed on dense breast regions, which was significantly higher than the AUC values achieved using the model trained by only two bilateral one-view images (p < 0.02). The adjustable OR values monotonically increased from 1.0 to 11.8 as model-generated risk score increased. The regression analysis of OR values also showed a significant increase trend in slope (p < 0.01). As a result, this preliminary study demonstrated that a new four-view mammographic image feature based risk model could provide useful and supplementary image information to help predict the near-term breast cancer risk.

  19. The relationship of obesity, mammographic breast density, and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Jennifer; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Schnabel, Freya; Moy, Linda

    The purpose was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI), mammographic breast density, magnetic resonance (MR) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and MR fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer. Our institutional database was queried for patients with preoperative mammography and breast MR imaging. There were 573 women eligible for analysis. Elevated BMI was associated with advanced stage of disease (P=.01), lower mammographic density (P<.0001), lower FGT (P<.0001), higher BPE (P=.005), and nonpalpable lesions (P=.04). Higher BMI was associated with decreased breast density and FGT. Higher BMI was also associated with advanced stage disease and nonpalpable tumors on clinical exam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    PubMed

    Dontchos, Brian N; Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C; Korde, Larissa A; Lam, Diana L; Scheel, John R; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for

  1. Combined photoacoustic and acoustic imaging of human breast specimens in the mammographic geometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    A photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of near-infrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photoacoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression.

  2. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  3. Feature extraction using convolutional neural network for classifying breast density in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaz, Ricardo L.; Carneiro, Pedro C.; Patrocinio, Ana C.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women in most countries. The high levels of mortality relate mostly to late diagnosis and to the direct proportionally relationship between breast density and breast cancer development. Therefore, the correct assessment of breast density is important to provide better screening for higher risk patients. However, in modern digital mammography the discrimination among breast densities is highly complex due to increased contrast and visual information for all densities. Thus, a computational system for classifying breast density might be a useful tool for aiding medical staff. Several machine-learning algorithms are already capable of classifying small number of classes with good accuracy. However, machinelearning algorithms main constraint relates to the set of features extracted and used for classification. Although well-known feature extraction techniques might provide a good set of features, it is a complex task to select an initial set during design of a classifier. Thus, we propose feature extraction using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for classifying breast density by a usual machine-learning classifier. We used 307 mammographic images downsampled to 260x200 pixels to train a CNN and extract features from a deep layer. After training, the activation of 8 neurons from a deep fully connected layer are extracted and used as features. Then, these features are feedforward to a single hidden layer neural network that is cross-validated using 10-folds to classify among four classes of breast density. The global accuracy of this method is 98.4%, presenting only 1.6% of misclassification. However, the small set of samples and memory constraints required the reuse of data in both CNN and MLP-NN, therefore overfitting might have influenced the results even though we cross-validated the network. Thus, although we presented a promising method for extracting features and classifying breast density, a greater database is

  4. Mammographic equipment, technique, and quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The most important improvements in mammographic technique were the introduction of single- or double-emulsion high-contrast film-screen combinations for mammography, the use of a specially designed low-kilovoltage Bucky grid to reduce scattered radiation, and the introduction of smaller focal spots to improve imaging geometry. Magnification techniques, especially the spot-film technique, yields clearer delineation of high-contrast microcalcifications. Dedicated mammographic equipment with specially designed x-ray tubes is necessary for modern high-quality mammography. However, in many modern mammographic units, the automatic exposure controller still fails to provide appropriate and constant optical film density over a wide range of tissue thickness and absorption. Extended-cycle processing of single-emulsion mammographic films can yield better image contrast and reduce exposure by up to 30%. Exposure times of less than 1 second are recommended to avoid the unnecessary higher doses caused by longer exposure times and reciprocity law failure. The wide dynamic range in mammography can be reduced by a beam equalization filter, and thus be better adapted to the decreased latitude of modern high-contrast mammographic screen-film systems. Mammographic film reading (detection of subtle microcalcifications) can be facilitated by modern computer evaluation of previously digitized mammograms. Standardization and assurance of image quality have been major challenges in the technical development of mammography. Different technical and anthropomorphic phantoms have been designed to measure and compare practical image quality. Detailed quality control measures have been developed. The benefit of a single or annual screening mammography, calculated in gained life expectancy, by far outweighs the relative risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. 22 references.

  5. Associated factors with mammographic changes in women undergoing breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    de Sant'Ana, Ricardo Soares; Mattos, Jacó Saraiva de Castro; da Silva, Anderson Soares; de Mello, Luanes Marques; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate association of sociodemographic, anthropometric, and epidemiological factors with result of mammogram in women undergoing breast cancer screening. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study with data obtained through interviews, anthropometric measurements, and mammography of 600 women aged 40 to 69 years at the Preventive Medicine Department of Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Brazil, in 2014. The results of these examinations in the BI-RADS categories 1 and 2 were grouped and classified in this study as normal mammogram outcome, and those of BI-RADS categories 3, 4A, 4B, 4C, and 5 were grouped and classified as altered mammogram outcome. The statistical analysis included the Student's t-test to compare means, as well as odds ratios (OR), with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), to verify an association by means of the multivariate analysis. Results: Of 600 women evaluated, 45% belonged to the age group of 40–49 years-old and 60.2% were classified as BI-RADS category 2. The multivariate analysis showed that women with blood hypertension (OR: 2.64; 95%CI: 1.07–6.49; p<0.05) were more likely to present changes in the mammography, while physical activity was associated with lower chances (OR: 0.30; 95%CI: 0.11–0.81; p<0.05). Conclusion: Hypertensive women undergoing screening mammography are more likely to present mammographic changes, whereas women practicing physical activity have lower chances (70%) of presenting changes in the breast compared with sedentary individuals. PMID:27759819

  6. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  7. Analysis of mammographic microcalcifications using gray-level image structure features

    SciTech Connect

    Dhawan, A.P.; Chitre, Y.; Kaiser-Bonasso, C.; Moskowitz, M.

    1996-06-01

    Most of the techniques used in the computerized analysis of mammographic microcalcifications use shape features on the segmented regions of microcalcifications extracted from the digitized mammograms. Since mammographic images usually suffer from poorly defined microcalcification features, the extraction of shape features based on a segmentation process may not accurately represent microcalcifications. In this paper, the authors define a set of image structure features for classification of malignancy. Two categories of correlated gray-level image structure features are defined for classification of difficult-to-diagnose cases. The first category of features includes second-order histogram statistics-based features representing the global texture and the wavelet decomposition-based features representing the local texture of the microcalcification area of interest. The second category of features represents the first-order gray-level histogram-based statistics of the segmented microcalcification regions and the size, number, and distance features of the segmented microcalcification cluster. Various features in each category were correlated with the biopsy examination results of 191 difficult-to-diagnose cases for selection of the best set of features representing the complete gray-level image structure information. The selection of the best features was performed using the multivariate cluster analysis as well as a genetic algorithm (GA)-based search method. The selected features were used for classification using backpropagation neural network and parametric statistical classifiers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the neural network-based classification with linear and k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifiers.

  8. A novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Sari-Sarraf, H.; Gleason, S.S.; Hudson, K.T.; Hubner, K.F.

    1996-08-01

    This is a work-in-progress report of a research endeavor that deals with the design and development of a novel approach to computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of mammographic images. With the initial emphasis being on the analysis of microcalcifications, the proposed approach defines a synergistic paradigm that utilizes new methodologies together with previously developed techniques. The new paradigm is intended to promote a higher degree of accuracy in CAD of mammograms with an increased overall throughput. The process of accomplishing these goals is initiated by the fractal encoding of the input image, which gives rise to the generation of focus-of-attention regions (FARs), that is, regions that contain anomalies. The primary thrust of this work is to demonstrate that by considering FARs, rather than the entire input image, the performances of the ensuing processes (i.e., segmentation, feature extraction, and classification) are enhanced in terms of accuracy and speed. After presenting the proposed approach to CAD of mammographic images, the paper describes the generation of FARs. Furthermore, an experimental study is included that demonstrates the impact of this front-end procedure on the process of microcalcification segmentation. Specifically, the experimentation reveals a dramatic decrease (increase) in the amount of input data (throughput), as well as a reduction in the number of false detections.

  9. Development of a Mammographic Image Processing Environment Using MATLAB.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Rogers, Steven K, Dennis W. Ruck, and Matthew Kabrisky. " Artificial Neural Networks for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Cancer ," Cancer Letters, 77 : 79...variables, like compressed breast thickness, may provide risk estimates that could dictate the frequency and type of screening procedures performed...just entering this field. [Rogers and others, 1994] Rogers, Steven K., Dennis W. Ruck, and Matthew Kabrisky. " Artificial Neural Networks for Early

  10. Feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic image based on multiscale analysis and morphology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibin; Yu, Shaode; Yang, Yuhan; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII).

  11. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  12. Automatic detection of regions of interest in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Erkang; Ling, Haibin; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2011-03-01

    This work is a part of our ongoing study aimed at comparing the topology of anatomical branching structures with the underlying image texture. Detection of regions of interest (ROIs) in clinical breast images serves as the first step in development of an automated system for image analysis and breast cancer diagnosis. In this paper, we have investigated machine learning approaches for the task of identifying ROIs with visible breast ductal trees in a given galactographic image. Specifically, we have developed boosting based framework using the AdaBoost algorithm in combination with Haar wavelet features for the ROI detection. Twenty-eight clinical galactograms with expert annotated ROIs were used for training. Positive samples were generated by resampling near the annotated ROIs, and negative samples were generated randomly by image decomposition. Each detected ROI candidate was given a confidences core. Candidate ROIs with spatial overlap were merged and their confidence scores combined. We have compared three strategies for elimination of false positives. The strategies differed in their approach to combining confidence scores by summation, averaging, or selecting the maximum score.. The strategies were compared based upon the spatial overlap with annotated ROIs. Using a 4-fold cross-validation with the annotated clinical galactographic images, the summation strategy showed the best performance with 75% detection rate. When combining the top two candidates, the selection of maximum score showed the best performance with 96% detection rate.

  13. Assessment of change in breast density: reader performance using synthetic mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Sue; Swayamprakasam, Chitra; Berks, Michael; Sergeant, Jamie; Morris, Julie; Wilson, Mary; Barr, Nicky; Boggis, Caroline

    2012-02-01

    A recent study has shown that breast cancer risk can be reduced by taking Tamoxifen, but only if this results in at least a 10% point reduction in mammographic density. When mammographic density is quantified visually, it is impossible to assess reader accuracy using clinical images as the ground truth is unknown. Our aim was to compare three models of assessing density change and to determine reader accuracy in identifying reductions of 10% points or more. We created 100 synthetic, mammogram-like images comprising 50 pairs designed to simulate natural reduction in density within each pair. Model I: individual images were presented to readers and density assessed. Model II: pairs of images were displayed together, with readers assessing density for each image. Model III: pairs of images were displayed together, and readers asked whether there was at least a 10% point reduction in density. Ten expert readers participated. Readers' estimates of percentage density were significantly closer to the truth (6.8%-26.4%) when images were assessed individually rather than in pairs (9.6%-29.8%). Measurement of change was significantly more accurate in Model II than Model I (p<0.005). Detecting density changes of at least 10% points in image pairs, mean accuracy was significantly (p<0.005) lower (58%-88%) when change was calculated from density assessments than in Model III (74%-92%). Our results suggest that where readers need to identify change in density, images should be displayed alongside one another. In our study, less accurate assessors performed better when asked directly about the magnitude of the change.

  14. Mammographic Screening at Age 40 or 45? What Difference Does It Make? The Potential Impact of American Cancer Society Mammography Screening Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fancher, Crystal E; Scott, Anthony; Allen, Ahkeel; Dale, Paul

    2017-08-01

    this is a 10-year retrospective chart review evaluating the potential impact of the most recent American Cancer Society mammography screening guidelines which excludes female patients aged 40 to 44 years from routine annual screening mammography. Instead they recommend screening mammography starting at age 45 with the option to begin screening earlier if the patient desires. The institutional cancer registry was systematically searched to identify all women aged 40 to 44 years treated for breast cancer over a 10-year period. These women were separated into two cohorts: screening mammography detected cancer (SMDC) and nonscreening mammography detected cancer (NSMDC). Statistical analysis of the cohorts was performed for lymph node status (SLN), five-year disease-free survival, and five-year overall survival. Women with SMDC had a significantly lower incidence of SLN positive cancer than the NSMDC group, 9 of 63 (14.3%) versus 36 of 81 (44 %; P < 0.001). The five-year disease-free survival for both groups was 84 per cent for SMDC and 80 per cent for NSMDC; this was not statistically significant. The five-year overall survival was statistically significant at 94 per cent for the SMDC group and 80 per cent for the NSMDC group (P < 0.05). This review demonstrates the significance of mammographic screening for early detection and treatment of breast cancer. Mammographic screening in women aged 40 to 44 detected tumors with fewer nodal metastases, resulting in improved survival and reaffirming the need for annual mammographic screening in this age group.

  15. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; p<0.043). The VDG measures for GE was not statistically different to Hologic (2.00 versus 2.00; p<0.877), likewise the median AvBD% for the GE and Hologic systems showed no difference (6.51 versus 6.79; p<0.935). BIRADS for GE and Hologic systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; p<0.001), while the VDG (ρ=0.978; p<0.001) and AvBD% (ρ=0.973; p<0.001) showed very strong positive correlations. There was a substantial agreement between GE and Hologic systems for BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  16. Optimizing Digital Mammographic Image Quality for Full-Field Digital Detectors: Artifacts Encountered during the QC Process.

    PubMed

    Jayadevan, Rashmi; Armada, M Julie; Shaheen, Rola; Mulcahy, Constance; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer through routine mammographic screening has been shown to reduce mortality from breast cancer by up to 30% in multiple studies. However, this reduction of mortality is possible only with careful attention to image quality by the medical physicist, radiologic technologist, and interpreting radiologist. The accepted quality control (QC) processes for analog mammography are well established. However, now that use of digital units is widespread in both the United States and internationally, information regarding the necessary steps and the inherent challenges that might be encountered at each step needs to be elucidated. In this review, the essential steps of the QC process for digital mammography are reviewed, with special attention to the possible problems that can occur during the QC process, many of which can lead to image artifacts. For each of the daily, weekly, monthly, and semiannual QC tests, we review the steps and expected performance and provide examples of some of the common artifacts that may be encountered. Understanding the components of the QC process and recognizing problems that may result in a suboptimal image is critical to ensure optimal image quality in an effort to maximize early detection of breast cancer. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  17. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  18. Mammographic microcalcifications: Detection with xerography, screen-film, and digitized film display

    SciTech Connect

    Smathers, R.L.; Bush, E.; Drace, J.; Stevens, M.; Sommer, F.G.; Brown, B.W.; Karras, B.

    1986-06-01

    Pulverized bone specks and aluminum oxide specks were measured by hand into sizes ranging from 0.2 mm to 1.0 mm and then arranged in clusters. These clusters were superimposed on a human breast tissue phantom, and xeromammograms and screen-film mammograms of the clusters were made. The screen-film mammograms were digitized using a high-resolution laser scanner and then displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Six radiologists independently counted the microcalcifications on the xeromammograms, the screen-film mammograms, and the digitized film mammograms. The xeromammograms were examined with a magnifying glass; the screen-film images were examined with a magnifying glass and by hot light; and the digitized-film images were examined by electronic magnification and image processing. The bone speck size that corresponded to a mean 50% detectability level for each technique was as follows: xeromammography, 0.550 mm; digitized film, 0.573 mm; and screen-film, 0.661 mm. We postulate that electronic magnification and image processing with edge enhancement can improve the capability of screen-film mammography to enhance the detection of microcalcifications.

  19. Mammographic microcalcifications: detection with xerography, screen-film, and digitized film display.

    PubMed

    Smathers, R L; Bush, E; Drace, J; Stevens, M; Sommer, F G; Brown, B W; Karras, B

    1986-06-01

    Pulverized bone specks and aluminum oxide specks were measured by hand into sizes ranging from 0.2 mm to 1.0 mm and then arranged in clusters. These clusters were superimposed on a human breast tissue phantom, and xeromammograms and screen-film mammograms of the clusters were made. The screen-film mammograms were digitized using a high-resolution laser scanner and then displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Six radiologists independently counted the microcalcifications on the xeromammograms, the screen-film mammograms, and the digitized-film mammograms. The xeromammograms were examined with a magnifying glass; the screen-film images were examined with a magnifying glass and by hot light; and the digitized-film images were examined by electronic magnification and image processing. The bone speck size that corresponded to a mean 50% detectability level for each technique was as follows: xeromammography, 0.550 mm; digitized film, 0.573 mm; and screen-film, 0.661 mm. We postulate that electronic magnification and image processing with edge enhancement can improve the capability of screen-film mammography to enhance the detection of microcalcifications.

  20. Developing a visual sensitive image features based CAD scheme to assist classification of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Qiu, Yuchen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes of mammograms have been previously developed and tested. However, due to using "black-box" approaches with a large number of complicated features, radiologists have lower confidence to accept or consider CAD-cued results. In order to help solve this issue, this study aims to develop and evaluate a new CAD scheme that uses visual sensitive image features to classify between malignant and benign mammographic masses. A dataset of 301 masses detected on both craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateraloblique (MLO) view images was retrospectively assembled. Among them, 152 were malignant and 149 were benign. An iterative region-growing algorithm was applied to the special Gaussian-kernel filtered images to segment mass regions. Total 13 Image features were computed to mimic 5 categories of visually sensitive features that are commonly used by radiologists in classifying suspicious mammographic masses namely, mass size, shape factor, contrast, homogeneity and spiculation. We then selected one optimal feature in each of 5 feature categories by using a student t-test, and applied two logistic regression classifiers using either CC or MLO view images to distinguish between malignant and benign masses. Last, a fusion method of combining two classification scores was applied and tested. By applying a 10-fold cross-validation method, the area under receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.806+/-0.025. This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a "visual-aid" interface, CAD results are much more easily explainable to the observers and may increase their confidence to consider CAD-cued results.

  1. Mammographic surveillance of breast cancer patients: should the mastectomy site be imaged?

    PubMed

    Fajardo, L L; Roberts, C C; Hunt, K R

    1993-11-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of routine mammography of the mastectomy site in women who have been treated for breast carcinoma. From a retrospective review of medical records and mammographic examinations of 827 patients who had mastectomies, the following information was obtained: demographic data, type of breast reconstruction (if any), length of follow-up after mastectomy, evidence of local recurrence, and results of physical examination of the breast and mammography immediately before diagnosis of local recurrence. Local recurrences of breast cancer were seen in 39 (4.5%) of the 859 breasts in the study group. All patients had a physical examination of the breast and mammography within 3 months of the diagnosis of recurrent breast carcinoma. Mammography of the mastectomy site did not show any recurrences that were not suspected on the basis of physical examination. For two of 20 patients, spot-compression views of palpable abnormalities showed thickening of the surgical scar. In four patients with pain in the chest wall, no abnormalities were found on physical examination or mammograms, but bone scintigrams showed metastasis to the ribs. Our results indicate that mammographic imaging of the mastectomy site does not increase the detection of locally recurrent breast cancer.

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic masses using geometric verification-based image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingliang; Shi, Weili; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Li, Guoxin; Chen, Tao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2017-03-01

    Computer-Aided Diagnosis of masses in mammograms is an important indicator of breast cancer. The use of retrieval systems in breast examination is increasing gradually. In this respect, the method of exploiting the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file in the mammographic masse retrieval have been proved high accuracy and excellent scalability. However it just considered the features in each image as a visual word and had ignored the spatial configurations of features. It greatly affect the retrieval performance. To overcome this drawback, we introduce the geometric verification method to retrieval in mammographic masses. First of all, we obtain corresponding match features based on the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file. After that, we grasps the main point of local similarity characteristic of deformations in the local regions by constructing the circle regions of corresponding pairs. Meanwhile we segment the circle to express the geometric relationship of local matches in the area and generate the spatial encoding strictly. Finally we judge whether the matched features are correct or not, based on verifying the all spatial encoding are whether satisfied the geometric consistency. Experiments show the promising results of our approach.

  3. Roles of biologic breast tissue composition and quantitative image analysis of mammographic images in breast tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.; Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Christopher I.; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Shepherd, John

    2014-03-01

    Purpose. Investigate whether knowledge of the biologic image composition of mammographic lesions provides imagebased biomarkers above and beyond those obtainable from quantitative image analysis (QIA) of X-ray mammography. Methods. The dataset consisted of 45 in vivo breast lesions imaged with the novel 3-component breast (3CB) imaging technique based on dual-energy mammography (15 malignant, 30 benign diagnoses). The 3CB composition measures of water, lipid, and protein thicknesses were assessed and mathematical descriptors, `3CB features', were obtained for the lesions and their periphery. The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method obtaining `QIA features' describing morphology and texture. We investigated the correlation within the `3CB features', within the `QIA features', and between the two. In addition, the merit of individual features in the distinction between malignant and benign lesions was assessed. Results. Whereas many descriptors within the `3CB features' and `QIA features' were, often by design, highly correlated, correlation between descriptors of the two feature groups was much weaker (maximum absolute correlation coefficient 0.58, p<0.001) indicating that 3CB and QIA-based biomarkers provided potentially complementary information. Single descriptors from 3CB and QIA appeared equally well-suited for the distinction between malignant and benign lesions, with maximum area under the ROC curve 0.71 for a protein feature (3CB) and 0.71 for a texture feature (QIA). Conclusions. In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of breast tissue composition appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between benign and malignant lesions.

  4. 'Should a mammographic screening programme carry the warning: screening can damage your health!'?

    PubMed

    Thornton, H; Baum, M

    1999-02-01

    The balanced presentation afforded by convening a Citizens' Jury when considering a major question such as the introduction of a breast screening programme is advocated. This method would enable account to be taken of all the costs, both human and financial, to all those affected, both participating and organizing, as well as the benefits. Provision of such a democratic opportunity enables consideration to be given to a broad range of factors, by selection of an appropriate range of witnesses, with the advantage of involving the lay public in this decision-making process. Attendance by health correspondents, medical journalists and other media representatives enables publicization of a democracy in action whilst helping to inform the wider debate. Such an exercise could inform whether the NHS BSP should continue in its current form.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of mammographic screening as practised in Vermont and Norway

    PubMed Central

    Hofvind, S; Geller, B M; Skelly, J; Vacek, P M

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography as performed in Vermont, USA, and Norway. Methods Incident screening data from 1997 to 2003 for female patients aged 50–69 years from the Vermont Breast Cancer Surveillance System (116 996 subsequent screening examinations) and the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (360 872 subsequent screening examinations) were compared. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the initial (based on screening mammogram only) and final (screening mammogram plus any further diagnostic imaging) interpretations were directly adjusted for age using 5-year age intervals for the combined Vermont and Norway population, and computed for 1 and 2 years of follow-up, which ended at the time of the next screening mammogram. Results For the 1-year follow-up, sensitivities for initial assessments were 82.0%, 88.2% and 92.5% for 1-, 2- and >2-year screening intervals, respectively, in Vermont (p=0.022). For final assessments, the values were 73.6%, 83.3% and 81.2% (p=0.047), respectively. For Norway, sensitivities for initial assessments were 91.0% and 91.3% (p=0.529) for 2- and >2-year intervals, and 90.7% and 91.3%, respectively, for final assessments (p=0.630). Specificity was lower in Vermont than in Norway for each screening interval and for all screening intervals combined, for both initial (90.6% vs 97.8% for all intervals; p<0.001) and final (98.8% vs 99.5% for all intervals; p<0.001) assessments. Conclusion Our study showed higher sensitivity and specificity in a biennial screening programme with an independent double reading than in a predominantly annual screening program with a single reading. Advances in knowledge This study demonstrates that higher recall rates and lower specificity are not always associated with higher sensitivity of screening mammography. Differences in the screening processes in Norway and Vermont suggest potential areas for improvement in the

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of mammographic screening as practised in Vermont and Norway.

    PubMed

    Hofvind, S; Geller, B M; Skelly, J; Vacek, P M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography as performed in Vermont, USA, and Norway. Incident screening data from 1997 to 2003 for female patients aged 50-69 years from the Vermont Breast Cancer Surveillance System (116 996 subsequent screening examinations) and the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (360 872 subsequent screening examinations) were compared. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the initial (based on screening mammogram only) and final (screening mammogram plus any further diagnostic imaging) interpretations were directly adjusted for age using 5-year age intervals for the combined Vermont and Norway population, and computed for 1 and 2 years of follow-up, which ended at the time of the next screening mammogram. For the 1-year follow-up, sensitivities for initial assessments were 82.0%, 88.2% and 92.5% for 1-, 2- and >2-year screening intervals, respectively, in Vermont (p=0.022). For final assessments, the values were 73.6%, 83.3% and 81.2% (p=0.047), respectively. For Norway, sensitivities for initial assessments were 91.0% and 91.3% (p=0.529) for 2- and >2-year intervals, and 90.7% and 91.3%, respectively, for final assessments (p=0.630). Specificity was lower in Vermont than in Norway for each screening interval and for all screening intervals combined, for both initial (90.6% vs 97.8% for all intervals; p<0.001) and final (98.8% vs 99.5% for all intervals; p<0.001) assessments. Our study showed higher sensitivity and specificity in a biennial screening programme with an independent double reading than in a predominantly annual screening program with a single reading. This study demonstrates that higher recall rates and lower specificity are not always associated with higher sensitivity of screening mammography. Differences in the screening processes in Norway and Vermont suggest potential areas for improvement in the latter.

  7. Cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers and in women at high risk for breast cancer: MR imaging and mammographic features.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Warren, Ruth M L; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Thompson, Deborah J; Eeles, Ros A; Evans, D Gareth; Leach, Martin O

    2009-08-01

    To review imaging features of screening-detected cancers on images from diagnostic and prior examinations to identify specific abnormalities to aid earlier detection of or facilitate differentiation of cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers and in women with a high risk for breast cancer. Informed consent and multicenter and local research ethics committee approval were obtained. Women (mean age, 40.1 years; range, 27-55 years) who had at least a 50% risk of being a BRCA1, BRCA2, or TP53 gene mutation carrier were recruited from August 1997 to March 2003 into the United Kingdom Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breast Screening Study Group trial and were offered annual magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and two-view mammography (total number of screenings, 2065 and 1973; mean, 2.38 and 2.36, respectively). Images in all 39 cancer cases were reread in consensus to document the morphologic and enhancement imaging features on MR and mammographic images in screening and prior examinations. Cases were grouped into genetic subtypes. With MR imaging, there was no difference in morphologic or enhancement characteristics between the genetic subgroups. Cancers on images from prior examinations were of smaller size, showed less enhancement, and were more likely to have a type 1 enhancement curve compared with those cancers in the subsequent diagnostic screening examinations. The tumor sizes detected by using MR imaging and mammography were not significantly different (P = .46). The cancers in BRCA1 carriers found by using MR imaging tended to be smaller than those detected by using mammography (median, 17 mm vs 30 mm; P = .37), whereas the opposite was true for cancers found in BRCA2 carriers (MR imaging median size = 12.5 mm vs mammographic median size = 6 mm; P = .067); the difference was not significant. Tumors with prior MR imaging abnormalities grew at an average of 5.1 mm/y. When undertaking MR imaging surveillance in high-risk women, small enhancing lesions should be regarded

  8. Associated factors with mammographic changes in women undergoing breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Ricardo Soares de; Mattos, Jacó Saraiva de Castro; Silva, Anderson Soares da; Mello, Luanes Marques de; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate association of sociodemographic, anthropometric, and epidemiological factors with result of mammogram in women undergoing breast cancer screening. This is a cross-sectional study with data obtained through interviews, anthropometric measurements, and mammography of 600 women aged 40 to 69 years at the Preventive Medicine Department of Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Brazil, in 2014. The results of these examinations in the BI-RADS categories 1 and 2 were grouped and classified in this study as normal mammogram outcome, and those of BI-RADS categories 3, 4A, 4B, 4C, and 5 were grouped and classified as altered mammogram outcome. The statistical analysis included the Student's t-test to compare means, as well as odds ratios (OR), with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), to verify an association by means of the multivariate analysis. Of 600 women evaluated, 45% belonged to the age group of 40-49 years-old and 60.2% were classified as BI-RADS category 2. The multivariate analysis showed that women with blood hypertension (OR: 2.64; 95%CI: 1.07-6.49; p<0.05) were more likely to present changes in the mammography, while physical activity was associated with lower chances (OR: 0.30; 95%CI: 0.11-0.81; p<0.05). Hypertensive women undergoing screening mammography are more likely to present mammographic changes, whereas women practicing physical activity have lower chances (70%) of presenting changes in the breast compared with sedentary individuals. Avaliar a associação de fatores sociodemográficos, antropométricos e epidemiológicos com o resultado das mamografias de mulheres submetidas ao rastreamento. Trata-se de um estudo transversal com dados obtidos por meio de entrevistas, avaliação antropométrica e mamografia de 600 mulheres entre 40 a 69 anos, atendidas no Departamento de Prevenção do Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, em 2014. Os resultados de tais exames nas categorias BI-RADS 1 e 2 foram agrupados e classificados neste estudo

  9. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Nielsen, Mads; Petersen, Kersten; Lillholm, Martin; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Lynge, Elsebeth; Uldall, Wei Yao; Vejborg, Ilse

    2016-07-07

    Mammographic density is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. We investigated the association between three different methods of measuring density or parenchymal pattern/texture on digitized film-based mammograms, and examined to what extent textural features independently and jointly with density can improve the ability to identify screening women at increased risk of breast cancer. The study included 121 cases and 259 age- and time matched controls based on a cohort of 14,736 women with negative screening mammograms from a population-based screening programme in Denmark in 2007 (followed until 31 December 2010). Mammograms were assessed using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density classification, Tabár's classification on parenchymal patterns and a fully automated texture quantification technique. The individual and combined association with breast cancer was estimated using binary logistic regression to calculate Odds Ratios (ORs) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUCs). Cases showed significantly higher BI-RADS and texture scores on average than controls (p < 0.001). All three methods were individually able to segregate women into different risk groups showing significant ORs for BI-RADS D3 and D4 (OR: 2.37; 1.32-4.25 and 3.93; 1.88-8.20), Tabár's PIII and PIV (OR: 3.23; 1.20-8.75 and 4.40; 2.31-8.38), and the highest quartile of the texture score (3.04; 1.63-5.67). AUCs for BI-RADS, Tabár and the texture scores (continuous) were 0.63 (0.57-0-69), 0.65 (0.59-0-71) and 0.63 (0.57-0-69), respectively. Combining two or more methods increased model fit in all combinations, demonstrating the highest AUC of 0.69 (0.63-0.74) when all three methods were combined (a significant increase from standard BI-RADS alone). Our findings suggest that the (relative) amount of fibroglandular tissue (density) and mammographic structural features (texture/parenchymal pattern) jointly can improve risk

  10. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Dontchos, Brian N.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Korde, Larissa A.; Lam, Diana L.; Scheel, John R.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Results Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Conclusion Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. © RSNA

  11. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  12. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes; Seta, Marismary Horsth De; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Delamarque, Elizabete Vianna; de Azevedo, Ana Cecília Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%), films development (72.7%), film response (72.7%), low contrast fine detail (92.2%), tumor mass visualization (76.5%), absence of image artifacts (94.1%), mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%). On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8%) and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%). Conclusion The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval. PMID:25987749

  13. Similarity of fibroglandular breast tissue content measured from magnetic resonance and mammographic images and by a mathematical algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nayeem, Fatima; Ju, Hyunsu; Brunder, Donald G; Nagamani, Manubai; Anderson, Karl E; Khamapirad, Tuenchit; Lu, Lee-Jane W

    2014-01-01

    Women with high breast density (BD) have a 4- to 6-fold greater risk for breast cancer than women with low BD. We found that BD can be easily computed from a mathematical algorithm using routine mammographic imaging data or by a curve-fitting algorithm using fat and nonfat suppression magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. These BD measures in a strictly defined group of premenopausal women providing both mammographic and breast MRI images were predicted as well by the same set of strong predictor variables as were measures from a published laborious histogram segmentation method and a full field digital mammographic unit in multivariate regression models. We also found that the number of completed pregnancies, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, and progesterone were more strongly associated with amounts of glandular tissue than adipose tissue, while fat body mass, alanine aminotransferase, and insulin like growth factor-II appear to be more associated with the amount of breast adipose tissue. Our results show that methods of breast imaging and modalities for estimating the amount of glandular tissue have no effects on the strength of these predictors of BD. Thus, the more convenient mathematical algorithm and the safer MRI protocols may facilitate prospective measurements of BD.

  14. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  15. Paget disease of the breast: mammographic, US, and MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Paget disease is a rare malignancy of the breast characterized by infiltration of the nipple epidermis by adenocarcinoma cells. The clinical features of Paget disease are characteristic and should increase the likelihood of the diagnosis being made. An important point is that more than 90% of cases of Paget disease are associated with an additional underlying breast malignancy. Paget disease is frequently associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the underlying lactiferous ducts of the nipple-areolar complex; it may even be associated with DCIS or invasive breast cancer elsewhere in the breast, at least 2 cm from the nipple-areolar complex. Nevertheless, mammographic findings may be negative in up to 50% of cases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be useful in patients with Paget disease for evaluation of the nipple-areolar complex and identification of an additional underlying malignancy in the breast. The appropriate surgical treatment must be carefully selected and individualized on the basis of radiologic findings, especially those obtained with breast MR imaging.

  16. A Review on Automatic Mammographic Density and Parenchymal Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R. E.; Oliver, Arnau

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. However, the exact cause(s) of breast cancer still remains unknown. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective way to tackle breast cancer. There are more than 70 common genetic susceptibility factors included in the current non-image-based risk prediction models (e.g., the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick models). Image-based risk factors, such as mammographic densities and parenchymal patterns, have been established as biomarkers but have not been fully incorporated in the risk prediction models used for risk stratification in screening and/or measuring responsiveness to preventive approaches. Within computer aided mammography, automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methods have been developed for estimation of breast tissue composition to facilitate mammographic risk assessment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methodologies developed over the past two decades and the evidence for risk assessment/density classification using segmentation. The aim of this review is to analyse how engineering advances have progressed and the impact automatic mammographic tissue segmentation has in a clinical environment, as well as to understand the current research gaps with respect to the incorporation of image-based risk factors in non-image-based risk prediction models. PMID:26171249

  17. Computer-assisted diagnosis of mammographic masses using an information-theoretic image retrieval scheme with BIRADs-based relevance feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourassi, Georgia D.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach for computer-assisted diagnosis of masses detected in screening mammograms. The system follows an information theoretic retrieval scheme with a BIRADS-based relevance feedback (RF) algorithm. Initially, a knowledge databank of 365 mammographic regions of interest (ROIs) was created. They were all 512x512 pixel ROIs extracted from DDSM mammograms digitized using the Lumisys digitizer. The ROIs were extracted around the known locations of the annotated masses. Specifically, there were 177 ROIs depicting a biopsy-proven malignant mass and 188 ROIs with a benign mass. Subsequently, the CBIR algorithm was implemented using mutual information (MI) as the similarity metric for image retrieval. The CBIR algorithm formed the basis of a knowledge-based CAD system. Given a databank of mammographic masses with known pathology, a query mass was evaluated. Based on their information content, all similar masses in the databank were retrieved. A relevance feedback algorithm based on BIRADS findings was implemented to determine the relevance factor of the retrieved masses. Finally, a decision index was calculated using the query's k best matches. The decision index effectively combined the similarity metric of the retrieved cases and their relevance factor into a prediction regarding the malignancy status of the mass depicted in the query ROI. ROC analysis was to evaluate diagnostic performance. Performance improved dramatically with the incorporation of the relevance feedback algorithm. Overall, the CAD system achieved ROC area index AZ= 0.86+/-0.02 for the diagnosis of masses in screening mammograms.

  18. Qualitative Radiogenomics: Association between Oncotype DX Test Recurrence Score and BI-RADS Mammographic and Breast MR Imaging Features.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Genevieve A; Ray, Kimberly M; Joe, Bonnie N; Price, Elissa R

    2017-09-08

    Purpose To evaluate the association between Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) mammographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and breast cancer recurrence risk in patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer who underwent the Oncotype DX assay. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board-approved and HIPAA-compliant protocol, 408 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2004 and 2013 who underwent the Oncotype DX assay were identified. Mammographic and MR imaging features were retrospectively collected according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Linear regression assessed the association between imaging features and Oncotype DX test recurrence score (ODxRS), and post hoc pairwise comparisons assessed ODxRS means by using imaging features. Results Mammographic breast density was inversely associated with ODxRS (P ≤ .05). Average ODxRS for density category A was 24.4 and that for density category D was 16.5 (P < .02). Both indistinct mass margins and fine linear branching calcifications at mammography were significantly associated with higher ODxRS (P < .01 and P < .03, respectively). Masses with indistinct margins had an average ODxRS of 31.3, which significantly differed from the ODxRS of 18.5 for all other mass margins (P < .01). The average ODxRS for fine linear branching calcifications was 29.6, whereas the ODxRS for all other suspicious calcification morphologies was 19.4 (P < .03). Average ODxRS was significantly higher for irregular mass margins at MR imaging compared with spiculated mass margins (24.0 vs 17.6; P < .02). The presence of nonmass enhancement at MR imaging was associated with lower ODxRS than was its absence (16.4 vs 19.9; P < .05). Conclusion The BI-RADS features of mammographic breast density, calcification morphology, mass margins at mammography and MR imaging, and nonmass enhancement at MR imaging have the potential to serve as imaging biomarkers of breast cancer recurrence risk

  19. Effect on biopsy technique of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) for nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Butchart, Michael; MacFarlane, John K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine if the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) defines a group of patients with mammographic abnormalities in whom stereotactic core needle biopsy (SCNB) is appropriate. Design A blinded retrospective validation sample. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Patients One hundred and nine consecutive patients who underwent fine-wire localization breast biopsy (FWLB) between Jan. 1, 1994, and June 1, 1999, with a known final pathological diagnosis. Intervention Blinded mammographic review and classification using the BI-RADS; review of corresponding pathological findings from FWLBs. Outcome measures Correlation of pathological findings with each BI-RADS category and analysis of the predictive value of clinical and radiologic features. Results BI-RADS findings were as follows: 0 malignant lesions in 10 category 3 cases, 18 malignant lesions (3 in situ, 15 invasive) in 68 category 4 cases and 24 malignant lesions (8 in situ and 16 invasive) in 31 category 5 cases. There was 1 malignant lesion in 22 category 4 cases in women younger than 50 years. Conclusions SCNB should be applied to BI-RADS categories 3 and 4 (< 50 yr of age). FWLB should be reserved for category 4 (> 50 yr of age) and category 5 cases. This algorithm will reduce the morbidity and cost of breast biopsies in patients with nonpalpable mammographic abnormalities. PMID:12174979

  20. Disentangling the roles of mammographic screening and HRT in recent breast cancer incidence trends in italy by analyses based on calendar time and time since screening activation.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Falcini, Fabio; Cortesi, Laura; De Lisi, Vincenzo; Ferretti, Stefano; Tumino, Rosario; Russo, Antonio; Paci, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the roles of screening activation and hormone replacement therapy discontinuation on the recent declining breast cancer incidence trends in Italy. We analyzed 41,358 invasive female breast cancers incident during 1991-2004 in six Italian population-based cancer registries. Overall and age-specific incidence trends were evaluated using Joinpoint analysis. In addition to calendar years, data were analyzed on a years-since-screening-activation basis. Annual percentage change of standardized rates was computed. There were statistically significant increasing trends for women 40-44 and 45-49 years that did not change after screening activation. On the contrary, for women 50-69 years old and for those 70+ years, the increasing trends flattened around 2 years after screening activation. The prevalence of hormone replacement therapy use in Italy is and was rather low. In conclusion, the recent tendency toward stabilization observed in Italy for female breast cancer incidence rates in women aged 50 years or more follows the introduction of mammographic screening.

  1. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  2. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%-5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC results of the ANNs optimized

  3. Misclassification of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) mammographic density and implications for breast density reporting legislation

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Charlotte C.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Taplin, Stephen H.; Rutter, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. states have begun legislating mammographic breast density reporting to women, requiring that women undergoing screening mammography who have dense breast tissue (BI-RADS density c or d) receive written notification of their breast density; however, the impact that misclassification of breast density will have on this reporting remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility of the four-category Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density measure and examine its relationship with a continuous measure of percent density. We enrolled 19 radiologists, experienced in breast imaging, from a single integrated healthcare system. Radiologists interpreted 341 screening mammograms at two points in time six months apart. We assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement in radiologists’ interpretations of BI-RADS density and explored whether agreement depended upon radiologist characteristics. We examined the relationship between BI-RADS density and percent density in a subset of 282 examinations. Intra-radiologist agreement was moderate to substantial, with kappa varying across radiologists from 0.50–0.81 (mean=0.69, 95% CI (0.63, 0.73)). Intra-radiologist agreement was higher for radiologists with ≥10 years experience interpreting mammograms (difference in mean kappa=0.10, 95% CI (0.01, 0.24)). Inter-radiologist agreement varied widely across radiologist pairs from slight to substantial, with kappa ranging from 0.02–0.72 (mean=0.46, 95% CI (0.36, 0.55)). Of 145 examinations interpreted as “non-dense” (BI-RADS density a or b) by the majority of radiologists, 82.8% were interpreted as “dense” (BI-RADS density c or d) by at least one radiologist. Of 187 examinations interpreted as “dense” by the majority of radiologists, 47.1% were interpreted as “non-dense” by at least one radiologist. While the examinations of almost half of the women in our study were interpreted clinically as having BI-RADS density c or d, only

  4. Misclassification of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) Mammographic Density and Implications for Breast Density Reporting Legislation.

    PubMed

    Gard, Charlotte C; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Miglioretti, Diana L; Taplin, Stephen H; Rutter, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    USA states have begun legislating mammographic breast density reporting to women, requiring that women undergoing screening mammography who have dense breast tissue (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] density c or d) receive written notification of their breast density; however, the impact that misclassification of breast density will have on this reporting remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility of the four-category BI-RADS density measure and examine its relationship with a continuous measure of percent density. We enrolled 19 radiologists, experienced in breast imaging, from a single integrated health care system. Radiologists interpreted 341 screening mammograms at two points in time 6 months apart. We assessed intra- and interobserver agreement in radiologists'; interpretations of BI-RADS density and explored whether agreement depended upon radiologist characteristics. We examined the relationship between BI-RADS density and percent density in a subset of 282 examinations. Intraradiologist agreement was moderate to substantial, with kappa varying across radiologists from 0.50 to 0.81 (mean = 0.69, 95% CI [0.63, 0.73]). Intraradiologist agreement was higher for radiologists with ≥10 years experience interpreting mammograms (difference in mean kappa = 0.10, 95% CI [0.01, 0.24]). Interradiologist agreement varied widely across radiologist pairs from slight to substantial, with kappa ranging from 0.02 to 0.72 (mean = 0.46, 95% CI [0.36, 0.55]). Of 145 examinations interpreted as "nondense" (BI-RADS density a or b) by the majority of radiologists, 82.8% were interpreted as "dense" (BI-RADS density c or d) by at least one radiologist. Of 187 examinations interpreted as "dense" by the majority of radiologists, 47.1% were interpreted as "nondense" by at least one radiologist. While the examinations of almost half of the women in our study were interpreted clinically as having BI-RADS density c or d, only about 10% of

  5. Impact of type of full-field digital image on mammographic density assessment and breast cancer risk estimation: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Busana, Marta Cecilia; Eng, Amanda; Denholm, Rachel; Dowsett, Mitch; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Allen, Steve; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2016-09-26

    Full-field digital mammography, which is gradually being introduced in most clinical and screening settings, produces two types of images: raw and processed. However, the extent to which mammographic density measurements, and their ability to predict breast cancer risk, vary according to type of image is not fully known. We compared the performance of the semi-automated Cumulus method on digital raw, "analogue-like" raw and processed images, and the performance of a recently developed method - Laboratory for Breast Radiodensity Assessment (LIBRA) - on digital raw and processed images, in a case-control study (414 patients (cases) and 684 controls) by evaluating the extent to which their measurements were associated with breast cancer risk factors, and by comparing their ability to predict breast cancer risk. Valid Cumulus and LIBRA measurements were obtained from all available images, but the resulting distributions differed according to the method and type of image used. Both Cumulus and LIBRA percent density were inversely associated with age, body mass index (BMI), parity and postmenopausal status, regardless of type of image used. Cumulus percent density was strongly associated with breast cancer risk, but with the magnitude of the association slightly stronger for processed (risk increase per one SD increase in percent density (95 % CI): 1.55 (1.29, 1.85)) and "analogue-like" raw (1.52 (1.28, 1.80)) than for raw (1.35 (1.14, 1.60)) images. LIBRA percent density produced weaker associations with risk, albeit stronger for processed (1.32 (1.08, 1.61)) than raw images (1.17 (0.99, 1.37)). The percent density values yielded by the various density assessment/type of image combinations had similar ability to discriminate between patients and controls (area under the receiving operating curve values for percent density, age, BMI, parity and menopausal status combined ranged from 0.61 and 0.64). The findings showed that Cumulus can be used to measure density on all

  6. Mammographically screen-detected asymmetric densities with architectural distortion and normal ultrasound at assessment: Value of MRI as a problem-solving tool.

    PubMed

    Price, Jeremy; Chen, Suet Wan

    2015-06-01

    Four cases are presented in which asymptomatic clients from an Australian mammography screening programme (BreastScreen ACT) were recalled for assessment of an asymmetric density with possible architectural distortion. In all four women, mammographic work-up was equivocal and ultrasound showed no suspicious correlate for biopsy. It was then doubtful as to whether any significant lesion was present. In all four cases, MRI revealed the presence of malignancy. Breast MRI can be a useful problem-solving tool in the work-up of such cases.

  7. Risk of breast cancer after false-positive results in mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Román, Marta; Castells, Xavier; Hofvind, Solveig; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2016-06-01

    Women with false-positive results are commonly referred back to routine screening. Questions remain regarding their long-term outcome of breast cancer. We assessed the risk of screen-detected breast cancer in women with false-positive results. We conducted a joint analysis using individual level data from the population-based screening programs in Copenhagen and Funen in Denmark, Norway, and Spain. Overall, 150,383 screened women from Denmark (1991-2008), 612,138 from Norway (1996-2010), and 1,172,572 from Spain (1990-2006) were included. Poisson regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of screen-detected cancer for women with false-positive versus negative results. We analyzed information from 1,935,093 women 50-69 years who underwent 6,094,515 screening exams. During an average 5.8 years of follow-up, 230,609 (11.9%) women received a false-positive result and 27,849 (1.4%) were diagnosed with screen-detected cancer. The adjusted RR of screen-detected cancer after a false-positive result was 2.01 (95% CI: 1.93-2.09). Women who tested false-positive at first screen had a RR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.77-1.96), whereas those who tested false-positive at third screening had a RR of 2.42 (95% CI: 2.21-2.64). The RR of breast cancer at the screening test after the false-positive result was 3.95 (95% CI: 3.71-4.21), whereas it decreased to 1.25 (95% CI: 1.17-1.34) three or more screens after the false-positive result. Women with false-positive results had a twofold risk of screen-detected breast cancer compared to women with negative tests. The risk remained significantly higher three or more screens after the false-positive result. The increased risk should be considered when discussing stratified screening strategies. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  9. Mammographic Screening Downstages Breast Carcinomas at Time of Diagnosis: A Community-Based Experience.

    PubMed

    Parker, Robert G.; Leung, Kwan-Moon; Rees, Karen S.; Bassett, Lawrence W.; Legorreta, Antonio P.

    1999-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of screening mammography in a community medical setting, data from a population-based, retrospective study was analyzed. Medical records of 827 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer in California between October 1994 and March 1996 were reviewed. The primary care physician's record was abstracted for clinical history, including recommendation of screening mammography. The facility records where final diagnosis was made were abstracted for stage and treatment data. Among the patients who did not have previous screening mammography, 65.7% were diagnosed with "advanced" breast cancer (stages II, III, IV), while only 39.9% who had previous screening mammography were diagnosed with advanced breast cancer (p < 0.001). This study has reaffirmed that screening mammography of adult females generates downstaging at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer. Despite possession of a health insurance program and receiving educational materials, only 65% of patients over 50 years of age had screening mammography. As opposed to the once-a-year mailing of general reminders to all women 40 years old and older, developing a longitudinal electronic medical record in the managed care setting will support a more coordinated and individualized intervention based on age, date of last mammogram, and relative risk, among other factors. Continuing education efforts must also be directed to referring physicians, who may not yet recognize the value of screening mammography.

  10. Volume and tissue composition preserving deformation of breast CT images to simulate breast compression in mammographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Chen, Lingyun; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Images of mastectomy breast specimens have been acquired with a bench top experimental Cone beam CT (CBCT) system. The resulting images have been segmented to model an uncompressed breast for simulation of various CBCT techniques. To further simulate conventional or tomosynthesis mammographic imaging for comparison with the CBCT technique, a deformation technique was developed to convert the CT data for an uncompressed breast to a compressed breast without altering the breast volume or regional breast density. With this technique, 3D breast deformation is separated into two 2D deformations in coronal and axial views. To preserve the total breast volume and regional tissue composition, each 2D deformation step was achieved by altering the square pixels into rectangular ones with the pixel areas unchanged and resampling with the original square pixels using bilinear interpolation. The compression was modeled by first stretching the breast in the superior-inferior direction in the coronal view. The image data were first deformed by distorting the voxels with a uniform distortion ratio. These deformed data were then deformed again using distortion ratios varying with the breast thickness and re-sampled. The deformation procedures were applied in the axial view to stretch the breast in the chest wall to nipple direction while shrinking it in the mediolateral to lateral direction re-sampled and converted into data for uniform cubic voxels. Threshold segmentation was applied to the final deformed image data to obtain the 3D compressed breast model. Our results show that the original segmented CBCT image data were successfully converted into those for a compressed breast with the same volume and regional density preserved. Using this compressed breast model, conventional and tomosynthesis mammograms were simulated for comparison with CBCT.

  11. Concordance of computer-extracted image features with BI-RADS descriptors for mammographic mass margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Nees, Alexis; Helvie, Mark; Shi, Jiazheng

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate computer-extracted features for characterizing mammographic mass margins according to BI-RADS spiculated and circumscribed categories. The mass was automatically segmented using an active contour model. A spiculation measure for a pixel on the mass boundary was defined by using the angular difference between the image gradient vector and the normal to the mass, averaged over pixels in a spiculation search region. For the circumscribed margin feature, the angular difference between the principal eigenvector of the Hessian matrix and the normal to the mass was estimated in a band of pixels centered at each point on the boundary, and the feature was extracted from the resulting profile along the boundary. Three MQSA radiologists provided BI-RADS margin ratings for a data set of 198 regions of interest containing breast masses. The features were evaluated with respect to the individual radiologists' characterization using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, as well as with respect to that from the majority rule, in which a mass was labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) if it was characterized as such by 2 or 3 radiologists, and non-spiculated (non-circumscribed) otherwise. We also investigated the performance of the features for consensus masses, defined as those labeled as spiculated (circumscribed) or nonspiculated (non-circumscribed) by all three radiologists. When masses were labeled according to radiologists R1, R2, and R3 individually, the spiculation feature had an area A z under the ROC curve of 0.90+/-0.04, 0.90+/-0.03, 0.88+/-0.03, respectively, while the circumscribed margin feature had an A z value of 0.77+/-0.04, 0.74+/-0.04, and 0.80+/-0.03, respectively. When masses were labeled according to the majority rule, the A z values for the spiculation and the circumscribed margin features were 0.92+/-0.03 and 0.80+/-+/-0.03, respectively. When only the consensus masses were considered, the A z

  12. Abnormal mammographic findings with short-interval follow-up recommendation.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Rowan T; Khalkhali, Iraj

    2005-08-01

    An abnormal Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System (BIRADS) category 3 mammogram with a short interval follow-up recommendation is a common finding seen in approximately 40% of women for each decade of screening. Factors associated with category 3 mammograms include mammography examination features, tendencies of the interpreting physician, and features of the country's health care system and the screened population including age, family history, previous biopsies, obesity, and menopausal hormone therapy. Recently, the degree to which a BIRADS category 3 mammographic result provides differential breast cancer risk compared with normal mammographic categories (BIRADS category 1 or 2) has been questioned. The yield of category 3 mammographic results could potentially be increased by more uniform performance of additional imaging workup (additional views and/or ultrasonography). In addition, other strategies to more accurately characterize the risk of breast cancer in women with category 3 mammographic results are under evaluation and including magnetic resonance imaging, computer-aided classification systems, and digital tomosynthesis. Given the potential psychologic impact of abnormal mammographic results, studies attempting to more accurately relate screening mammography findings to breast cancer risk are a priority.

  13. In newly diagnosed breast cancer, screening MRI of the contralateral breast detects mammographically occult cancer, even in elderly women: the mayo clinic in Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Vallow, Laura A; DePeri, Elizabeth R; McNeil, Rebecca B; Feigel, Deborah G; Amar, Surabhi; Buskirk, Steven J; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer is somewhat controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of synchronous, occult contralateral breast cancer detected by MRI but not by mammography or clinical breast examination in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, including those aged 70 years or older at our institution. MRI results for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent bilateral breast MRI after negative mammography and clinical examination between February 2003 and November 2007 at Mayo Clinic in Florida were reviewed. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed contralateral carcinoma diagnosed solely by MRI was determined and analyzed in the context of age, family history, menopausal status, breast density, and primary-tumor characteristics. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between contralateral carcinoma and potential patient risk factors. A total of 425 women were evaluated, of whom 129 (30%) were aged 70 years or older. A contralateral biopsy was recommended and performed solely on the basis of MRI in 72 of the 425 women (17%). Sixteen of these 72 women (22%) had pathologically confirmed carcinoma, including seven in the older subgroup. The prevalence of clinically and mammographically occult contralateral carcinoma detected by MRI was 3.8% (16/425) overall and 5.4% (7/129) in the group of older women. When potential risk factors for contralateral breast cancer were evaluated, postmenopausal status was the only significant predictor of contralateral cancer detected by MRI (p = 0.016). We concluded that contralateral breast screening with MRI should be considered in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, even those aged 70 years or older at diagnosis.

  14. Early detection of breast cancer through population-based mammographic screening in Asian women: a comparison study between screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Chuwa, Esther W L; Yeo, Allen W Y; Koong, Heng Nung; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Tan, Puay Hoon; Ho, Juliana T S; Wong, Jill S L; Ho, Gay Hui

    2009-01-01

    The first nation-wide mammographic screening program in Asia, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS), was launched in Singapore in January 2002. This study compared the presentation and results of screen-detected breast cancers with symptomatic breast cancers in two affiliated high-volume institutions, one of which was an assessment centre for BSS. The medical records of patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital and the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore, during the period January 2002 to December 2003 were reviewed. Clinical and pathological comparisons were made between screen-detected lesions and symptomatic lesions. Of a total of 767 cases, 640 (83.4%) were invasive carcinomas and 127 (16.6%) were ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) lesions. Only 13.4% of them were screen-detected. Compared to symptomatic cancers, screen-detected lesions were of smaller size (median size 18 versus 23 mm), a lower stage (stages 0-2, 95 versus 83.2%) and histologic grade (grade 1-2, 71 versus 60%), with a higher incidence of DCIS (31.0 versus 14.3%) and had higher rates of breast conservation (45.6 versus 28.2%) (all p-values <0.05). By multivariate analysis, tumor palpability, tumor size >20 mm, nodal involvement, cerbB2 overexpression, and advanced disease stage were independent poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival, whereas nodal involvement, advanced disease, and recurrence predicted poor cancer-specific survival. However, there was no statistically significant difference in disease-free survival or cancer-specific survival between the two groups at a median follow-up of 38 months. Screening mammography has allowed the detection of smaller and hence oncologically more favorable lesions in Asian women. Although no significant survival benefit was demonstrated in our study, a longer period of follow-up is essential before the benefit of mortality reduction, as a result of

  15. Likelihood of early detection of breast cancer in relation to false-positive risk in life-time mammographic screening: population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Otten, J D M; Fracheboud, J; den Heeten, G J; Otto, S J; Holland, R; de Koning, H J; Broeders, M J M; Verbeek, A L M

    2013-10-01

    Women require balanced, high-quality information when making an informed decision on screening benefits and harms before attending biennial mammographic screening. The cumulative risk of a false-positive recall and/or (small) screen-detected or interval cancer over 13 consecutive screening examinations for women aged 50 from the start of screening were estimated using data from the Nijmegen programme, the Netherlands. Women who underwent 13 successive screens in the period 1975-1976 had a 5.3% cumulative chance of a screen-detected cancer, with a 4.2% risk of at least one false-positive recall. The risk of being diagnosed with interval cancer was 3.7%. Two decades later, these estimates were 6.9%, 7.3% and 2.9%, respectively. The chance of detection of a small, favourable invasive breast cancer, anticipating a normal life-expectancy, rose from 2.3% to 3.7%. Extrapolation to digital screening mammography indicates that the proportion of false-positive results will rise to 16%. Dutch women about to participate in the screening programme can be reassured that the chance of false-positive recall in the Netherlands is relatively low. A new screening policy and improved mammography have increased the detection of an early screening carcinoma and lowering the risk of interval carcinoma.

  16. Mammographic compression in Asian women

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. Methods We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35–80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Results Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p<0.0001). Compression parameters including compression force, compression pressure, CBT and breast contact area were widely variable between [relative standard deviation (RSD)≥21.0%] and within (p<0.0001) Asian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2–11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Conclusions Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD. PMID:28419125

  17. Validation of no-reference image quality index for the assessment of digital mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Borges, Lucas R.; Gabarda, Salvador; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-03-01

    To ensure optimal clinical performance of digital mammography, it is necessary to obtain images with high spatial resolution and low noise, keeping radiation exposure as low as possible. These requirements directly affect the interpretation of radiologists. The quality of a digital image should be assessed using objective measurements. In general, these methods measure the similarity between a degraded image and an ideal image without degradation (ground-truth), used as a reference. These methods are called Full-Reference Image Quality Assessment (FR-IQA). However, for digital mammography, an image without degradation is not available in clinical practice; thus, an objective method to assess the quality of mammograms must be performed without reference. The purpose of this study is to present a Normalized Anisotropic Quality Index (NAQI), based on the Rényi entropy in the pseudo-Wigner domain, to assess mammography images in terms of spatial resolution and noise without any reference. The method was validated using synthetic images acquired through an anthropomorphic breast software phantom, and the clinical exposures on anthropomorphic breast physical phantoms and patient's mammograms. The results reported by this noreference index follow the same behavior as other well-established full-reference metrics, e.g., the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Reductions of 50% on the radiation dose in phantom images were translated as a decrease of 4dB on the PSNR, 25% on the SSIM and 33% on the NAQI, evidencing that the proposed metric is sensitive to the noise resulted from dose reduction. The clinical results showed that images reduced to 53% and 30% of the standard radiation dose reported reductions of 15% and 25% on the NAQI, respectively. Thus, this index may be used in clinical practice as an image quality indicator to improve the quality assurance programs in mammography; hence, the proposed method reduces the subjectivity

  18. [Customer satisfaction analysis in women attending an organized mammographic screening. Pilot study at Trento].

    PubMed

    Della Sala, W; Tognotti, F; Pellegrini, M; Bernardi, D; Gentilini, M; Piffer, S

    2005-01-01

    Present paper reports on the results of a pilot customer satisfaction study carried out on 1.720 consecutive women (18.7 with spontaneous access) attended senology department (Trento and Borgo) in the context of a organized mammography screening programme, started in October 2000. Data were collected by a questionnarie filled by the women after mammography. 4.3% of the invited women reported the receiving the letter late, 0.9% considered it inaccurate, 7.2% had some problems for getting a new date for test, 1.8% of the whole sample reported some problems for external access and 2.2% for internal access to health facilities; 1.9% perceived waiting room as not friendly. The welcoming by the personnel is judged quite well, only 0.6% complained about it. Trento centre, is more efficient than Borgo. In 21.7% of the cases the mammography has been performed within next 30 minutes of the fixed time and in 7.9% besides that. 36.8% of the whole sample perceived mammography as tiresome and 4.1% as painful. The percentage of women reporting mammography disconforting increase, in Trento sample, according the education level as previously reported. The data about perceived quality are satisfactory, on the whole. Anyway it would be opportune to contain the waiting time.

  19. Image quality and breast dose of 24 screen-film combinations for mammography.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulou, A D; Tsalafoutas, I A; Georgiou, E K; Yakoumakis, E N

    2006-02-01

    In this study the effect of different mammographic screen-film combinations on image quality and breast dose, and the correlation between the various image quality parameters, breast dose and the sensitometric parameters of a film were investigated. Three Agfa (MR5-II, HDR, HT), two Kodak (Min-R M, Min-R 2000), one Fuji (AD-M), one Konica (CM-H) and one Ferrania (HM plus) single emulsion mammographic films were combined with three intensifying screens (Agfa HDS, Kodak Min-R 2190 and Fuji AD-MA). The film characteristics were determined by sensitometry, while the image quality and the dose to the breast of the resulting 24 screen-film combinations were assessed using a mammography quality control phantom. For each combination, three images of the phantom were acquired with optical density within three different ranges. Two observers assessed the quality of the 72 phantom images obtained, while the breast dose was calculated from the exposure data required for each image. Large differences among screen-film combinations in terms of image quality and breast dose were identified however, that, could not be correlated with the film's sensitometric characteristics. All films presented the best resolution when combined with the HDS screen at the expense of speed, and the largest speed when combined with the AD-MA screen, without degradation of the overall image quality. However, an ideal screen-film combination presenting the best image quality with the least dose was not identified. It is also worth mentioning that the best performance for a film was not necessarily obtained when this was combined with the screen provided by the same manufacturer. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that comparison of films based on their sensitometric characteristics are of limited value for clinical practice, as their performance is strongly affected by the screens with which they are combined.

  20. The role of mammographic calcification in the neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-jie; Chen, Canming; Gu, Yajia; Di, Genhong; Wu, Jiong; Liu, Guangyu; Shao, ZhiMin

    2014-01-01

    Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR) positive tumors (74.3% versus 64.6%) and HER2 positive tumors (51.3% versus 33.4%, p = 0.004) and a similar pathologic complete response (pCR) rate compared to patients without calcifications (35.4% versus 29.8%). After NACT, the range of calcification decreased in 40% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 52.5%; the calcification density decreased in 15% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 77.5%; none of these change patterns were related to tumor response rate. No significant correlation was observed between the calcification appearance (morphology, distribution, range, diameter or density) and tumor subtypes or pCR rates. Among patients with malignant calcifications, 54 showed calcifications alone, 40 occurred with an architectural distortion (AD) and 93 with a mass. Calcifications were observed inside the tumor in 44% of patients and outside in 56%, with similar pCR rates and patterns of change. Calcification appearance did not clearly change after NACT, and calcification patterns were not related to pCR rate, suggesting that mammogram may not accurate to evaluate tumor response changes. Microcalcifications visible after NACT is essential for determining the extent of excision, patients with calcifications that occurred outside of the mass still had the opportunity for breast conservation.

  1. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    PubMed

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  2. Diagnosis of breast cancer in light microscopic and mammographic images textures using relative entropy via kernel estimation.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevcan Aytac; Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Poyraz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article was to provide early detection of breast cancer by using both mammography and histopathology images of the same patient. When the studies in the literature are examined, it is seen that the mammography and histopathology images of the same patient are not used together for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Mammographic and microscopic images can be limited when using only one of them for the early detection of the breast cancer. Therefore, multi-modality solutions that give more accuracy results than single solutions have been realized in this paper. 3 × 50 microscopic (histopathology) and 3 × 50 mammography image sets have been taken from Firat University Medicine Faculty Pathology and Radiology Laboratories, respectively. Optimum feature space has been obtained by minimum redundancy and maximum relevance via mutual information method applying to the 3 × 50 microscopic and mammography images. Then, probabilistic values of suspicious lesions in the image for selected features have been found by exponential curve fitting. Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measurements have been used for the diagnosis of breast cancer. It has been proved that these measures have been related to each other. Weight values for selected each feature have been found using these measures. These weight values have been used in object function. Afterward, histopathology and mammography images have been classified as normal, malign, and benign utilizing object function. In the result of this classifier, the accuracy of diagnosis of breast cancer has been estimated probabilistically. Furthermore, classifications have been probabilistically visualized on a pie chart. Consequently, the performances of Jensen Shannon, Hellinger, and Triangle measures have been compared with ROC analysis using histopathology and mammography test images. It has been observed that Jensen Shannon measure has higher performance than Hellinger and Triangle measures. Accuracy rates of

  3. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-15

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as 'gold standard', similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms.

  4. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li, Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-01

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as "gold standard," similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms. © 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Investigation of psychophysical measure for evaluation of similar images for mammographic masses: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li, Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Schmidt, Robert A; Shiraishi, Junji; Newstead, Gillian M; Doi, Kunio

    2005-07-01

    We investigated a psychophysical similarity measure for selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses. Sixty pairs of masses were selected from 1445 mass images prepared for this study, which were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography by the University of South Florida. Five radiologists provided subjective similarity ratings for these 60 pairs of masses based on the overall impression for diagnosis. Radiologists' subjective ratings were marked on a continuous rating scale and quantified between 0 and 1, which correspond to pairs not similar at all and pairs almost identical, respectively. By use of the subjective ratings as "gold standard," similarity measures based on the Euclidean distance between pairs in feature space and the psychophysical measure were determined. For determination of the psychophysical similarity measure, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' average subjective similarity ratings and computer-extracted image features. To evaluate the usefulness of the similarity measures, the agreement with the radiologists' subjective similarity ratings was assessed in terms of correlation coefficients between the average subjective ratings and the similarity measures. A commonly used similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance was moderately correlated (r=0.644) with the radiologists' average subjective ratings, whereas the psychophysical measure by use of the ANN was highly correlated (r=0.798). The preliminary result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown masses on mammograms.

  6. Assessment of two mammographic density related features in predicting near-term breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    In order to establish a personalized breast cancer screening program, it is important to develop risk models that have high discriminatory power in predicting the likelihood of a woman developing an imaging detectable breast cancer in near-term (e.g., <3 years after a negative examination in question). In epidemiology-based breast cancer risk models, mammographic density is considered the second highest breast cancer risk factor (second to woman's age). In this study we explored a new feature, namely bilateral mammographic density asymmetry, and investigated the feasibility of predicting near-term screening outcome. The database consisted of 343 negative examinations, of which 187 depicted cancers that were detected during the subsequent screening examination and 155 that remained negative. We computed the average pixel value of the segmented breast areas depicted on each cranio-caudal view of the initial negative examinations. We then computed the mean and difference mammographic density for paired bilateral images. Using woman's age, subjectively rated density (BIRADS), and computed mammographic density related features we compared classification performance in estimating the likelihood of detecting cancer during the subsequent examination using areas under the ROC curves (AUC). The AUCs were 0.63+/-0.03, 0.54+/-0.04, 0.57+/-0.03, 0.68+/-0.03 when using woman's age, BIRADS rating, computed mean density and difference in computed bilateral mammographic density, respectively. Performance increased to 0.62+/-0.03 and 0.72+/-0.03 when we fused mean and difference in density with woman's age. The results suggest that, in this study, bilateral mammographic tissue density is a significantly stronger (p<0.01) risk indicator than both woman's age and mean breast density.

  7. Modeling error in assessment of mammographic image features for improved computer-aided mammography training: initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2011-03-01

    In this study we investigate the hypothesis that there exist patterns in erroneous assessment of BI-RADS image features among radiology trainees when performing diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. We also investigate whether these error making patterns can be captured by individual user models. To test our hypothesis we propose a user modeling algorithm that uses the previous readings of a trainee to identify whether certain BI-RADS feature values (e.g. "spiculated" value for "margin" feature) are associated with higher than usual likelihood that the feature will be assessed incorrectly. In our experiments we used readings of 3 radiology residents and 7 breast imaging experts for 33 breast masses for the following BI-RADS features: parenchyma density, mass margin, mass shape and mass density. The expert readings were considered as the gold standard. Rule-based individual user models were developed and tested using the leave one-one-out crossvalidation scheme. Our experimental evaluation showed that the individual user models are accurate in identifying cases for which errors are more likely to be made. The user models captured regularities in error making for all 3 residents. This finding supports our hypothesis about existence of individual error making patterns in assessment of mammographic image features using the BI-RADS lexicon. Explicit user models identifying the weaknesses of each resident could be of great use when developing and adapting a personalized training plan to meet the resident's individual needs. Such approach fits well with the framework of adaptive computer-aided educational systems in mammography we have proposed before.

  8. Mammographic Breast Density Assessment Using Automated Volumetric Software and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) Categorization by Expert Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; McEntee, Mark F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate agreement on mammographic breast density (MD) assessment between automated volumetric software and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by expert radiologists. Forty cases of left craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique mammograms from 20 women were used. All images had their volumetric density classified using Volpara density grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage. The same images were then classified into BIRADS categories (I-IV) by 20 American Board of Radiology examiners. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement (κ = 0.537; 95% CI = 0.234-0.699) between VDG classification and radiologists' BIRADS density assessment. Interreader agreement using BIRADS also demonstrated moderate agreement (κ = 0.565; 95% CI = 0.519-0.610) ranging from 0.328 to 0.669. Radiologists' average BIRADS was lower than average VDG scores by 0.33, with their mean being 2.13, whereas the mean VDG was 2.48 (U = -3.742; P < 0.001). VDG and BIRADS showed a very strong positive correlation (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001) as did BIRADS and average volumetric breast density percentage (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001). Automated volumetric breast density assessment shows moderate agreement and very strong correlation with BIRADS; interreader variations still exist within BIRADS. Because of the increasing importance of MD measurement in clinical management of patients, widely accepted, reproducible, and accurate measures of MD are required. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiologists' preferences for digital mammographic display. The International Digital Mammography Development Group.

    PubMed

    Pisano, E D; Cole, E B; Major, S; Zong, S; Hemminger, B M; Muller, K E; Johnston, R E; Walsh, R; Conant, E; Fajardo, L L; Feig, S A; Nishikawa, R M; Yaffe, M J; Williams, M B; Aylward, S R

    2000-09-01

    To determine the preferences of radiologists among eight different image processing algorithms applied to digital mammograms obtained for screening and diagnostic imaging tasks. Twenty-eight images representing histologically proved masses or calcifications were obtained by using three clinically available digital mammographic units. Images were processed and printed on film by using manual intensity windowing, histogram-based intensity windowing, mixture model intensity windowing, peripheral equalization, multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA), contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, Trex processing, and unsharp masking. Twelve radiologists compared the processed digital images with screen-film mammograms obtained in the same patient for breast cancer screening and breast lesion diagnosis. For the screening task, screen-film mammograms were preferred to all digital presentations, but the acceptability of images processed with Trex and MUSICA algorithms were not significantly different. All printed digital images were preferred to screen-film radiographs in the diagnosis of masses; mammograms processed with unsharp masking were significantly preferred. For the diagnosis of calcifications, no processed digital mammogram was preferred to screen-film mammograms. When digital mammograms were preferred to screen-film mammograms, radiologists selected different digital processing algorithms for each of three mammographic reading tasks and for different lesion types. Soft-copy display will eventually allow radiologists to select among these options more easily.

  10. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  11. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jing Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  12. Disparities in mammographic screening for Asian women in California: a cross-sectional analysis to identify meaningful groups for targeted intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Tan, Susanna; Keegan, Theresa HM; Clarke, Christina A

    2007-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among the rapidly growing population of Asian Americans; it is also the most common cause of cancer mortality among Filipinas. Asian women continue to have lower rates of mammographic screening than women of most other racial/ethnic groups. While prior studies have described the effects of sociodemographic and other characteristics of women on non-adherence to screening guidelines, they have not identified the distinct segments of the population who remain at highest risk of not being screened. Methods To better describe characteristics of Asian women associated with not having a mammogram in the last two years, we applied recursive partitioning to population-based data (N = 1521) from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), for seven racial/ethnic groups of interest: Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, Vietnamese, and all Asians combined. Results We identified two major subgroups of Asian women who reported not having a mammogram in the past two years and therefore, did not follow mammography screening recommendations: 1) women who have never had a pap exam to screen for cervical cancer (68% had no mammogram), and 2) women who have had a pap exam, but have no women's health issues (osteoporosis, using menopausal hormone therapies, and/or hysterectomy) nor a usual source of care (62% had no mammogram). Only 19% of Asian women who have had pap screening and have women's health issues did not have a mammogram in the past two years. In virtually all ethnic subgroups, having had pap or colorectal screening were the strongest delineators of mammography usage. Other characteristics of women least likely to have had a mammogram included: Chinese non-U.S. citizens or citizens without usual source of health care, Filipinas with no health insurance, Koreans without women's health issues and public or no health insurance, South Asians less than age 50 who were unemployed or non

  13. Evaluation of a new mammographic film: methods and considerations.

    PubMed

    Tsalafoutas, Oannis A; Kolovos, Christos A; Tsapaki, Virginia; Betsou, Sofia; Koliakou, Eleni; Maniatis, Petros N; Xenofos, Stelios

    2008-04-01

    In this study the performance of a new mammographic film, the XMA (Retina), was evaluated in comparison with HT (Agfa). The comparison was made in terms of sensitometric characteristics and in terms of image quality and speed when combined with four different cassettes-HDS (Agfa), Min-R 2000 and Min-R 2190 (Kodak), and AD-MA (Fuji)-using the Leeds TOR(MAX) Mammographic Quality Control phantom. The entrance surface air kerma was calculated from exposure factors and the relative speed of each screen-film combination was determined. These tests revealed that XMA requires about 40% less dose than HT when combined with the same intensifying screen, at a penalty of less than 8% in image quality. When combined with AD-MA the XMA presents the greatest speed, whereas the Min-R 2190 is the best compromise between image quality and breast dose. The above values are indicative of the dilemma that medical physicists and radiologists face when it comes to the selection of a screen-film combination for mammography. Both image quality and breast dose should be considered, but strict instructions on what weight should be assigned to each parameter have not been established yet. Health Phys. 94(4):338-344; 2008.

  14. Mammographic findings of women recalled for diagnostic work-up in digital versus screen-film mammography in a population-based screening program.

    PubMed

    Lipasti, Seppo; Anttila, Ahti; Pamilo, Martti

    2010-06-01

    Limited information is available concerning differences in the radiological findings of women recalled for diagnostic work-up in digital mammography (DM) versus screen-film mammography (SFM) screening. To compare the radiological findings, their positive predictive values (PPVs) for cancer and other process indicators of DM screening performed by computed radiography (CR) technology and SFM screening in a population-based program. The material consisted of women, 50-59 years of age, who were invited for screening: 30 153 women with DM in 2007-2008 and 32 939 women with SFM in 1999-2000. The attendance rate was 77.7% (23 440) in the DM arm and 83.8% (27 593) in the SFM arm. In the DM arm, 1.71% of those screened (401) and in the SFM arm 1.59% (438) were recalled for further work-up. The images resulting in the recall were classified as: 1) tumor-like mass, 2) parenchymal distortion/asymmetry, 3) calcifications, and 4) combination of mass and calcifications. The distributions of the various radiological findings and their PPVs for cancer were compared in both study groups. The recall rates, cancer detection rates, test specificities, and PPVs of the DM and SFM groups were also compared. Women were recalled for diagnostic work-up most often due to tumor-like mass. It was more common in SFM (1.08% per woman screened) than in DM (0.93%). The second most common finding was parenchymal distortion and asymmetry, more often in DM (0.58%) than in SFM (0.37%). Calcifications were the third most common finding. DM exposed calcifications more often (0.49%) than SFM (0.26%). The PPVs for cancer of the recalls were higher in DM than in SFM in all subgroups of radiological findings. The test specificities were similar (DM 98.9%, SFM 98.8%). Significantly more cancers were detected by DM (cancer detection rate 0.623% per woman screened, n=146) than by SFM (cancer detection rate 0.406% per woman screened, n=112). The PPVs for cancer of all recalls for diagnostic work-up were

  15. Investigation of diagnostic and image quality attributes: comparison of screen-film to CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn; Richards, Anne; Ryan-Kron, Susan

    2006-03-01

    Digital mammography is advancing into an arena where analog has long been the gold standard. Direct digital systems may not be the favored solution for a particular site while computed radiography (CR) mammography, remains unproven worldwide. This pilot study responds to the growing desire to acquire and display digital mammographic images by exploring the acceptability of CR mammography. Images representing a range of breast tissue types were collected from 49 subjects (17 screening; 32 diagnostic) at four clinical sites. Comparison views were collected on the same breast, under the same compression, using automatic exposure control on state-of-the-art film systems followed by CR. CR images were processed and printed to a mammography printer for hard copy feature comparison. Each image pair in the study was evaluated according to 13 image quality attributes covering noise, contrast, sharpness, and image quality in the overall captured images as well as in each of several particular breast regions (periphery and skin-line, parenchyma and fatty tissue). A rating scale from 1 to 5 was used (strong preference for film=1, strong preference for CR=5). Twelve experienced mammographers at four clinical sites scored a subset of the 49 cases for a total of 64 image pair readings. There were 64 ratings for each of 13 image quality attributes for all cases and, an additional series of scores (four or five attribute ratings) for each abnormality in the category of mass, architectural distortion and microcalcification, for a total of 1069 scores. Based on the pilot study results, it was suggested that CR was equivalent or preferred to conventional screen-film for overall image quality (38% scored 3; 46% scored >3), image contrast (27% scored 3; 59% scored >3) and sharpness (28% scored 3; 50% scored >3). No preference was found when assessing noise. This pilot study also suggested that diagnostic quality was maintained in assessing abnormalities for attributes necessary to

  16. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  17. Impact of the elimination of cost sharing for mammographic breast cancer screening among rural US women: A natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Horick, Nora; Houck, Kevin; Rabin, Julia; Villagra, Victor; Lyman, Gary H; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2017-07-01

    Rural US women experience disparities in breast cancer screening and outcomes. In 2006, a national rural health insurance provider, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), eliminated out-of-pocket costs for screening mammography. This study evaluated the elimination of cost sharing as a natural experiment: it compared trends in screening before and after the policy change. NRECA insurance claims data were used to identify all women aged 40 to 64 years who were eligible for breast cancer screening, and mammography utilization from 1998 through 2011 was evaluated. Repeated measures regression models were used to evaluate changes in utilization over time and the association between screening and sociodemographic factors. The analysis was based on 45,738 women enrolled in the NRECA membership database for an average of 6.1 years and included 279,940 person-years of enrollment. Between 1998 and 2011, the annual screening rate increased from 35% to a peak of 50% among women aged 40 to 49 years and from 49% to 58% among women aged 50 to 64 years. The biennial screening rate increased from 56% to 66% for women aged 40 to 49 years and from 68% to 73% for women aged 50 to 64 years. Screening rates increased significantly (P < .0001) after the elimination of cost sharing and then declined slightly after changes to government screening guidelines in 2009. Younger women experienced greater increases in both annual screening (6.2%) and biennial screening (5.6%) after the elimination of cost sharing in comparison with older women (3.0% and 2.6%, respectively). In a multivariate analysis, rural residence, lower population income, and lower population education were associated with modestly lower screening. In a national sample of predominantly rural working-age women, the elimination of cost sharing correlated with increased breast cancer screening. Cancer 2017;123:2506-15. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using visually sensitive image features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Zarafshani, Ali; Qiu, Yuchen; Qian, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To develop a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme that computes visually sensitive image features routinely used by radiologists to develop a machine learning classifier and distinguish between the malignant and benign breast masses detected from digital mammograms. An image dataset including 301 breast masses was retrospectively selected. From each segmented mass region, we computed image features that mimic five categories of visually sensitive features routinely used by radiologists in reading mammograms. We then selected five optimal features in the five feature categories and applied logistic regression models for classification. A new CAD interface was also designed to show lesion segmentation, computed feature values and classification score. Areas under ROC curves (AUC) were 0.786±0.026 and 0.758±0.027 when to classify mass regions depicting on two view images, respectively. By fusing classification scores computed from two regions, AUC increased to 0.806±0.025. This study demonstrated a new approach to develop CAD scheme based on 5 visually sensitive image features. Combining with a "visual aid" interface, CAD results may be much more easily explainable to the observers and increase their confidence to consider CAD generated classification results than using other conventional CAD approaches, which involve many complicated and visually insensitive texture features.

  19. Pilot study of quantitative analysis of background enhancement on breast MR images: association with menstrual cycle and mammographic breast density.

    PubMed

    Scaranelo, Anabel M; Carrillo, Maria Claudia; Fleming, Rachel; Jacks, Lindsay M; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Crystal, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    To perform semiautomated quantitative analysis of the background enhancement (BE) in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and to correlate it with mammographic breast density and menstrual cycle. Informed consent was waived after the research ethics board approved this study. Results of 177 consecutive preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) examinations performed from February to December 2009 were reviewed; 147 female patients (median age, 48 years; range, 26-86 years) were included. Ordinal values of BE and breast density were described by two independent readers by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. The BE coefficient (BEC) was calculated thus: (SI2 · 100/SI1) - 100, where SI is signal intensity, SI2 is the SI enhancement measured in the largest anteroposterior dimension in the axial plane 1 minute after the contrast agent injection, and SI1is the SI before contrast agent injection. BEC was used for the quantitative analysis of BE. Menstrual cycle status was based on the last menstrual period. The Wilcoxon rank-sum or Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare quantitative assessment groups. Cohen weighted κ was used to evaluate agreement. Of 147 patients, 68 (46%) were premenopausal and 79 (54%) were postmenopausal. The quantitative BEC was associated with the menstrual status (BEC in premenopausal women, 31.48 ± 20.68 [standard deviation]; BEC in postmenopausal women, 25.65 ± 16.74; P = .02). The percentage of overall BE was higher when the MR imaging was performed in women in the inadequate phase of the cycle (<35 days, not 7-14 days; mean BEC, 35.7) compared with women in the postmenopausal group (P = .001). Premenopausal women had significantly higher BEC when compared with postmenopausal women (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the percentage of BE between breast density groups. Premenopausal women with breast cancer, and specifically women in the inadequate phase of the cycle, presented with

  20. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  1. Development of active matrix flat panel imagers incorporating thin layers of polycrystalline HgI(2) for mammographic x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Qihua; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Gupta, Tapan

    2013-02-07

    Active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) offer many advantages and have become ubiquitous across a wide variety of medical x-ray imaging applications. However, for mammography, the imaging performance of conventional AMFPIs incorporating CsI:Tl scintillators or a-Se photoconductors is limited by their relatively modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), particularly at low x-ray exposures or high spatial resolution. One strategy for overcoming this limitation involves the use of a high gain photoconductor such as mercuric iodide (HgI(2)) which has the potential to improve the SNR by virtue of its low effective work function (W(EFF)). In this study, the performance of direct-detection AMFPI prototypes employing relatively thin layers of polycrystalline HgI(2) operated under mammographic irradiation conditions over a range of 0.5 to 16.0 mR is presented. High x-ray sensitivity (corresponding to W(EFF) values of ∼19 eV), low dark current (<0.1 pA mm(-2)) and good spatial resolution, largely limited by the size of the pixel pitch, were observed. For one prototype, a detective quantum efficiency of ∼70% was observed at an x-ray exposure of ∼0.5 mR at 26 kVp.

  2. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system

    PubMed Central

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman’s density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists’ visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer’s equipment affects a woman’s MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; p<0.001), while the VDG (ρ=0.978; p<0.001) and AvBD% (ρ=0.973; p<0.001) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001). PMID:26158085

  3. An examination of sexual orientation group patterns in mammographic and colorectal screening in a cohort of U.S. women.

    PubMed

    Austin, S Bryn; Pazaris, Mathew J; Nichols, Lauren P; Bowen, Deborah; Wei, Esther K; Spiegelman, Donna

    2013-03-01

    Underutilization of cancer screening has been found especially to affect socially marginalized groups. We investigated sexual orientation group patterns in breast and colorectal cancer screening adherence. Data on breast and colorectal cancer screening, sexual orientation, and sociodemographics were gathered prospectively from 1989 through 2005 from 85,759 U.S. women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Publicly available data on state-level healthcare quality and sexual-orientation-related legal protections were also gathered. Multivariable models were used to estimate sexual orientation group differences in breast and colorectal cancer screening, controlling for sociodemographics and state-level healthcare quality and legal protections for sexual minorities. Receipt of a mammogram in the past 2 years was common though not universal and differed only slightly by sexual orientation: heterosexual 84 %, bisexual 79 %, and lesbian 82 %. Fewer than half of eligible women had ever received a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and rates did not differ by sexual orientation: heterosexual 39 %, bisexual 39 %, and lesbian 42 %. In fully adjusted models, state-level healthcare quality score, though not state-level legal protections for sexual minorities, was positively associated with likelihood of being screened for all women regardless of sexual orientation. Concerns have been raised that unequal healthcare access for sexual orientation minorities may adversely affect cancer screening. We found small disparities in mammography and none in colorectal screening, though adherence to colorectal screening recommendations was uniformly very low. Interventions are needed to increase screening in women of all sexual orientation groups, particularly in areas with poor healthcare policies.

  4. An Examination of Sexual Orientation Group Patterns in Mammographic and Colorectal Screening in a Cohort of U.S. Women

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S. Bryn; Pazaris, Mathew J.; Nichols, Lauren P.; Bowen, Deborah; Wei, Esther K.; Spiegelman, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Underutilization of cancer screening has been found especially to affect socially marginalized groups. We investigated sexual orientation group patterns in breast and colorectal cancer screening adherence. Methods Data on breast and colorectal cancer screening, sexual orientation, and sociodemographics were gathered prospectively from 1989 through 2005 from 85,759 U.S. women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Publicly available data on state-level health care quality and sexual orientation-related legal protections were also gathered. Multivariable models were used to estimate sexual orientation-group differences in breast and colorectal cancer screening, controlling for sociodemographics and state-level health care quality and legal protections for sexual minorities. Results Receipt of a mammogram in the past two years was common though not universal and differed only slightly by sexual orientation: heterosexual 84%; bisexual 79%; lesbian 82%. Fewer than half of eligible women had ever received a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and rates did not differ by sexual orientation: heterosexual 39%; bisexual 39%; lesbian 42%. In fully adjusted models, state-level health care quality score, though not state-level legal protections for sexual minorities, was positively associated with likelihood of being screened for all women regardless of sexual orientation. Conclusions Concerns have been raised that unequal health care access for sexual orientation minorities may adversely affect cancer screening. We found small disparities in mammography and none in colorectal screening, though adherence to colorectal screening recommendations was uniformly very low. Interventions are needed to increase screening in women of all sexual orientation groups, particularly in areas with poor health care policies. PMID:22729931

  5. AutoDensity: an automated method to measure mammographic breast density that predicts breast cancer risk and screening outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While Cumulus – a semi-automated method for measuring breast density – is utilised extensively in research, it is labour-intensive and unsuitable for screening programmes that require an efficient and valid measure on which to base screening recommendations. We develop an automated method to measure breast density (AutoDensity) and compare it to Cumulus in terms of association with breast cancer risk and breast cancer screening outcomes. Methods AutoDensity automatically identifies the breast area in the mammogram and classifies breast density in a similar way to Cumulus, through a fast, stand-alone Windows or Linux program. Our sample comprised 985 women with screen-detected cancers, 367 women with interval cancers and 4,975 controls (women who did not have cancer), sampled from first and subsequent screening rounds of a film mammography screening programme. To test the validity of AutoDensity, we compared the effect estimates using AutoDensity with those using Cumulus from logistic regression models that tested the association between breast density and breast cancer risk, risk of small and large screen-detected cancers and interval cancers, and screening programme sensitivity (the proportion of cancers that are screen-detected). As a secondary analysis, we report on correlation between AutoDensity and Cumulus measures. Results AutoDensity performed similarly to Cumulus in all associations tested. For example, using AutoDensity, the odds ratios for women in the highest decile of breast density compared to women in the lowest quintile for invasive breast cancer, interval cancers, large and small screen-detected cancers were 3.2 (95% CI 2.5 to 4.1), 4.7 (95% CI 3.0 to 7.4), 6.4 (95% CI 3.7 to 11.1) and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.0) respectively. For Cumulus the corresponding odds ratios were: 2.4 (95% CI 1.9 to 3.1), 4.1 (95% CI 2.6 to 6.3), 6.6 (95% CI 3.7 to 11.7) and 1.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.8). Correlation between Cumulus and AutoDensity measures was 0

  6. Evaluation of objective similarity measures for selecting similar images of mammographic lesions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Abe, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Junji; Doi, Kunio

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate four objective similarity measures as an image retrieval tool for selecting lesions similar to unknown lesions on mammograms. Measures A and B were based on the Euclidean distance in feature space and the psychophysical similarity measure, respectively. Measure C was the sequential combination of B and A, whereas measure D was the sequential combination of A and B. In this study, we selected 100 lesions each for masses and clustered microcalcifications randomly from our database, and we selected five pairs of lesions from 4,950 pairs based on all combinations of the 100 lesions by use of each measure. In two observer studies for 20 mass pairs and 20 calcification pairs, six radiologists compared all combinations of 20 pairs by using a two-alternative forced-choice method to determine the subjective similarity ranking score which was obtained from the frequency with which a pair was considered as more similar than the other 19 pairs. In both mass and calcification pairs, pairs selected by use of measure D had the highest mean value of the average subjective similarity ranking scores. The difference between measures D and A (P = 0.008 and 0.024), as well as that between measures D and B (P = 0.018 and 0.028) were statistically significant for masses and microcalcifications, respectively. The sequential combination of the objective similarity measure based on the Euclidean distance and the psychophysical similarity measure would be useful in the selection of images similar to those of unknown lesions.

  7. Assessment of BI-RADS category 4 lesions detected with screening mammography and screening US: utility of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kevin; Schrading, Simone; Hansen, Nienke L; Barabasch, Alexandra; Kuhl, Christiane K

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging according to different types of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4 findings from screening mammography and/or screening ultrasonography (US). This institutional review board-approved prospective study included 340 patients in whom 353 lesions were detected at screening mammography or US and were rated BI-RADS category 4 after appropriate conventional work-up. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Women underwent standard dynamic contrast material-enhanced MR imaging for further assessment. Women with negative or benign MR findings who did not proceed to biopsy underwent intensified follow-up for at least 18 months. Pure clustered microcalcifications were followed up for at least 24 months. Of the 353 study findings, 66 (18.7%) were finally shown to be true-positive (23 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS], 43 invasive cancers) and 287 (81.3%) were false-positive. Assessment of MR imaging findings led to a correct diagnosis of no breast cancer in 264 of the 287 false-positive findings (92%) and helped confirm the presence of breast cancer in 63 of 66 malignancies. The false-negative rate for pure clustered microcalcifications was 12% (three of 25 cases) because of three nonenhancing low-grade DCIS cases; in turn, MR imaging depicted additional invasive cancers in three women with false-positive findings from mammography and US. For mammographic findings other than pure clustered microcalcifications, MR imaging increased the positive predictive value (PPV) from 17.5% (21 of 120 cases; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.7%, 24.3%) to 78% (21 of 27 cases; 95% CI: 62.1%, 93.5%), with a false-negative rate of 0%. For all US findings, MR imaging increased the PPV from 12.9% (20 of 155 cases; 95% CI: 7.6%, 18.2%) to 69% (20 of 29 cases; 95% CI: 52.2%, 85.8%), again with a false-negative rate of 0%. MR imaging resulted in false-positive findings that led to MR

  8. New mammography screen/film combinations: Imaging characteristics and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Zheutlin, J.; Gornbein, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3{degrees}C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

  9. New mammography screen/film combinations: imaging characteristics and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Zheutlin, J; Gornbein, J A

    1990-04-01

    Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3 degrees C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

  10. An exploration of mammographers' attitudes towards the use of social media for providing breast screening information to clients.

    PubMed

    Scragg, B; Shaikh, S; Shires, G; Stein Hodgins, J; Mercer, C; Robinson, L; Wray, J

    2017-08-01

    Increasingly patients and clients of health services are using social media to locate information about medical procedures and outcomes. There is increasing pressure for health professionals to engage in on-line spaces to provide clear and accurate information to their patient community. Research suggests there are some anxieties on the part of practitioners to do this. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of the NHS breast screening programme workforce towards engaging in online discussions with clients about breast screening. 78 practitioners, representing a range of professional roles within the NHS Breast Screening Programme, attended one of 4 workshops. We used a Nominal Group Technique to identify and rank responses to the question: "What are the challenges that practitioners face in using SoME as part of their role?" Responses were categorised into themes. Participants were also asked to identify solutions to these challenges. Challenges: We identified two overarching themes: (1) Working within boundaries: which was further categorised into (a) Professional/legal accountability; (b) Information accuracy and (c)Time as a boundary, and (2) Support: further categorised into (a) Employer and (b) Manager. Solutions: These included: training in technical and interactional aspects of on-line communication and a responsibility to better understand employer and professional body SoMe policies. The study participants appeared willing and motivated to engage in SoMe. However, in keeping with the literature from other disciplines, a number of challenges need to be overcome for its use to be adopted more widely by breast screening professionals. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantification of mammographic masking risk with volumetric breast density maps: how to select women for supplemental screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Katharina; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna OP; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of mammograms is low for women with dense breasts, since cancers may be masked by dense tissue. In this study, we investigated methods to identify women with density patterns associated with a high masking risk. Risk measures are derived from volumetric breast density maps. We used the last negative screening mammograms of 93 women who subsequently presented with an interval cancer (IC), and, as controls, 930 randomly selected normal screening exams from women without cancer. Volumetric breast density maps were computed from the mammograms, which provide the dense tissue thickness at each location. These were used to compute absolute and percentage glandular tissue volume. We modeled the masking risk for each pixel location using the absolute and percentage dense tissue thickness and we investigated the effect of taking the cancer location probability distribution (CLPD) into account. For each method, we selected cases with the highest masking measure (by thresholding) and computed the fraction of ICs as a function of the fraction of controls selected. The latter can be interpreted as the negative supplemental screening rate (NSSR). Between the models, when incorporating CLPD, no significant differences were found. In general, the methods performed better when CLPD was included. At higher NSSRs some of the investigated masking measures had a significantly higher performance than volumetric breast density. These measures may therefore serve as an alternative to identify women with a high risk for a masked cancer.

  12. Mammographic screening in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group. Are early outcome measures influenced by ethnicity?

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Hofvind, Solveig; Nieder, Carsten; Schnell, Edrun Andrea; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2012-04-16

    Female citizens of Sami (the indigenous people of Norway) municipalities in northern Norway have a low risk of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the attendance rate and outcome of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in the Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group. A retrospective registry-based study. The 8 municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami). Population data were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data regarding invitations and outcome in the NBCSP during the period 2001-2010 was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN). The NBCSP targets women aged 50-69 years. Rates and percentages were compared using chi-square test with a p-value<0.05 as statistical significant. The attendance rate in the NBCSP was 78% in the Sami and 75% in the non-Sami population (p< 0.01). The recall rates were 2.4 and 3.3% in the Sami and non-Sami population, respectively (p<0.01). The rate of invasive screen detected cancer was not significantly lower in the Sami group (p=0.14). The percentage of all breast cancers detected in the NBCSP among the Sami (67%) was lower compared with the non-Sami population (86%, p=0.06). Despite a lower risk of breast cancer, the Sami attended the NBCSP more frequently than the control group. The recall and cancer detection rate was lower among the Sami compared with the non-Sami group.

  13. Mammographic screening in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group. Are early outcome measures influenced by ethnicity?

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Hofvind, Solveig; Nieder, Carsten; Andrea Schnell, Edrun; Ragnhild Broderstad, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Objectives . Female citizens of Sami (the indigenous people of Norway) municipalities in northern Norway have a low risk of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the attendance rate and outcome of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in the Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group. Study design . A retrospective registry-based study. Methods . The 8 municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami). Population data were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data regarding invitations and outcome in the NBCSP during the period 2001-2010 was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN). The NBCSP targets women aged 50-69 years. Rates and percentages were compared using chi-square test with a p-value<0.05 as statistical significant. Results . The attendance rate in the NBCSP was 78% in the Sami and 75% in the non-Sami population (p< 0.01). The recall rates were 2.4 and 3.3% in the Sami and non-Sami population, respectively (p<0.01). The rate of invasive screen detected cancer was not significantly lower in the Sami group (p=0.14). The percentage of all breast cancers detected in the NBCSP among the Sami (67%) was lower compared with the non-Sami population (86%, p=0.06). Conclusion . Despite a lower risk of breast cancer, the Sami attended the NBCSP more frequently than the control group. The recall and cancer detection rate was lower among the Sami compared with the non-Sami group.

  14. Mammographic screening in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group. Are early outcome measures influenced by ethnicity?

    PubMed Central

    Norum, Jan; Hofvind, Solveig; Nieder, Carsten; Andrea Schnell, Edrun; Ragnhild Broderstad, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Female citizens of Sami (the indigenous people of Norway) municipalities in northern Norway have a low risk of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the attendance rate and outcome of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in the Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group. Study design A retrospective registry-based study. Methods The 8 municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami). Population data were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data regarding invitations and outcome in the NBCSP during the period 2001–2010 was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN). The NBCSP targets women aged 50–69 years. Rates and percentages were compared using chi-square test with a p-value<0.05 as statistical significant. Results The attendance rate in the NBCSP was 78% in the Sami and 75% in the non-Sami population (p< 0.01). The recall rates were 2.4 and 3.3% in the Sami and non-Sami population, respectively (p<0.01). The rate of invasive screen detected cancer was not significantly lower in the Sami group (p=0.14). The percentage of all breast cancers detected in the NBCSP among the Sami (67%) was lower compared with the non-Sami population (86%, p=0.06). Conclusion Despite a lower risk of breast cancer, the Sami attended the NBCSP more frequently than the control group. The recall and cancer detection rate was lower among the Sami compared with the non-Sami group. PMID:22564465

  15. The use of lower resolution viewing devices for mammographic interpretation: implications for education and training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; James, Jonathan J; Turnbull, Anne E; Gale, Alastair G

    2015-10-01

    To establish whether lower resolution, lower cost viewing devices have the potential to deliver mammographic interpretation training. On three occasions over eight months, fourteen consultant radiologists and reporting radiographers read forty challenging digital mammography screening cases on three different displays: a digital mammography workstation, a standard LCD monitor, and a smartphone. Standard image manipulation software was available for use on all three devices. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) were used to determine the significance of differences in performance between the viewing devices with/without the application of image manipulation software. The effect of reader's experience was also assessed. Performance was significantly higher (p < .05) on the mammography workstation compared to the other two viewing devices. When image manipulation software was applied to images viewed on the standard LCD monitor, performance improved to mirror levels seen on the mammography workstation with no significant difference between the two. Image interpretation on the smartphone was uniformly poor. Film reader experience had no significant effect on performance across all three viewing devices. Lower resolution standard LCD monitors combined with appropriate image manipulation software are capable of displaying mammographic pathology, and are potentially suitable for delivering mammographic interpretation training. • This study investigates potential devices for training in mammography interpretation. • Lower resolution standard LCD monitors are potentially suitable for mammographic interpretation training. • The effect of image manipulation tools on mammography workstation viewing is insignificant. • Reader experience had no significant effect on performance in all viewing devices. • Smart phones are not suitable for displaying mammograms.

  16. Barriers Against Mammographic Screening in a Socioeconomically Underdeveloped Population: A Population-based, Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Yüce, Salih; Güler, Tekin; Ulun, Canan; Özaydın, Nilufer; Pruthi, Sandhya; Akkapulu, Nezih; Karabulut, Koray; Soran, Atilla; Özmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mammography-screening (MS) rates remain low in underdeveloped populations. We aimed to find the barriers against MS in a low socioeconomic population. Materials and Methods Women aged 40–69 years who lived in the least developed city in Turkey (Mus), were targeted. A survey was used to question breast cancer (BC) knowledge and health practices. Results In total, 2054 women were surveyed (participation rate: 85%). The MS rate was 35%. Women aged 50–59 years (42%, p<0.001), having annual Obstetric-Gynecology (OB-GYN) visits (42%, p<0.001), reading daily newspaper (44%, p=0.003), having Social Security (39%, p=0.006) had increased MS rates. The most common source of information about BC was TV/radio (36%). Having doctors as main source of information (42%, p<0.001), knowing BC as the most common cancer in females (36%, p=0.024), knowing that BC is curable if detected early (36%, p=0.016), knowing that MS is free (42%, p<0.001) and agreeing to the phrase “I would get mammography (MG), if my doctor referred me” (36%, p=0.015) increased MS rates. Agreeing that MG exposes women to unnecessary radiation decreased MS rate (32%, p=0.002). Conclusion To increase the MS rate in low socioeconomic populations, clear messages about BC being the most common cancer in women, MS after 40 years of age not causing unnecessary radiation but saving lives through enabling early detection, and MS being free of charge should be given frequently on audiovisual media. Uninsured women and women aged 40–49 years should be especially targeted. Physicians from all specialties should inform their patients about BC.

  17. Modeling resident error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses using computer-extracted image features: preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Zhang, Jing; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora

    2014-03-01

    Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, as good interpretation skills potentially ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. We have previously proposed a computer-aided education system that utilizes trainee models, which relate human-assessed image characteristics to interpretation error. We proposed that these models be used to identify the most difficult and therefore the most educationally useful cases for each trainee. In this study, as a next step in our research, we propose to build trainee models that utilize features that are automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms. To predict error, we used a logistic regression which accepts imaging features as input and returns error as output. Reader data from 3 experts and 3 trainees were used. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to evaluate the proposed trainee models. Our experiments showed that, for three trainees, our models were able to predict error better than chance. This is an important step in the development of adaptive computer-aided education systems since computer-extracted features will allow for faster and more extensive search of imaging databases in order to identify the most educationally beneficial cases.

  18. Consistency of visual assessments of mammographic breast density from vendor-specific “for presentation” images

    PubMed Central

    Abdolell, Mohamed; Tsuruda, Kaitlyn; Lightfoot, Christopher B.; Barkova, Eva; McQuaid, Melanie; Caines, Judy; Iles, Sian E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Discussions of percent breast density (PD) and breast cancer risk implicitly assume that visual assessments of PD are comparable between vendors despite differences in technology and display algorithms. This study examines the extent to which visual assessments of PD differ between mammograms acquired from two vendors. Pairs of “for presentation” digital mammography images were obtained from two mammography units for 146 women who had a screening mammogram on one vendor unit followed by a diagnostic mammogram on a different vendor unit. Four radiologists independently visually assessed PD from single left mediolateral oblique view images from the two vendors. Analysis of variance, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), scatter plots, and Bland–Altman plots were used to evaluate PD assessments between vendors. The mean radiologist PD for each image was used as a consensus PD measure. Overall agreement of the PD assessments was excellent between the two vendors with an ICC of 0.95 (95% confidence interval: 0.93 to 0.97). Bland–Altman plots demonstrated narrow upper and lower limits of agreement between the vendors with only a small bias (2.3 percentage points). The results of this study support the assumption that visual assessment of PD is consistent across mammography vendors despite vendor-specific appearances of “for presentation” images. PMID:26870747

  19. Screen film versus digital mammography: a perceptual analysis of postprocessed hard copy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Ved, Hetal; D'Orsi, Carl J.

    2002-04-01

    In this investigation we studied the imaging characteristics of a mammographic screen-film (MinR-2000, Eastman Kodak Co.) and an amorphous-silicon flat-panel digital mammography system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems) based on information perception by human observers. The focus of the study was to utilize an effective means to estimate the contrast-detail characteristics of x-ray imaging systems at various threshold levels to evaluate system performance with reduced observer subjectivity. We obtained three images of a contrast-detail phantom (CDMAM, Nuclear Associates) with screen-film and three images with digital mammography under identical exposure conditions. The digital images were printed using dry film printer (DryView 8600, Eastman Kodak Co.) after being windowed/leveled appropriately by two experienced radiologists. Seven observers reviewed the images and 'proportion correct' detection data were computed for each observer. A psychophysical signal detection model that hypothesizes a continuous decision variable internal to the observer with Gaussian probability density functions was used to fit the experimental observer data. Projection data from the detection curves at 50%, 62.5%, and 75% threshold levels were used to generate contrast-detail diagrams. Digital mammography, on average, exhibited lower (better) threshold contrast-detail characteristics compared to screen-film mammography.

  20. Technologic improvements in screen-film mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Haus, A.G. )

    1990-03-01

    During the past 20 years, many significant technologic improvements in mammographic x-ray equipment and screen-film-processing systems have occurred. Today it is possible to obtain mammograms with higher image quality at a significantly lower radiation dose, compared with mammograms dating back about 20 years. In this review article, clinical image comparisons and technical information--including x-ray spectra, limiting geometric resolution, sensitometric characteristic curves, modulation transfer function, and noise power spectra--are used to demonstrate technologic improvements in mammographic image quality.48 references.

  1. Pilot study of intraoperative digital imaging with the use of a mammograph for assessment of bone surgical margins in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Ntomouchtsis, A; Xinou, K; Patrikidou, A; Paraskevopoulos, K; Kechagias, N; Tsekos, A; Balis, G C; Gerasimidou, D; Thuau, H; Mangoudi, D; Vahtsevanos, K

    2013-03-01

    To investigate alternative possibilities for the intraoperative evaluation of surgical margins after bone resection utilizing more conventional hospital infrastructure technologies. A small pilot study was performed using digital mammograph imaging intraoperatively on 16 surgical specimens of bone tumours or malignancies with bone infiltration of the head and neck area, with the aim of evaluating the resection margins. In thirteen cases the intraoperative specimen images indicated clinically complete excision. In two cases incomplete resection or close proximity of margins was detected, which required additional resection. The results indicated that intraoperative specimen radiography can prove useful in evaluating completeness of excision. The significance of intraoperative assessment of surgical margin is of paramount importance when immediate reconstruction is performed. This proposed method is cheap, easy to perform and fast. Its cost-benefit ratio is superior than that of any other available technique. Intraoperative analysis of specimens with digital mammography imaging can potentially become a useful tool for immediate evaluation of osseous margins after resection. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kVp, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-μm pixel size, 230.5×339 mm2 active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one.

  3. Mammographic resolution: influence of focal spot intensity distribution and geometry.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, E L; Donnelly, E; Eve, L; Atherton, J V; Asch, T

    1990-01-01

    The influence of focal spot intensity distribution and geometry upon mammographic image quality were evaluated. The modulation transfer functions (MTF's) for eight different intensity distributions were determined and plotted in a manner to eliminate the effects of magnification and focal spot dimension. The results indicated that the total cross-sectional area is important for focal spots with uniform intensity distributions and equivalent diameters. For equivalent focal spot dimensions, intensity distributions with edge bands were shown to have less spatial resolution than uniform intensity distributions. Focal spots with greater intensities towards their centers provided better resolution than either uniform intensity distributions or distributions with edge bands for equivalent sizes. The type of intensity distribution was also shown to affect the accuracy of star pattern measurements of focal spot size; this method of measurement is only precise for a uniform square intensity distribution. Errors obtained with several other intensity distributions were tabulated. The variations of the effective focal spot size with position along the anode-cathode axis were shown to be of a factor of approximately two to three. The combined effects of geometric blur and film/screen blur were present for various heights above the cassette tray on several different mammographic systems.

  4. Variable Shadow Screens for Imaging Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ed; Chretien, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Variable shadow screens have been proposed for reducing the apparent brightnesses of very bright light sources relative to other sources within the fields of view of diverse imaging optical devices, including video and film cameras and optical devices for imaging directly into the human eye. In other words, variable shadow screens would increase the effective dynamic ranges of such devices. Traditionally, imaging sensors are protected against excessive brightness by use of dark filters and/or reduction of iris diameters. These traditional means do not increase dynamic range; they reduce the ability to view or image dimmer features of an image because they reduce the brightness of all parts of an image by the same factor. On the other hand, a variable shadow screen would darken only the excessively bright parts of an image. For example, dim objects in a field of view that included the setting Sun or bright headlights could be seen more readily in a picture taken through a variable shadow screen than in a picture of the same scene taken through a dark filter or a narrowed iris. The figure depicts one of many potential variations of the basic concept of the variable shadow screen. The shadow screen would be a normally transparent liquid-crystal matrix placed in front of a focal-plane array of photodetectors in a charge-coupled-device video camera. The shadow screen would be placed far enough from the focal plane so as not to disrupt the focal-plane image to an unacceptable degree, yet close enough so that the out-of-focus shadows cast by the screen would still be effective in darkening the brightest parts of the image. The image detected by the photodetector array itself would be used as feedback to drive the variable shadow screen: The video output of the camera would be processed by suitable analog and/or digital electronic circuitry to generate a negative partial version of the image to be impressed on the shadow screen. The parts of the shadow screen in front of

  5. Detection of lesions in mammographic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper is a report on very surprising results from recent work on detection of real lesions in digitized mammograms. The experiments were done using a novel experimental procedure with hybrid images. The lesions (signals) were real tumor masses extracted from breast tissue specimen radiographs. In the detection experiments, the tumors were added to digitized normal mammographic backgrounds. The results of this new work have been both novel and very surprising. Contrast thresholds increased with increasing lesion size for lesions larger than approximately 1 mm in diameter. Earlier work with white noise, radiographic image noise, computed tomography (CT) noise and some types of patient structure have accustomed us to a particular relationship between lesion size and contrast for constant detectability. All previous contrast/detail (CD) diagrams have been similar, the contrast threshold decreases as lesion size increases and flattens at large lesion sizes. The CD diagram for lesion detection in mammographic structure is completely different. It will be shown that this is a consequence of the power-law dependence of the projected breast tissue structure spectral density on spatial frequency. Mammographic tissue structure power spectra have the form P(f) equals B/f(beta ), with an average exponent of approximately 3 (range from 2 to 4), and are approximately isotropic (small angular dependence). Results for two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) signal detection experiments using 4 tumor lesions and one mathematically generated signal will be presented. These results are for an unbiased selection of mammographic backgrounds. It is possible that an additional understanding of the effects of breast structure on lesion detectability can be obtained by investigating detectability in various classes of mammographic backgrounds. This will be the subject of future research.

  6. Evaluation of Doses and Image Quality in Mammography with Screen-Film, CR, and DR Detectors – Application of the ACR Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Skrzyński, Witold; Fabiszewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Different methods of image quality evaluation are routinely used for analogue and digital mammography systems in Poland. In the present study, image quality for several screen-film (SF), computed radiography (CR), and fully digital (DR) mammography systems was compared directly with the use of the ACR mammography accreditation phantom. Material/Methods Image quality and mean glandular doses were measured and compared for 47 mammography systems in the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland, including 26 SF systems, 12 CR systems, and 9 DR systems. The mean glandular dose for the breast simulated by 4.5 cm of PMMA was calculated with methods described in the “European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis”. Visibility of the structures in the image (fibers, microcalcifications, and masses) was evaluated with the mammographic accreditation ACR phantom. Results Image quality for DR systems was significantly higher than for SF and CR systems. Several SF systems failed to pass the image quality tests because of artifacts. The doses were within acceptable limits for all of the systems, but the doses for the CR systems were significantly higher than for the SF and DR systems. Conclusions The best image quality, at a reasonably low dose, was observed for the DR systems. The CR systems are capable of obtaining the same image quality as the SF systems, but only at a significantly higher dose. The ACR phantom can be routinely used to evaluate image quality for all types of mammographic systems. PMID:27617048

  7. Shapelet analysis of pupil dilation for modeling visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamudun, Folami; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hammond, Tracy; Hudson, Kathy; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Tourassi, Georgia

    2016-03-01

    Our objective is to improve understanding of visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography under clinically equivalent experimental conditions. To this end, we examined pupillometric data, acquired using a head-mounted eye-tracking device, from 10 image readers (three breast-imaging radiologists and seven Radiology residents), and their corresponding diagnostic decisions for 100 screening mammograms. The corpus of mammograms comprised cases of varied pathology and breast parenchymal density. We investigated the relationship between pupillometric fluctuations, experienced by an image reader during mammographic screening, indicative of changes in mental workload, the pathological characteristics of a mammographic case, and the image readers' diagnostic decision and overall task performance. To answer these questions, we extract features from pupillometric data, and additionally applied time series shapelet analysis to extract discriminative patterns in changes in pupil dilation. Our results show that pupillometric measures are adequate predictors of mammographic case pathology, and image readers' diagnostic decision and performance with an average accuracy of 80%.

  8. Development of terminology for mammographic techniques for radiological technologists.

    PubMed

    Yagahara, Ayako; Yokooka, Yuki; Tsuji, Shintaro; Nishimoto, Naoki; Uesugi, Masahito; Muto, Hiroshi; Ohba, Hisateru; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2011-07-01

    We are developing a mammographic ontology to share knowledge of the mammographic domain for radiologic technologists, with the aim of improving mammographic techniques. As a first step in constructing the ontology, we used mammography reference books to establish mammographic terminology for identifying currently available knowledge. This study proceeded in three steps: (1) determination of the domain and scope of the terminology, (2) lexical extraction, and (3) construction of hierarchical structures. We extracted terms mainly from three reference books and constructed the hierarchical structures manually. We compared features of the terms extracted from the three reference books. We constructed a terminology consisting of 440 subclasses grouped into 19 top-level classes: anatomic entity, image quality factor, findings, material, risk, breast, histological classification of breast tumors, role, foreign body, mammographic technique, physics, purpose of mammography examination, explanation of mammography examination, image development, abbreviation, quality control, equipment, interpretation, and evaluation of clinical imaging. The number of terms that occurred in the subclasses varied depending on which reference book was used. We developed a terminology of mammographic techniques for radiologic technologists consisting of 440 terms.

  9. Association of infertility and fertility treatment with mammographic density in a large screening-based cohort of women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Frida E; Johansson, Anna L V; Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny; Brand, Judith S; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Iliadou, Anastasia N

    2016-04-13

    Ovarian stimulation drugs, in particular hormonal agents used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) required to perform in vitro fertilization, increase estrogen and progesterone levels and have therefore been suspected to influence breast cancer risk. This study aims to investigate whether infertility and hormonal fertility treatment influences mammographic density, a strong hormone-responsive risk factor for breast cancer. Cross-sectional study including 43,313 women recruited to the Karolinska Mammography Project between 2010 and 2013. Among women who reported having had infertility, 1576 had gone through COS, 1429 had had hormonal stimulation without COS and 5958 had not received any hormonal fertility treatment. Percent and absolute mammographic densities were obtained using the volumetric method Volpara™. Associations with mammographic density were assessed using multivariable generalized linear models, estimating mean differences (MD) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). After multivariable adjustment, women with a history of infertility had 1.53 cm(3) higher absolute dense volume compared to non-infertile women (95 % CI: 0.70 to 2.35). Among infertile women, only those who had gone through COS treatment had a higher absolute dense volume than those who had not received any hormone treatment (adjusted MD 3.22, 95 % CI: 1.10 to 5.33). No clear associations were observed between infertility, fertility treatment and percent volumetric density. Overall, women reporting infertility had more dense tissue in the breast. The higher absolute dense volume in women treated with COS may indicate a treatment effect, although part of the association might also be due to the underlying infertility. Continued monitoring of cancer risk in infertile women, especially those who undergo COS, is warranted.

  10. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Branderhorst, W. Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  11. Comparison of Mammographic Density Assessed as Volumes and Areas among Women Undergoing Diagnostic Image-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Geller, Berta M.; Shepherd, John A.; Patel, Deesha A.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Johnson, Jason M.; Herschorn, Sally D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD), the area of non-fatty appearing tissue divided by total breast area, is a strong breast cancer risk factor. Most MD analyses have employed visual categorizations or computer-assisted quantification, which ignore breast thickness. We explored MD volume and area, using a volumetric approach previously validated as predictive of breast cancer risk, in relation to risk factors among women undergoing breast biopsy. Methods Among 413 primarily white women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies between 2007–2010 at an academic facility in Vermont, MD volume (cm3) was quantified in cranio-caudal views of the breast contralateral to the biopsy target using a density phantom, while MD area (cm2) was measured on the same digital mammograms using thresholding software. Risk factor associations with continuous MD measurements were evaluated using linear regression. Results Percent MD volume and area were correlated (r=0.81) and strongly and inversely associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and menopause. Both measures were inversely associated with smoking and positively associated with breast biopsy history. Absolute MD measures were correlated (r=0.46) and inversely related to age and menopause. Whereas absolute dense area was inversely associated with BMI, absolute dense volume was positively associated. Conclusions Volume and area MD measures exhibit some overlap in risk factor associations, but divergence as well, particularly for BMI. Impact Findings suggest that volume and area density measures differ in subsets of women; notably, among obese women, absolute density was higher with volumetric methods, suggesting that breast cancer risk assessments may vary for these techniques. PMID:25139935

  12. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  13. [Analysis of Cost-effectiveness of screening for breast cancer with conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Peregrino, Antonio Augusto de Freitas; Vianna, Cid Manso de Mello; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso; Gonzáles, Gabriela Bittencourt; Machado, Samara Cristina Ferreira; Costa e Silva, Frances Valéria; Rodrigues, Marcus Paulo da Silva

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in screening for breast cancer. The use of conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging were compared with natural disease history as a baseline. A Markov model projected breast cancer in a group of 100,000 women for a 30 year period, with screening every two years. Four distinct scenarios were modeled: (1) the natural history of breast cancer, as a baseline, (2) conventional film mammography, (3) digital mammography and (4) magnetic resonance imaging. The costs of the scenarios modeled ranged from R$ 194.216,68 for natural history, to R$ 48.614.338,31, for screening with magnetic resonance imaging. The difference in effectiveness between the interventions ranged from 300 to 78.000 years of life gained in the cohort. The ratio of incremental cost-effectiveness in terms of cost per life-year gains, conventional mammographic screening has produced an extra year for R$ 13.573,07. The ICER of magnetic resonance imaging was R$ 2.904.328,88, compared to no screening. In conclusion, it is more cost-effective to perform the screening with conventional mammography than other technological interventions.

  14. Introduction of an automated user-independent quantitative volumetric magnetic resonance imaging breast density measurement system using the Dixon sequence: comparison with mammographic breast density assessment.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Georg Johannes; Helbich, Thomas H; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Baltzer, Pascal; Langs, Georg; Weber, Michael; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pinker, Katja

    2015-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to introduce and assess an automated user-independent quantitative volumetric (AUQV) breast density (BD) measurement system on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the Dixon technique as well as to compare it with qualitative and quantitative mammographic (MG) BD measurements. Forty-three women with normal mammogram results (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 1) were included in this institutional review board-approved prospective study. All participants were subjected to BD assessment with MRI using the following sequence with the Dixon technique (echo time/echo time, 6 milliseconds/2.45 milliseconds/2.67 milliseconds; 1-mm isotropic; 3 minutes 38 seconds). To test the reproducibility, a second MRI after patient repositioning was performed. The AUQV magnetic resonance (MR) BD measurement system automatically calculated percentage (%) BD. The qualitative BD assessment was performed using the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System BD categories. Quantitative BD was estimated semiautomatically using the thresholding technique Cumulus4. Appropriate statistical tests were used to assess the agreement between the AUQV MR measurements and to compare them with qualitative and quantitative MG BD estimations. The AUQV MR BD measurements were successfully performed in all 43 women. There was a nearly perfect agreement of AUQV MR BD measurements between the 2 MR examinations for % BD (P < 0.001; intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.998) with no significant differences (P = 0.384). The AUQV MR BD measurements were significantly lower than quantitative and qualitative MG BD assessment (P < 0.001). The AUQV MR BD measurement system allows a fully automated, user-independent, robust, reproducible, as well as radiation- and compression-free volumetric quantitative BD assessment through different levels of BD. The AUQV MR BD measurements were significantly lower than the currently used qualitative

  15. Task-Specific Optimization of Mammographic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    by the equation: SNR Actual2 = DQE(O) . SNRI, i,,,i (1) where SNRIdeal was computed using a program by Boone to generate x-ray spectra2 and DQE(0...masses and microcalcifications. We have generated four image sets using the mammographic data obtained in 1.1. The first set was obtained at full dose...resolution and noise properties of the combined display and detector system using the generalized curve-fitting algorithm. After obtaining the

  16. Breast cancer screening controversies: who, when, why, and how?

    PubMed

    Chetlen, Alison; Mack, Julie; Chan, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic screening is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The issue is not whether mammography is effective, but whether the false positive rate and false negative rates can be reduced. This review will discuss controversies including the reduction in breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, the ideal screening candidate, and the optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. The article will compare and contrast screening mammography, tomosynthesis, whole-breast screening ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging. Though supplemental imaging modalities are being utilized to improve breast cancer diagnosis, mammography still remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening.

  17. Childhood factors associated with mammographic density in adult women.

    PubMed

    Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Moreno, María Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Ascunce, Nieves; Román, Isabel González; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, María Carmen; Carrete, Jose Antonio Vázquez; Collado-García, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ederra, María; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Peris, Mercé; Abad, Soledad; Cabanes, Anna; Pollán, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Growth and development factors could contribute to the development of breast cancer associated with an increase in mammographic density. This study examines the influence of certain childhood-related, socio-demographic and anthropometric variables on mammographic density in adult woman. The study covered 3574 women aged 45-68 years, participating in breast cancer-screening programmes in seven Spanish cities. Based on a craniocaudal mammogram, blind, anonymous measurement of mammographic density was made by a single radiologist, using Boyd's semiquantitative scale. Data associated with the early stages of life were obtained from a direct survey. Ordinal logistic regression and generalised linear models were employed to estimate the association between mammographic density and the variables covered by the questionnaire. Screening programme was introduced as a random effects term. Age, number of children, body mass index (BMI) and other childhood-related variables were used as adjustment variables, and stratified by menopausal status. A total of 811 women (23%) presented mammographic density of over 50%, and 5% of densities exceeded 75%. Our results show a greater prevalence of high mammographic density in women with low prepubertal weight (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.02-1.36); marked prepubertal height (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 0.97-1.60) and advanced age of their mothers at their birth (>39 years: OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.03-1.60); and a lower prevalence of high mammographic density in women with higher prepubertal weight, low birth weight and earlier menarche. The influence of these early-life factors may be explained by greater exposure to hormones and growth factors during the development of the breast gland, when breast tissue would be particularly susceptible to proliferative and carcinogenic stimulus.

  18. Personnel screening with advanced multistatic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sherif S.

    2013-05-01

    Personnel screening is demanded nowadays for securing air traffic as well as critical infrastructures. The millimeter-waves are able to penetrate clothes and detect concealed objects, making them an attractive choice for security screening. Imaging methods based on multistatic architecture can ensure high quality imagery in terms of resolution and dynamic range. Following the advances in semiconductor technology, fully electronic solutions delivering real-time imaging are becoming feasible. Furthermore, the continuously increasing capabilities of digital signal processing units allow for the utilization of digital-beamforming techniques for image reconstruction, thus offering new opportunities for imaging systems to use sophisticated operation modes. Based on these modern technologies, an advanced realization addressing personnel screening in E-band with planar multistatic sparse array design is demonstrated.

  19. Commentary on the Canadian National Breast Screening study.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Kimberly J; Hansen, Nora M; Barrio, Andrea V; Connor, Carol S; Danforth, David N; Euhus, David M; Kulkarni, Swati A; McCready, David R; McLaughlin, Sarah; Wilke, Lee G

    2014-12-01

    In the setting of the 25-year follow-up of the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, the Society of Surgical Oncology continues to endorse mammographic screening for women beginning at 40 years of age, while acknowledging that mammography has both risks and benefits. Further investigation is warranted to develop better screening methods and to determine optimal screening schedules for women based on their risk of future breast cancer and their imaging characteristics.

  20. Posterior breast cancer - mammographic and ultrasonographic features.

    PubMed

    Janković, Ana; Nadrljanski, Mirjan; Karapandzić, Vesna Plesinac; Ivanović, Nebojsa; Radojicić, Zoran; Milosević, Zorica

    2013-11-01

    Posterior breast cancers are located in the prepectoral region of the breast. Owing to this distinctive anatomical localization, physical examination and mammographic or ultrasonographic evaluation can be difficult. The purpose of the study was to assess possibilities of diagnostic mammography and breast ultrasonography in detection and differentiation of posterior breast cancers. The study included 40 women with palpable, histopathological confirmed posterior breast cancer. Mammographic and ultrasonographic features were defined according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. Based on standard two-view mammography 87.5%, of the cases were classified as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories, while after additional mammographic views all the cases were defined as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories. Among 96 mammographic descriptors, the most frequent were: spiculated mass (24.0%), architectural distortion (16.7%), clustered micro-calcifications (12.6%) and focal asymmetric density (12.6%). The differentiation of the spiculated mass was significantly associated with the possibility to visualize the lesion at two-view mammography (p = 0.009), without the association with lesion diameter (p = 0.083) or histopathological type (p = 0.055). Mammographic signs of invasive lobular carcinoma were significantly different from other histopathological types (architectural distortion, p = 0.003; focal asymmetric density, p = 0.019; association of four or five subtle signs of malignancy, p = 0.006). All cancers were detectable by ultrasonography. Mass lesions were found in 82.0% of the cases. Among 153 ultrasonographic descriptors, the most frequent were: irregular mass (15.7%), lobulated mass (7.2%), abnormal color Doppler signals (20.3%), posterior acoustic attenuation (18.3%). Ultrasonographic BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were defined in 72.5% of the cases, without a significant difference among various histopathological types (p = 0.109). Standard two-view mammography

  1. Intagliated phosphor screen image tube project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzel, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production and evaluation of a magnetic focus image tube for astronomical photography that has an intagliated phosphor screen is described. The modulation transfer function of such a tube was measured by electronic means and by film tests, and the results compared with tubes of more conventional construction. The physical properties of the image tube and film combination, the analytical model of the optical interface, and the salient features of the intagliated screen tube are described. The results of electronic MTF tests of the intagliated image tube and of the densitometry of the tube and film test samples are presented. It is concluded that the intagliated screen is a help, but that the thickness of the photographic film is also important.

  2. Validation of a digital mammographic unit model for an objective and highly automated clinical image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ponce, Hector; Daul, Christian; Wolf, Didier; Noel, Alain

    2013-08-01

    In mammography, image quality assessment has to be directly related to breast cancer indicator (e.g. microcalcifications) detectability. Recently, we proposed an X-ray source/digital detector (XRS/DD) model leading to such an assessment. This model simulates very realistic contrast-detail phantom (CDMAM) images leading to gold disc (representing microcalcifications) detectability thresholds that are very close to those of real images taken under the simulated acquisition conditions. The detection step was performed with a mathematical observer. The aim of this contribution is to include human observers into the disc detection process in real and virtual images to validate the simulation framework based on the XRS/DD model. Mathematical criteria (contrast-detail curves, image quality factor, etc.) are used to assess and to compare, from the statistical point of view, the cancer indicator detectability in real and virtual images. The quantitative results given in this paper show that the images simulated by the XRS/DD model are useful for image quality assessment in the case of all studied exposure conditions using either human or automated scoring. Also, this paper confirms that with the XRS/DD model the image quality assessment can be automated and the whole time of the procedure can be drastically reduced. Compared to standard quality assessment methods, the number of images to be acquired is divided by a factor of eight. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging for melanoma screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Justin; Krueger, James; Gareau, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The 5-year survival rate for patients diagnosed with Melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, in its latest stages is about 15%, compared to over 90% for early detection and treatment. We present an imaging system and algorithm that can be used to automatically generate a melanoma risk score to aid clinicians in the early identification of this form of skin cancer. Our system images the patient's skin at a series of different wavelengths and then analyzes several key dermoscopic features to generate this risk score. We have found that shorter wavelengths of light are sensitive to information in the superficial areas of the skin while longer wavelengths can be used to gather information at greater depths. This accompanying diagnostic computer algorithm has demonstrated much higher sensitivity and specificity than the currently commercialized system in preliminary trials and has the potential to improve the early detection of melanoma.

  4. Signal template generation from acquired mammographic images for the non-prewhitening model observer with eye-filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, Christiana; Bouwman, Ramona W.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Broeders, Mireille J. M.; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Engen, Ruben E.; Veldkamp, Wouter J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Model observers (MOs) are being investigated for image quality assessment in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). Signal templates for the non-prewhitening MO with eye filter (NPWE) were formed using acquired FFDM images. A signal template was generated from acquired images by averaging multiple exposures resulting in a low noise signal template. Noise elimination while preserving the signal was investigated and a methodology which results in a noise-free template is proposed. In order to deal with signal location uncertainty, template shifting was implemented. The procedure to generate the template was evaluated on images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom containing microcalcification-related signals. Optimal reduction of the background noise was achieved without changing the signal. Based on a validation study in simulated images, the difference (bias) in MO performance from the ground truth signal was calculated and found to be <1%. As template generation is a building stone of the entire image quality assessment framework, the proposed method to construct templates from acquired images facilitates the use of the NPWE MO in acquired images.

  5. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  6. Polychromatic image noise in rear projection screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Matthew Brian

    This dissertation studies rear projection diffusing screens. We provide a methodology, a theoretical background, metrics, and experimental results to aid in the understanding and design of such screens. For this work, a theoretical model has been developed to predict local fluctuations of measured color that appear as image noise in projection screens. This predictive model is based on Fraunhofer diffraction along with Huygens' wavelet analysis and linear systems theory. Of importance are the figures of merit that have been defined and used to compare the theoretical predictions and experimental results. The range of validity of the model has also been determined. We set up an experiment to test the theoretical model. By experimentally varying the numerical aperture of the input illumination, color variations on screens have been measured and characterized. The results of both the experiment and the model show a strong relationship between the polychromatic image noise and the size of the illumination cone. As the size of the illumination cone was decreased from 6 to less than 0.1 millisteradians, there was more than a threefold increase in the figures of merit. Our model shows insight, validates and augments a common rule of thumb. It is often assumed that making the screen structure significantly larger than the coherence length of the source will result in a system with minimal noise. The model shows that this is correct, but it also provides predictions in the cross over region. This allows one to understand how the image noise in a projection system will change as screen designs are changed. Ultimately, this allows screen solutions to be assessed before they are reduced to practice.

  7. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed

    Bagnera, Silvia; Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology-Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. "No change" was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5-9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after AWB-RT treatment (up to 5-9 years after radiotherapy) justifies large

  8. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed Central

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  9. The impact of using weight estimated from mammographic images vs. self-reported weight on breast cancer risk calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Kalyani P.; Harkness, Elaine F.; Gadde, Soujanye; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Moschidis, Emmanouil; Foden, Philip; Cuzick, Jack; Brentnall, Adam; Evans, D. Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Astley, Susan M.

    2017-03-01

    Personalised breast screening requires assessment of individual risk of breast cancer, of which one contributory factor is weight. Self-reported weight has been used for this purpose, but may be unreliable. We explore the use of volume of fat in the breast, measured from digital mammograms. Volumetric breast density measurements were used to determine the volume of fat in the breasts of 40,431 women taking part in the Predicting Risk Of Cancer At Screening (PROCAS) study. Tyrer-Cuzick risk using self-reported weight was calculated for each woman. Weight was also estimated from the relationship between self-reported weight and breast fat volume in the cohort, and used to re-calculate Tyrer-Cuzick risk. Women were assigned to risk categories according to 10 year risk (below average <2%, average 2-3.49%, above average 3.5-4.99%, moderate 5-7.99%, high >=8%) and the original and re-calculated Tyrer-Cuzick risks were compared. Of the 716 women diagnosed with breast cancer during the study, 15 (2.1%) moved into a lower risk category, and 37 (5.2%) moved into a higher category when using weight estimated from breast fat volume. Of the 39,715 women without a cancer diagnosis, 1009 (2.5%) moved into a lower risk category, and 1721 (4.3%) into a higher risk category. The majority of changes were between below average and average risk categories (38.5% of those with a cancer diagnosis, and 34.6% of those without). No individual moved more than one risk group. Automated breast fat measures may provide a suitable alternative to self-reported weight for risk assessment in personalized screening.

  10. Alcohol intake over the life course and mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Flom, Julie D; Ferris, Jennifer S; Tehranifar, Parisa; Terry, Mary Beth

    2009-10-01

    Alcohol intake is one of the few modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. Current alcohol intake has been associated with mammographic density, a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, though few studies have examined the effect of both current and average lifetime alcohol intake. We interviewed 262 participants from a New York birth cohort (born 1959-1963) and obtained mammograms from 163 (71.5% of participants with a mammogram). We collected information on alcohol intake by beverage type separately for each decade of life. We used multivariable linear models to assess the associations between current and average lifetime alcohol intake and mammographic density using a quantitative measure of density from digitized images. Overall, current alcohol intake was more strongly associated with mammographic density than average lifetime alcohol intake; compared with nondrinkers, those with current intake of seven or more servings per week had on average 12.3% (95% CI: 4.3, 20.4) higher density, adjusted for average lifetime alcohol intake, age, and body mass index. We observed a consistent inverse association for red wine intake and mammographic density, suggesting that the positive association between mammographic density and overall alcohol intake was driven by other types of alcoholic beverages. Our findings support an association between current alcohol intake and increased mammographic density independent of the effect of average lifetime alcohol intake. If replicated, our study suggests that reducing current alcohol consumption, particularly beer and white wine intake, may be a means of reducing mammographic density regardless of intake earlier in life.

  11. Use of border information in the classification of mammographic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, C.; Timp, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a new method to characterize the margin of a mammographic mass lesion to improve the classification of benign and malignant masses. Towards this goal, we designed features that measure the degree of sharpness and microlobulation of mass margins. We calculated these features in a border region of the mass defined as a thin band along the mass contour. The importance of these features in the classification of benign and malignant masses was studied in relation to existing features used for mammographic mass detection. Features were divided into three groups, each representing a different mass segment: the interior region of a mass, the border and the outer area. The interior and the outer area of a mass were characterized using contrast and spiculation measures. Classification was done in two steps. First, features representing each of the three mass segments were merged into a neural network classifier resulting in a single regional classification score for each segment. Secondly, a classifier combined the three single scores into a final output to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. We compared the classification performance of each regional classifier and the combined classifier on a data set of 1076 biopsy proved masses (590 malignant and 486 benign) from 481 women included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the classifiers. The area under the ROC curve (Az) was 0.69 for the interior mass segment, 0.76 for the border segment and 0.75 for the outer mass segment. The performance of the combined classifier was 0.81 for image-based and 0.83 for case-based evaluation. These results show that the combination of information from different mass segments is an effective approach for computer-aided characterization of mammographic masses. An advantage of this approach is that it allows the assessment of the contribution of regions rather

  12. Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0553 TITLE: Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer K. Simpson Francemary Modugno...NUMBER Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has

  13. Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0553 TITLE: Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer K. Simpson, R.N. Francesmary...August 2004 Annual Summary (I Aug 2003 - 31 Jul 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density DAMD17-02...proprietary or confidential information) Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to increase breast cancer risk as well as to increase breast

  14. A new texture descriptor based on local micro-pattern for detection of architectural distortion in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Moraes, Diego R.; Reche, Gustavo A.; Borges, Lucas R.; Catani, Juliana H.; de Barros, Nestor; Melo, Carlos F. E.; Gonzaga, Adilson; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a new local micro-pattern texture descriptor for the detection of Architectural Distortion (AD) in digital mammography images. AD is a subtle contraction of breast parenchyma that may represent an early sign of breast cancer. Due to its subtlety and variability, AD is more difficult to detect compared to microcalcifications and masses, and is commonly found in retrospective evaluations of false-negative mammograms. Several computer-based systems have been proposed for automatic detection of AD, but their performance are still unsatisfactory. The proposed descriptor, Local Mapped Pattern (LMP), is a generalization of the Local Binary Pattern (LBP), which is considered one of the most powerful feature descriptor for texture classification in digital images. Compared to LBP, the LMP descriptor captures more effectively the minor differences between the local image pixels. Moreover, LMP is a parametric model which can be optimized for the desired application. In our work, the LMP performance was compared to the LBP and four Haralick's texture descriptors for the classification of 400 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from clinical mammograms. ROIs were selected and divided into four classes: AD, normal tissue, microcalcifications and masses. Feature vectors were used as input to a multilayer perceptron neural network, with a single hidden layer. Results showed that LMP is a good descriptor to distinguish AD from other anomalies in digital mammography. LMP performance was slightly better than the LBP and comparable to Haralick's descriptors (mean classification accuracy = 83%).

  15. Mammographic imaging with a small format CCD-based digital cassette: Physical characteristics of a clinical systema

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Levis, Ilias; Sayag, Michel; Kleehammer, Robert; Heidsieck, Robert; D’Orsi, Carl J.

    2008-01-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical charge coupled device (CCD)-based imager (Senovision, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) for small-field digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a MinR 2000™ (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) scintillator coupled by a 1:1 optical fiber to a front-illuminated 61×61 mm CCD operating at a pixel pitch of 30 microns. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were employed for this evaluation. The results demonstrated a limiting spatial resolution (10% MTF) of 10 cy/mm. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo–Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is ~40% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 8.2 mR, and decreases to ~28% at a low exposure of 1.1 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions. PMID:10984230

  16. Factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Cannas; Cant, Rosemary; Sullivan, Gerard

    2005-12-01

    BreastScreen (a free breast cancer screening service) has been implemented in Australia since 1991. Surveys conducted overseas consistently report that women of Chinese ancestry have low participation rates in breast cancer screening. Although Chinese women's use of breast cancer screening services has been investigated abroad, to date there are few studies of mammographic screening behavior among Chinese-Australian women. The purpose of this study is to explore and investigate the factors associated with mammographic decisions of Chinese-Australian women. Using a qualitative approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Chinese-Australian women. These were augmented by additional data from ethnographic observations. The findings show two facilitators: organizational factors (an invitation letter from BreastScreen and seniors' clubs arrangements) and the influence of 'significant others'. Barriers identified were fear perceptions of mammography, modesty and fear of stigmatization. This study provides a useful framework for designing and implementing mammographic screening services for Chinese-Australian women that may improve their participation rates.

  17. Simulation model of mammographic calcifications based on the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, or BIRADS.

    PubMed

    Kallergi, M; Gavrielides, M A; He, L; Berman, C G; Kim, J J; Clark, R A

    1998-10-01

    The authors developed and evaluated a method for the simulation of calcification clusters based on the guidelines of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System of the American College of Radiology. They aimed to reproduce accurately the relative and absolute size, shape, location, number, and intensity of real calcifications associated with both benign and malignant disease. Thirty calcification clusters were simulated by using the proposed model and were superimposed on real, negative mammograms digitized at 30 microns and 16 bits per pixel. The accuracy of the simulation was evaluated by three radiologists in a blinded study. No statistically significant difference was observed in the observers' evaluation of the simulated clusters and the real clusters. The observers' classification of the cluster types seemed to be a good approximation of the intended types from the simulation design. This model can provide simulated calcification clusters with well-defined morphologic, distributional, and contrast characteristics for a variety of applications in digital mammography.

  18. An approach for tissue density classification in mammographic images using artificial neural network based on wavelet and curvelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, Hüseyin; Ceylan, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the types of cancer which is most commonly seen in women. Density of breast is an important indicator for the risk of cancer. In addition, densities of tissue may harden the diagnosis by hiding the abnormalities occurring on the breast. For this reason, during the process of diagnosis, the process of automatic classification of breast density has a significant importance. In this study, a new system with the base of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and multiple resolution analysis is suggested. Wavelet and curvelet analyses having the most common use have been used as multi resolution analysis. 4 pieces of statistics which are minimum value, maximum value, mean value and standard deviation have been extracted from the images which have been eluted to their sub-bands via multi resolution analysis. For the purpose of testing the success of the system, 322 pieces of images which are in MIAS database have been used. The obtained results for different backgrounds are so satisfying; and the highest classification values have been obtained as 97.16 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty background and 79.80 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty-glanduar background. The same results have been obtained using Wavelet transform and ANN and Curvelet transform and ANN for dense background and accuracy rate of 84.82 % have been reached. The results of mean classification have been obtained, for three pieces of tissue types (fatty, fatty-glanduar, dense), in sequence as 84.47 % with the use of ANN, 85.71 % with the use of curvelet analysis and ANN; and 87.26 % with the use of wavelet analysis and ANN.

  19. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  20. Local mammographic density as a predictor of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Mayu; Harkness, Elaine F.; Chen, Xin; Moschidis, Emmanouil; Bydder, Megan; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, Gareth D.; Howell, Anthony; Stavrinos, Paula; Wilson, Mary; Astley, Susan M.

    2015-03-01

    High overall mammographic density is associated with both an increased risk of developing breast cancer and the risk of cancer being masked. We compared local density at cancer sites in diagnostic images with corresponding previous screening mammograms (priors), and matched controls. VolparaTM density maps were obtained for 54 mammograms showing unilateral breast cancer and their priors which had been previously read as normal. These were each matched to 3 controls on age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy usage, body mass index and year of prior. Local percent density was computed in 15mm square regions at lesion sites and similar locations in the corresponding images. Conditional logistic regression was used to predict case-control status. In diagnostic and prior images, local density was increased at the lesion site compared with the opposite breast (medians 21.58%, 9.18%, p<0.001 diagnostic; 18.82%, 9.45%, p <0.001 prior). Women in the highest tertile of local density in priors were more likely to develop cancer than those in the lowest tertile (OR 42.09, 95% CI 5.37-329.94). Those in the highest tertile of VolparaTM gland volume were also more likely to develop cancer (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.30-6.42). Local density is increased where cancer will develop compared with corresponding regions in the opposite breast and matched controls, and its measurement could enhance computer-aided mammography.

  1. The imaging performance of compact Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens: Monte Carlo simulation for applications in mammography.

    PubMed

    Liaparinos, P F; Kandarakis, I S

    2009-06-01

    In medical mammographic imaging systems, one type of detector configuration, often referred to as indirect detectors, is based on a scintillator layer (phosphor screen) that converts the x-ray radiation into optical signal. The indirect detector performance may be optimized either by improving the structural parameters of the screen or by employing new phosphor materials with improved physical characteristics (e.g., x-ray absorption efficiency, intrinsic conversion efficiency, emitted light spectrum). Lu2O3:Eu is a relatively new phosphor material that exhibits improved scintillating properties indicating a promising material for mammographic applications. In this article, a custom validated Monte Carlo program was used in order to examine the performance of compact Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens under diagnostic mammography conditions (x-ray spectra: 28 kV Mo, 0.030 mm Mo and 32 kV W, 0.050 mm Rh). Lu2O3:Eu screens of coating weight in the range between 20 and 40 mg/cm2 were examined. The Monte Carlo code was based on a model using Mie-scattering theory for the description of light propagation within the phosphor. The overall performance of Lu2O3:Eu powdered phosphor screens was investigated in terms of the (i) quantum detection efficiency, (ii) luminescence efficiency, (iii) compatibility with optical sensors, (iv) modulation transfer function, (v) the Swank factor, and (vi) zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency. Results were compared to the traditional rare-earth Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor material. The increased packing density and therefore the light extinction properties of Lu2O3:Eu phosphor were found to improve the x-ray absorption (approximately up to 21% and 16% at 40 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), the spatial resolution (approximately 2.6 and 2.4 cycles/mm at 40 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), as well as the zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency (approximately up to 8% and 18% at 20 mg/cm2 for Mo and W x

  2. Deep image mining for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Quellec, Gwenolé; Charrière, Katia; Boudi, Yassine; Cochener, Béatrice; Lamard, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Deep learning is quickly becoming the leading methodology for medical image analysis. Given a large medical archive, where each image is associated with a diagnosis, efficient pathology detectors or classifiers can be trained with virtually no expert knowledge about the target pathologies. However, deep learning algorithms, including the popular ConvNets, are black boxes: little is known about the local patterns analyzed by ConvNets to make a decision at the image level. A solution is proposed in this paper to create heatmaps showing which pixels in images play a role in the image-level predictions. In other words, a ConvNet trained for image-level classification can be used to detect lesions as well. A generalization of the backpropagation method is proposed in order to train ConvNets that produce high-quality heatmaps. The proposed solution is applied to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening in a dataset of almost 90,000 fundus photographs from the 2015 Kaggle Diabetic Retinopathy competition and a private dataset of almost 110,000 photographs (e-ophtha). For the task of detecting referable DR, very good detection performance was achieved: Az=0.954 in Kaggle's dataset and Az=0.949 in e-ophtha. Performance was also evaluated at the image level and at the lesion level in the DiaretDB1 dataset, where four types of lesions are manually segmented: microaneurysms, hemorrhages, exudates and cotton-wool spots. For the task of detecting images containing these four lesion types, the proposed detector, which was trained to detect referable DR, outperforms recent algorithms trained to detect those lesions specifically, with pixel-level supervision. At the lesion level, the proposed detector outperforms heatmap generation algorithms for ConvNets. This detector is part of the Messidor® system for mobile eye pathology screening. Because it does not rely on expert knowledge or manual segmentation for detecting relevant patterns, the proposed solution is a promising image mining

  3. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake.

  4. Ghosted images: old lesbians on screen.

    PubMed

    Krainitzki, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Screen images of old lesbians combine modes of representing female gender, lesbian sexuality, and old age, all of which contain layers of otherness within a hetero-patriarchal and youth-centered society. Analyzing a range of films, from independent to mainstream cinema, this article explores how the ghosted lesbian paradigm intersects with narratives of aging as decline in representations of lesbian characters who are over the age of sixty. The spectral matters of illness, death, mourning, and widowhood inevitably culminate in an unhappy ending. Removed from a lesbian community context, intergenerational continuity vanishes and the old lesbian emerges as the cultural other.

  5. Mammographic feature enhancement by multiscale analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, A.F.; Schuler, S.; Fan, J.; Huda, W. )

    1994-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis by overcomplete multiresolution representations. The authors show that efficient representations may be identified within a continuum of scale-space and used to enhance features of importance to mammography. Methods of contrast enhancement are described based on three overcomplete multiscale representations: (1) the dyadic wavelet transform (separable), (2) the [var phi]-transform (nonseparable, nonorthogonal), and (3) the hexagonal wavelet transform (nonseparable). Multiscale edges identified within distinct levels of transform space provide local support for image enhancement. Mammograms are reconstructed from wavelet coefficients modified at one or more levels by local and global nonlinear operators. In each case, edges and gain parameters are identified adaptively by a measure of energy within each level of scale-space. The authors show quantitatively that transform coefficients, modified by adaptive nonlinear operators, can make more obvious unseen or barely seen features of mammography without requiring additional radiation. The results are compared with traditional image enhancement techniques by measuring the local contrast of known mammographic features. The authors demonstrate that features extracted from multiresolution representations can provide an adaptive mechanism for accomplishing local contrast enhancement. By improving the visualization of breast pathology, they can improve chances of early detection while requiring less time to evaluate mammograms for most patients.

  6. Abbreviated breast MRI for screening women with dense breast: The EA1141 Trial.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Christiane K

    2017-07-27

    Early diagnosis improves survival of women with breast cancer. Mammographic screening improves early diagnosis of breast cancer. And yet, there appears to be room for improvement. Major shortcomings of mammographic screening are overdiagnosis of prognostically unimportant cancer, as well as underdiagnosis of cancers that are indeed relevant. Failure to detect biologically relevant breast cancer with mammographic screening is driven by host-related factors, i.e. breast tissue density, but also tumour-related factors: Biologically relevant cancers may exhibit imaging features that renders them indistinguishable from normal or benign breast tissue on mammography. These cancers will then progress to become the advanced-stage interval cancers observed in women undergoing mammographic screening. Since breast cancer continues to represent a major cause of cancer death in women, the search for improved breast cancer screening method continues. Abbreviated breast MRI has been proposed for this purpose because it will greatly reduce the cost associated with this method, due to a greatly reduced magnet time (down to 3 minutes), but especially also due to a greatly abridged image interpretation time, i.e. radiologist reading time. This commentary reviews the current situation and presents the EA1141 trial designed to investigate the utility of abbreviated breast MRI for screening average-risk women with dense breast tissue.

  7. Clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions: detection and classification with high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Niehoff, A; Obrist, P; DeKoekkoek-Doll, P; Dünser, M

    2000-08-01

    With recent significant advances in ultrasound technology, the potential of high-resolution sonography to improve the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis in women with dense breasts has become a matter of interest for breast imagers. To determine how often physician-performed high-resolution sonography can detect nonpalpable breast cancers that are not revealed by mammography, 8,970 women with breast density grades 2 through 4 underwent high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography. All sonographically detected, clinically and mammographically occult breast lesions that were not simple cysts were prospectively classified into benign, indeterminate, or malignant categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, core-needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy. In 8,103 women with normal findings at mammography and physical examination, 32 cancers and 330 benign lesions were detected in 273 patients with sonography only. Eight additional cancers were found in 867 patients with a malignant (n = 5) or a benign (n = 3) palpable or mammographically detected index lesion. The overall prevalence of cancers detected with screening sonography was 0.41%, and the proportion of sonographically detected cancers to the total number of nonpalpable cancers was 22%. The mean size of invasive cancers detected only by sonography was 9.1 mm, and was not statistically different from the mean size of invasive cancers detected by mammography. The sensitivity of prospective sonographic classification for malignancy was 100%, and the specificity was 31%. In conclusion, the use of high-resolution sonography as an adjunct to mammography in women with dense breasts may lead to detection of a significant number of otherwise occult cancers that are no different in size from nonpalpable mammographically detected cancers. Prospective classification of these lesions based on sonographic characteristics resulted in an acceptable benign-to-malignant biopsy rate of 6.3:1.

  8. Perceptual Quality Assessment of Screen Content Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Fang, Yuming; Lin, Weisi

    2015-11-01

    Research on screen content images (SCIs) becomes important as they are increasingly used in multi-device communication applications. In this paper, we present a study on perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs subjectively and objectively. We construct a large-scale screen image quality assessment database (SIQAD) consisting of 20 source and 980 distorted SCIs. In order to get the subjective quality scores and investigate, which part (text or picture) contributes more to the overall visual quality, the single stimulus methodology with 11 point numerical scale is employed to obtain three kinds of subjective scores corresponding to the entire, textual, and pictorial regions, respectively. According to the analysis of subjective data, we propose a weighting strategy to account for the correlation among these three kinds of subjective scores. Furthermore, we design an objective metric to measure the visual quality of distorted SCIs by considering the visual difference of textual and pictorial regions. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SCI perceptual quality assessment scheme, consisting of the objective metric and the weighting strategy, can achieve better performance than 11 state-of-the-art IQA methods. To the best of our knowledge, the SIQAD is the first large-scale database published for quality evaluation of SCIs, and this research is the first attempt to explore the perceptual quality assessment of distorted SCIs.

  9. Breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Kopans, D B; Meyer, J E; Sadowsky, N

    1984-04-12

    The majority of information available today indicates that the most efficient and accurate method of screening women to detect early-stage breast cancer is an aggressive program of patient self-examination, physical examination by well-trained, motivated personnel, and high-quality x-ray mammography. There are two important factors in the implementation of mammographic screening. The first is the availability of facilities to perform high-quality, low-dose mammography, which is directly related to the second factor: the expense to society for support of this large-scale effort. Cost-benefit analysis is beyond the scope of this review. In 1979 Moskowitz and Fox attempted to address this issue, using data from the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project in Cincinnati, but additional analysis is required. The cost for each "curable" cancer that is detected must be compared with the psychological, social, and personal losses that accrue, as well as the numerous medical expenses incurred, in a frequently protracted death from breast cancer. All other imaging techniques that have been reviewed should be regarded as adjuncts to rather than replacements for mammographic screening (Table 1). Ultrasound and computerized tomography are helpful when the physical examination and mammogram are equivocal. Other techniques, such as transillumination, thermography, and magnetic-resonance imaging, should be considered experimental. In patients with clinically evident lesions, x-ray mammography is helpful to evaluate the suspicious area, as well as to "screen" the remaining tissue in both breasts and to search for multicentric or bilateral lesions. Mammography is the only imaging technique that has been proved effective for screening. The low doses required by present-day mammographic technology pose a possible risk that is so small it is not measurable. The image quality has improved considerably over the past decade, and data supporting the benefits of mammography are

  10. The impact of mammographic density and lesion location on detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Reed, Warren; Poulos, Ann; Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the impact of breast density and lesion location on detection. A set of 55 mammographic images (23 abnormal images with 26 lesions and 32 normal images) were examined by 22 expert radiologists. The images were classified by an expert radiologist according to the Synoptic Breast Imaging Report of the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC) as having low mammographic density (D1<25% glandular and D2> 25-50% glandular) or high density (D3 51-75% glandular and D4> 75-glandular). The observers freely examined the images and located any malignancy using a 5-point confidence. Performance was defined using the following metrics: sensitivity, location sensitivity, specificity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC Az) curves and jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figures of merit. Significant increases in sensitivity (p= 0.0174) and ROC (p=0.0001) values were noted for the higher density compared with lower density images according to NBCC classification. No differences were seen in radiologists' performance between lesions within or outside the fibroglandular region. In conclusion, analysis of our data suggests that radiologists scored higher using traditional metrics in higher mammographic density images without any improvement in lesion localisation. Lesion location whether within or outside the fibroglandular region appeared to have no impact on detection abilities suggesting that if a masking effect is present the impact is minimal. Eye-tracking analyses are ongoing.

  11. Understanding Clinical Mammographic Breast Density Assessment: a Deep Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aly A; Luo, Yahong; Peng, Hong; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Wu, Shandong

    2017-09-20

    Mammographic breast density has been established as an independent risk marker for developing breast cancer. Breast density assessment is a routine clinical need in breast cancer screening and current standard is using the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System (BI-RADS) criteria including four qualitative categories (i.e., fatty, scattered density, heterogeneously dense, or extremely dense). In each mammogram examination, a breast is typically imaged with two different views, i.e., the mediolateral oblique (MLO) view and cranial caudal (CC) view. The BI-RADS-based breast density assessment is a qualitative process made by visual observation of both the MLO and CC views by radiologists, where there is a notable inter- and intra-reader variability. In order to maintain consistency and accuracy in BI-RADS-based breast density assessment, gaining understanding on radiologists' reading behaviors will be educational. In this study, we proposed to leverage the newly emerged deep learning approach to investigate how the MLO and CC view images of a mammogram examination may have been clinically used by radiologists in coming up with a BI-RADS density category. We implemented a convolutional neural network (CNN)-based deep learning model, aimed at distinguishing the breast density categories using a large (15,415 images) set of real-world clinical mammogram images. Our results showed that the classification of density categories (in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) using MLO view images is significantly higher than that using the CC view. This indicates that most likely it is the MLO view that the radiologists have predominately used to determine the breast density BI-RADS categories. Our study holds a potential to further interpret radiologists' reading characteristics, enhance personalized clinical training to radiologists, and ultimately reduce reader variations in breast density assessment.

  12. Biological and Computational Modeling of Mammographic Density and Stromal Patterning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    will be completed. Mammographic Density: Over 559 serial screen-film mammograms were digitized from the 150 women described in Task 1: 75 high... mammograms were digitized from 75 women taking tam oxifen prevention an d 75 controls using a new Howtek MultiRad 860 digitizer. The anonymized...en taking tamoxifen chemoprevention and 75 high-risk women who elected not to tak e tamoxifen using pattern analy sis of 1) serial m ammograms, 2

  13. Prenatal smoke exposure and mammographic density in mid-life

    PubMed Central

    Terry, M. B.; Schaefer, C. A.; Flom, J. D.; Wei, Y.; Tehranifar, P.; Liao, Y.; Buka, S.; Michels, K. B.

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoke has both carcinogenic effects and anti-estrogenic properties and its inconsistent association with breast cancer risk in observational studies may be because of these competing effects across the lifecourse. We conducted a prospective study of prenatal smoke exposure, childhood household smoke exposure, and adult active smoke exposure and mammographic density, a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, in an adult follow-up of existing US birth cohorts. Specifically, we followed up women who were born between 1959 and 1967 and whose mothers participated in either the Collaborative Perinatal Project (Boston and Providence sites) or the Childhood Health and Development Study in California. Of the 1134 women interviewed in adulthood (ranging in age from 39 to 49 years at interview), 79% had a screening mammogram. Cigarette smoking was reported by mothers at the time of their pregnancy; 40% of mothers smoked while pregnant. Women whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had a 3.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) = −6.0%, −0.2%) lower mammographic density than women whose mothers did not smoke during pregnancy. When we further accounted for adult body mass index and adult smoking status, the association remained (β = −2.7, 95% CI = −5.0, −0.3).When we examined patterns of smoking, prenatal smoke exposure without adult smoke exposure was associated with a 5.6% decrease in mammographic density (β = −5.6, 95% CI = −9.6, −1.6). Given the strength of mammographic density as an intermediate marker for breast cancer, the inverse associations between mammographic density and smoking patterns across the lifecourse may help explain the complex association between cigarette smoking and breast cancer risk. PMID:23378890

  14. Variation in mammographic appearance between projections of small breast cancers compared with radial scars.

    PubMed

    Cawson, Jennifer N; Nickson, Carolyn; Evans, Jill; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    The study aims to assess variation in appearance between mammographic projections (conspicuity variation) for invasive breast cancers (IBCs) compared with radial scars (RS). Conspicuity variation has been previously described as characteristic of RS. The lesions were also compared with respect to breast density and the proportion of cases detected by one of two readers and required a third (consensus) read. The study was approved by the BreastScreen Victoria research committee. Mammograms of 75 randomly selected invasive breast cancers, with histological diameter ≤10 mm (IBC), were mixed with 67 consecutively detected RS, all from a double-reading population-based breast cancer screening programme. On blinded review, these 142 lesions were classified for mammographic findings and assessed for marked or minor conspicuity variation between views. We assessed the associations between lesion type, lesion spicules and centres, breast density, conspicuity variation and proportion detected by one reader only. Marked conspicuity variation was common, but not statistically different for IBC and RS (64% vs. 66%, χ(2) = 0.8, P = 0.04). Conspicuity variation did not correlate with spiculation type (long, fine or short, broad based) or lesion centres (lucent or dense) (ρ < 0.05, P = 0.5), and showed no significant change with increasing Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System breast density (IBC, χ(2) = 2.3, P = 0.5; RS, χ(2) = 0.95, P = 0.6). Density did not vary by lesion type. In the screening programme, 29% of IBC (125 of 431) versus 43% of RS (32 of 75) had been detected by one of two readers (χ(2) = 2.7, P = 0.098). Two-thirds of small IBCs displayed marked conspicuity variation, similar to RS. Therefore, conspicuity variation does not discriminate between IBC and RS. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. Impact of deprivation on breast cancer survival among women eligible for mammographic screening in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia): Women diagnosed 1997–2006

    PubMed Central

    Rachet, Bernard; O'Connell, Dianne; Lawrence, Gill; Coleman, Michel P.

    2016-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK display marked differences in survival between categories defined by socio‐economic deprivation. Timeliness of diagnosis is one of the possible explanations for these patterns. Women whose cancer is screen‐detected are more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier stage. We examined deprivation and screening‐specific survival in order to evaluate the role of early diagnosis upon deprivation‐specific survival differences in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia). We estimated net survival for women aged 50–65 years at diagnosis and whom had been continuously eligible for screening from the age of 50. Records for 5,628 women in West Midlands (98.5% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.7 years) and 6,396 women in New South Wales (99.9% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.8 years). In New South Wales, survival was similar amongst affluent and deprived women, regardless of whether their cancer was screen‐detected or not. In the West Midlands, there were large and persistent differences in survival between affluent and deprived women. Deprivation differences were similar between the screen‐detected and non‐screen detected groups. These differences are unlikely to be solely explained by artefact, or by patient or tumour factors. Further investigations into the timeliness and appropriateness of the treatments received by women with breast cancer across the social spectrum in the UK are warranted. PMID:26756181

  16. Level set-based core segmentation of mammographic masses facilitating three stage (core, periphery, spiculation) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, John E; Bruce, Lori Mann

    2007-01-01

    We present mammographic mass core segmentation, based on the Chan-Vese level set method. The proposed method is analyzed via resulting feature efficacies. Additionally, the core segmentation method is used to investigate the idea of a three stage segmentation approach, i.e. segment the mass core, periphery, and spiculations (if any exist) and use features from these three segmentations to classify the mass as either benign or malignant. The proposed core segmentation method and a proposed end-to-end computer aided detection (CAD) system using a three stage segmentation are implemented and experimentally tested with a set of 60 mammographic images from the Digital Database of Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve AZ values for morphological and texture features extracted from the core segmentation are shown to be on par, or better, than those extracted from a periphery segmentation. The efficacy of the core segmentation features when combined with the periphery and spiculation segmentation features are shown to be feature set dependent. The proposed end-to-end system uses stepwise linear discriminant analysis for feature selection and a maximum likelihood classifier. Using all three stages (core + periphery + spiculations) results in an overall accuracy (OA) of 90% with 2 false negatives (FN). Since many CAD systems only perform a periphery analysis, adding core features could be a benefit to potentially increase OA and reduce FN cases.

  17. Impedance mammograph 3D phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wtorek, J; Stelter, J; Nowakowski, A

    1999-04-20

    The results obtained using the Technical University of Gdansk Electroimpedance Mammograph (TUGEM) of a 3D phantom study are presented. The TUGEM system is briefly described. The hardware contains the measurement head and DSP-based identification modules controlled by a PC computer. A specially developed reconstruction algorithm, Regulated Correction Frequency Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (RCFART), is used to obtain 3D images. To visualize results, the Advance Visualization System (AVS) is used. It allows a powerful image processing on a fast workstation or on a high-performance computer. Results of three types of 3D conductivity perturbations used in the study (aluminum, Plexiglas, and cucumber) are shown. The relative volumes of perturbations less than 2% of the measurement chamber are easily evidenced.

  18. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Catarious, David M. Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number of

  19. Characterization of difference of Gaussian filters in the detection of mammographic regions.

    PubMed

    Catarious, David M; Baydush, Alan H; Floyd, Carey E

    2006-11-01

    In this article, we present a characterization of the effect of difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters in the detection of mammographic regions. DoG filters have been used previously in mammographic mass computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. As DoG filters are constructed from the subtraction of two bivariate Gaussian distributions, they require the specification of three parameters: the size of the filter template and the standard deviations of the constituent Gaussians. The influence of these three parameters in the detection of mammographic masses has not been characterized. In this work, we aim to determine how the parameters affect (1) the physical descriptors of the detected regions, (2) the true and false positive rates, and (3) the classification performance of the individual descriptors. To this end, 30 DoG filters are created from the combination of three template sizes and four values for each of the Gaussians' standard deviations. The filters are used to detect regions in a study database of 181 craniocaudal-view mammograms extracted from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. To describe the physical characteristics of the identified regions, morphological and textural features are extracted from each of the detected regions. Differences in the mean values of the features caused by altering the DoG parameters are examined through statistical and empirical comparisons. The parameters' effects on the true and false positive rate are determined by examining the mean malignant sensitivities and false positives per image (FPpI). Finally, the effect on the classification performance is described by examining the variation in FPpI at the point where 81% of the malignant masses in the study database are detected. Overall, the findings of the study indicate that increasing the standard deviations of the Gaussians used to construct a DoG filter results in a dramatic decrease in the number of regions identified at the expense of missing a small number

  20. Clinical performance of Siemens digital breast tomosynthesis versus standard supplementary mammography for the assessment of screen-detected soft-tissue abnormalities: a multi-reader study.

    PubMed

    Whelehan, P; Heywang-Köbrunner, S H; Vinnicombe, S J; Hacker, A; Jänsch, A; Hapca, A; Gray, R; Jenkin, M; Lowry, K; Oeppen, R; Reilly, M; Stahnke, M; Evans, A

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of standard screening images plus single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), using Siemens DBT equipment, with standard screening images plus supplementary mammographic views in non-calcific, screen-detected mammographic abnormalities. Participants were unselected women aged 50-69 years recalled within a population-based European breast screening programme for assessment of soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities. Supplementary mammographic views (SMVs) and DBT were performed in all cases. A range of equipment was used for screening and supplementary mammography, but all DBT examinations were performed using the Siemens Mammomat Inspiration. A retrospective multi-reader study including 238 cases for whom either histology or at least 2 years' follow-up was available was performed with eight suitably accredited UK breast screening personnel reading all cases under both conditions, with temporal separation. Readers were blinded to case outcomes and findings from other examinations. Diagnostic accuracy using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was compared between screening plus SMV images and screening plus DBT images. The study was powered to detect a 3% inferiority margin in diagnostic accuracy between methods. The final sample with complete data available for analysis included 195 benign cases (1,560 reads) and 35 malignant cases (280 reads). The DBT method yielded a slightly higher area under the curve (AUC) value than the SMV method (0.870 versus 0.857), but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.4890), indicating that the methods have equivalent accuracy. Siemens DBT demonstrates equivalent diagnostic accuracy according to ROC curve analysis when used in place of SMVs in screen-detected soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Occupation and mammographic density: A population-based study (DDM-Occup).

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; González-Sánchez, Mario; Cortés Barragán, Rosa Ana; Maqueda Blasco, Jerónimo; González-Galarzo, María Carmen; Alba, Miguel Ángel; van der Haar, Rudolf; Casas, Silvia; Vicente, Cándida; Medina, Pilar; Ederra, María; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreno, María Pilar; Casanova, Francisco; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Ascunce, Nieves; García, Montse; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Llobet, Rafael; Lope, Virginia

    2017-11-01

    High mammographic density is one of the main risk factors for breast cancer. Although several occupations have been associated with breast cancer, there are no previous occupational studies exploring the association with mammographic density. Our objective was to identify occupations associated with high mammographic density in Spanish female workers. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of occupational determinants of high mammographic density in Spain, based on 1476 women, aged 45-68 years, recruited from seven screening centers within the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program network. Reproductive, family, personal, and occupational history data were collected. The latest occupation of each woman was collected and coded according to the 1994 National Classification of Occupations. Mammographic density was assessed from the cranio-caudal mammogram of the left breast using a semi-automated computer-assisted tool. Association between mammographic density and occupation was evaluated by using mixed linear regression models, using log-transformed percentage of mammographic density as dependent variable. Models were adjusted for age, body mass index, menopausal status, parity, smoking, alcohol intake, educational level, type of mammography, first-degree relative with breast cancer, and hormonal replacement therapy use. Screening center and professional reader were included as random effects terms. Mammographic density was higher, although non-statistically significant, among secondary school teachers (e(β) = 1.41; 95%CI = 0.98-2.03) and nurses (e(β) = 1.23; 95%CI = 0.96-1.59), whereas workers engaged in the care of people (e(β) = 0.81; 95%CI = 0.66-1.00) and housewives (e(β) = 0.87; 95%CI = 0.79-0.95) showed an inverse association with mammographic density. A positive trend for every 5 years working as secondary school teachers was also detected (p-value = 0.035). Nurses and secondary school teachers were the occupations with the highest

  2. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document.

  3. Should processed or raw image data be used in mammographic image quality analyses? A comparative study of three full-field digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Borg, Mark; Badr, Ishmail; Royle, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare a number of measured image quality parameters using processed and unprocessed or raw images in two full-field direct digital units and one computed radiography mammography system. This study shows that the difference between raw and processed image data is system specific. The results have shown that there are no significant differences between raw and processed data in the mean threshold contrast values using the contrast-detail mammography phantom in all the systems investigated; however, these results cannot be generalised to all available systems. Notable differences were noted in contrast-to-noise ratios and in other tests including: response function, modulation transfer function , noise equivalent quanta, normalised noise power spectra and detective quantum efficiency as specified in IEC 62220-1-2. Consequently, the authors strongly recommend the use of raw data for all image quality analyses in digital mammography. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Identification of simulated microcalcifications in white noise and mammographic backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2006-08-15

    This work investigates human performance in discriminating between differently shaped simulated microcalcifications embedded in white noise or mammographic backgrounds. Human performance was determined through two alternative forced-choice (2-AFC) experiments. The signals used were computer-generated simple shapes that were designed such that they had equal signal energy. This assured equal detectability. For experiments involving mammographic backgrounds, signals were blurred to account for the imaging system modulation transfer function (MTF). White noise backgrounds were computer generated; anatomic background patches were extracted from normal mammograms. We compared human performance levels as a function of signal energy in the expected difference template. In the discrimination task, the expected difference template is the difference between the two signals shown. In white noise backgrounds, human performance in the discrimination task was degraded compared to the detection task. In mammographic backgrounds, human performance in the discrimination task exceeded that of the detection task. This indicates that human observers do not follow the optimum decision strategy of correlating the expected signal template with the image. Human observer performance was qualitatively reproduced by non-prewhitening with eye filter (NPWE) model observer calculations, in which spatial uncertainty was explicitly included by shifting the locations of the expected difference templates. The results indicate that human strategy in the discrimination task may be to match individual signal templates with the image individually, rather than to perform template matching between the expected difference template and the image.

  5. Qualitative Versus Quantitative Mammographic Breast Density Assessment: Applications for the US and Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Destounis, Stamatia; Arieno, Andrea; Morgan, Renee; Roberts, Christina; Chan, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) has been proven to be an important risk factor for breast cancer and an important determinant of mammographic screening performance. The measurement of density has changed dramatically since its inception. Initial qualitative measurement methods have been found to have limited consistency between readers, and in regards to breast cancer risk. Following the introduction of full-field digital mammography, more sophisticated measurement methodology is now possible. Automated computer-based density measurements can provide consistent, reproducible, and objective results. In this review paper, we describe various methods currently available to assess MBD, and provide a discussion on the clinical utility of such methods for breast cancer screening. PMID:28561776

  6. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® on nonpalpable mammographic findings (excluding calcifications).

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Birdwell, Robyn L; D'Orsi, Carl J; Bassett, Lawrence W; Mahoney, Mary C; Bailey, Lisa; Berg, Wendie A; Harvey, Jennifer A; Herman, Cheryl R; Kaplan, Stuart S; Liberman, Laura; Mendelson, Ellen B; Parikh, Jay R; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Rosen, Eric L; Sutherland, M Linda

    2010-12-01

    Screening mammography can detect breast cancer before it becomes clinically apparent. However, the screening process identifies many false-positive findings for each cancer eventually confirmed. Additional tools are available to help differentiate spurious findings from real ones and to help determine when tissue sampling is required, when short-term follow-up will suffice, or whether the finding can be dismissed as benign. These tools include additional diagnostic mammographic views, breast ultrasound, breast MRI, and, when histologic evaluation is required, percutaneous biopsy. The imaging evaluation of a finding detected at screening mammography proceeds most efficiently, cost-effectively, and with minimization of radiation dose when approached in an evidence-based manner. The appropriateness of the above-referenced tools is presented here as they apply to a variety of findings often encountered on screening mammography; an algorithmic approach to workup of these potential scenarios is also included. The recommendations put forth represent a compilation of evidence-based data and expert opinion of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Expert Panel on Breast Imaging. Copyright © 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  8. Automatic image classification for the urinoculture screening.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Paolo; Bonechi, Simone; Bianchini, Monica; Garzelli, Andrea; Mecocci, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are considered to be the most common bacterial infection and, actually, it is estimated that about 150 million UTIs occur world wide yearly, giving rise to roughly $6 billion in healthcare expenditures and resulting in 100,000 hospitalizations. Nevertheless, it is difficult to carefully assess the incidence of UTIs, since an accurate diagnosis depends both on the presence of symptoms and on a positive urinoculture, whereas in most outpatient settings this diagnosis is made without an ad hoc analysis protocol. On the other hand, in the traditional urinoculture test, a sample of midstream urine is put onto a Petri dish, where a growth medium favors the proliferation of germ colonies. Then, the infection severity is evaluated by a visual inspection of a human expert, an error prone and lengthy process. In this paper, we propose a fully automated system for the urinoculture screening that can provide quick and easily traceable results for UTIs. Based on advanced image processing and machine learning tools, the infection type recognition, together with the estimation of the bacterial load, can be automatically carried out, yielding accurate diagnoses. The proposed AID (Automatic Infection Detector) system provides support during the whole analysis process: first, digital color images of Petri dishes are automatically captured, then specific preprocessing and spatial clustering algorithms are applied to isolate the colonies from the culture ground and, finally, an accurate classification of the infections and their severity evaluation are performed. The AID system speeds up the analysis, contributes to the standardization of the process, allows result repeatability, and reduces the costs. Moreover, the continuous transition between sterile and external environments (typical of the standard analysis procedure) is completely avoided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  10. Mammographic density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D, which influences cellular proliferation and breast tissue characteristics, has been inversely correlated with breast cancer risk. Dietary vitamin D intake has been associated with lower mammographic density (MD), a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk. Findings We examined the relationship between MD and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], an integrated measure of vitamin D status from dietary sources and sunlight exposure, in a multi-ethnic cohort of women undergoing screening mammography. We recruited women age 40–60 years without a history of breast cancer at the time of their routine screening mammogram, and conducted in-person interviews and collected blood specimens. We enrolled 195 women from 2007–2008, 120 gave blood, and 114 were evaluable, including 25% white, 41% African American, 18% African Caribbean, and 16% Hispanic. We digitized mammograms and calculated percent density, dense area, and non-dense area on cranial-caudal images. We measured serum 25(OH)D in batched, archived specimens. Median serum 25(OH)D was 22 ng/ml (range, 8–66 ng/ml). In univariable analysis, higher serum 25(OH)D was associated with white race, higher educational level, ever breast feeding, and blood draw during the summer. After adjusting for body mass index and other confounders, we found no association between serum 25(OH)D and different measures of MD. However, when stratified by season, 25(OH)D was inversely associated with dense area during July-December (p = 0.034). Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that circulating vitamin D, a potentially modifiable breast cancer risk factor, is not associated with MD; the seasonal effects we observed need to be replicated in larger cohorts. PMID:24742098

  11. Grid-enabled mammographic auditing and training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    Effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing secure grid-enabled healthcare provision. In the UK, a large-scale collaborative research project (GIMI: Generic Infrastructures for Medical Informatics), which is concerned with the development of a secure IT infrastructure to support very widespread medical research across the country, is underway. In the UK, there are some 109 breast screening centers and a growing number of individuals (circa 650) nationally performing approximately 1.5 million screening examinations per year. At the same, there is a serious, and ongoing, national workforce issue in screening which has seen a loss of consultant mammographers and a growth in specially trained technologists and other non-radiologists. Thus there is a need to offer effective and efficient mammographic training so as to maintain high levels of screening skills. Consequently, a grid based system has been proposed which has the benefit of offering very large volumes of training cases that the mammographers can access anytime and anywhere. A database, spread geographically across three university systems, of screening cases is used as a test set of known cases. The GIMI mammography training system first audits these cases to ensure that they are appropriately described and annotated. Subsequently, the cases are utilized for training in a grid-based system which has been developed. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of such a grid based approach.

  12. On the orientation of mammographic structure

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, I.; Lee, S.; Nishikawa, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Burgess et al. have shown that the power-spectral density of mammographic breast tissue P(f) follows a power-law, P(f) = c/fβ.1 Due to the complexity of the breast anatomy, breast phantoms often make use of power-law backgrounds to approximate the irregular texture of breast images. However, the current methodology of estimating power-law coefficients assumes that the breast structure is isotropic. The purpose of this letter is to demonstrate that breast anatomic structure is not isotropic, but in fact has a preferred orientation. Further, we present a formalism to estimate power-law coefficients β and c while accounting for tissue orientation in mammographic regions-of-interests (ROIs). We then show the effect of structure orientation on β and c, as well as on the appearance of simulated power-law backgrounds. Methods: When breast tissue exhibits a preferred orientation, the radial symmetry in the associated power spectrum is broken. The new symmetry was fit by an ellipsoidal model. Ellipse tilt angle and axis ratio were accounted for in the power-law fit. Results: On average, breast structure was found to point toward the nipple: the average orientation in MLO views was 22.5 °, while it was 5 ° for CC views, and the mean orientation for left breasts was negative while it was positive for right breasts. For both power-law magnitude and exponent, the mean difference was statistically significant (<Δβ > = −0.096, <Δlog(c) > =−0.192). Conclusions: A formalism for quantification of breast structure and structure orientation is provided. The difference in power-law coefficient estimates when accounting for orientation was found to be statistically significant. Examples of statistically defined backgrounds indicate that breast structure is mimicked more closely when structure orientation is accounted for. PMID:21992347

  13. Correspondence in texture features between two mammographic views

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shalini; Markey, Mia K.

    2005-06-15

    It is well established that radiologists are better able to interpret mammograms when two mammographic views are available. Consequently, two mammographic projections are standard: mediolateral oblique (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC). Computer-aided diagnosis algorithms have been investigated for assisting in the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions in digitized/digital mammograms. A few previous studies suggest that computer-aided systems may also benefit from combining evidence from the two views. Intuitively, we expect that there would only be value in merging data from two views if they provide complementary information. A measure of the similarity of information is the correlation coefficient between corresponding features from the MLO and CC views. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correspondence in Haralick's texture features between the MLO and CC mammographic views of breast lesions. Features were ranked on the basis of correlation values and the two-view correlation of features for subgroups of data including masses versus calcification and benign versus malignant lesions were compared. All experiments were performed on a subset of mammography cases from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). It was observed that the texture features from the MLO and CC views were less strongly correlated for calcification lesions than for mass lesions. Similarly, texture features from the two views were less strongly correlated for benign lesions than for malignant lesions. These differences were statistically significant. The results suggest that the inclusion of texture features from multiple mammographic views in a CADx algorithm may impact the accuracy of diagnosis of calcification lesions and benign lesions.

  14. Prediction of near-term breast cancer risk based on bilateral mammographic feature asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin; Ramalingam, Pandiyarajan; Gur, David

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of predicting near-term risk of breast cancer development in women after a negative mammography screening examination. It is based on a statistical learning model that combines computerized image features related to bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and other clinical factors. A database of negative digital mammograms acquired from 994 women was retrospectively collected. In the next sequential screening examination (12 to 36 months later), 283 women were diagnosed positive for cancer, 349 were recalled for additional diagnostic workups and later proved to be benign, and 362 remain negative (not recalled). From an initial pool of 183 features, we applied a Sequential Forward Floating Selection feature selection method to search for effective features. Using 10 selected features, we developed and trained a support vector machine classification model to compute a cancer risk or probability score for each case. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and odds ratios (ORs) were used as the two performance assessment indices. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.725 ± 0.018 was obtained for positive and negative/benign case classification. The ORs showed an increasing risk trend with increasing model-generated risk scores (from 1.00 to 12.34, between positive and negative/benign case groups). Regression analysis of ORs also indicated a significant increase trend in slope (P = .006). This study demonstrates that the risk scores computed by a new support vector machine model involving bilateral mammographic feature asymmetry have potential to assist the prediction of near-term risk of women for developing breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Colon Cancer Screening with Image-Enhanced Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality worldwide, and this has led to an increased use of screening colonoscopy. This screening has resulted in long-term risk reduction in asymptomatic individuals. However, endoscopists may fail to detect advanced adenomas or colon cancer during screening. The reasons that adenomas or cancers are missed are thought to be associated with the location of the lesions or the skills of the endoscopist. To address the limitations of white light endoscopy (WLE) for adenoma detection, advanced endoscopic images have recently been used. Image-enhanced endoscopies (IEEs), including the use of topical dyes, optical filtering, and ultramagnification, allow for gastrointestinal lesion analysis. Many studies have compared the adenoma detection rate (ADR) obtained by using WLE and IEE, but with different results. IEE can be used to help the endoscopist to improve their ADR in screening colonoscopy. This review examines the possible roles of image-enhanced colonoscopy in CRC screening. PMID:25505715

  16. Dual purpose passive screen for simultaneous display and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomro, Shoaib R.; Ulusoy, Erdem; Eralp, Muhsin; Urey, Hakan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced imaging and display techniques are widely explored for realistic content capture and visualization but cannot fully follow the miniaturization and mobility trends in technology. Wide field-of-view displays require large surfaces and image capture requires separate installation of cameras having separate footprints and perspective views. Here we propose a novel, portable dual purpose passive screen that can simultaneously facilitate display and imaging with unprecedented features and performance. The optical design of the screen is presented. A prototype of the dual-purpose screen paired with a camera and a low power mobile projector is demonstrated. The developed screen has size of 28×21cm2 to facilitate capture of eye contacted perspective view and displays high-quality images with high-brightness (>100cd/m2 ) using only 15 lumen pico projector.

  17. The Role and Design of Screen Images in Software Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meij, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of learning a new computer software program focuses on how to support the joint handling of a manual, input devices, and screen display. Describes a study that examined three design styles for manuals that included screen images to reduce split-attention problems and discusses theory versus practice and cognitive load theory.…

  18. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  19. Mammographic features of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, E.A.

    1984-09-01

    Mammographic detection of breast cancer at the earliest possible stage requires optimal radiographic technique and a full knowledge of the subtle features with which very small cancers can present. Although some early cancers are identified as characteristic clusters of calcifications or as spiculated or multinodular (knobby) masses, others demonstrate less typical and sometimes much less obvious mammographic signs: the single dilated duct, focal architectural distortion, asymmetry, and the developing density sign. Although these indirect signs are nonspecific, they provide mammographers with the important opportunity to discover breast cancer at a very early stage, when the likelihood for cure is great.

  20. Can mammographic assessments lead to consider density as a risk factor for breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Colin, C; Prince, V; Valette, P J

    2013-03-01

    Admitting that mammographic breast density is an important independent risk factor for breast cancer in the general population, has a crucial economical health care impact, since it might lead to increasing screening frequency or reinforcing additional modalities. Thus, the impact of density as a risk factor has to be carefully investigated and might be debated. Some authors suggested that high density would be either a weak factor or confused with a masking effect. Others concluded that most of the studies have methodological biases in basic physics to quantify percentage of breast density, as well as in mammographic acquisition parameters. The purpose of this review is to evaluate mammographic procedures and density assessments in published studies regarding density as a breast cancer risk. No standardization was found in breast density assessments and compared density categories. High density definitions varied widely from 25 to 75% of dense tissues on mammograms. Some studies showed an insufficient follow-up to reveal masking effect related to mammographic false negatives. Evaluating breast density impact needs thorough studies with consensual mammographic procedures, methods of density measurement, breast density classification as well as a standardized definition of high breast density. Digital mammography, more effective in dense breasts, should help to re-evaluate the issue of density as a risk factor for breast cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk driven by breast anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Oustimov, Andrew; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2017-03-01

    Image-derived features of breast parenchymal texture patterns have emerged as promising risk factors for breast cancer, paving the way towards personalized recommendations regarding women's cancer risk evaluation and screening. The main steps to extract texture features of the breast parenchyma are the selection of regions of interest (ROIs) where texture analysis is performed, the texture feature calculation and the texture feature summarization in case of multiple ROIs. In this study, we incorporate breast anatomy in these three key steps by (a) introducing breast anatomical sampling for the definition of ROIs, (b) texture feature calculation aligned with the structure of the breast and (c) weighted texture feature summarization considering the spatial position and the underlying tissue composition of each ROI. We systematically optimize this novel framework for parenchymal tissue characterization in a case-control study with digital mammograms from 424 women. We also compare the proposed approach with a conventional methodology, not considering breast anatomy, recently shown to enhance the case-control discriminatory capacity of parenchymal texture analysis. The case-control classification performance is assessed using elastic-net regression with 5-fold cross validation, where the evaluation measure is the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic. Upon optimization, the proposed breast-anatomy-driven approach demonstrated a promising case-control classification performance (AUC=0.87). In the same dataset, the performance of conventional texture characterization was found to be significantly lower (AUC=0.80, DeLong's test p-value<0.05). Our results suggest that breast anatomy may further leverage the associations of parenchymal texture features with breast cancer, and may therefore be a valuable addition in pipelines aiming to elucidate quantitative mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk.

  2. Impact of full field digital mammography on the classification and mammographic characteristics of interval breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Knox, Mark; O'Brien, Angela; Szabó, Endre; Smith, Clare S; Fenlon, Helen M; McNicholas, Michelle M; Flanagan, Fidelma L

    2015-06-01

    Full field digital mammography (FFDM) is increasingly replacing screen film mammography (SFM) in breast screening programs. Interval breast cancers are an issue in all screening programs and the purpose of our study is to assess the impact of FFDM on the classification of interval breast cancers at independent blind review and to compare the mammographic features of interval cancers at FFDM and SFM. This study included 138 cases of interval breast cancer, 76 following an FFDM screening examination and 62 following screening with SFM. The prior screening mammogram was assessed by each of five consultant breast radiologists who were blinded to the site of subsequent cancer. Subsequent review of the diagnostic mammogram was performed and cases were classified as missed, minimal signs, occult or true interval. Mammographic features of the interval cancer at diagnosis and any abnormality identified on the prior screening mammogram were recorded. The percentages of cancers classified as missed at FFDM and SFM did not differ significantly, 10.5% (8 of 76) at FFDM and 8.1% (5 of 62) at SFM (p=.77). There were significantly less interval cancers presenting as microcalcifications (alone or in association with another abnormality) following screening with FFDM, 16% (12 of 76) than following a SFM examination, 32% (20 of 62) (p=.02). Interval breast cancers continue to pose a problem at FFDM. The switch to FFDM has changed the mammographic presentation of interval breast cancer, with less interval cancers presenting in association with microcalcifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing a new case based computer-aided detection scheme and an adaptive cueing method to improve performance in detecting mammographic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new method to improve performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of screening mammograms with two approaches. In the first approach, we developed a new case based CAD scheme using a set of optimally selected global mammographic density, texture, spiculation, and structural similarity features computed from all four full-field digital mammography images of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views by using a modified fast and accurate sequential floating forward selection feature selection algorithm. Selected features were then applied to a ‘scoring fusion’ artificial neural network classification scheme to produce a final case based risk score. In the second approach, we combined the case based risk score with the conventional lesion based scores of a conventional lesion based CAD scheme using a new adaptive cueing method that is integrated with the case based risk scores. We evaluated our methods using a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on 924 cases (476 cancer and 448 recalled or negative), whereby each case had all four images from the CC and MLO views. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC  =  0.793  ±  0.015 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 37.21 as CAD-generated case based detection scores increased. Using the new adaptive cueing method, the region based and case based sensitivities of the conventional CAD scheme at a false positive rate of 0.71 per image increased by 2.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The study demonstrated that supplementary information can be derived by computing global mammographic density image features to improve CAD-cueing performance on the suspicious mammographic lesions.

  4. Developing a new case based computer-aided detection scheme and an adaptive cueing method to improve performance in detecting mammographic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-21

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new method to improve performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of screening mammograms with two approaches. In the first approach, we developed a new case based CAD scheme using a set of optimally selected global mammographic density, texture, spiculation, and structural similarity features computed from all four full-field digital mammography images of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views by using a modified fast and accurate sequential floating forward selection feature selection algorithm. Selected features were then applied to a 'scoring fusion' artificial neural network classification scheme to produce a final case based risk score. In the second approach, we combined the case based risk score with the conventional lesion based scores of a conventional lesion based CAD scheme using a new adaptive cueing method that is integrated with the case based risk scores. We evaluated our methods using a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on 924 cases (476 cancer and 448 recalled or negative), whereby each case had all four images from the CC and MLO views. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC  =  0.793  ±  0.015 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 37.21 as CAD-generated case based detection scores increased. Using the new adaptive cueing method, the region based and case based sensitivities of the conventional CAD scheme at a false positive rate of 0.71 per image increased by 2.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The study demonstrated that supplementary information can be derived by computing global mammographic density image features to improve CAD-cueing performance on the suspicious mammographic lesions.

  5. Diagnostic imaging and biopsy pathways following abnormal screen-film and digital screening mammography

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Zhu, Weiwei; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Karliner, Leah; Sprague, Brian L.; Henderson, Louise; Lee, David; Onega, Tracy; Buist, Diana SM.; Sweet, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Objective The transition from screen-film to digital mammography may have altered diagnostic evaluation of women following a positive screening examination. This study compared use and timeliness of diagnostic imaging and biopsy for women screened with screen-film or digital mammography. Materials and Methods Data were from 35,321 positive screening mammograms on 32,087 women aged 40–89 years, from 22 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium facilities in 2005–2008. Diagnostic pathways were classified by their inclusion of diagnostic mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and biopsy. We compared time to resolution and frequency of diagnostic pathways by patient characteristics, screening exam modality, and radiology facility. Between-facility differences were evaluated by computing the proportion of mammograms receiving follow-up with a particular pathway for each facility and examining variation in these proportions across facilities. Multinomial logistic regression adjusting for age, calendar year, and facility compared odds of follow-up with each pathway. Results The median time to resolution of a positive screening mammogram was 10 days. Compared to screen-film mammograms, digital mammograms were more frequently followed by only a single diagnostic mammogram (46% vs. 36%). Pathways following digital screening mammography were also less likely to include biopsy (16% vs. 20%). However, in adjusted analyses most differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.857 for mammography only; p = 0.03 for biopsy). Substantial variability in diagnostic pathway frequency was seen across facilities. For instance, the frequency of evaluation with diagnostic mammography alone ranged from 23% to 55% across facilities. Conclusion Differences in evaluation of positive digital and screen-film screening mammograms were minor, and appeared to be largely attributable to substantial variation between radiology facilities. To guide health systems in their

  6. Diagnostic imaging and biopsy pathways following abnormal screen-film and digital screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Rebecca A; Zhu, Weiwei; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Karliner, Leah; Sprague, Brian L; Henderson, Louise; Lee, David; Onega, Tracy; Buist, Diana S M; Sweet, Alison

    2013-04-01

    The transition from screen-film to digital mammography may have altered diagnostic evaluation of women following a positive screening examination. This study compared the use and timeliness of diagnostic imaging and biopsy for women screened with screen-film or digital mammography. Data were obtained from 35,321 positive screening mammograms on 32,087 women aged 40-89 years, from 22 breast cancer surveillance consortium facilities in 2005-2008. Diagnostic pathways were classified by their inclusion of diagnostic mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and biopsy. We compared time to resolution and frequency of diagnostic pathways by patient characteristics, screening exam modality, and radiology facility. Between-facility differences were evaluated by computing the proportion of mammograms receiving follow-up with a particular pathway for each facility and examining variation in these proportions across facilities. Multinomial logistic regression adjusting for age, calendar year, and facility compared odds of follow-up with each pathway. The median time to resolution of a positive screening mammogram was 10 days. Compared to screen-film mammograms, digital mammograms were more frequently followed by only a single diagnostic mammogram (46 vs. 36 %). Pathways following digital screening mammography were also less likely to include biopsy (16 vs. 20 %). However, in adjusted analyses, most differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.857 for mammography only; p = 0.03 for biopsy). Substantial variability in diagnostic pathway frequency was seen across facilities. For instance, the frequency of evaluation with diagnostic mammography alone ranged from 23 to 55 % across facilities. Differences in evaluation of positive digital and screen-film screening mammograms were minor, and appeared to be largely attributable to substantial variation between radiology facilities. To guide health systems in their efforts to eliminate practices that do not

  7. Analysis of confidence level scores from an ROC study: comparison of three mammographic systems for detection of simulated calcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the detection performance of three different mammography systems: screen/film (SF) combination, a-Si/CsI flat-panel (FP-), and charge-coupled device (CCD-) based systems. A 5-cm thick 50% adipose/50% glandular breast tissue equivalent slab phantom was used to provide an uniform background. Calcium carbonate grains of three different size groups were used to simulate microcalcifications (MCs): 112-125, 125-140, and 140-150 μm overlapping with the uniform background. Calcification images were acquired with the three mammography systems. Digital images were printed on hardcopy films. All film images were displayed on a mammographic viewer and reviewed by 5 mammographers. The visibility of the MC was rated with a 5-point confidence rating scale for each detection task, including the negative controls. Scores were averaged over all readers for various detectors and size groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the areas under the ROC curves (Az"s) were computed for various imaging conditions. The results shows that (1) the FP-based system performed significantly better than the SF and CCD-based systems for individual size groups using ROC analysis (2) the FP-based system also performed significantly better than the SF and CCD-based systems for individual size groups using averaged confidence scale, and (3) the results obtained from the Az"s were largely correlated with these from confidence level scores. However, the correlation varied slightly among different imaging conditions.

  8. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Methods: Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was

  9. The influence of mammogram acquisition on the mammographic density and breast cancer association in the mayo mammography health study cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Image acquisition technique varies across mammograms to limit radiation and produce a clinically useful image. We examined whether acquisition technique parameters at the time of mammography were associated with mammographic density and whether the acquisition parameters confounded the density and breast cancer association. Methods We examined this question within the Mayo Mammography Health Study (MMHS) cohort, comprised of 19,924 women (51.2% of eligible) seen in the Mayo Clinic mammography screening practice from 2003 to 2006. A case-cohort design, comprising 318 incident breast cancers diagnosed through December 2009 and a random subcohort of 2,259, was used to examine potential confounding of mammogram acquisition technique parameters (x-ray tube voltage peak (kVp), milliampere-seconds (mAs), thickness and compression force) on the density and breast cancer association. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System four-category tissue composition measure (BI-RADS) and percent density (PD) (Cumulus program) were estimated from screen-film mammograms at time of enrollment. Spearman correlation coefficients (r) and means (standard deviations) were used to examine the relationship of density measures with acquisition parameters. Hazard ratios (HR) and C-statistics were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for age, menopausal status, body mass index and postmenopausal hormones. A change in the HR of at least 15% indicated confounding. Results Adjusted PD and BI-RADS density were associated with breast cancer (p-trends < 0.001), with a 3 to 4-fold increased risk in the extremely dense vs. fatty BI-RADS categories (HR: 3.0, 95% CI, 1.7 - 5.1) and the ≥ 25% vs. ≤ 5% PD categories (HR: 3.8, 95% CI, 2.5 - 5.9). Of the acquisition parameters, kVp was not correlated with PD (r = 0.04, p = 0.07). Although thickness (r = -0.27, p < 0.001), compression force (r = -0

  10. Performance Benchmarks for Screening Breast MR Imaging in Community Practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janie M; Ichikawa, Laura; Valencia, Elizabeth; Miglioretti, Diana L; Wernli, Karen; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Henderson, Louise M; Sprague, Brian L; Onega, Tracy; Rauscher, Garth H; Lehman, Constance D

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To compare screening magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performance in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) benchmarks. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA and included BCSC screening MR examinations collected between 2005 and 2013 from 5343 women (8387 MR examinations) linked to regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program registries, state tumor registries, and pathologic information databases that identified breast cancer cases and tumor characteristics. Clinical, demographic, and imaging characteristics were assessed. Performance measures were calculated according to BI-RADS fifth edition and included cancer detection rate (CDR), positive predictive value of biopsy recommendation (PPV2), sensitivity, and specificity. Results The median patient age was 52 years; 52% of MR examinations were performed in women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, 46% in women with a personal history of breast cancer, and 15% in women with both risk factors. Screening MR imaging depicted 146 cancers, and 35 interval cancers were identified (181 total-54 in situ, 125 invasive, and two status unknown). The CDR was 17 per 1000 screening examinations (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15, 20 per 1000 screening examinations; BI-RADS benchmark, 20-30 per 1000 screening examinations). PPV2 was 19% (95% CI: 16%, 22%; benchmark, 15%). Sensitivity was 81% (95% CI: 75%, 86%; benchmark, >80%), and specificity was 83% (95% CI: 82%, 84%; benchmark, 85%-90%). The median tumor size of invasive cancers was 10 mm; 88% were node negative. Conclusion The interpretative performance of screening MR imaging in the BCSC meets most BI-RADS benchmarks and approaches benchmark levels for remaining measures. Clinical practice performance data can inform ongoing benchmark development and help identify areas for quality improvement. (©) RSNA

  11. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  12. [Results of an automatic evaluation of test images according to PAS 1054 and IEC 6220-1-2 on different types of digital mammographic units].

    PubMed

    Blendl, C; Schreiber, A C; Buhr, H

    2009-10-01

    To test whether image processing methods are suitable for detecting differences in the image quality of digital mammography units and whether the methods are more sensitive than visual test methods like the evaluation of CDMAM test images. Test images according to PAS 1054 were acquired with CR and DR systems and analyzed automatically. Only parameters were used that are obligatory for calculating the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), the noise power spectrum (NPS), the spatial resolution (MTF, modulation transfer function), and the averaged glandular dose (AGD). The derived value, the NEQ index, is linked to the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). Additionally CDMAM test images were acquired and evaluated at one CR and one DR system. The accuracy of the evaluated values is in the range below of 2 %. The accuracy requirements are fulfilled to establish values for detecting changes in image quality related to changes in dose no greater than one exposure value. If a visual evaluation of test images is used, a significant difference in image quality can only be detected when the dose is doubled. A method is proposed for establishing dose-correlated tolerances for values used in constancy and acceptance tests independently of the type of mammography unit (CR and DR systems). A method which abstains from visual tests for establishing the performance of digital mammography units could be used in acceptance tests. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  13. Fundus autofluorescence imaging in an ocular screening program.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, A M; Nayak, N V; Szirth, B C; Khouri, A S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe integration of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging into an ocular screening program. Methods. Fifty consecutive screening participants were included in this prospective pilot imaging study. Color and FAF (530/640 nm exciter/barrier filters) images were obtained with a 15.1MP Canon nonmydriatic hybrid camera. A clinician evaluated the images on site to determine need for referral. Visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), and ocular pathology detected by color fundus and FAF imaging modalities were recorded. Results. Mean ± SD age was 47.4 ± 17.3 years. Fifty-two percent were female and 58% African American. Twenty-seven percent had a comprehensive ocular examination within the past year. Mean VA was 20/39 in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Mean IOP was 15 mmHg bilaterally. Positive color and/or FAF findings were identified in nine (18%) individuals with diabetic retinopathy or macular edema (n = 4), focal RPE defects (n = 2), age-related macular degeneration (n = 1), central serous retinopathy (n = 1), and ocular trauma (n = 1). Conclusions. FAF was successfully integrated in our ocular screening program and aided in the identification of ocular pathology. Larger studies examining the utility of this technology in screening programs may be warranted.

  14. Mammographic density: intersection of science, the law, and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Scott; Keely, Patricia; Seewaldt, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    High mammographic density is associated with a two- to sixfold increased risk of breast cancer. Mammographic density can be altered by endogenous and exogenous hormonal factors and generally declines with age. Mammographic density is affected by confounding factors such as age, parity, menopausal status, and body mass index (BMI), thus making interpretation of mammographic density challenging. None of the established means of measuring mammographic density are entirely satisfactory because they are time consuming and/or subjective. Although mammographic density has been shown to predict breast cancer risk, the role of mammographic density in precisely assessing a woman's breast cancer risk over her lifetime and evaluating response to risk-reduction strategies cannot be fully realized until we have a better understanding of the biology that links mammographic density to breast cancer risk.

  15. From Planetary Imaging to Enzyme Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Based in San Diego, KAIROS Scientific develops molecular biology methods, instrumentation, and computer algorithms to create solutions to challenging problems in the medical and chemical industries. company s pioneering efforts in digital imaging spectroscopy (DIS) enable researchers to obtain spectral and/or time-dependent information for each pixel or group of pixels in a two-dimensional scene. In addition to having Yang s NASA experience at its foundation, KAIROS Scientific was established with the support of many government grants and contracts. Its first was a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, from Ames Research Center, to develop HIRIM, a high-resolution imaging microscope embodying both novel hardware and software that can be used to simultaneously acquire hundreds of individual absorbance spectra from microscopic features. Using HIRIM s graphical user interface, MicroDIS, scientists and engineers are presented with a revolutionary new tool which enables them to point to a feature in an image and recall its associated spectrum in real time.

  16. No Effect of Aspirin on Mammographic Density in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, Anne; Wang, CY; Sorensen, Bess; Xiao, Liren; Buist, Diana S. M.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; White, Emily; Rossing, Mary Anne; Potter, John; Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer among women who regularly use aspirin; a plausible mechanism is through aspirin effect on mammographic breast density, a breast cancer risk factor, possibly mediated through aspirin interference with estrogen synthesis. Methods: In a 2-arm randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of 6-months administration of 325 mg/day aspirin on total mammographic breast dense area and percent of the mammographic breast image occupied by dense areas (% density) in 143 postmenopausal women. Eligible women, recruited 2005-7, were healthy, not taking hormone therapy, with elevated mammographic breast density (American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) density category 2, 3 or 4) within 6 months prior to enrollment. Results: Women were a mean (s.d.) 59.5 (5.5) years. Geometric mean baseline percent density was 17.6% (95% CI 14.8, 20.9) in women randomized to aspirin and 19.2% (95% CI 16.3, 22.7) in women randomized to placebo. Percent density decreased in women randomized to aspirin by an absolute 0.8% vs. an absolute decrease of 1.2% in controls (p = 0.84). Total breast area and dense area decreased to a similar degree in women assigned to aspirin and in those assigned to placebo, with no differences statistically significantly different between trial arms. Conclusions: A single daily administration of adult-dose aspirin for 6 months had no effect on mammographic density in postmenopausal women. If aspirin affects breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, it may do so through alternative pathways than mammographic breast density. PMID:19423529

  17. Preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma on screening mammograms.

    PubMed

    Borecky, N; Rickard, M

    2008-02-01

    Three cases of fibroadenoma associated with carcinoma are reported. These cases were diagnosed within a screening programme as a result of suspicious mammographic findings, and the diagnosis of malignancy was confirmed preoperatively by core biopsy in all cases. The mammographic findings suggestive of carcinoma within fibroadenoma were irregularity of margins in one case and associated new suspicious pleomorphic and linear calcifications in the two other cases. The preoperative diagnosis of carcinoma within fibroadenoma was provided by ultrasound-guided core biopsy in two cases and core biopsy under stereotactic guidance in one case. Whereas asymptomatic fibroadenoma with benign imaging appearances usually does not require further investigation, fibroadenoma with atypical imaging features requires a triple test investigation.

  18. Diabetic Rethinopathy Screening by Bright Lesions Extraction from Fundus Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanđsková, Veronika; Pavlovičova, Jarmila; Oravec, Miloš; Blaško, Radoslav

    2013-09-01

    Retinal images are nowadays widely used to diagnose many diseases, for example diabetic retinopathy. In our work, we propose the algorithm for the screening application, which identifies the patients with such severe diabetic complication as diabetic retinopathy is, in early phase. In the application we use the patient's fundus photography without any additional examination by an ophtalmologist. After this screening identification, other examination methods should be considered and the patient's follow-up by a doctor is necessary. Our application is composed of three principal modules including fundus image preprocessing, feature extraction and feature classification. Image preprocessing module has the role of luminance normalization, contrast enhancement and optical disk masking. Feature extraction module includes two stages: bright lesions candidates localization and candidates feature extraction. We selected 16 statistical and structural features. For feature classification, we use multilayer perceptron (MLP) with one hidden layer. We classify images into two classes. Feature classification efficiency is about 93 percent.

  19. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mammographic x-ray system is a device intended to be used to produce radiographs of the breast...

  20. The implementation of an AR (augmented reality) approach to support mammographic interpretation training: an initial feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiang; Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.

    2017-03-01

    Appropriate feedback plays an important role in optimising mammographic interpretation training whilst also ensuring good interpretation performance. The traditional keyboard, mouse and workstation technical approach has a critical limitation in providing supplementary image-related information and providing complex feedback in real time. Augmented Reality (AR) provides a possible superior approach in this situation, as feedback can be provided directly overlaying the displayed mammographic images so making a generic approach which can also be vendor neutral. In this study, radiological feedback was dynamically remapped virtually into the real world, using perspective transformation, in order to provide a richer user experience in mammographic interpretation training. This is an initial attempt of an AR approach to dynamically superimpose pre-defined feedback information of a DICOM image on top of a radiologist's view, whilst the radiologist is examining images on a clinical workstation. The study demonstrates the feasibility of the approach, although there are limitations on interactive operations which are due to the hardware used. The results of this fully functional approach provide appropriate feedback/image correspondence in a simulated mammographic interpretation environment. Thus, it is argued that employing AR is a feasible way to provide rich feedback in the delivery of mammographic interpretation training.

  1. Mammographic Breast Density Response to Aromatase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, Celine M.; Suman, Vera J.; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Buzdar, Aman U.; Olson, Janet E.; Wu, Fang-Fang; Flickinger, Lynn M.; Ursin, Giske; Elliott, Catherine R.; Shepherd, Lois; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Goss, Paul E.; Ingle, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mammographic breast density (MBD) is decreased by tamoxifen, but the effect of aromatase inhibitors (AI) is less clear. Experimental Design We enrolled early stage postmenopausal breast cancer patients initiating adjuvant AI therapy and ascertained mammograms before and at an average 10 months of AI therapy. We matched cases to healthy postmenopausal women (controls) from a large mammography screening cohort on age, baseline body mass index, baseline MBD and interval between mammograms. We estimated change in MBD using a computer-assisted thresholding program (Cumulus) and compared differences between cases and matched controls. Results In predominantly white women (96%), we found 14% of the 387 eligible cases had a MBD reduction of at least 5% after an average of 10 months of AI therapy. MBD reductions were associated with higher baseline MBD, AI use for more than 12 months and prior postmenopausal hormone use. Comparing each case to her matched control, there was no evidence of an association of change in MBD with AI therapy (median case-control difference among 369 pairs was −0.1% (10th and 90th percentile: −5.9%, 5.2%) p=0.51). Case-control differences were similar by type of AI (p’s 0.41 and 0.56); prior use of postmenopausal hormones (p=0.85); baseline MBD (p=0.55); or length of AI therapy (p=0.08). Conclusions In postmenopausal women treated with AIs, 14% of cases had a MBD reduction of >5%, but these decreases did not differ from matched controls. These data suggest that MBD is not a clinically useful biomarker for predicting the value of AI therapy in white postmenopausal women. PMID:23468058

  2. Improving CAD performance by fusion of the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Xu, Weidong; Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry could be an important factor in assessing risk of developing breast cancer and improving the detection of the suspicious lesions. This study aims to assess whether fusion of the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical information into a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme could improve CAD performance in detecting mass-like breast cancers. A testing dataset involving 1352 full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) acquired from 338 cases was used. In this dataset, half (169) cases are positive containing malignant masses and half are negative. Two computerized schemes were first independently applied to process FFDM images of each case. The first single-image based CAD scheme detected suspicious mass regions on each image. The second scheme detected and computed the bilateral mammographic tissue density asymmetry for each case. A fusion method was then applied to combine the output scores of the two schemes. The CAD performance levels using the original CAD-generated detection scores and the new fusion scores were evaluated and compared using a free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) type data analysis method. By fusion with the bilateral mammographic density asymmetrical scores, the case-based CAD sensitivity was increased from 79.2% to 84.6% at a false-positive rate of 0.3 per image. CAD also cued more "difficult" masses with lower CAD-generated detection scores while discarded some "easy" cases. The study indicated that fusion between the scores generated by a single-image based CAD scheme and the computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry scores enabled to increase mass detection sensitivity in particular to detect more subtle masses.

  3. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in White and African American Women.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hilda; Troester, Melissa A; Gierach, Gretchen L; Olshan, Andrew F; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Millikan, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but limited data are available in African American (AA) women. We examined the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk in AA and white women. Cases (n = 491) and controls (n = 528) were from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). Mammographic density was reported to CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories. Increasing mammographic density was associated with increased breast cancer risk among all women. After adjusting for potential confounders, a monotonically increasing risk of breast cancer was observed between the highest versus the lowest BI-RADS density categories [OR = 2.45, (95 % confidence interval: 0.99, 6.09)]. The association was stronger in whites, with ~40 % higher risk among those with extremely dense breasts compared to those with scattered fibroglandular densities [1.39, (0.75, 2.55)]. In AA women, the same comparison suggested lower risk [0.75, (0.30, 1.91)]. Because age, obesity, and exogenous hormones have strong associations with breast cancer risk, mammographic density, and race in the CBCS, effect measure modification by these factors was considered. Consistent with previous literature, density-associated risk was greatest among those with BMI > 30 and current hormone users (P value = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In the CBCS, mammographic density is associated with increased breast cancer risk, with some suggestion of effect measure modification by race, although results were not statistically significant. However, exposures such as BMI and hormone therapy may be important modifiers of this association and merit further investigation.

  4. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in White and African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Troester, Melissa A.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but limited data are available in African American (AA) women. We examined the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk in AA and white women. Cases (n = 491) and controls (n = 528) were from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). Mammographic density was reported to CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories. Increasing mammographic density was associated with increased breast cancer risk among all women. After adjusting for potential confounders, a monotonically increasing risk of breast cancer was observed between the highest versus the lowest BI-RADS density categories [OR = 2.45, (95 % confidence interval: 0.99, 6.09)]. The association was stronger in whites, with ~40 % higher risk among those with extremely dense breasts compared to those with scattered fibroglandular densities [1.39, (0.75, 2.55)]. In AA women, the same comparison suggested lower risk [0.75, (0.30, 1.91)]. Because age, obesity, and exogenous hormones have strong associations with breast cancer risk, mammographic density, and race in the CBCS, effect measure modification by these factors was considered. Consistent with previous literature, density-associated risk was greatest among those with BMI > 30 and current hormone users (P value = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In the CBCS, mammographic density is associated with increased breast cancer risk, with some suggestion of effect measure modification by race, although results were not statistically significant. However, exposures such as BMI and hormone therapy may be important modifiers of this association and merit further investigation. PMID:22864770

  5. Association between air pollution and mammographic breast density in the Breast Cancer Surveilance Consortium.

    PubMed

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Arao, Robert; Brokamp, Cole; O'Meara, Ellen S; Sprague, Brian L; Ghita, Gabriela; Ryan, Patrick

    2017-04-06

    Mammographic breast density is a well-established strong risk factor for breast cancer. The environmental contributors to geographic variation in breast density in urban and rural areas are poorly understood. We examined the association between breast density and exposure to ambient air pollutants (particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3)) in a large population-based screening registry. Participants included women undergoing mammography screening at imaging facilities within the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (2001-2009). We included women aged ≥40 years with known residential zip codes before the index mammogram (n = 279,967). Breast density was assessed using the American College of Radiology's Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) four-category breast density classification. PM2.5 and O3 estimates for grids across the USA (2001-2008) were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency Hierarchical Bayesian Model (HBM). For the majority of women (94%), these estimates were available for the year preceding the mammogram date. Association between exposure to air pollutants and density was estimated using polytomous logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Women with extremely dense breasts had higher mean PM2.5 and lower O3 exposures than women with fatty breasts (8.97 vs. 8.66 ug/m(3) and 33.70 vs. 35.82 parts per billion (ppb), respectively). In regression analysis, women with heterogeneously dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were more likely to have higher exposure to PM2.5 (fourth vs. first quartile odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 1.23). Women with extremely dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were less likely to have higher levels of ozone exposure (fourth vs. first quartile OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.87). Exposure to PM2.5 and O3 may in part explain geographical variation in mammographic density. Further studies are warranted to

  6. Epidemiologic studies of isoflavones & mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Verheus, Martijn; Tice, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  7. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  8. Mammographic density is the main correlate of tumors detected on ultrasound but not on mammography.

    PubMed

    Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Brehm, Barbara; Heusinger, Katharina; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Hack, Carolin C; Preuss, Caroline; Lux, Michael P; Hartmann, Arndt; Vachon, Celine M; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    Although mammography screening programs do not include ultrasound examinations, some diagnostic units do provide women with both mammography and ultrasonography. This article is concerned with estimating the risk of a breast cancer patient diagnosed in a hospital-based mammography unit having a tumor that is visible on ultrasound but not on mammography. A total of 1,399 women with invasive breast cancer from a hospital-based diagnostic mammography unit were included in this retrospective study. For inclusion, mammograms from the time of the primary diagnosis had to be available for computer-assisted assessment of percentage mammographic density (PMD), as well as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessment of mammography. In addition, ultrasound findings were available for the complete cohort as part of routine diagnostic procedures, regardless of any patient or imaging characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of mammography failure, defined as BIRADS assessment 1 or 2. The probability that the visibility of a tumor might be masked at diagnosis was estimated using a regression model with the identified predictors. Tumors were only visible on ultrasound in 107 cases (7.6%). PMD was the strongest predictor for mammography failure, but age, body mass index and previous breast surgery also influenced the risk, independently of the PMD. Risk probabilities ranged from 1% for a defined low-risk group up to 40% for a high-risk group. These findings might help identify women who should be offered ultrasound examinations in addition to mammography.

  9. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  10. Vision 20/20: Mammographic breast density and its clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong Lau, Susie

    2015-12-15

    Breast density is a strong predictor of the failure of mammography screening to detect breast cancer and is a strong predictor of the risk of developing breast cancer. The many imaging options that are now available for imaging dense breasts show great promise, but there is still the question of determining which women are “dense” and what imaging modality is suitable for individual women. To date, mammographic breast density has been classified according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories from visual assessment, but this is known to be very subjective. Despite many research reports, the authors believe there has been a lack of physics-led and evidence-based arguments about what breast density actually is, how it should be measured, and how it should be used. In this paper, the authors attempt to start correcting this situation by reviewing the history of breast density research and the debates generated by the advocacy movement. The authors review the development of breast density estimation from pattern analysis to area-based analysis, and the current automated volumetric breast density (VBD) analysis. This is followed by a discussion on seeking the ground truth of VBD and mapping volumetric methods to BI-RADS density categories. The authors expect great improvement in VBD measurements that will satisfy the needs of radiologists, epidemiologists, surgeons, and physicists. The authors believe that they are now witnessing a paradigm shift toward personalized breast screening, which is going to see many more cancers being detected early, with the use of automated density measurement tools as an important component.

  11. Vision 20/20: Mammographic breast density and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Lau, Susie

    2015-12-01

    Breast density is a strong predictor of the failure of mammography screening to detect breast cancer and is a strong predictor of the risk of developing breast cancer. The many imaging options that are now available for imaging dense breasts show great promise, but there is still the question of determining which women are "dense" and what imaging modality is suitable for individual women. To date, mammographic breast density has been classified according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories from visual assessment, but this is known to be very subjective. Despite many research reports, the authors believe there has been a lack of physics-led and evidence-based arguments about what breast density actually is, how it should be measured, and how it should be used. In this paper, the authors attempt to start correcting this situation by reviewing the history of breast density research and the debates generated by the advocacy movement. The authors review the development of breast density estimation from pattern analysis to area-based analysis, and the current automated volumetric breast density (VBD) analysis. This is followed by a discussion on seeking the ground truth of VBD and mapping volumetric methods to BI-RADS density categories. The authors expect great improvement in VBD measurements that will satisfy the needs of radiologists, epidemiologists, surgeons, and physicists. The authors believe that they are now witnessing a paradigm shift toward personalized breast screening, which is going to see many more cancers being detected early, with the use of automated density measurement tools as an important component.

  12. The TOMMY trial: a comparison of TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme--a multicentre retrospective reading study comparing the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography with digital mammography alone.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Gillan, Maureen Gc; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Lim, Yit Yoong; Purushothaman, Hema; Strudley, Celia; Astley, Susan M; Morrish, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional mammography technique with the potential to improve accuracy by improving differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions. The objectives of the study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of DBT in conjunction with two-dimensional (2D) mammography or synthetic 2D mammography, against standard 2D mammography and to determine if DBT improves the accuracy of detection of different types of lesions. Women (aged 47-73 years) recalled for further assessment after routine breast screening and women (aged 40-49 years) with moderate/high of risk of developing breast cancer attending annual mammography screening were recruited after giving written informed consent. All participants underwent a two-view 2D mammography of both breasts and two-view DBT imaging. Image-processing software generated a synthetic 2D mammogram from the DBT data sets. In an independent blinded retrospective study, readers reviewed (1) 2D or (2) 2D + DBT or (3) synthetic 2D + DBT images for each case without access to original screening mammograms or prior examinations. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each reading arm and by subgroup analyses. Data were available for 7060 subjects comprising 6020 (1158 cancers) assessment cases and 1040 (two cancers) family history screening cases. Overall sensitivity was 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) 85% to 89%] for 2D only, 89% (95% CI 87% to 91%) for 2D + DBT and 88% (95% CI 86% to 90%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. The difference in sensitivity between 2D and 2D + DBT was of borderline significance (p = 0.07) and for synthetic 2D + DBT there was no significant difference (p = 0.6). Specificity was 58% (95% CI 56% to 60%) for 2D, 69% (95% CI 67% to 71%) for 2D + DBT and 71% (95% CI 69% to 73%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. Specificity was significantly higher in both DBT reading arms for all subgroups of age, density and dominant radiological

  13. [Follow-up of surgical biopsies in microcalcifications of the breast. Comparative analysis of patients submitted to mammography and digitalization of mammographic images].

    PubMed

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Vento, A R; Naninato, P; Zanetti, A; Carli, L

    1997-01-01

    Improvements in the techniques of preoperative needle localization of nonpalpable breast lesions that have been detected at mammography, coupled with surgical biopsy of smaller volumes of breast tissue and the use of local anesthesia have produced a more aggressive attitude toward early biopsy of lesions that are suspected of malignancy. The authors report the follow-up in 92 cases, who underwent breast biopsy for microcalcifications with no palpable lesions. In 46 women the presence of microcalcifications was evaluated through a computerized instrument which allows digitalization of the image.

  14. Radiologist agreement for mammographic recall by case difficulty and finding type.

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Smith, Megan; Miglioretti, Diana L; Carney, Patricia A; Geller, Berta A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Buist, Diana S M; Rosenberg, Robert D; Smith, Robert A; Sickles, Edward A; Haneuse, Sebastien; Anderson, Melissa L; Yankaskas, Bonnie

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess agreement of mammographic interpretations by community radiologists with consensus interpretations of an expert radiology panel to inform approaches that improve mammographic performance. From 6 mammographic registries, 119 community-based radiologists were recruited to assess 1 of 4 randomly assigned test sets of 109 screening mammograms with comparison studies for no recall or recall, giving the most significant finding type (mass, calcifications, asymmetric density, or architectural distortion) and location. The mean proportion of agreement with an expert radiology panel was calculated by cancer status, finding type, and difficulty level of identifying the finding at the patient, breast, and lesion level. Concordance in finding type between study radiologists and the expert panel was also examined. For each finding type, the proportion of unnecessary recalls, defined as study radiologist recalls that were not expert panel recalls, was determined. Recall agreement was 100% for masses and for examinations with obvious findings in both cancer and noncancer cases. Among cancer cases, recall agreement was lower for lesions that were subtle (50%) or asymmetric (60%). Subtle noncancer findings and benign calcifications showed 33% agreement for recall. Agreement for finding responsible for recall was low, especially for architectural distortions (43%) and asymmetric densities (40%). Most unnecessary recalls (51%) were asymmetric densities. Agreement in mammographic interpretation was low for asymmetric densities and architectural distortions. Training focused on these interpretations could improve the accuracy of mammography and reduce unnecessary recalls. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitamin D and Mammographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, J.; Straub, L.; Wissing, J.; Artmann, A.; Schmidmayr, M.; Kiechle, M.; Seifert-Klauss, V. R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleiotropic immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative effects of vitamin D and hopes to stop cancerogenesis have led to an increased interest in possible reduction of breast cancer with higher vitamin D levels. Mammographic density is an established risk factor for breast cancer risk, and its association with serum vitamin D is complex, as recent studies have shown. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1103 participants were recruited in the breast diagnostic unit of the Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU Munich. A standardised questionnaire and blood samples for 25-OH-vitamin D were taken on the day of mammography. Histologic results of biopsies in suspicious mammographies were documented. Results: In the 1090 data-sets analysed, vitamin D-deficiency was common among women under 40. Highest vitamin D values were observed in participants aged 60–69 years, but average values for all age cohorts were below 20 ng/ml of vitamin D. 15.6 % of all participants had very low vitamin D values (< 10 ng/ml), 51.3 % were vitamin D-deficient (10–19 ng/ml) and only 5.7 % were above 30 ng/ml, i.e. showed sufficient vitamin D. Patients with malignant results had vitamin D < 10 ng/ml more often (16.9 %; p = 0.61), and only 3.4 % in this group had sufficient vitamin D supply (> 30 ng/ml). There were no significant differences in vitamin D-levels between density groups according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Conclusion: Vitamin D values were lower than in comparable US women. Up to now, there is no direct clinical evidence for a relationship between the risk for breast cancer and a specific vitamin D value. PMID:27239067

  16. Multi-modality image registration for effective thermographic fever screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwith, C. Y. N.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Pfefer, Joshua; Casamento, Jon; Wang, Quanzeng

    2017-02-01

    Fever screening based on infrared thermographs (IRTs) is a viable mass screening approach during infectious disease pandemics, such as Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), for temperature monitoring in public places like hospitals and airports. IRTs have been found to be powerful, quick and non-invasive methods for detecting elevated temperatures. Moreover, regions medially adjacent to the inner canthi (called the canthi regions in this paper) are preferred sites for fever screening. Accurate localization of the canthi regions can be achieved through multi-modality registration of infrared (IR) and white-light images. Here we propose a registration method through a coarse-fine registration strategy using different registration models based on landmarks and edge detection on eye contours. We have evaluated the registration accuracy to be within +/- 2.7 mm, which enables accurate localization of the canthi regions.

  17. Body Image Screening for Cancer Patients Undergoing Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Nipomnick, Summer; Guindani, Michele; Baumann, Donald; Hanasono, Matthew; Crosby, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Body image is a critical issue for cancer patients undergoing reconstructive surgery, as they can experience disfigurement and functional impairment. Distress related to appearance changes can lead to various psychosocial difficulties, and patients are often reluctant to discuss these issues with their healthcare team. Our goals were to design and evaluate a screening tool to aid providers in identifying patients who may benefit from referral for specialized psychosocial care to treat body image concerns. Methods We designed a brief 4-item instrument and administered it at a single time point to cancer patients who were undergoing reconstructive treatment. We used simple and multinomial regression models to evaluate whether survey responses, demographic, or clinical variables predicted interest and enrollment in counseling. Results Over 95% of the sample (n = 248) endorsed some concerns, preoccupation, or avoidance due to appearance changes. Approximately one-third of patients were interested in obtaining counseling or additional information to assist with body image distress. Each survey item significantly predicted interest and enrollment in counseling. Concern about future appearance changes was the single best predictor of counseling enrollment. Sex, age, and cancer type were not predictive of counseling interest or enrollment. Conclusions We present initial data supporting use of the Body Image Screener for Cancer Reconstruction. Our findings suggest benefits of administering this tool to patients presenting for reconstructive surgery. It is argued that screening and treatment for body image distress should be provided to this patient population at the earliest possible time point. PMID:25066586

  18. Circularly Polarized Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Personnel Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-08-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  19. Consequences of false-positive screening mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, Anna N A; Fryback, Dennis G; Hammond, Cristina S; Hanna, Lucy G; Grove, Margaret R; Brown, Mary; Wang, Qianfei; Lindfors, Karen; Pisano, Etta D

    2014-06-01

    False-positive mammograms, a common occurrence in breast cancer screening programs, represent a potential screening harm that is currently being evaluated by the US Preventive Services Task Force. To measure the effect of false-positive mammograms on quality of life by measuring personal anxiety, health utility, and attitudes toward future screening. The Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) quality-of-life substudy telephone survey was performed shortly after screening and 1 year later at 22 DMIST sites and included randomly selected DMIST participants with positive and negative mammograms. Mammogram requiring follow-up testing or referral without a cancer diagnosis. The 6-question short form of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory state scale (STAI-6) and the EuroQol EQ-5D instrument with US scoring. Attitudes toward future screening as measured by women's self-report of future intention to undergo mammographic screening and willingness to travel and stay overnight to undergo a hypothetical new type of mammography that would identify as many cancers with half the false-positive results. Among 1450 eligible women invited to participate, 1226 (84.6%) were enrolled, with follow-up interviews obtained in 1028 (83.8%). Anxiety was significantly higher for women with false-positive mammograms (STAI-6, 35.2 vs 32.7), but health utility scores did not differ and there were no significant differences between groups at 1 year. Future screening intentions differed by group (25.7% vs 14.2% more likely in false-positive vs negative groups); willingness to travel and stay overnight did not (9.9% vs 10.5% in false-positive vs negative groups). Future screening intention was significantly increased among women with false-positive mammograms (odds ratio, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.54-2.93), younger age (2.78; 1.5-5.0), and poorer health (1.63; 1.09-2.43). Women's anticipated high-level anxiety regarding future false-positive mammograms was associated with willingness

  20. Development of a sampling strategy and sample size calculation to estimate the distribution of mammographic breast density in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Kwan; Kim, Mi Jin; Choi, Kui Son; Suh, Mina; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2012-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is a known risk factor for breast cancer. To conduct a survey to estimate the distribution of mammographic breast density in Korean women, appropriate sampling strategies for representative and efficient sampling design were evaluated through simulation. Using the target population from the National Cancer Screening Programme (NCSP) for breast cancer in 2009, we verified the distribution estimate by repeating the simulation 1,000 times using stratified random sampling to investigate the distribution of breast density of 1,340,362 women. According to the simulation results, using a sampling design stratifying the nation into three groups (metropolitan, urban, and rural), with a total sample size of 4,000, we estimated the distribution of breast density in Korean women at a level of 0.01% tolerance. Based on the results of our study, a nationwide survey for estimating the distribution of mammographic breast density among Korean women can be conducted efficiently.

  1. An investigation of mammographic density and gene variants in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Lurie, Galina; Williams, Andrew E; Le Marchand, Loic

    2004-11-20

    This cross-sectional study examined if polymorphisms in genes that code for enzymes involved in the production and metabolism of estrogens are associated with mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. The study included 328 healthy women of different ethnicities who underwent mammographic screening and donated a blood or mouthwash sample for DNA analysis. After digitizing cranio-caudal views of the mammograms, we performed computer-assisted mammographic density assessment. Following DNA extraction, samples were analyzed for polymorphisms in the COMT (Val158Met), CYP1A1 (Ile462Val), CYP1B1 (Val432Leu), CYP1A2 (*1F) and CYP17 (T27C) genes using PCR-RFLP. Breast density was lower in Caucasians than in Asians. Caucasian women were less likely to carry the CYP1A1 variant allele and more likely to carry the variant alleles for CYP1B1 and COMT than women with Asian or Hawaiian ancestry. The low-activity COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles were weakly related to lower percent mammographic density after adjustment for age, ethnicity, body mass index and reproductive variables (p for gene-dosage =0.08 and 0.05, respectively). These relations were observed in premenopausal women only and were similar in direction and magnitude after stratification by ethnicity. We found no significant associations between breast density and the variant alleles for CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP17. Our data suggest lower mammographic density for women carrying the COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles than for women carrying the common alleles, though this is the opposite of what is commonly hypothesized from the enzyme function.

  2. An Investigation into the Consistency in Mammographic Density Identification by Radiologists: Effect of Radiologist Expertise and Mammographic Appearance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W; Ryan, Elaine A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate how radiologist expertise and image appearance may have an impact on inter-reader variability of mammographic density (MD) identification. Seventeen radiologists, divided into three expertise groups, were asked to manually segment the areas they consider to be MD in 40 clinical images. The variation in identification of MD for each image was quantified by finding the range of segmentation areas. The impact of radiologist expertise and image appearance on this variation was explored. The range of areas chosen by participating radiologists varied from 7 to 73% across the 40 images, with a mean range of 35 ± 13%. Participants with high expertise were more likely to choose similar areas to one another, compared to participants with medium and low expertise levels (mean range were 19 ± 10%, 29 ± 13% and 25 ± 14 %, respectively, p < 0.0001). There was a significantly higher average grey level for the area segmented by all radiologists as MD compared to the area of variation, with mean grey level value for 8-bit images being 146 ± 19 vs. 99 ± 14, respectively. MD segmentation borders were consistent in areas where there was a sharp intensity change within a short distance. In conclusion, radiologists with high expertise tend to have a higher agreement when identifying MD. Tissues which have a lower contrast and a less visually sharp gradient change at the interface between high density tissue and adipose background lead to inter-reader variation in choosing mammographic density.

  3. Retinal SD-OCT image-based pituitary tumor screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-03-01

    In most cases, the pituitary tumor compresses optic chiasma and causes optic nerves atrophy, which will reflect in retina. In this paper, an Adaboost classification based method is first proposed to screen pituitary tumor from retinal spectral- domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image. The method includes four parts: pre-processing, feature extraction and selection, training and testing. First, in the pre-processing step, the retinal OCT image is segmented into 10 layers and the first 5 layers are extracted as our volume of interest (VOI). Second, 19 textural and spatial features are extracted from the VOI. Principal component analysis (PCA) is utilized to select the primary features. Third, in the training step, an Adaboost based classifier is trained using the above features. Finally, in the testing phase, the trained model is utilized to screen pituitary tumor. The proposed method was evaluated on 40 retinal OCT images from 30 patients and 30 OCT images from 15 normal subjects. The accuracy rate for the diseased retina was (85.00+/-16.58)% and the rate for normal retina was (76.68+/-21.34)%. Totally average accuracy of the Adaboost classifier was (81.43+/- 9.15)%. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method.

  4. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  5. Breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kopans, D.B.; Meyer, J.E.; Sadowsky, N.

    1984-04-12

    The majority of information available today indiates that the most efficient and accurate method of screening women to detect early-stage breast cancer is an aggressive program of patient self-examination, physical examination by well-trained, motivated personnel, and high-quality x-ray mammography. There are two important factors in the implementation of mammographic screening. The first is the availability of facilities to perform high-quality, low-dose mammography, which is directly related to the second factor: the expense to society for support of this large-scale effort. Cost-benefit analysis is beyond the scope of this review. In 1979 Moskowitz and Fox attempted to address this issue, using data from the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project in Cincinnati, but additional analysis is required. The cost for each ''curable'' cancer that is detected must be compared with the psychological, social, and personal losses that accrue, as well as the numerous medical expenses incurred, in a frequently protracted death from breast cancer. All other imaging techniques that have been reviewed should be regarded as adjuncts to rather than replacements for mammographic screening. Ultrasound and computerized tomography are helpful when the physical examination and mammogram are equivocal. Other techniques, such as transillumination, thermography, and magnetic-resonance imaging, should be considered experimental. In patients with clinically evident lesions, x-ray mammography is helpful to evaluate the suspicious area, as well as to ''screen'' the remaining tissue in both breasts and to search for multicentric or bilateral lesions. Mammography is the only imaging technique that has been proved effective for screening.

  6. Reconfigurable metasurface aperture for security screening and microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Boyarsky, Michael; Pulido-Mancera, Laura; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Microwave imaging systems have seen growing interest in recent decades for applications ranging from security screening to space/earth observation. However, hardware architectures commonly used for this purpose have not seen drastic changes. With the advent of metamaterials a wealth of opportunities have emerged for honing metasurface apertures for microwave imaging systems. Recent thrusts have introduced dynamic reconfigurability directly into the aperture layer, providing powerful capabilities from a physical layer with considerable simplicity. The waveforms generated from such dynamic metasurfaces make them suitable for application in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and, more generally, computational imaging. In this paper, we investigate a dynamic metasurface aperture capable of performing microwave imaging in the K-band (17.5-26.5 GHz). The proposed aperture is planar and promises an inexpensive fabrication process via printed circuit board techniques. These traits are further augmented by the tunability of dynamic metasurfaces, which provides the dexterity necessary to generate field patterns ranging from a sequence of steered beams to a series of uncorrelated radiation patterns. Imaging is experimentally demonstrated with a voltage-tunable metasurface aperture. We also demonstrate the aperture's utility in real-time measurements and perform volumetric SAR imaging. The capabilities of a prototype are detailed and the future prospects of general dynamic metasurface apertures are discussed.

  7. The imaging performance of compact Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens: Monte Carlo simulation for applications in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Liaparinos, P. F.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2009-06-15

    In medical mammographic imaging systems, one type of detector configuration, often referred to as indirect detectors, is based on a scintillator layer (phosphor screen) that converts the x-ray radiation into optical signal. The indirect detector performance may be optimized either by improving the structural parameters of the screen or by employing new phosphor materials with improved physical characteristics (e.g., x-ray absorption efficiency, intrinsic conversion efficiency, emitted light spectrum). Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu is a relatively new phosphor material that exhibits improved scintillating properties indicating a promising material for mammographic applications. In this article, a custom validated Monte Carlo program was used in order to examine the performance of compact Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens under diagnostic mammography conditions (x-ray spectra: 28 kV Mo, 0.030 mm Mo and 32 kV W, 0.050 mm Rh). Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu screens of coating weight in the range between 20 and 40 mg/cm{sup 2} were examined. The Monte Carlo code was based on a model using Mie-scattering theory for the description of light propagation within the phosphor. The overall performance of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu powdered phosphor screens was investigated in terms of the (i) quantum detection efficiency, (ii) luminescence efficiency, (iii) compatibility with optical sensors, (iv) modulation transfer function, (v) the Swank factor, and (vi) zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency. Results were compared to the traditional rare-earth Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb phosphor material. The increased packing density and therefore the light extinction properties of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu phosphor were found to improve the x-ray absorption (approximately up to 21% and 16% at 40 mg/cm{sup 2} for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), the spatial resolution (approximately 2.6 and 2.4 cycles/mm at 40 mg/cm{sup 2} for Mo and W x-ray spectra, respectively), as well as the zero

  8. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  9. Robust estimation of mammographic breast density: a patient-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, Harald S.; Erhard, Klaus; Gooßen, Andre; Bulow, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Breast density has become an established risk indicator for developing breast cancer. Current clinical practice reflects this by grading mammograms patient-wise as entirely fat, scattered fibroglandular, heterogeneously dense, or extremely dense based on visual perception. Existing (semi-) automated methods work on a per-image basis and mimic clinical practice by calculating an area fraction of fibroglandular tissue (mammographic percent density). We suggest a method that follows clinical practice more strictly by segmenting the fibroglandular tissue portion directly from the joint data of all four available mammographic views (cranio-caudal and medio-lateral oblique, left and right), and by subsequently calculating a consistently patient-based mammographic percent density estimate. In particular, each mammographic view is first processed separately to determine a region of interest (ROI) for segmentation into fibroglandular and adipose tissue. ROI determination includes breast outline detection via edge-based methods, peripheral tissue suppression via geometric breast height modeling, and - for medio-lateral oblique views only - pectoral muscle outline detection based on optimizing a three-parameter analytic curve with respect to local appearance. Intensity harmonization based on separately acquired calibration data is performed with respect to compression height and tube voltage to facilitate joint segmentation of available mammographic views. A Gaussian mixture model (GMM) on the joint histogram data with a posteriori calibration guided plausibility correction is finally employed for tissue separation. The proposed method was tested on patient data from 82 subjects. Results show excellent correlation (r = 0.86) to radiologist's grading with deviations ranging between -28%, (q = 0.025) and +16%, (q = 0.975).

  10. Evaluation of mammographic density patterns: reproducibility and concordance among scales.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Estepa, Macarena; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco; Miranda, Josefa; Ascunce, Nieves; González-Román, Isabel; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Peris, Mercé; Moreno, María P; Váquez-Carrete, Jose A; Collado-García, Francisca; Casanova, Francisco; Ederra, María; Salas, Dolores; Pollán, Marina

    2010-09-13

    the quantitative scales (21.89% for BI-RADS and 21.86% for Boyd). Visual scales of mammographic density show a high reproducibility when appropriate training is provided. Their ability to distinguish between high and low risk render them useful for routine use by breast cancer screening programs. Quantitative-based scales are more specific than pattern-based scales in classifying populations in the high-risk group.

  11. Evaluation of mammographic density patterns: reproducibility and concordance among scales

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    this percentage was lower for the quantitative scales (21.89% for BI-RADS and 21.86% for Boyd). Conclusions Visual scales of mammographic density show a high reproducibility when appropriate training is provided. Their ability to distinguish between high and low risk render them useful for routine use by breast cancer screening programs. Quantitative-based scales are more specific than pattern-based scales in classifying populations in the high-risk group. PMID:20836850

  12. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk: current understanding and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Variations in percent mammographic density (PMD) reflect variations in the amounts of collagen and number of epithelial and non-epithelial cells in the breast. Extensive PMD is associated with a markedly increased risk of invasive breast cancer. The PMD phenotype is important in the context of breast cancer prevention because extensive PMD is common in the population, is strongly associated with risk of the disease, and, unlike most breast cancer risk factors, can be changed. Work now in progress makes it likely that measurement of PMD will be improved in the near future and that understanding of the genetics and biological basis of the association of PMD with breast cancer risk will also improve. Future prospects for the application of PMD include mammographic screening, risk prediction in individuals, breast cancer prevention research, and clinical decision making. PMID:22114898

  13. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  14. High Fidelity Electronic Display of Digital Mammographs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    quality of scattering processes are modeled with the Monte Carlo CRT devices has not been adequate for displaying digital method by randomly sampling the...Electronic Display of Digital Mammographs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael J. Flynn, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Henry Ford Health Systems Detroit...TYPE AND DATES COVERED October 1997 Annual (3 Sep 96 - 2 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS High Fidelity Electronic Display of Digital

  15. Individualized grid-enabled mammographic training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2009-02-01

    The PERFORMS self-assessment scheme measures individuals skills in identifying key mammographic features on sets of known cases. One aspect of this is that it allows radiologists' skills to be trained, based on their data from this scheme. Consequently, a new strategy is introduced to provide revision training based on mammographic features that the radiologist has had difficulty with in these sets. To do this requires a lot of random cases to provide dynamic, unique, and up-to-date training modules for each individual. We propose GIMI (Generic Infrastructure in Medical Informatics) middleware as the solution to harvest cases from distributed grid servers. The GIMI middleware enables existing and legacy data to support healthcare delivery, research, and training. It is technology-agnostic, data-agnostic, and has a security policy. The trainee examines each case, indicating the location of regions of interest, and completes an evaluation form, to determine mammographic feature labelling, diagnosis, and decisions. For feedback, the trainee can choose to have immediate feedback after examining each case or batch feedback after examining a number of cases. All the trainees' result are recorded in a database which also contains their trainee profile. A full report can be prepared for the trainee after they have completed their training. This project demonstrates the practicality of a grid-based individualised training strategy and the efficacy in generating dynamic training modules within the coverage/outreach of the GIMI middleware. The advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed together with future plans.

  16. Objective Quality Assessment and Perceptual Compression of Screen Content Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiqi; Gu, Ke; Zeng, Kai; Wang, Zhou; Lin, Weisi

    2016-05-25

    Screen content image (SCI) has recently emerged as an active topic due to the rapidly increasing demand in many graphically rich services such as wireless displays and virtual desktops. Image quality models play an important role in measuring and optimizing user experience of SCI compression and transmission systems, but are currently lacking. SCIs are often composed of pictorial regions and computer generated textual/graphical content, which exhibit different statistical properties that often lead to different viewer behaviors. Inspired by this, we propose an objective quality assessment approach for SCIs that incorporates both visual field adaptation and information content weighting into structural similarity based local quality assessment. Furthermore, we develop a perceptual screen content coding scheme based on the newly proposed quality assessment measure, targeting at further improving the SCI compression performance. Experimental results show that the proposed quality assessment method not only better predicts the perceptual quality of SCIs, but also demonstrates great potentials in the design of perceptually optimal SCI compression schemes.

  17. [Reliability of retinal imaging screening in retinopathy of prematurity].

    PubMed

    Navarro-Blanco, C; Peralta-Calvo, J; Pastora-Salvador, N; Alvarez-Rementería, L; Chamorro, E; Sánchez-Ramos, C

    2014-09-01

    The retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially avoidable cause of blindness in children. The advances in neonatal care make the survival of extremely premature infants, who show a greater incidence of the disease, possible. The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of ROP screening using retinography imaging with the RetCam 3 wide-angle camera and also study the variability of ROP diagnosis depending on the evaluator. The indirect ophthalmoscopy exam was performed by a Pediatric ROP-Expert Ophthalmologist. The same ophthalmologist and a technician specialized in digital image capture took retinal images using the RetCam 3 wide-angle camera. A total of 30 image sets were analyzed by 3 masked groups: group A (8 ophthalmologists), group B (5 experts in vision), and group C (2 ROP-expert ophthalmologists). According to the diagnosis using indirect ophthalmoscopy, the sensitivity (26-93), Kappa (0.24-0.80), and the percent agreement were statistically significant in group C for the diagnosis of ROP Type 1. In the diagnosis of ROP Type 1+Type 2, Kappa (0.17-0.33) and the percent agreement (58-90) were statistically significant, with higher values in group C. The diagnosis, carried out by ROP-expert ophthalmologists, using the wide-angle camera RetCam 3 has proved to be a reliable method. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Videotaped helical CT images for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Iwano, S; Makino, N; Ikeda, M; Itoh, S; Ishihara, S; Tadokoro, M; Ishigaki, T

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this work was to determine a radiologist's ability to detect solitary pulmonary nodules on helical CT using both video (cine) viewing and film-based viewing. Sixty-five chest helical CT studies were reviewed. Six radiologists searched for 40 lung nodules on CT images presented in three formats. Film-based viewing of images at 10 and 5 mm increments was performed with a light box. Video viewing of the same examinations was performed in 5 mm increments at 2 frames/s. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) measured the observer's ability to detect nodules. The Az was 0.948 for the video viewing, 0.844 for 5 mm increment film-based viewing, and 0.879 for 10 mm increment film-based viewing. There were no statistically significant differences. Lung nodules can be detected with similar detection rates when viewing conventional film or videotaped helical CT images. Videotaped images incur a lower cost, an important consideration in mass screening for lung cancer.

  19. Rapid combinatorial screening by synchrotron X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eba, Hiromi; Sakurai, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    An X-ray imaging system, which does not require any scans of the sample or an X-ray beam and which, therefore, dramatically reduces the amount of time required, was employed to evaluate combinatorial libraries efficiently. Two-dimensional X-ray fluorescence (XRF) images of an 8 mm × 8 mm area were observed for combinatorial substrates of manganese-cobalt spinel MnCo 2O 4 and lithium ferrite LiFeO 2 via an exposure time of 1-3 s using synchrotron X-rays. Thus, XRF signals from a whole substrate could be observed at once in a short space of time. In order to observe the chemical environment simultaneously for all materials arranged on the substrate, the fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) was measured by repeating the imaging during the monochromator scans across the absorption edge for metals. This is extremely efficient because XAFS spectra for all materials placed on the common substrate are obtained from only a single energy scan. One can determine the valence numbers, as well as other aspects of the chemical environment of the metal included in each material, from the differences in spectral features and the energy shifts. Hence, combinatorial libraries can be screened very rapidly, and therefore efficiently, using the X-ray imaging system.

  20. Computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using the deep learning technology: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although mammography is the only clinically acceptable imaging modality used in the population-based breast cancer screening, its efficacy is quite controversy. One of the major challenges is how to help radiologists more accurately classify between benign and malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to investigate a new mammographic mass classification scheme based on a deep learning method. In this study, we used an image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms, which includes 280 malignant and 280 benign mass ROIs, respectively. An eight layer deep learning network was applied, which employs three pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perception (MLP) classifier for feature categorization. In order to improve robustness of selected features, each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer. A number of 20, 10, and 5 feature maps were utilized for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd convolution layer, respectively. The convolution networks are followed by a MLP classifier, which generates a classification score to predict likelihood of a ROI depicting a malignant mass. Among 560 ROIs, 420 ROIs were used as a training dataset and the remaining 140 ROIs were used as a validation dataset. The result shows that the new deep learning based classifier yielded an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.810+/-0.036. This study demonstrated the potential superiority of using a deep learning based classifier to distinguish malignant and benign breast masses without segmenting the lesions and extracting the pre-defined image features.

  1. A mammographic mass CAD system incorporating features from shape, fractal, and channelized Hotelling observer measurements: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarious, David M., Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Abbey, Craig K.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary results from a highly sensitive and specific CAD system for mammographic masses. For false positive reduction, the system incorporated features derived from shape, fractal, and channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) measurements. The database for this study consisted of 80 craniocaudal mammograms randomly extracted from USF's digital database for screening mammography. The database contained 49 mass findings (24 malignant, 25 benign). To detect initial mass candidates, a difference of Gaussians (DOG) filter was applied through normalized cross correlation. Suspicious regions were localized in the filtered images via multi-level thresholding. Features extracted from the regions included shape, fractal dimension, and the output from a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) CHO. Influential features were identified via feature selection techniques. The regions were classified with a linear classifier using leave-one-out training/testing. The DOG filter achieved a sensitivity of 88% (23/24 malignant, 20/25 benign). Using the selected features, the false positives per image dropped from ~20 to ~5 with no loss in sensitivity. This preliminary investigation of combining multi-level thresholded DOG-filtered images with shape, fractal, and LG-CHO features shows great promise as a mass detector. Future work will include the addition of more texture and mass-boundary descriptive features as well as further exploration of the LG-CHO.

  2. Mammographic features in infertile women as a potential risk for breast cancer: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meggiorini, M L; Cipolla, V; Rech, F; Labi, L; Vestri, A; de Felice, C

    2012-01-01

    mammography, age at menarche, BMI and family history for breast cancer, while ovulatory etiology of infertility was found to be associated with high mammographic density (p < 0.05). In conclusion, bearing in mind that 68% of our study sample had high breast density, we can assume that patients with primary infertility might represent a group at high risk for breast cancer, particularly if infertility is due to an ovulatory factor. We suggest breast screening from the age of 35 in infertile patients who undergo treatment with fertility drugs in accordance with FONCAM recommendations. This might allow the identification of higher risk patients who need more closely monitored breast examinations.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  4. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  5. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  6. 21 CFR 892.1710 - Mammographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mammographic x-ray system. 892.1710 Section 892.1710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1710 Mammographic x-ray system....

  7. Mammographic density, blood telomere length and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Natalie J; Harrington, Lea A; Martin, Lisa J

    2017-07-19

    Extensive mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but may also be an indicator of biological age. In this study we examined whether mammographic density is related to blood telomere length, a potential marker of susceptibility to age-related disease. We measured mammographic density by a computer assisted method and blood telomere length using a validated PCR method. Urinary malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation, was measured in 24 hour urine collections. In the 342 women examined telomere length was negatively correlated with age, was lower in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women and in smokers compared to non-smokers, and was positively correlated with urinary MDA. Telomere length was not associated with percent mammographic density or dense area, before or after adjustment for risk factors and MDA. However, there was a significant interaction between telomere length and MDA in their association with mammographic density. At lower levels of MDA, mammographic density and telomere length were inversely associated; while at high levels of MDA, there was evidence of a J-shaped association between mammographic density and telomere length. Further work is need to replicate these results and to examine the association of mammographic density with age-related chronic disease and mortality.

  8. Imaging tilted transversely isotropic media with a generalised screen propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Il; Byun, Joongmoo; Seol, Soon Jee

    2015-01-01

    One-way wave equation migration is computationally efficient compared with reverse time migration, and it provides a better subsurface image than ray-based migration algorithms when imaging complex structures. Among many one-way wave-based migration algorithms, we adopted the generalised screen propagator (GSP) to build the migration algorithm. When the wavefield propagates through the large velocity variation in lateral or steeply dipping structures, GSP increases the accuracy of the wavefield in wide angle by adopting higher-order terms induced from expansion of the vertical slowness in Taylor series with each perturbation term. To apply the migration algorithm to a more realistic geological structure, we considered tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. The new GSP, which contains the tilting angle as a symmetric axis of the anisotropic media, was derived by modifying the GSP designed for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. To verify the developed TTI-GSP, we analysed the accuracy of wave propagation, especially for the new perturbation parameters and the tilting angle; the results clearly showed that the perturbation term of the tilting angle in TTI media has considerable effects on proper propagation. In addition, through numerical tests, we demonstrated that the developed TTI-GS migration algorithm could successfully image a steeply dipping salt flank with high velocity variation around anisotropic layers.

  9. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  10. Evaluating Thin Compression Paddles for Mammographically Compatible Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Booi, Rebecca C.; Krücker, Jochen F.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Kapur, Ajay; LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a combined digital mammography/3D ultrasound system to improve detection and/or characterization of breast lesions. Ultrasound scanning through a mammographic paddle could significantly reduce signal level, degrade beam focusing, and create reverberations. Thus, appropriate paddle choice is essential for accurate sonographic lesion detection and assessment with this system. In this study, we characterized ultrasound image quality through paddles of varying materials (lexan, polyurethane, TPX, mylar) and thicknesses (0.25–2.5 mm). Analytical experiments focused on lexan and TPX, which preliminary results demonstrated were most competitive. Spatial and contrast resolution, sidelobe and range lobe levels, contrast and signal strength were compared with no-paddle images. When the beamforming of the system was corrected to account for imaging through the paddle, the TPX 2.5 mm paddle performed the best. Test objects imaged through this paddle demonstrated ≤ 15% reduction in spatial resolution, ≤ 7.5 dB signal loss, ≤ 3 dB contrast loss, and range lobe levels ≥ 35 dB below signal maximum over 4 cm. TPX paddles < 2.5 mm could also be used with this system, depending on imaging goals. In 10 human subjects with cysts, small CNR losses were observed but were determined to be statistically insignificant. Radiologists concluded that 75% of cysts in through-paddle scans were at least as detectable as in their corresponding direct-contact scans. (Email: rbooi@umich.edu) PMID:17280765

  11. No ‘cure’ within 12 years of diagnosis among breast cancer patients who are diagnosed via mammographic screening: women diagnosed in the West Midlands region of England 1989–2011

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L. M.; Morris, M.; Rachet, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that there is little evidence of population ‘cure’ among two populations of women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. ‘Cure’ has not yet been examined in the context of screen-detection. Patients and methods We examined cancer registry data on 19 800 women aged 50–70, diagnosed with a primary, invasive, non-metastatic breast cancer between 1 April 1989 and 31 March 2011 in the West Midlands region of England, linked to Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and the National Breast Screening Service (NBSS). Follow-up was complete on all women up to 31 July 2012. Analyses were stratified by screening status, age, tumour stage, deprivation and ethnicity. We estimated net survival for the whole cohort and each subgroup. Population ‘cure’ was evaluated by fitting flexible parametric log-cumulative excess hazard regression models in which the excess hazard of breast cancer death was assumed to be equal to zero after a given follow-up time. Results There was an overall lack of evidence for ‘cure’. Across all subgroups examined, the general pattern was that of a continuous decrease in net survival over time, with no obvious asymptotic tendency within 12 years of follow-up. Model-based analyses confirmed this observation. Conclusions Despite dramatic improvements in survival over past decades, diagnosis with breast cancer remains associated with a small but persistent increased risk of death for all groups of women, including those whose cancer is detected asymptomatically. These findings are unlikely to be due to methodological inadequacies. Communication of these long-term consequences of breast cancer among women recently diagnosed and to those considering undergoing screening should take due consideration of these patterns. PMID:27573567

  12. Risk of Breast Cancer in Women with False-Positive Results according to Mammographic Features.

    PubMed

    Castells, Xavier; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Posso, Margarita; Román, Marta; Vernet-Tomas, Maria; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Domingo, Laia; Vidal, Carmen; Baré, Marisa; Ferrer, Joana; Quintana, María Jesús; Sánchez, Mar; Natal, Carmen; Espinàs, Josep A; Saladié, Francina; Sala, María

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess the risk of breast cancer in women with false-positive screening results according to radiologic classification of mammographic features. Materials and Methods Review board approval was obtained, with waiver of informed consent. This retrospective cohort study included 521 200 women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening as part of the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program between 1994 and 2010 and who were observed until December 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer and the 95% confidence interval (CI) in women with false-positive mammograms as compared with women with negative mammograms. Separate models were adjusted for screen-detected and interval cancers and for screen-film and digital mammography. Time without a breast cancer diagnosis was plotted by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results When compared with women with negative mammograms, the age-adjusted HR of cancer in women with false-positive results was 1.84 (95% CI: 1.73, 1.95; P < .001). The risk was higher in women who had calcifications, whether they were (HR, 2.73; 95% CI: 2.28, 3.28; P < .001) or were not (HR, 2.24; 95% CI: 2.02, 2.48; P < .001) associated with masses. Women in whom mammographic features showed changes in subsequent false-positive results were those who had the highest risk (HR, 9.13; 95% CI: 8.28, 10.07; P < .001). Conclusion Women with false-positive results had an increased risk of breast cancer, particularly women who had calcifications at mammography. Women who had more than one examination with false-positive findings and in whom the mammographic features changed over time had a highly increased risk of breast cancer. Previous mammographic features might yield useful information for further risk-prediction models and personalized follow-up screening protocols. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. The Problem of Mammographic Breast Density - The Position of the DEGUM Working Group on Breast Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Schimpfle, M P; Brandenbusch, V C; Degenhardt, F; Duda, V; Madjar, H; Mundinger, A; Rathmann, R; Hahn, M

    2016-04-01

    Mammographic breast density correlates with breast cancer risk and also with the number of false-negative calls. In the USA these facts lead to the "Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act" of 2011. In the case of mammographically dense breasts, the Working Group on Breast Ultrasound in Germany recommends explaining the advantages of adjunct imaging to women, depending on the individual breast cancer risk. Due to the particular structure of German healthcare, quality-assured breast ultrasound would be the first choice. Possible overdiagnosis, costs, potentially increased emotional stress should be addressed. In high familial breast cancer risk, genetic counselling and an intensified early detection program should be performed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Ethnic differences in mammographic densities: an Asian cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mariapun, Shivaani; Li, Jingmei; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer and is highly variable, but, to date, few studies have examined density in Asian women, particularly those in low and middle-income Asian countries where genetic and lifestyle determinants may be significantly different. A total of 1,240 women who attended an opportunistic mammogram screening programme were eligible for analysis. Mammographic density was estimated using a fully-automated thresholding method and differences across ethnic groups were examined using linear regression in 205 randomly selected Chinese women, 138 Malay and 199 Indian women. Percent density was significantly higher in Chinese women (28.5%; 95% CI 27.0%, 30.0%) compared to Malay (24.2%; 95% CI 22.5%, 26.0%) and Indian (24.3%; 95% CI 22.8%, 25.7%) women (p<0.001), after adjustment for age, BMI, menopausal status, parity and age at first full term pregnancy. Correspondingly, adjusted nondense area was significantly lower in Chinese (72.2cm2; 95% CI 67.9cm2, 76.5cm2) women compared to Malay (92.1cm2; 95% CI 86.9cm2, 97.2cm2) and Indian (97.7cm2; 95% CI 93.4cm2, 101.9cm2) women (p<0.001), but dense area did not differ across the three ethnic groups. Our study shows that higher percent density and lower nondense area reflect the higher incidence of breast cancer in Chinese compared to Malay and Indian women in Malaysia. Known lifestyle determinants of mammographic density do not fully account for the ethnic variations observed in mammographic density in this Asian cohort.

  15. Thermal image measurement and analysis under obscured IR smoke screen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zeying; Chen, Zhigang; Chen, Wenjian; Li, Li; You, Mingjun

    1998-08-01

    Under the condition of laying artificial smoke screen, studying transmission property of IR, laser and visible light, especially studying the effect of smoke screen on transmission of thermal image of target is of theoretical and practical significance. The paper is based on a field- testing during which artificial IR smoke screen was produced. In the course of testing, typical motor vehicle in operating condition was chosen as target. By combing the change of typical thermal image which was taken by AGEMA-880 thermovision before and after IR smoke screen producing with a large amount of data concerned, the nature and law are studied and analyzed that different types of IR smoke screen have an effect on thermal image of target and image quality of thermovision. Therefore, we further have put forward that the change of thermal image quality is reflected under the influence of smoke screen by fractal fitting error.

  16. An infrared image based methodology for breast lesions screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, K. C. C.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Reisemberger, G. G.; Freitas, F. N. P.; Oliari, S. H.; Brioschi, M. L.; Louveira, M. H.; Spautz, C.; Dias, F. G.; Gasperin, P.; Budel, V. M.; Cordeiro, R. A. G.; Schittini, A. P. P.; Neto, C. D.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of utilizing a structured methodology for breast lesions screening, based on infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges, and of breast cancer patients, previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. An analysis of the systematic error of the infrared camera skin temperature measurements was conducted in several different regions of the body, by direct comparison to high precision thermistor temperature measurements, showing that infrared camera temperatures are consistently around 2 °C above the thermistor temperatures. Therefore, a method of conjugated gradients is proposed to eliminate the infrared camera direct temperature measurement imprecision, by calculating the temperature difference between two points to cancel out the error. The method takes into account the human body approximate bilateral symmetry, and compares measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ bar) between two symmetric regions of the patient's breast, that takes into account the breast region, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures, and doing so, the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and non subjective. The range of normal whole breast average dimensionless temperature differences for 101 healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the breasts temperatures exhibit a unimodal normal distribution, the healthy normal range for each region was considered to be the dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements, Δ θ bar ‾ + 2σ Δ θ bar ‾ , in order to represent 95% of the population. Forty-seven patients with previously diagnosed breast cancer through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting breast abnormalities in 45 cases (96%). Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective

  17. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns on a large clinical dataset of full-field digital mammograms: robustness study with two high-risk datasets.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L; Lan, Li; Bancroft Brown, Jeremy; MacMahon, Aoife; Mussman, Mary; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Sennett, Charlene

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the robustness of our prior computerized texture analysis method for breast cancer risk assessment, which was developed initially on a limited dataset of screen-film mammograms. This current study investigated the robustness by (1) evaluating on a large clinical dataset, (2) using full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) as opposed to screen-film mammography, and (3) incorporating analyses over two types of high-risk patient sets, as well as patients at low risk for breast cancer. The evaluation included the analyses on the parenchymal patterns of women at high risk of developing of breast cancer, including both BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and unilateral cancer patients, and of women at low risk of developing breast cancer. A total of 456 cases, including 53 women with BRCA1/2 gene mutations, 75 women with unilateral cancer, and 328 low-risk women, were retrospectively collected under an institutional review board approved protocol. Regions-of-interest (ROIs), were manually selected from the central breast region immediately behind the nipple. These ROIs were subsequently used in computerized feature extraction to characterize the mammographic parenchymal patterns in the images. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized texture features in the task of distinguishing between high-risk and low-risk subjects. In a round robin evaluation on the FFDM dataset with Bayesian artificial neural network analysis, AUC values of 0.82 (95% confidence interval [0.75, 0.88]) and 0.73 (95% confidence interval [0.67, 0.78]) were obtained between BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and low-risk women, and between unilateral cancer and low-risk women, respectively. These results from computerized texture analysis on digital mammograms demonstrated that high-risk and low-risk women have different mammographic parenchymal patterns. On this large clinical dataset, we validated our methods for

  18. Change descriptors for determining nodule malignancy in national lung screening trial CT screening images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Benjamin; Hawkins, Samuel; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodules are effectively diagnosed in CT scans, but determining their malignancy has been a challenge. The rate of change of the volume of a pulmonary nodule is known to be a prognostic factor for cancer development. In this study, we propose that other changes in imaging characteristics are similarly informative. We examined the combination of image features across multiple CT scans, taken from the National Lung Screening Trial, with individual scans of the same patient separated by approximately one year. By subtracting the values of existing features in multiple scans for the same patient, we were able to improve the ability of existing classification algorithms to determine whether a nodule will become malignant. We trained each classifier on 83 nodules determined to be malignant by biopsy and 172 nodules determined to be benign by their clinical stability through two years of no change; classifiers were tested on 77 malignant and 144 benign nodules, using a set of features that in a test-retest experiment were shown to be stable. An accuracy of 83.71% and AUC of 0.814 were achieved with the Random Forests classifier on a subset of features determined to be stable via test-retest reproducibility analysis, further reduced with the Correlation-based Feature Selection algorithm.

  19. Mammographic image quality in relation to positioning of the breast: A multicentre international evaluation of the assessment systems currently used, to provide an evidence base for establishing a standardised method of assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; Parashar, D; Bouverat, G; Poulos, A; Gullien, R; Stewart, E; Aarre, R; Crystal, P; Wallis, M

    2017-11-01

    Optimum mammography positioning technique is necessary to maximise cancer detection. Current criteria for mammography appraisal lack reliability and validity with a need to develop a more objective system. We aimed to establish current international practice in assessing image quality (IQ), of screening mammograms then develop and validate a reproducible assessment tool. A questionnaire sent to centres in countries undertaking population screening identified practice, participants for an expert panel (EP) of radiologists/radiographers and a testing panel (TP) of radiographers. The EP developed category criteria and descriptors using a modified Delphi process to agree definitions. The EP scored 12 screening mammograms to test agreement then a main set of 178 cases. Weighted scores were derived for each descriptor enabling calculation of numerical parameters for each new category. The TP then scored the main set. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, t-tests and Kendall's coefficient. 11 centres in 8 countries responded forming an EP of 7 members and TP of 44 members. The EP showed moderate agreement when the scoring the mini test set W = 0.50 p < 0.001 and the main set W = 0.55 p < 0.001, 'posterior nipple line' being the most difficult descriptor. The weighted total scores differentiated the 4 new categories Perfect, Good, Adequate and Inadequate (p < 0.001). We have developed an assessment tool by Delphi consensus and weighted consensus criteria. We have successfully tabulated a range of numerical scores for each new category providing the first validated and reproducible mammography IQ scoring system. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast Cancer Risk and Mammographic Density Assessed with Semiautomated and Fully Automated Methods and BI-RADS.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Abra M; Sieh, Weiva; Lipson, Jafi A; Rothstein, Joseph H; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S; Rubin, Daniel L

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To compare three metrics of breast density on full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) images as predictors of future breast cancer risk. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved study included 125 women with invasive breast cancer and 274 age- and race-matched control subjects who underwent screening FFDM during 2004-2013 and provided informed consent. The percentage of density and dense area were assessed semiautomatically with software (Cumulus 4.0; University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada), and volumetric percentage of density and dense volume were assessed automatically with software (Volpara; Volpara Solutions, Wellington, New Zealand). Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classifications of breast density were extracted from mammography reports. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using conditional logistic regression stratified according to age and race and adjusted for body mass index, parity, and menopausal status, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was computed. Results The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for each standard deviation increment of the percentage of density, dense area, volumetric percentage of density, and dense volume were 1.61 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.19), 1.49 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.92), 1.54 (95% CI: 1.12, 2.10), and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.80), respectively. Odds ratios for women with extremely dense breasts compared with those with scattered areas of fibroglandular density were 2.06 (95% CI: 0.85, 4.97) and 2.05 (95% CI: 0.90, 4.64) for BI-RADS and Volpara density classifications, respectively. Clinical BI-RADS was more accurate (AUC, 0.68; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.74) than Volpara (AUC, 0.64; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.70) and continuous measures of percentage of density (AUC, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.72), dense area (AUC, 0.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.72), volumetric percentage of density (AUC, 0.64; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.70), and density volume (AUC, 0.65; 95% CI: 0.59, 0

  1. Thermal Image Scanning for Influenza Border Screening: Results of an Airport Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Patricia C.; Duncan, Alasdair R.; Jennings, Lance C.; Baker, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Infrared thermal image scanners (ITIS) appear an attractive option for the mass screening of travellers for influenza, but there are no published data on their performance in airports. Methods ITIS was used to measure cutaneous temperature in 1275 airline travellers who had agreed to tympanic temperature measurement and respiratory sampling. The prediction by ITIS of tympanic temperature (37.8°C and 37.5°C) and of influenza infection was assessed using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and estimated sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). Findings Using front of face ITIS for prediction of tympanic temperature ≥37.8°C, the area under the ROC curve was 0.86 (95%CI 0.75–0.97) and setting sensitivity at 86% gave specificity of 71%. The PPV in this population of travellers, of whom 0.5% were febrile using this definition, was 1.5%. We identified influenza virus infection in 30 travellers (3 Type A and 27 Type B). For ITIS prediction of influenza infection the area under the ROC curve was 0.66 (0.56–0.75), a sensitivity of 87% gave specificity of 39%, and PPV of 2.8%. None of the 30 influenza-positive travellers had tympanic temperature ≥37.8°C at screening (95%CI 0% to 12%); three had no influenza symptoms. Conclusion ITIS performed moderately well in detecting fever but in this study, during a seasonal epidemic of predominantly influenza type B, the proportion of influenza-infected travellers who were febrile was low and ITIS were not much better than chance at identifying travellers likely to be influenza-infected. Although febrile illness is more common in influenza A infections than influenza B infections, many influenza A infections are afebrile. Our findings therefore suggest that ITIS is unlikely to be effective for entry screening of travellers to detect influenza infection with the intention of preventing entry of the virus into a country. PMID:21245928

  2. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and Population Diversity captured across 22 Countries

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Valerie A.; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H.; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Ling Lee, Charmaine Pei; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna O.P.; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J.; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD by a core team to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses. PMID:26724463

  3. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and population diversity captured across 22 countries.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Valerie A; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Lee, Charmaine Pei Ling; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H; Wanders, Johanna O P; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Won Lee, Jong; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna M; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F

    2016-02-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  5. ESIM: Edge Similarity for Screen Content Image Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhangkai; Ma, Lin; Zeng, Huanqiang; Chen, Jing; Cai, Canhui; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an accurate full-reference image quality assessment (IQA) model developed for assessing screen content images (SCIs), called the edge similarity (ESIM), is proposed. It is inspired by the fact that the human visual system (HVS) is highly sensitive to edges that are often encountered in SCIs; therefore, essential edge features are extracted and exploited for conducting IQA for the SCIs. The key novelty of the proposed ESIM lies in the extraction and use of three salient edge features-i.e., edge contrast, edge width, and edge direction. The first two attributes are simultaneously generated from the input SCI based on a parametric edge model, while the last one is derived directly from the input SCI. The extraction of these three features will be performed for the reference SCI and the distorted SCI, individually. The degree of similarity measured for each above-mentioned edge attribute is then computed independently, followed by combining them together using our proposed edge-width pooling strategy to generate the final ESIM score. To conduct the performance evaluation of our proposed ESIM model, a new and the largest SCI database (denoted as SCID) is established in our work and made to the public for download. Our database contains 1800 distorted SCIs that are generated from 40 reference SCIs. For each SCI, nine distortion types are investigated, and five degradation levels are produced for each distortion type. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed ESIM model is more consistent with the perception of the HVS on the evaluation of distorted SCIs than the multiple state-of-the-art IQA methods.

  6. Simultaneous image reproduction on CRT screen: Moves ultrasonic sectional view and electrocardiogram curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A method for simultaneous reproduction of images, requiring different amounts of time to reproduce, on a cathode ray tube (CRT) screen is disclosed. Ultrasonic sectional views and electrocardiogram curves are simultaneously reproduced on the CRT screen by producing the images on different areas of a screen with two phosphors having different persistence times and luminous colors, within the times required for the appearance of the images. In front of the area on which is produced the image requiring the shorter time is a color filter which is permeable to the color of the phosphor with the shorter persistence time by which absorbs the color of the other phosphor.

  7. Outcomes of Preoperative MRI-Guided Needle Localization of Nonpalpable Mammographically Occult Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yiming; Bagadiya, Neeti R; Jardon, Meghan L; Heller, Samantha L; Melsaether, Amy N; Toth, Hildegard B; Moy, Linda

    2016-09-01

    MRI-guided needle localization allows access to MRI-detected mammographically occult breast lesions that are not amenable to MRI-guided biopsy. The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and outcomes of MRI-guided needle localization. Ninety-nine consecutive breast lesions that underwent preoperative MRI-guided needle localization were identified. Clinical indications for breast MRI, reasons for performing MRI-guided needle localization, and surgical pathology results were recorded. Lesion characteristics, procedure time, and complications were assessed. Of 99 lesions, 60 (60.6%) were in a location inaccessible for MRI biopsy, necessitating MRI-guided needle localization. Histologic evaluation revealed 38 (38.4%) carcinomas, 31 (31.3%) high-risk lesions, and 30 (30.3%) benign lesions. Carcinoma was more likely to be found in women with known cancer (31/61 [50.8%]; p = 0.003) than in women undergoing imaging for high-risk screening (2/18 [11.1%]) or problem solving (6/20 [30%]). Masses (p = 0.013) and foci (p < 0.001) were more likely to be malignant than were lesions with nonmass enhancement. Foci were significantly more often malignant compared with all other lesion types (9/10 [90%]; p < 0.001). The mean (± SD) procedure time was 32.9 ± 9.39 minutes. All lesions were occult on specimen radiographs. There were no procedure-related complications. The positive predictive value of MRI-guided needle localization (38.4%) is comparable to that of mammography- and tomosynthesis-guided localizations and is highest in women with a known diagnosis of cancer. It is highly accurate in targeting small enhancing lesions, thereby improving surgical management. MRI-guided needle localization is a safe, accurate, and time-efficient procedure.

  8. Clinical Utility of Breast MRI in the Diagnosis of Malignancy After Inconclusive or Equivocal Mammographic Diagnostic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Chikarmane, Sona A; Sippo, Dorothy A; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical utility of breast MRI for diagnosing malignancy in women with equivocal mammographic findings but no symptoms. Retrospective review of an institutional MRI database of 7332 contrast-enhanced breast MRI examinations from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, yielded the records of 296 (4.0%) examinations of 294 women without symptoms who underwent MRI for mammographic findings uncertain at diagnostic evaluation. Imaging findings, histopathologic results, and patient demographics were obtained from the electronic medical record. The mean patient age was 55 years (range, 29-83 years). Mammographic lesion type (n = 294) included 89 focal asymmetries, 76 asymmetries, 64 masses, 44 architectural distortions, 17 surgical scar versus lesion, and four miscellaneous lesions. Diagnostic ultrasound, performed on 286 of 294 (97.3%) lesions at mammographic evaluation, showed an ultrasound correlate in 37 (12.9%) lesions, equivocal correlate in 48 (16.8%), and no ultrasound correlate in 201 (70.3%). MRI examination of 294 index lesions showed a correlate in 133 (45.2%) and no correlate in 161 (54.8%). Forty of 294 (13.6%) index lesions were malignant, 37 (92.5%) with an MRI correlate and three (7.5%) without an MRI correlate. Among 250 patients who underwent biopsy or had 2 or more years of imaging stability, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of breast MRI for malignancy were 92.5%, 62.4%, 97.8%, and 31.9%. Forty-four of 294 (15.0%) patients had lesions incidentally found at MRI; 7 of 41 (17.1%) lesions that were biopsied or were stable for at least 1 year were malignant. Problem-solving breast MRI for inconclusive mammographic findings helps identify malignancies with high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value.

  9. Quality Imaging - Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaona, E.; Azorin Nieto, J.; Iran Diaz Gongora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigon Castaneda, G. M.; Franco Enriquez, J. G.

    2006-09-08

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film.

  10. Quality Imaging — Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, E.; Azorín Nieto, J.; Irán Díaz Góngora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigón Castañeda, G. M.; Franco Enríquez, J. G.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film.

  11. Status of the fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1993-11-01

    Ten fluorescent screens and cameras determine the relative position and image profile of the beam in both the electron and positron linacs at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The timing techniques used to capture the beam image allow direct synchronization to the electron gun trigger to minimize timing uncertainties. This paper discusses the design and status of the APS linac fluorescent screen assemblies and imaging system.

  12. Breast cancer CAD{sub x} based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from two mammographic views

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shalini; Chyn, Priscilla F.; Markey, Mia K.

    2006-06-15

    In this study we compared the performance of computer aided diagnosis (CAD{sub x}) algorithms based on Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS trade mark sign ) descriptors from one or two views. To select cases for the study with different mediolateral (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC) view descriptors, we assessed the agreement in BI-RADS trade mark sign lesion descriptors, BI-RADS trade mark sign assessment, and subtlety ratings for 1626 cases from the Digital Database for Screening Mammogrpahy (DDSM) using kappa statistics. We used 115 mass cases with different descriptors for the two views to design linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based CAD{sub x} algorithms. The CAD{sub x} algorithms used BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors and patient age as features. The algorithms based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from both the views performed marginally better than algorithms based on BI-RADS trade mark sign descriptors from a single view. A system that averaged the results of two classifiers trained separately on the MLO and CC views displayed the best performance (A{sub z}=0.920{+-}0.027). Thus, some improvement in performance of BI-RADS trade mark sign based CAD{sub x} algorithms may be achieved by combining information from two mammographic views.

  13. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  14. Mammographic density, lobular involution, and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, O M; Martin, L J; Boyd, N F

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we propose that age-related changes in mammographic density and breast tissue involution are closely related phenomena, and consider their potential relevance to the aetiology of breast cancer. We propose that the reduction in mammographic density that occurs with increasing age, parity and menopause reflects the involution of breast tissue. We further propose that age-related changes in both mammographic density and breast tissue composition are observable and measurable phenomena that resemble Pike's theoretical construct of ‘breast tissue ageing'. Extensive mammographic density and delayed breast involution are both associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and are consistent with the hypothesis of the Pike model that cumulative exposure of breast tissue to hormones and growth factors that stimulate cell division, as well as the accumulation of genetic damage in breast cells, are major determinants of breast cancer incidence. PMID:18781174

  15. Can upstaging of ductal carcinoma in situ be predicted at biopsy by histologic and mammographic features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Bibo; Grimm, Lars J.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; King, Lorraine M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2017-03-01

    Reducing the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) requires accurate prediction of the invasive potential at cancer screening. In this work, we investigated the utility of pre-operative histologic and mammographic features to predict upstaging of DCIS. The goal was to provide intentionally conservative baseline performance using readily available data from radiologists and pathologists and only linear models. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 99 patients with DCIS. Of those 25 were upstaged to invasive cancer at the time of definitive surgery. Pre-operative factors including both the histologic features extracted from stereotactic core needle biopsy (SCNB) reports and the mammographic features annotated by an expert breast radiologist were investigated with statistical analysis. Furthermore, we built classification models based on those features in an attempt to predict the presence of an occult invasive component in DCIS, with generalization performance assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Histologic features including nuclear grade and DCIS subtype did not show statistically significant differences between cases with pure DCIS and with DCIS plus invasive disease. However, three mammographic features, i.e., the major axis length of DCIS lesion, the BI-RADS level of suspicion, and radiologist's assessment did achieve the statistical significance. Using those three statistically significant features as input, a linear discriminant model was able to distinguish patients with DCIS plus invasive disease from those with pure DCIS, with AUC-ROC equal to 0.62. Overall, mammograms used for breast screening contain useful information that can be perceived by radiologists and help predict occult invasive components in DCIS.

  16. Compound image compression for real-time computer screen image transmission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tony; Hao, Pengwei

    2005-08-01

    We present a compound image compression algorithm for real-time applications of computer screen image transmission. It is called shape primitive extraction and coding (SPEC). Real-time image transmission requires that the compression algorithm should not only achieve high compression ratio, but also have low complexity and provide excellent visual quality. SPEC first segments a compound image into text/graphics pixels and pictorial pixels, and then compresses the text/graphics pixels with a new lossless coding algorithm and the pictorial pixels with the standard lossy JPEG, respectively. The segmentation first classifies image blocks into picture and text/graphics blocks by thresholding the number of colors of each block, then extracts shape primitives of text/graphics from picture blocks. Dynamic color palette that tracks recent text/graphics colors is used to separate small shape primitives of text/graphics from pictorial pixels. Shape primitives are also extracted from text/graphics blocks. All shape primitives from both block types are losslessly compressed by using a combined shape-based and palette-based coding algorithm. Then, the losslessly coded bitstream is fed into a LZW coder. Experimental results show that the SPEC has very low complexity and provides visually lossless quality while keeping competitive compression ratios.

  17. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Lore; Bleyen, Luc; Bacher, Klaus; Van Herck, Koen; Lemmens, Kim; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Van Steen, Andre; Martens, Patrick; De Brabander, Isabel; Goossens, Mathieu; Thierens, Hubert

    2017-09-01

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. • Interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. • Cancer detection rate in high-density breasts is superior in DR. • IC rate exceeds CDR for SF and CR in high-density breasts. • DR performs better in high-density breasts for third readings and false-positives.

  18. Determining efficacy of mammographic CAD systems.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W; Rogers, Steven K; DeSimio, Martin P; Brem, Rachel F

    2002-01-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) system sensitivity estimates without a radiologist in the loop are straightforward to measure but are extremely data dependent. The only relevant performance metric is improvement in CAD-assisted radiologist sensitivity. Unfortunately, this is difficult to accurately assess. Without a large study measuring the improvement in CAD-assisted radiologist sensitivity over the same cases, it is not possible to make valid comparisons between systems. As multiple CAD systems become commercially available, comparison issues need to be explored and resolved. Data from clinical trials of 2 systems are examined. Statistical hypothesis tests are applied to these data. Additionally, sensitivities of 2 systems are compared from an experiment testing over the same 120 cases. Even with large databases, there is not sufficient evidence to conclude performance differences exist between the 2 systems. It is prohibitively expensive to show conclusive sensitivity differences between commercially available mammographic CAD systems.

  19. Accuracy and reading time for six strategies using digital breast tomosynthesis in women with mammographically negative dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto Stefano; Calabrese, Massimo; Bignotti, Bianca; Signori, Alessio; Fisci, Erica; Rossi, Federica; Valdora, Francesca; Houssami, Nehmat

    2017-06-22

    To compare six strategies using digital breast tomosynthesis in women with mammographically negative dense breasts. This is a substudy of the 'ASTOUND' trial. 163 women who underwent tomosynthesis with synthetically reconstructed projection images (S-2D) inclusive of 13 (7.9%) cases diagnosed with breast cancer at histopathology after surgery were evaluated. Accuracy measures and screen-reading time of six reading strategies were assessed: (A) Single reading of S-2D alone, (B) single reading of tomosynthesis alone, (C) single reading of joint interpretation of tomosynthesis + S-2D, (D) double-reading of S-2D alone, (E) double reading of tomosynthesis alone, (F) double reading of joint interpretation of tomosynthesis + S-2D. The median age of the patients was 53 years (range, 36-88 years). The highest global accuracy was obtained with double reading of tomosynthesis + S2D (F) with an AUC of 0.979 (p<0.001) and a mean reading time of 154 s versus 34 s for the fastest strategy (single reading of S-2D alone). The AUCs for the other five strategies did not differ from each other. Double reading of tomosynthesis+ S2D had the best accuracy of six screen-reading strategies although it had the longest reading time. • Tomosynthesis acquisitions are progressively implemented with reconstructed synthesized 2D images • Double reading using S-2D plus tomosynthesis had the highest global accuracy (p<0.001). • Double reading of S-2D plus tomosynthesis increased reading time.

  20. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, E.A. )

    1991-10-01

    Mammography is generally accepted as a useful problem-solving clinical tool in characterizing known breast lesions, so that appropriate and timely treatment can be given. However, it remains grossly underutilized at what it does best: screening. The major strengths of mammography are (a) its ability to detect breast cancer at a smaller, potentially more curable stage than any other examination, and (b) its proved efficacy in reducing breast cancer mortality in asymptomatic women aged 40-74. If, as has recently been estimated, screening with mammography and physical examination can be expected to lower breast cancer deaths by 40%-50% among those actually examined (13), then the lives of almost 20,000 U.S. women might be saved each year if screening were to become very widely used. The challenges of the next decade are clear, to mount much more effective campaigns to educate physicians and lay women about the life-saving benefits of breast cancer screening, to devise increasingly effective and lower cost screening strategies, to further improve the current high quality of mammographic imaging despite its increasing proliferation, and to train large numbers of breast imaging specialists to guarantee that the growing case load of screening and problem-solving mammograms is interpreted with a very high level of skill.

  1. Recent advances in screen-film mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Haus, A.G.

    1987-09-01

    Today there are many dedicated mammographic x-ray units available that are capable of providing high-quality screen-film mammograms. Likewise, screen-film combinations designed for mammography are capable of providing images with appropriate contrast, resolution, and noise levels. Proper film processing is most important in order to obtain the appropriate film speed and contrast. A higher-speed screen-film combination designed for mammography can provide mammograms with significantly lower radiation dose, especially for grid and magnification techniques. Designing x-ray units and techniques as well as screen-film combinations with the singular goal of reducing radiation dose will always involve compromises and trade-offs. The key is to always consider optimizing all of the factors that affect image quality: (1) appropriate beam quality, (2) breast compression, (3) consideration of the use of grids, (4) good geometry, (5) selection of an appropriate screen-film combination, and (6) proper film processing. Optimization of all appropriate imaging factors will produce high-quality mammograms at the lowest radiation dose to the patient.52 references.

  2. Prospective screening study of 0.5 Tesla dedicated magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in young, high-risk women

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Wendy S; Latimer, Jean J; Sumkin, Jules H; Huerbin, Michelle; Grant, Stephen G; Vogel, Victor G

    2006-01-01

    Background Evidence-based screening guidelines are needed for women under 40 with a family history of breast cancer, a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, or other risk factors. An accurate assessment of breast cancer risk is required to balance the benefits and risks of surveillance, yet published studies have used narrow risk assessment schemata for enrollment. Breast density limits the sensitivity of film-screen mammography but is not thought to pose a limitation to MRI, however the utility of MRI surveillance has not been specifically examined before in women with dense breasts. Also, all MRI surveillance studies yet reported have used high strength magnets that may not be practical for dedicated imaging in many breast centers. Medium strength 0.5 Tesla MRI may provide an alternative economic option for surveillance. Methods We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study of 30 women age 25–49 years with dense breasts evaluating the addition of 0.5 Tesla MRI to conventional screening. All participants had a high quantitative breast cancer risk, defined as ≥ 3.5% over the next 5 years per the Gail or BRCAPRO models, and/or a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation. Results The average age at enrollment was 41.4 years and the average 5-year risk was 4.8%. Twenty-two subjects had BIRADS category 1 or 2 breast MRIs (negative or probably benign), whereas no category 4 or 5 MRIs (possibly or probably malignant) were observed. Eight subjects had BIRADS 3 results, identifying lesions that were "probably benign", yet prompting further evaluation. One of these subjects was diagnosed with a stage T1aN0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, and later determined to be a BRCA1 mutation carrier. Conclusion Using medium-strength MRI we were able to detect 1 early breast tumor that was mammographically undetectable among 30 young high-risk women with dense breasts. These results support the concept that breast MRI can enhance surveillance for young high-risk women with dense breasts, and

  3. Prospective screening study of 0.5 Tesla dedicated magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in young, high-risk women.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Wendy S; Latimer, Jean J; Sumkin, Jules H; Huerbin, Michelle; Grant, Stephen G; Vogel, Victor G

    2006-06-26

    Evidence-based screening guidelines are needed for women under 40 with a family history of breast cancer, a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, or other risk factors. An accurate assessment of breast cancer risk is required to balance the benefits and risks of surveillance, yet published studies have used narrow risk assessment schemata for enrollment. Breast density limits the sensitivity of film-screen mammography but is not thought to pose a limitation to MRI, however the utility of MRI surveillance has not been specifically examined before in women with dense breasts. Also, all MRI surveillance studies yet reported have used high strength magnets that may not be practical for dedicated imaging in many breast centers. Medium strength 0.5 Tesla MRI may provide an alternative economic option for surveillance. We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study of 30 women age 25-49 years with dense breasts evaluating the addition of 0.5 Tesla MRI to conventional screening. All participants had a high quantitative breast cancer risk, defined as > or = 3.5% over the next 5 years per the Gail or BRCAPRO models, and/or a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation. The average age at enrollment was 41.4 years and the average 5-year risk was 4.8%. Twenty-two subjects had BIRADS category 1 or 2 breast MRIs (negative or probably benign), whereas no category 4 or 5 MRIs (possibly or probably malignant) were observed. Eight subjects had BIRADS 3 results, identifying lesions that were "probably benign", yet prompting further evaluation. One of these subjects was diagnosed with a stage T1aN0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, and later determined to be a BRCA1 mutation carrier. Using medium-strength MRI we were able to detect 1 early breast tumor that was mammographically undetectable among 30 young high-risk women with dense breasts. These results support the concept that breast MRI can enhance surveillance for young high-risk women with dense breasts, and further suggest that a medium

  4. Training retinal imagers for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Karen A; Baumritter, Agnieshka; Pearson, Denise J; Pistilli, Maxwell; Nyquist, Darla; Huynh, Michele; Satnes, Kelli; Keith, Rachel; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Quinn, Graham E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the training/certification process of nonphysician imagers, image quality, and factors that affected image quality in the National Eye Institute sponsored multicentered e-ROP study. Methods Nonphysician imagers underwent rigorous training and certification in obtaining retinal images, with attention to clarity, focus, and optic disk placement. Image readers measured pupil size in pupil image and graded posterior pole, temporal, nasal, superior, and inferior retinal images and classified them as good, adequate, poor, or missing. Good and adequate images were deemed acceptable. Results In 4,003 image sessions of 1,257 infants, 3,453 (86.8%) were complete. Of 39,550 retinal images, 91.7% had acceptable quality, 5.6% poor, and 2.7% were missing. Inadequate pupil dilation negatively affected acceptable image quality: 54% acceptable images for pupil <5 mm versus 93% for >6 mm (P < 0.0001). When ventilatory equipment obstructed access to imaged infant, the percent of acceptable image quality decreased: 94% for no support versus 66.6% for oscillatory ventilation (P < 0.0001). Acceptable image quality rates improved from 87% to 90% (P = 0.03) from first 6 months to last 6 months at low patient volume centers, while high patient volume centers remained stable at 95%. Conclusions Nonphysicians successfully obtained acceptable quality images for ROP evaluation. Skills improved with experience. Image quality was negatively affected by inadequate pupil dilation and the presence of obstructive ventilatory equipment. PMID:27164425

  5. Do mammographic tumor features in breast cancer relate to breast density and invasiveness, tumor size, and axillary lymph node involvement?

    PubMed

    Sartor, Hanna; Borgquist, Signe; Hartman, Linda; Olsson, Åsa; Jawdat, Faith; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-05-01

    Breast density and mammographic tumor features of breast cancer may carry prognostic information. The potential benefit of using the combined information obtained from breast density, mammographic tumor features, and pathological tumor characteristics has not been extensively studied. To investigate how mammographic tumor features relate to breast density and pathological tumor characteristics. This retrospective study was carried out within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study: a population-based cohort study recruiting 17,035 women during 1991-1996. A total of 826 incident breast cancers were identified during follow-up. Mammography images were collected and analyzed according to breast density and tumor features at diagnosis. Pathological data were retrieved from medical reports. Mammographic tumor features in relation to invasiveness, tumor size, and axillary lymph node involvement were analyzed using logistic regression yielding odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and adjusted for age at diagnosis, mode of detection, and breast density. Tumors presenting as an ill-defined mass or calcifications were more common in dense breasts than tumors presenting as a distinct mass or with spiculated appearance. Invasive cancer was more common in tumors with spiculated appearance than tumors presenting as a distinct mass (adjusted OR, 5.68 [1.81-17.84]). Among invasive tumors, an ill-defined mass was more often large (>20 mm) compared with a distinct mass, (adjusted OR, 3.16 [1.80-5.55]). Tumors presenting as an ill-defined mass or calcifications were more common in dense breasts. Spiculated appearance was related to invasiveness, and ill-defined mass to larger tumor size, regardless of mode of detection and breast density. The potential role of mammographic tumor features in clinical decision-making warrants further investigation. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Explaining variance in the cumulus mammographic measures that predict breast cancer risk: a twins and sisters study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong L; Schmidt, Daniel F; Makalic, Enes; Dite, Gillian S; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Bui, Minh; Macinnis, Robert J; Odefrey, Fabrice; Cawson, Jennifer N; Treloar, Susan A; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L

    2013-12-01

    Mammographic density, the area of the mammographic image that appears white or bright, predicts breast cancer risk. We estimated the proportions of variance explained by questionnaire-measured breast cancer risk factors and by unmeasured residual familial factors. For 544 MZ and 339 DZ twin pairs and 1,558 non-twin sisters from 1,564 families, mammographic density was measured using the computer-assisted method Cumulus. We estimated associations using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression and studied familial aspects using a multivariate normal model. The proportions of variance explained by age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors, respectively, were 4%, 1%, and 4% for dense area; 7%, 14%, and 4% for percent dense area; and 7%, 40%, and 1% for nondense area. Associations with dense area and percent dense area were in opposite directions than for nondense area. After adjusting for measured factors, the correlations of dense area with percent dense area and nondense area were 0.84 and -0.46, respectively. The MZ, DZ, and sister pair correlations were 0.59, 0.28, and 0.29 for dense area; 0.57, 0.30, and 0.28 for percent dense area; and 0.56, 0.27, and 0.28 for nondense area (SE = 0.02, 0.04, and 0.03, respectively). Under the classic twin model, 50% to 60% (SE = 5%) of the variance of mammographic density measures that predict breast cancer risk are due to undiscovered genetic factors, and the remainder to as yet unknown individual-specific, nongenetic factors. Much remains to be learnt about the genetic and environmental determinants of mammographic density. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Higher alcohol intake may modify the association between mammographic density and breast cancer: an analysis of three case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Shannon M; Koga, Karin; Woolcott, Christy G; Dahl, Timothy; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Yaffe, Martin J; Vachon, Celine M; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and mammographic density are established risk factors for breast cancer. This study examined whether the association of mammographic density with breast cancer varies by alcohol intake. Mammographic density was assessed in digitized images for 1207 cases and 1663 controls from three populations (Japan, Hawaii, California) using a computer-assisted method. Associations were estimated by logistic regression. When comparing ever to never drinking, mean density was similar and consumption was not associated with breast cancer risk. However, within the Hawaii/Japan subset, women consuming >1 drink/day had a non-significantly elevated relative risk compared to never drinkers. Also in the Hawaii/Japan population, alcohol intake only modified the association between mammographic density and breast cancer in women consuming >1 drink/day (p(interaction)=0.05) with significant risk estimates of 3.65 and 6.58 for the 2nd and 3rd density tertiles as compared to 1.57 and 1.61 for never drinkers in Hawaii/Japan. Although these findings suggest a stronger association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk for alcohol consumers, the small number of cases requires caution in interpreting the results.

  8. Application of Localization and Needle Placement Guided by Mammographic, Ultrasound and Fiberoptic Ductoscopy for Resection of Non-palpable Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhu; Qu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Wen G

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of localization needles under mammographic, ultrasound or fiberoptic ductoscopy guidance for non-palpable breast lesions. Eighty-three patients undergoing needle localization and biopsy of non-palpable breast lesions under mammographic, ultrasound or fiberoptic ductoscopy guidance from June 2013 to December 2014 in Beijing Friendship Hospital were included in the study. The preoperative imaging assessment, application of localization needles, surgical operation and pathological examination were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. A total of 83 localization and biopsies were carried out, of which 27 were performed under mammographic guidance, 32 under ultrasound guidance and 24 under fiberoptic ductoscopy guidance. Twenty-seven cases of breast microcalcifications were localized under mammographic guidance and surgically removed, of which eight cases were pathologically diagnosed as malignant. Thirty-two cases of non-palpable breast lesions were localized under ultrasound guidance and 30 pathologically diagnosed, of these, four cases were pathologically diagnosed as malignant. Twenty-four cases of intraductal space-occupying lesions were localized under ductoscopy guidance and surgically removed, of which five cases were pathologically diagnosed as malignant. Utilization of localization needles under mammographic, ultrasound or fiberoptic ductoscopy guidance for non-palpable breast lesions is a safe and effective procedure, and is helpful in the diagnosis of breast cancer. With the help of this procedure, more malignant lesions can be localized and surgically removed. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Correlates of mammographic density in B-mode ultrasound and real time elastography.

    PubMed

    Jud, Sebastian Michael; Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin; Faschingbauer, Florian; Uder, Michael; Wittenberg, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Matthias W; Adamietz, Boris R

    2012-07-01

    The aim of our study involved the assessment of B-mode imaging and elastography with regard to their ability to predict mammographic density (MD) without X-rays. Women, who underwent routine mammography, were prospectively examined with additional B-mode ultrasound and elastography. MD was assessed quantitatively with a computer-assisted method (Madena). The B-mode and elastography images were assessed by histograms with equally sized gray-level intervals. Regression models were built and cross validated to examine the ability to predict MD. The results of this study showed that B-mode imaging and elastography were able to predict MD. B-mode seemed to give a more accurate prediction. R for B-mode image and elastography were 0.67 and 0.44, respectively. Areas in the B-mode images that correlated with mammographic dense areas were either dark gray or of intermediate gray levels. Concerning elastography only the gray levels that represent extremely stiff tissue correlated positively with MD. In conclusion, ultrasound seems to be able to predict MD. Easy and cheap utilization of regular breast ultrasound machines encourages the use of ultrasound in larger case-control studies to validate this method as a breast cancer risk predictor. Furthermore, the application of ultrasound for breast tissue characterization could enable comprehensive research concerning breast cancer risk and breast density in young and pregnant women.

  10. Automated screening versus manual screening: a comparison of the ThinPrep imaging system and manual screening in a time study.

    PubMed

    Schledermann, Doris; Hyldebrandt, Tina; Ejersbo, Dorthe; Hoelund, Berit

    2007-06-01

    The ThinPrep Imaging System (TIS) is an automated system that assists cytotechnologists in the primary screening of ThinPrep liquid based cervical samples. Between June 1, 2004, and April 1, 2005, four experienced cytotechnologists participated in the study in which the duration of the screening procedure was timed for each of the 11,354 slides included. In every slide 22 fields of view were reviewed, and the samples that contained potentially abnormal cells were fully screened. The screening time was reduced by 42% (mean) (p < 0.001). By manual rescreening of the negative TIS samples, abnormal cells were found in 10 samples (false negative rate 0.14%). In every case the abnormal cells had been identified by the scanner, but misinterpreted by the cytotechnologist. These findings stressed the importance of carefulness in the interpretation of the marked fields and beyond that helped the cytotechnologists and pathologists to have more confidence in the automated system.

  11. Advantages and Disadvantages of Mammography Screening

    PubMed Central

    Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H.; Hacker, Astrid; Sedlacek, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mammography screening is the only method presently considered appropriate for mass screening of asymptomatic women. Its frequent use, however, warrants diligent analysis of potential side effects. Radiation risk is far below the natural yearly risk of breast cancer and should not be used as an argument against screening. False-positive calls lead to additional imaging or histopathological assessment, mainly percutaneous breast biopsy. These measures are tolerated and accepted fairly well. Their number is limited by strict quality assurance and constant training. Interval cancers represent a limitation of breast screening that should prompt further research for optimization. Evaluation of overdiagnosis is a highly debated topic in the literature. According to the probably most realistic available calculations, overdiagnosis is acceptable as it is compensated by the potential mortality reduction. Nonetheless, this potential side effect warrants optimal adjustment of therapy to the patient's individual risk. The mortality reduction seen in randomized studies was confirmed by results from national screening programs. A recent case referent study indicated that improvements in mortality reduction run parallel to improved mammographic techniques. Use of less aggressive therapies is another valuable effect of screening. Awareness of potential problems, strict quality assurance, and further research should help to further develop screening programs. PMID:21779225

  12. Mammographic density and intake of selected nutrients and vitamins in Norwegian women.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Samera Azeem; Couto, Elisabeth; Hilsen, Marit; Hofvind, Solveig; Wu, Anna H; Ursin, Giske

    2011-01-01

    Investigating the association between dietary factors and mammographic density (MD) could shed light on the relationship between diet and breast cancer risk. We took advantage of a national mammographic screening program to study the association between intake of nutrients and MD. In this study, we analyzed data of 2,252 postmenopausal women aged 50-69 yr who participated in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program in 2004. MD was assessed on digitized mammograms using a computer-assisted method. We used multivariate linear regression models to determine least square means of percent and absolute MD. Overall, we observed no associations between MD and intake of total calories, protein, carbohydrates, cholesterol, and dietary fiber. There was a positive borderline statistically significant association between absolute MD and total fat intake (P = 0.10) and between percent MD and intake of saturated fat (P = 0.06). There was no association between MD and intake of calcium, retinol, vitamins A, B12, C, or D, or combined intake of vitamin D and calcium. This study provides some evidence of an association between MD and dietary intake. Our study highlights the importance of adequate adjustments for BMI in studies of diet and MD.

  13. Effect of dose reduction on the detection of mammographic lesions: A mathematical observer model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert; Abbey, Craig; Delong, David

    2007-08-15

    The effect of reduction in dose levels normally used in mammographic screening procedures on the detection of breast lesions were analyzed. Four types of breast lesions were simulated and inserted into clinically-acquired digital mammograms. Dose reduction by 50% and 75% of the original clinically-relevant exposure levels were simulated by adding corresponding simulated noise into the original mammograms. The mammograms were converted into luminance values corresponding to those displayed on a clinical soft-copy display station and subsequently analyzed by Laguerre-Gauss and Gabor channelized Hotelling observer models for differences in detectability performance with reduction in radiation dose. Performance was measured under a signal known exactly but variable detection task paradigm in terms of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves. The results suggested that luminance mapping of digital mammograms affects performance of model observers. Reduction in dose levels by 50% lowered the detectability of masses with borderline statistical significance. Dose reduction did not have a statistically significant effect on detection of microcalcifications. The model results indicate that there is room for optimization of dose level in mammographic screening procedures.

  14. Impact of luminance distribution in the visual field on foveal contrast sensitivity in the context of mammographic softcopy reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelt, Dörte; Rascher-Friesenhausen, Richard; Klein, Jan; Strasburger, Hans; Preim, Bernhard; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2009-02-01

    For quality control in mammographic softcopy reading (SCR) a number of recommendations exists. Among them is a room illuminance of 10 lx. Moreover, the use of masks on the image seems to be advantageous, due to a reduction of scattered light in the focus of view. Room illuminance affects the global luminance adaptation and the maximal monitor contrast; masking decreases the luminance in the central and near-peripheral region. We investigated the effects of masking and illuminance on foveal contrast sensitivity. A study with eight observers was conducted in the context of mammographic softcopy reading. Using Gabor patterns with varying spatial frequencies, orientations and contrast levels as stimuli and an orientation discrimination task, the intraobserver contrast sensitivity was determined for foveal vision. Tested illuminances for a non-masked image were 10, 30, 50 and 90 lx, and for a masked image 10 lx. Major findings are: (1) Masking does not lead to improved contrast sensitivity. Instead, all observers reported a strong fatigue effect during the presentation of the masked image. (2) Among the illuminances tested, only half of the observers showed the best contrast sensitivity at 10 lx. For the other observers best results were achieved at illuminance levels of 50 or 90 lx, respectively. The results can be used to appraise the effects of viewing conditions with the aim of drawing conclusions for mammographic SCR, and to initiate further studies.

  15. Evaluation Of Digital Unsharp-Mask Filtering For The Detection Of Subtle Mammographic Microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Vyborny, Carl J.; MacMahon, Heber; Metz, Charles E.; Doi, Kunio; Sickles, Edward A.

    1986-06-01

    We have conducted a study to assess the effects of digitization and unsharp-mask filtering on the ability of observers to detect subtle microcalcifications in mammograms. Thirty-two conventional screen-film mammograms were selected from patient files by two experienced mammographers. Twelve of the mammograms contained a suspicious cluster of microcalcifications in patients who subsequently underwent biopsy. Twenty of the mammograms were normal cases which were initially interpreted as being free of clustered microcalcifications and did not demonstrate such on careful review. The mammograms were digitized with a high-quality Fuji image processing/simulation system. The system consists of two drum scanners with which an original radiograph can be digitized, processed by a minicomputer, and reconstituted on film. In this study, we employed a sampling aperture of 0.1 mm X 0.1 mm and a sampling distance of 0.1 mm. The density range from 0.2 to 2.75 was digitized to 1024 grey levels per pixel. The digitized images were printed on a single emulsion film with a display aperture having the same size as the sampling aperture. The system was carefully calibrated so that the density and contrast of a digitized image were closely matched to those of the original radiograph. Initially, we evaluated the effects of the weighting factor and the mask size of a unsharp-mask filter on the appearance of mammograms for various types of breasts. Subjective visual comparisons suggested that a mask size of 91 X 91 pixels (9.1 mm X 9.1 mm) enhances the visibility of microcalcifications without excessively increasing the high-frequency noise. Further, a density-dependent weighting factor that increases linearly from 1.5 to 3.0 in the density range of 0.2 to 2.5 enhances the contrast of microcalcifications without introducing many potentially confusing artifacts in the low-density areas. An unsharp-mask filter with these parameters was used to process the digitized mammograms. We conducted

  16. Large-scale image-based screening and profiling of cellular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bougen-Zhukov, Nicola; Loh, Sheng Yang; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Loo, Lit-Hsin

    2017-02-01

    Cellular phenotypes are observable characteristics of cells resulting from the interactions of intrinsic and extrinsic chemical or biochemical factors. Image-based phenotypic screens under large numbers of basal or perturbed conditions can be used to study the influences of these factors on cellular phenotypes. Hundreds to thousands of phenotypic descriptors can also be quantified from the images of cells under each of these experimental conditions. Therefore, huge amounts of data can be generated, and the analysis of these data has become a major bottleneck in large-scale phenotypic screens. Here, we review current experimental and computational methods for large-scale image-based phenotypic screens. Our focus is on phenotypic profiling, a computational procedure for constructing quantitative and compact representations of cellular phenotypes based on the images collected in these screens. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Enhanced imaging process for xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, William D.; Zanrosso, Eddie M.

    1993-09-01

    An enhanced mammographic imaging process has been developed which is based on the conventional powder-toner selenium technology used in the Xerox 125/126 x-ray imaging system. The process is derived from improvements in the amorphous selenium x-ray photoconductor, the blue powder toner and the aerosol powder dispersion process. Comparisons of image quality and x-ray dose using the Xerox aluminum-wedge breast phantom and the Radiation Measurements Model 152D breast phantom have been made between the new Enhanced Process, the standard Xerox 125/126 System and screen-film at mammographic x-ray exposure parameters typical for each modality. When comparing the Enhanced Xeromammographic Process with the standard 125/126 System, a distinct advantage is seen for the Enhanced equivalent mass detection and superior fiber and speck detection. The broader imaging latitude of enhanced and standard Xeroradiography, in comparison to film, is illustrated in images made using the aluminum-wedge breast phantom.

  18. Cancer Screening with Digital Mammography for Women at Average Risk for Breast Cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Women at High Risk

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of 2 separate modalities, digital mammography (DM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), relative to film mammography (FM), in the screening of women asymptomatic for breast cancer. A third analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of the combination of MRI plus mammography (MRI plus FM) in screening of women at high risk. An economic analysis was also conducted. Research Questions How does the sensitivity and specificity of DM compare to FM? How does the sensitivity and specificity of MRI compare to FM? How do the recall rates compare among these screening modalities, and what effect might this have on radiation exposure? What are the risks associated with radiation exposure? How does the sensitivity and specificity of the combination of MRI plus FM compare to either MRI or FM alone? What are the economic considerations? Clinical Need The effectiveness of FM with respect to breast cancer mortality in the screening of asymptomatic average- risk women over the age of 50 has been established. However, based on a Medical Advisory Secretariat review completed in March 2006, screening is not recommended for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. Guidelines published by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Care recommend mammography screening every 1 to 2 years for women aged 50 years and over, hence, the inclusion of such women in organized breast cancer screening programs. In addition to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of mammography screening from the age of 40 years, there is concern over the risks associated with mammographic screening for the 10 years between the ages of 40 and 49 years. The lack of effectiveness of mammography screening starting at the age of 40 years (with respect to breast cancer mortality) is based on the assumption that the ability to detect cancer decreases with increased breast tissue density. As breast density is highest in the

  19. Personnel screening with terahertz opto-mechanical scanning imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Liu, Xin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2014-11-01

    We presented a passive THz opto-mechnical scanning imaging method using a single detector and a trihedral scanning mirror. The system improved the imaging speed through employing two flapping mirrors. Also the trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror were adopted. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 2.2m with the image range of 1.6m (W) ×1.6m (H), the imaging time was 2s, and the resolution was 3cm. We imaged human body with different objects concealed under their clothes, such as buckle, ceramic chip, etc.

  20. Influence of lifestyle factors on mammographic density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Brand, Judith S; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Louise; Trinh, Thang; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Hall, Per; Celebioglu, Fuat

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Apart from hormone replacement therapy (HRT), little is known about lifestyle factors that influence breast density. We examined the effect of smoking, alcohol and physical activity on mammographic density in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women without breast cancer. Lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire and percentage and area measures of mammographic density were measured using computer-assisted software. General linear models were used to assess the association between lifestyle factors and mammographic density and effect modification by body mass index (BMI) and HRT was studied. Overall, alcohol intake was positively associated with percent mammographic density (P trend  = 0.07). This association was modified by HRT use (P interaction  = 0.06): increasing alcohol intake was associated with increasing percent density in current HRT users (P trend  = 0.01) but not in non-current users (P trend  = 0.82). A similar interaction between alcohol and HRT was found for the absolute dense area, with a positive association being present in current HRT users only (P interaction  = 0.04). No differences in mammographic density were observed across categories of smoking and physical activity, neither overall nor in stratified analyses by BMI and HRT use. Increasing alcohol intake is associated with an increase in mammography density, whereas smoking and physical activity do not seem to influence density. The observed interaction between alcohol and HRT may pose an opportunity for HRT users to lower their mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

  1. Influence of Lifestyle Factors on Mammographic Density in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Judith S.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Louise; Trinh, Thang; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Hall, Per; Celebioglu, Fuat

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Apart from hormone replacement therapy (HRT), little is known about lifestyle factors that influence breast density. Methods We examined the effect of smoking, alcohol and physical activity on mammographic density in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women without breast cancer. Lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire and percentage and area measures of mammographic density were measured using computer-assisted software. General linear models were used to assess the association between lifestyle factors and mammographic density and effect modification by body mass index (BMI) and HRT was studied. Results Overall, alcohol intake was positively associated with percent mammographic density (P trend  = 0.07). This association was modified by HRT use (P interaction  = 0.06): increasing alcohol intake was associated with increasing percent density in current HRT users (P trend  = 0.01) but not in non-current users (P trend  = 0.82). A similar interaction between alcohol and HRT was found for the absolute dense area, with a positive association being present in current HRT users only (P interaction  = 0.04). No differences in mammographic density were observed across categories of smoking and physical activity, neither overall nor in stratified analyses by BMI and HRT use. Conclusions Increasing alcohol intake is associated with an increase in mammography density, whereas smoking and physical activity do not seem to influence density. The observed interaction between alcohol and HRT may pose an opportunity for HRT users to lower their mammographic density and breast cancer risk. PMID:24349146

  2. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and mammographic density in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ahn, Jiin; Jung, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Chan-Won; Yun, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Min-Jung; Suh, Byung-Seong; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Ryu, Seungho

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance (IR) with mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to evaluate these associations in pre- and postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study was performed in 73,974 adult women who underwent a comprehensive health screening examination that included a mammogram between 2011 and 2013 (mean age 42.6 years). MetS was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. IR was assessed with the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dense breast were estimated using logistic regression models after adjustment for potential confounders. In premenopausal women, MetS and all its components except waist circumference were associated with dense breast. After adjustment for potential confounders, the OR (95% CI) for dense breast in women with MetS compared with those without MetS was 1.22 (1.06-1.39). In postmenopausal women, however, there was positive but non-significant association between MetS and dense breast. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, high blood glucose and IR were positively associated with dense breast. The OR (95% CI) for dense breast between the highest and lowest quartiles of HOMA-IR was 1.29 (1.20-1.39) for premenopausal women and 1.44 (1.05-1.97) for postmenopausal women. In a large sample of Korean women, MetS and IR were associated with mammographic dense breast, demonstrating that IR, a potentially modifiable risk factor, may increase breast cancer risk, possibly through high mammographic density.

  3. Circulating serum xenoestrogens and mammographic breast density

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Humans are widely exposed to estrogenically active phthalates, parabens, and phenols, raising concerns about potential effects on breast tissue and breast cancer risk. We sought to determine the association of circulating serum levels of these chemicals (reflecting recent exposure) with mammographic breast density (a marker of breast cancer risk). Methods We recruited postmenopausal women aged 55 to 70 years from mammography clinics in Madison, Wisconsin (N = 264). Subjects completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample that was analyzed for mono-ethyl phthalate, mono-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, butyl paraben, propyl paraben, octylphenol, nonylphenol, and bisphenol A (BPA). Percentage breast density was measured from mammograms by using a computer-assisted thresholding method. Results Serum BPA was positively associated with mammographic breast density after adjusting for age, body mass index, and other potentially confounding factors. Mean percentage density was 12.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 11.4 to 14.0) among the 193 women with nondetectable BPA levels, 13.7% (95% CI, 10.7 to 17.1) among the 35 women with detectable levels below the median (<0.55 ng/ml), and 17.6% (95% CI, 14.1 to 21.5) among the 34 women with detectable levels above the median (>0.55 ng/ml; Ptrend = 0.01). Percentage breast density was also elevated (18.2%; 95% CI, 13.4 to 23.7) among the 18 women with serum mono-ethyl phthalate above the median detected level (>3.77 ng/ml) compared with women with nondetectable BPA levels (13.1%; 95% CI, 11.9 to 14.3; Ptrend = 0.07). No other chemicals demonstrated associations with percentage breast density. Conclusions Postmenopausal women with high serum levels of BPA and mono-ethyl phthalate had elevated breast density. Further investigation of the impact of BPA and mono-ethyl phthalate on breast cancer risk by using repeated serum measurements or other markers of xenoestrogen exposure are needed. PMID:23710608

  4. Clinical comparison of CR and screen film for imaging the critically ill neonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Brasch, Robert C.; Gooding, Charles A.; Gould, Robert G.; Cohen, Pierre A.; Rencken, Ingo R.; Huang, H. K.

    1996-05-01

    A clinical comparison of computed radiography (CR) versus screen-film for imaging the critically-ill neonate is performed, utilizing a modified (hybrid) film cassette containing a CR (standard ST-V) imaging plate, a conventional screen and film, allowing simultaneous acquisition of perfectly matched CR and plain film images. For 100 portable neonatal chest and abdominal projection radiographs, plain film was subjectively compared to CR hardcopy. Three pediatric radiologists graded overall image quality on a scale of one (poor) to five (excellent), as well as visualization of various anatomic structures (i.e., lung parenchyma, pulmonary vasculature, tubes/lines) and pathological findings (i.e., pulmonary interstitial emphysema, pleural effusion, pneumothorax). Results analyzed using a combined kappa statistic of the differences between scores from each matched set, combined over the three readers showed no statistically significant difference in overall image quality between screen- film and CR (p equals 0.19). Similarly, no statistically significant difference was seen between screen-film and CR for anatomic structure visualization and for visualization of pathological findings. These results indicate that the image quality of CR is comparable to plain film, and that CR may be a suitable alternative to screen-film imaging for portable neonatal chest and abdominal examinations.

  5. Development and application of a segmentation routine in a mammographic mass CAD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarious, David M., Jr.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new segmentation routine developed for mammographic masses. We previously developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that employed a simple but imprecise segmentation procedure. To improve the systems performance, an iterative, linear segmentation routine was developed. The routine begins by employing a linear discriminant function to determine the optimal threshold between estimates of an objects interior and exterior pixels. After applying the threshold and identifying the objects outline, two constraints are applied to minimize the influence of extraneous background structures. Each iteration further refines the outline until the stopping criterion is reached. The segmentation algorithm was tested on a database of 181 mammographic images that contained forty-nine malignant and fifty benign masses. A set of suspicious regions of interest (ROIs) was found using the previous CAD system. Twenty features were measured from the regions before and after applying the new segmentation routine. The difference in the features discriminatory ability was examined via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A significant performance difference was observed in many features, particularly those describing the object border. Free-response ROC (FROC) curves were utilized to examine how the overall CAD system performance changed with the inclusion of the segmentation routine. The FROC performance appeared to be improved, especially for malignant masses. When detecting 90% of the malignant masses, the previous system achieved 4.4 false positives per image (FPpI) compared to the post-segmentation systems 3.7 FPpI. At 85%, the respective FPpI are 4.1 and 2.1.

  6. Isotopically-enriched gadolinium-157 oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high-resolution neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the production of isotopically-enriched gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screens for the high spatial-resolution neutron imaging. Approximately 10 g of 157Gd2O2S:Tb was produced in the form of fine powder (particle size approximately 2 μm). The level of 157Gd enrichment was above 88%. Approximately 2.5 μm thick 157Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were produced and tested for the absorption power and the light output. The results are compared to the reference screens based on natGd2O2S:Tb. The isotopically enriched screens provided increase by a factor of 3.8 and 3.6 for the absorption power and the light output, respectively. The potential of the scintillator screens based on 157Gd2O2S phosphor for the purpose of the (high-resolution) neutron imaging is discussed.

  7. No association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julia A; Vachon, Celine M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vieth, Reinhold; Cerhan, James R; Sellers, Thomas A

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that vitamin D may protect against breast cancer. Some studies have suggested that dietary and supplemental vitamin D is associated with reduced mammographic density, which is highly associated with breast cancer risk, although this evidence is not entirely consistent. We investigated a possible association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), the best indicator of vitamin D status, and quantitative mammographic density in the Minnesota Breast Cancer Family Study. Mean values of mammographic density (both percent and area densities) and circulating levels of 25OHD were compared across categories of covariates using ANOVA. Models were adjusted for age and body mass index, as well as other covariates, and also stratified by dietary calcium intake, menopause, and season. Serum, mammographic density, and questionnaire data were available from 487 women [133 premenopausal and 354 postmenopausal; mean age, 56.4 years (range, 27-85 years)] without breast cancer, and for 73%, the blood was drawn within 1 year of their mammogram. No evidence was found for an association between 25OHD and either percent density or total dense area. There was also no evidence for any association when the data were stratified by season of sample (winter and summer) or menopause. However, both percent density and dense area were lowest among those in the highest vitamin D quartile with calcium intake above the median. Unlike some previous reports, vitamin D does not seem to be related to mammographic density in this cohort.

  8. Volume of Mammographic Density and Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, John A.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Ma, Lin; Duewer, Frederick; Fan, Bo; Wang, Jeff; Malkov, Sergei; Vittinghoff, Eric; Cummings, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Assessing the volume of mammographic density might more accurately reflect the amount of breast volume at risk of malignant transformation and provide a stronger indication of risk of breast cancer than methods based on qualitative scores or dense breast area. Methods We prospectively collected mammograms for women undergoing screening mammography. We determined the diagnosis of subsequent invasive or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) for 275 cases, selected 825 controls matched for age, ethnicity, and mammography system, and assessed three measures of breast density: percent dense area, fibroglandular volume, and percent fibroglandular volume. Results After adjustment for familial breast cancer history, body mass index, history of breast biopsy, and age at first live birth, the odds ratios for breast cancer risk in the highest versus lowest measurement quintiles were 2.5 (95% CI: 1.5, 4.3) for percent dense area, 2.9 (95% CI: 1.7, 4.9) for fibroglandular volume, and 4.1 (95% CI: 2.3, 7.2) for percent fibroglandular volume. Net reclassification indexes for density measures plus risk factors versus risk factors alone were 9.6% (P=0.07) for percent dense area, 21.1% (P=0.0001) for fibroglandular volume, and 14.8% (P=0.004) for percent fibroglandular volume. Fibroglandular volume improved the categorical risk classification of 1 in 5 women for both women with and without breast cancer. Conclusion Volumetric measures of breast density are more accurate predictors of breast cancer risk than risk factors alone and than percent dense area. Impact Risk models including dense fibroglandular volume may more accurately predict breast cancer risk than current risk models. PMID:21610220

  9. Retina Image Screening and Analysis Software Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Aykac, Deniz

    2009-04-01

    The software allows physicians or researchers to ground-truth images of retinas, identifying key physiological features and lesions that are indicative of disease. The software features methods to automatically detect the physiological features and lesions. The software contains code to measure the quality of images received from a telemedicine network; create and populate a database for a telemedicine network; review and report the diagnosis of a set of images; and also contains components to transmit images from a Zeiss camera to the network through SFTP.

  10. Volumetric mammographic density: heritability and association with breast cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Thompson, Deborah J; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-12-01

    Mammographic density is a strong heritable trait, but data on its genetic component are limited to area-based and qualitative measures. We studied the heritability of volumetric mammographic density ascertained by a fully-automated method and the association with breast cancer susceptibility loci. Heritability of volumetric mammographic density was estimated with a variance component model in a sib-pair sample (N pairs = 955) of a Swedish screening based cohort. Associations with 82 established breast cancer loci were assessed in an independent sample of the same cohort (N = 4025 unrelated women) using linear models, adjusting for age, body mass index, and menopausal status. All tests were two-sided, except for heritability analyses where one-sided tests were used. After multivariable adjustment, heritability estimates (standard error) for percent dense volume, absolute dense volume, and absolute nondense volume were 0.63 (0.06) and 0.43 (0.06) and 0.61 (0.06), respectively (all P < .001). Percent and absolute dense volume were associated with rs10995190 (ZNF365; P = 9.0 × 10(-6) and 8.9 × 10(-7), respectively) and rs9485372 (TAB2; P = 1.8 × 10(-5) and 1.8 × 10(-3), respectively). We also observed associations of rs9383938 (ESR1) and rs2046210 (ESR1) with the absolute dense volume (P = 2.6 × 10(-4) and 4.6 × 10(-4), respectively), and rs6001930 (MLK1) and rs17356907 (NTN4) with the absolute nondense volume (P = 6.7 × 10(-6) and 8.4 × 10(-5), respectively). Our results support the high heritability of mammographic density, though estimates are weaker for absolute than percent dense volume. We also demonstrate that the shared genetic component with breast cancer is not restricted to dense tissues only. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P < .0001). Overall cancer detection rate for attending radiologists reading alone was 5.7 per 1,000 compared with 5.2 per 1,000 when reading with a trainee (P = .517). When reading with a trainee, dense breasts represented a greater portion of recalls (P = .0001), and more frequently, greater than one abnormality was described in the breast (P = .013). Detection of ductal carcinoma in situ versus invasive carcinoma or invasive cancer type was not significantly different. The mean size of cancers in patients recalled by attending radiologists alone was smaller, and nodal involvement was less frequent, though not statistically significantly. These results demonstrate a significant overall increase in recall rate when interpreting screening mammograms with radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Physical activity and mammographic parenchymal patterns among Greek postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Marmara, Eleni A; Papacharalambous, Xenofon N; Kouloulias, Vassilios E; Maridaki, D Maria; Baltopoulos, J Panayiotis

    2011-05-01

    To examine whether physical activity during the last five years is related to later breast mammographic density in postmenopausal Greek women. We designed a cross-sectional study in 724 women, of ages 45-67 years. An interview-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on duration and intensity of recreational physical activity during five years preceding study recruitment. Mammograms were evaluated according to BIRADS classification and BIRADS score was also estimated. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between physical activity index and breast density according to the BIRADS classification methods. We observed a statistically significant inverse association of mammographic breast density measured by the BIRADS classification method and recreational exercise (OR=-0.10; 95% CI -0.018, -0.001; p=0.022). For one unit increase in physical activity as expressed by the MET-h/week score, the odds of lower versus higher breast density categories are 1.105 greater, given that all of the other variables in the model are held constant. A modifying effect by age at recruitment was evident among participants, with a stronger inverse association between recreational activity and mammographic breast density among older women (OR=-0.036; 95% CI -0.063, -0.009; p=0.009). An inverse association between physical activity and BIRADS score was evident, not reaching statistical significance (OR=0.00; 95% CI -0.009, 0.008; p=0.887). Mammographic breast area was lower in postmenopausal women who participated in sports/recreational physical activity compared to inactive controls. Increasing physical activity levels among postmenopausal women might be a reasonable approach to reduce mammographic density. However, until more physical activity and mammographic breast density studies are conducted that confirm our findings, they have to be interpreted with caution, due to the retrospective nature of our data and the possibility of

  13. Thermography is not a feasible method for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Brkljacić, Boris; Miletić, Damir; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy causing high mortality in women especially in developed countries. Due to the contribution of mammographic screening and improvements in therapy, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased considerably. An imaging-based early detection of breast cancer improves the treatment outcome. Mammography is generally established not only as diagnostic but also as screening tool, while breast ultrasound plays a major role in the diagnostic setting in distinguishing solid lesions from cysts and in guiding tissue sampling. Several indications are established for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Thermography was not validated as a screening tool and the only study performed long ago for evaluating this technology in the screening setting demonstrated very poor results. The conclusion that thermography might be feasible for screening cannot be derived from studies with small sample size, unclear selection of patients, and in which mammography and thermography were not blindly compared as screening modalities. Thermography can not be used to aspirate, biopsy or localize lesions preoperatively since no method so far was described to accurately transpose the thermographic location of the lesion to the mammogram or ultrasound and to surgical specimen. Thermography cannot be proclaimed as a screening method, without any evidence whatsoever.

  14. A Clinicopathologic Correlation of Mammographic Parenchymal Patterns and Associated Risk Factors for Human Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Kirby I.; Kuhns, James G.; Buchanan, Jerry B.; Dwyer, Patricia A.; Heuser, Louis F.; O'Connor, Carol A.; Gray, Laman A.; Polk, Hiram C.

    1982-01-01

    The five-year screening experience for 10,131 asymptomatic women evaluated at the Louisville Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (LBCDDP) disclosed 144 breast carcinomas in 1,209 patients (12%) aged 35 to 74 years in whom 904 biopsies and 305 aspirations were performed. This study included 44,711 high-quality xeromammograms (XM) prospectively classified by the modified Wolfe mammographic parenchymal patterns into low-risk (N1, P1) versus high-risk (P2, DY) groups, with expansion of the P2 cohort into three additional categories. Using BMDP computer-program analysis, each XM pattern was collated with 21 nonneoplastic and 18 malignant pathologic variables and commonly associated risk factors. A separate analysis of epithelial proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast (FCDB) was performed. The histopathology for each biopsy, with distinction of FCDB and neoplasms, was analyzed with regard to the statistical probability of influencing the XM pattern. An average of 1.05 biopsies per patient were performed in women with findings suggestive of carcinoma at clinical and/or XM examinations. An equal distribution of the N1, P1, and P2 DYXM patterns was observed in the 10,131 screenees. Of 8.5% of the screened population having biopsies, 623 were observed to have nonproliferative FCDB and 137, proliferative FCDB. For women 50 years of age or younger, these pathologic variables were seen more frequently in the P2 DY patterns (p < 0.001), whereas no difference in XM pattern distribution was observed for the screenee 50 years of age or older for proliferative FCDB (p = 0.65). Sixteen percent of the biopsied/aspirated lesions were carcinomas, yielding a biopsy/cancer ratio of 6.25:1. These in situ and invasive neoplasms were more commonly (p < 0.04) observed in 55% of the P2 (P2f, P2n, P2c) categories, while 64% of all cancers appeared more frequently in the P2 DY subgroup (p <0.001), compared with this pattern in the screened population. An

  15. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  16. Cost-benefit analysis of biopsy methods for suspicious mammographic lesions; discussion 994-5.

    PubMed

    Fahy, B N; Bold, R J; Schneider, P D; Khatri, V; Goodnight, J E

    2001-09-01

    Stereotactic core biopsy (SCB) is more cost-effective than needle-localized biopsy (NLB) for evaluation and treatment of mammographic lesions. A computer-generated mathematical model was developed based on clinical outcome modeling to estimate costs accrued during evaluation and treatment of suspicious mammographic lesions. Total costs were determined for evaluation and subsequent treatment of cancer when either SCB or NLB was used as the initial biopsy method. Cost was estimated by the cumulative work relative value units accrued. The risk of malignancy based on the Breast Imaging Reporting Data System (BIRADS) score and mammographic suspicion of ductal carcinoma in situ were varied to simulate common clinical scenarios. Total cost accumulated during evaluation and subsequent surgical therapy (if required). Evaluation of BIRADS 5 lesions (highly suggestive, risk of malignancy = 90%) resulted in equivalent relative value units for both techniques (SCB, 15.54; NLB, 15.47). Evaluation of lesions highly suspicious for ductal carcinoma in situ yielded similar total treatment relative value units (SCB, 11.49; NLB, 10.17). Only for evaluation of BIRADS 4 lesions (suspicious abnormality, risk of malignancy = 34%) was SCB more cost-effective than NLB (SCB, 7.65 vs. NLB, 15.66). No difference in cost-benefit was found when lesions highly suggestive of malignancy (BIRADS 5) or those suspicious for ductal carcinoma in situ were evaluated initially with SCB vs. NLB, thereby disproving the hypothesis. Only for intermediate-risk lesions (BIRADS 4) did initial evaluation with SCB yield a greater cost savings than with NLB.

  17. Digital imaging biomarkers feed machine learning for melanoma screening.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Daniel S; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Yagerman, Sarah; Carucci, John A; Gulati, Nicholas; Hueto, Ferran; DeFazio, Jennifer L; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Krueger, James G

    2017-07-01

    We developed an automated approach for generating quantitative image analysis metrics (imaging biomarkers) that are then analysed with a set of 13 machine learning algorithms to generate an overall risk score that is called a Q-score. These methods were applied to a set of 120 "difficult" dermoscopy images of dysplastic nevi and melanomas that were subsequently excised/classified. This approach yielded 98% sensitivity and 36% specificity for melanoma detection, approaching sensitivity/specificity of expert lesion evaluation. Importantly, we found strong spectral dependence of many imaging biomarkers in blue or red colour channels, suggesting the need to optimize spectral evaluation of pigmented lesions. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Stereoscopic representation of the breast from two mammographic view with external markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Manohar, Anand

    2003-05-01

    A new breast imaging technique has been develoepd and tested for the stereoscopic representation of the breast. The method uses markers at specific locations on the breast surface and standard mammographic projections and was tested with an anthropomorphic phantom containing five mass-like objects at locations determined by a CT scan. The phantom was imaged with a GE Senographe 2000D digital system with and without the markers. The algorithm's modules included: 1) Breast area segmentation; 2) Pectoral muscle segmentation; 3) Registration and alignment of the mammographic projections based on selected reference points; 4) Breast volume estimation basdd on volume conservation principle during compression and shape definition using surface points; 5) 3D lesion(s) localization and representation. An interactive, ILD-based, graphical interface was also developed for the stereoscopic display of the breast. The reconstruction algorithm assumed that the breast shrinks and stretches uniformly when compression is applied and removed. The relative movement of the markers after compression allowed more accurate estimation of the shrinking and stretching of the surface offering a relatively simple and practical way to improve volume estimation and surface reconstruction. Such stereoscopic representation of the breast and associated findings may improve radiological interpretation and physical examinations for breast cancer diagnosis.

  19. A multichannel time-domain scanning fluorescence mammograph: Performance assessment and first in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Hagen, Axel; Steinkellner, Oliver; Poellinger, Alexander; Burock, Susen; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert; Macdonald, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    We present a scanning time-domain fluorescence mammograph capable to image the distribution of a fluorescent contrast agent within a female breast, slightly compressed between two parallel glass plates, with high sensitivity. Fluorescence of the contrast agent is excited using a near infrared picosecond diode laser module. Four additional picosecond diode lasers with emission wavelengths between 660 and 1066 nm allow to measure the intrinsic optical properties of the breast tissue. By synchronously moving a source fiber and seven detection fiber bundles across the breast, distributions of times of flight of photons are recorded simultaneously for selected source-detector combinations in transmission and reflection geometry either at the fluorescence wavelength or at the selected laser wavelengths. To evaluate the performance of the mammograph, we used breastlike rectangular phantoms comprising fluorescent and absorbing objects using the fluorescent dye Omocyanine as contrast agent excited at 735 nm. We compare two-dimensional imaging of the phantom based on transmission and reflection data. Furthermore, we developed an improved tomosynthesis algorithm which permits three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence and absorption properties of lesions with good spatial resolution. For illustration, we present fluorescence mammograms of one patient recorded 30 min after administration of the contrast agent indocyanine green showing the carcinoma at high contrast originating from fluorescence of the extravasated dye, excited at 780 nm.

  20. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  1. The connecticut experiment: the role of ultrasound in the screening of women with dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Jean; Steenbergen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of screening breast ultrasound to improve breast cancer detection in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts. Six Connecticut radiology practices with 12 total sites participated in a retrospective chart review. The total number of screening mammograms, screening ultrasounds broken down by BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) codes, and the number of positive and negative biopsies were collected from November 2009 through November 2010. Demographic data on the patients with positive biopsies as well as cancer staging were also collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value, and Negative Predictive Value were calculated. A total of 72,030 screening mammograms and 8,647 screening ultrasounds were performed at the research sites during the study period. Relevant research indicates that 41% of the female population has dense breasts. In this study, 12% (8,647/72,030) underwent follow-up breast ultrasound screening. A total of 86% (7,451/8,647) of the ultrasounds were BIRADS 1 or 2, 9% (767/8,647) were BIRADS 3, 5% (429/8,647) were BIRADS 4 or 5. Of those 429 recommended to undergo biopsy 418 were performed and 28 cancers were found. There was one false negative. Screening breast ultrasound in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts has a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 6.7% (28/418), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 99.9% (7,450/7,451), sensitivity of 96.6% (28/29), and a specificity of 94.9% (7,450/7,851). Screening ultrasound had an additional yield of 3.25 per 1,000 cancers in women with dense breasts and normal mammograms and no additional risk factors. As with all screening tests, time, cost, and false positive risk must be considered.

  2. Reduction of radiation dose and imaging costs in scoliosis radiography. Application of large-screen image intensifier photofluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, H.; Kiekara, O.; Soimakallio, S.; Vainio, J.

    1988-04-01

    Photofluorography using a large-field image intensifier (Siemens Optilux 57) was applied to scoliosis radiography and compared with a full-size rare-earth screen/film technique. When scoliosis radiography (PA-projection) was performed on 25 adolescent patients, the photofluorographs were found to be of comparable diagnostic quality with full-size films. A close correspondence between the imaging techniques was found in the Cobb angle measurements as well as in the grading of rotation with the pedicle method. The use of photofluorography results in a radiation dose reduction of about one-half and considerable savings in direct imaging costs and archive space. In our opinion the method is particularly well-suited for follow-up and screening evaluation of scoliosis, but in tall patients the image field size of 40 x 40 cm restricts its usefulness as initial examination.

  3. Distribution of mammographic density and its influential factors among Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peishan; Liu, Peifang; Cao, Yali; Xiong, Li; Luo, Yahong; Pan, Tie; Ma, Xiangjun; Wang, Jie; Yang, Zhenhua; Liu, Xueou; Chen, Chuan; Huang, Yubei; Li, Yi; Wang, Yaogang; Hao, Xishan; Ye, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mammographic density (MD) has not been systematically investigated among Chinese women. Breast cancer screening programmes provided detailed information on MD in a large number of asymptomatic women. Methods: In the Multi-modality Independent Screening Trial (MIST), we estimated the association between MD and its influential factors using logistic regression, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI) and study area. Differences between Chinese and other ethnic groups with respect to MD were also explored with adjustment for age and BMI. Results: A total of 28 388 women aged 45 to 65 years, who had been screened by mammography, were enrolled in the study. Of these, 49.2% were categorized as having dense breasts (BI-RADS density 3 and 4) and 50.8% as fatty breasts (BI-RADS density 1 and 2). Postmenopausal status [odds ratio (OR) = 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62–0.70] and higher number of live births (OR = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.46–0.68) were inversely associated with MD, whereas prior benign breast disease (OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.40–1.56) and later age at first birth (OR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.08–1.27) were positively associated with MD. In comparison with the data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, we found that women in MIST were more likely to have fatty breasts than Americans (from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium) in the older age group (≥50 years) but more likely to have dense breasts in the younger age group (<50 years). Conclusions: This study suggests that several risk factors for breast cancer were associated with breast density in Chinese women. Information on the determinants of mammographic density may provide valuable insights into breast cancer aetiology. PMID:24639441

  4. Fractal Analysis of Radiologists Visual Scanning Pattern in Screening Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Alamudun, Folami T; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hudson, Kathy; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Tourassi, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators have investigated radiologists visual scanning patterns with respect to features such as total time examining a case, time to initially hit true lesions, number of hits, etc. The purpose of this study was to examine the complexity of the radiologists visual scanning pattern when viewing 4-view mammographic cases, as they typically do in clinical practice. Gaze data were collected from 10 readers (3 breast imaging experts and 7 radiology residents) while reviewing 100 screening mammograms (24 normal, 26 benign, 50 malignant). The radiologists scanpaths across the 4 mammographic views were mapped to a single 2-D image plane. Then, fractal analysis was applied on the derived scanpaths using the box counting method. For each case, the complexity of each radiologist s scanpath was estimated using fractal dimension. The association between gaze complexity, case pathology, case density, and radiologist experience was evaluated using 3 factor fixed effects ANOVA. ANOVA showed that case pathology, breast density, and experience level are all independent predictors of the visual scanning pattern complexity. Visual scanning patterns are significantly different for benign and malignant cases than for normal cases as well as when breast parenchyma density changes.

  5. Use of digital retinal imaging in screening for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Yogavijayan; Smith, Roger; Wright, Ian; Hartley, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of premature births is increasing world-wide. This factor, combined with improved survival and revised screening criteria, is resulting in an increased workload in screening for retinopathy of prematurity. Digital retinal imaging is emerging as an important alternative tool for diagnosing retinopathy of prematurity, and its use has even been extended to developing countries. Neonatal nurses and technicians can be trained to use digital imaging devices effectively. This is important in areas that do not have ready access to paediatric ophthalmologists. The ability to transfer images electronically makes it a valuable tool in telemedicine, while the ability to store and retrieve images is also advantageous from a medico-legal perspective. Image analysis software can further improve the accuracy of diagnosis. The main limitation of this technology is its high capital cost.

  6. Percent Mammographic Density and Dense Area as Risk Factors for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rauh, C; Hack, C C; Häberle, L; Hein, A; Engel, A; Schrauder, M G; Fasching, P A; Jud, S M; Ekici, A B; Loehberg, C R; Meier-Meitinger, M; Ozan, S; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Uder, M; Hartmann, A; Wachter, D L; Beckmann, M W; Heusinger, K

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Mammographic characteristics are known to be correlated to breast cancer risk. Percent mammographic density (PMD), as assessed by computer-assisted methods, is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Along with this assessment the absolute dense area (DA) of the breast is reported as well. Aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of DA concerning breast cancer risk in addition to other risk factors and in addition to PMD. Methods: We conducted a case control study with hospital-based patients with a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and healthy women as controls. A total of 561 patients and 376 controls with available mammographic density were included into this study. We describe the differences concerning the common risk factors BMI, parital status, use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and menopause between cases and controls and estimate the odds ratios for PMD and DA, adjusted for the mentioned risk factors. Furthermore we compare the prediction models with each other to find out whether the addition of DA improves the model. Results: Mammographic density and DA were highly correlated with each other. Both variables were as well correlated to the commonly known risk factors with an expected direction and strength, however PMD (ρ = -0.56) was stronger correlated to BMI than DA (ρ = -0.11). The group of women within the highest quartil of PMD had an OR of 2.12 (95 % CI: 1.25-3.62). This could not be seen for the fourth quartile concerning DA. However the assessment of breast cancer risk could be improved by including DA in a prediction model in addition to common risk factors and PMD. Conclusions: The inclusion of the parameter DA into a prediction model for breast cancer in addition to established risk factors and PMD could improve the breast cancer risk assessment. As DA is measured together with PMD in the process of computer-assisted assessment of PMD it might be considered to include it as one additional breast

  7. Percent Mammographic Density and Dense Area as Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, C.; Hack, C. C.; Häberle, L.; Hein, A.; Engel, A.; Schrauder, M. G.; Fasching, P. A.; Jud, S. M.; Ekici, A. B.; Loehberg, C. R.; Meier-Meitinger, M.; Ozan, S.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Uder, M.; Hartmann, A.; Wachter, D. L.; Beckmann, M. W.; Heusinger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic characteristics are known to be correlated to breast cancer risk. Percent mammographic density (PMD), as assessed by computer-assisted methods, is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Along with this assessment the absolute dense area (DA) of the breast is reported as well. Aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of DA concerning breast cancer risk in addition to other risk factors and in addition to PMD. Methods: We conducted a case control study with hospital-based patients with a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and healthy women as controls. A total of 561 patients and 376 controls with available mammographic density were included into this study. We describe the differences concerning the common risk factors BMI, parital status, use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and menopause between cases and controls and estimate the odds ratios for PMD and DA, adjusted for the mentioned risk factors. Furthermore we compare the prediction models with each other to find out whether the addition of DA improves the model. Results: Mammographic density and DA were highly correlated with each other. Both variables were as well correlated to the commonly known risk factors with an expected direction and strength, however PMD (ρ = −0.56) was stronger correlated to BMI than DA (ρ = −0.11). The group of women within the highest quartil of PMD had an OR of 2.12 (95 % CI: 1.25–3.62). This could not be seen for the fourth quartile concerning DA. However the assessment of breast cancer risk could be improved by including DA in a prediction model in addition to common risk factors and PMD. Conclusions: The inclusion of the parameter DA into a prediction model for breast cancer in addition to established risk factors and PMD could improve the breast cancer risk assessment. As DA is measured together with PMD in the process of computer-assisted assessment of PMD it might be considered to include it as one additional

  8. The Shrinking Breast: An Unusual Mammographic Finding of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Nazia F; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2007-01-01

    We report two cases of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that were initially missed on first mammographic interpretation because of an uncommon, easily overlooked, and unreported imaging presentation. The abnormality in the cases manifested as an apparent decrease in breast glandular tissue volume when compared with the patients' previous mammograms, observed as "shrinking" of the breast on mammography. Invasive lobular carcinoma is considered one of the most difficult subtypes of breast cancer to identify on mammography because the changes that occur are often nonspecific and subtle. Microcalcifications that are usually associated with breast masses on imaging are rarely seen in this subtype of breast cancer. Although magnetic resonance imaging and computer-aided detection have somewhat improved the detection of invasive lobular carcinoma, radiologic and clinical detection remains a challenge.

  9. Negative estrogen-receptor invasive breast carcinoma: mammographic aspects, correlations with HER2/neu oncoprotein status.

    PubMed

    Enache, Dana Elena; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Pătrană, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    This study involved 40 ER-negative female patients with invasive breast cancer, aged between 25 and 88 years, diagnosed at Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, during a two-year interval (2010-2011). All patients that took part in the study were subjected to a preoperative mammography exam, and later to HP and IHC exams, in order to detect the ER, PR and HER2 status. These exams were followed by CISH in ambiguous HER2 cases. The tumor detection method was palpation in 16 cases, whereas in 24 cases the method used was the screening mammography. Histopathologically, the analyzed tumors were infiltrative ductal carcinoma (35 cases), lobular carcinoma (one case), mucinous (two cases) and metaplastic carcinoma (two cases). Depending on the status of the oncoprotein HER2, the 40 ER-negative female patients included in the study formed two groups: the ER-negative, HER2-positive (11 cases, 27.5%) formed the first group and the ER-negative, HER2-negative (29 cases, 72.5%) formed the second group. Depending on the expression of the receptors for progesterone, 60% of cases were classified as triple negative mammary carcinomas (ER-, PR-, HER2-). The comparative study of the ER-negative, HER2-positive and the ER-negative, HER2-negative mammary carcinomas showed that the tumors of the ER-negative, HER2-positive group were mostly high degree cancers (80% vs. 56%), with negative progesterone receptors (81.81% vs. 48.27%), associated with axillary lymph node metastasis (63.63% vs. 48.27%), and were detected at a higher cancer stage (II/III) (81.81% vs. 62.06%). Regarding the mammographic features, the ER-negative HER2-positive breast cancers are more likely to be irregular masses (62.5% vs. 33.33%), with spiculated margins (45.45% vs. 6.9%), frequently associated with dense or heterogeneously dense breast (82% vs. 69%) and pleomorphic calcifications (62.5% vs. 28.57%) comparative with ER-negative HER2-negative cancers that were more frequently round/oval mass, with

  10. 78 FR 18287 - Passenger Screening Using Advanced Imaging Technology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... wave technology bounces electromagnetic waves off of the human body to detectors in the machine, which... removed pursuant to statute, as well as the non-ionizing electromagnetic waves from the millimeter wave... millimeter wave spectrum to generate a three-dimensional image based on the energy reflected from the...

  11. Towards Rapid Screening of Tagged MR Images of the Heart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    tag line from above of the infracted human cardiac image. The exaggerated curvature is because of zooming on the tag and unequal scaling of both axis...National Magnetic Resonance Conference, Izmir 2000 [9]. Goksel D., Ozkan M. ve Ozturk C., “MR Tag Analysis using Harmonic Phase Method”, 9. Signal Processing Conference, Northern Cyprus 2000

  12. Comparison of handheld ultrasound and automated breast ultrasound in women recalled after mammography screening.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Roxanna; Dickman, Paul; Leifland, Karin; Saracco, Ariel; Hall, Per; Celebioglu, Fuat

    2017-05-01

    Background Automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) is an ultrasound (US) device with a wide scanner that sweeps over a large area of the breast and the acquired transverse images are sent to a workstation for reconstruction and review. Whether ABVS is as reliable as handheld US is, however, still not established. Purpose To compare the sensitivity and specificity of ABVS to handheld breast US for detection of breast cancer, in the situation of recall after mammography screening. Material and Methods A total of 113 women, five with bilateral suspicious findings, undergoing handheld breast US due to a suspicious mammographic finding in screening, underwent additional ABVS. The methods were assessed for each breast and each detected lesion separately and classified into two categories: breasts with mammographic suspicion of malignancy and breasts with a negative mammogram. Results Twenty-six cancers were found in 25 women. In the category of breasts with a suspicious mammographic finding (n = 118), the sensitivity of both handheld US and ABVS was 88% (22/25). The specificity of handheld US was 93.5% (87/93) and ABVS was 89.2% (83/93). In the category of breasts with a negative mammography (n = 103), the sensitivity of handheld US and ABVS was 100% (1/1). The specificity of handheld US was 100% (102/102) and ABVS was 94.1% (96/102). Conclusion ABVS can potentially replace handheld US in the investigation of women recalled from mammography screening due to a suspicious finding. Due to the small size of our study population, further investigation with larger study populations is necessary before the implementation of such practice.

  13. Sclerosing adenosis: Ultrasonographic and mammographic findings and correlation with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Chen, Jia-Jian; Chang, Cai; Gao, Yi; Wu, Jiong; Yang, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiological findings, particularly the ultrasonographic (US) characteristics of sclerosing adenosis (SA), and their correlation with histopathological results. A retrospective review identified 191 patients with a total of 200 lesions histopathologically confirmed as SA following breast surgery between July 2009 and December 2012. Of the 191 patients, 145 (151 lesions) with SA as the major component were included for US and mammographic (MG) analysis. All 145 patients analyzed were female, with a mean age ± standard deviation of 46.8±7.8 years (range, 25–71 years). All 145 patients underwent US examination and the imaging findings included heterogeneously echogenic areas in 9.3% (14/151), masses in 51.7% (78/151), masses with calcifications in 13.9% (21/151), focal acoustic shadowing in 4.0% (6/151) and were negative in 21.2% (32/151) patients. Among the 119 lesions with visible abnormalities, 87.4% (104/119) were hypoechoic, 58.0% (69/119) were irregular in shape, 52.1% (62/119) had an ill-defined margin, calcifications were found in 17.6% (21/119) and 7.6% (9/119) were hypervascular, while none of the characteristics mentioned above were significantly correlated with histopathology. A total of 136 patients underwent MG at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, and the imaging findings included microcalcifications in 31.6% (43/136), masses in 23.5% (32/136), asymmetric focal density in 14.7% (20/136), focal architectural distortion in 22.8% (31/136), and were negative in 7.4% (10/136). The mass lesions were fewer on MG compared with US (23.5 vs. 65.6%, respectively). The area under the curve of US distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions was significantly larger compared with that of MG (0.547 vs. 0.497, respectively; P=0.036). In the 60 lesions that were overestimated by Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System US category, one or more characteristics of malignancy were found on US imaging. The

  14. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-08-15

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A{sub z}=0.783{+-}0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity.

  15. A Multi-Functional Imaging Approach to High-Content Protein Interaction Screening

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Daniel R.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O.; Weitsman, Gregory; Carlin, Leo M.; Ofo, Enyinnaya; Keppler, Melanie; Barber, Paul R.; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.

    2012-01-01

    Functional imaging can provide a level of quantification that is not possible in what might be termed traditional high-content screening. This is due to the fact that the current state-of-the-art high-content screening systems take the approach of scaling-up single cell assays, and are therefore based on essentially pictorial measures as assay indicators. Such phenotypic analyses have become extremely sophisticated, advancing screening enormously, but this approach can still be somewhat subjective. We describe the development, and validation, of a prototype high-content screening platform that combines steady-state fluorescence anisotropy imaging with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). This functional approach allows objective, quantitative screening of small molecule libraries in protein-protein interaction assays. We discuss the development of the instrumentation, the process by which information on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be extracted from wide-field, acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging and cross-checking of this modality using lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting. Imaging of cells expressing protein constructs where eGFP and mRFP1 are linked with amino-acid chains of various lengths (7, 19 and 32 amino acids) shows the two methodologies to be highly correlated. We validate our approach using a small-scale inhibitor screen of a Cdc42 FRET biosensor probe expressed in epidermoid cancer cells (A431) in a 96 microwell-plate format. We also show that acceptor fluorescence anisotropy can be used to measure variations in hetero-FRET in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate this using a screen of inhibitors of internalization of the transmembrane receptor, CXCR4. These assays enable us to demonstrate all the capabilities of the instrument, image processing and analytical techniques that have been developed. Direct correlation between acceptor anisotropy and donor FLIM is observed for FRET assays, providing

  16. Breast Cancer Detection: Mammography and other methods in breast imaging, second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The text addresses mammography and the advantages and limitations of other breast imaging methods presently available. The establishment of X-ray mammography as the safest and most accurate noninvasive method of early, nonpalpable breast cancer detection is addressed in the first section of the book. The second section emphasizes the signs of early cancer, the complete mammographic examination, and the team approach to diagnosis. The advantages and limitations of film-screen mammography, zero mammography, breast ultrasound, thermography, light scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, and ductography are highlighted as alternate methods of detection. The benefits of mammography, and its unmatched value in screeening for breast cancer, are presented in the final section.

  17. Centroids evaluation of the images obtained with the conical null-screen corneal topographer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio-Infante, Arturo I.; Armengol-Cruz, Victor de Emanuel; Campos-García, Manuel; Cossio-Guerrero, Cesar; Marquez-Flores, Jorge; Díaz-Uribe, José Rufino

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose some algorithms to recover the centroids of the resultant image obtained by a conical nullscreen based corneal topographer. With these algorithms, we obtain the region of interest (roi) of the original image and using an image-processing algorithm, we calculate the geometric centroid of each roi. In order to improve our algorithm performance, we use different settings of null-screen targets, changing their size and number. We also improved the illumination system to avoid inhomogeneous zones in the corneal images. Finally, we report some corneal topographic measurements with the best setting we found.

  18. Automatic screening and classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy using fuzzy image processing.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Sarni Suhaila; Palade, Vasile; Shuttleworth, James; Jayne, Chrisina

    2016-12-01

    Digital retinal imaging is a challenging screening method for which effective, robust and cost-effective approaches are still to be developed. Regular screening for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy diseases is necessary in order to identify the group at risk of visual impairment. This paper presents a novel automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in eye fundus images by employing fuzzy image processing techniques. The paper first introduces the existing systems for diabetic retinopathy screening, with an emphasis on the maculopathy detection methods. The proposed medical decision support system consists of four parts, namely: image acquisition, image preprocessing including four retinal structures localisation, feature extraction and the classification of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy. A combination of fuzzy image processing techniques, the Circular Hough Transform and several feature extraction methods are implemented in the proposed system. The paper also presents a novel technique for the macula region localisation in order to detect the maculopathy. In addition to the proposed detection system, the paper highlights a novel online dataset and it presents the dataset collection, the expert diagnosis process and the advantages of our online database compared to other public eye fundus image databases for diabetic retinopathy purposes.

  19. A Picture You Can Handle: Infants Treat Touch-Screen Images More Like Photographs than Objects.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Christine J; Snyder, Makenna

    2016-01-01

    Infants actively explore their world in order to determine the different ways in which they can interact with various objects. Although research on infant perception has focused on how infants understand the differences between 2- and 3-dimensional objects, today's infants increasingly encounter 2D images with interactive qualities on smart-phone screens, tablets, and laptops. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the types of manual behaviors infants direct toward tablet images and to compare these actions to those evoked by 2D photographs or 3D when tactile feedback is controlled. Infants between the ages of 7-10 months sat on their parent's lap in front of a table with a built-in well covered by a clear, plastic sheet while the three types of displays (photographs, objects, and screen images on a tablet) were presented for 30 s each. Infants saw three examples of each type of display presented in the built-in well so that tactile feedback information from the different displays was controlled. Coders noted the proportion of trials in which infants grasped, scratched, rubbed, or patted the display. Results indicate that infants direct significantly more grasps, scratches, and rubs toward 3D objects than 2D photographs. Infants also direct more grasps to objects compared to screen images. Our data suggests that infants are treating screen images more similarly to 2D photographs than 3D objects.

  20. A Picture You Can Handle: Infants Treat Touch-Screen Images More Like Photographs than Objects

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, Christine J.; Snyder, Makenna

    2016-01-01

    Infants actively explore their world in order to determine the different ways in which they can interact with various objects. Although research on infant perception has focused on how infants understand the differences between 2- and 3-dimensional objects, today’s infants increasingly encounter 2D images with interactive qualities on smart-phone screens, tablets, and laptops. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the types of manual behaviors infants direct toward tablet images and to compare these actions to those evoked by 2D photographs or 3D when tactile feedback is controlled. Infants between the ages of 7–10 months sat on their parent’s lap in front of a table with a built-in well covered by a clear, plastic sheet while the three types of displays (photographs, objects, and screen images on a tablet) were presented for 30 s each. Infants saw three examples of each type of display presented in the built-in well so that tactile feedback information from the different displays was controlled. Coders noted the proportion of trials in which infants grasped, scratched, rubbed, or patted the display. Results indicate that infants direct significantly more grasps, scratches, and rubs toward 3D objects than 2D photographs. Infants also direct more grasps to objects compared to screen images. Our data suggests that infants are treating screen images more similarly to 2D photographs than 3D objects. PMID:27597837

  1. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 3 Lesions Detected on Whole-Breast Screening Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sang Yu; Ko, Eun Young; Han, Boo-Kyung; Shin, Jung Hee; Hahn, Soo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the incidence and cancer rate of probably benign lesions detected on bilateral whole-breast screening ultrasound (US), which corresponded to US Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3, and evaluated the proper management of those lesions. Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board in our institution, which waived informed patient consent. We retrospectively reviewed US images of 1,666 patients who underwent bilateral whole-breast screening US as a supplemental screening test to negative screening mammography or screening US only. The incidence, clinical course, and cancer rate of screening US-detected probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were investigated, and the size and multiplicity of screening US-detected category 3 lesions were evaluated. Results Probably benign lesions corresponding to US BI-RADS category 3 were detected in 689 of 1,666 patients (41.4%) who underwent screening US. Among them, 653 had follow-up US images for at least 24 months, and among these 653, 190 (29.1%) had multiple bilateral category 3 lesions. Moreover, 539 of 1,666 patients (32.4%) had lesions ≤1 cm in size and 114 of 1,666 (6.8%) had lesions >1 cm (median, 0.82 cm; range, 0.3–4.2 cm). Four of the 653 patients (0.6%) showed suspicious interval changes and were categorized into BI-RADS category 4. Biopsy analysis confirmed only one lesion as invasive ductal carcinoma at the 6-month follow-up; another lesion was an intraductal papilloma and the remaining two were fibroadenomas. Overall cancer rate of the screening US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions was 0.2%. Conclusion The incidence of category 3 lesions detected on screening US only was very high, but the cancer rate was very low. Therefore, in an average-risk population, routine screening US is preferable over short-term follow-up for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected on whole-breast screening US. PMID:27721880

  2. New York State Breast Density Mandate: Follow-up Data With Screening Sonography.

    PubMed

    Destounis, Stamatia; Arieno, Andrea; Morgan, Renee

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the impact on breast cancer detection from screening breast sonography performed in women with mammographically dense breasts. This study used a retrospective chart review. Data collected included total number of screening mammograms, total number of dense breast screening sonograms, total number of procedures performed, biopsy results, and demographic data. Data were obtained from January 1, 2013, through August 31, 2015. During this period, there were a total of 195,982 screening mammographic examinations performed at our facility. Of these, 83,234 patients (42.5%) were informed that their breast tissue was heterogeneously dense or extremely dense. We specifically reviewed cases to identify those with findings on sonography only. The positive predictive value, biopsy rate, and cancer detection rate were determined. During the study period, 5434 screening sonographic examinations were performed in 4898 women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts. Most (95.7%) of the sonographic examinations resulted in an American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 1 or 2 designation. A total of 101 lesions were given a BI-RADS 3 designation; 134 suspicious findings were given a BI-RADS 4 or 5 designation; and 100 of these were seen on sonography only, all of which underwent tissue sampling, resulting in the diagnosis of 18 malignancies; all were invasive. In evaluating screening sonographic findings, we found a positive predictive value of 18.0%, with an overall biopsy rate of 2.0% and a cancer detection rate of 3.3 per 1000. The results of our continued evaluation of our screening sonography program confirm that screening breast sonography in women with dense breast tissue can detect otherwise occult malignancy, with a low biopsy rate. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. The potential of imaging techniques as a screening tool for colorectal cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berkhof, Johannes; Fijneman, Remond J A; Demirel, Erhan; Lew, Jie-Bin; Meijer, Gerrit A; Stoker, Jaap; Coupé, Veerle M H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Imaging may be promising for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, since it has test characteristics comparable with colonoscopy but is less invasive. We aimed to assess the potential of CT colonography (CTC) and MR colonography (MRC) in terms of (cost-effectiveness) using the Adenoma and Serrated pathway to Colorectal CAncer model. Methods: We compared several CTC and MRC strategies with 5- or 10-yearly screening intervals with no screening, 10-yearly colonoscopy screening and biennial faecal immunochemical test (FIT) screening. We assumed trial-based participation rates in the base-case analyses and varied the rates in sensitivity analyses. Incremental lifetime costs and health effects were estimated from a healthcare perspective. Results: The health gain of CTC and MRC was similar and ranged from 0.031 to 0.048 life-year gained compared with no screening, for 2–5 screening rounds. Lifetime costs per person for MRC strategies were €60–110 higher than those for CTC strategies with an equal number of screening rounds. All imaging-based strategies were cost-effective compared with no screening. FIT screening was the dominant screening strategy, leading to most LYG and highest cost-savings. Compared with three rounds of colonoscopy screening, CTC with five rounds was found to be cost-effective in an incremental analysis of imaging strategies. Assumptions on screening participation have a major influence on the ordering of strategies in terms of costs and effects. Conclusion: CTC and MRC have potential for CRC screening, compared with no screening and compared with three rounds of 10-yearly colonoscopy screening. When taking FIT screening as the reference, imaging is not cost-effective. Participation is an important driver of effectiveness and cost estimates. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study to assess the cost-effectiveness of MRC screening for CRC. PMID:27194458

  4. Time course of perception and decision making during mammographic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nodine, Calvin F; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Kundel, Harold L; Weinstein, Susan P

    2002-10-01

    This article describes the time course of lesion detection on digital mammograms using data about both eye position and decision time to compare performance between experienced mammographers and trainees. Research indicates that a longer decision time works against performance in the interpretation of chest radiographs because the likelihood of error is increased, particularly for trainees. Is this relation between decision time and performance also true for interpreting mammograms? Is there an optimal decision time-performance trade-off for detecting breast lesions? Six radiology trainees (experience, 302-976 cases) and three mammographers (experience, 3000-5000 cases per year) reviewed 40 test cases. Each test case was represented by two mammograms that showed different views of the same breast. Twenty breasts contained suspicious lesions, and 20 were lesion-free. An interactive computer display system with an eye-head tracker measured the timing of decisions, where visual attention was directed, and how much time was spent fixating on a region of interest for each decision. Eye position was monitored during an initial-decision phase, and decision times were measured throughout a final-decision phase during which suspicious lesions recognized initially were interpreted and localized. Performance was analyzed using localization receiver operating characteristic curves. The time course of interpreting mammograms is similar to that for interpreting chest radiographs. Mammographers detected 71% of the true lesions within 25 sec, and trainees detected 46% within 40 sec. Both a fixation dwell time of 1000 msec and a high level of confidence in the decision were associated with the detection of true lesions for the mammographers but not for the trainees. Mammographers detected most breast lesions by global recognition within 25 sec, but trainees took more time. Prolonging one's search beyond the global recognition phase yielded few new lesions and increased the risk of

  5. The relationship between education level and mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-11-01

    To further understand the factors that contribute to interindividual variation in mammographic density, we evaluated the relationship between education level and each component of the mammographic density measures. Study participants included 535 women between 40 and 65 years of age who received a mammogram for a population-based twin and family study. Mammographic density was measured from digital mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. To avoid negative confounding by obesity level, we calculated BMI-adjusted mammographic measures. Thereafter, each of the mammographic density measures was t-transformed using its mean value and SD for each age strata. The level of education was chosen as a marker representing socioeconomic status at the individual level. A linear mixed model considering familial correlations was used for analyses. In the unadjusted analysis for all women, the BMI-adjusted nondense area gradually decreased with an increase in education level (P for trend=0.017). This association persisted after adjusting for menstrual and reproductive factors. When we repeated the analysis according to menopausal status, an inverse association between education level and nondense area was evident in premenopausal women, whereas the inverse association attenuated to a statistically insignificant level after adjusting for menstrual and reproductive factors in postmenopausal women. Absolute dense area and percentage dense area were not associated with education level. The significant association between nondense area and education level after eliminating the effect of age and BMI suggests that socioeconomic factors may have an influential role in determining the amount of fat tissue in the breast.

  6. Security screening via computational imaging using frequency-diverse metasurface apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Marks, Daniel L.; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Yurduseven, Okan; Arnitz, Daniel; Pedross-Engel, Andreas; Sleasman, Timothy; Trofatter, Parker; Boyarsky, Michael; Rose, Alec; Odabasi, Hayrettin; Lipworth, Guy

    2017-05-01

    Computational imaging is a proven strategy for obtaining high-quality images with fast acquisition rates and simpler hardware. Metasurfaces provide exquisite control over electromagnetic fields, enabling the radiated field to be molded into unique patterns. The fusion of these two concepts can bring about revolutionary advances in the design of imaging systems for security screening. In the context of computational imaging, each field pattern serves as a single measurement of a scene; imaging a scene can then be interpreted as estimating the reflectivity distribution of a target from a set of measurements. As with any computational imaging system, the key challenge is to arrive at a minimal set of measurements from which a diffraction-limited image can be resolved. Here, we show that the information content of a frequency-diverse metasurface aperture can be maximized by design, and used to construct a complete millimeter-wave imaging system spanning a 2 m by 2 m area, consisting of 96 metasurfaces, capable of producing diffraction-limited images of human-scale targets. The metasurfacebased frequency-diverse system presented in this work represents an inexpensive, but tremendously flexible alternative to traditional hardware paradigms, offering the possibility of low-cost, real-time, and ubiquitous screening platforms.

  7. Combined use of backscattered and transmitted images in x-ray personnel screening systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, B.; Schiefele, Markus; Alvino, Christopher; Miller, Eric; Al-Kofani, Omar

    2012-06-01

    Current aviation security relies heavily on personnel screening using X-ray backscatter systems or other advanced imaging technologies. Passenger privacy concerns and screening times can be reduced through the use of low-dose twosided X-ray backscatter (Bx) systems, which also have the ability to collect transmission (Tx) X-ray. Bx images reveal objects placed on the body, such as contraband and security threats, as well as anatomical features at or close to the surface, such as lungs cavities and bones. While the quality of the transmission images is lower than medical imagery due to the low X-ray dose, Tx images can be of significant value in interpreting features in the Bx images, such as lung cavities, which can cause false alarms in automated threat detection (ATD) algorithms. Here we demonstrate an ATD processing chain fusing both Tx and BX images. The approach employs automatically extracted fiducial points on the body and localized active contour methods to segments lungs in acquired Tx and Bx images. Additionally, we derive metrics from the Tx image can be related to the probability of observing internal body structure in the Bx image. The combined use of Tx and Bx data can enable improved overall system performance.

  8. History, evolution, and current status of radiologic imaging tests for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Yee, Judy

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is thought to be an effective tool with which to reduce the mortality from colorectal cancer through early detection and removal of colonic adenomas and early colon cancers. In this article, we review the history, evolution, and current status of imaging tests of the colon-including single-contrast barium enema, double-contrast barium enema, computed tomographic (CT) colonography, and magnetic resonance (MR) colonography-for colorectal cancer screening. Despite its documented value in the detection of colonic polyps, the double-contrast barium enema has largely disappeared as a screening test because it is widely perceived as a labor-intensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding procedure. In the past decade, the barium enema has been supplanted by CT colonography as the major imaging test in colorectal cancer screening in the United States, with MR colonography emerging as another viable option in Europe. Although MR colonography does not require ionizing radiation, the radiation dose for CT colonography has decreased substantially, and regular screening with this technique has a high benefit-to-risk ratio. In recent years, CT colonography has been validated as an effective tool for use in colorectal cancer screening that is increasingly being disseminated.

  9. Imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations for narcotics and explosives screening

    SciTech Connect

    Trower, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    The author describes a nuclear technique for imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations with surface densities characteristics of bulk narcotics and concealed explosives, the Carbon and the Nitrogen Camera. The physics is rooted in the tightly bound carbon-12 nucleus to which its neighboring isobars, nitrogen-12 and boron-12, decay rapidly (11 and 20 ms), mostly to its ground state, by emitting energetic beta particles (E{sub {beta}}{sup max} {approximately} 13 and 17 MeV) all of which produce bremsstrahlung and some yield annihilate radiation. The signal, photons detected in the multiscalar mode, results from the reactions {sup 13}C({gamma},p){sup 12}{Beta} for the bulk narcotics application and {sup 14}N({gamma},2n){sup 12}N and 14N({gamma},2p){sup 12}{Beta} for explosives detection and are initiated by a stepped pulsed electron beam with energy of {approximately} 30 and {approximately} 50 MeV, respectively. Images of 180 {approximately} 5 cm{sup 2} pixels taken in {approximately} 7 seconds will be presented of the carbon in a kilo of cocaine and the nitrogen in 125 grams of SEMTEX.

  10. Radiation dose affected by mammographic composition and breast size: first application of a radiation dose management system for full-field digital mammography in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Hyun Sil

    2017-02-02

    Relative to Western women, Korean women show several differences in breast-related characteristics, including higher rates of dense breasts and small breasts. We investigated how mammographic composition and breast size affect the glandular dose during full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in Korean women using a radiation dose management system. From June 1 to June 30, 2015, 2120 FFDM images from 560 patients were acquired and mammographic breast composition and breast size were assessed. We analyzed the correlations of patient age, peak kilovoltage (kVp), current (mAs), compressed breast thickness, compression force, mammographic breast composition, and mammographic breast size with the mean glandular dose (MGD) of the breast using a radiation dose management system. The causes of increased radiation were investigated, among patients with radiation doses above the diagnostic reference level (4th quartile, ≥75%). The MGD per view of 2120 images was 1.81 ± 0.70 mGy. In multivariate linear regression analysis, age was negatively associated with MGD (p < 0.05). The mAs, kVp, compressed breast thickness, and mammographic breast size were positively associated with MGD (p < 0.05). The "dense" group had a significantly higher MGD than the "non-dense" group (p < 0.05). Patients with radiation dose values above the diagnostic reference value had large breasts of dense composition. Among Korean women, patients with large and dense breasts should be more carefully managed to ensure that a constant radiation dose is maintained.

  11. Retinal Image Classification for the Screening of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, Mohd Hanafi Ahmad; Coenen, Frans; Zheng, Yalin

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in old-age. Early identification of AMD can allow for mitigation (but not cure). One of the fist symptoms of AMD is the presence of fatty deposits, called drusen, on the retina. The presence of drusen may be identified through inspection of retina images. Given the aging global population, the prevalence of AMD is increasing. Many health authorities therefore run screening programmes. The automation, or at least partial automation, of retina image screening is therefore seen as beneficial. This paper describes a Case Based Reasoning (CBR) approach to retina image classification to provide support for AMD screening programmes. In the proposed approach images are represented in the form of spatial-histograms that store both colour and spatial image information. Each retina image is represented using a series of histograms each encapsulated as a time series curve. The Case Base (CB) is populated with a labelled set of such curves. New cases are classified by finding the most similar case (curve) in the CB. Similarity checking is achieved using the Dynamic Time warping (DTW).

  12. Tolerability of magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy for esophageal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takenaka, Ryuta; Hori, Keisuke; Takemoto, Koji; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the tolerability of magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy for esophageal cancer screening with that of lugol chromoendoscopy. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled and analyzed 51 patients who were at high risk for esophageal cancer. All patients were divided into two groups: a magnifying narrow band imaging group, and a lugol chromoendoscopy group, for comparison of adverse symptoms. Esophageal cancer screening was performed on withdrawal of the endoscope. The primary endpoint was a score on a visual analogue scale for heartburn after the examination. The secondary endpoints were scale scores for retrosternal pain and dyspnea after the examinations, change in vital signs, total procedure time, and esophageal observation time. RESULTS: The scores for heartburn and retrosternal pain in the magnifying narrow band imaging group were significantly better than those in the lugol chromoendoscopy group (P = 0.004, 0.024, respectively, ANOVA for repeated measures). The increase in heart rate after the procedure was significantly greater in the lugol chromoendoscopy group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to other vital sign. The total procedure time and esophageal observation time in the magnifying narrow band imaging group were significantly shorter than those in the lugol chromoendoscopy group (450 ± 116 vs 565 ± 174, P = 0.004, 44 ± 26 vs 151 ± 72, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Magnifying narrow band imaging endoscopy reduced the adverse symptoms compared with lugol chromoendoscopy. Narrow band imaging endoscopy is useful and suitable for esophageal cancer screening periodically. PMID:25759551

  13. Investigation of the performance of digital mammographic X-ray equipment: determination of noise equivalent quanta (NEQQC) and detective quantum efficiency (DQEQC) compared with the automated analysis of CDMAM test images with CDCOM and CDIC programs.

    PubMed

    Loos, C; Buhr, H; Blendl, C

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the values for noise equivalent quanta, detective quantum efficiency, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and the values for the parameters for automated CDMAM test phantom analyses required to achieve satisfactory quality of digital mammograms. During the course of tests according to PAS 1054 (8 CR and 12 DR systems), test images were made with a test phantom insertion plate containing two lead edges in nearly horizontal and vertical directions. Only original data were processed with a program that was developed at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences (FH-Köln). All equipment systems complied with the requirements regarding visual recognition of gold-plated mammo detail test objects. CDMAM test images were also evaluated using the CDIC (CUAS) and CDCOM (EUREF) programs. CDMAM test images show comparable values for the parameters, precision, sensitivity and specificity. DR systems require about half the dose used for CR systems for similar results. The NEQ values achieved with the dose used for the CDMAM test images show larger scatter ranges. The MTF of the different equipment system types differ significantly from each other. Visual evaluation of CDMAM test images can be replaced by automated evaluation. Limiting values were determined for each parameter. Automated evaluation of CDMAM test phantom images should be used to determine the physical parameter NEQQC. This method is much more sensitive to noise and sharpness influences and has a higher validity than diagnostic methods. Automated evaluation objectivizes testing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Screening and comparison of polychromatic and monochromatic image reconstruction of abdominal arterial energy spectrum CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, X P; Wang, B; Hou, P; Li, R; Gao, J B

    2017-01-01

    We screened the suitable image reconstruction to observe the abdominal artery and compare the quality between the polychromatic and the monochromatic reconstruction images of the abdominal artery spectrum CT. Eighty patients underwent Gemstone CT energy spectrum imaging to obtain an abdominal artery polychromatic image (140 kVp) and a monochromatic image from 40 ~ 140 keV. The CT value of region of interest (ROI) was measured on the polychromatic image and the single energy image. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery were determined. The images in each group underwent image quality subjective scoring by three experienced radiologists using a blinded method. Finally, comprehensive comparisons and image quality subjective scorings were performed on the CT, SNR, and CNR values of the abdominal aorta. The obtained data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 19.0 software. When the keV value was reduced, the CT value of the abdominal artery gradually increased, and the image noise also changed. The comprehensive comparisons and subjective scorings were finalized for each single energy image based on the abdominal artery image quality objective indicators (CT value, SNR, and CNR). Results revealed that the abdominal artery image quality in the 50 ~ 60 keV monochromatic group was better compared to the polychromatic group. Furthermore, onochromatic imaging had different impacts on the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery image qualities. In different types of abdominal arterial reconstruction images obtained using abdominal energy spectrum CT conventional enhanced scanning, the image quality of the 50 ~ 60keV monochromatic reconstruction was higher when compared with the polychromatic reconstruction. Thus, it is recommended to apply the conventional reconstruction for abdominal artery energy spectrum CT scanning.

  15. IDIOS: An innovative index for evaluating dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices

    PubMed Central

    Halboub, Esam; Almashraqi, Abeer Abdulkareem; Khattab, Razan; Al Haffar, Iyad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop a new index as an objective reference for evaluating current and newly developed indices used for osteoporosis screening based on dental images. Its name; IDIOS, stands for Index of Dental-imaging Indices of Osteoporosis Screening. Materials and Methods A comprehensive PubMed search was conducted to retrieve studies on dental imaging-based indices for osteoporosis screening. The results of the eligible studies, along with other relevant criteria, were used to develop IDIOS, which has scores ranging from 0 (0%) to 15 (100%). The indices presented in the studies we included were then evaluated using IDIOS. Results The 104 studies that were included utilized 24, 4, and 9 indices derived from panoramic, periapical, and computed tomographic/cone-beam computed tomographic techniques, respectively. The IDIOS scores for these indices ranged from 0 (0%) to 11.75 (78.32%). Conclusion IDIOS is a valuable reference index that facilitates the evaluation of other dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices. Furthermore, IDIOS can be utilized to evaluate the accuracy of newly developed indices. PMID:27672615

  16. A tool for automated diabetic retinopathy pre-screening based on retinal image computer analysis.

    PubMed

    Gegundez-Arias, Manuel E; Marin, Diego; Ponte, Beatriz; Alvarez, Fatima; Garrido, Javier; Ortega, Carlos; Vasallo, Manuel J; Bravo, Jose M

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology and first results of an automatic detection system of first signs of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) in fundus images, developed for the Health Ministry of the Andalusian Regional Government (Spain). The system detects the presence of microaneurysms and haemorrhages in retinography by means of techniques of digital image processing and supervised classification. Evaluation was conducted on 1058 images of 529 diabetic patients at risk of presenting evidence of DR (an image of each eye is provided). To this end, a ground-truth diagnosis was created based on gradations performed by 3 independent ophthalmology specialists. The comparison between the diagnosis provided by the system and the reference clinical diagnosis shows that the system can work at a level of sensitivity that is similar to that achieved by experts (0.9380 sensitivity per patient against 0.9416 sensitivity of several specialists). False negatives have proven to be mild cases. Moreover, while the specificity of the system is significantly lower than that of human graders (0.5098), it is high enough to screen more than half of the patients unaffected by the disease. Results are promising in integrating this system in DR screening programmes. At an early stage, the system could act as a pre-screening system, by screening healthy patients (with no obvious signs of DR) and identifying only those presenting signs of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High

  18. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-04-25

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5-20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1-40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as "long distance observation and short distance operation" and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery.

  19. Color correction for projected image on colored-screen based on a camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Chul; Lee, Tae-Hyoung; Choi, Myong-Hui; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Recently, projector is one of the most common display devices not only for presentation at