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Sample records for mammography image quality

  1. Quality Imaging - Comparison of CR Mammography with Screen-Film Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaona, E.; Azorin Nieto, J.; Iran Diaz Gongora, J. A.; Arreola, M.; Casian Castellanos, G.; Perdigon Castaneda, G. M.; Franco Enriquez, J. G.

    2006-09-08

    The aim of this work is a quality imaging comparison of CR mammography images printed to film by a laser printer with screen-film mammography. A Giotto and Elscintec dedicated mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in screen-film mammography. Four CR mammography units from two different manufacturers and three dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure and a nominal large focal spot size of 0.3 mm were used for the image acquisition of phantoms in CR mammography. The tests quality image included an assessment of system resolution, scoring phantom images, Artifacts, mean optical density and density difference (contrast). In this study, screen-film mammography with a quality control program offers a significantly greater level of quality image relative to CR mammography images printed on film.

  2. Physical measures of image quality in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.

    1996-04-01

    A recently introduced method for quantitative analysis of images of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography accreditation phantom has been extended to include signal- to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements, and has been applied to survey the image quality of 54 mammography machines from 17 hospitals. Participants sent us phantom images to be evaluated for each mammography machine at their hospital. Each phantom was loaned to us for obtaining images of the wax insert plate on a reference machine at our institution. The images were digitized and analyzed to yield indices that quantified the image quality of the machines precisely. We have developed methods for normalizing for the variation of the individual speck sizes between different ACR phantoms, for the variation of the speck sizes within a microcalcification group, and for variations in overall speeds of the mammography systems. In terms of the microcalcification SNR, the variability of the x-ray machines was 40.5% when no allowance was made for phantom or mAs variations. This dropped to 17.1% when phantom variability was accounted for, and to 12.7% when mAs variability was also allowed for. Our work shows the feasibility of practical, low-cost, objective and accurate evaluations, as a useful adjunct to the present ACR method.

  3. Reproducibility of Mammography Units, Film Processing and Quality Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the problems of quality control in mammography and processors units as a diagnosis of the current situation of mammography facilities. Measurements of reproducibility, optical density, optical difference and gamma index are included. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is a radiographic examination specially designed for detecting breast pathology. We found that the problems of reproducibility of AEC are smaller than the problems of processors units because almost all processors fall outside of the acceptable variation limits and they can affect the mammography quality image and the dose to breast. Only four mammography units agree with the minimum score established by ACR and FDA for the phantom image.

  4. Evaluation of image quality in computed radiography based mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhinav; Bhwaria, Vipin; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Mammography is the most widely accepted procedure for the early detection of breast cancer and Computed Radiography (CR) is a cost-effective technology for digital mammography. We have demonstrated that CR mammography image quality is viable for Digital Mammography. The image quality of mammograms acquired using Computed Radiography technology was evaluated using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE). The measurements were made using a 28 kVp beam (RQA M-II) using 2 mm of Al as a filter and a target/filter combination of Mo/Mo. The acquired image bit depth was 16 bits and the pixel pitch for scanning was 50 microns. A Step-Wedge phantom (to measure the Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) and the CDMAM 3.4 Contrast Detail phantom were also used to assess the image quality. The CNR values were observed at varying thickness of PMMA. The CDMAM 3.4 phantom results were plotted and compared to the EUREF acceptable and achievable values. The effect on image quality was measured using the physics metrics. A lower DQE was observed even with a higher MTF. This could be possibly due to a higher noise component present due to the way the scanner was configured. The CDMAM phantom scores demonstrated a contrast-detail comparable to the EUREF values. A cost-effective CR machine was optimized for high-resolution and high-contrast imaging.

  5. The influence of software filtering in digital mammography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C.; Spyropoulou, V.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women. Several techniques have been developed to help in the early detection of breast cancer such as conventional and digital x-ray mammography, positron and single-photon emission mammography, etc. A key advantage in digital mammography is that images can be manipulated as simple computer image files. Thus non-dedicated commercially available image manipulation software can be employed to process and store the images. The image processing tools of the Photoshop (CS 2) software usually incorporate digital filters which may be used to reduce image noise, enhance contrast and increase spatial resolution. However, improving an image quality parameter may result in degradation of another. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of three sharpening filters, named hereafter sharpen, sharpen more and sharpen edges on image resolution and noise. Image resolution was assessed by means of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).In conclusion it was found that the correct use of commercial non-dedicated software on digital mammograms may improve some aspects of image quality.

  6. Average glandular dose and phantom image quality in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M.; Nogueira, M. S.; Guedes, E.; Andrade, M. C.; Peixoto, J. E.; Joana, G. S.; Castro, J. G.

    2007-09-01

    Doses in mammography should be maintained as low as possible without reducing the high image quality needed for early detection of the breast cancer. The breast is composed of tissues with very close composition and densities. It increases the difficulty to detect small changes in the normal anatomical structures which may be associated with breast cancer. To achieve the standards of definition and contrast for mammography, the quality and intensity of the X-ray beam, the breast positioning and compression, the film-screen system, and the film processing have to be in optimal operational conditions. This study sought to evaluate average glandular dose (AGD) and image quality on a standard phantom in 134 mammography units in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between December 2004 and May 2006. AGDs were obtained by means of entrance kerma measured with TL LiF100 dosimeters on phantom surface. Phantom images were obtained with automatic exposure technique, fixed 28 kV and molybdenum anode-filter combination. The phantom used contained structures simulating tumoral masses, microcalcifications, fibers and low contrast areas. High-resolution metallic meshes to assess image definition and a stepwedge to measure image contrast index were also inserted in the phantom. The visualization of simulated structures, the mean optical density and the contrast index allowed to classify the phantom image quality in a seven-point scale. The results showed that 54.5% of the facilities did not achieve the minimum performance level for image quality. It is mainly due to insufficient film processing observed in 61.2% of the units. AGD varied from 0.41 to 2.73 mGy with a mean value of 1.32±0.44 mGy. In all optimal quality phantom images, AGDs were in this range. Additionally, in 7.3% of the mammography units, the AGD constraint of 2 mGy was exceeded. One may conclude that dose level to patient and image quality are not in conformity to regulations in most of the facilities. This

  7. A survey on performance status of mammography machines: image quality and dosimetry studies using a standard mammography imaging phantom.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Mayya, Y S

    2012-07-01

    It is essential to perform quality control (QC) tests on mammography equipment in order to produce an appropriate image quality at a lower radiation dose to patients. Imaging and dosimetric measurements on 15 mammography machines located at the busiest radiology centres of Mumbai, India were carried out using a standard CIRS breast imaging phantom in order to see the level of image quality and breast doses. The QC tests include evaluations of image quality and the mean glandular doses (MGD), which is derived from the breast entrance exposure, half-value layer (HVL), compressed breast thickness (CBT) and breast tissue compositions. At the majority of the centres, film-processing and darkroom conditions were not found to be maintained, which is required to meet the technical development specifications for the mammography film in use as recommended by the American College of Radiology (ACR). In most of the surveyed centres, the viewbox luminance and room illuminance conditions were not found to be in line with the mammography requirements recommended by the ACR. The measured HVL values of the machines were in the range of 0.27-0.39 mm aluminium (Al) with a mean value of 0.33±0.04 mm Al at 28 kV(p) following the recommendation provided by ACR. The measured MGDs were in the range of 0.14-3.80 mGy with a mean value of 1.34 mGy. The measured MGDs vary between centre to centre by a factor of 27.14. Referring to patient doses and image quality, it was observed that only one mammography centre has exceeded the recommended MGD, i.e. 3.0 mGy per view with the value of 3.80 mGy and at eight mammography centres the measured central background density (CBD) values for mammography phantom image are found to be less than the recommended CBD limit value of 1.2-2.0 optical density. PMID:22090414

  8. Comparison of Image Quality Criteria between Digital Storage Phosphor Plate in Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in the Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thevi Rajendran, Pushpa; Krishnapillai, Vijayalakshmi; Tamanang, Sulaiman; Kumari Chelliah, Kanaga

    2012-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography is slowly replacing screen film mammography. In digital mammography, 2 methods are available in acquiring images: digital storage phosphor plate and full-field digital mammography. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality acquired from the 2 methods of digital mammography in the detection of breast cancer. Methods: The study took place at the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, and followed 150 asymptomatic women for the duration of 1 year. Participating women gave informed consent and were exposed to 4 views from each system. Two radiologists independently evaluated the printed images based on the image quality criteria in mammography. McNemar’s test was used to compare the image quality criteria between the systems. Results: The agreement between the radiologists for the digital storage phosphor plate was к = 0.551 and for full-field digital mammography was к = 0.523. Full-field digital mammography was significantly better compared with the digital storage phosphor plate in right and left mediolateral oblique views (P < 0.05) in the detection of microcalcifications, which are early signs of breast cancer. However, both systems were comparable in all other aspects of image quality. Conclusion: Digital mammography is a useful screening tool for the detection of early breast cancer and ensures better prognosis and quality of life. PMID:22977375

  9. Exploratory survey of image quality on CR digital mammography imaging systems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Arreola, M; Franco, J; Molina, N; Alvarez, B; Azorín, C G; Casian, G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of image quality and dose in computed radiographic digital mammography (CRDM) systems. Studies included CRDM systems of various models and manufacturers which dose and image quality comparisons were performed. Due to the recent rise in the use of digital radiographic systems in Mexico, CRDM systems are rapidly replacing conventional film-screen systems without any regard to quality control or image quality standards. Study was conducted in 65 mammography facilities which use CRDM systems in the Mexico City and surrounding States. The systems were tested as used clinically. This means that the dose and beam qualities were selected using the automatic beam selection and photo-timed features. All systems surveyed generate laser film hardcopies for the radiologist to read on a scope or mammographic high luminance light box. It was found that 51 of CRDM systems presented a variety of image artefacts and non-uniformities arising from inadequate acquisition and processing, as well as from the laser printer itself. Undisciplined alteration of image processing settings by the technologist was found to be a serious prevalent problem in 42 facilities. Only four of them showed an image QC program which is periodically monitored by a medical physicist. The Average Glandular Dose (AGD) in the surveyed systems was estimated to have a mean value of 2.4 mGy. To improve image quality in mammography and make more efficient screening mammographic in early detection of breast cancer is required new legislation.

  10. Exploratory survey of image quality on CR digital mammography imaging systems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Arreola, M; Franco, J; Molina, N; Alvarez, B; Azorín, C G; Casian, G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of image quality and dose in computed radiographic digital mammography (CRDM) systems. Studies included CRDM systems of various models and manufacturers which dose and image quality comparisons were performed. Due to the recent rise in the use of digital radiographic systems in Mexico, CRDM systems are rapidly replacing conventional film-screen systems without any regard to quality control or image quality standards. Study was conducted in 65 mammography facilities which use CRDM systems in the Mexico City and surrounding States. The systems were tested as used clinically. This means that the dose and beam qualities were selected using the automatic beam selection and photo-timed features. All systems surveyed generate laser film hardcopies for the radiologist to read on a scope or mammographic high luminance light box. It was found that 51 of CRDM systems presented a variety of image artefacts and non-uniformities arising from inadequate acquisition and processing, as well as from the laser printer itself. Undisciplined alteration of image processing settings by the technologist was found to be a serious prevalent problem in 42 facilities. Only four of them showed an image QC program which is periodically monitored by a medical physicist. The Average Glandular Dose (AGD) in the surveyed systems was estimated to have a mean value of 2.4 mGy. To improve image quality in mammography and make more efficient screening mammographic in early detection of breast cancer is required new legislation. PMID:23938078

  11. Quality of images acquired with and without grid in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Al Khalifah, Khaled H; Brindhaban, Ajit; Saeed, Raed A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the quality of digital mammography images acquired with a grid and without a grid for different kVp values. A digital mammography system was used for acquisition of images of the CIRS Model 015 Mammography Accreditation Phantom. The images were obtained in the presence of the grid and then with the grid removed from the system. The energy of the X-rays was varied between 26 and 32 kVp. The images were evaluated by five senior radiologic technologists with extensive experience in mammography. Statistical analysis was carried out with the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test with the level of significance set at p = 0.05. The comparison between images obtained with a grid and without a grid indicated that, for the visibility of fibers, the non-grid images at 28 kVp were significantly (p = 0.032) better than the images acquired with a grid. At all other kVp values, the images were not statistically different regarding the visibility of fibers. For the visibility of specks and masses, the images did not show any significant differences at any of the kVp values of the study. Imaging with kVp higher than 30 requires a grid to improve the visibility of fibrous calcifications and specks. For the visibility of masses at 32 kVp, no statistically significant differences between the grid and non-grid images were found.

  12. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  13. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  14. Figure of Image Quality and Information Capacity in Digital Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Christos M.; Kalyvas, Nektarios E.; Valais, Ioannis G.; Fudos, Ioannis P.; Fountos, George P.; Dimitropoulos, Nikos; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. In this work, a simple technique to assess the image quality characteristics of the postprocessed image is developed and an easy to use figure of image quality (FIQ) is introduced. This FIQ characterizes images in terms of resolution and noise. In addition information capacity, defined within the context of Shannon's information theory, was used as an overall image quality index. Materials and Methods. A digital mammographic image was postprocessed with three digital filters. Resolution and noise were calculated via the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the coefficient of variation, and the figure of image quality. In addition, frequency dependent parameters such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were estimated and used to assess information capacity. Results. FIQs for the “raw image” data and the image processed with the “sharpen edges” filter were found 907.3 and 1906.1, correspondingly. The information capacity values were 60.86 × 103 and 78.96 × 103 bits/mm2. Conclusion. It was found that, after the application of the postprocessing techniques (even commercial nondedicated software) on the raw digital mammograms, MTF, NPS, and NEQ are improved for medium to high spatial frequencies leading to resolving smaller structures in the final image. PMID:24895593

  15. SU-E-I-04: A Mammography Phantom to Measure Mean Glandular Dose and Image Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Pineda, E; Ruiz-Trejo, C; E, Brandan M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) and image quality in a selection of mammography systems using a novel phantom based on thermoluminescent dosemeters and the ACR wax insert. Methods: The phantom consists of two acrylic, 19 cm diameter, 4.5 cm thick, semicircular modules, used in sequence. The image quality module contains the ACR insert and is used to obtain a quality control image under automatic exposure conditions. The dosimetric module carries 15 TLD-100 chips, some under Al foils, to determine air kerma and half-value-layer. TL readings take place at our laboratory under controlled conditions. Calibration was performed using an ionization chamber and a Senographe 2000D unit for a variety of beam qualities, from 24 to 40 kV, Mo and Rh anodes and filters. Phantom MGD values agree, on the average, within 3% with ionization chamber data, and their precision is better than 10% (k=1). Results: MGD and image quality have been evaluated in a selection of mammography units currently used in Mexican health services. The sample includes analogic (screen/film), flexible digital (CR), and full-field digital image receptors. The highest MDG are associated to the CR technology. The most common image quality failure is due to artifacts (dust, intensifying screen scratches, and processor marks for film/screen, laser reader defects for CR). Conclusion: The developed phantom permits the MGD measurement without the need of a calibrated ionization chamber at the mammography site and can be used by a technician without the presence of a medical physicist. The results indicate the urgent need to establish quality control programs for mammography.

  16. Dosimetry and image quality in digital mammography facilities in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Sabrina Donato; Joana, Geórgia Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-11-01

    According to the National Register of Health Care Facilities (CNES), there are approximately 477 mammography systems operating in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, of which an estimated 200 are digital apparatus using mainly computerized radiography (CR) or direct radiography (DR) systems. Mammography is irreplaceable in the diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer, the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. A high standard of image quality alongside smaller doses and optimization of procedures are essential if early detection is to occur. This study aimed to determine dosimetry and image quality in 68 mammography services in Minas Gerais using CR or DR systems. The data of this study were collected between the years of 2011 and 2013. The contrast-to-noise ratio proved to be a critical point in the image production chain in digital systems, since 90% of services were not compliant in this regard, mainly for larger PMMA thicknesses (60 and 70 mm). Regarding the image noise, only 31% of these were compliant. The average glandular dose found is of concern, since more than half of the services presented doses above acceptable limits. Therefore, despite the potential benefits of using CR and DR systems, the employment of this technology has to be revised and optimized to achieve better quality image and reduce radiation dose as much as possible.

  17. Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Mammography Mammography is a specific type of breast imaging ... What are the limitations of Mammography? What is Mammography? Mammography is specialized medical imaging that uses a ...

  18. Mammography in New Zealand: radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Poletti, J L; Williamson, B D; Mitchell, A W

    1991-06-01

    The mean glandular doses to the breast, image quality and machine performance have been determined for all mammographic x-ray facilities in New Zealand, during 1988-89. For 30 mm and 45 mm phantoms the mean doses per film were 1.03 +/- 0.56 mGy and 1.97 +/- 1.06 mGy. These doses are within international guide-lines. Image quality (detection of simulated microcalcifications, and contrast-detail performance) was found to depend on focal spot size/FFD combination, breast thickness, and film processing. The best machines could resolve 0.2 mm aluminium oxide specks with the contact technique. The use of a grid improved image quality as did magnification. Extended cycle film processing reduced doses, but the claimed improvement in image quality was not apparent from our data. The machine calibration parameters kVp, HVL and timer accuracy were in general within accepted tolerances. Automatic exposure controls in some cases gave poor control of film density with changing breast thickness. PMID:1747087

  19. Objective assessment of phantom image quality in mammography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Castellano Smith, A D; Castellano Smith, I A; Dance, D R

    1998-01-01

    The need for test objects in mammography quality control programmes to provide an objective measure of image quality pertinent to clinical problems is well documented. However, interobserver variations may be greater than the fluctuations in image quality that the quality control programme is seeking to detect. We have developed a computer algorithm to score a number of features in the Leeds TOR(MAX) mammography phantom. Threshold scoring techniques have been applied in the first instance; scoring schemes which utilize measures such as signal-to-noise ratio and modulation have also been formulated. This fully automatic algorithm has been applied to a set of 10 films which have been digitized at 25 microns resolution using a Joyce-Loebl scanning microdensitometer. The films were chosen retrospectively from quality control test films to demonstrate: (a) a range of optimized imaging systems, and (b) variation from the optimum. The performance of the algorithm has been compared with that of five experienced observers, and has been shown to be as consistent as individual observers, but more consistent than a pool of observers. Problems have been encountered with the detection of small details, indicating that a more sophisticated localization technique is desirable. The computer performs more successfully with the scoring scheme which utilizes the full imaging information available, rather than with the threshold-determined one. However, both the observers and the computer algorithm failed to identify the non-optimum films, suggesting that the sensitivity of the TOR(MAX) test object may not be adequate for modern mammography imaging systems. PMID:9534699

  20. A new test phantom with different breast tissue compositions for image quality assessment in conventional and digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachoud, Marc; Lepori, D.; Valley, Jean-François; Verdun, Francis R.

    2004-12-01

    Our objective is to describe a new test phantom that permits the objective assessment of image quality in conventional and digital mammography for different types of breast tissue. A test phantom, designed to represent a compressed breast, was made from tissue equivalent materials. Three separate regions, with different breast tissue compositions, are used to evaluate low and high contrast resolution, spatial resolution and image noise. The phantom was imaged over a range of kV using a Contour 2000 (Bennett) mammography unit with a Kodak MinR 2190-MinR L screen film combination and a Senograph 2000D (General Electric) digital mammography unit. Objective image quality assessments for different breast tissue compositions were performed using the phantom for conventional and digital mammography. For a similar mean glandular dose (MGD), the digital system gives a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than the screen film system for 100% glandular tissue. In conclusion, in mammography, a range of exposure conditions is used for imaging because of the different breast tissue compositions encountered clinically. Ideally, the patient dose image quality relationship should be optimized over the range of exposure conditions. The test phantom presented in this work permits image quality parameters to be evaluated objectively for three different types of breast tissue. Thus, it is a useful tool for optimizing the patient dose image quality relationship.

  1. A phantom using titanium and Landolt rings for image quality evaluation in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Hugo; Schöfer, Felix; Tiller, Britta; Chevalier, Margarita; Zwettler, Georg; Semturs, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    A phantom for image quality evaluation of digital mammography systems is presented and compared to the most widely used phantoms in Europe and the US. The phantom contains objects for subjective detection of Landolt rings (four-alternative, forced-choice task) and for objective calculation of signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNR), both in a titanium background within a 12-step wedge. Evaluating phantom images corresponding to exposures between 15 and 160 mAs (average glandular dose between 0.2 and 2 mGy), the resulting scores were compared to the scores obtained following the European EPQC and American College of Radiology (ACR) protocols. Scores of the Landolt test equal to 19 and 8.5 and SDNR equal to 20 and 11 were found to be equivalent to the acceptable limiting values suggested by EPQC and ACR. In addition, the Landolt and SDNR tests were shown to take into account the anatomical variations in thickness and tissue density within the breast. The simplified evaluation method presented was shown to be a sensitive, efficient and reliable alternative for image quality evaluation of mammography systems.

  2. Digital mammography--DQE versus optimized image quality in clinical environment: an on site study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Nadia; Fracchetti, Alessandro; Springeth, Margareth; Moroder, Ehrenfried

    2010-04-01

    The intrinsic quality of the detection system of 7 different digital mammography units (5 direct radiography DR; 2 computed radiography CR), expressed by DQE, has been compared with their image quality/dose performances in clinical use. DQE measurements followed IEC 62220-1-2 using a tungsten test object for MTF determination. For image quality assessment two different methods have been applied: 1) measurement of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) according to the European guidelines and 2) contrast-detail (CD) evaluation. The latter was carried out with the phantom CDMAM ver. 3.4 and the commercial software CDMAM Analyser ver. 1.1 (both Artinis) for automated image analysis. The overall image quality index IQFinv proposed by the software has been validated. Correspondence between the two methods has been shown figuring out a linear correlation between CNR and IQFinv. All systems were optimized with respect to image quality and average glandular dose (AGD) within the constraints of automatic exposure control (AEC). For each equipment, a good image quality level was defined by means of CD analysis, and the corresponding CNR value considered as target value. The goal was to achieve for different PMMA-phantom thicknesses constant image quality, that means the CNR target value, at minimum dose. All DR systems exhibited higher DQE and significantly better image quality compared to CR systems. Generally switching, where available, to a target/filter combination with an x-ray spectrum of higher mean energy permitted dose savings at equal image quality. However, several systems did not allow to modify the AEC in order to apply optimal radiographic technique in clinical use. The best ratio image quality/dose was achieved by a unit with a-Se detector and W anode only recently available on the market.

  3. Survey of mammography practice in Croatia: equipment performance, image quality and dose.

    PubMed

    Faj, Dario; Posedel, Dario; Stimac, Damir; Ivezic, Zdravko; Kasabasic, Mladen; Ivkovic, Ana; Kubelka, Dragan; Ilakovac, Vesna; Brnic, Zoran; Bjelac, Olivera Ciraj

    2008-01-01

    A national audit of mammography equipment performance, image quality and dose has been conducted in Croatia. Film-processing parameters, optical density (OD), average glandular dose (AGD) to the standard breast, viewing conditions and image quality were examined using TOR(MAM) test object. Average film gradient ranged from 2.6 to 3.7, with a mean of 3.1. Tube voltage used for imaging of the standard 45 mm polymethylmethacrylate phantom ranged from 24 to 34 kV, and OD ranged from 0.75 to 1.94 with a mean of 1.26. AGD to the standard breast ranged from 0.4 to 2.3 mGy with a mean of 1.1 mGy. Besides clinical conditions, the authors have imaged the standard phantom in the referent conditions with 28 kV and OD as close as possible to 1.5. Then, AGD ranged from 0.5 to 2.6 mGy with a mean of 1.3 mGy. Image viewing conditions were generally unsatisfying with ambient light up to 500 lx and most of the viewing boxes with luminance between 1000 and 2000 cd per m(2). TOR(MAM) scoring of images taken in clinical and referent conditions was done by local radiologists in local image viewing conditions and by the referent radiologist in good image viewing conditions. Importance of OD and image viewing conditions for diagnostic information were analysed. The survey showed that the main problem in Croatia is the lack of written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures. Consequently, equipment performance, image quality and dose are unstable and activities to improve image quality or to reduce the dose are not evidence-based. This survey also had an educational purpose, introducing in Croatia the QC based on European Commission Guidelines.

  4. Image Quality and Radiation Dose Assessment of a Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, N. M.; Hassan, W. M. S. W.; Abdullah, W. A. K. W.; Othman, F.; Ramli, A. A. M.

    2010-07-07

    Image quality and radiation dose of a direct amorphous selenium digital mammography system were considered in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD). They were measured for various qualities and breast phantom thicknesses with different types of breast tissue composition to determine optimal radiation quality and dose. Three sets of breast tissue equivalent slabs (30%:70%, 50%:50% and 70%:30% glandular-adipose) with thickness of 2 cm to 7 cm and 0.2 mm aluminum foil were used to provide certain CNR. Two different combinations of anode/ilter material and a wide range of tube voltages were employed for each phantom thickness. Phantom images with grid were acquired using automatic exposure control (AEC) mode for each thickness. Phantom images without grid were also obtained in manual exposure mode by selecting the same anode/filter combination and kVp as the image obtained with grid at the same thickness, but varying mAs of 10 to 200 mAs. Optimization indicated that relatively high energy beam qualities should be used with a greater dose to compensate for lower energy x-rays. The results also indicate that current AEC setting for a fixed detector is not optimal.

  5. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubiak, R. R.; Gamba, H. R.; Neves, E. B.; Peixoto, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in both

  6. Computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.

    1997-05-01

    Computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI) is a method for objective and precise measurements of phantom image quality in mammography. This investigation applied CAMPI methodology to the Fischer Mammotest Stereotactic Digital Biopsy machine. Images of an American College of Radiology phantom centered on the largest two microcalcification groups were obtained on this machine under a variety of x-ray conditions. Analyses of the images revealed that the precise behavior of the CAMPI measures could be understood from basic imaging physics principles. We conclude that CAMPI is sensitive to subtle image quality changes and can perform accurate evaluations of images, especially of directly acquired digital images.

  7. Positron emission mammography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Optimizing the anode-filter combination in the sense of image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjonen, Mari; Strömmer, Pekka

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the optimized image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography, and provides recommendations concerning anode-filter combinations in digital mammography, which is based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector technology. The full field digital mammography (FFDM) system based on a-Se technology, which is also a platform of tomosynthesis prototype, was used in this study. X-ray tube anode-filter combinations, which we studied, were tungsten (W) - rhodium (Rh) and tungsten (W) - silver (Ag). Anatomically adaptable fully automatic exposure control (AAEC) was used. The average glandular doses (AGD) were calculated using a specific program developed by Planmed, which automates the method described by Dance et al. Image quality was evaluated in two different ways: a subjective image quality evaluation, and contrast and noise analysis. By using W-Rh and W-Ag anode-filter combinations can be achieved a significantly lower average glandular dose compared with molybdenum (Mo) - molybdenum (Mo) or Mo-Rh. The average glandular dose reduction was achieved from 25 % to 60 %. In the future, the evaluation will concentrate to study more filter combinations and the effect of higher kV (>35 kV) values, which seems be useful while optimizing the dose in digital mammography.

  9. A prototype of mammography CADx scheme integrated to imaging quality evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiabel, Homero; Matheus, Bruno R. N.; Angelo, Michele F.; Patrocínio, Ana Claudia; Ventura, Liliane

    2011-03-01

    As all women over the age of 40 are recommended to perform mammographic exams every two years, the demands on radiologists to evaluate mammographic images in short periods of time has increased considerably. As a tool to improve quality and accelerate analysis CADe/Dx (computer-aided detection/diagnosis) schemes have been investigated, but very few complete CADe/Dx schemes have been developed and most are restricted to detection and not diagnosis. The existent ones usually are associated to specific mammographic equipment (usually DR), which makes them very expensive. So this paper describes a prototype of a complete mammography CADx scheme developed by our research group integrated to an imaging quality evaluation process. The basic structure consists of pre-processing modules based on image acquisition and digitization procedures (FFDM, CR or film + scanner), a segmentation tool to detect clustered microcalcifications and suspect masses and a classification scheme, which evaluates as the presence of microcalcifications clusters as well as possible malignant masses based on their contour. The aim is to provide enough information not only on the detected structures but also a pre-report with a BI-RADS classification. At this time the system is still lacking an interface integrating all the modules. Despite this, it is functional as a prototype for clinical practice testing, with results comparable to others reported in literature.

  10. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part I. Technical characterization of the systems.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W; Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Bochud, F O; Verdun, F R

    2011-07-21

    In many European countries, image quality for digital x-ray systems used in screening mammography is currently specified using a threshold-detail detectability method. This is a two-part study that proposes an alternative method based on calculated detectability for a model observer: the first part of the work presents a characterization of the systems. Eleven digital mammography systems were included in the study; four computed radiography (CR) systems, and a group of seven digital radiography (DR) detectors, composed of three amorphous selenium-based detectors, three caesium iodide scintillator systems and a silicon wafer-based photon counting system. The technical parameters assessed included the system response curve, detector uniformity error, pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Approximate quantum noise limited exposure range was examined using a separation of noise sources based upon standard deviation. Noise separation showed that electronic noise was the dominant noise at low detector air kerma for three systems; the remaining systems showed quantum noise limited behaviour between 12.5 and 380 µGy. Greater variation in detector MTF was found for the DR group compared to the CR systems; MTF at 5 mm(-1) varied from 0.08 to 0.23 for the CR detectors against a range of 0.16-0.64 for the DR units. The needle CR detector had a higher MTF, lower NNPS and higher DQE at 5 mm(-1) than the powder CR phosphors. DQE at 5 mm(-1) ranged from 0.02 to 0.20 for the CR systems, while DQE at 5 mm(-1) for the DR group ranged from 0.04 to 0.41, indicating higher DQE for the DR detectors and needle CR system than for the powder CR phosphor systems. The technical evaluation section of the study showed that the digital mammography systems were well set up and exhibiting typical performance for the detector technology employed in the respective systems.

  11. A comparison between objective and subjective image quality measurements for a full field digital mammography system.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W

    2006-05-21

    This paper presents pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) results for an amorphous selenium (a-Se) full field digital mammography system. MTF was calculated from the image of an angled 0.5 mm thick Cu edge, acquired without additional beam filtration. NNPS data were acquired at detector air-kerma levels ranging from 9.1 microGy to 331 microGy, using a standard mammography x-ray spectrum of 28 kV, Mo/Mo target/filter combination and 4 cm of PMMA additional filtration. Prior to NNPS estimation, the image statistics were assessed using a variance image. This method was able to easily identify a detector artefact and should prove useful in routine quality assurance (QA) measurements. Detector DQE, calculated from the NNPS and MTF data, dropped to 0.3 for low detector air-kerma settings but reached an approximately constant value of 0.6 above 50 microGy at the detector. Subjective image quality data were also obtained at these detector air-kerma settings using the CDMAM contrast-detail (c-d) test object. The c-d data reflected the trend seen in DQE, with threshold contrast increasing at low detector air-kerma values. The c-d data were then compared against predictions made using two established models, the Rose model and a standard signal detection theory model. Using DQE(0), the Rose model gave results within approximately 15% on average for all the detector air-kerma values studied and for detail diameters down to 0.2 mm. Similar agreement was also found between the measured c-d data and the signal detection theory results, which were calculated using an ideal human visual response function and a system magnification of unity. The use of full spatial frequency DQE improved the agreement between the calculated and observer results for detail sizes below 0.13 mm.

  12. Should processed or raw image data be used in mammographic image quality analyses? A comparative study of three full-field digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Borg, Mark; Badr, Ishmail; Royle, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare a number of measured image quality parameters using processed and unprocessed or raw images in two full-field direct digital units and one computed radiography mammography system. This study shows that the difference between raw and processed image data is system specific. The results have shown that there are no significant differences between raw and processed data in the mean threshold contrast values using the contrast-detail mammography phantom in all the systems investigated; however, these results cannot be generalised to all available systems. Notable differences were noted in contrast-to-noise ratios and in other tests including: response function, modulation transfer function , noise equivalent quanta, normalised noise power spectra and detective quantum efficiency as specified in IEC 62220-1-2. Consequently, the authors strongly recommend the use of raw data for all image quality analyses in digital mammography.

  13. Effect of filter on average glandular dose and image quality in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songsaeng, C.; Krisanachinda, A.; Theerakul, K.

    2016-03-01

    To determine the average glandular dose and entrance surface air kerma in both phantoms and patients to assess image quality for different target-filters (W/Rh and W/Ag) in digital mammography system. The compressed breast thickness, compression force, average glandular dose, entrance surface air kerma, peak kilovoltage and tube current time were recorded and compared between W/Rh and W/Ag target filter. The CNR and the figure of merit were used to determine the effect of target filter on image quality. The mean AGD of the W/Rh target filter was 1.75 mGy, the mean ESAK was 6.67 mGy, the mean CBT was 54.1 mm, the mean CF was 14 1bs. The mean AGD of W/Ag target filter was 2.7 mGy, the mean ESAK was 12.6 mGy, the mean CBT was 75.5 mm, the mean CF was 15 1bs. In phantom study, the AGD was 1.2 mGy at 4 cm, 3.3 mGy at 6 cm and 3.83 mGy at 7 cm thickness. The FOM was 24.6, CNR was 9.02 at thickness 6 cm. The FOM was 18.4, CNR was 8.6 at thickness 7 cm. The AGD from Digital Mammogram system with W/Rh of thinner CBT was lower than the AGD from W/Ag target filter.

  14. Evaluation of Doses and Image Quality in Mammography with Screen-Film, CR, and DR Detectors – Application of the ACR Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Skrzyński, Witold; Fabiszewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Different methods of image quality evaluation are routinely used for analogue and digital mammography systems in Poland. In the present study, image quality for several screen-film (SF), computed radiography (CR), and fully digital (DR) mammography systems was compared directly with the use of the ACR mammography accreditation phantom. Material/Methods Image quality and mean glandular doses were measured and compared for 47 mammography systems in the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland, including 26 SF systems, 12 CR systems, and 9 DR systems. The mean glandular dose for the breast simulated by 4.5 cm of PMMA was calculated with methods described in the “European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis”. Visibility of the structures in the image (fibers, microcalcifications, and masses) was evaluated with the mammographic accreditation ACR phantom. Results Image quality for DR systems was significantly higher than for SF and CR systems. Several SF systems failed to pass the image quality tests because of artifacts. The doses were within acceptable limits for all of the systems, but the doses for the CR systems were significantly higher than for the SF and DR systems. Conclusions The best image quality, at a reasonably low dose, was observed for the DR systems. The CR systems are capable of obtaining the same image quality as the SF systems, but only at a significantly higher dose. The ACR phantom can be routinely used to evaluate image quality for all types of mammographic systems.

  15. Evaluation of Doses and Image Quality in Mammography with Screen-Film, CR, and DR Detectors – Application of the ACR Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Skrzyński, Witold; Fabiszewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Different methods of image quality evaluation are routinely used for analogue and digital mammography systems in Poland. In the present study, image quality for several screen-film (SF), computed radiography (CR), and fully digital (DR) mammography systems was compared directly with the use of the ACR mammography accreditation phantom. Material/Methods Image quality and mean glandular doses were measured and compared for 47 mammography systems in the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland, including 26 SF systems, 12 CR systems, and 9 DR systems. The mean glandular dose for the breast simulated by 4.5 cm of PMMA was calculated with methods described in the “European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis”. Visibility of the structures in the image (fibers, microcalcifications, and masses) was evaluated with the mammographic accreditation ACR phantom. Results Image quality for DR systems was significantly higher than for SF and CR systems. Several SF systems failed to pass the image quality tests because of artifacts. The doses were within acceptable limits for all of the systems, but the doses for the CR systems were significantly higher than for the SF and DR systems. Conclusions The best image quality, at a reasonably low dose, was observed for the DR systems. The CR systems are capable of obtaining the same image quality as the SF systems, but only at a significantly higher dose. The ACR phantom can be routinely used to evaluate image quality for all types of mammographic systems. PMID:27617048

  16. A mammography quality assurance test program.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A

    1979-11-01

    The design and implementation of a program to investigate remote quality assurance testing for film mammography is described. The measurements included tube output, x-ray machine and processor stability, and film quality. Mammography phantoms and film sensitometric strips were distributed monthly to 24 regional hospitals. Most of the hospital processors and x-ray machines performed in a stable manner during the 12-month test period. It was found that x-ray machine useful beams could be reliably measured using nonscreen films. The main utility of the phantom was to identify cases of poor image quality. The measurements performed on the phantom image could not be used to diagnose specific causes of poor images. PMID:493542

  17. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  18. Authenticity and integrity of digital mammography images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Q; Huang, H K; Lou, S L

    2001-08-01

    Data security becomes more and more important in telemammography which uses a public high-speed wide area network connecting the examination site with the mammography expert center. Generally, security is characterized in terms of privacy, authenticity and integrity of digital data. Privacy is a network access issue and is not considered in this paper. We present a method, authenticity and integrity of digital mammography, here which can meet the requirements of authenticity and integrity for mammography image (IM) transmission. The authenticity and integrity for mammography (AIDM) consists of the following four modules. 1) Image preprocessing: To segment breast pixels from background and extract patient information from digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image header. 2) Image hashing: To compute an image hash value of the mammogram using the MD5 hash algorithm. 3) Data encryption: To produce a digital envelope containing the encrypted image hash value (digital signature) and corresponding patient information. 4) Data embedding: To embed the digital envelope into the image. This is done by replacing the least significant bit of a random pixel of the mammogram by one bit of the digital envelope bit stream and repeating for all bits in the bit stream. Experiments with digital IMs demonstrate the following. 1) In the expert center, only the user who knows the private key can open the digital envelope and read the patient information data and the digital signature of the mammogram transmitted from the examination site. 2) Data integrity can be verified by matching the image hash value decrypted from the digital signature with that computed from the transmitted image. 3) No visual quality degradation is detected in the embedded image compared with the original. Our preliminary results demonstrate that AIDM is an effective method for image authenticity and integrity in telemammography application.

  19. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  20. Experimental evaluation of the image quality and dose in digital mammography: Influence of x-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomal, A.; Perez, A. M. M. M.; Silva, M. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied experimentally the influence of x-ray spectrum on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the average glandular dose (MDG) for two digital mammography systems: Senographe 2000D (GE Medical Systems) and Lorad Selenia (Hologic), with indirect and direct detector imaging technology, respectively. CNR and MGD were determined using PMMA phantoms simulating breasts with thicknesses of 4 cm and 6 cm. All available anode/filter combinations of the systems were evaluated for a wide range of tube voltages values. Results indicated that the Rh/Rh combination provides the highest image quality with the lower mean glandular dose for the Senographe 2000D system. For the Lorad Selenia system, the W/Ag combination at 30 kV showed the best performance, in terms of dose saving and image quality improvement in relation to all tube voltage range. The comparison between the optimal x-ray spectra and those selected by the AEC mode showed that this automatic selection mechanism could be readjusted to optimize the relationship between image quality and dose.

  1. Application of wavelets to the evaluation of phantom images for mammography quality control.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M; Pina, D R; Miranda, J R A; Duarte, S B

    2012-11-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology for the computed analysis of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic phantom images, to be used in a quality control (QC) program of mammographic services. Discrete wavelet transform processing was applied to enhance the quality of images from the ACR mammographic phantom and to allow a lower dose for automatic evaluations of equipment performance in a QC program. Regions of interest (ROIs) containing phantom test objects (e.g., masses, fibers and specks) were focalized for appropriate wavelet processing, which highlighted the characteristics of structures present in each ROI. To minimize false-positive detection, each ROI in the image was submitted to pattern recognition tests, which identified structural details of the focalized test objects. Geometric and morphologic parameters of the processed test object images were used to quantify the final level of image quality. The final purpose of this work was to establish the main computational procedures for algorithms of quality evaluation of ACR phantom images. These procedures were implemented, and satisfactory agreement was obtained when the algorithm scores for image quality were compared with the results of assessments by three experienced radiologists. An exploratory study of a potential dose reduction was performed based on the radiologist scores and on the algorithm evaluation of images treated by wavelet processing. The results were comparable with both methods, although the algorithm had a tendency to provide a lower dose reduction than the evaluation by observers. Nevertheless, the objective and more precise criteria used by the algorithm to score image quality gave the computational result a higher degree of confidence. The developed algorithm demonstrates the potential use of the wavelet image processing approach for objectively evaluating the mammographic image quality level in routine QC tests. The implemented computational procedures

  2. Mammography equipment performance, image quality and mean glandular dose in Malta.

    PubMed

    Borg, M; Badr, I; Royle, G J

    2013-09-01

    In this first Maltese national mammography survey, the effectiveness of direct digital (DR) mammography in breast cancer screening has been confirmed. Patient data were made available from three clinics out of the participating nine. A dose survey of mean glandular dose (MGD) calculated for 759 patients examined in the state-owned mammography facilities was performed. An MGD national diagnostic reference level was set at 1.87 mGy for patients with breast compression thicknesses (BCT) between 5.0 and 7.0 cm. This range was selected since patient data were retrieved from three clinics only and the results showed that other international BCT reference levels may be unsuitable for the Maltese population. In fact, the overall average BCT was 5.75 ± 1.4 cm. The survey results have shown that the technical standard of mammographic equipment in the Malta National Breast Screening Programme is on a par with other countries, including its Western European counterparts.

  3. Initial Image Quality and Clinical Experience with New CR Digital Mammography System: A Phantom and Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus Gabriel Franco; Alfonso, Beatriz Y. Alvarez; Castellanos, Gustavo Casian

    2008-08-11

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the first CR digital mammography system ( registered Konica-Minolta) in Mexico in clinical routine for cancer detection in a screening population and to determine if high resolution CR digital imaging is equivalent to state-of-the-art screen-film imaging. The mammograms were evaluated by two observers with cytological or histological confirmation for BIRADS 3, 4 and 5. Contrast, exposure and artifacts of the images were evaluated. Different details like skin, retromamillary space and parenchymal structures were judged. The detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. The difference in sensitivity of CR Mammography (CRM) and Screen Film Mammography (SFM) was not statistically significant. However, CRM had a significantly lower recall rate, and the lesion detection was equal or superior to conventional images. There is no significant difference in the number of microcalcifications and highly suspicious calcifications were equally detected on both film-screen and digital images. Different anatomical regions were better detectable in digital than in conventional mammography.

  4. Initial Image Quality and Clinical Experience with New CR Digital Mammography System: A Phantom and Clinical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Enrique; Alfonso, Beatriz Y. Álvarez; Castellanos, Gustavo Casian; Enríquez, Jesús Gabriel Franco

    2008-08-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the first CR digital mammography system (® Konica-Minolta) in Mexico in clinical routine for cancer detection in a screening population and to determine if high resolution CR digital imaging is equivalent to state-of-the-art screen-film imaging. The mammograms were evaluated by two observers with cytological or histological confirmation for BIRADS 3, 4 and 5. Contrast, exposure and artifacts of the images were evaluated. Different details like skin, retromamillary space and parenchymal structures were judged. The detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. The difference in sensitivity of CR Mammography (CRM) and Screen Film Mammography (SFM) was not statistically significant. However, CRM had a significantly lower recall rate, and the lesion detection was equal or superior to conventional images. There is no significant difference in the number of microcalcifications and highly suspicious calcifications were equally detected on both film-screen and digital images. Different anatomical regions were better detectable in digital than in conventional mammography.

  5. Image quality evaluation of direct-conversion digital mammography system with new dual a-Se layer detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Takao; Iwasaki, Nobuyuki; Sendai, Tomonari; Furue, Ryosuke; Agano, Toshitaka

    2009-02-01

    To increase the detection performance of breast cancers in mammograms, we need to improve shape delineation of micro calcifications and tumors. We accomplished this by developing a direct-conversion mammography system with an optical reading method and a new dual a-Se layer detector. The system achieved both small pixel size (50 micrometer) and a high Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) realized by 100 % of fill factor and noise reduction. We evaluated image quality performance and determined the best exposure conditions. We measured DQE and Modulation Transfer Function(MTF) according to the IEC62220-1-2. High DQE was maintained at a low radiation dosage, indicating that the optical reading method accompanies low noises. Response of MTF was maintained at up to the Nyquist frequency of 10 cyc/mm, which corresponds to 50 micrometer pixel size. To determine the best exposure conditions, we measured Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and visually evaluated images of a resected breast under conditions of MoMo, MoRh, and WRh. There were occasional disagreements between the exposure conditions for achieving the maximum CNR and those for the best image graded by the visual evaluation. This was probably because CNR measurement does not measure effects of scattered X-ray. The images verified the improvement in detection and delineation performance of micro calcifications and tumors.

  6. CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.

    2012-10-23

    Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

  7. Dose sensitivity of three methods of image quality assessment in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kaar, Marcus; Hoffmann, Rainer; Kaldarar, Heinrich; Semturs, Friedrich; Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Image quality assurance is one of the key issues in breast screening protocols. Although image quality can always be improved by increasing dose this mechanism is restricted by limiting values given by the standards. Therefore, it is crucial for system adjustment to describe the dependency of the image quality parameters on small changes in dose. This dose sensitivity was tested for three image quality evaluation methods. The European protocol requires the use of the CDMAM phantom which is a conventional contrast-detail phantom, while in North America the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom is proposed. In contrast to these visual test methods the German PAS 1054 phantom uses digital image processing to derive image quality parameters like the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ). We varied the dose within the range of clinical use. For the ACR phantom the examined parameter was the number of detected objects. With the CDMAM phantom we chose the diameters 0,10, 0.13, 0.20, 0.31 and 0.5 mm and recorded the threshold thicknesses. With respect to the PAS 1054 measurements we evaluated the NEQ at typical spatial frequencies to calculate the relative changes. NEQ versus dose increment shows a linear relationship and can be described by a linear function (R = .998). Every current-time product increment can be detected. With the ACR phantom the number of detected objects increases only in the lower dose range and reaches saturation at about 100mAs. The CDMAM can detect a 50% increase in dose confidently although the parameter increase is not monotonous. We conclude that an NEQ based method can be used as a simple and highly sensitive procedure for weekly quality assurance.

  8. Comparison of full-field digital mammography workstation and conventional picture archiving and communication system in image quality and diagnostic performance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Sung Hun; Choi, Byung Gil

    2011-01-01

    The object of this study was to compare of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) workstation and conventional picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) in image quality and diagnostic performance. We assembled 80 masses and 80 microcalcifications. Images were displayed on workstation, 5M, and 3M PACS monitors. The image quality for mammograms on workstation was significantly better than that for mammograms on PACS monitors. The sensitivity and NPV for microcalcifications on workstation were higher than those on PACS monitors. The conventional PACS cannot substitute for a FFDM workstation for mammographic evaluation.

  9. [Influence of Detector Radiation Damage on CR Mammography Quality Control].

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsumi; Ishii, Mie; Terazono, Shiho; Arao, Keiko; Ishii, Rie; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Recently, radiation damage to the detector apparatus employed in computed radiography (CR) mammography has become problematic. The CR system and the imaging plate (IP) applied to quality control (QC) program were also used in clinical mammography in our hospital, and the IP to which radiation damage has occurred was used for approximately 5 years (approximately 13,000 exposures). We considered using previously acquired QC image data, which is stored in a server, to investigate the influence of radiation damage to an IP. The mammography unit employed in this study was a phase contrast mammography (PCM) Mermaid (KONICA MINOLTA) system. The QC image was made newly, and it was output in the film, and thereafter the optical density of the step-phantom image was measured. An input (digital value)-output (optical density) conversion curve was plotted using the obtained data. The digital values were then converted to optical density values using a reference optical density vs. digital value curve. When a high radiation dose was applied directly, radiation damage occurred at a position on the IP where no object was present. Daily QC for mammography is conducted using an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and acrylic disc, and an environmental background density measurement is performed as one of the management indexes. In this study, the radiation damage sustained by the acrylic disc was shown to differ from that of the background. Thus, it was revealed that QC results are influenced by radiation damage. PMID:27211088

  10. Grid-less imaging with antiscatter correction software in 2D mammography: the effects on image quality and MGD under a partial virtual clinical validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Peteghem, Nelis; Bemelmans, Frédéric; Bramaje Adversalo, Xenia; Salvagnini, Elena; Marshall, Nicholas; Bosmans, Hilde; Van Ongeval, Chantal

    2016-03-01

    This work investigated the effect of the grid-less acquisition mode with scatter correction software developed by Siemens Healthcare (PRIME mode) on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in a comparative study against a standard mammography system with grid. Image quality was technically quantified with contrast-detail (c-d) analysis and by calculating detectability indices (d') using a non-prewhitening with eye filter model observer (NPWE). MGD was estimated technically using slabs of PMMA and clinically on a set of 11439 patient images. The c-d analysis gave similar results for all mammographic systems examined, although the d' values were slightly lower for the system with PRIME mode when compared to the same system in standard mode (-2.8% to -5.7%, depending on the PMMA thickness). The MGD values corresponding to the PMMA measurements with automatic exposure control indicated a dose reduction from 11.0% to 20.8% for the system with PRIME mode compared to the same system without PRIME mode. The largest dose reductions corresponded to the thinnest PMMA thicknesses. The results from the clinical dosimetry study showed an overall population-averaged dose reduction of 11.6% (up to 27.7% for thinner breasts) for PRIME mode compared to standard mode for breast thicknesses from 20 to 69 mm. These technical image quality measures were then supported using a clinically oriented study whereby simulated clusters of microcalcifications and masses were inserted into patient images and read by radiologists in an AFROC study to quantify their detectability. In line with the technical investigation, no significant difference was found between the two imaging modes (p-value 0.95).

  11. Mammography calibration qualities establishment in a Mo- Mo clinical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, E. L.; dos Santos, L. R.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M. P. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study the mammography calibration qualities were established in a clinical mammography system. The objective is to provide the IPEN instruments calibration laboratory with both mammography calibration methods (using a clinical and an industrial system). The results showed a good behavior of mammography equipment, in terms of kVp, PPV and exposure time. The additional filtration of molybdenum is adequate, air-kerma rates were determined and spectra were obtained.

  12. SU-E-I-88: Mammography Imaging: Does Positioning Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Szabunio, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In mammography, compression is imperative for quality images and glandular radiation exposure dose. The thickness of the compressed breast directly determines mammography acquisition parameters. The compressed thickness varies due to variation in technologist practice, even for the same patient imaged at different time. This study is to investigate potential effect of the variation in breast positioning on radiation dose and image quality. Methods: Radiation dose at different thicknesses was measured with a BR-12 breast phantom for both conventional craniocaudal view and tomosynthesis in a Hologic Tomosynthesis mammography system. The CIRS stereotactic needle biopsy training phantom embedded dense masses and microcalcification in various sizes were imaged for image quality evaluation. Radiologists evaluated images. Clinical mammograms from the same patient but acquired at different time were retrospectively retrieved to evaluate potential effects of variation in positioning. Results: Acquisition parameters (kVp and mAs) increase with the increased phantom thickness. Radiation exposure increases following an exponential trend. The stereotactic phantom images showed loss of spatial and contrast resolution with inappropriate positioning. The compressed pressure may not be a good indicator for appropriate positioning. The inclusion of different amount of pectoralis muscle may lead to the same compressed pressure but different compressed thickness. The initial retrospective study of 3 patients showed that there were potential large variations in positioning the same patient at different examination time, resulting in large variations in patient radiation dose and image quality. Conclusion: Variations in patient positioning potentially influence patient radiation dose and image quality. The technologist has the critical responsibility to position patient to provide quality images in spite of different breast and body types. To reduce intra and inter practice

  13. Automated Analysis of Mammography Phantom Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kenneth Wesley

    The present work stems from the hypothesis that humans are inconsistent when making subjective analyses of images and that human decisions for moderately complex images may be performed by a computer with complete objectivity, once a human acceptance level has been established. The following goals were established to test the hypothesis: (1) investigate observer variability within the standard mammographic phantom evaluation process; (2) evaluate options for high-resolution image digitization and utilize the most appropriate technology for standard mammographic phantom film digitization; (3) develop a machine-based vision system for evaluating standard mammographic phantom images to eliminate effects of human variabilities; and (4) demonstrate the completed system's performance against human observers for accreditation and for manufacturing quality control of standard mammographic phantom images. The following methods and procedures were followed to achieve the goals of the research: (1) human variabilities in the American College of Radiology accreditation process were simulated by observer studies involving 30 medical physicists and these were compared to the same number of diagnostic radiologists and untrained control group of observers; (2) current digitization technologies were presented and performance test procedures were developed; three devices were tested which represented commercially available high, intermediate and low-end contrast and spatial resolution capabilities; (3) optimal image processing schemes were applied and tested which performed low, intermediate and high-level computer vision tasks; and (4) the completed system's performance was tested against human observers for accreditation and for manufacturing quality control of standard mammographic phantom images. The results from application of the procedures were as follows: (1) the simulated American College of Radiology mammography accreditation program phantom evaluation process demonstrated

  14. Early experience in the use of quantitative image quality measurements for the quality assurance of full field digital mammography x-ray systems.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W

    2007-09-21

    Quantitative image quality results in the form of the modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are presented for nine full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems. These parameters are routinely measured as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the seven FFDM units covered by our centre. Just one additional image is required compared to the standard FFDM protocol; this is the image of an edge, from which the MTF is calculated. A variance image is formed from one of the flood images used to measure the detector response and this provides useful information on the condition of the detector with respect to artefacts. Finally, the NNPS is calculated from the flood image acquired at a target detector air kerma (DAK) of 100 microGy. DQE is then estimated from these data; however, no correction is currently made for effects of detector cover transmission on DQE. The coefficient of variation (cov) of the 50% point of the MTF for five successive MTF results was 1%, while the cov for the 50% MTF point for an a-Se system over a period of 17 months was approximately 3%. For four a-Se based systems, the cov for the NNPS at 1 mm(-1) for a target DAK of 100 microGy was approximately 4%; the same result was found for four CsI based FFDM units. With regard to the stability of NNPS over time, the cov for four NNPS results acquired over a period of 12 months was also approximately 4%. The effect of acquisition geometry on NNPS was also assessed for a CsI based system. NNPS data acquired with the antiscatter grid in place showed increased noise at low spatial frequency; this effect was more severe as DAK increased. DQE results for the three detector types (a-Se, CsI and CR) are presented as a function of DAK. Some reduction in DQE was found for both the a-Se and CsI based systems at a target DAK of 12.5 microGy when compared to DQE data acquired at 100 microGy. For the CsI based systems, DQE at 1 mm

  15. Early experience in the use of quantitative image quality measurements for the quality assurance of full field digital mammography x-ray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, N. W.

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative image quality results in the form of the modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are presented for nine full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems. These parameters are routinely measured as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the seven FFDM units covered by our centre. Just one additional image is required compared to the standard FFDM protocol; this is the image of an edge, from which the MTF is calculated. A variance image is formed from one of the flood images used to measure the detector response and this provides useful information on the condition of the detector with respect to artefacts. Finally, the NNPS is calculated from the flood image acquired at a target detector air kerma (DAK) of 100 µGy. DQE is then estimated from these data; however, no correction is currently made for effects of detector cover transmission on DQE. The coefficient of variation (cov) of the 50% point of the MTF for five successive MTF results was 1%, while the cov for the 50% MTF point for an a-Se system over a period of 17 months was approximately 3%. For four a-Se based systems, the cov for the NNPS at 1 mm-1 for a target DAK of 100 µGy was approximately 4%; the same result was found for four CsI based FFDM units. With regard to the stability of NNPS over time, the cov for four NNPS results acquired over a period of 12 months was also approximately 4%. The effect of acquisition geometry on NNPS was also assessed for a CsI based system. NNPS data acquired with the antiscatter grid in place showed increased noise at low spatial frequency; this effect was more severe as DAK increased. DQE results for the three detector types (a-Se, CsI and CR) are presented as a function of DAK. Some reduction in DQE was found for both the a-Se and CsI based systems at a target DAK of 12.5 µGy when compared to DQE data acquired at 100 µGy. For the CsI based systems, DQE at 1 mm-1 fell from 0

  16. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  17. A task-based quality control metric for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, A K Maki; Mainprize, J G; Mawdsley, G E; Yaffe, M J

    2014-11-01

    A reader study was conducted to tune the parameters of an observer model used to predict the detectability index (dʹ ) of test objects as a task-based quality control (QC) metric for digital mammography. A simple test phantom was imaged to measure the model parameters, namely, noise power spectrum,modulation transfer function and test-object contrast. These are then used ina non-prewhitening observer model, incorporating an eye-filter and internal noise, to predict dʹ. The model was tuned by measuring dʹ of discs in a four-alternative forced choice reader study. For each disc diameter, dʹ was used to estimate the threshold thicknesses for detectability. Data were obtained for six types of digital mammography systems using varying detector technologies and x-ray spectra. A strong correlation was found between measured and modeled values of dʹ, with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.96. Repeated measurements from separate images of the test phantom show an average coefficient of variation in dʹ for different systems between 0.07 and 0.10. Standard deviations in the threshold thickness ranged between 0.001 and 0.017 mm. The model is robust and the results are relatively system independent, suggesting that observer model dʹ shows promise as a cross platform QC metric for digital mammography. PMID:25325670

  18. Digital Mammography Imaging: Breast Tomosynthesis and Advanced Applications

    PubMed Central

    Helvie, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis This article discusses recent developments in advanced derivative technologies associated with digital mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis – its principles, development, and early clinical trials are reviewed. Contrast enhanced digital mammography and combined imaging systems with digital mammography and ultrasound are also discussed. Although all these methods are currently research programs, they hold promise for improving cancer detection and characterization if early results are confirmed by clinical trials. PMID:20868894

  19. Image toggling saves time in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avi M.; Thompson, Matthew B.; Kovacs, Mark D.; Trambert, Michael; Reicher, Murray A.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. When two images are perfectly aligned, even subtle differences are readily detected when the images are “toggled” back and forth in the same location. However, substantial changes between two photographs can be missed if the images are misaligned (“change blindness”). Nevertheless, recent work from our lab, testing nonradiologists, suggests that toggling misaligned photographs leads to superior performance compared to side-by-side viewing (SBS). In order to determine if a benefit of toggling misaligned images may be observed in clinical mammography, we developed an image toggling technique where pairs of new and prior breast imaging exam images could be efficiently toggled back and forth. Twenty-three radiologists read 10 mammograms evenly divided in toggle and SBS modes. The toggle mode led to a 6-s benefit in reaching a decision [t(22)=5.11, p<.05]. The toggle viewing mode also led to a 5% improvement in diagnostic accuracy, though in our small sample this effect was not statistically reliable. Time savings were found even though successive mammograms were not perfectly aligned. Given the ever-increasing caseload for radiologists, this simple manipulation of how the images are viewed could save valuable time in clinical practice, allowing radiologists to read more cases or spend more time on difficult cases. PMID:26870746

  20. Quality control for digital mammography: Part II recommendations from the ACRIN DMIST trial

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, Martin J.; Bloomquist, Aili K.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.

    2006-03-15

    The Digital Mammography Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), conducted under the auspices of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN), is a clinical trial designed to compare the accuracy of digital versus screen-film mammography in a screening population [E. Pisano et al., ACRIN 6652--Digital vs. Screen-Film Mammography, ACRIN (2001)]. Part I of this work described the Quality Control program developed to ensure consistency and optimal operation of the digital equipment. For many of the tests, there were no failures during the 24 months imaging was performed in DMIST. When systems failed, they generally did so suddenly rather than through gradual deterioration of performance. In this part, the utility and effectiveness of those tests are considered. This suggests that after verification of proper operation, routine extensive testing would be of minimal value. A recommended set of tests is presented including additional and improved tests, which we believe meet the intent and spirit of the Mammography Quality Standards Act regulations to ensure that full-field digital mammography systems are functioning correctly, and consistently producing mammograms of excellent image quality.

  1. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  2. Computational assessment of mammography accreditation phantom images and correlation with human observer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barufaldi, Bruno; Lau, Kristen C.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Routine performance of basic test procedures and dose measurements are essential for assuring high quality of mammograms. International guidelines recommend that breast care providers ascertain that mammography systems produce a constant high quality image, using as low a radiation dose as is reasonably achievable. The main purpose of this research is to develop a framework to monitor radiation dose and image quality in a mixed breast screening and diagnostic imaging environment using an automated tracking system. This study presents a module of this framework, consisting of a computerized system to measure the image quality of the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom. The methods developed combine correlation approaches, matched filters, and data mining techniques. These methods have been used to analyze radiological images of the accreditation phantom. The classification of structures of interest is based upon reports produced by four trained readers. As previously reported, human observers demonstrate great variation in their analysis due to the subjectivity of human visual inspection. The software tool was trained with three sets of 60 phantom images in order to generate decision trees using the software WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis). When tested with 240 images during the classification step, the tool correctly classified 88%, 99%, and 98%, of fibers, speck groups and masses, respectively. The variation between the computer classification and human reading was comparable to the variation between human readers. This computerized system not only automates the quality control procedure in mammography, but also decreases the subjectivity in the expert evaluation of the phantom images.

  3. Conversion factors between human and automatic readouts of CDMAM phantom images of CR mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Homolka, Peter; Osanna-Elliott, Angelika; Semturs, Friedrich; Kaar, Marcus; Hummel, Johann

    2016-09-01

    In mammography screening, profound assessment of technical image quality is imperative. The European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening (EPQCM) suggests using an alternate fixed choice contrast-detail phantom-like CDMAM. For the evaluation of technical image quality, human or automated readouts can be used. For automatic evaluation, a software (cdcom) is provided by EUREF. If the automated readout indicates unacceptable image quality, additional human readout may be performed overriding the automated readout. As the latter systematically results in higher image quality ratings, conversion factors between both methods are regularly applied. Since most image quality issues with mammography systems arise within CR systems, an assessment restricted to CR systems with data from the Austrian Reference Center in the mammography screening program has been conducted. Forty-five CR systems were evaluated. Human readouts were performed with a randomisation software to avoid bias due to learning effects. Additional automatic evaluation allowed for the computation of conversion factors between human and automatic readouts. These factors were substantially lower compared to those suggested by EUREF, namely 1.21 compared to 1.62 (EUREF UK method) and 1.42 (EUREF EU method) for 0.1 mm, and 1.40 compared to 1.83 (EUREF UK) and 1.73 (EUREF EU) for 0.25 mm structure size, respectively. Using either of these factors to adjust patient dose in order to comply with image quality requirements results in differences in the dose increase of up to 90%. This necessitates a consensus on their proper application and limits the validity of the assessment methods. Clear criteria for CR systems based on appropriate studies should be promoted.

  4. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  5. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  6. An SVM Based Approach for the Analysis Of Mammography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, X.; Kapsokalivas, L.; Skaliotis, A.; Steinhoefel, K.; Tangaro, S.

    2007-09-06

    Mammography is among the most popular imaging techniques used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Nevertheless distinguishing between healthy and ill images is hard even for an experienced radiologist, because a single image usually includes several regions of interest (ROIs). The hardness of this classification problem along with the substantial amount of data, gathered from patients' medical history, motivates the use of a machine learning approach as part of a CAD (Computer Aided Detection) tool, aiming to assist radiologists in the characterization of mammography images. Specifically, our approach involves: i) the ROI extraction, ii) the Feature Vector extraction, iii) the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification of ROIs and iv) the characterization of the whole image. We evaluate the performance of our approach in terms of the SVM's training and testing error and in terms of ROI specificity - sensitivity. The results show a relation between the number of features used and the SVM's performance.

  7. An SVM Based Approach for the Analysis Of Mammography Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, X.; Kapsokalivas, L.; Skaliotis, A.; Steinhöfel, K.; Tangaro, S.

    2007-09-01

    Mammography is among the most popular imaging techniques used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Nevertheless distinguishing between healthy and ill images is hard even for an experienced radiologist, because a single image usually includes several regions of interest (ROIs). The hardness of this classification problem along with the substantial amount of data, gathered from patients' medical history, motivates the use of a machine learning approach as part of a CAD (Computer Aided Detection) tool, aiming to assist radiologists in the characterization of mammography images. Specifically, our approach involves: i) the ROI extraction, ii) the Feature Vector extraction, iii) the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification of ROIs and iv) the characterization of the whole image. We evaluate the performance of our approach in terms of the SVM's training and testing error and in terms of ROI specificity—sensitivity. The results show a relation between the number of features used and the SVM's performance.

  8. Three-dimensional mammography reconstruction using low-dose projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao

    A method is described for the reconstruction of three-dimensional distribution of attenuation coefficient of the breast using a limited number of low dose projection images. This method uses the cone beam x-ray geometry, a digital detector and a constrained iterative reconstruction algorithm. The method has been tested on a digital Tomosynthesis mammography system. The total radiation dose to the patient is comparable to that used for one conventional mammogram. The reconstructed image has intrinsically high resolution (˜0.1mm) in two dimensions and lower resolution in the third dimension (˜1mm). Using this method, a breast that is projected into one two-dimensional image in conventional mammography is separated into layers parallel to the two high-resolution dimensions. The thickness of the layer is in the low-resolution dimension. The three-dimensional reconstruction increases the conspicuity of features that is often obscured by overlapping tissues in a single projection. Factors affecting the quality of reconstruction have been investigated by computer simulations. These factors include the scatter, the projection angular range, the shape of the breast and the x-ray energy. Non-uniform distribution of x-ray exposures among projection images and non-uniform-resolution image-acquisition are explored to optimize the image quality within an x-ray dose limit. The method is validated with reconstruction images of mammography phantoms, mastectomy specimens, computer simulations and volunteer patients.

  9. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Mammography Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities.

  10. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    PubMed Central

    Arefan, D.; Talebpour, A.; Ahmadinejhad, N.; Kamali Asl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU). PMID:26171373

  11. Regulatory Compliance in Mammography.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Although the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) passed when analog mammography and film processors were used across the United States, now most health care facilities have full-field digital mammography. This article reviews MQSA requirements including qualifications for personnel, the clinical image evaluation process, and components of a quality control program. In light of technological advances, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's extension certificate for digital breast tomosynthesis is discussed, along with the American College of Radiology's Breast Imaging Center of Excellence designation and laws regarding density notification. PMID:26952076

  12. Image segmentation and 3D visualization for MRI mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihua; Chu, Yong; Salem, Angela F.; Clark, Robert A.

    2002-05-01

    MRI mammography has a number of advantages, including the tomographic, and therefore three-dimensional (3-D) nature, of the images. It allows the application of MRI mammography to breasts with dense tissue, post operative scarring, and silicon implants. However, due to the vast quantity of images and subtlety of difference in MR sequence, there is a need for reliable computer diagnosis to reduce the radiologist's workload. The purpose of this work was to develop automatic breast/tissue segmentation and visualization algorithms to aid physicians in detecting and observing abnormalities in breast. Two segmentation algorithms were developed: one for breast segmentation, the other for glandular tissue segmentation. In breast segmentation, the MRI image is first segmented using an adaptive growing clustering method. Two tracing algorithms were then developed to refine the breast air and chest wall boundaries of breast. The glandular tissue segmentation was performed using an adaptive thresholding method, in which the threshold value was spatially adaptive using a sliding window. The 3D visualization of the segmented 2D slices of MRI mammography was implemented under IDL environment. The breast and glandular tissue rendering, slicing and animation were displayed.

  13. Getting started with protocol for quality assurance of digital mammography in the clinical centre of Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, S; Bosmans, H; Mijovic, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work is (i) to work out a test procedure for quality assurance (QA) in digital mammography with newly released test equipment, including the MagicMax mam multimeter (IBA, Germany) and the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT (IBA, Germany), and (ii) to determine whether a first digital computer radiography (CR) system in Montenegro meets the current European standards. Tested parameters were tube output (µGy mAs(-1)) and output rate (mGy s(-1)), reproducibility and accuracy of tube voltage, half value layer, reproducibility and accuracy of the AEC system, exposure control steps, image receptor's response function, image quality and printer stability test. The evaluated dosimetric quantity is the average glandular dose (AGD) as evaluated from PMMA slabs simulating breast tissue. The main findings are that QA can be organised in Montenegro. (1) All measured parameters are within the range described in European protocols except the tube voltage which deviated more than ± 1 kV. The automatic determination of the HVL was satisfactorily. AGD ranged from 0.66 to 7.02 mGy for PMMA thicknesses from 20 to 70 mm, and is in accordance with literature data. (2) The image quality score as obtained with the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT for the CR system was similar to findings on the authors' conventional screen-film mammography. (3) In clinical practice the mammograms are printed. The CR reader produces images with a pixel size of 43.75 µm, which is compatible with the laser printer (39 µm laser spot spacing). The image processing algorithm embedded in the reader successfully processes mammograms with desirable image brightness and contrast in the printed image. The authors conclude that this first digital mammography system seems a good candidate for breast cancer screening applications. PMID:25862535

  14. Getting started with protocol for quality assurance of digital mammography in the clinical centre of Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, S; Bosmans, H; Mijovic, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work is (i) to work out a test procedure for quality assurance (QA) in digital mammography with newly released test equipment, including the MagicMax mam multimeter (IBA, Germany) and the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT (IBA, Germany), and (ii) to determine whether a first digital computer radiography (CR) system in Montenegro meets the current European standards. Tested parameters were tube output (µGy mAs(-1)) and output rate (mGy s(-1)), reproducibility and accuracy of tube voltage, half value layer, reproducibility and accuracy of the AEC system, exposure control steps, image receptor's response function, image quality and printer stability test. The evaluated dosimetric quantity is the average glandular dose (AGD) as evaluated from PMMA slabs simulating breast tissue. The main findings are that QA can be organised in Montenegro. (1) All measured parameters are within the range described in European protocols except the tube voltage which deviated more than ± 1 kV. The automatic determination of the HVL was satisfactorily. AGD ranged from 0.66 to 7.02 mGy for PMMA thicknesses from 20 to 70 mm, and is in accordance with literature data. (2) The image quality score as obtained with the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT for the CR system was similar to findings on the authors' conventional screen-film mammography. (3) In clinical practice the mammograms are printed. The CR reader produces images with a pixel size of 43.75 µm, which is compatible with the laser printer (39 µm laser spot spacing). The image processing algorithm embedded in the reader successfully processes mammograms with desirable image brightness and contrast in the printed image. The authors conclude that this first digital mammography system seems a good candidate for breast cancer screening applications.

  15. Compositional breast imaging using a dual-energy mammography protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Laidevant, Aurelie D.; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Chris I.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Mammography has a low sensitivity in dense breasts due to low contrast between malignant and normal tissue confounded by the predominant water density of the breast. Water is found in both adipose and fibroglandular tissue and constitutes most of the mass of a breast. However, significant protein mass is mainly found in the fibroglandular tissue where most cancers originate. If the protein compartment in a mammogram could be imaged without the influence of water, the sensitivity and specificity of the mammogram may be improved. This article describes a novel approach to dual-energy mammography, full-field digital compositional mammography (FFDCM), which can independently image the three compositional components of breast tissue: water, lipid, and protein. Methods: Dual-energy attenuation and breast shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional thicknesses. Dual-energy measurements were performed on breast-mimicking phantoms using a full-field digital mammography unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the compositional compartments. They were made of two main stacks of thicknesses around 2 and 4 cm. Twenty-six thickness and composition combinations were used to derive the compositional calibration using a least-squares fitting approach. Results: Very high accuracy was achieved with a simple cubic fitting function with root mean square errors of 0.023, 0.011, and 0.012 cm for the water, lipid, and protein thicknesses, respectively. The repeatability (percent coefficient of variation) of these measures was tested using sequential images and was found to be 0.5%, 0.5%, and 3.3% for water, lipid, and protein, respectively. However, swapping the location of the two stacks of the phantom on the imaging plate introduced further errors showing the need for more complete system uniformity corrections. Finally, a preliminary breast image is presented of each of the compositional

  16. Method for position emission mammography image reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Mark Frederick

    2004-10-12

    An image reconstruction method comprising accepting coincidence datat from either a data file or in real time from a pair of detector heads, culling event data that is outside a desired energy range, optionally saving the desired data for each detector position or for each pair of detector pixels on the two detector heads, and then reconstructing the image either by backprojection image reconstruction or by iterative image reconstruction. In the backprojection image reconstruction mode, rays are traced between centers of lines of response (LOR's), counts are then either allocated by nearest pixel interpolation or allocated by an overlap method and then corrected for geometric effects and attenuation and the data file updated. If the iterative image reconstruction option is selected, one implementation is to compute a grid Siddon retracing, and to perform maximum likelihood expectation maiximization (MLEM) computed by either: a) tracing parallel rays between subpixels on opposite detector heads; or b) tracing rays between randomized endpoint locations on opposite detector heads.

  17. 76 FR 60848 - National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... 301-948-8900. Contact Person: Shanika Craig, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug...) accreditation body review of soft copy mammography images; and (3) reporting breast density on mammography... issues pending before the committee. Written submissions may be made to the contact person on or...

  18. Local image registration a comparison for bilateral registration mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celaya-Padilaa, José M.; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Trevino, Victor; Tamez-Pena, José G.

    2013-11-01

    Early tumor detection is key in reducing the number of breast cancer death and screening mammography is one of the most widely available and reliable method for early detection. However, it is difficult for the radiologist to process with the same attention each case, due the large amount of images to be read. Computer aided detection (CADe) systems improve tumor detection rate; but the current efficiency of these systems is not yet adequate and the correct interpretation of CADe outputs requires expert human intervention. Computer aided diagnosis systems (CADx) are being designed to improve cancer diagnosis accuracy, but they have not been efficiently applied in breast cancer. CADx efficiency can be enhanced by considering the natural mirror symmetry between the right and left breast. The objective of this work is to evaluate co-registration algorithms for the accurate alignment of the left to right breast for CADx enhancement. A set of mammograms were artificially altered to create a ground truth set to evaluate the registration efficiency of DEMONs , and SPLINE deformable registration algorithms. The registration accuracy was evaluated using mean square errors, mutual information and correlation. The results on the 132 images proved that the SPLINE deformable registration over-perform the DEMONS on mammography images.

  19. Advanced Breast Cancer as Indicator of Quality Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is the more important screening tool for detecting early breast cancer. Screening mammography involves taking x-rays from two views from each breast, typically from above (cranial-caudal view, CC) and from an oblique or angled view (mediolateral-oblique, MLO). The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of patients with advanced breast cancer who have had a screening mammography. A general result of the survey is that 22.5% of all patients (102) with advanced breast cancer that participated in the study had previous screening mammography. But we should consider that 10% of breast cancers are not detected by mammography. Only 70% of the family doctors prescribed a diagnostic mammography when the first symptoms were diagnosed.

  20. Mammography imaging studies using a laue crystal analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Arfelli, F. |

    1995-12-31

    Synchrotron based mammography imaging experiments have been performed with monochromatic x-rays in which a laue crystal placed after the object being imaged has been used to split the beam transmitted through the object. The X27C R&D beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used with the white beam monochromatized by a double crystal Si(111) monochromator tuned to 18 keV. The imaging beam was a thin horizontal line approximately 0.5 mm high by 100 mm wide. Images were acquired in line scan mode with the phantom and detector both scanned together. The detector for these experiments was an image plate. A thin Si(l11) laue analyzer was used to diffract a portion of the beam transmitted through the phantom before the image plate detector. This ``scatter free`` diffracted beam was then recorded on the image plate during the phantom scan. Since the thin laue crystal also transmitted a fraction of the incident beam, this beam was also simultaneously recorded on the image plate. The imaging results are interpreted in terms of an x-ray schliere or refractive index inhomogeneities. The analyzer images taken at various points in the rocking curve will be presented.

  1. Comparative Study Of Image Enhancement Algorithms For Digital And Film Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Gonzalez, A.

    2008-08-11

    Here we discuss the application of edge enhancement algorithms on images obtained with a Mammography System which has a Selenium Detector and on the other hand, on images obtained from digitized film mammography. Comparative analysis of such images includes the study of technical aspects of image acquisition, storage, compression and display. A protocol for a local database has been created as a result of this study.

  2. Investigating the visual inspection subjectivity on the contrast-detail evaluation in digital mammography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Medeiros, Regina B.; Schiabel, Homero

    2014-03-01

    A major difficulty in the interpretation of mammographic images is the low contrast and, in the case of early detection of breast cancer, the reduced size of the features of malignancy on findings such as microcalcifications. Furthermore, image assessment is subject to significant reliance of the capacity of observation of the expert that will perform it, compromising the final diagnosis accuracy. Thinking about this aspect, this study evaluated the subjectivity of visual inspection to assess the contrast-detail in mammographic images. For this, we compared the human readings of images generated with the CDMAM phantom performed by four observers, enabling to determining a threshold of contrast visibility in each diameter disks present in the phantom. These thresholds were compared graphically and by statistical measures allowing us to build a strategy for use of contrast and detail (dimensions) as parameters of quality in mammography.

  3. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.; Downey, D. B.; Fenster, A.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM and US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target localization

  4. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  5. Dosimetry and kVp standardization for quality assurance of mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chien-Hau; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer mortality rates were significantly reduced in Taiwan after achieving early-stage monitoring with mammography screening. This study establishes an appropriate and traceable calibration infrastructure, which offers calibration services for mammography X-ray quality assurance instrumentation, which is performed clinically on a regular basis. The entrance air kerma, HVL, and kVp of mammography equipment with five different target/filter combinations can be taken as adequate indicators for the level of average glandular dose (AGD). The primary dose standard in mammography uses a free-air ionization chamber to estimate the rate of air kerma. Several correction factors were determined by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. A secondary kVp standard in mammography is in accordance with the IEC 61676 recommendations. The calibration system of kVp meter uses a high-voltage divider, which is traceable to ITRI primary standard in Taiwan. Dose and kVp verifications were conducted by mammography instruments, which were previously calibrated by NIST and PTB. The evaluation results indicate that the capabilities of this irradiation system met the ISO 4037-1 requirements. The expanded uncertainties (k=2) were 1.03% and 1.6% when the mammography X-ray air kerma rate and kVp meter calibration factors were evaluated using ISO GUM. Experimental verification and a comparison with NIST using transfer ionization chambers yielded differences in calibration factors. Comparison with the PTB using kVp meter indicated a less than 1% difference. The results showed that dose and kVp standards were in reasonable agreement with standard uncertainty. The low uncertainties associated with the obtained results in this work show that the standardization employed can be accurately used for calibration of instrument in mammography in Taiwan.

  6. Breast cancer screening: emerging role of new imaging techniques as adjuncts to mammography.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Lord, Sarah J; Ciatto, Stefano

    2009-05-01

    Early detection of breast cancer has been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of mammography in women aged 50-69 years, with weaker evidence of benefit in those aged 40-49 or 70 years and older. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography have been evaluated in breast cancer screening, relative to, or in addition to, mammography, in selected populations; neither test has been examined in an RCT, and thus evidence of associated screening benefit is uncertain. MRI is more sensitive than mammography in screening women with suspected or proven inherited mutations of the breast cancer genes. The addition of MRI in screening this population detects 8-24 additional cancers per 1000 screens, but also significantly increases a woman's risk of being recalled for investigation or surgical biopsy for false-positive findings. In Australia, Medicare funding for MRI screening of women in specific risk groups was announced in February 2009. Ultrasonography can detect cancers not identified on mammography in asymptomatic women with dense breast tissue. Incremental ultrasound cancer detection is reported in 0.27%-0.46% of women with mammography-negative dense breasts; evidence varies on its association with false-positive findings. Computer-aided detection (CAD) is a complementary tool to mammography, prompting the reader to consider lesions on the mammogram that may represent cancer. Emerging evidence and improved CAD technology are likely to help define its role in breast screening. PMID:19413520

  7. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J.; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  8. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  9. Feasibility of generating quantitative composition images in dual energy mammography: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. For years, mammography has been used as the gold standard for localizing breast cancer, despite its limitation in determining cancer composition. Therefore, the purpose of this simulation study is to confirm the feasibility of obtaining tumor composition using dual energy digital mammography. To generate X-ray sources for dual energy mammography, 26 kVp and 39 kVp voltages were generated for low and high energy beams, respectively. Additionally, the energy subtraction and inverse mapping functions were applied to provide compositional images. The resultant images showed that the breast composition obtained by the inverse mapping function with cubic fitting achieved the highest accuracy and least noise. Furthermore, breast density analysis with cubic fitting showed less than 10% error compare to true values. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the feasibility of creating individual compositional images and capability of analyzing breast density effectively.

  10. Attenuation correction with region growing method used in the positron emission mammography imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Li, Lin; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yun, Ming-Kai; Chai, Pei; Huang, Xian-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Li; Wei, Long

    2015-10-01

    The Positron Emission Mammography imaging system (PEMi) provides a novel nuclear diagnosis method dedicated for breast imaging. With a better resolution than whole body PET, PEMi can detect millimeter-sized breast tumors. To address the requirement of semi-quantitative analysis with a radiotracer concentration map of the breast, a new attenuation correction method based on a three-dimensional seeded region growing image segmentation (3DSRG-AC) method has been developed. The method gives a 3D connected region as the segmentation result instead of image slices. The continuity property of the segmentation result makes this new method free of activity variation of breast tissues. The threshold value chosen is the key process for the segmentation method. The first valley in the grey level histogram of the reconstruction image is set as the lower threshold, which works well in clinical application. Results show that attenuation correction for PEMi improves the image quality and the quantitative accuracy of radioactivity distribution determination. Attenuation correction also improves the probability of detecting small and early breast tumors. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-EW-N06)

  11. Design for a coherent-scatter imaging system compatible with screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Kern, Katie; Peerzada, Lubna; Hassan, Laila; MacDonald, Carolyn

    2016-07-01

    A system using a wide-slot beam and simple antiscatter grids or slots has been designed to provide a localized map of tissue type that could be overlaid on the simultaneous conventional transmission image to provide an inexpensive, low dose adjunct to conventional screening mammography. Depth information is obtainable from the stereoscopic viewing angles. The system was demonstrated to produce observable contrast between adipose tissue and a phantom chosen to mimic carcinoma at an exposure comparable with screening mammography. Imaging data was collected over a range of system parameters to optimize contrast and to allow verification of simulation modeling. PMID:27610395

  12. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikejimba, Lynda; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Baiyu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2012-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique that provides 3D structural information of the breast. In contrast to 2D mammography, DBT minimizes tissue overlap potentially improving cancer detection and reducing number of unnecessary recalls. The addition of a contrast agent to DBT and mammography for lesion enhancement has the benefit of providing functional information of a lesion, as lesion contrast uptake and washout patterns may help differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. This study used a task-based method to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: contrast enhanced mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d', derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine contrast, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 5 mm lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d' was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. In general, higher dose gave higher d', but for the lowest iodine concentration and lowest dose, dual energy subtraction tomosynthesis and temporal subtraction tomosynthesis demonstrated the highest performance.

  13. A Reconstruction Algorithm for Breast Cancer Imaging With Electrical Impedance Tomography in Mammography Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Tzu-Jen; Isaacson, David; Saulnier, Gary J.; Newell, Jonathan C.

    2009-01-01

    The conductivity and permittivity of breast tumors are known to differ significantly from those of normal breast tissues, and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is being studied as a modality for breast cancer imaging to exploit these differences. At present, X-ray mammography is the primary standard imaging modality used for breast cancer screening in clinical practice, so it is desirable to study EIT in the geometry of mammography. This paper presents a forward model of a simplified mammography geometry and a reconstruction algorithm for breast tumor imaging using EIT techniques. The mammography geometry is modeled as a rectangular box with electrode arrays on the top and bottom planes. A forward model for the electrical impedance imaging problem is derived for a homogeneous conductivity distribution and is validated by experiment using a phantom tank. A reconstruction algorithm for breast tumor imaging based on a linearization approach and the proposed forward model is presented. It is found that the proposed reconstruction algorithm performs well in the phantom experiment, and that the locations of a 5-mm-cube metal target and a 6-mm-cube agar target could be recovered at a target depth of 15 mm using a 32 electrode system. PMID:17405377

  14. The Quality of Tumor Size Assessment by Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography and the Benefit of Additional Breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Lalji, Ulrich C.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Houben, Ivo; Smidt, Marjolein L.; Heuts, Esther; de Vries, Bart; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.

    2015-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising new breast imaging modality that is superior to conventional mammography for breast cancer detection. We aimed to evaluate correlation and agreement of tumor size measurements using CESM. As additional analysis, we evaluated whether measurements using an additional breast MRI exam would yield more accurate results. Methods - Between January 1st 2013 and April 1st 2014, 87 consecutive breast cancer cases that underwent CESM were collected and data on maximum tumor size measurements were gathered. In 57 cases, tumor size measurements were also available for breast MRI. Histopathological results of the surgical specimen served as gold standard in all cases. Results - The Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC) of CESM versus histopathology and breast MRI versus histopathology were all >0.9, p<0.0001. For the agreement between measurements, the mean difference between CESM and histopathology was 0.03 mm. The mean difference between breast MRI and histopathology was 2.12 mm. Using a 2x2 contingency table to assess the frequency distribution of a relevant size discrepancy of >1 cm between the two imaging modalities and histopathological results, we did not observe any advantage of performing an additional breast MRI after CESM in any of the cases. Conclusion - Quality of tumor size measurement using CESM is good and matches the quality of these measurement assessed by breast MRI. Additional measurements using breast MRI did not improve the quality of tumor size measurements. PMID:25561979

  15. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  16. REVIEW: The development of mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, J.

    2006-07-01

    This review traces the development of mammography physics over the last 50 years, concentrating mainly on technological changes and their inter-relations. It has been written for physicists with no specific mammography experience but a general interest in radiology, as much as for those with recent involvement in mammography. Topics covered include industrial film, xerography, intensifying screens, x-ray tube developments, image quality test objects, patient dose and performance checks. Some of these developments were necessary before population screening of healthy women could be considered, while others have resulted from increased opportunities for equipment manufactures which screening programmes created. The standpoint of this review is that of a physicist with long experience in a UK centre where mammography was performed on dedicated equipment well over 40 years ago and where screening has been performed continuously for 30 years.

  17. CADx Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costaridou, Lena

    Although a wide variety of Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) schemes have been proposed across breast imaging modalities, and especially in mammography, research is still ongoing to meet the high performance CADx requirements. In this chapter, methodological contributions to CADx in mammography and adjunct breast imaging modalities are reviewed, as they play a major role in early detection, diagnosis and clinical management of breast cancer. At first, basic terms and definitions are provided. Then, emphasis is given to lesion content derivation, both anatomical and functional, considering only quantitative image features of micro-calcification clusters and masses across modalities. Additionally, two CADx application examples are provided. The first example investigates the effect of segmentation accuracy on micro-calcification cluster morphology derivation in X-ray mammography. The second one demonstrates the efficiency of texture analysis in quantification of enhancement kinetics, related to vascular heterogeneity, for mass classification in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. United States radiological health activities: inspection results of mammography facilities

    PubMed Central

    Spelic, DC; Kaczmarek, RV; Hilohi, M; Belella, S

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) was enacted in 1992 to set national standards for high-quality mammography, including standards for mammographic X-ray equipment, patient dose, clinical image quality, and related technical parameters. The MQSA also requires minimum qualifications for radiologic technologists, interpreting physicians and medical physicists, mandates acceptable practices for quality-control, quality-assurance, and requires processes to audit medical outcomes. This paper presents the findings of MQSA inspections of facilities, which characterize significant factors affecting mammography quality in the United States. Materials and Methods: Trained inspectors collected data regarding X-ray technical factors, made exposure measurements for the determination of mean glandular dose (MGD), evaluated image quality, and inspected the quality of the film-processing environment. The average annual facility and total U.S. screening exam workloads were computed using workload data reported by facilities. Results: Mammography facilities have made technical improvements as evidenced by a narrower distribution of doses, higher phantom-film background optical densities associated with higher phantom image-quality scores, and better film processing. It is estimated that approximately 36 million screening mammography exams were conducted in 2006, a rate that is almost triple the exam volume estimated for 1997. Digital mammography (DM) is now in use at approximately 14% (1,191 of 8,834) of MQSA-certified mammography facilities. The results indicate that DM can offer lower dose to the patient while providing comparable or better image quality. PMID:21614276

  19. Mammography and breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bassett, L W; Manjikian, V; Gold, R H

    1990-08-01

    Breast radiography should be performed only with film-screen mammography or xeromammography. At least two views of each breast should be obtained, and for film-screen mammography, at least one of these should be the oblique view. Quality assurance is becoming a significant concern in breast cancer screening. The ACR Mammography Accreditation Program takes into account the qualifications of the personnel, the performance of the x-ray equipment, and a peer review of the final product: the diagnostic image. The mammographic signs of malignancy can be divided into primary, secondary, and indirect. The accuracy of mammography depends on several factors, but the greatest limitation is the density of the breast tissue. Very dense tissue makes detection of breast cancer difficult, and a negative mammogram should never deter one from a biopsy of a clinically suspect mass. New consensus guidelines for breast cancer screening were developed to bring uniformity to the recommendations of the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and various professional medical societies. These new guidelines reflect the encouraging results from recent clinical trials, as well as some discouraging reports on breast self-examination and the baseline mammogram. The underutilization of screening mammography is a problem of significant concern to both private and public health agencies. Barriers to mammographic screening include lack of awareness of the benefits of screening, physicians' misconceptions about patient compliance, concerns about radiation risk and overdiagnosis, fear of mastectomy, a perception that a mammogram involves great discomfort, and relatively high cost. Nationwide educational programs are under way to counter misconceptions about mammography, and various strategies are evolving to overcome the other barriers. Sonography is a useful adjunct to mammography for cyst-solid differentiation, but mammography is the only imaging modality effective for the early

  20. The relative biological effectiveness of low-dose mammography quality X rays in the human breast MCF-10A cell line.

    PubMed

    Mills, Caitlin E; Thome, Christopher; Koff, David; Andrews, David W; Boreham, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Mammography is used to screen a large fraction of the population for breast cancer, and mammography quality X rays are speculated to be more damaging than the higher energy X rays used for other diagnostic procedures. The radiation dose delivered to breast cells as a result of these screening exposures may be a concern. The purpose of this current study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low-energy mammography X rays for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks evaluated using a highly sensitive automated 53BP1 assay. Automation of the 53BP1 assay enabled the quantification and analysis of meaningful image-based features, including foci counting, within the cell nuclei. Nontumorigenic, human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells were irradiated in the low-dose range with approximately 3-30 mGy of 29 kVp mammography X rays or (137)Cs (662 keV) gamma rays. The induction and resolution of the 53BP1 foci did not differ significantly between exposures to (137)Cs gamma rays and 29 kVp X rays. The RBE was calculated to be 1.1 with a standard deviation of 0.2 for the initial number of radiation-induced double-strand breaks. The radiation dose from a single mammogram did not yield a significant change in the number of detectable foci. However, analysis of additional features revealed subtle differences in the distribution of 53BP1 throughout the nuclei after exposure to the different radiation qualities. A single mammogram was sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1 within the nuclear area, but not into discrete foci, while a dose-matched gamma exposure was not sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1. Our results indicate that exposure to clinically relevant doses of low-energy mammography quality X rays does not induce more DNA double-strand breaks than exposure to higher energy photons.

  1. Assessment of Content-Based Image Retrieval Approaches for Mammography Based on Breast Density Patterns.

    PubMed

    Purwadi, Nabila Sabatini; Atay, Hüseyin Tanzer; Kurt, Kenan Kaan; Turkeli, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    This study is trying to assess methods commonly used in content-based image retrieval (CBIR) for screening mammography analysis. A database consists of 12 different BI-RADS classes related to breast density patterns of mammogram patches which are taken from IRMA database is used in this study. Three feature extraction methods, namely grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), principal component analysis (PCA), and scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) are being investigated and compared with prior studies. Two retrieval methods are also used in this study, namely k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and mutual information (MI) to measure the similarity between query image and images in database. The result will be evaluated using positive count rate in each query for each class. The result of this study is expected to contribute more towards better Computed-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) and specifically screening mammography analysis in clinical cases. PMID:27577481

  2. Measurements and simulations of scatter imaging as a simultaneous adjunct for screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Katie; Hassan, Laila; Peerzada, Lubna; Ur-Rehman, Mahboob; MacDonald, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray coherent scatter is dependent upon the molecular structure of the scattering material and hence allows differentiation between tissue types with potentially much higher contrast than conventional absorption-based radiography. Coherent-scatter computed tomography has been used to produce images based on the x-ray scattering properties of the tissue. However, the geometry for CT imaging requires a thin fan beam and multiple projections and is incommensurate with screening mammography. In this work we demonstrate progress in a developing a system using a wide slot beam and simple anti-scatter grid which is adequate to differentiate between scatter peaks to remove the fat background from the coherent scatter image. Adequate intensity in the coherent scatter image can be achieved at the dose commonly used for screening mammography to detect carcinoma surrogates as small as 2 mm in diameter. This technique would provide an inexpensive, low dose, simultaneous adjunct to conventional screening mammography to provide a localized map of tissue type that could be overlaid on the conventional transmission mammogram. Comparisons between phantom measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show good agreement, which allowed for detailed examination of the visibility of carcinoma under realistic conditions.

  3. Mammography: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Mammography: What You Need to Know Share Tweet Linkedin ... Lerner, FDA medical officer in the Division of Mammography Quality Standards, discusses the importance of mammography and ...

  4. Reproducing 2D breast mammography images with 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    Mammography is currently the standard imaging modality used to screen women for breast abnormalities and, as a result, it is a tool of great importance for the early detection of breast cancer. Physical phantoms are commonly used as surrogates of breast tissue to evaluate some aspects of the performance of mammography systems. However, most phantoms do not reproduce the anatomic heterogeneity of real breasts. New fabrication technologies, such as 3D printing, have created the opportunity to build more complex, anatomically realistic breast phantoms that could potentially assist in the evaluation of mammography systems. The primary objective of this work is to present a simple, easily reproducible methodology to design and print 3D objects that replicate the attenuation profile observed in real 2D mammograms. The secondary objective is to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the competing 3D printing technologies, and characterize the x-ray properties of the different materials they use. Printable phantoms can be created using the open-source code introduced in this work, which processes a raw mammography image to estimate the amount of x-ray attenuation at each pixel, and outputs a triangle mesh object that encodes the observed attenuation map. The conversion from the observed pixel gray value to a column of printed material with equivalent attenuation requires certain assumptions and knowledge of multiple imaging system parameters, such as x-ray energy spectrum, source-to-object distance, compressed breast thickness, and average breast material attenuation. A detailed description of the new software, a characterization of the printed materials using x-ray spectroscopy, and an evaluation of the realism of the sample printed phantoms are presented.

  5. Multi-scale image fusion for x-ray grating-based mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-10-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) can provide high sensitivity of weakly absorbing low-Z objects in medical and biological fields, especially in mammography. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) method is the most potential PCI method for clinic applications because it can works well with conventional X-ray tube and it can retrieve attenuation, DPC and dark-field information of the samples in a single scanning. Three kinds of information have different details and contrast which represent different physical characteristics of X-rays with matters. Hence, image fusion can show the most desirable characteristics of each image. In this paper, we proposed a multi-scale image fusion for X-ray grating-based DPC mammography. Firstly, non-local means method is adopted for denoising due to the strong noise, especially for DPC and dark-field images. Then, Laplacian pyramid is used for multi-scale image fusion. The principal component analysis (PCA) method is used on the high frequency part and the spatial frequency method is used on the low frequency part. Finally, the fused image is obtained by inverse Laplacian pyramid transform. Our algorithm is validated by experiments. The experiments were performed on mammoDPC instrumentation at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Villigen, Switzerland. The results show that our algorithm can significantly show the advantages of three kinds of information in the fused image, which is very helpful for the breast cancer diagnosis.

  6. Mammography accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  7. Validation of no-reference image quality index for the assessment of digital mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Borges, Lucas R.; Gabarda, Salvador; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-03-01

    To ensure optimal clinical performance of digital mammography, it is necessary to obtain images with high spatial resolution and low noise, keeping radiation exposure as low as possible. These requirements directly affect the interpretation of radiologists. The quality of a digital image should be assessed using objective measurements. In general, these methods measure the similarity between a degraded image and an ideal image without degradation (ground-truth), used as a reference. These methods are called Full-Reference Image Quality Assessment (FR-IQA). However, for digital mammography, an image without degradation is not available in clinical practice; thus, an objective method to assess the quality of mammograms must be performed without reference. The purpose of this study is to present a Normalized Anisotropic Quality Index (NAQI), based on the Rényi entropy in the pseudo-Wigner domain, to assess mammography images in terms of spatial resolution and noise without any reference. The method was validated using synthetic images acquired through an anthropomorphic breast software phantom, and the clinical exposures on anthropomorphic breast physical phantoms and patient's mammograms. The results reported by this noreference index follow the same behavior as other well-established full-reference metrics, e.g., the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Reductions of 50% on the radiation dose in phantom images were translated as a decrease of 4dB on the PSNR, 25% on the SSIM and 33% on the NAQI, evidencing that the proposed metric is sensitive to the noise resulted from dose reduction. The clinical results showed that images reduced to 53% and 30% of the standard radiation dose reported reductions of 15% and 25% on the NAQI, respectively. Thus, this index may be used in clinical practice as an image quality indicator to improve the quality assurance programs in mammography; hence, the proposed method reduces the subjectivity

  8. Noise power spectra of images from digital mammography detectors.

    PubMed

    Williams, M B; Mangiafico, P A; Simoni, P U

    1999-07-01

    Noise characterization through estimation of the noise power spectrum (NPS) is a central component of the evaluation of digital x-ray systems. We begin with a brief review of the fundamentals of NPS theory and measurement, derive explicit expressions for calculation of the one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) NPS, and discuss some of the considerations and tradeoffs when these concepts are applied to digital systems. Measurements of the NPS of two detectors for digital mammography are presented to illustrate some of the implications of the choices available. For both systems, two-dimensional noise power spectra obtained over a range of input fluence exhibit pronounced asymmetry between the orthogonal frequency dimensions. The 2D spectra of both systems also demonstrate dominant structures both on and off the primary frequency axes indicative of periodic noise components. Although the two systems share many common noise characteristics, there are significant differences, including markedly different dark-noise magnitudes, differences in NPS shape as a function of both spatial frequency and exposure, and differences in the natures of the residual fixed pattern noise following flat fielding corrections. For low x-ray exposures, quantum noise-limited operation may be possible only at low spatial frequency. Depending on the method of obtaining the 1D NPS (i.e., synthetic slit scanning or slice extraction from the 2D NPS), on-axis periodic structures can be misleadingly smoothed or missed entirely. Our measurements indicate that for these systems, 1D spectra useful for the purpose of detective quantum efficiency calculation may be obtained from thin cuts through the central portion of the calculated 2D NPS. On the other hand, low-frequency spectral values do not converge to an asymptotic value with increasing slit length when 1D spectra are generated using the scanned synthetic slit method. Aliasing can contribute significantly to the digital NPS, especially near the

  9. Complete internal audit of a mammography service in a reference institution for breast imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Roveda Júnior, Décio; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; de Noronha Junior, Ozeas Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective Undertaking of a complete audit of the service of mammography, as recommended by BI-RADS®, in a private reference institution for breast cancer diagnosis in the city of São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and comparison of results with those recommended by the literature. Materials and Methods Retrospective, analytical and cross-sectional study including 8,000 patients submitted to mammography in the period between April 2010 and March 2011, whose results were subjected to an internal audit. The patients were followed-up until December 2012. Results The radiological classification of 7,249 screening mammograms, according to BI-RADS, was the following: category 0 (1.43%), 1 (7.82%), 2 (80.76%), 3 (8.35%), 4 (1.46%), 5 (0.15%) and 6 (0.03%). The breast cancer detection ratio was 4.8 cases per 1,000 mammograms. Ductal carcinoma in situ was found in 22.8% of cases. Positive predictive values for categories 3, 4 and 5 were 1.3%, 41.3% and 100%, respectively. In the present study, the sensitivity of the method was 97.1% and specificity, 97.4%. Conclusion The complete internal audit of a service of mammography is essential to evaluate the quality of such service, which reflects on an early breast cancer detection and reduction of mortality rates. PMID:25741052

  10. Scatter free imaging for the improvement of breast cancer detection in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, F. H.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Scuffham, J.; Pani, S.

    2016-10-01

    In mammography, the reduction of scattered x-rays is vital due to the low contrast or small dimension of the details that are searched for. The typical method of doing so in current conventional mammography is the anti-scatter grid. The disadvantage of this method is the absorption of a proportion of the primary beam and therefore an increase in dose is required to compensate for the loss of counts. An alternative method is proposed, using quasi-monochromatic beams and a pixellated spectroscopic detector. As Compton-scattered x-rays lose energy in the scattering process, they are detected at a lower energy in the spectrum. Therefore the spectrum can be windowed around the monochromatic energy peak, removing the scattered x-rays from the image. The work presented here shows contrast improvement of up to 50% and contrast to noise ratio improvements of around 20% for scatter free imaging in comparison to full spectrum imaging. Contrast improvements of around 45% were found when comparing scatter free images to conventional polychromatic imaging for both the low contrast test object and the Rachel anthropomorphic breast phantom.

  11. Computer-aided diagnostics of screening mammography using content-based image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Soiron, Michael; de Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; de A. Araújo, Arnaldo

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of death among women in occidental countries. In the last years, screening mammography has been established worldwide for early detection of breast cancer, and computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) is being developed to assist physicians reading mammograms. A promising method for CAD is content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Recently, we have developed a classification scheme of suspicious tissue pattern based on the support vector machine (SVM). In this paper, we continue moving towards automatic CAD of screening mammography. The experiments are based on in total 10,509 radiographs that have been collected from different sources. From this, 3,375 images are provided with one and 430 radiographs with more than one chain code annotation of cancerous regions. In different experiments, this data is divided into 12 and 20 classes, distinguishing between four categories of tissue density, three categories of pathology and in the 20 class problem two categories of different types of lesions. Balancing the number of images in each class yields 233 and 45 images remaining in each of the 12 and 20 classes, respectively. Using a two-dimensional principal component analysis, features are extracted from small patches of 128 x 128 pixels and classified by means of a SVM. Overall, the accuracy of the raw classification was 61.6 % and 52.1 % for the 12 and the 20 class problem, respectively. The confusion matrices are assessed for detailed analysis. Furthermore, an implementation of a SVM-based CBIR system for CADx in screening mammography is presented. In conclusion, with a smarter patch extraction, the CBIR approach might reach precision rates that are helpful for the physicians. This, however, needs more comprehensive evaluation on clinical data.

  12. Experience in reading digital images may decrease observer accuracy in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Lewis, Sarah J.; Lee, Warwick; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Reed, Warren M.; McEntee, Mark; Tapia, Kriscia; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Rationale and Objectives: To identify parameters linked to higher levels of performance in screening mammography. In particular we explored whether experience in reading digital cases enhances radiologists' performance. Methods: A total of 60 cases were presented to the readers, of which 20 contained cancers and 40 showed no abnormality. Each case comprised of four images and 129 breast readers participated in the study. Each reader was asked to identify and locate any malignancies using a 1-5 confidence scale. All images were displayed using 5MP monitors, supported by radiology workstations with full image manipulation capabilities. A jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic, figure of merit (JAFROC, FOM) methodology was employed to assess reader performance. Details were obtained from each reader regarding their experience, qualifications and breast reading activities. Spearman and Mann Whitney U techniques were used for statistical analysis. Results: Higher performance was positively related to numbers of years professionally qualified (r= 0.18; P<0.05), number of years reading breast images (r= 0.24; P<0.01), number of mammography images read per year (r= 0.28; P<0.001) and number of hours reading mammographic images per week (r= 0.19; P<0.04). Unexpectedly, higher performance was inversely linked to previous experience with digital images (r= - 0.17; p<0.05) and further analysis, demonstrated that this finding was due to changes in specificity. Conclusion: This study suggests suggestion that readers with experience in digital images reporting may exhibit a reduced ability to correctly identify normal appearances requires further investigation. Higher performance is linked to number of cases read per year.

  13. Predicting diagnostic error in radiology via eye-tracking and image analytics: Preliminary investigation in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Pinto, Frank; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hudson, Kathleen B.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of predicting diagnostic errors in mammography by merging radiologists’ gaze behavior and image characteristics. A secondary aim was to investigate group-based and personalized predictive models for radiologists of variable experience levels.Methods: The study was performed for the clinical task of assessing the likelihood of malignancy of mammographic masses. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions for 40 cases were acquired from four Radiology residents and two breast imaging experts as part of an IRB-approved pilot study. Gaze behavior features were extracted from the eye-tracking data. Computer-generated and BIRADS images features were extracted from the images. Finally, machine learning algorithms were used to merge gaze and image features for predicting human error. Feature selection was thoroughly explored to determine the relative contribution of the various features. Group-based and personalized user modeling was also investigated.Results: Machine learning can be used to predict diagnostic error by merging gaze behavior characteristics from the radiologist and textural characteristics from the image under review. Leveraging data collected from multiple readers produced a reasonable group model [area under the ROC curve (AUC) = 0.792 ± 0.030]. Personalized user modeling was far more accurate for the more experienced readers (AUC = 0.837 ± 0.029) than for the less experienced ones (AUC = 0.667 ± 0.099). The best performing group-based and personalized predictive models involved combinations of both gaze and image features.Conclusions: Diagnostic errors in mammography can be predicted to a good extent by leveraging the radiologists’ gaze behavior and image content.

  14. Predicting diagnostic error in Radiology via eye-tracking and image analytics: Application in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Voisin, Sophie; Pinto, Frank M; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hudson, Kathy; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of predicting diagnostic errors in mammography by merging radiologists gaze behavior and image characteristics. A secondary aim was to investigate group-based and personalized predictive models for radiologists of variable experience levels. Methods: The study was performed for the clinical task of assessing the likelihood of malignancy of mammographic masses. Eye-tracking data and diagnostic decisions for 40 cases were acquired from 4 Radiology residents and 2 breast imaging experts as part of an IRB-approved pilot study. Gaze behavior features were extracted from the eye-tracking data. Computer-generated and BIRADs images features were extracted from the images. Finally, machine learning algorithms were used to merge gaze and image features for predicting human error. Feature selection was thoroughly explored to determine the relative contribution of the various features. Group-based and personalized user modeling was also investigated. Results: Diagnostic error can be predicted reliably by merging gaze behavior characteristics from the radiologist and textural characteristics from the image under review. Leveraging data collected from multiple readers produced a reasonable group model (AUC=0.79). Personalized user modeling was far more accurate for the more experienced readers (average AUC of 0.837 0.029) than for the less experienced ones (average AUC of 0.667 0.099). The best performing group-based and personalized predictive models involved combinations of both gaze and image features. Conclusions: Diagnostic errors in mammography can be predicted reliably by leveraging the radiologists gaze behavior and image content.

  15. Eight years of quality control in Bulgaria: impact on mammography practice.

    PubMed

    Avramova-Cholakova, S; Lilkov, G; Kaneva, M; Terziev, K; Nakov, I; Mutkurov, N; Kovacheva, D; Ivanova, M; Vasilev, D

    2015-07-01

    The requirements for quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology were introduced in Bulgarian legislation in 2005. Hospital medical physicists and several private medical physics groups provide QC services to radiology departments. The aim of this study was to analyse data from QC tests in mammography and to investigate the impact of QC introduction on mammography practice in the country. The study was coordinated by the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection. All medical physics services were requested to fill in standardised forms with information about most important parameters routinely measured during QC. All QC service providers responded. Results demonstrated significant improvement of practice since the introduction of QC, with reduction of established deviations from 65 % during the first year to 7 % in the last year. The systems that do not meet the acceptability criteria were suspended from use. Performance of automatic exposure control and digital detectors are not regularly tested because of the absence of requirements in the legislation. The need of updated guidance and training of medical physicists to reflect the change in technology was demonstrated. PMID:25836697

  16. Eight years of quality control in Bulgaria: impact on mammography practice.

    PubMed

    Avramova-Cholakova, S; Lilkov, G; Kaneva, M; Terziev, K; Nakov, I; Mutkurov, N; Kovacheva, D; Ivanova, M; Vasilev, D

    2015-07-01

    The requirements for quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology were introduced in Bulgarian legislation in 2005. Hospital medical physicists and several private medical physics groups provide QC services to radiology departments. The aim of this study was to analyse data from QC tests in mammography and to investigate the impact of QC introduction on mammography practice in the country. The study was coordinated by the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection. All medical physics services were requested to fill in standardised forms with information about most important parameters routinely measured during QC. All QC service providers responded. Results demonstrated significant improvement of practice since the introduction of QC, with reduction of established deviations from 65 % during the first year to 7 % in the last year. The systems that do not meet the acceptability criteria were suspended from use. Performance of automatic exposure control and digital detectors are not regularly tested because of the absence of requirements in the legislation. The need of updated guidance and training of medical physicists to reflect the change in technology was demonstrated.

  17. Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range

  18. A Pilot Study on the Development of Remote Quality Control of Digital Mammography Systems in the NHS Breast Screening Programme.

    PubMed

    Looney, P; Halling-Brown, M D; Oduko, J M; Young, K C

    2015-10-01

    In the UK, physicists and radiographers perform routine quality control (QC) of digital mammography equipment at daily, weekly and monthly intervals. The tests performed and tolerances are specified by standard protocols. The manual nature of many of the tests introduces variability due to the positioning of regions of interest (ROIs) and can be time consuming. The tools on workstations provided by manufacturers limit the range of analysis that radiographers can perform and do not allow for a standard set of tools and analysis because they are specific to a given manufacturer. Automated software provides a means of reducing the variability in the analysis and also provides the possibility of additional, more complex analysis than is currently performed on the daily, weekly and monthly checks by radiographers. To this end, a set of tools has been developed to analyse the routine images taken by radiographers. As well as automatically reproducing the usual measurements by radiographers more complex analysis is provided. A QC image collection system has been developed which automatically routes QC data from a clinical site to a centralised server for analysis. A Web-based interface has been created that allows the users to view the performance of the mammographic equipment. The pilot system obtained over 3000 QC images from seven X-ray units at a single screening centre over 2 years. The results show that these tools and methods of analysis can highlight changes in a detector over time that may otherwise go unnoticed with the conventional analysis.

  19. Effect of image processing version on detection of non-calcification cancers in 2D digital mammography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R. M.; Wallis, M. G.; Halling-Brown, M.; Mackenzie, A.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Bosmans, H.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-03-01

    Image processing (IP) is the last step in the digital mammography imaging chain before interpretation by a radiologist. Each manufacturer has their own IP algorithm(s) and the appearance of an image after IP can vary greatly depending upon the algorithm and version used. It is unclear whether these differences can affect cancer detection. This work investigates the effect of IP on the detection of non-calcification cancers by expert observers. Digital mammography images for 190 patients were collected from two screening sites using Hologic amorphous selenium detectors. Eighty of these cases contained non-calcification cancers. The images were processed using three versions of IP from Hologic - default (full enhancement), low contrast (intermediate enhancement) and pseudo screen-film (no enhancement). Seven experienced observers inspected the images and marked the location of regions suspected to be non-calcification cancers assigning a score for likelihood of malignancy. This data was analysed using JAFROC analysis. The observers also scored the clinical interpretation of the entire case using the BSBR classification scale. This was analysed using ROC analysis. The breast density in the region surrounding each cancer and the number of times each cancer was detected were calculated. IP did not have a significant effect on the radiologists' judgment of the likelihood of malignancy of individual lesions or their clinical interpretation of the entire case. No correlation was found between number of times each cancer was detected and the density of breast tissue surrounding that cancer.

  20. Investigation of physical image characteristics and phenomenon of edge enhancement by phase contrast using equipment typical for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2008-11-15

    A technique called phase contrast mammography (PCM) has only recently been applied in clinical examination. In this application, PCM images are acquired at a 1.75x magnification using an x-ray tube for clinical use, and then reduced to the real size of the object by image processing. The images showed enhanced object edges; reportedly, this enhancement occurred because of the refraction of x rays through a cylindrical object. The authors measured the physical image characteristics of PCM to compare the image characteristics of PCM with those of conventional mammography. More specifically, they measured the object-edge-response characteristics and the noise characteristics in the spatial frequency domain. The results revealed that the edge-response characteristics of PCM outperformed those of conventional mammography. In addition, the characteristics changed with the object-placement conditions and the object shapes. The noise characteristics of PCM were better than those of conventional mammography. Subsequently, to verify why object edges were enhanced in PCM images, the authors simulated image profiles that would be obtained if the x rays were refracted and totally reflected by using not only a cylindrical substance but also a planar substance as the object. So, they confirmed that the object edges in PCM images were enhanced because x rays were refracted irrespective of the object shapes. Further, they found that the edge enhancements depended on the object shapes and positions. It was also proposed that the larger magnification than 1.75 in the commercialized system might be more suitable for PCM. Finally, the authors investigated phase-contrast effects to breast tissues by the simulation and demonstrated that PCM would be helpful in the diagnoses of mammography.

  1. Impact of two types of image processing on cancer detection in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Lucy M.; Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, Padraig T.; Dance, David R.; Wilkinson, Louise; Wallis, Matthew G.; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Cooke, Julie; McAvinchey, Rita; Young, Kenneth C.

    2016-03-01

    The impact of image processing on cancer detection is still a concern to radiologists and physicists. This work aims to evaluate the effect of two types of image processing on cancer detection in mammography. An observer study was performed in which six radiologists inspected 349 cases (a mixture of normal cases, benign lesions and cancers) processed with two types of image processing. The observers marked areas they were suspicious were cancers. JAFROC analysis was performed to determine if there was a significant difference in cancer detection between the two types of image processing. Cancer detection was significantly better with the standard setting image processing (flavor A) compared with one that provides enhanced image contrast (flavor B), p = 0.036. The image processing was applied to images of the CDMAM test object, which were then analysed using CDCOM. The threshold gold thickness measured with the CDMAM test object was thinner using flavor A than flavor B image processing. Since Flavor A was found to be superior in both the observer study and the measurements using the CDMAM phantom, this may indicate that measurements using the CDMAM correlate with change in cancer detection with different types of image processing.

  2. Experience with the European quality assurance guidelines for digital mammography systems in a national screening programme.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, J; Keavey, E; Egan, G; Phelan, N

    2013-02-01

    The transition to a fully digital breast screening programme, utilising three different full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems has presented many challenges to the implementation of the European guidelines for physico-technical quality assurance (QA) testing. An analysis of the QA results collected from the FFDM systems in the screening programme over a 2-y period indicates that the three different systems have similar QA performances. Generally, the same tests were failed by all systems and failure rates were low. The findings provide some assurance that the QA guidelines are being correctly implemented. They also suggest that there is more scope for the development of the relevance of the guidelines with respect to modern FFDM systems. This study has also shown that a summary review of the QA data can be achieved by simple organisation of the QA data storage and by automation of data query and retrieval using commonly available software.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of digital mammography images using unsupervised clustering and biclustering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Olfe, Mohamed A.; Al-Akwaa, Fadhl M.; Mohamed, Wael A.; Kadah, Yasser M.

    2010-03-01

    A new methodology for computer aided diagnosis in digital mammography using unsupervised classification and classdependent feature selection is presented. This technique considers unlabeled data and provides unsupervised classes that give a better insight into classes and their interrelationships, thus improving the overall effectiveness of the diagnosis. This technique is also extended to utilize biclustering methods, which allow for definition of unsupervised clusters of both pathologies and features. This has potential to provide more flexibility, and hence better diagnostic accuracy, than the commonly used feature selection strategies. The developed methods are applied to diagnose digital mammographic images from the Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) database and the results confirm the potential for improving the current diagnostic rates.

  4. Predicting malignancy from mammography findings and image-guided core biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Dutra, Inês; Woods, Ryan; Burnside, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to produce machine learning models that predict the outcome of a mammography from a reduced set of annotated mammography findings. In the study we used a dataset consisting of 348 consecutive breast masses that underwent image guided core biopsy performed between October 2005 and December 2007 on 328 female subjects. We applied various algorithms with parameter variation to learn from the data. The tasks were to predict mass density and to predict malignancy. The best classifier that predicts mass density is based on a support vector machine and has accuracy of 81.3%. The expert correctly annotated 70% of the mass densities. The best classifier that predicts malignancy is also based on a support vector machine and has accuracy of 85.6%, with a positive predictive value of 85%. One important contribution of this work is that our model can predict malignancy in the absence of the mass density attribute, since we can fill up this attribute using our mass density predictor. PMID:26333262

  5. Image quality analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Antoshkin, L. V.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Image quality analyzer (IQA) which used as device for efficiency analysis of adaptive optics application is described. In analyzer marketed possibility estimations quality of images on three different criterions of quality images: contrast, sharpnesses and the spectral criterion. At present given analyzer is introduced on Big Solar Vacuum Telescope in stale work that allows at observations to conduct the choice of the most contrasting images of Sun. Is it hereinafter planned use the analyzer in composition of the ANGARA adaptive correction system.

  6. Computer simulation technique to preview the influence of the recording system on the image sharpness in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiabel, Homero; Silva, Marcia A.; de Oliveira, Henrique J. Q.; Azevedo Marques, Paulo M.; Frere, Annie F.

    1998-07-01

    Following procedures used to simulate the image sharpness along the radiation field based on X-rays geometric exposure developed in previous work, here we describe another computer simulation procedure intended to evaluate the influence of any recording system as radiographic film or screen-film combinations, on the image sharpness in mammography. In this current work we take into account the parameters from the recording system besides the radiation projection from the focal spot in order to yield a simulated image on the computer screen relative to the expected image to be obtained in actual conditions with a singular recording system for a singular mammography equipment. The focal spot sizes in all field locations, as well as the respectives intensity distributions, the sensitometric curve for a radiographic film or for a screen-film combination, and also the screen intensifying factor, conversion efficiency, absorption factor and emission spectrum were used as input parameters for the simulation. Simulated images were compared to those obtained with actual mammographic equipment, by using a resolution phantom, and both types of images were in good agreement. The main advantage of this procedure will be the possibility of predicting the image sharpness characteristics for any mammography equipment with any type of recording system without exposure tests.

  7. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  8. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Răzvan; Muller, Serge; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters α and β. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, α and β, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers β to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing β by about 0.07 compared to DM, with α unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases α by about 2

  9. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search ...

  10. Applying the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening threshold contrast visibility assessment to digital systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metter, Richard; Heath, Michael; Fletcher-Heath, Lynn

    2006-03-01

    The need to assure the image quality of digital systems for mammography screening applications is now widely recognized. One approach is embodied in Part B of the European Protocol for the Quality Control of the Physical and Technical Aspects of Mammography Screening (EPQCM), which prescribes criteria for several interconnected image quality metrics. The focus of this study is on the "threshold contrast visibility" (TCV) protocol (section 2.4.1 of the EPQCM), in which human observers score images of a CDMAM or similar 4-AFC phantom. This section of the EPQCM currently omits many critical experimental details, which must be gleaned from ancillary documents. Given these, the purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of several remaining experimental variables, including phantom design, and the methods used for scoring and analysis, on the measured results. Preliminary studies of two CDMAM version 3.4 (CDMAM 3.4) phantoms have revealed a 17% difference in TCV when averaged over all target diameters from 0.1 to 2.0 mm. This indicates phantom variability may affect results at some sites. More importantly, we have shown that the current CDMAM phantom design, methods for scoring, and analysis, substantially limit the ability to measure system performance accurately and precisely. An improved phantom design has been shown to avoid these limitations. Viewing environment and presentation context affect the performance and efficiency of visual scoring of phantom images. An automated display tool has been developed that isolates individual 4-AFC targets of CDMAM phantom images, automatically optimizes window/level, and automatically records observers' scores. While not substantially changing TCV, the tool has increased scoring efficiency while mitigating several of the limitations associated with unassisted visual scoring. For example, learning bias and navigational issues are completely avoided. Ultimately, software-based ideal observer scoring will likely prove to be

  11. Positron Emission Mammography Imaging with Low Activity Fluorodeoxyglucose and Novel Utilization in Core-needle Biopsy Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Choudhery, Sadia; Seiler, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM), a relatively novel breast imaging modality, provides certain advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including the ability to image biopsy samples. However, the radiation activity associated with PEM has remained a concern in clinical practice. We present a case of an invasive ductal carcinoma that was adequately imaged with a much lower than the standard 185 to 370 MBq activity of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. In addition, we demonstrate ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy sample imaging with PEM to assess adequacy of sampling, a strategy that has previously only been documented with vacuum-assisted biopsy samples. PMID:25709550

  12. Shape determination of microcalcifications in simulated digital mammography images with varying pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschin, Mark; Bath, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Tingberg, Anders

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study how the pixel size of digital detectors can affect shape determination of microcalcifications in mammography. Screen-film mammograms containing microcalcifications clinically proven to be indicative of malignancy were digitised at 100 lines/mm using a high-resolution Tango drum scanner. Forty microcalcifications were selected to cover an appropriate range of sizes, shapes and contrasts typically found of malignant cases. Based on the measured MTF and NPS of the combined screen-film and scanner system, these digitised images were filtered to simulate images acquired with a square sampling pixel size of 10 μm x 10 μm and a fill factor of one. To simulate images acquired with larger pixel sizes, these finely sampled images were re-binned to yield a range of effective pixel sizes from 20 μm up to 140 μm. An alternative forced-choice (AFC) observer experiment was conducted with eleven observers for this set of digitised microcalcifications to determine how pixel size affects the ability to discriminate shape. It was found that observer score increased with decreasing pixel size down to 60 μm (p<0.01), at which point no significant advantage was obtained by using smaller pixel sizes due to the excessive relative noise-per-pixel. The relative gain in shape discrimination ability at smaller pixel sizes was larger for microcalcifications that were smaller than 500 μm and circular.

  13. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part I. Single-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Muller, Serge; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The use of an intravenously injected iodinated contrast agent could help increase the sensitivity of digital mammography by adding information on tumor angiogenesis. Two approaches have been made for clinical implementation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM), namely, single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) imaging. In each technique, pairs of mammograms are acquired, which are then subtracted with the intent to cancel the appearance of healthy breast tissue to permit sensitive detection and specific characterization of lesions. Patterns of contrast agent uptake in the healthy parenchyma, and uncanceled signal from background tissue create a 'clutter' that can mask or mimic an enhancing lesion. This type of 'anatomical noise' is often the limiting factor in lesion detection tasks, and thus, noise quantification may be useful for cascaded systems analysis of CEDM and for phantom development. In this work, the authors characterize the anatomical noise in CEDM clinical images and the authors evaluate the influence of the x-ray energy used for acquisition, the presence of iodine in the breast, and the timing of imaging postcontrast administration on anatomical noise. The results are presented in a two-part report, with SE CEDM described here, and DE CEDM in Part II. Methods: A power law is used to model anatomical noise in CEDM images. The exponent, {beta}, which describes the anatomical structure, and the constant {alpha}, which represents the magnitude of the noise, are determined from Wiener spectra (WS) measurements on images. A total of 42 SE CEDM cases from two previous clinical pilot studies are assessed. The parameters {alpha} and {beta} are measured both from unprocessed images and from subtracted images. Results: Consistent results were found between the two SE CEDM pilot studies, where a significant decrease in {beta} from a value of approximately 3.1 in the unprocessed images to between about 1.1 and 1.8 in the subtracted images was

  14. Quantification of image quality using information theory.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Takanaga; Maeda, Hisatoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Imai, Kuniharu

    2011-12-01

    Aims of present study were to examine usefulness of information theory in visual assessment of image quality. We applied first order approximation of the Shannon's information theory to compute information losses (IL). Images of a contrast-detail mammography (CDMAM) phantom were acquired with computed radiographies for various radiation doses. Information content was defined as the entropy Σp( i )log(1/p ( i )), in which detection probabilities p ( i ) were calculated from distribution of detection rate of the CDMAM. IL was defined as the difference between information content and information obtained. IL decreased with increases in the disk diameters (P < 0.0001, ANOVA) and in the radiation doses (P < 0.002, F-test). Sums of IL, which we call total information losses (TIL), were closely correlated with the image quality figures (r = 0.985). TIL was dependent on the distribution of image reading ability of each examinee, even when average reading ratio was the same in the group. TIL was shown to be sensitive to the observers' distribution of image readings and was expected to improve the evaluation of image quality.

  15. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  16. Using LROC analysis to evaluate detection accuracy of microcalcification clusters imaged with flat-panel CT mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Vedula, Aruna A.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the detectability of microcalcification clusters (MCCs) using CT mammography with a flat-panel detector. Compared with conventional mammography, CT mammography can provide improved discrimination between malignant and benign cases as it can provide the radiologist with more accurate morphological information on MCCs. In this study, two aspects of MCC detection with flat-panel CT mammography were examined: (1) the minimal size of MCCs detectable with mean glandular dose (MGD) used in conventional mammography; (2) the effect of different detector pixel size on the detectability of MCCs. A realistic computer simulation modeling x-ray transport through the breast, as well as both signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager, was developed to investigate these questions. Microcalcifications were simulated as calcium carbonate spheres with diameters set at the levels of 125, 150 and 175 μm. Each cluster consisted of 10 spheres spread randomly in a 6×6 mm2 region of interest (ROI) and the detector pixel size was set to 100×100, 200×200, or 300×300μm2. After reconstructing 100 projection sets for each case (half with signal present) with the cone-beam Feldkamp (FDK) algorithm, a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study was conducted to evaluate the detectability of MCCs. Five observers chose the locations of cluster centers with correspondent confidence ratings. The average area under the LROC curve suggested that the 175 μm MCCs can be detected at a high level of confidence. Results also indicate that flat-panel detectors with pixel size of 200×200 μm2 are appropriate for detecting small targets, such as MCCs.

  17. Social image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Kheiri, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Current subjective image quality assessments have been developed in the laboratory environments, under controlledconditions, and are dependent on the participation of limited numbers of observers. In this research, with the help of Web 2.0 and social media technology, a new method for building a subjective image quality metric has been developed where the observers are the Internet users. A website with a simple user interface that enables Internet users from anywhere at any time to vote for a better quality version of a pair of the same image has been constructed. Users' votes are recorded and used to rank the images according to their perceived visual qualities. We have developed three rank aggregation algorithms to process the recorded pair comparison data, the first uses a naive approach, the second employs a Condorcet method, and the third uses the Dykstra's extension of Bradley-Terry method. The website has been collecting data for about three months and has accumulated over 10,000 votes at the time of writing this paper. Results show that the Internet and its allied technologies such as crowdsourcing offer a promising new paradigm for image and video quality assessment where hundreds of thousands of Internet users can contribute to building more robust image quality metrics. We have made Internet user generated social image quality (SIQ) data of a public image database available online (http://www.hdri.cs.nott.ac.uk/siq/) to provide the image quality research community with a new source of ground truth data. The website continues to collect votes and will include more public image databases and will also be extended to include videos to collect social video quality (SVQ) data. All data will be public available on the website in due course.

  18. Applicability of ACR breast dosimetry methodology to a digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomon, John J.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Swenson, Kristin N.; Schauer, David A.

    2006-03-15

    Determination of mean glandular dose (MGD) to breast tissue is an essential aspect of mammography equipment evaluations and exposure controls. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Quality Control Manual outlines the procedure for MGD determination in screen-film mammography based upon conversions of entrance skin exposures (ESEs) measured with an ionization chamber (IC). The development of digital mammography has increased with the demand for improved object resolution and tissue contrast. This change in image receptor from screen-film to a solid-state detector has led to questions about the applicability of the ACR MGD methodology to digital mammography. This research has validated the applicability of the ACR MGD methodology to digital mammography in the GE digital mammography system Senographe 2000D[reg]. MGD was determined using light output measurements from thermoluminescent dosimeters (MGD{sub TL}), exposure measurements from an IC (MGD{sub IC}) and conversion factors from the ACR Mammography Quality Control Manual. MGD{sub TL} and MGD{sub IC} data indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the two measurements with the Senographe 2000D[reg]. However, the applicability of the ACR's methodology was validated by calculating MGD at various depths in a 50/50 breast phantom. Additionally, the results of backscatter measurements from the image receptors of both mammography modalities indicate there is a difference (all P values <0.001) in the radiation backscattered from each image receptor.

  19. Evaluation of a photon-counting x-ray imaging detector based on microchannel plates for mammography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2004-05-01

    Experimental prototype of a photon counting scanning slit X-ray imaging system is being evaluated for potential application in digital mammography. This system is based on a recently developed and tested "edge-on" illuminated Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector. The MCP detectors are well known for providing a combination of capabilities such as direct conversion, physical charge amplification, pulse counting, high spatial and temporal resolution, and very low noise. However, their application for medical imaging was hampered by their low detection efficiency. This limitation was addressed using an "edge-on" illumination mode for MCP. The current experimental prototype was developed to investigate the imaging performance of this detector concept for digital mammography. The current prototype provides a 60 mm field of view, 200 kHz count rate with 20% non-paralysable dead time and >7 lp/mm limiting resolution. A 0.3 mm focal spot W target X-ray tube was used for image acquisition. The detector noise is 0.3 count/pixel for 50x50 micron pixels. The count rate of the current prototype is limited by the delay line readout electronics, which causes long scanning times (minutes) and high tube loading. This problem will be addressed using multichannel ASIC electronics for clinical implementation. However, the current readout architecture is adequate for evaluation of the performance parameters of the new detector concept. It is very simple and provides a maximum intrinsic resolution of 28 micron FWHM. The prototype was evaluated using resolution, contrast detail and breast Phantoms. The MTF and DQE of the system are being evaluated at different tube voltages. The design parameters of a scanning multiple slit mammography system are being evaluated. It is concluded that a photon counting, quantum limited and virtually scatter free digital mammography system can be developed based on the proposed detector.

  20. 75 FR 11542 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Mammography...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Mammography Quality Standards Act Requirements AGENCY: Food and Drug... Mammography Quality Standards Act requirements. DATES: Submit written or electronic comments on the collection... techniques, when appropriate, and other forms of information technology. The Mammography Quality...

  1. 78 FR 13681 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Mammography...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Mammography Quality Standards Act Requirements AGENCY: Food and Drug... associated with the Mammography Quality Standards Act requirements. DATES: Submit either electronic or... of information technology. Mammography Quality Standards Act Requirements--21 CFR Part 900...

  2. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-04-15

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  3. Validity of breast-specific gamma imaging for Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Jeng; Yu, Yeong Beom; Park, Kyoung Sik; Chung, Hyun Woo; So, Young; Choi, Nami; Kim, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 162 patients who underwent BSGI in BI-RADS 4 lesions on mammography and/or ultrasound. Results Of the 162 breast lesions, 66 were malignant tumors and 96 were benign tumors. Sensitivity and specificity of BSGI were 90.9% and 78.1%, and positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 74.1% and 92.6%. The sensitivity or specificity of mammography and ultrasound were 74.2% and 56.3% and 87.9% and 19.8%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI for breast lesions ≤1 cm were 88.0% and 86.8%, while the values of beast lesions >1 cm were 92.7% and 61.5%. The sensitivity or specificity of BSGI and mammography for patients with dense breasts were 92.0% and 81.3% and 72.0% and 50.0%, respectively. 26 patients showed neither a nodule nor microcalcification on ultrasound, but showed suspicious calcification on mammography. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI with microcalcification only lesion were 75.0% and 94.4%. Conclusion This study demonstrated that BSGI had shown high sensitivity and specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values in BI-RADS 4 lesions on ultrasound and/or mammography. BSGI showed excellent results in dense breasts, in lesions that are less than 1 cm in size and lesions with suspicious microcalcification only. PMID:27073789

  4. A quantitative method for visual phantom image quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.; Liu, Xiong; O'Shea, Michael; Toto, Lawrence C.

    2000-04-01

    This work presents an image quality evaluation technique for uniform-background target-object phantom images. The Degradation-Comparison-Threshold (DCT) method involves degrading the image quality of a target-containing region with a blocking processing and comparing the resulting image to a similarly degraded target-free region. The threshold degradation needed for 92% correct detection of the target region is the image quality measure of the target. Images of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography accreditation program phantom were acquired under varying x-ray conditions on a digital mammography machine. Five observers performed ACR and DCT evaluations of the images. A figure-of-merit (FOM) of an evaluation method was defined which takes into account measurement noise and the change of the measure as a function of x-ray exposure to the phantom. The FOM of the DCT method was 4.1 times that of the ACR method for the specks, 2.7 times better for the fibers and 1.4 times better for the masses. For the specks, inter-reader correlations on the same image set increased significantly from 87% for the ACR method to 97% for the DCT method. The viewing time per target for the DCT method was 3 - 5 minutes. The observed greater sensitivity of the DCT method could lead to more precise Quality Control (QC) testing of digital images, which should improve the sensitivity of the QC process to genuine image quality variations. Another benefit of the method is that it can measure the image quality of high detectability target objects, which is impractical by existing methods.

  5. EDITORIAL: Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light (OPTIMAMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    The Commission of the European Union (EU) conceived its Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) to identify the priorities for the European Union's research, technological development and demonstration activities for the period 1998-2002. By encouraging collaborative research between groups in different member countries, FP5 was intended to help solve problems the EU is facing and respond to major socio-economic challenges. The programme focused on a number of objectives and areas combining technological, industrial, economic, social and cultural aspects. A specific call was made, under its `Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources' section, for proposals which aim to explore improvements in non-invasive methods of imaging for early diagnosis and clinical evaluation of disease. Among the projects successfully funded under the FP5 programme was one entitled `Optical mammography: Imaging and characterization of breast lesions by pulsed near-infrared laser light', known by its acronym OPTIMAMM. The project involved a consortium of nine partners, comprising ten applied science and clinical research groups based in six EU countries, with overall administration and management provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany. The broad aim of the OPTIMAMM project was to combine multi-disciplinary basic (physics, engineering, mathematics, computer science) and clinical (oncology, histology) research to assess the diagnostic potential of time-domain optical and photoacoustic mammography as novel, non-invasive imaging modalities for the detection and clinical evaluation of breast lesions. Funding for the project, at a total cost of about 1.67 MEuro, began in December 2000 for a period of three years, although a zero-cost extension was granted to enable the ongoing project activities to continue until the end of May 2004. The importance of developing new tools for the detection and diagnosis of breast disease is evident from the very high incidence and

  6. Visibility of microcalcification clusters and masses in breast tomosynthesis image volumes and digital mammography: A 4AFC human observer study

    SciTech Connect

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the visibility of simulated lesions in digital breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes compared with 2D digital mammography (DM). Methods: Simulated lesions (masses and microcalcifications) were added to images of the same women acquired on a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens) and a BT prototype. The same beam quality was used for the DM and BT acquisitions. The total absorbed dose resulting from a 25-projection BT acquisition and reconstruction (BT{sub 25}) was approximately twice that of a single DM view. By excluding every other projection image from the reconstruction (BT{sub 13}), approximately the same dose as in DM was effected. Simulated microcalcifications were digitally added with varying contrast to the DM and BT images. Simulated masses with 8 mm diameter were also added to BT images. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments were conducted. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments, each consisting of 60 trials per experimental condition. The observers interpreted the BT image volumes in cine-mode at a fixed image sequence speed. The required threshold contrast (S{sub t}) to achieve a detectability index (d') of 2.5 (i.e., 92.5% correct decisions) was determined. Results: The S{sub t} for mass detection in DM was approximately a factor of 2 higher than required in BT indicating that the detection of masses was improved under BT conditions compared to DM. S{sub t} for microcalcification detection was higher for BT than for DM at both BT dose levels (BT{sub 25} and BT{sub 13}), with a statistically significant difference in S{sub t} between DM and BT{sub 13}. These results indicate a dose-dependent decrease in detection performance in BT for detection of microcalcifications. Conclusions: In agreement with previous investigations, masses of size 8 mm can be detected with less contrast in BT than in DM indicating improved detection performance for BT. However, for the investigated

  7. A novel method to assess incompleteness of mammography reports.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Francisco J; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Rubin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Mammography has been shown to improve outcomes of women with breast cancer, but it is subject to inter-reader variability. One well-documented source of such variability is in the content of mammography reports. The mammography report is of crucial importance, since it documents the radiologist's imaging observations, interpretation of those observations in terms of likelihood of malignancy, and suggested patient management. In this paper, we define an incompleteness score to measure how incomplete the information content is in the mammography report and provide an algorithm to calculate this metric. We then show that the incompleteness score can be used to predict errors in interpretation. This method has 82.6% accuracy at predicting errors in interpretation and can possibly reduce total diagnostic errors by up to 21.7%. Such a method can easily be modified to suit other domains that depend on quality reporting.

  8. A Novel Method to Assess Incompleteness of Mammography Reports

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Francisco J.; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography has been shown to improve outcomes of women with breast cancer, but it is subject to inter-reader variability. One well-documented source of such variability is in the content of mammography reports. The mammography report is of crucial importance, since it documents the radiologist’s imaging observations, interpretation of those observations in terms of likelihood of malignancy, and suggested patient management. In this paper, we define an incompleteness score to measure how incomplete the information content is in the mammography report and provide an algorithm to calculate this metric. We then show that the incompleteness score can be used to predict errors in interpretation. This method has 82.6% accuracy at predicting errors in interpretation and can possibly reduce total diagnostic errors by up to 21.7%. Such a method can easily be modified to suit other domains that depend on quality reporting. PMID:25954448

  9. Imaging properties of the magnification factor in digital mammography by the generalized MTF (GMTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2011-03-01

    Our aim in this study was to examine the resolution effects of breast thickness in magnification technique by evaluating generalized modulation transfer function (GMTF) including the effect of focal spot, effective pixel size and the scatter. The PMMAs ranging from 10 to 40 mm in thickness were placed on a standard supporting platform that was positioned to achieve magnification factors ranging from 1.2 to 2.0. As the magnification increased, the focal spot MTF degraded while the detector MTF improved. A small focal spot resulted in an improvement of GMTF due to a smaller effective pixel size by magnification. In contrast, a large focal spot resulted in significant degradation of GMTF due to dominating the effect of focal spot blurring. The resolution of small focal spot did improve slightly with increasing PMMA thickness for magnification factors less than 1.8. System resolution decreased with increasing PMMA thickness for magnification factors greater than 1.8, since focal spot blur begins to dominate spatial resolution. In particular, breast thickness had a large effect on the resolution at lower frequencies as a low frequency drop effect. Hence, the effect of compressed breast thickness should be considered for the standard magnification factor of 1.8 that is most commonly used in clinical practice. Our results should provide insights for determining optimum magnification in clinical application of digital mammography, and our approaches can be extended to a wide diversity of radiological imaging systems.

  10. Prediction of background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI using mammography, ultrasonography, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akiko; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Kimura, Reiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This retrospective study assessed the effects of menopausal status and menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and investigated whether the degree of BPE can be predicted by findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). There were 160 study patients (80 premenopausal, 80 postmenopausal). Degree of BPE was classified into minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. Mammographic density was classified into fatty, scattered, heterogeneously dense, and extremely dense. BP echotexture on US and BP intensity on DWI were visually classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal breast tissue were measured. Associations of the degree of BPE with menopausal status, menstrual cycle, or imaging features were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. No significant correlation was found between mammographic density and BPE (p=0.085), whereas menopausal status (p=0.000), BP echotexture (p=0.000), and BP intensity on DWI (p= 0.000), and ADC values (p=0.000) showed significant correlations with BPE. Multivariate analysis showed that postmenopausal status was an independent predictor of minimal BPE (p=0.002, OR=3.743). In premenopausal women, there was no significant correlation between menstrual cycle and BPE, whereas BP echotexture was an independent predictor of whether BPE was less than mild or greater than moderate (p=0.001, OR=26.575). BPE on breast MRI is associated with menopausal status and the findings of US and DWI. Because premenopausal women with heterogeneous BP echotexture may be predicted to show moderate or marked BPE, scheduling of breast MRI should preferentially be adjusted to the menstrual cycle. PMID:26412889

  11. Optimization of breast cancer detection in Dual Energy X-ray Mammography using a CMOS imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, V.; Fountos, G.; Martini, N.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Michail, C.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Bakas, A.; Kounadi, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy mammography has the ability to improve the detection of microcalcifications leading to early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this simulation study, a prototype dual energy mammography system, using a CMOS based imaging detector with different X-ray spectra, was modeled. The device consists of a 33.91 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screen, placed in direct contact with the sensor, with a pixel size of 22.5 μm. Various filter materials and tube voltages of a Tungsten (W) anode for both the low and high energy were examined. The selection of the filters applied to W spectra was based on their K- edges (K-edge filtering). Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. Calcification signal-to-noise ratio (SNRtc) was calculated for entrance surface dose within the acceptable levels of conventional mammography. Optimization was based on the maximization of SNRtc while minimizing the entrance dose. The best compromise between SNRtc value and dose was provided by a 35kVp X-ray spectrum with added beam filtration of 100μm Pd and a 70kVp Yb filtered spectrum of 800 μm for the low and high energy, respectively. Computer simulation results show that a SNRtc value of 3.6 can be achieved for a calcification size of 200 μm. Compared with previous studies, this method can improve detectability of microcalcifications.

  12. The mammography project at the SYRMEP beamline.

    PubMed

    Dreossi, D; Abrami, A; Arfelli, F; Bregant, P; Casarin, K; Chenda, V; Cova, M A; Longo, R; Menk, R-H; Quai, E; Quaia, E; Rigon, L; Rokvic, T; Sanabor, D; Tonutti, M; Tromba, G; Vascotto, A; Zanconati, F; Castelli, E

    2008-12-01

    A clinical program for X-ray phase contrast (PhC) mammography with synchrotron radiation (SR) has been started in March 2006 at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra, the SR facility in Trieste, Italy. The original beamline layout has been modified substantially and a clinical facility has been realized. In order to fulfill all security requirements, dedicated systems have been designed and implemented, following redundancy criteria and "fail safe" philosophy. Planar radiographic images are obtained by scanning simultaneously the patient and the detector through the stationary and laminar SR beam. In this first phase of the project a commercial screen-film system has been used as image receptor. Upon approval by the respective authorities, the mammography program is about half way to conclusion. Up to now about 50 patients have been examined. The patients are volunteers recruited by the radiologist after conventional examinations at the hospital resulted in an uncertain diagnosis. As an example one case of PhC SR mammography is shown and compared to conventional digital mammography. Preliminary analysis shows the high diagnostic quality of the PhC SR images that were acquired with equal or less delivered dose compared to the conventional ones. PMID:18617344

  13. Comparison of breast tissue measurements using magnetic resonance imaging, digital mammography and a mathematical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lee-Jane W.; Nishino, Thomas K.; Johnson, Raleigh F.; Nayeem, Fatima; Brunder, Donald G.; Ju, Hyunsu; Leonard, Morton H., Jr.; Grady, James J.; Khamapirad, Tuenchit

    2012-11-01

    Women with mostly mammographically dense fibroglandular tissue (breast density, BD) have a four- to six-fold increased risk for breast cancer compared to women with little BD. BD is most frequently estimated from two-dimensional (2D) views of mammograms by a histogram segmentation approach (HSM) and more recently by a mathematical algorithm consisting of mammographic imaging parameters (MATH). Two non-invasive clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols: 3D gradient-echo (3DGRE) and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) were modified for 3D volumetric reconstruction of the breast for measuring fatty and fibroglandular tissue volumes by a Gaussian-distribution curve-fitting algorithm. Replicate breast exams (N = 2 to 7 replicates in six women) by 3DGRE and STIR were highly reproducible for all tissue-volume estimates (coefficients of variation <5%). Reliability studies compared measurements from four methods, 3DGRE, STIR, HSM, and MATH (N = 95 women) by linear regression and intra-class correlation (ICC) analyses. Rsqr, regression slopes, and ICC, respectively, were (1) 0.76-0.86, 0.8-1.1, and 0.87-0.92 for %-gland tissue, (2) 0.72-0.82, 0.64-0.96, and 0.77-0.91, for glandular volume, (3) 0.87-0.98, 0.94-1.07, and 0.89-0.99, for fat volume, and (4) 0.89-0.98, 0.94-1.00, and 0.89-0.98, for total breast volume. For all values estimated, the correlation was stronger for comparisons between the two MRI than between each MRI versus mammography, and between each MRI versus MATH data than between each MRI versus HSM data. All ICC values were >0.75 indicating that all four methods were reliable for measuring BD and that the mathematical algorithm and the two complimentary non-invasive MRI protocols could objectively and reliably estimate different types of breast tissues.

  14. Mammography use.

    PubMed Central

    David, Michele M.; Ko, Linda; Prudent, Nicole; Green, Eric H.; Posner, Michael A.; Freund, Karen M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to compare mammography use in Haitian women versus that of other racial/ethnic groups in the same neighborhoods and to identify factors associated with mammography use in subpopulations that are seldom studied. METHODS: A community-based, cross-sectional survey sampled a multiethnic group of inner-city women from eastern Massachusetts. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression models were used to predict lifetime and recent (within two years) mammography screening. RESULTS: Self-reported lifetime mammography use was similar for Haitian (82%), African-American (78%), Caribbean (81%) and Latina women (86%) but higher for white women (94%, p = 0.008). Mammography use in the past two years was also similar in all groups (66-82%, p = 0.41). In multivariate models, African-American (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]; 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.9) and Haitian women (AOR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.9) had lower odds of lifetime mammography compared to white women. Factors independently related to lifetime and recent mammography included having a regular healthcare provider, greater knowledge of breast cancer screening; higher education, and private health insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Haitian women with a regular provider and knowledge of breast cancer screening reported recent mammography use similar to women from other racial/ethnic groups. The racial/ethnic patterns of mammography use in our study do not explain racial/ethnic differences in breast cancer stage or mortality. PMID:15712789

  15. Image feature analysis for classification of microcalcifications in digital mammography: neural networks and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chris Y.; Tsujii, Osamu; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-04-01

    We have developed an image feature-based algorithm to classify microcalcifications associated with benign and malignant processes in digital mammograms for the diagnosis of breast cancer. The feature-based algorithm is an alternative approach to image based method for classification of microcalcifications in digital mammograms. Microcalcifications can be characterized by a number of quantitative variables describing the underling key features of a suspicious region such as the size, shape, and number of microcalcifications in a cluster. These features are calculated by an automated extraction scheme for each of the selected regions. The features are then used as input to a backpropagation neural network to make a decision regarding the probability of malignancy of a selected region. The initial selection of image features set is a rough estimation that may include redundant and non-discriminant features. A genetic algorithm is employed to select an optimal image feature set from the initial feature set and select an optimized structure of the neural network for the optimal input features. The performance of neural network is compared with that of radiologists in classifying the clusters of microcalcifications. Two set of mammogram cases are used in this study. The first set is from the digital mammography database from the Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS). The second set is from cases collected at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC). The diagnostic truth of the cases have been verified by biopsy. The performance of the neural network system is evaluated by ROC analysis. The system of neural network and genetic algorithms improves performance of our previous TRBF neural network. The neural network system was able to classify benign and malignant microcalcifications at a level favorably compared to experienced radiologists. The use of the neural network system can be used to help radiologists reducing the number biopsies in clinical applications

  16. A comparison of lesion detection accuracy using digital mammography and flat-panel CT breast imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta; Glick, Stephen J.

    2005-04-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a 3D object onto a 2D plane. As an alternative, cone-beam CT breast imaging with a CsI based flat-panel imager (CTBI) has been proposed with the ability to provide 3D visualization of breast tissue. To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy using CTBI over digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of W/Al 50 kVp for CTBI and Mo/Mo 28 kVp for DM were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total mean glandular dose (MGD) of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in a conventional two-view screening mammography study. Since only one DM view was investigated here, the intensity of the DM x-ray spectra was defined to give 2 mGy MGD. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with 4 observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (Az) was 0.94 for CTBI, and 0.81 for DM. Results indicate that a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom can be detected by CT breast imaging with statistically significant higher confidence than with digital mammography.

  17. Breast Cancers Detected at Screening MR Imaging and Mammography in Patients at High Risk: Method of Detection Reflects Tumor Histopathologic Results.

    PubMed

    Sung, Janice S; Stamler, Sarah; Brooks, Jennifer; Kaplan, Jennifer; Huang, Tammy; Dershaw, D David; Lee, Carol H; Morris, Elizabeth A; Comstock, Christopher E

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical, imaging, and histopathologic features of breast cancers detected at screening magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, screening mammography, and those detected between screening examinations (interval cancers) in women at high risk. Materials and Methods This retrospective institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant review of 7519 women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with MR imaging and mammography between January 2005 and December 2010 was performed to determine the number of screening-detected and interval cancers diagnosed. The need for informed consent was waived. Medical records were reviewed for age, risk factors (family or personal history of breast cancer, BRCA mutation status, history of high-risk lesion or mantle radiation), tumor histopathologic results, and time between diagnosis of interval cancer and most recent screening examination. The χ(2) test and logistic regression methods were used to compare the features of screening MR imaging, screening mammography, and interval cancers. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to calculate P values. Results A total of 18 064 screening MR imaging examinations and 26 866 screening mammographic examinations were performed. Two hundred twenty-two cancers were diagnosed in 219 women, 167 (75%) at MR imaging, 43 (19%) at mammography, and 12 (5%) interval cancers. Median age at diagnosis was 52 years. No risk factors were associated with screening MR imaging, screening mammography, or interval cancer (P > .06). Cancers found at screening MR imaging were more likely to be invasive cancer (118 of 167 [71%]; P < .0001). Of the 43 cancers found at screening mammography, 38 (88%) manifested as calcifications and 28 (65%) were ductal carcinoma in situ. Interval cancers were associated with nodal involvement (P = .005) and the triple-negative subtype (P = .03). Conclusion In women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with mammography and MR

  18. Towards in vivo TLD dosimetry in mammography.

    PubMed

    Warren-Forward, H M; Duggan, L

    2004-05-01

    While phantoms are used for quality control assessment of the mammography unit, in vivo dose measurements are necessary to account for the variation in size and composition of the female breast. The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in mammography has been limited due to TLD visibility. The aim of this current investigation was to access the suitability of a paper-thin LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD (GR-200F) for in vivo dosimetric mammography measurements. The visibility of GR-200F has been directly compared with LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs (GR-200A) using a number of commercially available phantoms. The phantoms of thickness 2-5 cm were imaged over the range of tube potentials (24-28 kVp) used clinically. Both types of TLD were placed on the surface of the phantoms allowing assessment of visibility, entrance surface dose (ESD) and field homogeneity. In vivo assessment of ESD and visibility was also carried out on a volunteer undergoing a routine mammography examination. The positions of the GR-200F TLDs were not identified either on the image of the Leeds TOR(MAM) phantom or the patient mammograms. The average ESD for the Leeds phantom was 8.8 mGy, while the patient ESD was 13 mGy. It is now possible to perform in vivo measurements with the potential of increasing the accuracy of the doses measured for women that do not conform to a standard breast thickness or density.

  19. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  20. Automated quality assessment in three-dimensional breast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, Julia; Diez, Yago; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; van Zelst, Jan; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Mourri, Ahmed Bensouda; Gregori, Johannes; Günther, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a valuable adjunct to x-ray mammography for breast cancer screening of women with dense breasts. High image quality is essential for proper diagnostics and computer-aided detection. We propose an automated image quality assessment system for ABUS images that detects artifacts at the time of acquisition. Therefore, we study three aspects that can corrupt ABUS images: the nipple position relative to the rest of the breast, the shadow caused by the nipple, and the shape of the breast contour on the image. Image processing and machine learning algorithms are combined to detect these artifacts based on 368 clinical ABUS images that have been rated manually by two experienced clinicians. At a specificity of 0.99, 55% of the images that were rated as low quality are detected by the proposed algorithms. The areas under the ROC curves of the single classifiers are 0.99 for the nipple position, 0.84 for the nipple shadow, and 0.89 for the breast contour shape. The proposed algorithms work fast and reliably, which makes them adequate for online evaluation of image quality during acquisition. The presented concept may be extended to further image modalities and quality aspects. PMID:27158633

  1. Projection-based energy weighting on photon-counting X-ray images in digital subtraction mammography: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-03-01

    In digital subtraction mammography where subtracts the one image (with contrast medium) from the other (anatomical background) for observing the tumor structure, tumors which include more blood vessels than normal tissue could be distinguished through the enhancement of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In order to improve CNR, we adopted projection-based energy weighting for iodine solutions with four different concentrations embedded in a breast phantom (50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues). In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate a 40 mm thickness breast phantom, which has 15 and 30 mg/cm3 iodine solutions with two different thicknesses, and an energy resolving photon-counting system. The input energy spectrum was simulated in a range of 20 to 45 keV in order to reject electronic noise and include k-edge energy of iodine (33.2 keV). The results showed that the projection-based energy weighting improved the CNR by factors of 1.05-1.86 compared to the conventional integrating images. Consequently, the CNR of images from the digital subtraction mammography could be improved by the projection-based energy weighting with photon-counting detectors.

  2. Cassette-based digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J A; Boone, J M; Cooper, V N; Lindfors, K K

    2004-10-01

    Over the past several years, digital mammography systems have been installed clinically across North America in small but growing numbers. A photostimulable phosphor-based full-field digital mammography image was evaluated in this investigation. Commonly known as computed radiography (CR), its use closely mimics the screen-film mammography paradigm. System performance using modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) metrics show MTF(2.5 mm(-1)) = 0.5, DQE(2.5 mm(-1)) = 0.3, and MTF(5.0 mm(-1)) = 0.2, DQE(5.0 mm(-1)) = 0.05, for a 26 kVp beam, 0.03 mm molybdenum tube filtration, 4.5 cm tissue attenuation, and 15 mR incident exposure to the detector. Slightly higher DQE values were measured at 32 kVp with 0.025 mm rhodium tube filtration. CR mammography advantages include the ability to use existing mammography machines, where multiple rooms can be converted to "digital" operation, which allows overall cost savings compared to integrated digital mammography systems. Chief disadvantages include the labor-intensive handling of the cassettes prior to and after the imaging exam, lack of a direct interface to the x-ray system for recording technique parameters, and relatively slow processing time. Clinical experience in an IRB-approved research trial has suggested that digital mammography with photostimulable storage phosphors and a dedicated CR reader is a viable alternative to conventional screen-film mammography. PMID:15453806

  3. Evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Vanessa Cristina Felippe Lopes; Seta, Marismary Horsth De; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares; Delamarque, Elizabete Vianna; de Azevedo, Ana Cecília Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the evolution of mammographic image quality in the state of Rio de Janeiro on the basis of parameters measured and analyzed during health surveillance inspections in the period from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods Descriptive study analyzing parameters connected with imaging quality of 52 mammography apparatuses inspected at least twice with a one-year interval. Results Amongst the 16 analyzed parameters, 7 presented more than 70% of conformity, namely: compression paddle pressure intensity (85.1%), films development (72.7%), film response (72.7%), low contrast fine detail (92.2%), tumor mass visualization (76.5%), absence of image artifacts (94.1%), mammography-specific developers availability (88.2%). On the other hand, relevant parameters were below 50% conformity, namely: monthly image quality control testing (28.8%) and high contrast details with respect to microcalcifications visualization (47.1%). Conclusion The analysis revealed critical situations in terms of compliance with the health surveillance standards. Priority should be given to those mammography apparatuses that remained non-compliant at the second inspection performed within the one-year interval. PMID:25987749

  4. The Values of Combined and Sub-Stratified Imaging Scores with Ultrasonography and Mammography in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsun-Hou; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Huang, Guo-Shu; Liao, Guo-Shiou

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) of Mammography (MG) and Ultrasonography (US) were equivalent to the “5-point score” and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. This study evaluated the value of combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments with MG and US over breast cancer subtypes (BCS). Materials and Methods Medical records of 5,037 cases having imaging-guided core biopsy, performed from 2009 to 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. This study selected 1,995 cases (1,457 benign and 538 invasive cancer) having both MG and US before biopsy. These cases were categorized with the “5-point score” for their MG and US, and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. Invasive cancers were classified on the basis of BCS, and correlated with combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. Results These selected cases were evaluated by the “5-point score.” MG, US, and combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments all revealed statistically significant (P < 0.001) incidence of malignancy. The sensitivity was increased in the combined imaging score (99.8%), and the specificity was increased in the sub-stratified combined score (75.4%). In the sub-stratified combined imaging assessment, all BCS can be classified with higher scores (abnormality hierarchy), and luminal B subtype showed the most salient result (hierarchy: higher, 95%; lower, 5%). Conclusions Combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments can increase sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer diagnosis, respectively, and Luminal B subtype shows the best identification by sub-stratified combined imaging scoring. PMID:26689198

  5. Application of computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI) methodology to the comparison of two digital biopsy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.; Fatouros, Panos P.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this research was to compare a Fischer MammoVision/MammoTest and a LoRad DSM digital biopsy machine using the Computer Analysis of Mammography Phantom Images (CAMPI) methodology. This study reports on analysis of the 4 largest microcalcification groups (M1, M2, M3 and M4) and the largest nodule (N1) in a mammography accreditation phantom on images acquired at 26 kVp and different mAs values on the two machines. Both machines were linear in response but the MammoTest was more sensitive (i.e., it yielded a larger gray- scale value for a given x-ray technique). However, even after correcting for this difference, the CAMPI noise measure was substantially smaller for the LoRad than the MammoTest over the range of mAS values studied. Similarly, the CAMPI signal- to-noise-ratio and correlation measures were higher for the LoRad than the MammoTest over the same range of mAs, especially for the larger objects (M1/M2 and N1). For the smaller specks in M3/M4 somewhat closer performance was observed. The overall differences are attributed to better contrast/noise performance of the LoRad which appear to outweigh its lesser resolution capability. Our results are in agreement with earlier physical and psychophysical measurements using different methodologies. This work also describes better predictive models (i.e., fits) to describe the variation of all CAMPI measures with mAs at constant kVp. For example, the noise measure was fitted to a function that included physically reasonable sources of noise e.g., dark noise and detector gain fluctuations, in addition to the usual quantum noise. These fits can be used to summarize machine performance and to predict dependencies on other variables (e.g., exposure or dose) that are related to the mAs.

  6. Dose sensitivity of three phantoms used for quality assurance in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, M.; Semturs, F.; Kaar, M.; Hoffmann, R.; Kaldarar, H.; Homolka, P.; Mostbeck, G.; Scholz, B.; Hummel, J.

    2013-01-01

    Technical quality assurance (QA) is one of the key issues in breast cancer screening protocols. For this QA task, three different methods are commonly used to assess image quality. The European protocol suggests a contrast-detail phantom (e.g. the CDMAM phantom), while in North America the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom is proposed. Alternatively, phantoms based on image quality parameters from applied system theory such as the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) are applied (e.g. the PAS 1054 phantom). The aim of this paper was to correlate the changes in the output of the three evaluation methods (CDMAM, ACR and NEQ) with changes in dose. We varied the time-current product within a range of clinically used values (40-140 mAs, corresponding to 3.5-12.4 mGy entrance dose and detector dose of 32-110 μGy). For the ACR phantom, the examined parameter was the number of detected objects. With the CDMAM phantom we chose the diameters 0.10, 0.13, 0.20, 0.31 and 0.5 mm and recorded the threshold thicknesses. With respect to the third method, we evaluated the NEQ at typical spatial frequencies to calculate the relative changes in NEQ. Plotting NEQ versus dose increment shows a linear relationship and can be described by a linear function (with R > 0.99). Every manually selectable current- time product increment can be detected. With the ACR phantom, the number of detected objects increases only in the lower dose range and reaches saturation at about 9 mGy entrance dose (80 μGy detector dose). The CDMAM can detect a 50% increase in dose over the examined dose range with all five diameters, although the increases of threshold thickness are not monotonous. We conclude that an NEQ-based method has the potential to replace the established detail phantom methods to detect dose changes in the course of QA.

  7. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Naha, Pratap C; Lau, Kristen C; Hsu, Jessica C; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Maidment, Andrew D A; Cormode, David P

    2016-07-14

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening. PMID:27412458

  8. Breast cancer tumor size assessment with mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging at a community based multidisciplinary breast center.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Sarah Ines; Scholle, Max; Buckmaster, Jennifer; Paley, Robert Hunter; Kowdley, Gopal Chandru

    2012-04-01

    Paramount to staging and patient management is accurately measuring the size of invasive breast cancers. We assessed the accuracy of mammography (MG), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at our community-based hospital in which multiple radiologists and imaging machines are used in the care of our patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 277 patients seen at our breast center from 2009 to 2010. We tabulated MG, US, and MRI-reported tumor sizes in 161 women with pathology-proven invasive breast cancer and compared the preoperative size measurements with final pathologic tumor size. In the 161 patients, 169 lesions were identified. Imaging using all three modalities was available in 47 patients. When compared with final pathology, MRI had a correlation of r = 0.75 to mean tumor size as compared with US (r = 0.67) and MG (r = 0.76). Mean tumor size was 1.90 cm by MG, 1.87 cm by US, 2.40 cm by MRI, and 2.19 cm by pathology. We were able to achieve an excellent correlation of pathologic tumor size to preoperative imaging. The absolute differences in size between the modalities were small. MRI, in select patients, added to the assessment of tumor size based on US and MG. PMID:22472402

  9. Calibrated breast density methods for full field digital mammography: A system for serial quality control and inter-system generalization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, B.; Smallwood, A. M.; Sellers, T. A.; Drukteinis, J. S.; Heine, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors are developing a system for calibrated breast density measurements using full field digital mammography (FFDM). Breast tissue equivalent (BTE) phantom images are used to establish baseline (BL) calibration curves at time zero. For a given FFDM unit, the full BL dataset is comprised of approximately 160 phantom images, acquired prior to calibrating prospective patient mammograms. BL curves are monitored serially to ensure they produce accurate calibration and require updating when calibration accuracy degrades beyond an acceptable tolerance, rather than acquiring full BL datasets repeatedly. BL updating is a special case of generalizing calibration datasets across FFDM units, referred to as cross-calibration. Serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques were developed and evaluated. Methods: BL curves were established for three Hologic Selenia FFDM units at time zero. In addition, one set of serial phantom images, comprised of equal proportions of adipose and fibroglandular BTE materials (50/50 compositions) of a fixed height, was acquired biweekly and monitored with the cumulative sum (Cusum) technique. These 50/50 composition images were used to update the BL curves when the calibration accuracy degraded beyond a preset tolerance of ±4 standardized units. A second set of serial images, comprised of a wide-range of BTE compositions, was acquired biweekly to evaluate serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques. Results: Calibration accuracy can degrade serially and is a function of acquisition technique and phantom height. The authors demonstrated that all heights could be monitored simultaneously while acquiring images of a 50/50 phantom with a fixed height for each acquisition technique biweekly, translating into approximately 16 image acquisitions biweekly per FFDM unit. The same serial images are sufficient for serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration. Serial calibration accuracy was

  10. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  11. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  12. Digital breast tomosynthesis: application of 2D digital mammography CAD to detection of microcalcification clusters on planar projection image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) has the potential to aid radiologists in detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs). CAD for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can be developed by using the reconstructed volume, the projection views or other derivatives as input. We have developed a novel method of generating a single planar projection (PPJ) image from a regularized DBT volume to emphasize the high contrast objects such as microcalcifications while removing the anatomical background and noise. In this work, we adapted a CAD system developed for digital mammography (CADDM) to the PPJ image and compared its performance with our CAD system developed for DBT volumes (CADDBT) in the same set of cases. For microcalcification detection in the PPJ image using the CADDM system, the background removal preprocessing step designed for DM was not needed. The other methods and processing steps in the CADDM system were kept without modification while the parameters were optimized with a training set. The linear discriminant analysis classifier using cluster based features was retrained to generate a discriminant score to be used as decision variable. For view-based FROC analysis, at 80% sensitivity, an FP rate of 1.95/volume and 1.54/image were achieved, respectively, for CADDBT and CADDM in an independent test set. At a threshold of 1.2 FPs per image or per DBT volume, the nonparametric analysis of the area under the FROC curve shows that the optimized CADDM for PPJ is significantly better than CADDBT. However, the performance of CADDM drops at higher sensitivity or FP rate, resulting in similar overall performance between the two CAD systems. The higher sensitivity of the CADDM in the low FP rate region and vice versa for the CADDBT indicate that a joint CAD system combining detection in the DBT volume and the PPJ image has the potential to increase the sensitivity and reduce the FP rate.

  13. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  14. Evaluating the impact of x-ray spectral shape on image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Thacker, Samta; Gong Xing; Liu, Bob

    2007-01-15

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in exploring the feasibility of dedicated computed tomography (CT) breast imaging using a flat-panel digital detector in a truncated cone-beam imaging geometry. Preliminary results are promising and it appears as if three-dimensional tomographic imaging of the breast has great potential for reducing the masking effect of superimposed parenchymal structure typically observed with conventional mammography. In this study, a mathematical framework used for determining optimal design and acquisition parameters for such a CT breast imaging system is described. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is used as a figure of merit, under the assumptions that the imaging system is linear and shift invariant. Computation of the ideal observer SNR used a parallel-cascade model to predict signal and noise propagation through the detector, as well as a realistic model of the lesion detection task in breast imaging. For all evaluations, the total mean glandular dose for a CT breast imaging study was constrained to be approximately equivalent to that of a two-view conventional mammography study. The framework presented was used to explore the effect of x-ray spectral shape across an extensive range of kVp settings, filter material types, and filter thicknesses. The results give an indication of how spectral shape can affect image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging.

  15. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  16. Quality assessment for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Jiankang; Shen, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    Image quality assessment is an essential value judgement approach for many applications. Multi & hyper spectral imaging has more judging essentials than grey scale or RGB imaging and its image quality assessment job has to cover up all-around evaluating factors. This paper presents an integrating spectral imaging quality assessment project, in which spectral-based, radiometric-based and spatial-based statistical behavior for three hyperspectral imagers are jointly executed. Spectral response function is worked out based on discrete illumination images and its spectral performance is deduced according to its FWHM and spectral excursion value. Radiometric response ability of different spectral channel under both on-ground and airborne imaging condition is judged by SNR computing based upon local RMS extraction and statistics method. Spatial response evaluation of the spectral imaging instrument is worked out by MTF computing with slanted edge analysis method. Reported pioneering systemic work in hyperspectral imaging quality assessment is carried out with the help of several domestic dominating work units, which not only has significance in the development of on-ground and in-orbit instrument performance evaluation technique but also takes on reference value for index demonstration and design optimization for instrument development.

  17. Performance of mammography equipment in the Macedonian breast screening campaign 2008/2009.

    PubMed

    Gershan, V; Antevska-Grujoska, S

    2011-09-01

    Breast screening campaign in Macedonia started in the end of 2007 and 19 national mammography departments were included. Contrary to the European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Mammography Screening, the quality assurance activities were not implemented before the start of the campaign, except at the University Clinic of Radiology, Skopje. The quality control tests were performed for the very first time at 13 mammography units under a licence-obtaining procedure. One of the machines was suspended from clinical and screening practice due to heavy malfunction of the generator, X-ray tube and automatic exposure control (AEC) system. Only 3 of the 13 mammography machines met the criteria for tube voltage (kV) accuracy. Two of the seven AEC systems were calibrated in the optimal optical density (OD) range (OD >1.4). AEC settings corresponded to the recommendations at eight units, while nine units met basic overall image quality criteria. Mean glandular dose (MGD) was higher than the recommended level of 2.5 mGy in four departments. Mean gradient of the film G(0.25-2.0) was below 2.8 at four units. Only two light boxes had a luminance of >1700 cd m(-2) and six rooms had an ambient light level of <50 lx. The findings of this work clearly suggest that the performance of the mammography equipment involved in the campaign in almost 50 % do not supply basic quality criteria for a breast screening programme. PMID:21733866

  18. Quality management in cardiopulmonary imaging.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2011-02-01

    Increased scrutiny of the practice of medicine by government, insurance providers, and individual patients has led to a rapid growth of quality management programs in health care. Radiology is no exception to this trend, and quality management has become an important issue for individual radiologists as well as their respective practices. Quality control has been a mainstay of the practice of radiology for many years, with quality assurance and quality improvement both relative newcomers. This article provides an overview of quality management in the context of cardiopulmonary imaging and describes specific areas of cardiopulmonary radiology in which the components of a quality management program can be integrated. Specific quality components are discussed, and examples of quality initiatives are provided.

  19. [Efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography in diagnosis of breast cancer--comparison with film-screen mammography].

    PubMed

    Kitahama, H

    1991-05-25

    The aim of this study is to present efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography (CR-mammography) in diagnosis of breast cancer. Ninety-seven cases with breast cancer including 44 cases less than 2 cm in macroscopic size (t1 cases) were evaluated using storage phosphor-based digital mammography (2000 x 2510 pixels by 10 bits). Abnormal findings on CR-mammography were detected in 86 cases (88.7%) of 97 women with breast cancer. Sensitivity of CR-mammography was 88.7%. It was superior to that of film-screen mammography. On t1 breast cancer cases, sensitivity on CR-mammography was 88.6%. False negative rate in t1 breast cancer cases was reduced by image processing using CR-mammography. To evaluate microcalcifications, CR-mammograms and film-screen mammograms were investigated in 22 cases of breast cancer proven pathologically the existence of microcalcifications and 11 paraffin tissue blocks of breast cancer. CR-mammography was superior to film-screen mammography in recognizing of microcalcifications. As regards the detectability for the number and the shape of microcalcifications, CR-mammography was equivalent to film-screen mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis by eight observers was performed for CR-mammography and film-screen mammography with 54 breast cancer patients and 54 normal cases. The detectability of abnormal findings of breast cancer on CR-mammography (ROC area = 0.91) was better than that on film-screen mammography (ROC area = 0.88) (p less than 0.05). Efficacy of storage phosphor-based digital mammography in diagnosis of breast cancer was discussed and demonstrated in this study.

  20. A device for measuring compression force in mammography.

    PubMed

    Thiele, D L; Simeoni, R J; Panaretos, S

    1993-03-01

    Compression in mammography is an accepted technique for improving image quality and reducing dose, but excessive compression can cause pain and other undesirable effects. Therefore, maximum compression force should be measured in a quality assurance programme. A compression force meter, based on a load cell design, has been constructed and used to make compression force measurements on three GE Senographe 600T mammography machines. These measurements show that the conversion from pneumatic pressure (as indicated on the machine) to applied compression force is given by Compression Force (N) = (79.0 +/- 0.9) x Pneumatic Pressure (bars) + (12.2 +/- 4.0). Using this equation and pneumatic pressure settings on nine GE Senographe 600T units in our quality assurance programme, the maximum compression force in clinical use ranges from 102 to 150 N with a mean of 126 N. This is lower than guidelines used in the United States and the United Kingdom. PMID:8470999

  1. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  2. Comparison of air kerma measurements for tungsten anode based mammography x-ray beam qualities (EURAMET.RI(I)-S4.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, I.; Büermann, L.; Gomola, I.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in mammography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two reference-class ionization chamber types Radcal RC6M and Magna A650 of the IAEA and tungsten anode based beam qualities with Mo and Al external filtrations (W+Mo, W+Al) established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients, NK_air, were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in May 2015 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show good agreement, to be well within the 0.55 % standard uncertainty of the comparison. Correction factors to determine NK_air for these beam qualities based on calibration in RQR-M mammography beam qualities, established according to the IEC 61267 standard, were also calculated for the Radcal RC6M, 10X5-6M, and Magna A650 types of chambers. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Image quality and dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Oliveira, N.; Matela, N.; Janeiro, L.; Almeida, P.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is considered a standard technique for the early detection of breast cancer. However, its sensitivity is limited essentially due to the issue of the overlapping breast tissue. This limitation can be partially overcome, with a relatively new technique, called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). For this technique, optimization of acquisition parameters which maximize image quality, whilst complying with the ALARA principle, continues to be an area of considerable research. The aim of this work was to study the best quantum energies that optimize the image quality with the lowest achievable dose in DBT and compare these results with the digital mammography (DM) ones. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program MCNPX 2.7.0 in order to generate several 2D cranio-caudal (CC) projections obtained during an acquisition of a standard DBT examination. Moreover, glandular absorbed doses and photon flux calculations, for each projection image, were performed. A homogeneous breast computational phantom with 50%/50% glandular/adipose tissue composition was used and two compressed breast thicknesses were evaluated: 4 cm and 8 cm. The simulated projection images were afterwards reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction tool and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) was calculated in order to evaluate the image quality in DBT and DM. Finally, a thorough comparison between the results obtained in terms of SDNR and dose assessment in DBT and DM was performed.

  4. Elasto-Mammography: Elastic Property Reconstruction in Breast Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. G.; Liu, Y.; Wang, G.; Sun, L. Z.

    2008-02-15

    Mammography is the primary method for screening and detecting breast cancers. However, it frequently fails to detect small tumors and is not quite specific in terms of tumor benignity and malignancy. The objective of this paper is to develop a new imaging modality called elasto-mammography that generates the modulus elastograms based on conventional mammographs. A new elastic reconstruction method is described based on elastography and mammography for breast tissues. Elastic distribution can be reconstructed through the measurement of displacement provided by mammographic projection. It is shown that the proposed elasto-mammography provides higher sensitivity and specificity than the conventional mammography on its own for breast cancer diagnosis.

  5. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  6. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  7. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings. PMID:27101241

  8. Visual Limits To Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Edward M.

    1985-07-01

    Today's high speed computers, large and inexpensive memory devices and high definition displays have opened up the area of electronic image processing. Computers are being used to compress,enhance,and geometrically correct a wide range of image related data. It is necessary to develop Image Quality Merit Factors (IOW) that can be used to evaluate, compare, and specify imaging systems. A meaningful IQMF will have to include both the effects of the transfer function of the system and the noise introduced by the system. Most of the methods used to date have utilized linear system techniques to describe performance. In our work on the IOMF, we have found that it may be necessary to imitate the eye-brain combination in order to best describe the performance of an imaging system. This paper presents the idea that understanding the organization of and the rivalry between visual mechanisms may lead to new ways of considering photographic and electronic system image quality and the loss in image quality due to grain, halftones, and pixel noise.

  9. Estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full field digital mammography images via adaptive fuzzy c-means clustering and support vector machine segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Wang Yan; Zheng Yuanjie; Gee, James C.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The amount of fibroglandular tissue content in the breast as estimated mammographically, commonly referred to as breast percent density (PD%), is one of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Approaches to quantify breast density commonly focus on either semiautomated methods or visual assessment, both of which are highly subjective. Furthermore, most studies published to date investigating computer-aided assessment of breast PD% have been performed using digitized screen-film mammograms, while digital mammography is increasingly replacing screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening protocols. Digital mammography imaging generates two types of images for analysis, raw (i.e., 'FOR PROCESSING') and vendor postprocessed (i.e., 'FOR PRESENTATION'), of which postprocessed images are commonly used in clinical practice. Development of an algorithm which effectively estimates breast PD% in both raw and postprocessed digital mammography images would be beneficial in terms of direct clinical application and retrospective analysis. Methods: This work proposes a new algorithm for fully automated quantification of breast PD% based on adaptive multiclass fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and support vector machine (SVM) classification, optimized for the imaging characteristics of both raw and processed digital mammography images as well as for individual patient and image characteristics. Our algorithm first delineates the breast region within the mammogram via an automated thresholding scheme to identify background air followed by a straight line Hough transform to extract the pectoral muscle region. The algorithm then applies adaptive FCM clustering based on an optimal number of clusters derived from image properties of the specific mammogram to subdivide the breast into regions of similar gray-level intensity. Finally, a SVM classifier is trained to identify which clusters within the breast tissue are likely fibroglandular, which are then

  10. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  11. Fovea based image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Anan; Zhao, Debin; Liu, Shaohui; Cao, Guangyao

    2010-07-01

    Humans are the ultimate receivers of the visual information contained in an image, so the reasonable method of image quality assessment (IQA) should follow the properties of the human visual system (HVS). In recent years, IQA methods based on HVS-models are slowly replacing classical schemes, such as mean squared error (MSE) and Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR). IQA-structural similarity (SSIM) regarded as one of the most popular HVS-based methods of full reference IQA has apparent improvements in performance compared with traditional metrics in nature, however, it performs not very well when the images' structure is destroyed seriously or masked by noise. In this paper, a new efficient fovea based structure similarity image quality assessment (FSSIM) is proposed. It enlarges the distortions in the concerned positions adaptively and changes the importances of the three components in SSIM. FSSIM predicts the quality of an image through three steps. First, it computes the luminance, contrast and structure comparison terms; second, it computes the saliency map by extracting the fovea information from the reference image with the features of HVS; third, it pools the above three terms according to the processed saliency map. Finally, a commonly experimental database LIVE IQA is used for evaluating the performance of the FSSIM. Experimental results indicate that the consistency and relevance between FSSIM and mean opinion score (MOS) are both better than SSIM and PSNR clearly.

  12. D3D augmented reality imaging system: proof of concept in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, David B; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to present images from simulated breast microcalcifications and assess the pattern of the microcalcifications with a technical development called “depth 3-dimensional (D3D) augmented reality”. Materials and methods A computer, head display unit, joystick, D3D augmented reality software, and an in-house script of simulated data of breast microcalcifications in a ductal distribution were used. No patient data was used and no statistical analysis was performed. Results The D3D augmented reality system demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception by presenting a unique image to each eye, focal point convergence, head position tracking, 3D cursor, and joystick fly-through. Conclusion The D3D augmented reality imaging system offers image viewing with depth perception and focal point convergence. The D3D augmented reality system should be tested to determine its utility in clinical practice. PMID:27563261

  13. Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Linda L.; Ballard, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women and, until recently surpassed by lung cancer, was the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. It is the leading cause of death in women aged 39 to 44 years. The American Cancer Society has estimated that there will be 135,000 new cases of breast cancer and 42,300 breast cancer-related deaths in 1988. It is now predicted that breast cancer will develop in one out of every ten women in the United States. Given the clinical and public health significance of breast cancer, annual screening with mammography and clinical breast examination is recommended for women aged 50 and older to reduce breast cancer mortality. PMID:3407172

  14. Landsat image data quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, C. F.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Landsat-4 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program to characterize the data obtained using the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on board the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 satellites are reported. TM design specifications were compared to the obtained data with respect to four criteria, including spatial resolution; geometric fidelity; information content; and image relativity to Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data. The overall performance of the TM was rated excellent despite minor instabilities and radiometric anomalies in the data. Spatial performance of the TM exceeded design specifications in terms of both image sharpness and geometric accuracy, and the image utility of the TM data was at least twice as high as MSS data. The separability of alfalfa and sugar beet fields in a TM image is demonstrated.

  15. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Solves-Llorens, J. A.; Rupérez, M. J. Monserrat, C.; Lloret, M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. Methods: The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. Results: The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. Conclusions: A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the

  16. Near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast for quantitative oximetry in optical mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Liu Ning; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    We present a hybrid continuous-wave, frequency-domain instrument for near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast based on a tandem, planar scanning of one illumination optical fiber and one collection optical fiber configured in a transmission geometry. The spatial sampling rate of 25 points/cm{sup 2} is increased to 400 points/cm{sup 2} by postprocessing the data with a 2D cubic spline interpolation. We then apply a previously developed spatial second-derivative algorithm to an edge-corrected intensity image (N-image) to enhance the visibility and resolution of optical inhomogeneities in breast tissue such as blood vessels and tumors. The spectral data at each image pixel consist of 515-point spectra over the 650-900 nm wavelength range, thus featuring a spectral density of two data points per nanometer. We process the measured spectra with a paired-wavelength spectral analysis method to quantify the oxygen saturation of detected optical inhomogeneities, under the assumption that they feature a locally higher hemoglobin concentration. Our initial measurements on two healthy human subjects have generated high-resolution optical mammograms displaying a network of blood vessels with values of hemoglobin saturation typically falling within the 60%-95% range, which is physiologically reasonable. This approach to spectral imaging and oximetry of the breast has the potential to efficiently exploit the high intrinsic contrast provided by hemoglobin in breast tissue and to contribute a useful tool in the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast pathologies.

  17. An Interactive Method Based on the Live Wire for Segmentation of the Breast in Mammography Images

    PubMed Central

    Zewei, Zhang; Tianyue, Wang; Li, Guo; Tingting, Wang; Lu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve accuracy of computer-aided diagnosis of breast lumps, the authors introduce an improved interactive segmentation method based on Live Wire. This paper presents the Gabor filters and FCM clustering algorithm is introduced to the Live Wire cost function definition. According to the image FCM analysis for image edge enhancement, we eliminate the interference of weak edge and access external features clear segmentation results of breast lumps through improving Live Wire on two cases of breast segmentation data. Compared with the traditional method of image segmentation, experimental results show that the method achieves more accurate segmentation of breast lumps and provides more accurate objective basis on quantitative and qualitative analysis of breast lumps. PMID:25024740

  18. An interactive method based on the live wire for segmentation of the breast in mammography images.

    PubMed

    Zewei, Zhang; Tianyue, Wang; Li, Guo; Tingting, Wang; Lu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve accuracy of computer-aided diagnosis of breast lumps, the authors introduce an improved interactive segmentation method based on Live Wire. This paper presents the Gabor filters and FCM clustering algorithm is introduced to the Live Wire cost function definition. According to the image FCM analysis for image edge enhancement, we eliminate the interference of weak edge and access external features clear segmentation results of breast lumps through improving Live Wire on two cases of breast segmentation data. Compared with the traditional method of image segmentation, experimental results show that the method achieves more accurate segmentation of breast lumps and provides more accurate objective basis on quantitative and qualitative analysis of breast lumps.

  19. A similarity learning approach to content-based image retrieval: application to digital mammography.

    PubMed

    El-Naqa, Issam; Yang, Yongyi; Galatsanos, Nikolas P; Nishikawa, Robert M; Wernick, Miles N

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to content-based retrieval of medical images from a database, and provide a preliminary demonstration of our approach as applied to retrieval of digital mammograms. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) refers to the retrieval of images from a database using information derived from the images themselves, rather than solely from accompanying text indices. In the medical-imaging context, the ultimate aim of CBIR is to provide radiologists with a diagnostic aid in the form of a display of relevant past cases, along with proven pathology and other suitable information. CBIR may also be useful as a training tool for medical students and residents. The goal of information retrieval is to recall from a database information that is relevant to the user's query. The most challenging aspect of CBIR is the definition of relevance (similarity), which is used to guide the retrieval machine. In this paper, we pursue a new approach, in which similarity is learned from training examples provided by human observers. Specifically, we explore the use of neural networks and support vector machines to predict the user's notion of similarity. Within this framework we propose using a hierarchal learning approach, which consists of a cascade of a binary classifier and a regression module to optimize retrieval effectiveness and efficiency. We also explore how to incorporate online human interaction to achieve relevance feedback in this learning framework. Our experiments are based on a database consisting of 76 mammograms, all of which contain clustered microcalcifications (MCs). Our goal is to retrieve mammogram images containing similar MC clusters to that in a query. The performance of the retrieval system is evaluated using precision-recall curves computed using a cross-validation procedure. Our experimental results demonstrate that: 1) the learning framework can accurately predict the perceptual similarity reported by human observers, thereby

  20. Signal uniformity of mammography systems and its impact on test results from contrast detail phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaar, M.; Semturs, F.; Hummel, J.; Hoffmann, R.; Figl, M.

    2015-03-01

    Technical quality assurance (TQA) procedures for mammography systems usually include tests with a contrast-detail phantom. These phantoms contain multiple objects of varying dimensions arranged on a flat body. Exposures of the phantom are then evaluated by an observer, either human or software. One well-known issue of this method is that dose distribution is not uniform across the image area of any mammography system, mainly due to the heel effect. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent image quality differs across the detector plane. We analyze a total of 320 homogeneous mammography exposures from 32 radiology institutes. Systems of different models and manufacturers, both computed radiography (CR) and direct radiography (DR) are included. All images were taken from field installations operated within the nationwide Austrian mammography screening program, which includes mandatory continuous TQA. We calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for 15 regions of interest arranged to cover the area of the phantom. We define the 'signal range' of an image and compare this value categorized by technologies. We found the deviations of SNR greater in anterior-posterior than in lateral direction. SNR ranges are significantly higher for CR systems than for DR systems.

  1. Toward clinical differential phase contrast mammography: preliminary evaluations and image processing schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Thüring, T.; David, C.; Rössl, E.; van Stevendaal, U.; Köhler, T.; Trippel, M.; Singer, G.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hohl, M. K.; Hauser, N.

    2013-05-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging are very promising tools for medical diagnostics because they are able to provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based methods. In this work, we discuss the investigation of three native breast samples with a grating interferometer equipped with a conventional X-ray tube, the full study being published in ref. [1]. We briefly introduce a method to fuse absorption, differential phase and scattering signals into a unique image with improved diagnostic contents. Our approach yields complementary and inaccessible information on the electron density distribution and the small-angle scattering power of the sample which could potentially answer clinically relevant, yet unresolved questions such as the capability to unequivocally discern between (pre-) malignant changes and post-operative scars or to distinguish cancer-invaded regions within healthy tissue.

  2. Dedicated Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography and Diagnostic Mammography: Comparison of Radiation Dose, Patient Comfort, And Qualitative Review of Imaging Findings in BI-RADS 4 and 5 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Avice M.; Kawakyu-O’Connor, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study was undertaken to compare radiation dose, relative visibility/conspicuity of biopsy-proven lesions, and relative patient comfort in diagnostic mammography and dedicated cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) in Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)® 4 or 5 lesions. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients (37 breasts) with abnormal mammographic and/or ultrasound categorized as BI-RADS® 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated with CBBCT prior to biopsy. Administered radiation dose was calculated for each modality. Mammograms and CBBCT images were compared side-by-side and lesion visibility/conspicuity was qualitatively scored. Histopathology of lesions was reviewed. Patients were administered a survey for qualitative evaluation of comfort between the two modalities. Results: CBBCT dose was similar to or less than diagnostic mammography, with a mean dose of 9.4 mGy (±3.1 SD) for CBBCT vs. 16.9 mGy (±6.9 SD) for diagnostic mammography in a total of 37 imaged breasts (P<0.001). Thirty-three of 34 mammographic lesions were scored as equally or better visualized in CBBCT relative to diagnostic mammography. Characterization of high-risk lesions was excellent. Patients reported greater comfort in CBBCT imaging relative to mammography. Conclusion: Our experience of side-by-side comparison of CBBCT and diagnostic mammography in BI-RADS® 4 and 5 breast lesions demonstrated a high degree of correlation between the two modalities across a variety of lesion types. Owing to favorable radiation dose profile, excellent visualization of lesions, and qualitative benefits including improved patient comfort, excellent field-of-view, and more anatomical evaluation of lesion margins, CBBCT offers a promising modality for diagnostic evaluation of breast lesions. PMID:22439131

  3. Broadband optical mammography instrument for depth-resolved imaging and local dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Anderson, Pamela G.; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    We present a continuous-wave instrument for non-invasive diffuse optical imaging of the breast in a parallel-plate transmission geometry. The instrument measures continuous spectra in the wavelength range 650-1000 nm, with an intensity noise level <1.5% and a spatial sampling rate of 5 points/cm in the x- and y-directions. We collect the optical transmission at four locations, one collinear and three offset with respect to the illumination optical fiber, to recover the depth of optical inhomogeneities in the tissue. We imaged a tissue-like, breast shaped, silicone phantom (6 cm thick) with two embedded absorbing structures: a black circle (1.7 cm in diameter) and a black stripe (3 mm wide), designed to mimic a tumor and a blood vessel, respectively. The use of a spatially multiplexed detection scheme allows for the generation of on-axis and off-axis projection images simultaneously, as opposed to requiring multiple scans, thus decreasing scan-time and motion artifacts. This technique localizes detected inhomogeneities in 3D and accurately assigns their depth to within 1 mm in the ideal conditions of otherwise homogeneous tissue-like phantoms. We also measured induced hemodynamic changes in the breast of a healthy human subject at a selected location (no scanning). We applied a cyclic, arterial blood pressure perturbation by alternating inflation (to a pressure of 200 mmHg) and deflation of a pneumatic cuff around the subject's thigh at a frequency of 0.05 Hz, and measured oscillations with amplitudes up to 1 μM and 0.2 μM in the tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, respectively. These hemodynamic oscillations provide information about the vascular structure and functional integrity in tissue, and may be used to assess healthy or abnormal perfusion in a clinical setting.

  4. Building an intranet digital mammography case library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Fan, Yu; Sickles, Edward A.; Huang, H. K.

    2000-05-01

    To practice mammography diagnosis effectively, radiologists expect convenient access to well-organized and authoritative mammography related information, especially when there is case in question. The purpose of this study is to build infrastructural diagnosis support by incorporating various clinical information into a digital mammography case library, and allow user to search the library based on mammographic findings. The digital mammography case library has a three- tier architecture: (1) Back-end mammography databases integrate multimedia clinical information from various operational systems, including RIS and PACS. Cases are stored in a finding index database powered by an object-relational database with finding-coded reports, which are modeled around the ACR BI-RADS (American College of Radiology, Breast Imaging Report and Data System) standard. (2) The middle-end application controllers process application logic, such as user authorization, HTTP request handling, database connection and dynamic HTML page generation. (3) Web-based user interface is developed for authorized Intranet personnel to formulate query based on radiological finding (such as mass, calcification and architectural distortion), shape and assessment, using ACR BI-RADS specified lexicon. The case library so far has 103 cases selected from over 800 digital mammography studies carried out at the Mt. Zion hospital, UCSF, during an on-going digital telemammography project. We believe that an Intranet based digital mammography case library with mammographic finding search capability facilitates continuous medical education and online decision support, by providing exemplary study to compare with case in question.

  5. Automatic multimodal 2D/3D image fusion of ultrasound computer tomography and x-ray mammography for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Torsten; Duric, Neb; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. The established screening method to detect breast cancer in an early state is X-ray mammography. However, X-ray frequently provides limited contrast of tumors located within glandular tissue. A new imaging approach is Ultrasound Computer Tomography generating threedimensional volumes of the breast. Three different images are available: reflectivity, attenuation and speed of sound. The correlation of USCT volumes with X-ray mammograms is of interest for evaluation of the new imaging modality as well as for a multimodal diagnosis. Yet, both modalities differ in image dimensionality, patient positioning and deformation state of the breast. In earlier work we proposed a methodology based on Finite Element Method to register speed of sound images with the according mammogram. In this work, we enhanced the methodology to register all three image types provided by USCT. Furthermore, the methodology is now completely automated using image similarity measures to estimate rotations in datasets. A fusion methodology is proposed which combines the information of the three USCT image types with the X-ray mammogram via semitransparent overlay images. The evaluation was done using 13 datasets from a clinical study. The registration accuracy was measured by the displacement of the center of a lesion marked in both modalities. Using the automated rotation estimation, a mean displacement of 10.4 mm was achieved. Due to the clinically relevant registration accuracy, the methodology provides a basis for evaluation of the new imaging device USCT as well as for multimodal diagnosis.

  6. Practical application of a scan-rotate equalization geometry to mammography.

    PubMed

    Sabol, J M; Soutar, I C; Plewes, D B

    1996-12-01

    The presence of dense fibroglandular tissue within the breast is the most significant cause of failure to detect breast cancer with mammography. The dense tissue often produces a range of exposure which exceeds the useful dynamic range of film-screen mammography. It has been shown that equalization radiography overcomes the latitude limitations of film-screen imaging. Equalization compensates for regional variations in x-ray transmission within the patient through spatial modulation of the entrance exposure. We have proposed rotary scanning equalization radiography (RSER), a scan-rotate geometry for efficient equalization radiography. In RSER the image receptor is exposed by repeated scans of a source-modulated fan beam. The fan beam is rotated with respect to the patient between scans. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis have shown that the superposition of exposure from appropriately modulated fan beams at a variety of angles is an entrance exposure that effectively equalizes the film exposure. The design and characteristics of a prototype RSER imaging system are described. Anthropomorphic breast phantom images are used to determine the improvement in image contrast obtained with RSER, the expected tube loading, and the presence of artifacts. RSER increases the fraction of the breast imaged with high contrast (at least 90% of peak gradient) from 46% (conventional mammography) to 80%. Subjective examination of the phantom images show that RSER achieves image quality very similar to that of much less efficient equalization geometries with only 2.7 times greater tube loading than conventional mammography. As predicted by theoretical analysis of exposure artifacts in RSER, the prototype RSER system is relatively immune to artifacts. Exposure artifacts were demonstrated for extreme variations in x-ray transmission within the patient. These results show that RSER is an efficient, practical means of overcoming the latitude limitations of film

  7. Crews-l'Ecritoire analysis for the implementation of a medical image database for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demigha, Souad; Rolland, Colette; Baum, Thierry-Pascal; Balleyguier, Corinne; Vincent, Benedicte; Chabriais, Joel; Menu, Yves

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, we present our approach in order to implement a Medical Image Database (MIDB) for archiving mammograms and their related information in the Department of Radiology of the Necker Hospital (Paris). The aim of such a database is to help breast cancer screening in clinics, research and education. As implementation of such a MIDB requires the understanding of users' needs, we have analyzed requirements by using the Crews-l'Ecritoire (Cooperative REquirements With Scenarios) approach developed in our laboratory. This approach is based on the 'Requirement Engineering' concept. It helps understanding users' needs using a semi-automatic analysis of textual scenarios, i.e. scenarios written in natural language. This approach mixes concepts of goals and of scenarios into the notion of 'Requirement Chunk'. Authored scenarios and goal discovery are guided by rules, which lead to a structured network of scenarios. Our analysis results in 58 Requirements Chunks gathering 72 authored scenarios and 300 goals which represent MIDB services requested by radiologists in the course of their daily practice.

  8. Optimization of image quality in breast tomosynthesis using lumpectomy and mastectomy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberg, Pontus; Ruschin, Mark; Båth, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Andersson, Ingvar; Svahn, Tony; Mattsson, Sören; Tingberg, Anders

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how image quality in breast tomosynthesis (BT) is affected when acquisition modes are varied, using human breast specimens containing malignant tumors and/or microcalcifications. Images of thirty-one breast lumpectomy and mastectomy specimens were acquired on a BT prototype based on a Mammomat Novation (Siemens) full-field digital mammography system. BT image acquisitions of the same specimens were performed varying the number of projections, angular range, and detector signal collection mode (binned and nonbinned in the scan direction). An enhanced filtered back projection reconstruction method was applied with constant settings of spectral and slice thickness filters. The quality of these images was evaluated via relative visual grading analysis (VGA) human observer performance experiments using image quality criteria. Results from the relative VGA study indicate that image quality increases with number of projections and angular range. A binned detector collecting mode results in less noise, but reduced resolution of structures. Human breast specimens seem to be suitable for comparing image sets in BT with image quality criteria.

  9. Study on computer-aided diagnosis of hepatic MR imaging and mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xuejun

    2005-04-01

    It is well known that the liver is an organ easily attacked by diseases. The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for helping radiologists to differentiate hepatic diseases more efficiently. Our software named LIVERANN integrated the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings with different pulse sequences to classify the five categories of hepatic diseases by using the artificial neural network (ANN) method. The intensity and homogeneity within the region of interest (ROI) delineated by a radiologist were automatically calculated to obtain numerical data by the program for input signals to the ANN. Outputs were the five pathological categories of hepatic diseases (hepatic cyst, hepatocellular carcinoma, dysplasia in cirrhosis, cavernous hemangioma, and metastasis). The experiment demonstrated a testing accuracy of 93% from 80 patients. In order to differentiate the cirrhosis from normal liver, the volume ratio of left to whole (LTW) was proposed to quantify the degree of cirrhosis by three-dimensional (3D) volume analysis. The liver region was firstly extracted from computed tomography (CT) or MR slices based on edge detection algorithms, and then separated into left lobe and right lobe by the hepatic umbilical fissure. The volume ratio of these two parts showed that the LTW ratio in the liver was significantly improved in the differentiation performance, with (25.6%{+-}4.3%) in cirrhosis versus the normal liver (16.4%{+-}5.4%). In addition, the application of the ANN method for detecting clustered microcalcifications in masses on mammograms was described here as well. A new structural ANN, so-called a shift-invariant artificial neural network (SIANN), was integrated with our triple-ring filter (TRF) method in our CAD system. As the result, the sensitivity of detecting clusters was improved from 90% by our previous TRF method to 95% by using both SIANN and TRF.

  10. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B.; Heine, J. J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (κ) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had κ between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had κ between 0.42–0.45. Two of these measures

  11. Contrast to Noise Ratio and Contrast Detail Analysis in Mammography:A Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, V.; Delis, H.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Zampakis, P.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The mammographic spectrum is one of the major factors affecting image quality in mammography. In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model was used to evaluate image quality characteristics of various mammographic spectra. The anode/filter combinations evaluated, were those traditionally used in mammography, for tube voltages between 26 and 30 kVp. The imaging performance was investigated in terms of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and Contrast Detail (CD) analysis, by involving human observers, utilizing a mathematical CD phantom. Soft spectra provided the best characteristics in terms of both CNR and CD scores, while tube voltage had a limited effect. W-anode spectra filtered with k-edge filters demonstrated an improved performance, that sometimes was better compared to softer x-ray spectra, produced by Mo or Rh anode. Regarding the filter material, k-edge filters showed superior performance compared to Al filters.

  12. Comparative performance of modern digital mammography systems in a large breast screening program

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, Martin J. Bloomquist, Aili K.; Hunter, David M.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Chiarelli, Anna M.; Muradali, Derek; Mainprize, James G.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare physical measures pertaining to image quality among digital mammography systems utilized in a large breast screening program. To examine qualitatively differences in these measures and differences in clinical cancer detection rates between CR and DR among sites within that program. Methods: As part of the routine quality assurance program for screening, field measurements are made of several variables considered to correlate with the diagnostic quality of medical images including: modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, d′ (an index of lesion detectability) and air kerma to allow estimation of mean glandular dose. In addition, images of the mammography accreditation phantom are evaluated. Results: It was found that overall there were marked differences between the performance measures of DR and CR mammography systems. In particular, the modulation transfer functions obtained with the DR systems were found to be higher, even for larger detector element sizes. Similarly, the noise equivalent quanta, d′, and the phantom scores were higher, while the failure rates associated with low signal-to-noise ratio and high dose were lower with DR. These results were consistent with previous findings in the authors’ program that the breast cancer detection rates at sites employing CR technology were, on average, 30.6% lower than those that used DR mammography. Conclusions: While the clinical study was not large enough to allow a statistically powered system-by-system assessment of cancer detection accuracy, the physical measures expressing spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio are consistent with the published finding that sites employing CR systems had lower cancer detection rates than those using DR systems for screening mammography.

  13. Zooming method (× 2.0) of digital mammography vs digital magnification view (× 1.8) in full-field digital mammography for the diagnosis of microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M J; Youk, J H; Kang, D R; Choi, S H; Kwak, J Y; Son, E J; Kim, E-K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the interpretation of microcalcifications assessed on images zoomed (× 2.0) from digital mammograms is at least equivalent to that from digital magnification mammography (× 1.8) with respect to diagnostic accuracy and image quality. Three radiologists with different levels of experience in mammography reviewed each full-field digital mammography reader set for 185 patients with pathologically proven microcalcification clusters, which consisted of digital magnification mammograms (MAGs) with a magnification factor of 1.8 and images zoomed from mammograms (ZOOM) with a zoom factor of 2.0. Each radiologist rated their suspicion of breast cancer in microcalcific lesions using a six-point scale and the image quality and their confidence in the decisions using a five-point scale. Results were analysed according to display methods using areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (Az value) for ZOOM and MAGs to interpret microcalcifications, and the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test for image quality and confidence levels. There was no statistically significant difference in the level of suspicion of breast cancer between the ZOOM and MAG groups (Az = 0.8680 for ZOOM; Az = 0.8682 for MAG; p = 0.9897). However, MAG images were significantly better than ZOOM images in terms of visual imaging quality (p < 0.001), and the confidence level with MAG was better than with ZOOM (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the performance of radiologists in the diagnosis of microcalcifications using ZOOM was similar to that using MAGs, although image quality and confidence levels were better using MAGs. PMID:19752171

  14. Screen-Film Mammography and Soft-Copy Full-Field Digital Mammography: Comparison in the Patients with Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Seong; Choo, Ki-Seok; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2005-01-01

    Objective We wanted to compare the ability of screen-film mammography (SFM) and soft-copy full-field digital mammography (s-FFDM) on two different monitors to detect and characterize microcalcifications. Materials and Methods The images of 40 patients with microcalcifications (three patients had malignant lesion and 37 patients had benign lesion), who underwent both SFM and FFDM at an interval of less than six months, were independently evaluated by three readers. Three reading sessions were undertaken for SFM and for FFDM on a mammography-dedicated review workstation (RWS, 2K×2.5K), and for FFDM on a high-resolution PACS monitor (1.7K×2.3K). The image quality, breast composition and the number and conspicuity of the microcalcifications were evaluated using a three-point rating method, and the mammographic assessment was classified into 4 categories (normal, benign, low concern and moderate to great concern). Results The image quality, the number and conspicuity of the microcalcifications by s-FFDM (on the RWS, PACS and both) were superior to those by SFM in 85.0%, 80.0% and 52.5% of the cases, respectively (p < 0.01), and those by the s-FFDM on the two different monitors were similar in 15.0%, 12.5% and 35.0% of the cases, respectively (p > 0.01). The mammographic assessment category for the microcalcifications in the three reading sessions was similar. Conclusion s-FFDM gives a superior image quality to SFM and it is better at evaluating microcalcifications. In addition, s-FFDM with the PACS monitor is comparable to s-FFDM with the RWS for evaluating microcalcifications. PMID:16374078

  15. Perspectives of Mobile Versus Fixed Mammography in Santa Clara County, California: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Kumarasamy, Narmadan A; Venegas, Angela; Braddock III, Clarence H

    2016-01-01

    environment for patients and ensuring the quality of mammography images.  PMID:27014528

  16. Assessing product image quality for online shopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Anjan; Chung, Sung H.; Chittar, Naren; Islam, Atiq

    2012-01-01

    Assessing product-image quality is important in the context of online shopping. A high quality image that conveys more information about a product can boost the buyer's confidence and can get more attention. However, the notion of image quality for product-images is not the same as that in other domains. The perception of quality of product-images depends not only on various photographic quality features but also on various high level features such as clarity of the foreground or goodness of the background etc. In this paper, we define a notion of product-image quality based on various such features. We conduct a crowd-sourced experiment to collect user judgments on thousands of eBay's images. We formulate a multi-class classification problem for modeling image quality by classifying images into good, fair and poor quality based on the guided perceptual notions from the judges. We also conduct experiments with regression using average crowd-sourced human judgments as target. We compute a pseudo-regression score with expected average of predicted classes and also compute a score from the regression technique. We design many experiments with various sampling and voting schemes with crowd-sourced data and construct various experimental image quality models. Most of our models have reasonable accuracies (greater or equal to 70%) on test data set. We observe that our computed image quality score has a high (0.66) rank correlation with average votes from the crowd sourced human judgments.

  17. Composite x-ray image assembly for large-field digital mammography with one- and two-dimensional positioning of a focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halama, G.; McAdoo, J.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel large-field digital mammography technique, a 1024 x 1024 pixel Loral charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane array (FPA) was positioned in a mammographic field with one- and two-dimensional scan sequences to obtain 950 x 1800 pixel and 3600 x 3600 pixel composite images, respectively. These experiments verify that precise positioning of FPAs produced seamless composites and that the CCD mosaic concept has potential for high-resolution, large-field imaging. The proposed CCD mosaic concept resembles a checkerboard pattern with spacing left between the CCDs for the driver and readout electronics. To obtain a complete x-ray image, the mosaic must be repositioned four times, with an x-ray exposure at each position. To reduce the patient dose, a lead shield with appropriately patterned holes is placed between the x-ray source and the patient. The high-precision motorized translation stages and the fiber-coupled-scintillating-screen-CCD sensor assembly were placed in the position usually occupied by the film cassette. Because of the high mechanical precision, seamless composites were constructed from the subimages. This paper discusses the positioning, image alignment procedure, and composite image results. The paper only addresses the formation of a seamless composite image from subimages and will not consider the effects of the lead shield, multiple CCDs, or the speed of motion.

  18. Breast Density in Mammography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in High Risk Women and Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Marissa; Schnabel, Freya; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Lee, Jiyon; Leite, Ana Paula Klautau; Moy, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose To evaluate the relationship between mammographic breast density (MBD), background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer (BC) and at high risk for developing BC. Methods Our institutional database was queried for patients who underwent mammography and MRI. Results 403 (85%) had BC and 72 (15%) were at high risk. MBD (p=0.0005), BPE (p<0.0001), and FGT (p=0.02) were all higher in high risk women compared to the BC group. Conclusions Higher levels of MBD, BPE and FGT are seen in women at higher risk for developing BC when compared to women with BC. PMID:26351036

  19. Mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women.

    PubMed

    Weyers, S; Villeirs, G; Vanherreweghe, E; Verstraelen, H; Monstrey, S; Van den Broecke, R; Gerris, J

    2010-06-01

    Data on the necessity of performing screening mammographies in transsexual women are lacking. The main objective of this study was to assess the possibility to perform mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women. Fifty Dutch-speaking transsexual women were interviewed about the following: attitude towards mammography and breast sonography, importance attributed to and satisfaction with breast appearance, opinion about the necessity of breast check-up, expectations regarding discomfort during the exams and knowledge about the breast surgery. A fasting blood sample, clinical breast exam, mammography and breast sonography were performed. At mammography the following parameters were noted: density, technical quality, location of the prostheses, presence of any abnormalities and painfulness. At sonography the following parameters were recorded: density, presence of cysts, visualisation of retro-areolar ducts or any abnormalities. Twenty-three percent of patients are not aware of the type of breast implants and 79% do not know their position to the pectoral muscles. Patient satisfaction with the appearance of their breasts was rather high (7.94 on a scale of 0-10). Mean expected and experienced pain from mammography was low (4.37 and 2.00 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in expected pain between those who already had mammography and those who did not. There was a significant positive correlation between the expected and the experienced pain. Mammography and breast sonography were technically feasible and no gross anomalies were detected. Since both exams were judged as nearly painless, 98% of transsexual women intended to come back if they would be invited. Since breast cancer risk in transsexual women is largely unknown and breast exams are very well accepted, breast screening habits in this population should not differ from those of biological women.

  20. Comparison of air kerma measurements between the PTB and the IAEA for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, István; Büermann, Ludwig; Gomola, Igor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography, identified as EURAMET.RI(I)-S10 (EURAMET project #1221), was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two spherical and two parallel-plate reference-class ionization chambers of the IAEA and 12 beam qualities standardized in the IEC standard 61267:2005 plus 7 additional standard beam qualities established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in September 2012 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show the calibration coefficients of both laboratories to be in good agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.47%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Effect of the Availability of Prior Full-Field Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images on the Interpretation of Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Catullo, Victor J.; Chough, Denise M.; Ganott, Marie A.; Kelly, Amy E.; Shinde, Dilip D.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Wallace, Luisa P.; Bandos, Andriy I.; Gur, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of and interaction between the availability of prior images and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images in decisions to recall women during mammogram interpretation. Materials and Methods Verbal informed consent was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant institutional review board–approved protocol. Eight radiologists independently interpreted twice deidentified mammograms obtained in 153 women (age range, 37–83 years; mean age, 53.7 years ± 9.3 [standard deviation]) in a mode by reader by case-balanced fully crossed study. Each study consisted of current and prior full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images and DBT images that were acquired in our facility between June 2009 and January 2013. For one reading, sequential ratings were provided by using (a) current FFDM images only, (b) current FFDM and DBT images, and (c) current FFDM, DBT, and prior FFDM images. The other reading consisted of (a) current FFDM images only, (b) current and prior FFDM images, and (c) current FFDM, prior FFDM, and DBT images. Fifty verified cancer cases, 60 negative and benign cases (clinically not recalled), and 43 benign cases (clinically recalled) were included. Recall recommendations and interaction between the effect of prior FFDM and DBT images were assessed by using a generalized linear model accounting for case and reader variability. Results Average recall rates in noncancer cases were significantly reduced with the addition of prior FFDM images by 34% (145 of 421) and 32% (106 of 333) without and with DBT images, respectively (P < .001). However, this recall reduction was achieved at the cost of a corresponding 7% (23 of 345) and 4% (14 of 353) reduction in sensitivity (P = .006). In contrast, availability of DBT images resulted in a smaller reduction in recall rates (false-positive interpretations) of 19% (76 of 409) and 26% (71 of 276) without and with prior FFDM images, respectively (P = .001). Availability of DBT images resulted in 4% (15 of

  2. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score.

  3. Wavelet-based noise-model driven denoising algorithm for differential phase contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Carolina; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Traditional mammography can be positively complemented by phase contrast and scattering x-ray imaging, because they can detect subtle differences in the electron density of a material and measure the local small-angle scattering power generated by the microscopic density fluctuations in the specimen, respectively. The grating-based x-ray interferometry technique can produce absorption, differential phase contrast (DPC) and scattering signals of the sample, in parallel, and works well with conventional X-ray sources; thus, it constitutes a promising method for more reliable breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Recently, our team proved that this novel technology can provide images superior to conventional mammography. This new technology was used to image whole native breast samples directly after mastectomy. The images acquired show high potential, but the noise level associated to the DPC and scattering signals is significant, so it is necessary to remove it in order to improve image quality and visualization. The noise models of the three signals have been investigated and the noise variance can be computed. In this work, a wavelet-based denoising algorithm using these noise models is proposed. It was evaluated with both simulated and experimental mammography data. The outcomes demonstrated that our method offers a good denoising quality, while simultaneously preserving the edges and important structural features. Therefore, it can help improve diagnosis and implement further post-processing techniques such as fusion of the three signals acquired.

  4. Automatic no-reference image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjun; Hu, Wei; Xu, Zi-Neng

    2016-01-01

    No-reference image quality assessment aims to predict the visual quality of distorted images without examining the original image as a reference. Most no-reference image quality metrics which have been already proposed are designed for one or a set of predefined specific distortion types and are unlikely to generalize for evaluating images degraded with other types of distortion. There is a strong need of no-reference image quality assessment methods which are applicable to various distortions. In this paper, the authors proposed a no-reference image quality assessment method based on a natural image statistic model in the wavelet transform domain. A generalized Gaussian density model is employed to summarize the marginal distribution of wavelet coefficients of the test images, so that correlative parameters are needed for the evaluation of image quality. The proposed algorithm is tested on three large-scale benchmark databases. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is easy to implement and computational efficient. Furthermore, our method can be applied to many well-known types of image distortions, and achieves a good quality of prediction performance. PMID:27468398

  5. JPEG2000 still image coding quality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzong-Jer; Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, You-Chen; Cheng, Ren-Gui; Lin, Li-Hui; Wu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    This work demonstrates the image qualities between two popular JPEG2000 programs. Two medical image compression algorithms are both coded using JPEG2000, but they are different regarding the interface, convenience, speed of computation, and their characteristic options influenced by the encoder, quantization, tiling, etc. The differences in image quality and compression ratio are also affected by the modality and compression algorithm implementation. Do they provide the same quality? The qualities of compressed medical images from two image compression programs named Apollo and JJ2000 were evaluated extensively using objective metrics. These algorithms were applied to three medical image modalities at various compression ratios ranging from 10:1 to 100:1. Following that, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated using five objective metrics. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients were measured under every metric in the two programs. We found that JJ2000 and Apollo exhibited indistinguishable image quality for all images evaluated using the above five metrics (r > 0.98, p < 0.001). It can be concluded that the image quality of the JJ2000 and Apollo algorithms is statistically equivalent for medical image compression. PMID:23589187

  6. Image quality scaling of electrophotographic prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Garrett M.; Patil, Rohit A.; Montag, Ethan D.; Fairchild, Mark D.

    2003-12-01

    Two psychophysical experiments were performed scaling overall image quality of black-and-white electrophotographic (EP) images. Six different printers were used to generate the images. There were six different scenes included in the experiment, representing photographs, business graphics, and test-targets. The two experiments were split into a paired-comparison experiment examining overall image quality, and a triad experiment judging overall similarity and dissimilarity of the printed images. The paired-comparison experiment was analyzed using Thurstone's Law, to generate an interval scale of quality, and with dual scaling, to determine the independent dimensions used for categorical scaling. The triad experiment was analyzed using multidimensional scaling to generate a psychological stimulus space. The psychophysical results indicated that the image quality was judged mainly along one dimension and that the relationships among the images can be described with a single dimension in most cases. Regression of various physical measurements of the images to the paired comparison results showed that a small number of physical attributes of the images could be correlated with the psychophysical scale of image quality. However, global image difference metrics did not correlate well with image quality.

  7. High dynamic range CMOS-based mammography detector for FFDM and DBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Miller, James J.; Lomako, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) requires excellent image quality in a dynamic mode at very low dose levels while Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is a static imaging modality that requires high saturation dose levels. These opposing requirements can only be met by a dynamic detector with a high dynamic range. This paper will discuss a wafer-scale CMOS-based mammography detector with 49.5 μm pixels and a CsI scintillator. Excellent image quality is obtained for FFDM as well as DBT applications, comparing favorably with a-Se detectors that dominate the X-ray mammography market today. The typical dynamic range of a mammography detector is not high enough to accommodate both the low noise and the high saturation dose requirements for DBT and FFDM applications, respectively. An approach based on gain switching does not provide the signal-to-noise benefits in the low-dose DBT conditions. The solution to this is to add frame summing functionality to the detector. In one X-ray pulse several image frames will be acquired and summed. The requirements to implement this into a detector are low noise levels, high frame rates and low lag performance, all of which are unique characteristics of CMOS detectors. Results are presented to prove that excellent image quality is achieved, using a single detector for both DBT as well as FFDM dose conditions. This method of frame summing gave the opportunity to optimize the detector noise and saturation level for DBT applications, to achieve high DQE level at low dose, without compromising the FFDM performance.

  8. Mammography today

    SciTech Connect

    Schutte, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this book the authors look at the various breast imaging techniques currently in use. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, they aim to help radiologists improve their skills in the accurate and early diagnosis of breast cancer, whilst reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies. These reports will also interest many public health officers as they discuss the risk- and cost-effectiveness of large scale screening as well as making several practical suggestions for the management of future programs.

  9. Developing a digital mammography data warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Cao, Xinhua; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Sickles, Edward A.

    2001-08-01

    This paper discusses our initial efforts to design and develop a digital mammography data warehouse to facilitate clinical and research activities. Data warehouse is a complete and consistent integration of data from many information sources. It enables users to explore the warehouse for various analysis and decision support purposes. We are designing an infra-structural information system by incorporating various kinds of breast imaging data, from a diversity of existing clinical systems, into a digital data warehouse. Various types of breast imaging data, including patient demographics, family history, digital mammography and radiological reports, will be acquired for the University of California San Francisco digital mammography PACS modules, as well as Radiological Information System.

  10. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation.

    PubMed

    Marques, T; Ribeiro, A; Di Maria, S; Belchior, A; Cardoso, J; Matela, N; Oliveira, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. PMID:25836692

  11. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation.

    PubMed

    Marques, T; Ribeiro, A; Di Maria, S; Belchior, A; Cardoso, J; Matela, N; Oliveira, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed.

  12. WFC3 UVIS Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Linda

    2009-07-01

    The UVIS imaging performance over the detector will be assessed periodically {every 4 months} in two passbands {F275W and F621M} to check for image stability. The field around star 58 in the open cluster NGC188 is the chosen target because it is sufficiently dense to provide good sampling over the FOV while providing enough isolated stars to permit accurate PSF {point spread function} measurement. It is available year-round and used previously for ACS image quality assessment. The field is astrometric, and astrometric guide stars will be used, so that the plate scale and image orientation may also be determined if necessary {as in SMOV proposals 11436 and 11442}. Full frame images will be obtained at each of 4 POSTARG offset positions designed to improve sampling over the detector.This proposal is a periodic repeat {once every 4 months} of visits similar to those in SMOV proposal 11436 {activity ID WFC3-23}. The data will be analyzed using the code and techniques described in ISR WFC3 2008-40 {Hartig}. Profiles of encircled energy will be monitored and presented in an ISR. If an update to the SIAF is needed, {V2,V3} locations of stars will be obtained from the Flight Ops Sensors and Calibrations group at GSFC, the {V2,V3} of the reference pixel and the orientation of the detector will be determined by the WFC3 group, and the Telescopes group will update and deliver the SIAF to the PRDB branch.The specific PSF metrics to be examined are encircled energy for aperture diameter 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, and 0.35 arcsec, FWHM, and sharpness. {See ISR WFC3 2008-40 tables 2 and 3 and preceding text.} about 20 stars distributed over the detector will be measured in each exposure for each filter. The mean, rms, and rms of the mean will be determined for each metric. The values determined from each of the 4 exposures per filter within a visit will be compared to each other to see to what extent they are affected by "breathing". Values will be compared from visit to visit, starting

  13. WFC3 IR Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Linda

    2009-07-01

    The IR imaging performance over the detector will be assessed periodically {every 4 months} in two passbands to check for image stability. The field around star 58 in the open cluster NGC188 is the chosen target because it is sufficiently dense to provide good sampling over the FOV while providing enough isolated stars to permit accurate PSF {point spread function} measurement. It is available year-round and used previously for ACS image quality assessment. The field is astrometric, and astrometric guide stars will be used, so that the plate scale and image orientation may also be determined if necessary {as in SMOV proposals 11437 and 11443}. Full frame images will be obtained at each of 4 POSTARG offset positions designed to improve sampling over the detector in F098M, F105W, and F160W. The PSFs will be sampled at 4 positions with subpixel shifts in filters F164N and F127M.This proposal is a periodic repeat {once every 4 months} of the visits in SMOV proposal 11437 {activity ID WFC3-24}. The data will be analyzed using the code and techniques described in ISR WFC3 2008-41 {Hartig}. Profiles of encircled energy will be monitored and presented in an ISR. If an update to the SIAF is needed, {V2,V3} locations of stars will be obtained from the Flight Ops Sensors and Calibrations group at GSFC, the {V2,V3} of the reference pixel and the orientation of the detector will be determined by the WFC3 group, and the Telescopes group will update and deliver the SIAF to the PRDB branch.The specific PSF metrics to be examined are encircled energy for aperture diameter 0.25, 0.37, and 0.60 arcsec, FWHM, and sharpness. {See ISR WFC3 2008-41 tables 2 and 3 and preceding text.} 20 stars distributed over the detector will be measured in each exposure for each filter. The mean, rms, and rms of the mean will be determined for each metric. The values determined from each of the 4 exposures per filter within a visit will be compared to each other to see to what extent they are affected

  14. A Comparative Study of the Diagnostic Value of Contrast-Enhanced Breast MR Imaging and Mammography on Patients with BI-RADS 3–5 Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erni; Li, Jing; Song, Ying; Xue, Mei; Zhou, Chunwu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively investigate the diagnostic value of breast MRI in patients with BI-RADS 3–5 microcalcifications in mammography. Methods Eighty-four patients with BI-RADS 3–5 microcalcifications on mammography underwent breast MR exams before surgical biopsy with a hookwire position under mammographic guidance. Two radiologists reviewed each lesion with BI-RADS by consensus. The diagnostic value of mammography and MRI was compared. Results Histopathological examination revealed 49 benign lesions and 42 malignant lesions. In the assessments of mammography, 21 lesions (23.1%) were assigned to category 3, 51 lesions (56.0%) to category 4, and 19 lesions (20.9%) to category 5. The area under the receiver operating characteristic(ROC) curve for mammography and MR assessment was 0.844, and 0.945, respectively (p<0.05). In cases of category 3 microcalcifications, the specificity of mammography and MR was 100%, and 95.2% (p = 1.000), respectively. In cases of category 4 microcalcifications, the specificity, PPV and accuracy of mammography was 0%, 45.1% and 45.1%; whereas those for MR was 82.1% (p<0.05), 80.8% (P = 0.003) and 86.3% (p<0.05). All microcalcifications of category 5 were correctly diagnosed by mammography and MR. Conclusions Breast MRI has the potential to significantly improve the diagnosis of category 4 microcalcifications on mammography. Among mammographic category 4 microcalcifications, about 82% of benign lesions can be degraded to BI-RADS 1∼3 by MRI. However for microcalcifications of category 3 and 5, MR exams do not show significant improvement over mammography. PMID:25365327

  15. Development Of A Digital Mammography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaffe, M. J.; Nishikawa, R. M.; Maidment, A. D. A.; Fenster, A.

    1988-06-01

    A digital breast imaging system is under development to provide improved detectability of breast cancer. In previous work, the limitations of screen-film mammography were studied using both theoretical and experimental techniques. Important limitations were found in both the acquisition and the display components of imaging. These have been addressed in the design of a scanned-projection digital mammography system. A high resolution x-ray image intensifier (XRII), optically coupled to a self-scanned linear photodiode array, is used to record the image. Pre- and post-patient collimation virtually eliminates scattered radiation and veiling glare of the XRII with only a 20% increase in dose due to penumbra. Geometric magnification of 1.6 times is employed to achieve limiting spatial resolution of 7 1p/mm. For low-contrast objects as small as 0.1 mm in diameter, the digital system is capable of producing images with higher contrast and signal-to-noise ratio than optimally-exposed conventional film-screen mammography systems. Greater latitude is obtainable on the digital system because of its wide dynamic range and linearity. The slit system is limited due to long image acquisition times, and poor quantum efficiency. This motivated our current work on a slot beam digital mammography system which is based on a fiber-optic x-ray detector. Preliminary results of this system will be presented.

  16. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez Casimiro, Mariana; Ruiz Trejo, Cesar; Espejo Fonseca, Ruby

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1-4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)- presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  17. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Villagomez Casimiro E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Cesar, Ruiz Trejo E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Ruby, Espejo Fonseca

    2014-11-07

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1–4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)– presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  18. Asymmetric scatter kernels for software-based scatter correction of gridless mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Adam; Shapiro, Edward; Yoon, Sungwon; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Proano, Cesar; Colbeth, Rick; Lehto, Erkki; Star-Lack, Josh

    2015-03-01

    Scattered radiation remains one of the primary challenges for digital mammography, resulting in decreased image contrast and visualization of key features. While anti-scatter grids are commonly used to reduce scattered radiation in digital mammography, they are an incomplete solution that can add radiation dose, cost, and complexity. Instead, a software-based scatter correction method utilizing asymmetric scatter kernels is developed and evaluated in this work, which improves upon conventional symmetric kernels by adapting to local variations in object thickness and attenuation that result from the heterogeneous nature of breast tissue. This fast adaptive scatter kernel superposition (fASKS) method was applied to mammography by generating scatter kernels specific to the object size, x-ray energy, and system geometry of the projection data. The method was first validated with Monte Carlo simulation of a statistically-defined digital breast phantom, which was followed by initial validation on phantom studies conducted on a clinical mammography system. Results from the Monte Carlo simulation demonstrate excellent agreement between the estimated and true scatter signal, resulting in accurate scatter correction and recovery of 87% of the image contrast originally lost to scatter. Additionally, the asymmetric kernel provided more accurate scatter correction than the conventional symmetric kernel, especially at the edge of the breast. Results from the phantom studies on a clinical system further validate the ability of the asymmetric kernel correction method to accurately subtract the scatter signal and improve image quality. In conclusion, software-based scatter correction for mammography is a promising alternative to hardware-based approaches such as anti-scatter grids.

  19. Disparities in Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E; Han, Jini H

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This paper describes trends in screening mammography utilization over the past decade and assesses the remaining disparities in mammography use among medically underserved women. We also describe the barriers to mammography and report effective interventions to enhance utilization. DESIGN We reviewed medline and other databases as well as relevant bibliographies. MAIN RESULTS The United States has dramatically improved its use of screening mammography over the past decade, with increased rates observed in every demographic group. Disparities in screening mammography are decreasing among medically underserved populations but still persist among racial/ethnic minorities and low-income women. Additionally, uninsured women and those with no usual care have the lowest rates of reported mammogram use. However, despite apparent increases in mammogram utilization, there is growing evidence that limitations in the national survey databases lead to overestimations of mammogram use, particularly among low-income racial and ethnic minorities. CONCLUSIONS The United States may be farther from its national goals of screening mammography, particularly among underserved women, than current data suggests. We should continue to support those interventions that increase mammography use among the medically underserved by addressing the barriers such as cost, language and acculturation limitations, deficits in knowledge and cultural beliefs, literacy and health system barriers such as insurance and having a source regular of medical care. Addressing disparities in the diagnostic and cancer treatment process should also be a priority in order to affect significant change in health outcomes among the underserved. PMID:15009798

  20. The positron emission mammography/tomography breast imaging and biopsy system (PEM/PET): design, construction and phantom-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Smith, Mark F; Proffitt, James; Hammond, William; Srinivasan, Amarnath; McKisson, John; Popov, Vladimir; Weisenberger, Andrew; Judy, Clifford O; Kross, Brian; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Banta, Larry E; Kinahan, Paul E; Champley, Kyle

    2008-02-01

    Tomographic breast imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. We have developed a high-resolution positron emission mammography/tomography imaging and biopsy device (called PEM/PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. PET images are acquired to detect suspicious focal uptake of the radiotracer and guide biopsy of the area. Limited-angle PEM images could then be used to verify the biopsy needle position prior to tissue sampling. The PEM/PET scanner consists of two sets of rotating planar detector heads. Each detector consists of a 4 x 3 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultipliers (PSPMTs) coupled to a 96 x 72 array of 2 x 2 x 15 mm(3) LYSO detector elements (pitch = 2.1 mm). Image reconstruction is performed with a three-dimensional, ordered set expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm parallelized to run on a multi-processor computer system. The reconstructed field of view (FOV) is 15 x 15 x 15 cm(3). Initial phantom-based testing of the device is focusing upon its PET imaging capabilities. Specifically, spatial resolution and detection sensitivity were assessed. The results from these measurements yielded a spatial resolution at the center of the FOV of 2.01 +/- 0.09 mm (radial), 2.04 +/- 0.08 mm (tangential) and 1.84 +/- 0.07 mm (axial). At a radius of 7 cm from the center of the scanner, the results were 2.11 +/- 0.08 mm (radial), 2.16 +/- 0.07 mm (tangential) and 1.87 +/- 0.08 mm (axial). Maximum system detection sensitivity of the scanner is 488.9 kcps microCi(-1) ml(-1) (6.88%). These promising findings indicate that PEM/PET may be an effective system for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  1. Combined terahertz imaging system for enhanced imaging quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganova, Irina N.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Metelkina, Anna A.; Yakovlev, Egor V.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2016-06-01

    An improved terahertz (THz) imaging system is proposed for enhancing image quality. Imaging scheme includes THz source and detection system operated in active mode as well as in passive one. In order to homogeneously illuminate the object plane the THz reshaper is proposed. The form and internal structure of the reshaper were studied by the numerical simulation. Using different test-objects we compare imaging quality in active and passive THz imaging modes. Imaging contrast and modulation transfer functions in active and passive imaging modes show drawbacks of them in high and low spatial frequencies, respectively. The experimental results confirm the benefit of combining both imaging modes into hybrid one. The proposed algorithm of making hybrid THz image is an effective approach of retrieving maximum information about the remote object.

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information (MQSA) Frequently Asked Questions About Digital Mammography Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... mammography exams, such as DBT? What is digital mammography? Full field digital mammography (FFDM, also known simply ...

  3. Technology transfer in digital mammography. Report of the Joint National Cancer Institute-National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop of May 19-20, 1993.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D; Silbiger, M; Brown, G S; Clarke, L; Dwyer, S; Yaffe, M; Shtern, F

    1994-04-01

    Digital mammography is one of the most promising novel technologies for further improvement of early detection of breast cancer, offering important potential advantages: 1) improved image quality; 2) digital image processing for improved lesion contrast; 3) computer-aided diagnosis for enhanced radiologic interpretation; and 4) teleradiology for facilitated radiologic consultation. The Diagnostic Imaging Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently funded an international, multidisciplinary, multi-institutional Digital Mammography Development Group for collaborations between NCI, the academic community, and industry to facilitate the integrated development and implementation of digital mammographic systems. Currently, however, digital mammography faces a number of fundamental technological roadblocks: 1) cost-effective digital detectors and displays for imaging systems; 2) the need for novel algorithms for image processing and computer-aided diagnosis; and 3) high performance, low cost digital networks to provide an "information superhighway" for teleradiology. To solve some of these technological problems, the Diagnostic Imaging Research Branch of NCI joined efforts with the Technology Transfer Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to pursue a federal technology transfer program in digital mammography. The authors discuss the findings and recommendations of the workshop entitled "Technology Transfer in Digital Mammography," which was organized and held jointly by the NCI and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in May, 1993. Numerous innovative technologies of varying degree of promise for digital mammography were presented at the conference. In this article, specific technologies presented at the workshop by the federal and federally-supported laboratories are described, and critiques of these technologies by the leaders of the medical imaging community are presented.

  4. Ultrasound mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Serge; Franceschini, Emilie; Pauzin, Marie-Christine

    2007-02-01

    We introduce a near-field formulation of the acoustic field scattered by a soft tissue organ. This derivation is based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle that describes the scattered field as the result of the interferential scheme of all the secondary spherical waves. This leads us to define a new Fourier transform which yields a spectrum whose harmonic components have an elliptical spatial support. Based on these projections, we define an Elliptical Radon transform that enables us to reconstruct either the impedance or the celerity maps of an acoustical model characterized in terms of impedance and celerity fluctuations. The formulation is very similar to that developed in the far-field domain where the Radon transform pair is derived from an harmonic plane wave decomposition. This formulation allows us to introduce the Ductal Tomography, following the example of the Ductal Echography, that provides a systematic inspection of each mammary lobe, in order to reveal breast lesions at an early stage. In order to review the performances obtained with current echographs in view of specific experiment (numerical simulations), we develop a computer phantom that gains in realism. This 2-D anatomical phantom is an axial cut of the ductolobular structure corresponding to a daisy-like internal arrangement with petals (lobes) radiating around the nipple, for healthy and pathological situations. The different constitutive tissues and ducts are characterized in terms of density and celerity parameters whose spatial distributions are defined with specific random density laws. The use of a velocity-pressure formulation permits us to model time domain acoustic wave propagation. Broadband US pulses are transmitted and measured in diffraction around the breast with a ring antenna, the images are reconstructed using the elliptical back-projection-based procedure mentioned above.

  5. Optimization of synthetic aperture image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures such as F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be optimized to reach a reasonably good performance, and to increase the frame rate by lowering the required number of emissions. All the measurements are performed using the experimental SARUS scanner connected to a λ/2-pitch transducer. A wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom containing anechoic cysts are scanned using the optimized parameters for the transducer. Measurements coincide with simulations.

  6. A comparative study of volumetric breast density estimation in digital mammography and magnetic resonance imaging: results from a high-risk population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Despina; Xing, Ye; Bakic, Predrag R.; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-03-01

    We performed a study to compare methods for volumetric breast density estimation in digital mammography (DM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a high-risk population of women. DM and MRI images of the unaffected breast from 32 women with recently detected abnormalities and/or previously diagnosed breast cancer (age range 31-78 yrs, mean 50.3 yrs) were retrospectively analyzed. DM images were analyzed using QuantraTM (Hologic Inc). The MRI images were analyzed using a fuzzy-C-means segmentation algorithm on the T1 map. Both methods were compared to Cumulus (Univ. Toronto). Volumetric breast density estimates from DM and MRI are highly correlated (r=0.90, p<=0.001). The correlation between the volumetric and the area-based density measures is lower and depends on the training background of the Cumulus software user (r=0.73-84, p<=0.001). In terms of absolute values, MRI provides the lowest volumetric estimates (mean=14.63%), followed by the DM volumetric (mean=22.72%) and area-based measures (mean=29.35%). The MRI estimates of the fibroglandular volume are statistically significantly lower than the DM estimates for women with very low-density breasts (p<=0.001). We attribute these differences to potential partial volume effects in MRI and differences in the computational aspects of the image analysis methods in MRI and DM. The good correlation between the volumetric and the area-based measures, shown to correlate with breast cancer risk, suggests that both DM and MRI volumetric breast density measures can aid in breast cancer risk assessment. Further work is underway to fully-investigate the association between volumetric breast density measures and breast cancer risk.

  7. Improving the timeliness of written patient notification of mammography results by mammography centers.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Robert M; McNally, Colleen; Rensing, Edna M; Campbell, Miriam K

    2004-01-01

    Timely reporting of mammogram results helps to reduce anxiety for women with negative results and speeds up diagnosis or treatment in the case of abnormal results. The goal of this project was to improve the rate at which Virginia mammography centers provide a written report to women in lay terms within 30 days of a mammogram. The project included six intervention and five control mammography centers. The baseline period was prior to when new regulations in the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) took effect in April 1999. The re-measurement period was after April 1999. Data were obtained from abstraction of mammography reports and patient notification letters from a sample of patients with negative and abnormal mammography results at each mammography center. Each intervention mammography center received a notebook that included numerous tools on systems for patient notification and tracking, baseline notification rates and other abstracted information, biopsy recommendations, sample results letters, and a copy of the MQSA. For negative mammograms, the intervention group in aggregate increased from 24% at baseline to 79% at re-measurement in their rate of notification within 30 days. The control group increased from 25% to 46%. For abnormal mammograms, increases were from 35% to 85% and from 25% to 58%, respectively. The intervention group's increases were considerably higher, suggesting an effect due to the interventions that involved technical assistance, education, and system change. All increases were statistically significant (p < 0.01). At baseline, three intervention centers and two controls had policies for written notification. All 11 had policies at re-measurement. However, only two of the five control centers could provide clear supporting documentation for dates of notification at re-measurement. Mammography centers can benefit from guidance in the form of intervention materials specifically designed to address the MQSA sections that apply to

  8. Automatic quality assessment of planetary images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, P.; Muller, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    A significant fraction of planetary images are corrupted beyond the point that much scientific meaning can be extracted. For example, transmission errors result in missing data which is unrecoverable. The available planetary image datasets include many such "bad data", which both occupy valuable scientific storage resources and create false impressions about planetary image availability for specific planetary objects or target areas. In this work, we demonstrate a pipeline that we have developed to automatically assess the quality of planetary images. Additionally, this method discriminates between different types of image degradation, such as low-quality originating from camera flaws or low-quality triggered by atmospheric conditions, etc. Examples of quality assessment results for Viking Orbiter imagery will be also presented.

  9. Normalized Noise Power Spectrum of Full Field Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, Norriza Mohd; Wan Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan

    2010-01-05

    A method to measure noise power spectrum of a full field digital mammography system is presented. The effect of X-ray radiation dose, size and configuration of region of interest on normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) was investigated. Flat field images were acquired using RQA-M2 beam quality technique (Mo/Mo anode-filter, 28 kV, 2 mm Al) with different clinical radiation doses. The images were cropped at about 4 cm from the edge of the breast wall and then divided into different size of non-overlapping or overlapping segments. NNPS was determined through detrending, 2-D fast Fourier transformation and normalization. Our measurement shows that high radiation dose gave lower NNPS at a specific beam quality.

  10. Developing a comprehensive database management system for organization and evaluation of mammography datasets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yirong; Rubin, Daniel L; Woods, Ryan W; Elezaby, Mai; Burnside, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to design and develop a comprehensive mammography database system (CMDB) to collect clinical datasets for outcome assessment and development of decision support tools. A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant CMDB was created to store multi-relational datasets of demographic risk factors and mammogram results using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. The CMDB collected both biopsy pathology outcomes, in a breast pathology lexicon compiled by extending BI-RADS, and our institutional breast cancer registry. The audit results derived from the CMDB were in accordance with Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) audits and national benchmarks. The CMDB has managed the challenges of multi-level organization demanded by the complexity of mammography practice and lexicon development in pathology. We foresee that the CMDB will be useful for efficient quality assurance audits and development of decision support tools to improve breast cancer diagnosis. Our procedure of developing the CMDB provides a framework to build a detailed data repository for breast imaging quality control and research, which has the potential to augment existing resources.

  11. Developing a Comprehensive Database Management System for Organization and Evaluation of Mammography Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Rubin, Daniel L; Woods, Ryan W; Elezaby, Mai; Burnside, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to design and develop a comprehensive mammography database system (CMDB) to collect clinical datasets for outcome assessment and development of decision support tools. A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant CMDB was created to store multi-relational datasets of demographic risk factors and mammogram results using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. The CMDB collected both biopsy pathology outcomes, in a breast pathology lexicon compiled by extending BI-RADS, and our institutional breast cancer registry. The audit results derived from the CMDB were in accordance with Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) audits and national benchmarks. The CMDB has managed the challenges of multi-level organization demanded by the complexity of mammography practice and lexicon development in pathology. We foresee that the CMDB will be useful for efficient quality assurance audits and development of decision support tools to improve breast cancer diagnosis. Our procedure of developing the CMDB provides a framework to build a detailed data repository for breast imaging quality control and research, which has the potential to augment existing resources. PMID:25368510

  12. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics. PMID:27364703

  13. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-07-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics.

  14. A Bayesian network for mammography.

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, E.; Rubin, D.; Shachter, R.

    2000-01-01

    The interpretation of a mammogram and decisions based on it involve reasoning and management of uncertainty. The wide variation of training and practice among radiologists results in significant variability in screening performance with attendant cost and efficacy consequences. We have created a Bayesian belief network to integrate the findings on a mammogram, based on the standardized lexicon developed for mammography, the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS). Our goal in creating this network is to explore the probabilistic underpinnings of this lexicon as well as standardize mammographic decision-making to the level of expert knowledge. PMID:11079854

  15. End-to-end image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raventos, Joaquin

    2012-05-01

    An innovative computerized benchmarking approach (US Patent pending Sep 2011) based on extensive application of photometry, geometrical optics, and digital media using a randomized target, for a standard observer to assess the image quality of video imaging systems, at different day time, and low-light luminance levels. It takes into account, the target's contrast and color characteristics, as well as the observer's visual acuity and dynamic response. This includes human vision as part of the "extended video imaging system" (EVIS), and allows image quality assessment by several standard observers simultaneously.

  16. Cartographic quality of ERTS-1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of simulated and operational ERTS images have provided initial estimates of resolution, ground resolution, detectability thresholds and other measures of image quality of interest to earth scientists and cartographers. Based on these values, including an approximate ground resolution of 250 meters for both RBV and MSS systems, the ERTS-1 images appear suited to the production and/or revision of planimetric and photo maps of 1:500,000 scale and smaller for which map accuracy standards are compatible with the imaged detail. Thematic mapping, although less constrained by map accuracy standards, will be influenced by measurement thresholds and errors which have yet to be accurately determined for ERTS images. This study also indicates the desirability of establishing a quantitative relationship between image quality values and map products which will permit both engineers and cartographers/earth scientists to contribute to the design requirements of future satellite imaging systems.

  17. Uncertainty modeling for ontology-based mammography annotation with intelligent BI-RADS scoring.

    PubMed

    Bulu, Hakan; Alpkocak, Adil; Balci, Pinar

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an ontology-based annotation system and BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) score reasoning with Semantic Web technologies in mammography. The annotation system is based on the Mammography Annotation Ontology (MAO) where the BI-RADS score reasoning works. However, ontologies are based on crisp logic and they cannot handle uncertainty. Consequently, we propose a Bayesian-based approach to model uncertainty in mammography ontology and make reasoning possible using BI-RADS scores with SQWRL (Semantic Query-enhanced Web Rule Language). First, we give general information about our system and present details of mammography annotation ontology, its main concepts and relationships. Then, we express uncertainty in mammography and present approaches to handle uncertainty issues. System is evaluated with a manually annotated dataset DEMS (Dokuz Eylul University Mammography Set) and DDSM (Digital Database for Screening Mammography). We give the result of experimentations in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, precision and uncertainty level measures.

  18. Digital Mammography: Improvements in Breast Cancer Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    X-ray mammography is the most sensitive imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer (diagnostics). It is performed by a radiological system equipped with a rotating molybdenum (Mo) anode tube with an additional Mo filter. In the production of X-ray, bremsstrahlung photons produce an intense diffuse radiation, affecting the contrast between normal and cancerous tissue. So it is known that a good mammographic imaging can help to detect cancer in the first stages avoiding surgery, amputation or even death. In the last years there has been some developments in new imaging techniques to improve the contrast spatial resolution between different tissues: digital imaging, or the so call digital mammography. Digital mammographic imaging is considered an improvement in the prevention of breast cancer due to the advantages it offers.

  19. Digital Mammography: Improvements in Breast Cancer Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-06

    X-ray mammography is the most sensitive imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer (diagnostics). It is performed by a radiological system equipped with a rotating molybdenum (Mo) anode tube with an additional Mo filter. In the production of X-ray, bremsstrahlung photons produce an intense diffuse radiation, affecting the contrast between normal and cancerous tissue. So it is known that a good mammographic imaging can help to detect cancer in the first stages avoiding surgery, amputation or even death. In the last years there has been some developments in new imaging techniques to improve the contrast spatial resolution between different tissues: digital imaging, or the so call digital mammography. Digital mammographic imaging is considered an improvement in the prevention of breast cancer due to the advantages it offers.

  20. A 70μm × 70μm CMOS digital active pixel sensor for digital mammography and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabadell, J.; Figueras, R.; Margarit, J. M.; Martín, E.; Terès, L.; Serra-Graells, F.

    2011-03-01

    This work presents an architecture for CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) based on a novel lossless charge integration method, proposed for X-ray imagers in general but specifically optimized for full-field digital mammography. The objective is to provide all the required functionality inside the pixel, so to use full digital control and read-out signals only, therefore avoiding crosstalk between analog lines over large pixel arrays. It includes a novel lossless A/D conversion scheme besides a self-calibrating dark current cancellation circuit, a self-biasing circuitry, biphasic current sensing for the collection of electrons (e-) or holes (h+) and built-in test. Furthermore, FPN compensation is available by individually addressing the pixel's internal DAC controlling the gain. Implemented in a 0.18μm 1P6M CMOS technology with MiM capacitors, everything fits into a 70μm by 70μm due to the extensive reuse of available blocks and aggressive layout techniques. Also, thanks to the MOSFET subthreshold operation, the average power consumption is as low as 8μW/pixel.

  1. Continuous assessment of perceptual image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roelof; de Ridder, Huib

    1995-12-01

    The study addresses whether subjects are able to assess the perceived quality of an image sequence continuously. To this end, a new method for assessing time-varying perceptual image quality is presented by which subjects continuously indicate the perceived strength of image quality by moving a slider along a graphical scale. The slider's position on this scale is sampled every second. In this way, temporal variations in quality can be monitored quantitatively, and a means is provided by which differences between, for example, alternative transmission systems can be analyzed in an informative way. The usability of this method is illustrated by an experiment in which, for a period of 815 s, subjects assessed the quality of still pictures comprising time-varying degrees of sharpness. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  2. Rendered virtual view image objective quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Li, Xiangchun; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The research on rendered virtual view image (RVVI) objective quality assessment is important for integrated imaging system and image quality assessment (IQA). Traditional IQA algorithms cannot be applied directly on the system receiver-side due to interview displacement and the absence of original reference. This study proposed a block-based neighbor reference (NbR) IQA framework for RVVI IQA. Neighbor views used for rendering are employed for quality assessment in the proposed framework. A symphonious factor handling noise and interview displacement is defined and applied to evaluate the contribution of the obtained quality index in each block pair. A three-stage experiment scheme is also presented to testify the proposed framework and evaluate its homogeneity performance when comparing to full reference IQA. Experimental results show the proposed framework is useful in RVVI objective quality assessment at system receiver-side and benchmarking different rendering algorithms.

  3. Tradeoffs between image quality and dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-10-01

    Image quality takes on different perspectives and meanings when associated with the concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), which is chiefly focused on radiation dose delivered as a result of a medical imaging procedure. ALARA is important because of the increased radiosensitivity of children to ionizing radiation and the desire to keep the radiation dose low. By the same token, however, image quality is also important because of the need to provide the necessary information in a radiograph in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Thus, there are tradeoffs to be considered between image quality and radiation dose, which is the main topic of this article. ALARA does not necessarily mean the lowest radiation dose, nor, when implemented, does it result in the least desirable radiographic images. With the recent widespread implementation of digital radiographic detectors and displays, a new level of flexibility and complexity confronts the technologist, physicist, and radiologist in optimizing the pediatric radiography exam. This is due to the separation of the acquisition, display, and archiving events that were previously combined by the screen-film detector, which allows for compensation for under- and overexposures, image processing, and on-line image manipulation. As explained in the article, different concepts must be introduced for a better understanding of the tradeoffs encountered when dealing with digital radiography and ALARA. In addition, there are many instances during the image acquisition/display/interpretation process in which image quality and associated dose can be compromised. This requires continuous diligence to quality control and feedback mechanisms to verify that the goals of image quality, dose and ALARA are achieved.

  4. An adaptive algorithm for the detection of microcalcifications in simulated low-dose mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiber, O.; Wanninger, F.; Führ, H.; Panzer, W.; Regulla, D.; Winkler, G.

    2003-02-01

    This paper uses the task of microcalcification detection as a benchmark problem to assess the potential for dose reduction in x-ray mammography. We present the results of a newly developed algorithm for detection of microcalcifications as a case study for a typical commercial film-screen system (Kodak Min-R 2000/2190). The first part of the paper deals with the simulation of dose reduction for film-screen mammography based on a physical model of the imaging process. Use of a more sensitive film-screen system is expected to result in additional smoothing of the image. We introduce two different models of that behaviour, called moderate and strong smoothing. We then present an adaptive, model-based microcalcification detection algorithm. Comparing detection results with ground-truth images obtained under the supervision of an expert radiologist allows us to establish the soundness of the detection algorithm. We measure the performance on the dose-reduced images in order to assess the loss of information due to dose reduction. It turns out that the smoothing behaviour has a strong influence on detection rates. For moderate smoothing, a dose reduction by 25% has no serious influence on the detection results, whereas a dose reduction by 50% already entails a marked deterioration of the performance. Strong smoothing generally leads to an unacceptable loss of image quality. The test results emphasize the impact of the more sensitive film-screen system and its characteristics on the problem of assessing the potential for dose reduction in film-screen mammography. The general approach presented in the paper can be adapted to fully digital mammography.

  5. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. PMID:27601691

  6. Evaluating the Figure of Merit in mammography utilizing Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, H.; Spyrou, G.; Costaridou, L.; Tzanakos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2007-09-01

    Mammography represents the most powerful screening tool available for the early detection of breast cancer. As a screening technique, it addresses to asymptomatic women and therefore the implementation of the "As Low As Reasonably Achievable" (ALARA) principle is of increased importance. The overall optimization of any radiographic procedure requires the definition of a suitable Figure of Merit (FOM), based on a representative combination of image quality and dose characteristics. For the present study, Monte Carlo simulation of the mammographic process was utilized to derive the energy deposition inside the breast phantom and the signal beneath it. Certain signal characteristics (Subject Contrast (SC), Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR), squared CNR) were studied (normalized to the output signal) and combined with appropriate dose indices (Entrance Surface Dose (ESD), Average Glandular Dose (AGD), Mid Plane Dose (MPD)) to extract an appropriate FOM index, suitable for spectrum based optimization. Results, for different breast glandularities and lesion sizes and compositions, demonstrate that the choice of the optimum spectrum strongly depends not only on the breast and lesion characteristics, but also on the selection of the utilized FOM index. For screen-film mammography, where the primary image quality index is considered the SC, the traditionally used Mo and Rh-anode spectra demonstrate improved overall performance, despite their inferior dosimetric characteristics compared to W-anode spectra. If digital mammography is considered, where the CNR is of primary importance, W-anode spectra demonstrate a noticeable improved performance.

  7. Image quality and automatic color equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambah, M.; Rizzi, A.; Saint Jean, C.

    2007-01-01

    In the professional movie field, image quality is mainly judged visually. In fact, experts and technicians judge and determine the quality of the film images during the calibration (post production) process. As a consequence, the quality of a restored movie is also estimated subjectively by experts [26,27]. On the other hand, objective quality metrics do not necessarily correlate well with perceived quality [28]. Moreover, some measures assume that there exists a reference in the form of an "original" to compare to, which prevents their use in digital restoration field, where often there is no reference to compare to. That is why subjective evaluation is the most used and most efficient approach up to now. But subjective assessment is expensive, time consuming and does not respond, hence, to the economic requirements of the field [29,25]. Thus, reliable automatic methods for visual quality assessment are needed in the field of digital film restoration. Ideally, a quality assessment system would perceive and measure image or video impairments just like a human being. The ACE method, for Automatic Color Equalization [1,2], is an algorithm for digital images unsupervised enhancement. Like our vision system ACE is able to adapt to widely varying lighting conditions, and to extract visual information from the environment efficaciously. We present in this paper is the use of ACE as a basis of a reference free image quality metric. ACE output is an estimate of our visual perception of a scene. The assumption, tested in other papers [3,4], is that ACE enhancing images is in the way our vision system will perceive them, increases their overall perceived quality. The basic idea proposed in this paper, is that ACE output can differ from the input more or less according to the visual quality of the input image In other word, an image appears good if it is near to the visual appearance we (estimate to) have of it. Reversely bad quality images will need "more filtering". Test

  8. Holographic projection with higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weidong; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-08-22

    The spatial resolution limited by the size of the spatial light modulator (SLM) in the holographic projection can hardly be increased, and speckle noise always appears to induce the degradation of image quality. In this paper, the holographic projection with higher image quality is presented. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed image is 2 times of that of the existing holographic projection, and speckles are suppressed well at the same time. Finally, the effectiveness of the holographic projection is verified in experiments. PMID:27557197

  9. The positron emission mammography/tomography breast imaging and biopsy system (PEM/PET): design, construction and phantom-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Smith, Mark F.; Proffitt, James; Hammond, William; Srinivasan, Amarnath; McKisson, John; Popov, Vladimir; Weisenberger, Andrew; Judy, Clifford O.; Kross, Brian; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Banta, Larry E.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Champley, Kyle

    2008-02-01

    Tomographic breast imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. We have developed a high-resolution positron emission mammography/tomography imaging and biopsy device (called PEM/PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. PET images are acquired to detect suspicious focal uptake of the radiotracer and guide biopsy of the area. Limited-angle PEM images could then be used to verify the biopsy needle position prior to tissue sampling. The PEM/PET scanner consists of two sets of rotating planar detector heads. Each detector consists of a 4 × 3 array of Hamamatsu H8500 flat panel position sensitive photomultipliers (PSPMTs) coupled to a 96 × 72 array of 2 × 2 × 15 mm3 LYSO detector elements (pitch = 2.1 mm). Image reconstruction is performed with a three-dimensional, ordered set expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm parallelized to run on a multi-processor computer system. The reconstructed field of view (FOV) is 15 × 15 × 15 cm3. Initial phantom-based testing of the device is focusing upon its PET imaging capabilities. Specifically, spatial resolution and detection sensitivity were assessed. The results from these measurements yielded a spatial resolution at the center of the FOV of 2.01 ± 0.09 mm (radial), 2.04 ± 0.08 mm (tangential) and 1.84 ± 0.07 mm (axial). At a radius of 7 cm from the center of the scanner, the results were 2.11 ± 0.08 mm (radial), 2.16 ± 0.07 mm (tangential) and 1.87 ± 0.08 mm (axial). Maximum system detection sensitivity of the scanner is 488.9 kcps µCi-1 ml-1 (6.88%). These promising findings indicate that PEM/PET may be an effective system for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  10. Perceptual image quality and telescope performance ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Joshua K.; Harvey, James E.; Marshall, Kenneth H.; Salg, Joseph; Houston, Joseph B.

    2010-08-01

    Launch Vehicle Imaging Telescopes (LVIT) are expensive, high quality devices intended for improving the safety of vehicle personnel, ground support, civilians, and physical assets during launch activities. If allowed to degrade from the combination of wear, environmental factors, and ineffective or inadequate maintenance, these devices lose their ability to provide adequate quality imagery to analysts to prevent catastrophic events such as the NASA Space Shuttle, Challenger, accident in 1986 and the Columbia disaster of 2003. A software tool incorporating aberrations and diffraction that was developed for maintenance evaluation and modeling of telescope imagery is presented. This tool provides MTF-based image quality metric outputs which are correlated to ascent imagery analysts' perception of image quality, allowing a prediction of usefulness of imagery which would be produced by a telescope under different simulated conditions.

  11. Method for inserting noise in digital mammography to simulate reduction in radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2015-03-01

    The quality of clinical x-ray images is closely related to the radiation dose used in the imaging study. The general principle for selecting the radiation is ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"). The practical optimization, however, remains challenging. It is well known that reducing the radiation dose increases the quantum noise, which could compromise the image quality. In order to conduct studies about dose reduction in mammography, it would be necessary to acquire repeated clinical images, from the same patient, with different dose levels. However, such practice would be unethical due to radiation related risks. One solution is to simulate the effects of dose reduction in clinical images. This work proposes a new method, based on the Anscombe transformation, which simulates dose reduction in digital mammography by inserting quantum noise into clinical mammograms acquired with the standard radiation dose. Thus, it is possible to simulate different levels of radiation doses without exposing the patient to new levels of radiation. Results showed that the achieved quality of simulated images generated with our method is the same as when using other methods found in the literature, with the novelty of using the Anscombe transformation for converting signal-independent Gaussian noise into signal-dependent quantum noise.

  12. Feasibility of using LODOX technology for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lease, Alyson; Vaughan, Christopher; Beningfield, Stephan; Potgieter, Herman; Booysen, Andre

    2002-05-01

    The LODOX (Low Dose X-ray) Scanner, created by De Beers, is currently being clinically tested at the Trauma Unit of Groote Schuur Hospital and the University of Cape Town in South Africa. High quality images with exceedingly low radiation suggest that the technology may also be used to identify breast cancer lesions and microcalcifications. The measured LODOX modulation transfer function averages 6 percent at 10 cycles per millimeter, while the detected quantum efficiency is approximately 25 percent at 1 cycle per millimeter. The mean glandular doses calculated for a breast thickness of 4 cm at various intensities -- ranging from 0.022 rad at 70mAs to 0.043 rad at 125mAs -- were approximately 10 times less than the value designated by the American College of Radiology (0.3 rad per breast image). At 40kV, LODOX exhibits an average half value layer of 1.59 mm of Al (compared to 0.3 to 0.4 mm recommended for mammography), illustrating the unfavorable higher penetration of LODOX X-rays. The extremely low radiation dose delivered by the LODOX suggests that the technology would be feasible for detecting and diagnosing cancers in the sensitive tissue of the breast, once adjustments to X-ray range and beam hardness had been accomplished.

  13. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: That scattered radiation negatively impacts the quality of medical radiographic imaging is well known. In mammography, even slight amounts of scatter reduce the high contrast required for subtle soft-tissue imaging. In current clinical mammography, image contrast is partially improved by use of an antiscatter grid. This form of scatter rejection comes with a sizeable dose penalty related to the concomitant elimination of valuable primary radiation. Digital mammography allows the use of image processing as a method of scatter correction that might avoid effects that negatively impact primary radiation, while potentially providing more contrast improvement than is currently possible with a grid. For this approach to be feasible, a detailed characterization of the scatter is needed. Previous research has modeled scatter as a constant background that serves as a DC bias across the imaging surface. The goal of this study was to provide a more substantive data set for characterizing the spatially-variant features of scatter radiation at the image detector of modern mammography units. Methods: This data set was acquired from a model of the radiation beam as a matrix of very narrow rays or pencil beams. As each pencil beam penetrates tissue, the pencil widens in a predictable manner due to the production of scatter. The resultant spreading of the pencil beam at the detector surface can be characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were calculated from measurements obtained using the beam stop method. Two digital mammography units were utilized, and the SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and presence or absence of a grid. These values were then used to generate general equations allowing the SF and MRE to be calculated for any combination of the above parameters. Results: With a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of about 0.05 to a maximum of about 0

  14. Modeling and simulation of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) based on double-sided CdTe strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsahin, I.; Unlu, M. Z.

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common leading cause of cancer death among women. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Mammography, also known as Positron Emission Mammography (PEM), is a method for imaging primary breast cancer. Over the past few years, PEMs based on scintillation crystals dramatically increased their importance in diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. However, these detectors have significant limitations like poor energy resolution resulting with false-negative result (missed cancer), and false-positive result which leads to suspecting cancer and suggests an unnecessary biopsy. In this work, a PEM scanner based on CdTe strip detectors is simulated via the Monte Carlo method and evaluated in terms of its spatial resolution, sensitivity, and image quality. The spatial resolution is found to be ~ 1 mm in all three directions. The results also show that CdTe strip detectors based PEM scanner can produce high resolution images for early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  15. Advantages and Disadvantages of Mammography Screening

    PubMed Central

    Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H.; Hacker, Astrid; Sedlacek, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mammography screening is the only method presently considered appropriate for mass screening of asymptomatic women. Its frequent use, however, warrants diligent analysis of potential side effects. Radiation risk is far below the natural yearly risk of breast cancer and should not be used as an argument against screening. False-positive calls lead to additional imaging or histopathological assessment, mainly percutaneous breast biopsy. These measures are tolerated and accepted fairly well. Their number is limited by strict quality assurance and constant training. Interval cancers represent a limitation of breast screening that should prompt further research for optimization. Evaluation of overdiagnosis is a highly debated topic in the literature. According to the probably most realistic available calculations, overdiagnosis is acceptable as it is compensated by the potential mortality reduction. Nonetheless, this potential side effect warrants optimal adjustment of therapy to the patient's individual risk. The mortality reduction seen in randomized studies was confirmed by results from national screening programs. A recent case referent study indicated that improvements in mortality reduction run parallel to improved mammographic techniques. Use of less aggressive therapies is another valuable effect of screening. Awareness of potential problems, strict quality assurance, and further research should help to further develop screening programs. PMID:21779225

  16. Measurement and control of color image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Eric; Johnson, Kate; Wolin, David

    1998-12-01

    Color hardcopy output is subject to many of the same image quality concerns as monochrome hardcopy output. Line and dot quality, uniformity, halftone quality, the presence of bands, spots or deletions are just a few by both color and monochrome output. Although measurement of color requires the use of specialized instrumentation, the techniques used to assess color-dependent image quality attributes on color hardcopy output are based on many of the same techniques as those used in monochrome image quality quantification. In this paper we will be presenting several different aspects of color quality assessment in both R and D and production environments. As well as present several examples of color quality measurements that are similar to those currently being used at Hewlett-Packard to characterize color devices and to verify system performance. We will then discuss some important considerations for choosing appropriate color quality measurement equipment for use in either R and D or production environments. Finally, we will discuss the critical relationship between objective measurements and human perception.

  17. A database for spectral image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moan, Steven; George, Sony; Pedersen, Marius; Blahová, Jana; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new image database dedicated to multi-/hyperspectral image quality assessment. A total of nine scenes representing pseudo-at surfaces of different materials (textile, wood, skin. . . ) were captured by means of a 160 band hyperspectral system with a spectral range between 410 and 1000nm. Five spectral distortions were designed, applied to the spectral images and subsequently compared in a psychometric experiment, in order to provide a basis for applications such as the evaluation of spectral image difference measures. The database can be downloaded freely from http://www.colourlab.no/cid.

  18. Observer model optimization of a spectral mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Åslund, Magnus; Cederström, Björn; Lundqvist, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2010-04-01

    Spectral imaging is a method in medical x-ray imaging to extract information about the object constituents by the material-specific energy dependence of x-ray attenuation. Contrast-enhanced spectral imaging has been thoroughly investigated, but unenhanced imaging may be more useful because it comes as a bonus to the conventional non-energy-resolved absorption image at screening; there is no additional radiation dose and no need for contrast medium. We have used a previously developed theoretical framework and system model that include quantum and anatomical noise to characterize the performance of a photon-counting spectral mammography system with two energy bins for unenhanced imaging. The theoretical framework was validated with synthesized images. Optimal combination of the energy-resolved images for detecting large unenhanced tumors corresponded closely, but not exactly, to minimization of the anatomical noise, which is commonly referred to as energy subtraction. In that case, an ideal-observer detectability index could be improved close to 50% compared to absorption imaging. Optimization with respect to the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, commonly referred to as energy weighting, deteriorated detectability. For small microcalcifications or tumors on uniform backgrounds, however, energy subtraction was suboptimal whereas energy weighting provided a minute improvement. The performance was largely independent of beam quality, detector energy resolution, and bin count fraction. It is clear that inclusion of anatomical noise and imaging task in spectral optimization may yield completely different results than an analysis based solely on quantum noise.

  19. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  20. Optimization of mammography with respect to anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Svensson, B.; Danielsson, M.; Lazzari, B.; Cederström, B.

    2011-03-01

    Beam quality optimization in mammography traditionally considers detection of a target obscured by quantum noise on a homogenous background. It can be argued that this scheme does not correspond well to the clinical imaging task because real mammographic images contain a complex superposition of anatomical structures, resulting in anatomical noise that may dominate over quantum noise. Using a newly developed spectral mammography system, we measured the correlation and magnitude of the anatomical noise in a set of mammograms. The results from these measurements were used as input to an observer-model optimization that included quantum noise as well as anatomical noise. We found that, within this framework, the detectability of tumors and microcalcifications behaved very differently with respect to beam quality and dose. The results for small microcalcifications were similar to what traditional optimization methods would yield, which is to be expected since quantum noise dominates over anatomical noise at high spatial frequencies. For larger tumors, however, low-frequency anatomical noise was the limiting factor. Because anatomical structure has similar energy dependence as tumor contrast, optimal x-ray energy was significantly higher and the useful energy region wider than traditional methods suggest. Measurements on a tissue phantom confirmed these theoretical results. Furthermore, since quantum noise constitutes only a small fraction of the noise, the dose could be reduced substantially without sacrificing tumor detectability. Exposure settings used clinically are therefore not necessarily optimal for this imaging task. The impact of these findings on the mammographic imaging task as a whole is, however, at this stage unclear.

  1. Development of mammography system using CdTe photon counting detector for the exposure dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Sho; Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon-counting detector for exposure dose reduction. In contrast to conventional mammography, this system uses high-energy X-rays. This study evaluates the usefulness of this system in terms of the absorbed dose distribution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at acrylic step using a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, we created a prototype system that uses a CdTe detector and automatic movement stage. For various conditions, we measured the properties and evaluated the quality of images produced by the system. The simulation result for a tube voltage of 40 kV and tungsten/barium (W/Ba) as a target/filter shows that the surface dose was reduced more than 60% compared to that under conventional conditions. The CNR of our proposal system also became higher than that under conventional conditions. The point at which the CNRs coincide for 4 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the 2-mm-thick step corresponds to a dose reduction of 30%, and these differences increased with increasing phantom thickness. To improve the image quality, we determined the problematic aspects of the scanning system. The results of this study indicate that, by using a higher X-ray energy than in conventional mammography, it is possible to obtain a significant exposure dose reduction without loss of image quality. Further, the image quality of the prototype system can be improved by optimizing the balance between the shift-and-add operation and the output of the X-ray tube. In future work, we will further examine these improvement points.

  2. Maximising image quality in small spaces.

    PubMed

    Alford, Arezoo; Brinkworth, Simon

    2015-06-01

    A Medical Illustration Department may need to set up a studio in a space that is not designed for that purpose. This joint paper describes the attempts of two separate trusts, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UHB) and Norfolk & Norwich University Hospitals (NNUH), to refurbish unusually small studio spaces of 4m × 2m. Each trust had a substantially different project budget and faced separate obstacles, but both had a shared aim; to maximise the limited studio space and enhance the quality of images produced. The outcome at both Trusts is a significant improvement in image quality.

  3. Subjective matters: from image quality to image psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovskaya, Elena A.; De Ridder, Huib

    2013-03-01

    From the advent of digital imaging through several decades of studies, the human vision research community systematically focused on perceived image quality and digital artifacts due to resolution, compression, gamma, dynamic range, capture and reproduction noise, blur, etc., to help overcome existing technological challenges and shortcomings. Technological advances made digital images and digital multimedia nearly flawless in quality, and ubiquitous and pervasive in usage, provide us with the exciting but at the same time demanding possibility to turn to the domain of human experience including higher psychological functions, such as cognition, emotion, awareness, social interaction, consciousness and Self. In this paper we will outline the evolution of human centered multidisciplinary studies related to imaging and propose steps and potential foci of future research.

  4. Beyond the mammography debate: a moderate perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaniklidis, C

    2015-06-01

    After some decades of contention, one can almost despair and conclude that (paraphrasing) "the mammography debate you will have with you always." Against that sentiment, in this review I argue, after reflecting on some of the major themes of this long-standing debate, that we must begin to move beyond the narrow borders of claim and counterclaim to seek consensus on what the balance of methodologically sound and critically appraised evidence demonstrates, and also to find overlooked underlying convergences; after acknowledging the reality of some residual and non-trivial harms from mammography, to promote effective strategies for harm mitigation; and to encourage deployment of new screening modalities that will render many of the issues and concerns in the debate obsolete. To these ends, I provide a sketch of what this looking forward and beyond the current debate might look like, leveraging advantages from abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging technologies (such as the ultrafast and twist protocols) and from digital breast tomosynthesis-also known as three-dimensional mammography. I also locate the debate within the broader context of mammography in the real world as it plays out not for the disputants, but for the stakeholders themselves: the screening-eligible patients and the physicians in the front lines who are charged with enabling both the acts of screening and the facts of screening at their maximally objective and patient-accessible levels to facilitate informed decisions. PMID:26089721

  5. Beyond the mammography debate: a moderate perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaniklidis, C

    2015-01-01

    After some decades of contention, one can almost despair and conclude that (paraphrasing) “the mammography debate you will have with you always.” Against that sentiment, in this review I argue, after reflecting on some of the major themes of this long-standing debate, that we must begin to move beyond the narrow borders of claim and counterclaim to seek consensus on what the balance of methodologically sound and critically appraised evidence demonstrates, and also to find overlooked underlying convergences; after acknowledging the reality of some residual and non-trivial harms from mammography, to promote effective strategies for harm mitigation; and to encourage deployment of new screening modalities that will render many of the issues and concerns in the debate obsolete. To these ends, I provide a sketch of what this looking forward and beyond the current debate might look like, leveraging advantages from abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging technologies (such as the ultrafast and twist protocols) and from digital breast tomosynthesis—also known as three-dimensional mammography. I also locate the debate within the broader context of mammography in the real world as it plays out not for the disputants, but for the stakeholders themselves: the screening-eligible patients and the physicians in the front lines who are charged with enabling both the acts of screening and the facts of screening at their maximally objective and patient-accessible levels to facilitate informed decisions. PMID:26089721

  6. Depth discrimination in diffuse optical transmission imaging by planar scanning off-axis fibers: initial applications to optical mammography.

    PubMed

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Yu, Yang; Weliwitigoda, Geethika; Anderson, Pamela G; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for depth discrimination in parallel-plate, transmission mode, diffuse optical imaging. The method is based on scanning a set of detector pairs, where the two detectors in each pair are separated by a distance δDi along direction δ D i within the x-y scanning plane. A given optical inhomogeneity appears shifted by αi δ D i (with 0≤ αi ≤1) in the images collected with the two detection fibers of the i-th pair. Such a spatial shift can be translated into a measurement of the depth z of the inhomogeneity, and the depth measurements based on each detector pair are combined into a specially designed weighted average. This depth assessment is demonstrated on tissue-like phantoms for simple inhomogeneities such as straight rods in single-rod or multiple-rod configurations, and for more complex curved structures which mimic blood vessels in the female breast. In these phantom tests, the method has recovered the depth of single inhomogeneities in the central position of the phantom to within 4 mm of their actual value, and within 7 mm for more superficial inhomogeneities, where the thickness of the phantom was 65 mm. The application of this method to more complex images, such as optical mammograms, requires a robust approach to identify corresponding structures in the images collected with the two detectors of a given pair. To this aim, we propose an approach based on the inner product of the skeleton images collected with the two detectors of each pair, and we present an application of this approach to optical in vivo images of the female breast. This depth discrimination method can enhance the spatial information content of 2D projection images of the breast by assessing the depth of detected structures, and by allowing for 3D localization of breast tumors.

  7. Characteristic functionals in imaging and image-quality assessment: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Eric; Barrett, Harrison H

    2016-08-01

    Characteristic functionals are one of the main analytical tools used to quantify the statistical properties of random fields and generalized random fields. The viewpoint taken here is that a random field is the correct model for the ensemble of objects being imaged by a given imaging system. In modern digital imaging systems, random fields are not used to model the reconstructed images themselves since these are necessarily finite dimensional. After a brief introduction to the general theory of characteristic functionals, many examples relevant to imaging applications are presented. The propagation of characteristic functionals through both a binned and list-mode imaging system is also discussed. Methods for using characteristic functionals and image data to estimate population parameters and classify populations of objects are given. These methods are based on maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori techniques in spaces generated by sampling the relevant characteristic functionals through the imaging operator. It is also shown how to calculate a Fisher information matrix in this space. These estimators and classifiers, and the Fisher information matrix, can then be used for image quality assessment of imaging systems.

  8. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  9. BREAST: a novel method to improve the diagnostic efficacy of mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, P. C.; Tapia, K.; Ryan, J.; Lee, W.

    2013-03-01

    High quality breast imaging and accurate image assessment are critical to the early diagnoses, treatment and management of women with breast cancer. Breast Screen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) provides a platform, accessible by researchers and clinicians world-wide, which will contain image data bases, algorithms to assess reader performance and on-line systems for image evaluation. The platform will contribute to the diagnostic efficacy of breast imaging in Australia and beyond on two fronts: reducing errors in mammography, and transforming our assessment of novel technologies and techniques. Mammography is the primary diagnostic tool for detecting breast cancer with over 800,000 women X-rayed each year in Australia, however, it fails to detect 30% of breast cancers with a number of missed cancers being visible on the image [1-6]. BREAST will monitor the mistakes, identify reasons for mammographic errors, and facilitate innovative solutions to reduce error rates. The BREAST platform has the potential to enable expert assessment of breast imaging innovations, anywhere in the world where experts or innovations are located. Currently, innovations are often being assessed by limited numbers of individuals who happen to be geographically located close to the innovation, resulting in equivocal studies with low statistical power. BREAST will transform this current paradigm by enabling large numbers of experts to assess any new method or technology using our embedded evaluation methods. We are confident that this world-first system will play an important part in the future efficacy of breast imaging.

  10. Communicating with mammography patients.

    PubMed

    Kamm, B L

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the barriers that prevent many women from undergoing mammography and strategies that can help them overcome those barriers. It also describes techniques for effective, individualized patient communication and education. Mammographers will learn how to ask the right questions, listen effectively for stated and unstated messages and determine which methods to use when communicating with different patients.

  11. Does resolution really increase image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisse, Christel-Loïc; Guichard, Frédéric; Cao, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A general trend in the CMOS image sensor market is for increasing resolution (by having a larger number of pixels) while keeping a small form factor by shrinking photosite size. This article discusses the impact of this trend on some of the main attributes of image quality. The first example is image sharpness. A smaller pitch theoretically allows a larger limiting resolution which is derived from the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). But recent sensor technologies (1.75μm, and soon 1.45μm) with typical aperture f/2.8 are clearly reaching the size of the diffraction blur spot. A second example is the impact on pixel light sensitivity and image sensor noise. For photonic noise, the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) is typically a decreasing function of the resolution. To evaluate whether shrinking pixel size could be beneficial to the image quality, the tradeoff between spatial resolution and light sensitivity is examined by comparing the image information capacity of sensors with varying pixel size. A theoretical analysis that takes into consideration measured and predictive models of pixel performance degradation and improvement associated with CMOS imager technology scaling, is presented. This analysis is completed by a benchmarking of recent commercial sensors with different pixel technologies.

  12. Image Quality Indicator for Infrared Inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The quality of images generated during an infrared thermal inspection depends on many system variables, settings, and parameters to include the focal length setting of the IR camera lens. If any relevant parameter is incorrect or sub-optimal, the resulting IR images will usually exhibit inherent unsharpness and lack of resolution. Traditional reference standards and image quality indicators (IQIs) are made of representative hardware samples and contain representative flaws of concern. These standards are used to verify that representative flaws can be detected with the current IR system settings. However, these traditional standards do not enable the operator to quantify the quality limitations of the resulting images, i.e. determine the inherent maximum image sensitivity and image resolution. As a result, the operator does not have the ability to optimize the IR inspection system prior to data acquisition. The innovative IQI described here eliminates this limitation and enables the operator to objectively quantify and optimize the relevant variables of the IR inspection system, resulting in enhanced image quality with consistency and repeatability in the inspection application. The IR IQI consists of various copper foil features of known sizes that are printed on a dielectric non-conductive board. The significant difference in thermal conductivity between the two materials ensures that each appears with a distinct grayscale or brightness in the resulting IR image. Therefore, the IR image of the IQI exhibits high contrast between the copper features and the underlying dielectric board, which is required to detect the edges of the various copper features. The copper features consist of individual elements of various shapes and sizes, or of element-pairs of known shapes and sizes and with known spacing between the elements creating the pair. For example, filled copper circles with various diameters can be used as individual elements to quantify the image sensitivity

  13. Quality evaluation of fruit by hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents new applications of hyperspectral imaging for measuring the optical properties of fruits and assessing their quality attributes. A brief overview is given of current techniques for measuring optical properties of turbid and opaque biological materials. Then a detailed descripti...

  14. Scene reduction for subjective image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska (Tomaszewska), Anna

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of image quality is important for many image processing systems, such as those used for acquisition, compression, restoration, enhancement, or reproduction. Its measurement is often accompanied by user studies, in which a group of observers rank or rate results of several algorithms. Such user studies, known as subjective image quality assessment experiments, can be very time consuming and do not guarantee conclusive results. This paper is intended to help design an efficient and rigorous quality assessment experiment. We propose a method of limiting the number of scenes that need to be tested, which can significantly reduce the experimental effort and still capture relevant scene-dependent effects. To achieve it, we employ a clustering technique and evaluate it on the basis of compactness and separation criteria. The correlation between the results obtained from a set of images in an initial database and the results received from reduced experiment are analyzed. Finally, we propose a procedure for reducing the initial scenes number. Four different assessment techniques were tested: single stimulus, double stimulus, forced choice, and similarity judgments. We conclude that in most cases, 9 to 12 judgments per evaluated algorithm for a large scene collection is sufficient to reduce the initial set of images.

  15. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Braig, Eva; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom. PMID:26110618

  16. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Braig, Eva; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom.

  17. Prediction of Viking lander camera image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Jobson, D. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    Formulations are presented that permit prediction of image quality as a function of camera performance, surface radiance properties, and lighting and viewing geometry. Predictions made for a wide range of surface radiance properties reveal that image quality depends strongly on proper camera dynamic range command and on favorable lighting and viewing geometry. Proper camera dynamic range commands depend mostly on the surface albedo that will be encountered. Favorable lighting and viewing geometries depend mostly on lander orientation with respect to the diurnal sun path over the landing site, and tend to be independent of surface albedo and illumination scattering function. Side lighting with low sun elevation angles (10 to 30 deg) is generally favorable for imaging spatial details and slopes, whereas high sun elevation angles are favorable for measuring spectral reflectances.

  18. Preliminary experience with monoenergetic photon mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.E.; Washburn, D.; Pisano, E.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, D.; Gmur, N.F.; Zhong, Zhong; Sayers, D.

    1995-12-31

    We are using a beam port at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a source of monoenergetic photons. The photon source is radiation from a bending magnet on the X-ray storage ring and provides a usable X-ray spectrum from 5 keV to over 50 keV. A tunable crystal monochromotor is used for energy selection. The beam is 79mm wide and 0.5 mm high. We imaged the ACR mammography phantom and a contrast-detail phantom using a phosphor plate as the unaging detector. Phantom images were obtained at 16, 18, 20 and 22 keV. Phantom thickness varied from 15 mm to 82 mm. These images were compared to images obtained with a conventional dedicated mammography unit. Subjective preliminary results show that image contrast of the monoenergetic images is similar to those obtained from the conventional x-ray source with somewhat sharper and cleaner images from the monoenergetic source. Quantitative analysis shows that the monoenergetic images have improved contrast compared to the polyenergetic derived images. Entrance skin dose measurements show a factor of 5 to 10 times less radiation for the monoenergetic images with equivalent or better contrast Although there remain a number of technical problems to be addressed and much more work to be done, we are encouraged to further explore the use of monoenergetic imaging.

  19. Mobile screening mammography for the corporate customer.

    PubMed

    Kettlehake, J; Malott, J C

    1988-01-01

    While the concept of mobile imaging services is not new, mobile screening mammography has recently gained a great deal of attention, and several mobile breast screening programs are in operation throughout the United States. This article describes the development of a mobile breast screening program designed to attract corporations' employees as its primary source of participants. The design of the program, corporate concerns and operational issues are discussed as well as the findings of its first year of operation.

  20. Medical Imaging Image Quality Assessment with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Kalyvas, N. I.; Martini, Niki; Koukou, Vaia; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction, with cluster computing. The PET scanner simulated in this study was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL algorithm. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3 to 21) and iterations (1 to 20), as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase up to the 12th iteration whereas remain almost constant thereafter. MTF improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method based on the TLC plane source can be also useful in research for the further development of PET and SPECT scanners though GATE simulations.

  1. Detection of image quality metamers based on the metric for unified image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a concept of the image quality metamerism as an expanded version of the metamerism defined in the color science. The concept is used to unify different image quality attributes, and applied to introduce a metric showing the degree of image quality metamerism to analyze a cultural property. Our global goal is to build a metric to evaluate total quality of images acquired by different imaging systems and observed under different viewing conditions. As the basic step to the global goal, the metric is consisted of color, spectral and texture information in this research, and applied to detect image quality metamers to investigate the cultural property. The property investigated is the oldest extant version of folding screen paintings that depict the thriving city of Kyoto designated as a nationally important cultural property in Japan. Gold colored areas painted by using high granularity colorants compared with other color areas in the property are evaluated based on the metric, then the metric is visualized as a map showing the possibility of the image quality metamer to the reference pixel.

  2. Mammography compression force in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Poletti, J L

    1994-06-01

    Maximum compression forces have been measured in New Zealand on 37 mammography machines, using a simple hydraulic device. The median measured maximum force was 145 N, and the range 58 to 230 N. Much greater attention needs to be paid to the setting of maximum force for compression devices by service personnel. Compression devices must be included in the quality assurance programme. Where indicated by the machine, the accuracy of the indicated force for some machines is poor. PMID:8074619

  3. Mammographic density is the main correlate of tumors detected on ultrasound but not on mammography.

    PubMed

    Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Brehm, Barbara; Heusinger, Katharina; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Hack, Carolin C; Preuss, Caroline; Lux, Michael P; Hartmann, Arndt; Vachon, Celine M; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    Although mammography screening programs do not include ultrasound examinations, some diagnostic units do provide women with both mammography and ultrasonography. This article is concerned with estimating the risk of a breast cancer patient diagnosed in a hospital-based mammography unit having a tumor that is visible on ultrasound but not on mammography. A total of 1,399 women with invasive breast cancer from a hospital-based diagnostic mammography unit were included in this retrospective study. For inclusion, mammograms from the time of the primary diagnosis had to be available for computer-assisted assessment of percentage mammographic density (PMD), as well as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessment of mammography. In addition, ultrasound findings were available for the complete cohort as part of routine diagnostic procedures, regardless of any patient or imaging characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of mammography failure, defined as BIRADS assessment 1 or 2. The probability that the visibility of a tumor might be masked at diagnosis was estimated using a regression model with the identified predictors. Tumors were only visible on ultrasound in 107 cases (7.6%). PMD was the strongest predictor for mammography failure, but age, body mass index and previous breast surgery also influenced the risk, independently of the PMD. Risk probabilities ranged from 1% for a defined low-risk group up to 40% for a high-risk group. These findings might help identify women who should be offered ultrasound examinations in addition to mammography.

  4. Mammographic density is the main correlate of tumors detected on ultrasound but not on mammography.

    PubMed

    Häberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A; Brehm, Barbara; Heusinger, Katharina; Jud, Sebastian M; Loehberg, Christian R; Hack, Carolin C; Preuss, Caroline; Lux, Michael P; Hartmann, Arndt; Vachon, Celine M; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    Although mammography screening programs do not include ultrasound examinations, some diagnostic units do provide women with both mammography and ultrasonography. This article is concerned with estimating the risk of a breast cancer patient diagnosed in a hospital-based mammography unit having a tumor that is visible on ultrasound but not on mammography. A total of 1,399 women with invasive breast cancer from a hospital-based diagnostic mammography unit were included in this retrospective study. For inclusion, mammograms from the time of the primary diagnosis had to be available for computer-assisted assessment of percentage mammographic density (PMD), as well as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessment of mammography. In addition, ultrasound findings were available for the complete cohort as part of routine diagnostic procedures, regardless of any patient or imaging characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of mammography failure, defined as BIRADS assessment 1 or 2. The probability that the visibility of a tumor might be masked at diagnosis was estimated using a regression model with the identified predictors. Tumors were only visible on ultrasound in 107 cases (7.6%). PMD was the strongest predictor for mammography failure, but age, body mass index and previous breast surgery also influenced the risk, independently of the PMD. Risk probabilities ranged from 1% for a defined low-risk group up to 40% for a high-risk group. These findings might help identify women who should be offered ultrasound examinations in addition to mammography. PMID:27389655

  5. Influence of the characteristic curve on the clinical image quality and patient absorbed dose in lumbar spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingberg, Anders; Herrmann, Clemens; Lanhede, Birgitta; Almen, Anja; Mattsson, Saron; Panzer, Werner; Besjakov, Jack; Mansson, Lars G.; Kheddache, Susanne; Zankl, Maria

    2001-06-01

    The 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images' do not address the choice of film characteristic (H/D) curve, which is an important parameter for the description of a radiographic screen-film system. Since it is not possible to investigate this influence by taking repeated exposures of the same patients on films with systematically varied H/D curves, patient images of lumbar spine were digitised in the current study. The image contrast was altered by digital image processing techniques, simulating images with H/D curves varying from flat over standard latitude to a film type steeper than a mammography film. The manipulated images were printed on film for evaluation. Seven European radiologists evaluated the clinical image quality of in total 224 images by analysing the fulfilment of the European Image Criteria and by visual grading analysis of the images. The results show that the local quality can be significantly improved by the application of films with a steeper film H/D curve compared to the standard latitude film. For images with an average optical density of about 1.25, the application of the steeper film results in a reduction of patient absorbed dose by about 10-15% without a loss of diagnostically relevant image information. The results also show that the patient absorbed dose reduction obtained by altering the tube voltage from 70 kV to 90 kV coincides with a loss of image information that cannot be compensated for by simply changing the shape of the H/D curve.

  6. High Image Quality Laser Color Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kimitoshi; Morimoto, Yoshinori

    1989-07-01

    A laser color printer has been developed to depict continuous tone color images on a photographic color film or color paper with high resolution and fidelity. We have used three lasers, He-Cd (441.6 nm), Ar4+ (514.5 nm), and He-Ne (632.8 nm) for blue, green, and red exposures. We have employed a drum scanner for two dimensional scanning. The maximum resolution of our system is 40 c/mm (80 lines/mm) and the accuracy of density reproduction is within 1.0 when measured in color difference, where most observers can not distinguish the difference. The scanning artifacts and noise are diminished to a visually negligible level. The image quality of output images compares well to that of actual color photographs, and is suitable for photographic image simulations.

  7. Blind image quality assessment via deep learning.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weilong; Gao, Xinbo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates how to blindly evaluate the visual quality of an image by learning rules from linguistic descriptions. Extensive psychological evidence shows that humans prefer to conduct evaluations qualitatively rather than numerically. The qualitative evaluations are then converted into the numerical scores to fairly benchmark objective image quality assessment (IQA) metrics. Recently, lots of learning-based IQA models are proposed by analyzing the mapping from the images to numerical ratings. However, the learnt mapping can hardly be accurate enough because some information has been lost in such an irreversible conversion from the linguistic descriptions to numerical scores. In this paper, we propose a blind IQA model, which learns qualitative evaluations directly and outputs numerical scores for general utilization and fair comparison. Images are represented by natural scene statistics features. A discriminative deep model is trained to classify the features into five grades, corresponding to five explicit mental concepts, i.e., excellent, good, fair, poor, and bad. A newly designed quality pooling is then applied to convert the qualitative labels into scores. The classification framework is not only much more natural than the regression-based models, but also robust to the small sample size problem. Thorough experiments are conducted on popular databases to verify the model's effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness. PMID:25122842

  8. Blind image quality assessment via deep learning.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weilong; Gao, Xinbo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates how to blindly evaluate the visual quality of an image by learning rules from linguistic descriptions. Extensive psychological evidence shows that humans prefer to conduct evaluations qualitatively rather than numerically. The qualitative evaluations are then converted into the numerical scores to fairly benchmark objective image quality assessment (IQA) metrics. Recently, lots of learning-based IQA models are proposed by analyzing the mapping from the images to numerical ratings. However, the learnt mapping can hardly be accurate enough because some information has been lost in such an irreversible conversion from the linguistic descriptions to numerical scores. In this paper, we propose a blind IQA model, which learns qualitative evaluations directly and outputs numerical scores for general utilization and fair comparison. Images are represented by natural scene statistics features. A discriminative deep model is trained to classify the features into five grades, corresponding to five explicit mental concepts, i.e., excellent, good, fair, poor, and bad. A newly designed quality pooling is then applied to convert the qualitative labels into scores. The classification framework is not only much more natural than the regression-based models, but also robust to the small sample size problem. Thorough experiments are conducted on popular databases to verify the model's effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness.

  9. Dried fruits quality assessment by hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Gargiulo, Aldo; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Dried fruits products present different market values according to their quality. Such a quality is usually quantified in terms of freshness of the products, as well as presence of contaminants (pieces of shell, husk, and small stones), defects, mould and decays. The combination of these parameters, in terms of relative presence, represent a fundamental set of attributes conditioning dried fruits humans-senses-detectable-attributes (visual appearance, organolectic properties, etc.) and their overall quality in terms of marketable products. Sorting-selection strategies exist but sometimes they fail when a higher degree of detection is required especially if addressed to discriminate between dried fruits of relatively small dimensions and when aiming to perform an "early detection" of pathogen agents responsible of future moulds and decays development. Surface characteristics of dried fruits can be investigated by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). In this paper, specific and "ad hoc" applications addressed to propose quality detection logics, adopting a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) based approach, are described, compared and critically evaluated. Reflectance spectra of selected dried fruits (hazelnuts) of different quality and characterized by the presence of different contaminants and defects have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with two HSI systems working in two different spectral ranges: visible-near infrared field (400-1000 nm) and near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The spectra have been processed and results evaluated adopting both a simple and fast wavelength band ratio approach and a more sophisticated classification logic based on principal component (PCA) analysis.

  10. Objective assessment of image quality VI: imaging in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Müeller, Stefan; Halpern, Howard J.; Morris, John C., III; Dwyer, Roisin

    2013-11-01

    Earlier work on objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) focused largely on estimation or classification tasks in which the desired outcome of imaging is accurate diagnosis. This paper develops a general framework for assessing imaging quality on the basis of therapeutic outcomes rather than diagnostic performance. By analogy to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their variants as used in diagnostic OAIQ, the method proposed here utilizes the therapy operating characteristic or TOC curves, which are plots of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall dose level of a radiotherapy treatment is varied. The proposed figure of merit is the area under the TOC curve, denoted AUTOC. This paper reviews an earlier exposition of the theory of TOC and AUTOC, which was specific to the assessment of image-segmentation algorithms, and extends it to other applications of imaging in external-beam radiation treatment as well as in treatment with internal radioactive sources. For each application, a methodology for computing the TOC is presented. A key difference between ROC and TOC is that the latter can be defined for a single patient rather than a population of patients.

  11. The supply of mammography resources in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Artz, D R; Brown, M L; Barrett, M J

    1992-04-01

    The distribution of mammography machines and related resources in West Virginia, along with the distribution of breast cancer screen-eligible women, are examined using county-specific data. This data placed on a state map shows that it is not necessary to cross more than one county line anywhere within West Virginia in order to visit a mammography facility. The overall density of these machines is 20 per 100,000 women over 45, almost double the capacity needed for screening mammography. After taking into account the projected demand for mammography, the current average cost per exam is around $65-$100. If mammography machines were placed in all the counties without machines, the cost in those countries would be around $140 per exam. It would be cheaper to provide a travel allowance to women in rural counties than to install machines in these areas. Machines that are accredited by the American College of Radiologists, the most available indicator of quality mammography, are located only in densely populated areas of the state. PMID:1615640

  12. Improving secondary ion mass spectrometry image quality with image fusion.

    PubMed

    Tarolli, Jay G; Jackson, Lauren M; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 μm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution because of counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure.

  13. Improving secondary ion mass spectrometry image quality with image fusion.

    PubMed

    Tarolli, Jay G; Jackson, Lauren M; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 μm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution because of counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  14. Visual pattern degradation based image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinjian; Li, Leida; Shi, Guangming; Lin, Weisi; Wan, Wenfei

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a visual pattern degradation based full-reference (FR) image quality assessment (IQA) method. Researches on visual recognition indicate that the human visual system (HVS) is highly adaptive to extract visual structures for scene understanding. Existing structure degradation based IQA methods mainly take local luminance contrast to represent structure, and measure quality as degradation on luminance contrast. In this paper, we suggest that structure includes not only luminance contrast but also orientation information. Therefore, we analyze the orientation characteristic for structure description. Inspired by the orientation selectivity mechanism in the primary visual cortex, we introduce a novel visual pattern to represent the structure of a local region. Then, the quality is measured as the degradations on both luminance contrast and visual pattern. Experimental results on Five benchmark databases demonstrate that the proposed visual pattern can effectively represent visual structure and the proposed IQA method performs better than the existing IQA metrics.

  15. Mammography dosimetry using an in-house developed polymethyl methacrylate phantom.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Mayya, Y S; Chourasiya, G

    2012-08-01

    Phantom-based measurements in mammography are well-established for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures involving equipment performance and comparisons of X-ray machines. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is among the best suitable materials for simulation of the breast. For carrying out QA/QC exercises in India, a mammographic PMMA phantom with engraved slots for keeping thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) has been developed. The radiation transmission property of the developed phantom was compared with the commercially available phantoms for verifying its suitability for mammography dosimetry. The breast entrance exposure (BEE), mean glandular dose (MGD), percentage depth dose (PDD), percentage surface dose distribution (PSDD), calibration testing of automatic exposure control (AEC) and density control function of a mammography machine were measured using this phantom. MGD was derived from the measured BEE following two different methodologies and the results were compared. The PDD and PSDD measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips. The in-house phantom was found comparable with the commercially available phantoms. The difference in the MGD values derived using two different methods were found in the range of 17.5-32.6 %. Measured depth ranges in the phantom lie between 0.32 and 0.40 cm for 75 % depth dose, 0.73 and 0.92 cm for 50 % depth dose, and 1.54 and 1.78 cm for 25 % depth dose. Higher PSDD value was observed towards chest wall edge side of the phantom, which is due to the orientation of cathode-anode axis along the chest wall to the nipple direction. Results obtained for AEC configuration testing shows that the observed mean optical density (O.D) of the phantom image was 1.59 and O.D difference for every successive increase in thickness of the phantom was within±0.15 O.D. Under density control function testing, at -2 and -1 density settings, the variation in film image O.D was within±0.15 O.D of the normal density

  16. Clinical value of mammography in diagnosis and identification of breast mass

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Zhang, Shanhua; Wang, Qingyuan; Zhu, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect and clinical value of mammography in the diagnosis of breast lump so as to improve the diagnosis level of breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical data of 110 patients with mammary lump confirmed by pathology to study the compliance of mammography diagnosis and Pathology diagnosis in breast lump, and the detection of microcalcifications, phyllode, and observe the image performance of mammography. Taking infitrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) as an example, the correlation of image performance and clinical pathological features of different types was studied so as to predict if mammography performance was effective in the treatment and prognosis in breast cancer. Results: Taking Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) grade 4A as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 90.80% (109/120), 84.60% (126/149) and 87.40% (235/269); taking BI-RADS grade 4B as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 85.00% (102/120), 93.30% (139/149) and 89.60% (241/269); the correlation analysis suggested that, there was some kind of correlation between the mammography performance and clinical features of breast cancer. Conclusion: Mammography is worth being promoted in clinic for its significant clinical value in diagnosing and identifying breast lump. PMID:27648060

  17. Clinical value of mammography in diagnosis and identification of breast mass

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Zhang, Shanhua; Wang, Qingyuan; Zhu, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect and clinical value of mammography in the diagnosis of breast lump so as to improve the diagnosis level of breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical data of 110 patients with mammary lump confirmed by pathology to study the compliance of mammography diagnosis and Pathology diagnosis in breast lump, and the detection of microcalcifications, phyllode, and observe the image performance of mammography. Taking infitrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) as an example, the correlation of image performance and clinical pathological features of different types was studied so as to predict if mammography performance was effective in the treatment and prognosis in breast cancer. Results: Taking Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) grade 4A as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 90.80% (109/120), 84.60% (126/149) and 87.40% (235/269); taking BI-RADS grade 4B as the critical point, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of mammography was 85.00% (102/120), 93.30% (139/149) and 89.60% (241/269); the correlation analysis suggested that, there was some kind of correlation between the mammography performance and clinical features of breast cancer. Conclusion: Mammography is worth being promoted in clinic for its significant clinical value in diagnosing and identifying breast lump.

  18. 21 CFR 900.12 - Quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., any cases of breast cancer among women imaged at the facility that subsequently become known to the... breast anatomy, pathology, physiology, technical aspects of mammography, and quality assurance and..., but not necessarily be limited to: (A) Training in breast anatomy and physiology, positioning...

  19. 21 CFR 900.12 - Quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., any cases of breast cancer among women imaged at the facility that subsequently become known to the... breast anatomy, pathology, physiology, technical aspects of mammography, and quality assurance and..., but not necessarily be limited to: (A) Training in breast anatomy and physiology, positioning...

  20. 21 CFR 900.12 - Quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., any cases of breast cancer among women imaged at the facility that subsequently become known to the... breast anatomy, pathology, physiology, technical aspects of mammography, and quality assurance and..., but not necessarily be limited to: (A) Training in breast anatomy and physiology, positioning...

  1. 21 CFR 900.12 - Quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., any cases of breast cancer among women imaged at the facility that subsequently become known to the... breast anatomy, pathology, physiology, technical aspects of mammography, and quality assurance and..., but not necessarily be limited to: (A) Training in breast anatomy and physiology, positioning...

  2. 21 CFR 900.12 - Quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., any cases of breast cancer among women imaged at the facility that subsequently become known to the... breast anatomy, pathology, physiology, technical aspects of mammography, and quality assurance and..., but not necessarily be limited to: (A) Training in breast anatomy and physiology, positioning...

  3. In vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography using a new real-time luminescence technique.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M C; Hemdal, B; Medin, J; Marckmann, C J; Andersen, C E; Bøtter-Jensen, L; Andersson, I; Mattsson, S

    2005-04-01

    A dosimetry system based on radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from carbon doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals was developed for in vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography. A small cylindrical crystal of Al2O3:C (diameter 0.48 mm and length 2 mm) was coupled to the end of a 1 mm diameter optical fibre cable. Owing to their small size and characteristic shape, these probes can be placed on the body surface in the field of view during the examination, without compromising the reading of the mammogram. Our new technique was tested with a mammography unit (Siemens Mammomat 3000) and screen-film technique over a range of clinically relevant X-ray energies. The results were compared with those obtained from an ionization chamber usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. The reproducibility of measurements was around 3% (1 standard deviation) at 4.5 mGy for both RL and OSL data. The dose response was found to be linear between 4.5 mGy and 30 mGy. The energy dependence of the system is around 18% between 23 kV and 35 kV. In vivo measurements were performed during three patient examinations. It was shown that entrance and exit doses could be measured. The presence of the small probes did not significantly interfere with the diagnostic quality of the images. Entrance doses estimated by RL/OSL results agreed within 3% with entrance surface dose values calculated from the ionization chamber measurements. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and in vivo dose measurements in mammography.

  4. Model-based quantification of image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazra, Rajeeb; Miller, Keith W.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    In 1982, Park and Schowengerdt published an end-to-end analysis of a digital imaging system quantifying three principal degradation components: (1) image blur - blurring caused by the acquisition system, (2) aliasing - caused by insufficient sampling, and (3) reconstruction blur - blurring caused by the imperfect interpolative reconstruction. This analysis, which measures degradation as the square of the radiometric error, includes the sample-scene phase as an explicit random parameter and characterizes the image degradation caused by imperfect acquisition and reconstruction together with the effects of undersampling and random sample-scene phases. In a recent paper Mitchell and Netravelli displayed the visual effects of the above mentioned degradations and presented subjective analysis about their relative importance in determining image quality. The primary aim of the research is to use the analysis of Park and Schowengerdt to correlate their mathematical criteria for measuring image degradations with subjective visual criteria. Insight gained from this research can be exploited in the end-to-end design of optical systems, so that system parameters (transfer functions of the acquisition and display systems) can be designed relative to each other, to obtain the best possible results using quantitative measurements.

  5. Convolutional neural networks for mammography mass lesion classification.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, John; Gonzalez, Fabio A; Ramos-Pollan, Raul; Oliveira, Jose L; Guevara Lopez, Miguel Angel

    2015-08-01

    Feature extraction is a fundamental step when mammography image analysis is addressed using learning based approaches. Traditionally, problem dependent handcrafted features are used to represent the content of images. An alternative approach successfully applied in other domains is the use of neural networks to automatically discover good features. This work presents an evaluation of convolutional neural networks to learn features for mammography mass lesions before feeding them to a classification stage. Experimental results showed that this approach is a suitable strategy outperforming the state-of-the-art representation from 79.9% to 86% in terms of area under the ROC curve. PMID:26736382

  6. Enhancement and quality control of GOES images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentoft-Nilsen, Marit; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Hasler, A. Frederick; Chesters, Dennis

    1996-10-01

    The new generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have an imager instrument with five multispectral bands of high spatial resolution,and very high dynamic range radiance measurements with 10-bit precision. A wide variety of environmental processes can be observed at unprecedented time scales using the new imager instrument. Quality assurance and feedback to the GOES project office is performed using rapid animation at high magnification, examining differences between successive frames, and applying radiometric and geometric correction algorithms. Missing or corrupted scanline data occur unpredictably due to noise in the ground based receiving system. Smooth high resolution noise-free animations can be recovered using automatic techniques even from scanline scratches affecting more than 25 percent of the dataset. Radiometric correction using the local solar zenith angle was applied to the visible channel to compensate for time- of-day illumination variations to produce gain-compensated movies that appear well-lit from dawn to dusk and extend the interval of useful image observations by more than two hours. A time series of brightness histograms displays some subtle quality control problems in the GOES channels related to rebinning of the radiance measurements. The human visual system is sensitive to only about half of the measured 10- bit dynamic range in intensity variations, at a given point in a monochrome image. In order to effectively use the additional bits of precision and handle the high data rate, new enhancement techniques and visualization tools were developed. We have implemented interactive image enhancement techniques to selectively emphasize different subranges of the 10-bits of intensity levels. Improving navigational accuracy using registration techniques and geometric correction of scanline interleaving errors is a more difficult problem that is currently being investigated.

  7. Bavarian mammography recertification program: experiences with a workstation prototype for softcopy reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesmeier, Jorg; Eichelberg, Marco; Kieschke, Joachim; Hellemann, Hans-Peter; Gruschka-Hellemann, Birgit; Sokiranski, Roman; Munte, Axel; Thoben, Wilfried; Jensch, Peter F.

    2003-05-01

    In January 2002, the Bavarian Statutory Health Care Administration ("Kassenarztliche Vereinigung Bayerns", KVB) started a recertification programme for quality assurance and quality improvement in mammography reading. All accredited radiologists and gynaecologists are asked to prove their qualification every 1-2 years. The recertification programme requires the physicians to read 50 cases randomly selected from a larger collection of high-quality test cases. The portion of malignant and benign cases corresponds to the requirements of the German National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians ("Kassenarztliche Bundesvereinigung", KBV). In order to read the mammograms on a softcopy device the images are digitised with a high-quality scanner and converted to DICOM Digital Mammography format. The workstation software has been implemented according to the particular requirements of this programme. To verify the applicability of digitised mammograms for recertification purposes, a comparative study with 32 trained radiologists and gynaecologists has been performed. As a result the study showed that there was no significant difference in the error rate of the reported findings between conventional film and softcopy reading. The first intermediate results of this quality initiative are promising. The introduction of a corresponding federal German recertification programme is intended.

  8. X-ray light valve (XLV): a novel detectors' technology for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcovici, Sorin; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Oakham, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A novel method, based on X-ray Light Valve (XLV) technology, is proposed for making good image quality yet inexpensive flat panel detectors for digital mammography. The digital mammography markets, particularly in the developing countries, demand quality machines at substantially lower prices than the ones available today. Continuous pressure is applied on x-ray detectors' manufacturers to reduce the flat panel detectors' prices. XLV presents a unique opportunity to achieve the needed price - performance characteristics for direct conversion, x-ray detectors. The XLV based detectors combine the proven, superior, spatial resolution of a-Se with the simplicity and low cost of liquid crystals and optical scanning. The x-ray quanta absorbed by a 200 μm a-Se produce electron - hole pairs that move under an electric field to the top and bottom of a-Se layer. This 2D charge distribution creates at the interface with the liquid crystals a continuous (analog) charge image corresponding to the impinging radiation's information. Under the influence of local electrical charges next to them, the liquid crystals twist proportionally to the charges and vary their light reflectivity. A scanning light source illuminates the liquid crystals while an associated, pixilated photo-detector, having a 42 μm pixel size, captures the light reflected by the liquid crystals and converts it in16 bit words that are transmitted to the machine for image processing and display. The paper will describe a novel XLV, 25 cm x 30 cm, flat panel detector structure and its underlying physics as well as its preliminary performance measured on several engineering prototypes. In particular, the paper will present the results of measuring XLV detectors' DQE, MTF, dynamic range, low contrast resolution and dynamic behavior. Finally, the paper will introduce the new, low cost, XLV detector based, digital mammography machine under development at XLV Diagnostics Inc.

  9. The effect of breast compression on mass conspicuity in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Robert S. Jr; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-10-15

    This study analyzed how the inherent quality of diagnostic information in digital mammography could be affected by breast compression. A digital mammography system was modeled using a Monte Carlo algorithm based on the Penelope program, which has been successfully used to model several medical imaging systems. First, the Monte Carlo program was validated against previous measurements and simulations. Once validated, the Monte Carlo software modeled a digital mammography system by tracking photons through a voxelized software breast phantom, containing anatomical structures and breast masses, and following photons until they were absorbed by a selenium-based flat-panel detector. Simulations were performed for two compression conditions (standard compression and 12.5% reduced compression) and three photon flux conditions (constant flux, constant detector signal, and constant glandular dose). The results showed that reduced compression led to higher scatter fractions, as expected. For the constant photon flux condition, decreased compression also reduced glandular dose. For constant glandular dose, the SdNR for a 4 cm breast was 0.60{+-}0.11 and 0.62{+-}0.11 under standard and reduced compressions, respectively. For the 6 cm case with constant glandular dose, the SdNR was 0.50{+-}0.11 and 0.49{+-}0.10 under standard and reduced compressions, respectively. The results suggest that if a particular imaging system can handle an approximately 10% increase in total tube output and 10% decrease in detector signal, breast compression can be reduced by about 12% in terms of breast thickness with little impact on image quality or dose.

  10. On pictures and stuff: image quality and material appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferwerda, James A.

    2014-02-01

    Realistic images are a puzzle because they serve as visual representations of objects while also being objects themselves. When we look at an image we are able to perceive both the properties of the image and the properties of the objects represented by the image. Research on image quality has typically focused improving image properties (resolution, dynamic range, frame rate, etc.) while ignoring the issue of whether images are serving their role as visual representations. In this paper we describe a series of experiments that investigate how well images of different quality convey information about the properties of the objects they represent. In the experiments we focus on the effects that two image properties (contrast and sharpness) have on the ability of images to represent the gloss of depicted objects. We found that different experimental methods produced differing results. Specifically, when the stimulus images were presented using simultaneous pair comparison, observers were influenced by the surface properties of the images and conflated changes in image contrast and sharpness with changes in object gloss. On the other hand, when the stimulus images were presented sequentially, observers were able to disregard the image plane properties and more accurately match the gloss of the objects represented by the different quality images. These findings suggest that in understanding image quality it is useful to distinguish between quality of the imaging medium and the quality of the visual information represented by that medium.

  11. Mammography in Connecticut: current estimates of capacity and usage.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, D I; Kegeles, S; Parker, C; Benn, S

    1990-07-01

    All 124 registered mammography facilities in Connecticut were surveyed in 1988 to determine the availability, quality, and usage of mammography services. A total of 112 responses (90% return) were analyzed. By the measures considered here, capacity and quality of mammography in Connecticut is very good to excellent. Services are available in Connecticut in a wide array of locales, times, and settings. Since 1985, 95 new dedicated machines have been put into service. We estimate that current capacity may exceed 400,000 annual studies. Utilization is below current capacity; roughly 155,000 examinations were completed in 1988. Continued recognition of the procedure's effectiveness, particularly in screening women for evidence of early disease, can help reduce the burden of breast cancer. PMID:2394095

  12. Evolution of Imaging in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Crowley, James; Hagan, Catherine; Atkinson, Lisa L

    2016-06-01

    The following topics are discussed in this article. A historical review of the evolution of breast cancer imaging from thermography through digital breast tomosynthesis, molecular breast imaging, and advanced breast magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of multiple clinical trials, their strengths, and weaknesses. Historical perspective on the Mammography Quality Standards Act and its relationship with development and implementation of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). PMID:27029017

  13. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  14. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Alistair Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Diaz, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    in CR. The use of the quantum noise correction factor reduced the difference from the model to the real NPS to generally within 4%. The use of the quantum noise correction improved the conversion of ASEh image to CRc image but had no difference for the conversion to CSI images. Conclusions: A practical method for estimating the NPS at any dose and over a range of beam qualities for mammography has been demonstrated. The noise model was incorporated into a methodology for converting an image to appear as if acquired on a different detector. The method can now be extended to work for a wide range of beam qualities and can be applied to the conversion of mammograms.

  15. American College of Radiology Imaging Network digital mammographic imaging screening trial: objectives and methodology.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Etta D; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Yaffe, Martin J; Hendrick, R Edward; Tosteson, Anna N A; Fryback, Dennis G; Bassett, Lawrence W; Baum, Janet K; Conant, Emily F; Jong, Roberta A; Rebner, Murray; D'Orsi, Carl J

    2005-08-01

    This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and each participating site and by the IRB and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program at the National Cancer Institute. The study was monitored by an independent Data Safety and Monitoring Board, which received interim analyses of data to ensure that the study would be terminated early if indicated by trends in the outcomes. The ACRIN, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute, conducted the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) primarily to compare the diagnostic accuracy of digital and screen-film mammography in asymptomatic women presenting for screening for breast cancer. Over the 25.5 months of enrollment, a total of 49 528 women were included at the 33 participating sites, which used five different types of digital mammography equipment. All participants underwent both screen-film and digital mammography. The digital and screen-film mammograms of each subject were independently interpreted by two radiologists. If findings of either examination were interpreted as abnormal, subsequent work-up occurred according to the recommendations of the interpreting radiologist. Breast cancer status was determined at biopsy or follow-up mammography 11-15 months after study entry. In addition to the measurement of diagnostic accuracy by using the interpretations of mammograms at the study sites, DMIST included evaluations of the relative cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life effects of digital versus screen-film mammography. Six separate reader studies using the de-identified archived DMIST mammograms will also assess the diagnostic accuracy of each of the individual digital mammography machines versus screen-film mammography machines, the effect of breast density on diagnostic accuracy of digital and screen-film mammography, and the effect of different rates of breast cancer on the diagnostic accuracy in a reader study. PMID

  16. Image quality characteristics of handheld display devices for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2 × 10(-5) mm(2) at 1 mm(-1), while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7 × 10(-6) mm(2). Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  17. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  18. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding.

  19. The influence of statistical variations on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Bror; Hertel, Dirk; Bullitt, Julian

    2006-01-01

    For more than thirty years imaging scientists have constructed metrics to predict psychovisually perceived image quality. Such metrics are based on a set of objectively measurable basis functions such as Noise Power Spectrum (NPS), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and characteristic curves of tone and color reproduction. Although these basis functions constitute a set of primitives that fully describe an imaging system from the standpoint of information theory, we found that in practical imaging systems the basis functions themselves are determined by system-specific primitives, i.e. technology parameters. In the example of a printer, MTF and NPS are largely determined by dot structure. In addition MTF is determined by color registration, and NPS by streaking and banding. Since any given imaging system is only a single representation of a class of more or less identical systems, the family of imaging systems and the single system are not described by a unique set of image primitives. For an image produced by a given imaging system, the set of image primitives describing that particular image will be a singular instantiation of the underlying statistical distribution of that primitive. If we know precisely the set of imaging primitives that describe the given image we should be able to predict its image quality. Since only the distributions are known, we can only predict the distribution in image quality for a given image as produced by the larger class of 'identical systems'. We will demonstrate the combinatorial effect of the underlying statistical variations in the image primitives on the objectively measured image quality of a population of printers as well as on the perceived image quality of a set of test images. We also will discuss the choice of test image sets and impact of scene content on the distribution of perceived image quality.

  20. Study of signal-to-noise ratio in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    Mammography techniques have recently advanced from those using analog systems (the screen-film system) to those using digital systems; for example, computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs) are nowadays used in mammography. Further, phase contrast mammography (PCM)-a digital technique by which images with a magnification of 1.75× can be obtained-is now available in the market. We studied the effect of the air gap in PCM and evaluated the effectiveness of an antiscatter x-ray grid in conventional mammography (CM) by measuring the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and relative signal-to-noise ratio (rSNR) and comparing them between PCM and the digital CM. The results indicated that the SFRs for the CM images obtained with a grid were the lowest and that these ratios were almost the same as those for the PCM images. In contrast, the rSNRs for the PCM images were the highest, which means that the scattering of x-rays was sufficiently reduced by the air gap without the loss of primary x-rays.

  1. Issues to Consider in Converting to Digital Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Etta D.; Zuley, Margarita; Baum, Janet K.; Marques, Helga S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will outline the reasons that many radiology practices are converting to digital mammography. In addition, we will provide basic information on the issues that must be considered in making the transformation. These include technical matters regarding image display, storage and retrieval, as well as clinical and ergonomic considerations. PMID:17888771

  2. A compensated radiolucent electrode array for combined EIT and mammography

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Tzu-Jen; Saulnier, G J; Xia, Hongjun; Tamma, Chandana; Newell, J C; Isaacson, D

    2008-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT), a non-invasive technique used to image the electrical conductivity and permittivity within a body from measurements taken on the body's surface, could be used as an indicator for breast cancer. Because of the low spatial resolution of EIT, combining it with other modalities may enhance its utility. X-ray mammography, the standard screening technique for breast cancer, is the first choice for that other modality. Here, we describe a radiolucent electrode array that can be attached to the compression plates of a mammography unit enabling EIT and mammography data to be taken simultaneously and in register. The radiolucent electrode array is made by depositing thin layers of metal on a plastic substrate. The structure of the array is presented along with data showing its x-ray absorbance and electrical properties. The data show that the electrode array has satisfactory radiolucency and sufficiently low resistance. PMID:17664644

  3. Process mapping in screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Whitman, G J; Venable, S L; Downs, R L; Garza, D; Levy, S; Ophir, K J; Spears, K F; Sprinkle-Vincent, S K; Stelling, C B

    1999-05-01

    Successful screening mammography programs aim to screen large numbers of women efficiently and inexpensively. Development of an effective screening mammography program requires skilled personnel, solid infrastructure, and a robust computer system. A group of physicians, technologists, computer support personnel, and administrators carefully analyzed a growing screening mammography program as a series of steps, starting with the request for the examination and ending with the receipt of a hard-copy consultation. The analysis involved a detailed examination of every step and every possible outcome in the screening process. The information gained through process mapping may be used for identification of systemic and personnel problems, allocation of resources, modification of workplace architecture, and design of computer networks. Process mapping is helpful for those involved in designing and improving screening mammography programs. Viewing a process (i.e., obtaining a screening mammogram) as a series of steps may allow for the identification of inefficient components that may limit growth. PMID:10342216

  4. Improving the Blanco Telescope's delivered image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy M. C.; Montane, Andrés; Tighe, Roberto; Walker, Alistair R.; Gregory, Brooke; Smith, R. Christopher; Cisternas, Alfonso

    2010-07-01

    The V. M. Blanco 4-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory is undergoing a number of improvements in preparation for the delivery of the Dark Energy Camera. The program includes upgrades having potential to deliver gains in image quality and stability. To this end, we have renovated the support structure of the primary mirror, incorporating innovations to improve both the radial support performance and the registration of the mirror and telescope top end. The resulting opto-mechanical condition of the telescope is described. We also describe some improvements to the environmental control. Upgrades to the telescope control system and measurements of the dome environment are described in separate papers in this conference.

  5. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  6. Annotation for information extraction from mammography reports.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Selen; Gulkesen, Kemal Hakan; Rubin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Inter and intra-observer variability in mammographic interpretation is a challenging problem, and decision support systems (DSS) may be helpful to reduce variation in practice. Since radiology reports are created as unstructured text reports, Natural language processing (NLP) techniques are needed to extract structured information from reports in order to provide the inputs to DSS. Before creating NLP systems, producing high quality annotated data set is essential. The goal of this project is to develop an annotation schema to guide the information extraction tasks needed from free-text mammography reports. PMID:23823416

  7. Food quality assessment by NIR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Martin B.; Millar, Samuel J.; Chau, Astor

    2010-04-01

    Near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy is well established in the food industry for rapid compositional analysis of bulk samples. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides new opportunities to measure the spatial distribution of components such as moisture and fat, and to identify and measure specific regions of composite samples. An NIR hyperspectral imaging system has been constructed for food research applications, incorporating a SWIR camera with a cooled 14 bit HgCdTe detector and N25E spectrograph (Specim Ltd, Finland). Samples are scanned in a pushbroom mode using a motorised stage. The system has a spectral resolution of 256 pixels covering a range of 970-2500 nm and a spatial resolution of 320 pixels covering a swathe adjustable from 8 to 300 mm. Images are acquired at a rate of up to 100 lines s-1, enabling samples to be scanned within a few seconds. Data are captured using SpectralCube software (Specim) and analysed using ENVI and IDL (ITT Visual Information Solutions). Several food applications are presented. The strength of individual absorbance bands enables the distribution of particular components to be assessed. Examples are shown for detection of added gluten in wheat flour and to study the effect of processing conditions on fat distribution in chips/French fries. More detailed quantitative calibrations have been developed to study evolution of the moisture distribution in baguettes during storage at different humidities, to assess freshness of fish using measurements of whole cod and fillets, and for prediction of beef quality by identification and separate measurement of lean and fat regions.

  8. Outcomes of modern screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Kerlikowske, K; Barclay, J

    1997-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco, Mobile Mammography Screening Program is a low-cost, community-based breast cancer screening program that offers mammography to women of diverse ethnic backgrounds (36% nonwhite) in six counties in northern California. Analysis of data collected on approximately 34,000 screening examinations from this program shows that the positive predictive value and sensitivity of modern screening mammography to be lower for women aged 40 to 49 years compared to women aged 50 and older. This lower performance is due to the lower prevalence of invasive breast cancer in younger women and possibly to age differences in breast tumor biology. Because of this lower performance, women in their forties may be subjected to more of the negative consequences of screening, which include additional diagnostic evaluations and the associated morbidity and anxiety, the potential for detecting and surgically treating clinically insignificant breast lesions, and the false reassurance resulting from normal mammographic results. Since the evidence is not compelling that the benefits of mammography screening outweigh the known risks for women aged 40 to 49 years, women considering mammography screening should be informed of the risks, potential benefits, and limitations of screening mammography, so that they can make individualized decisions based on their personal risk status and utility for the associated risks and potential benefits of screening.

  9. [Contrast media in MR mammography].

    PubMed

    Tontsch, P; Bauer, M; Birmelin, G; von Landenberg, E; Moeller, T B; Raible, G

    1997-03-01

    A standardized relationship between concentration of contrast media and normalized signal intensity should be the basis of a diagnostic evaluation of MR-mammography at different sites and with different sequences. In this work we compared the dynamic range of the MR-compatible contrast medium Magnevist at different sequences and machines. For this purpose we made measurements with a phantom, consisting of MR-compatible glass tubes filled with contrast medium of different concentrations. The glass tubes were placed in a water bath. All measurements were made with breast coils. The signal intensity of the glass tubes was normalized to the signal intensity of the native probe (water = 1). These normalized dynamic curves were compared with each other in order to find, for the different machines, the sequence which is nearest to a defined "Standard-Curve". As this task proved not possible for all machines, we measured how the dynamic curves of the different machines related to the "Standard-Curve". For all sequences we made also measurements with a female student to assure the quality of the pictures. Thus the participating radiologists can now compare their dynamic measurements of breast lesions with each other. PMID:9172669

  10. The physical and psychological factors governing sound-image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurozumi, K.; Ohgushi, K.

    1984-03-01

    One of the most important psychological impressions produced by a conventional two-loudspeakers reproduction-system is a localization of the sound image in the horizontal plane. The sound image is localized to some degree by varying the level and the time differences of the two acoustic signals. Even if the sound image was localized in the same direction, different impressions - for example, a feeling of the width of the sound image - are sometimes produced. These different impressions are explained by the phrase sound-image quality. The purpose is to find out the psychological and physical factors governing sound-image quality. To begin with, the effect on sound-image quality of varying the cross-correlation coefficient for white noise is investigated. A number of studies were performed in which the relationship between the cross-correlation coefficient and the sound-image quality were investigated.

  11. Reduced-reference image quality assessment using moment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Diwei; Shen, Yuantong; Shen, Yongluo; Li, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-reference image quality assessment (RR IQA) aims to evaluate the perceptual quality of a distorted image through partial information of the corresponding reference image. In this paper, a novel RR IQA metric is proposed by using the moment method. We claim that the first and second moments of wavelet coefficients of natural images can have approximate and regular change that are disturbed by different types of distortions, and that this disturbance can be relevant to human perceptions of quality. We measure the difference of these statistical parameters between reference and distorted image to predict the visual quality degradation. The introduced IQA metric is suitable for implementation and has relatively low computational complexity. The experimental results on Laboratory for Image and Video Engineering (LIVE) and Tampere Image Database (TID) image databases indicate that the proposed metric has a good predictive performance.

  12. Sensitometric analyses of screen-film systems for mammography exams in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, L. A. G.; Drexler, G. G.; de Almeida, C. E.; Medeiros, L. L.; Ferreira, N. M. P. D.; Estrada, J. J. S.

    2015-12-01

    A determination of the sensitometric parameters of screen-film systems to evaluate their qualities was performed. The quality control of the automatic film processor was carried out to ensure a high level of efficiency. Based on ISO 9236-3, the following potentials were applied on the X-ray tubes: 25 kV, 28 kV, 30 kV and 35 kV. Four different mammography films from different manufacturers with and without screens were tested for curve shape, speed and average gradient. The results indicated that film 1 exhibited better contrast, film 3 demonstrated the highest energy dependence, and film 4 presented the largest base+fog density. None of the four mammographic films tested achieved satisfactory results in all parameters analyzed. Improvements in the manufacturing process for these films must be completed to avoid losses in the image quality.

  13. Toward a standard reference database for computer-aided mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; Gueld, Mark O.; de A. Araújo, Arnaldo; Ott, Bastian; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2008-03-01

    Because of the lack of mammography databases with a large amount of codified images and identified characteristics like pathology, type of breast tissue, and abnormality, there is a problem for the development of robust systems for computer-aided diagnosis. Integrated to the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) project, we present an available mammography database developed from the union of: The Mammographic Image Analysis Society Digital Mammogram Database (MIAS), The Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and routine images from the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen. Using the IRMA code, standardized coding of tissue type, tumor staging, and lesion description was developed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) tissue codes and the ACR breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). The import was done automatically using scripts for image download, file format conversion, file name, web page and information file browsing. Disregarding the resolution, this resulted in a total of 10,509 reference images, and 6,767 images are associated with an IRMA contour information feature file. In accordance to the respective license agreements, the database will be made freely available for research purposes, and may be used for image based evaluation campaigns such as the Cross Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF). We have also shown that it can be extended easily with further cases imported from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS).

  14. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  15. Triple-energy contrast enhanced digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puong, Sylvie; Milioni de Carvalho, Pablo; Muller, Serge

    2010-04-01

    With the injection of iodine, Contrast Enhanced Digital Mammography (CEDM) provides functional information about breast tumour angiogenesis that can potentially help in cancer diagnosis. In order to generate iodine images in which the gray level is proportional to the iodine thickness, temporal and dual-energy approaches have already been considered. The dual-energy method offers the advantage of less patient motion artifacts and better comfort during the exam. However, this approach requires knowledge of the breast thickness at each pixel. Generally, as compression is applied, the breast thickness at each pixel is taken as the compression thickness. Nevertheless, in the breast border region, this assumption is not correct anymore and this causes inaccuracies in the iodine image. Triple-Energy CEDM could overcome these limitations by providing supplemental information in the form of a third image acquired with a different spectrum than the other two. This precludes the need of a priori knowledge of the breast thickness. Moreover, with Triple-Energy CEDM, breast thickness and glandularity maps could potentially be derived. In this study, we first focused on the method to recombine the three images in order to generate the iodine image, analyzing the performance of either quadratic, cubic or conic recombination functions. Then, we studied the optimal acquisition spectra in order to maximize the iodine SDNR in the recombined image for a given target total glandular dose. The concept of Triple-Energy CEDM was validated on simulated textured images and poly-energetic images acquired with a conventional X-ray mammography tube.

  16. Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

  17. Obesity, Gynecological Factors, and Abnormal Mammography Follow-Up in Minority and Medically Underserved Women

    PubMed Central

    Wujcik, Debra; Lin, Jin-Mann S.; Grau, Ana; Wilson, Veronica; Champion, Victoria; Zheng, Wei; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The relationship between obesity and screening mammography adherence has been examined previously, yet few studies have investigated obesity as a potential mediator of timely follow-up of abnormal (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BIRADS-0]) mammography results in minority and medically underserved patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 women who did not return for follow-up >6 months from index abnormal mammography and 41 who returned for follow-up ≤6 months in Nashville, Tennessee. Patients with a BIRADS-0 mammography event in 2003–2004 were identified by chart review. Breast cancer risk factors were collected by telephone interview. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on selected factors with return for diagnostic follow-up. Results Obesity and gynecological history were significant predictors of abnormal mammography resolution. A significantly higher frequency of obese women delayed return for mammography resolution compared with nonobese women (64.7% vs. 35.3%). A greater number of hysterectomized women returned for diagnostic follow-up compared with their counterparts without a hysterectomy (77.8% vs. 22.2%). Obese patients were more likely to delay follow-up >6 months (adjusted OR 4.09, p = 0.02). Conversely, hysterectomized women were significantly more likely to return for timely mammography follow-up ≤6 months (adjusted OR 7.95, p = 0.007). Conclusions Study results suggest that weight status and gynecological history influence patients' decisions to participate in mammography follow-up studies. Strategies are necessary to reduce weight-related barriers to mammography follow-up in the healthcare system including provider training related to mammography screening of obese women. PMID:19558307

  18. Breast cancer detection: radiologists’ performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Judy; Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Methods Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). Results True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Conclusion Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women. PMID:20632009

  19. Research iris serial images quality assessment method based on HVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-hui; Zhang, Chang-hai; Ming, Xing; Zhao, Yong-hua

    2006-01-01

    Iris recognition can be widely used in security and customs, and it provides superiority security than other human feature recognition such as fingerprint, face and so on. The iris image quality is crucial to recognition effect. Accordingly reliable image quality assessments are necessary for evaluating iris image quality. However, there haven't uniformly criterion to Image quality assessment. Image quality assessment have Objective and Subjective Evaluation methods, In practice, However Subjective Evaluation method is fussy and doesn't effective on iris recognition. Objective Evaluation method should be used in iris recognition. According to human visual system model (HVS) Multi-scale and selectivity characteristic, it presents a new iris Image quality assessment method. In the paper, ROI is found and wavelet transform zero-crossing is used to find Multi-scale edge, and Multi-scale fusion measure is used to assess iris image quality. In experiment, Objective and Subjective Evaluation methods are used to assess iris images. From the results, the method is effectively to iris image quality assessment.

  20. Limitations to adaptive optics image quality in rodent eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal image quality of rodent eyes is inferior to that of human eyes, despite the promise of greater numerical aperture. This paradox challenges several assumptions commonly made in AO imaging, assumptions which may be invalidated by the very high power and dioptric thickness of the rodent retina. We used optical modeling to compare the performance of rat and human eyes under conditions that tested the validity of these assumptions. Results showed that AO image quality in the human eye is robust to positioning errors of the AO corrector and to differences in imaging depth and wavelength compared to the wavefront beacon. In contrast, image quality in the rat eye declines sharply with each of these manipulations, especially when imaging off-axis. However, some latitude does exist to offset these manipulations against each other to produce good image quality.

  1. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  2. A method to measure paddle and detector pressures and footprints in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Peter; Szczepura, Katy; Darlington, Alison; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Compression is necessary in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation burden. Maximizing the amount of breast in contact with the image receptor (IR) is important. To achieve this, for the craniocaudal projection, there is no consensus within the literature regarding how the IR should be positioned relative to the inframammary fold (IMF). No information exists within the literature to describe how pressure balancing between IR and paddle, and IR breast footprint, might be optimized. This paper describes a novel method for measuring the respective pressures applied to the breast from the IR and the paddle and a method to simultaneously measure the breast footprints on the IR and the paddle. Methods: Using a deformable breast phantom and electronic pressure-sensitive mat, area and pressure readings were gathered from two mammography machines and four paddles at 60, 80, and 100 N with the IR positioned at -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2 cm relative to the IMF (60 combinations in total). Results: Paddle and IR footprints were calculated along with a uniformity index (UI). For all four paddle/machine/pressure combinations the greatest IR footprint was achieved at IMF +2 cm. The UI indicates that the best pressure/footprint balance is achieved at IMF +1 cm. Conclusions: The authors' method appears to be suited to measuring breast footprints and pressures on IR and paddle and a human female study is planned.

  3. A review of mammography test objects for the calibration of resolution, contrast, and exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Mandated and voluntary accreditation and quality control programs for mammography require the use of standardized mammography test objects. We evaluated eleven commercially available test objects and three prototype test objects, comparing them with respect to their resolution targets, contrast targets, and the dose they required when imaged by the same automatic exposure meter. Ion chamber and/or thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of exposure were made with each test object, while attenuation was measured for seven. Measurements of dosage using acrylic (5 test objects) and tissue equivalent epoxy (9 test objects) showed as much as a 400% variation in the radiation supplied by the same automatic exposure device when differences in thicknesses of test objects were normalized. Speck visibility was as dependent on the composition of the specks and of the surrounding material as on the size of the specks. Contrast targets were adequate in only three test objects. Optical density differences between images of a 4-cm-thick breast and of different test object materials, also 4 cm in thickness, exposed to the same radiation, imply that untested acrylic or epoxy resin materials should not used in the calibration of automatic exposure controls.

  4. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  5. Digital Mammography with a Mosaic of CCD Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); McAdoo, James A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A digital mammography device uses a mosaic of electronic digital imaging arrays to scan an x-ray image is discussed. The mosaic of arrays is repositioned several times to expose different portions of the image, until the entire image is scanned. The data generated by the arrays during each exposure is stored in a computer. After the final exposure, the computer combines data of the several partial images to produce a composite of the original x-ray image. An aperture plate is used to reduce scatter and the overall exposure of the patient to x-rays.

  6. Can pictorial images communicate the quality of pain successfully?

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Peter; Morley, Stephen; Stones, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is common and difficult for patients to communicate to health professionals. It may include neuropathic elements which require specialised treatment. A little used approach to communicating the quality of pain is through the use of images. This study aimed to test the ability of a set of 12 images depicting different sensory pain qualities to successfully communicate those qualities. Images were presented to 25 student nurses and 38 design students. Students were asked to write down words or phrases describing the quality of pain they felt was being communicated by each image. They were asked to provide as many or as few as occurred to them. The images were extremely heterogeneous in their ability to convey qualities of pain accurately. Only 2 of the 12 images were correctly interpreted by more than 70% of the sample. There was a significant difference between the two student groups, with nurses being significantly better at interpreting the images than the design students. Clearly, attention needs to be given not only to the content of images designed to depict the sensory qualities of pain but also to the differing audiences who may use them. Education, verbal ability, ethnicity and a multiplicity of other factors may influence the understanding and use of such images. Considerable work is needed to develop a set of images which is sufficiently culturally appropriate and effective for general use. PMID:26516574

  7. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  8. Improving the Quality of Imaging in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, C Craig; Castro, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is critical for the care of emergency department (ED) patients. However, much of the imaging performed for acute care today is overutilization, creating substantial cost without significant benefit. Further, the value of imaging is not easily defined, as imaging only affects outcomes indirectly, through interaction with treatment. Improving the quality, including appropriateness, of emergency imaging requires understanding of how imaging contributes to patient care. The six-tier efficacy hierarchy of Fryback and Thornbury enables understanding of the value of imaging on multiple levels, ranging from technical efficacy to medical decision-making and higher-level patient and societal outcomes. The imaging efficacy hierarchy also allows definition of imaging quality through the Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s quality domains of safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability and provides a foundation for quality improvement. In this article, the authors elucidate the Fryback and Thornbury framework to define the value of imaging in the ED and to relate emergency imaging to the IOM quality domains.

  9. Quaternion structural similarity: a new quality index for color images.

    PubMed

    Kolaman, Amir; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues for researchers developing image processing algorithms is image quality. Methodical quality evaluation, by showing images to several human observers, is slow, expensive, and highly subjective. On the other hand, a visual quality matrix (VQM) is a fast, cheap, and objective tool for evaluating image quality. Although most VQMs are good in predicting the quality of an image degraded by a single degradation, they poorly perform for a combination of two degradations. An example for such degradation is the color crosstalk (CTK) effect, which introduces blur with desaturation. CTK is expected to become a bigger issue in image quality as the industry moves toward smaller sensors. In this paper, we will develop a VQM that will be able to better evaluate the quality of an image degraded by a combined blur/desaturation degradation and perform as well as other VQMs on single degradations such as blur, compression, and noise. We show why standard scalar techniques are insufficient to measure a combined blur/desaturation degradation and explain why a vectorial approach is better suited. We introduce quaternion image processing (QIP), which is a true vectorial approach and has many uses in the fields of physics and engineering. Our new VQM is a vectorial expansion of structure similarity using QIP, which gave it its name-Quaternion Structural SIMilarity (QSSIM). We built a new database of a combined blur/desaturation degradation and conducted a quality survey with human subjects. An extensive comparison between QSSIM and other VQMs on several image quality databases-including our new database-shows the superiority of this new approach in predicting visual quality of color images.

  10. Slot scanning versus antiscatter grid in digital mammography: comparison of low-contrast performance using contrast-detail measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Geiser, William; Kappadath, Srinivas C.; Liu, Xinming; Wang, TianPeng; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.

    2004-05-01

    Slot scanning imaging techniques allow for effective scatter rejection without attenuating primary x-rays. The use of these techniques should generate better image quality for the same mean glandular dose (MGD) or a similar image quality for a lower MGD as compared to imaging techniques using an anti-scatter grid. In this study, we compared a slot scanning digital mammography system (SenoScan, Fisher Imaging Systems, Denver, CO) to a full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system used in conjunction with a 5:1 anti-scatter grid (SenoGraphe 2000D, General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Images of a contrast-detail phantom (University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands) were reviewed to measure the contrast-detail curves for both systems. These curves were measured at 100%, 71%, 49% and 33% of the reference mean glandular dose (MGD), as determined by photo-timing, for the Fisher system and 100% for the GE system. Soft-copy reading was performed on review workstations provided by the manufacturers. The correct observation ratios (CORs) were also computed and used to compare the performance of the two systems. The results showed that, based on the contrast-detail curves, the performance of the Fisher images, acquired at 100% and 71% of the reference MGD, was comparable to the GE images at 100% of the reference MGD. The CORs for Fisher images were 0.463 and 0.444 at 100% and 71% of the reference MGD, respectively, compared to 0.453 for the GE images at 100% of the reference MGD.

  11. International exchange activities with East Asian countries through mammography.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tokiko; Morimoto, Tadaoki; Horita, Katsuhei; Kimura, Chiaki; Okazaki, Masatoshi; Fukuda, Mamoru

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese NPO Central Committee on Quality Control of Mammographic Screening has initiated international exchange activities regarding quality control of mammographic screening with the concerned organizations in East Asian countries with the objective of contributing to reducing breast cancer mortality in the region. This paper describes the status of the international exchanges that are being carried out in various East Asian countries in relation to mammography and also discusses future aspects. PMID:19034615

  12. A new assessment method for image fusion quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liu; Jiang, Wanying; Li, Jing; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuming

    2013-03-01

    Image fusion quality assessment plays a critically important role in the field of medical imaging. To evaluate image fusion quality effectively, a lot of assessment methods have been proposed. Examples include mutual information (MI), root mean square error (RMSE), and universal image quality index (UIQI). These image fusion assessment methods could not reflect the human visual inspection effectively. To address this problem, we have proposed a novel image fusion assessment method which combines the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) with the regional mutual information in this paper. In this proposed method, the source medical images are firstly decomposed into different levels by the NSCT. Then the maximum NSCT coefficients of the decomposed directional images at each level are obtained to compute the regional mutual information (RMI). Finally, multi-channel RMI is computed by the weighted sum of the obtained RMI values at the various levels of NSCT. The advantage of the proposed method lies in the fact that the NSCT can represent image information using multidirections and multi-scales and therefore it conforms to the multi-channel characteristic of human visual system, leading to its outstanding image assessment performance. The experimental results using CT and MRI images demonstrate that the proposed assessment method outperforms such assessment methods as MI and UIQI based measure in evaluating image fusion quality and it can provide consistent results with human visual assessment.

  13. The effect of image sharpness on quantitative eye movement data and on image quality evaluation while viewing natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuori, Tero; Olkkonen, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study is to test both customer image quality rating (subjective image quality) and physical measurement of user behavior (eye movements tracking) to find customer satisfaction differences in imaging technologies. Methodological aim is to find out whether eye movements could be quantitatively used in image quality preference studies. In general, we want to map objective or physically measurable image quality to subjective evaluations and eye movement data. We conducted a series of image quality tests, in which the test subjects evaluated image quality while we recorded their eye movements. Results show that eye movement parameters consistently change according to the instructions given to the user, and according to physical image quality, e.g. saccade duration increased with increasing blur. Results indicate that eye movement tracking could be used to differentiate image quality evaluation strategies that the users have. Results also show that eye movements would help mapping between technological and subjective image quality. Furthermore, these results give some empirical emphasis to top-down perception processes in image quality perception and evaluation by showing differences between perceptual processes in situations when cognitive task varies.

  14. Image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, E. K.; Hammill, H. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new technique for image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation was developed. It was entirely objective, quantitative, and general, and should prove useful in system design and quality control. The technique and its application to determination of quality control procedures for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite NASA Data Processing Facility are described.

  15. Is the supply of mammography machines outstripping need and demand? An economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, M L; Kessler, L G; Rueter, F G

    1990-10-01

    The number of dedicated mammography machines installed in the United States has grown explosively. It is estimated that almost 10,000 machines will be installed by 1990, whereas the projected demand for screening mammography will require only approximately 2,600 machines, if the machines are used in a moderately efficient manner. The excess supply of mammography resources raises concern from an economic perspective for several reasons. First, such a condition means that health care resources are being used inefficiently. Second, the low average utilization rate of mammography equipment implied by these results necessitates charging a high price-over $100, on average-to cover costs. This price is above the $50 usually associated with low-cost screening mammography programs, and it may impede a desirable public health trend to increase use of mammography screening. Third, the existence of many mammography facilities operating at low capacity levels is inefficient from a health systems perspective, increasing the cost of quality assurance and medical record keeping. The current condition of excess supply is probably unsustainable over the long term. PMID:2393209

  16. Testing scanners for the quality of output images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepcion, Vicente P.; Nadel, Lawrence D.; D'Amato, Donald P.

    1995-01-01

    Document scanning is the means through which documents are converted to their digital image representation for electronic storage or distribution. Among the types of documents being scanned by government agencies are tax forms, patent documents, office correspondence, mail pieces, engineering drawings, microfilm, archived historical papers, and fingerprint cards. Increasingly, the resulting digital images are used as the input for further automated processing including: conversion to a full-text-searchable representation via machine printed or handwritten (optical) character recognition (OCR), postal zone identification, raster-to-vector conversion, and fingerprint matching. These diverse document images may be bi-tonal, gray scale, or color. Spatial sampling frequencies range from about 200 pixels per inch to over 1,000. The quality of the digital images can have a major effect on the accuracy and speed of any subsequent automated processing, as well as on any human-based processing which may be required. During imaging system design, there is, therefore, a need to specify the criteria by which image quality will be judged and, prior to system acceptance, to measure the quality of images produced. Unfortunately, there are few, if any, agreed-upon techniques for measuring document image quality objectively. In the output images, it is difficult to distinguish image degradation caused by the poor quality of the input paper or microfilm from that caused by the scanning system. We propose several document image quality criteria and have developed techniques for their measurement. These criteria include spatial resolution, geometric image accuracy, (distortion), gray scale resolution and linearity, and temporal and spatial uniformity. The measurement of these criteria requires scanning one or more test targets along with computer-based analyses of the test target images.

  17. No-reference visual quality assessment for image inpainting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Frantc, V. A.; Marchuk, V. I.; Sherstobitov, A. I.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-03-01

    Inpainting has received a lot of attention in recent years and quality assessment is an important task to evaluate different image reconstruction approaches. In many cases inpainting methods introduce a blur in sharp transitions in image and image contours in the recovery of large areas with missing pixels and often fail to recover curvy boundary edges. Quantitative metrics of inpainting results currently do not exist and researchers use human comparisons to evaluate their methodologies and techniques. Most objective quality assessment methods rely on a reference image, which is often not available in inpainting applications. Usually researchers use subjective quality assessment by human observers. It is difficult and time consuming procedure. This paper focuses on a machine learning approach for no-reference visual quality assessment for image inpainting based on the human visual property. Our method is based on observation that Local Binary Patterns well describe local structural information of the image. We use a support vector regression learned on assessed by human images to predict perceived quality of inpainted images. We demonstrate how our predicted quality value correlates with qualitative opinion in a human observer study. Results are shown on a human-scored dataset for different inpainting methods.

  18. WE-A-12A-01: Medical Physics 1.0 to 2.0, Session 2: Radiography, Mammography and Fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gingold, E; Karellas, A; Strauss, K

    2014-06-15

    Medical Physics 2.0 is a bold vision for an existential transition of clinical imaging physics in face of the new realities of value-based and evidencebased medicine, comparative effectiveness, and meaningful use. It speaks to how clinical imaging physics can expand beyond traditional insular models of inspection and acceptance testing, oriented toward compliance, towards team-based models of operational engagement, prospective definition and assurance of effective use, and retrospective evaluation of clinical performance. Organized into four sessions of the AAPM, this particular session focuses on three specific modalities as outlined below. Radiography 2.0: The development of electronic capture in recent years has changed the landscape and spurred reinvestment by healthcare providers. The radiography presentation will explore how the diagnostic medical physicist must adapt to these changes to support radiographic imaging, and how she/he can add value in radiography practice over the next 5-10 years. Topics of discussion include new metrology of evaluation, new models of clinical engagement, and effective integration of new technologies. Mammography 2.0: Mammography has been an interesting testing ground on the effectiveness of close involvement of medical physicists with equipment in the past twenty years. The outcomes have clearly shown major improvements in image quality and significant reduction in the average glandular dose. However, the medical physicist's role in mammography has been largely focused to annual surveys and with limited input on operational issues with image artifacts, optimal mammographic acquisition mode and problems with image quality. This mammography presentation will address why and how medical physicists must be prepared to address the new models of practice that include new metrics of performance and the integration of new technologies (DBT, syncretized mammograms, contrast mammography, breast CT) into clinical practice. Fluoroscopy 2

  19. Phase mammography - a new technique for breast investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, Viktor N.; Beliaevskaya, Elena A.; Brianskaya, Alla P.; Merkurieva, Raisa D.

    1998-09-01

    A new phase radiography technique for investigation and diagnosis of neoplasms in breast tissue is proposed. Forty-four mammography samples with adenocarcinoma that had been prepared after mastectomy were tested in a new phase radiography device. It was shown that the phase images manifest the changes in parenchyma structure due to malignancy and microcalcifications up to images/0031-9155/43/9/009/img6.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> in size. Results obtained were verified by histological examination. A contrast of the phase images of small microcalcifications and distortions of the stroma architecture ranges up to 40-60%; spatial resolution is about images/0031-9155/43/9/009/img7.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>. The proposed technique offers outstanding possibilities for digital mammography. The small and large details of structure manifest themselves with practically the same contrast. Phase images differ from those obtained in mammography and many details still require further decoding.

  20. Determination of Tube Output (kVp) and Exposure Mode for Breast Phantom of Various Thicknesses/Glandularity for Digital Mammography

    PubMed Central

    IZDIHAR, Kamal; KANAGA, Kumari Chelliah; KRISHNAPILLAI, Vijayalakshimi; SULAIMAN, Tamanang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimisation of average glandular dose (AGD) for two-dimensional (2D) mammography is important, as imaging using ionizing radiation has the probability to induce cancer resulting from stochastic effects. This study aims to observe the effects of kVp, anode/filter material, and exposure mode on the dose and image quality of 2D mammography. Methods: This experimental study was conducted using full-field digital mammography. The entrance surface air kerma was determined using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 100H and ionization chamber (IC) on three types of Computerized Imaging Reference System (CIRS) phantom with 50/50, 30/70, and 20/80 breast glandularity, respectively, in the auto-time mode and auto-filter mode. The Euref protocol was used to calculate the AGD while the image quality was evaluated using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), figure of merit (FOM), and image quality figure (IQF). Results: It is shown that AGD values in the auto-time mode did not decrease significantly with the increasing tube voltage of the silver filter (r = −0.187, P > 0.05) and rhodium filter (r = −0.131, P > 0.05) for all the phantoms. The general linear model showed that AGD for all phantoms had a significant effect between different exposure factors [F (6,12.3) = 4.48 and mode of exposure F (1,86) = 4.17, P < 0.05, respectively] but there is no significant difference between the different anode/filter combination [F (1,4) = 0.571]. Conclusion: In summary, the 28, 29, and 31 kVp are the optimum kVp for 50%, 30%, and 20% breast glandularity, respectively. Besides the auto-filter mode is suitable for 50%, 30%, and 20% breast glandularity because it is automatic, faster, and may avoid error done by the operator. PMID:25892949

  1. Implications of Overdiagnosis: Impact on Screening Mammography Practices

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Elizabeth; Feig, Stephen A.; Drexler, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review article explores the issue of overdiagnosis in screening mammography. Overdiagnosis is the screen detection of a breast cancer, histologically confirmed, that might not otherwise become clinically apparent during the lifetime of the patient. While screening mammography is an imperfect tool, it remains the best tool we have to diagnose breast cancer early, before a patient is symptomatic and at a time when chances of survival and options for treatment are most favorable. In 2015, an estimated 231,840 new cases of breast cancer (excluding ductal carcinoma in situ) will be diagnosed in the United States, and some 40,290 women will die. Despite these data, screening mammography for women ages 40–69 has contributed to a substantial reduction in breast cancer mortality, and organized screening programs have led to a shift from late-stage diagnosis to early-stage detection. Current estimates of overdiagnosis in screening mammography vary widely, from 0% to upwards of 30% of diagnosed cancers. This range reflects the fact that measuring overdiagnosis is not a straightforward calculation, but usually one based on different sets of assumptions and often biased by methodological flaws. The recent development of tomosynthesis, which creates high-resolution, three-dimensional images, has increased breast cancer detection while reducing false recalls. Because the greatest harm of overdiagnosis is overtreatment, the key goal should not be less diagnosis but better treatment decision tools. (Population Health Management 2015;18:S3–S11) PMID:26414384

  2. Implications of Overdiagnosis: Impact on Screening Mammography Practices.

    PubMed

    Morris, Elizabeth; Feig, Stephen A; Drexler, Madeline; Lehman, Constance

    2015-09-01

    This review article explores the issue of overdiagnosis in screening mammography. Overdiagnosis is the screen detection of a breast cancer, histologically confirmed, that might not otherwise become clinically apparent during the lifetime of the patient. While screening mammography is an imperfect tool, it remains the best tool we have to diagnose breast cancer early, before a patient is symptomatic and at a time when chances of survival and options for treatment are most favorable. In 2015, an estimated 231,840 new cases of breast cancer (excluding ductal carcinoma in situ) will be diagnosed in the United States, and some 40,290 women will die. Despite these data, screening mammography for women ages 40-69 has contributed to a substantial reduction in breast cancer mortality, and organized screening programs have led to a shift from late-stage diagnosis to early-stage detection. Current estimates of overdiagnosis in screening mammography vary widely, from 0% to upwards of 30% of diagnosed cancers. This range reflects the fact that measuring overdiagnosis is not a straightforward calculation, but usually one based on different sets of assumptions and often biased by methodological flaws. The recent development of tomosynthesis, which creates high-resolution, three-dimensional images, has increased breast cancer detection while reducing false recalls. Because the greatest harm of overdiagnosis is overtreatment, the key goal should not be less diagnosis but better treatment decision tools. (Population Health Management 2015;18:S3-S11).

  3. Image quality assessment by preprocessing and full reference model combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, S.; Ciocca, G.; Marini, F.; Schettini, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on full-reference image quality assessment and presents different computational strategies aimed to improve the robustness and accuracy of some well known and widely used state of the art models, namely the Structural Similarity approach (SSIM) by Wang and Bovik and the S-CIELAB spatial-color model by Zhang and Wandell. We investigate the hypothesis that combining error images with a visual attention model could allow a better fit of the psycho-visual data of the LIVE Image Quality assessment Database Release 2. We show that the proposed quality assessment metric better correlates with the experimental data.

  4. Method and tool for generating and managing image quality allocations through the design and development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Andrew W.; Olson, Craig; Theisen, Michael J.; Addiego, Chris J.; Hutchins, Tiffany G.; Goodman, Timothy D.

    2016-05-01

    Performance models for infrared imaging systems require image quality parameters; optical design engineers need image quality design goals; systems engineers develop image quality allocations to test imaging systems against. It is a challenge to maintain consistency and traceability amongst the various expressions of image quality. We present a method and parametric tool for generating and managing expressions of image quality during the system modeling, requirements specification, design, and testing phases of an imaging system design and development project.

  5. Experience with a proposed teleradiology system for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Emilie T.; Mitchell, Robert J.; Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Dudding, Kathryn E.

    1995-05-01

    Teleradiology offers significant improvement in efficiency and effectiveness over current practices in traditional film/screen-based diagnosis. In the context of digital mammography, the increasing number of women who need to be screened for breast cancer, including those in remote rural regions, make the advantages of teleradiology especially attractive for digital mammography. At the same time, the size and resolution of digital mammograms are among the most challenging to support in a cost effective teleradiology system. This paper describes a teleradiology architecture developed for use with digital mammography by GE Corporate Research and Development in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital under National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH) grant number R01 CA60246-01. Experience with a testbed prototype is described. The telemammography architecture is intended to consist of a main mammography diagnostic site serving several remote screening sites. As patient exams become available, they are forwarded by an image server to the diagnostic site over a WAN communications link. A radiologist at the diagnostic site views a patient exam as it arrives, interprets it, and then relays a report back to the technician at the remote site. A secondary future scenario consists of mobile units which forward images to a remote site, which then forwards them to the main diagnostic site. The testbed architecture is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, created by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). A specification of vendor-independent data formats and data transfer services for digital medical images, DICOM specifies a protocol suite starting at the application layer downward, including the TCP/IP layers. The current DICOM definition does not provide an information element that is specifically tailored to mammography, so we have used the DICOM secondary capture data format

  6. Feature maps driven no-reference image quality prediction of authentically distorted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiyaram, Deepti; Bovik, Alan C.

    2015-03-01

    Current blind image quality prediction models rely on benchmark databases comprised of singly and synthetically distorted images, thereby learning image features that are only adequate to predict human perceived visual quality on such inauthentic distortions. However, real world images often contain complex mixtures of multiple distortions. Rather than a) discounting the effect of these mixtures of distortions on an image's perceptual quality and considering only the dominant distortion or b) using features that are only proven to be efficient for singly distorted images, we deeply study the natural scene statistics of authentically distorted images, in different color spaces and transform domains. We propose a feature-maps-driven statistical approach which avoids any latent assumptions about the type of distortion(s) contained in an image, and focuses instead on modeling the remarkable consistencies in the scene statistics of real world images in the absence of distortions. We design a deep belief network that takes model-based statistical image features derived from a very large database of authentically distorted images as input and discovers good feature representations by generalizing over different distortion types, mixtures, and severities, which are later used to learn a regressor for quality prediction. We demonstrate the remarkable competence of our features for improving automatic perceptual quality prediction on a benchmark database and on the newly designed LIVE Authentic Image Quality Challenge Database and show that our approach of combining robust statistical features and the deep belief network dramatically outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  7. Interplay between JPEG-2000 image coding and quality estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Guilherme O.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2013-03-01

    Image quality and utility estimators aspire to quantify the perceptual resemblance and the usefulness of a distorted image when compared to a reference natural image, respectively. Image-coders, such as JPEG-2000, traditionally aspire to allocate the available bits to maximize the perceptual resemblance of the compressed image when compared to a reference uncompressed natural image. Specifically, this can be accomplished by allocating the available bits to minimize the overall distortion, as computed by a given quality estimator. This paper applies five image quality and utility estimators, SSIM, VIF, MSE, NICE and GMSE, within a JPEG-2000 encoder for rate-distortion optimization to obtain new insights on how to improve JPEG-2000 image coding for quality and utility applications, as well as to improve the understanding about the quality and utility estimators used in this work. This work develops a rate-allocation algorithm for arbitrary quality and utility estimators within the Post- Compression Rate-Distortion Optimization (PCRD-opt) framework in JPEG-2000 image coding. Performance of the JPEG-2000 image coder when used with a variety of utility and quality estimators is then assessed. The estimators fall into two broad classes, magnitude-dependent (MSE, GMSE and NICE) and magnitudeindependent (SSIM and VIF). They further differ on their use of the low-frequency image content in computing their estimates. The impact of these computational differences is analyzed across a range of images and bit rates. In general, performance of the JPEG-2000 coder below 1.6 bits/pixel with any of these estimators is highly content dependent, with the most relevant content being the amount of texture in an image and whether the strongest gradients in an image correspond to the main contours of the scene. Above 1.6 bits/pixel, all estimators produce visually equivalent images. As a result, the MSE estimator provides the most consistent performance across all images, while specific

  8. Computer-Assisted Mammography Feedback Program (CAMFP): An Electronic Tool for Continuing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nicole; Longton, Gary M; Crowe, Andrea D; Drucker, Mariann J; Lehman, Constance D; Peacock, Susan; Lowe, Kimberly A; Zeliadt, Steve B; Gaul, Marcia A

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to develop and evaluate software to support a computer assisted mammography feedback program (CAMFP) to be used for continuing medical education (CME). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five radiologists from our region signed consent to participate in an IRB-approved film-reading study. The radiologists primarily assessed digitized mammograms and received feedback in 5 film interpretation sessions. A bivariate analysis was used to evaluate the joint effects of the training on sensitivity and specificity, and the effects of image quality on reading performance were explored. RESULTS: Interpretation was influenced by the CAMFP intervention: Sensitivity increased (Δ sensitivity = 0.086, p <0.001) and specificity decreased (Δ specificity = −0.057, p=0.04). Variability in interpretation among radiologists also decreased after the training sessions (p = 0.035). CONCLUSION: The CAMFP intervention improved sensitivity and decreased variability among radiologist's interpretations. Although this improvement was partially offset by decreased specificity, the program is potentially useful as a component of continuing medical education of radiologists. Dissemination via the web may be possible using digital mammography. PMID:17707310

  9. A comparison of the performance of new screen-film and digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Gutierrez, D.; Castella, C.; Lepori, D.; Verdun, F. R.

    2006-03-01

    This work compares the detector performances of the recent Kodak Min-R EV 190/Min-R EV and current Kodak Min-R 2190/Min-R 2000 mammography screen-film combinations with the Kodak CR 850M system using the new EHR-M and standard HR plates. Basic image quality parameters (MTF, NNPS and DQE) were evaluated according to ISO 9236-3 conditions (i.e. 28 kV; Mo/Mo; HVL = 0.64 mm eq. Al) at an entrance air kerma level of 60 μGy. Compared with the Min-R 2000, the Kodak Min-R EV screen-film system has a higher contrast and an intrinsically lower noise level, leading to a better DQE. Due to a lower noise level, the new EHR-M plate improves the DQE of the CR system, in comparison with the use of the standard HR plate (30 % improvement) in a mammography cassette. Compared with the CR plates, screen-film systems still permit to resolve finer details and have a significantly higher DQE for all spatial frequencies.

  10. Perceived no reference image quality measurement for chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Anupama B.; Khambete, Madhuri

    2016-03-01

    Today there is need for no reference (NR) objective perceived image quality measurement techniques as conducting subjective experiments and making reference image available is a very difficult task. Very few NR perceived image quality measurement algorithms are available for color distortions like chromatic aberration (CA), color quantization with dither, and color saturation. We proposed NR image quality assessment (NR-IQA) algorithms for images distorted with CA. CA is mostly observed in images taken with digital cameras, having higher sensor resolution with inexpensive lenses. We compared our metric performance with two state-of-the-art NR blur techniques, one full reference IQA technique and three general-purpose NR-IQA techniques, although they are not tailored for CA. We used a CA dataset in the TID-2013 color image database to evaluate performance. Proposed algorithms give comparable performance with state-of-the-art techniques in terms of performance parameters and outperform them in terms of monotonicity and computational complexity. We have also discovered that the proposed CA algorithm best predicts perceived image quality of images distorted with realistic CA.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1715 - Full-field digital mammography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography acquisition software, full-field digital image receptor, acquisition workstation, automatic exposure control, image processing and reconstruction programs, patient and equipment supports,...

  13. Dosimetry and image quality assessment in a direct radiography system

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Paixão, Lucas; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mean glandular dose with a solid state detector and the image quality in a direct radiography system, utilizing phantoms. Materials and Methods Irradiations were performed with automatic exposure control and polymethyl methacrylate slabs with different thicknesses to calculate glandular dose values. The image quality was evaluated by means of the structures visualized on the images of the phantoms. Results Considering the uncertainty of the measurements, the mean glandular dose results are in agreement with the values provided by the equipment and with internationally adopted reference levels. Results obtained from images of the phantoms were in agreement with the reference values. Conclusion The present study contributes to verify the equipment conformity as regards dose values and image quality. PMID:25741119

  14. Image quality evaluation and control of computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Uetake, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    Image quality of the computer-generated holograms are usually evaluated subjectively. For example, the re- constructed image from the hologram is compared with other holograms, or evaluated by the double-stimulus impairment scale method to compare with the original image. This paper proposes an objective image quality evaluation of a computer-generated hologram by evaluating both diffraction efficiency and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Theory and numerical experimental results are shown on Fourier transform transmission hologram of both amplitude and phase modulation. Results without the optimized random phase show that the amplitude transmission hologram gives better peak signal-to noise ratio, but the phase transmission hologram provides about 10 times higher diffraction efficiency to the amplitude type. As an optimized phase hologram, Kinoform is evaluated. In addition, we investigate to control image quality by non-linear operation.

  15. TU-A-18C-01: ACR Accreditation Updates in CT, Ultrasound, Mammography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Berns, E; Hangiandreou, N; McNitt-Gray, M

    2014-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, the ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound, and computed tomography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program. To understand the new requirements of the ACR ultrasound accreditation program, and roles the physicist can play in annual equipment surveys and setting up and supervising the routine QC program. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process.

  16. Breast Cancer and Mammography: Summary of the Educational Impact of a Low-Cost Mammography Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Louise S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A mammography public education program which used newspaper press releases, local talk shows, news segments, and announcements, flyers, advertisements, and presentations to companies and select populations increased public awareness and decreased misconceptions about mammography. (CB)

  17. Incorporating mobile mammography units into primary care: focus group interviews among inner-city health center patients.

    PubMed

    Skinner, C S; Zerr, A D; Damson, R L

    1995-06-01

    Mammography screening is underutilized, especially among women of lower socioeconomic status (SES). Mobile mammography units reduce cost and patient burden of mammography, and therefore might enhance screening rates among underserved populations. Few studies have explored factors associated with the acceptability of mobile mammography; none have targeted low-SES women. To explore these issues, we conducted focus group interviews in five university-affiliated urban primary-care clinics. The forty-three participants were 74% African-American, ranged in age from 40 to 70 years and most (67%) had household incomes below $15,000. A trained moderator led the groups of eight to 12 women through standardized, open-end interview questions exploring perceptions of mobile mammography. Findings suggest mammography vans are acceptable under only certain circumstances, including advance notice and assurance of privacy and quality. Convenience was important; 53% related being more likely to have mammograms if scheduled in conjunction with primary-care visits. Participants felt strongly that vans were inappropriate for public forums such as shopping centers. Association with primary-care health centers seemed to legitimize mammography vans and to allay concerns. If mammography screening is to become more widespread among low-income populations, these exploratory findings must be addressed in research and intervention development.

  18. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:25086548

  19. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  20. Digital Mammography in Young Women: Is a Single View Sufficient?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Single view mammography may be a less time consuming, more comfortable and radiation reduced alternative for young women, but there are no studies examining this approach after the implementation of digital mammography into clinical practice. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all mammographies performed in women younger than 40 years during a 24 month period. The sample consisted of 109 women with 212 examined breasts. All patients initially received standard two- view mammography. In the study setting the MLO- views were read by a single viewer and compared to a composite reference standard. Results In this sample 7 malignant findings were present and the review of the MLO-view detected 6 of them (85%). In patients with dense breasts 4 out of 5 malignant findings were found on the single-view (sensitivity 80%) and all 2 malignant findings were detected in patients with low breast density (sensitivity 100%). There were 7 false positive findings (3.3%). i.e. in total 8 out of 212 examined breasts were therefore misinterpreted (3.8%). Conclusion Single view digital mammography detects the vast majority of malignant findings, especially in low density breast tissue and the rate of false-positive findings is within acceptable limits. Therefore this approach may be used in different scenarios (for example in increasing patient throughput, in resource poor settings, reducing radiation burden in the young or in combination with ultrasound to use the strengths of both methods). More research on this topic is needed to establish its potential role in breast imaging. PMID:27134963

  1. Applying image quality in cell phone cameras: lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Donald; Goma, Sergio R.; Aleksic, Milivoje

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the framework used in one of the pilot studies run under the I3A CPIQ initiative to quantify overall image quality in cell-phone cameras. The framework is based on a multivariate formalism which tries to predict overall image quality from individual image quality attributes and was validated in a CPIQ pilot program. The pilot study focuses on image quality distortions introduced in the optical path of a cell-phone camera, which may or may not be corrected in the image processing path. The assumption is that the captured image used is JPEG compressed and the cellphone camera is set to 'auto' mode. As the used framework requires that the individual attributes to be relatively perceptually orthogonal, in the pilot study, the attributes used are lens geometric distortion (LGD) and lateral chromatic aberrations (LCA). The goal of this paper is to present the framework of this pilot project starting with the definition of the individual attributes, up to their quantification in JNDs of quality, a requirement of the multivariate formalism, therefore both objective and subjective evaluations were used. A major distinction in the objective part from the 'DSC imaging world' is that the LCA/LGD distortions found in cell-phone cameras, rarely exhibit radial behavior, therefore a radial mapping/modeling cannot be used in this case.

  2. Breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pak, Fatemeh; Kanan, Hamidreza Rashidy; Alikhassi, Afsaneh

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most perilous diseases among women. Breast screening is a method of detecting breast cancer at a very early stage which can reduce the mortality rate. Mammography is a standard method for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed for breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution (SR). The presented algorithm includes three main parts including pre-processing, feature extraction and classification. In the pre-processing stage, after determining the region of interest (ROI) by an automatic technique, the quality of image is improved using NSCT and SR algorithm. In the feature extraction part, several features of the image components are extracted and skewness of each feature is calculated. Finally, AdaBoost algorithm is used to classify and determine the probability of benign and malign disease. The obtained results on Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) database indicate the significant performance and superiority of the proposed method in comparison with the state of the art approaches. According to the obtained results, the proposed technique achieves 91.43% and 6.42% as a mean accuracy and FPR, respectively.

  3. Perceived quality of wood images influenced by the skewness of image histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Shigehito; Mizokami, Yoko; Yaguchi, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    The shape of image luminance histograms is related to material perception. We investigated how the luminance histogram contributed to improvements in the perceived quality of wood images by examining various natural wood and adhesive vinyl sheets with printed wood grain. In the first experiment, we visually evaluated the perceived quality of wood samples. In addition, we measured the colorimetric parameters of the wood samples and calculated statistics of image luminance. The relationship between visual evaluation scores and image statistics suggested that skewness and kurtosis affected the perceived quality of wood. In the second experiment, we evaluated the perceived quality of wood images with altered luminance skewness and kurtosis using a paired comparison method. Our result suggests that wood images are more realistic if the skewness of the luminance histogram is slightly negative.

  4. A feature-enriched completely blind image quality evaluator.

    PubMed

    Lin Zhang; Lei Zhang; Bovik, Alan C

    2015-08-01

    Existing blind image quality assessment (BIQA) methods are mostly opinion-aware. They learn regression models from training images with associated human subjective scores to predict the perceptual quality of test images. Such opinion-aware methods, however, require a large amount of training samples with associated human subjective scores and of a variety of distortion types. The BIQA models learned by opinion-aware methods often have weak generalization capability, hereby limiting their usability in practice. By comparison, opinion-unaware methods do not need human subjective scores for training, and thus have greater potential for good generalization capability. Unfortunately, thus far no opinion-unaware BIQA method has shown consistently better quality prediction accuracy than the opinion-aware methods. Here, we aim to develop an opinion-unaware BIQA method that can compete with, and perhaps outperform, the existing opinion-aware methods. By integrating the features of natural image statistics derived from multiple cues, we learn a multivariate Gaussian model of image patches from a collection of pristine natural images. Using the learned multivariate Gaussian model, a Bhattacharyya-like distance is used to measure the quality of each image patch, and then an overall quality score is obtained by average pooling. The proposed BIQA method does not need any distorted sample images nor subjective quality scores for training, yet extensive experiments demonstrate its superior quality-prediction performance to the state-of-the-art opinion-aware BIQA methods. The MATLAB source code of our algorithm is publicly available at www.comp.polyu.edu.hk/~cslzhang/IQA/ILNIQE/ILNIQE.htm.

  5. A feature-enriched completely blind image quality evaluator.

    PubMed

    Lin Zhang; Lei Zhang; Bovik, Alan C

    2015-08-01

    Existing blind image quality assessment (BIQA) methods are mostly opinion-aware. They learn regression models from training images with associated human subjective scores to predict the perceptual quality of test images. Such opinion-aware methods, however, require a large amount of training samples with associated human subjective scores and of a variety of distortion types. The BIQA models learned by opinion-aware methods often have weak generalization capability, hereby limiting their usability in practice. By comparison, opinion-unaware methods do not need human subjective scores for training, and thus have greater potential for good generalization capability. Unfortunately, thus far no opinion-unaware BIQA method has shown consistently better quality prediction accuracy than the opinion-aware methods. Here, we aim to develop an opinion-unaware BIQA method that can compete with, and perhaps outperform, the existing opinion-aware methods. By integrating the features of natural image statistics derived from multiple cues, we learn a multivariate Gaussian model of image patches from a collection of pristine natural images. Using the learned multivariate Gaussian model, a Bhattacharyya-like distance is used to measure the quality of each image patch, and then an overall quality score is obtained by average pooling. The proposed BIQA method does not need any distorted sample images nor subjective quality scores for training, yet extensive experiments demonstrate its superior quality-prediction performance to the state-of-the-art opinion-aware BIQA methods. The MATLAB source code of our algorithm is publicly available at www.comp.polyu.edu.hk/~cslzhang/IQA/ILNIQE/ILNIQE.htm. PMID:25915960

  6. Patient Care, Communication, and Safety in the Mammography Suite.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Leisa

    2016-09-01

    Producing high-quality mammograms requires excellent technical skills along with exemplary communication. Mammographers must be able to address differences in patients' mental states, body habitus, and physical ability to obtain an optimal examination. In addition, every mammographer must practice consistently with patient safety, care, and satisfaction in mind. This article discusses verbal and nonverbal communication strategies, barriers to communication, and the care and safety of patients in the mammography suite who present special challenges. PMID:27601710

  7. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  8. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  9. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  10. Physical characteristics of five clinical systems for digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzari, B.; Belli, G.; Gori, C.; Rosselli Del Turco, M.

    2007-07-15

    our quantitative analysis demonstrated a higher DQE for direct conversion technology when compared to that of the indirect conversion. The NEQ behavior of each system can be exploited to select the optimum exposure level set in clinical practice to ensure minimum patient dose though adequate image quality. The detailed results of the physical characterization of the digital systems reported in this work allow the quantitative comparison of different technologies as well as the definition of reference values for subsequent quality control tests. The method developed in this work is suitable to be reproduced in any medical physics department for the previously described goals.

  11. Optimization and image quality assessment of the alpha-image reconstruction algorithm: iterative reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Faby, Sebastian; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of CT images with low noise and highest spatial resolution is a challenging task. Usually, a trade-off between at least these two demands has to be found or several reconstructions with mutually exclusive properties, i.e. either low noise or high spatial resolution, have to be performed. Iterative reconstruction methods might be suitable tools to overcome these limitations and provide images of highest diagnostic quality with formerly mutually exclusive image properties. While image quality metrics like the modulation transfer function (MTF) or the point spread function (PSF) are well-defined in case of standard reconstructions, e.g. filtered backprojection, the iterative algorithms lack these metrics. To overcome this issue alternate methodologies like the model observers have been proposed recently to allow a quantification of a usually task-dependent image quality metric.1 As an alternative we recently proposed an iterative reconstruction method, the alpha-image reconstruction (AIR), providing well-defined image quality metrics on a per-voxel basis.2 In particular, the AIR algorithm seeks to find weighting images, the alpha-images, that are used to blend between basis images with mutually exclusive image properties. The result is an image with highest diagnostic quality that provides a high spatial resolution and a low noise level. As the estimation of the alpha-images is computationally demanding we herein aim at optimizing this process and highlight the favorable properties of AIR using patient measurements.

  12. Pre-analytic process control: projecting a quality image.

    PubMed

    Serafin, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Within the health-care system, the term "ancillary department" often describes the laboratory. Thus, laboratories may find it difficult to define their image and with it, customer perception of department quality. Regulatory requirements give laboratories who so desire an elegant way to address image and perception issues--a comprehensive pre-analytic system solution. Since large laboratories use such systems--laboratory service manuals--I describe and illustrate the process for the benefit of smaller facilities. There exist resources to help even small laboratories produce a professional service manual--an elegant solution to image and customer perception of quality. PMID:17005095

  13. The effect of image quality and forensic expertise in facial image comparisons.

    PubMed

    Norell, Kristin; Läthén, Klas Brorsson; Bergström, Peter; Rice, Allyson; Natu, Vaidehi; O'Toole, Alice

    2015-03-01

    Images of perpetrators in surveillance video footage are often used as evidence in court. In this study, identification accuracy was compared for forensic experts and untrained persons in facial image comparisons as well as the impact of image quality. Participants viewed thirty image pairs and were asked to rate the level of support garnered from their observations for concluding whether or not the two images showed the same person. Forensic experts reached their conclusions with significantly fewer errors than did untrained participants. They were also better than novices at determining when two high-quality images depicted the same person. Notably, lower image quality led to more careful conclusions by experts, but not for untrained participants. In summary, the untrained participants had more false negatives and false positives than experts, which in the latter case could lead to a higher risk of an innocent person being convicted for an untrained witness. PMID:25537273

  14. Improving high resolution retinal image quality using speckle illumination HiLo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Retinal image quality from flood illumination adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes is adversely affected by out-of-focus light scatter due to the lack of confocality. This effect is more pronounced in small eyes, such as that of rodents, because the requisite high optical power confers a large dioptric thickness to the retina. A recently-developed structured illumination microscopy (SIM) technique called HiLo imaging has been shown to reduce the effect of out-of-focus light scatter in flood illumination microscopes and produce pseudo-confocal images with significantly improved image quality. In this work, we adopted the HiLo technique to a flood AO ophthalmoscope and performed AO imaging in both (physical) model and live rat eyes. The improvement in image quality from HiLo imaging is shown both qualitatively and quantitatively by using spatial spectral analysis. PMID:25136486

  15. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  16. Recent advances in breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Newman, J

    1999-01-01

    Mammography is the best technique currently available for early detection of breast cancer, but it has limitations. Several new techniques are under investigation that may provide valuable complementary images. This article discusses some of the most promising adjuncts to film-screen mammography, including digital mammography, ultrasound of the breast, breast MR, scintimammography and sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy.

  17. Peripheral Aberrations and Image Quality for Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Contact lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes and rigid contact lenses reduced sphero-cylindrical image blur on the peripheral retina, but their effect on higher order aberrations and overall optical quality of the eye in the peripheral visual field is still unknown. The purpose of our study was to evaluate peripheral wavefront aberrations and image quality across the visual field before and after contact lens correction. Methods A commercial Hartmann-Shack aberrometer was used to measure ocular wavefront errors in 5° steps out to 30° of eccentricity along the horizontal meridian in uncorrected eyes and when the same eyes are corrected with soft or rigid contact lenses. Wavefront aberrations and image quality were determined for the full elliptical pupil encountered in off-axis measurements. Results Ocular higher-order aberrations increase away from fovea in the uncorrected eye. Third-order aberrations are larger and increase faster with eccentricity compared to the other higher-order aberrations. Contact lenses increase all higher-order aberrations except 3rd-order Zernike terms. Nevertheless, a net increase in image quality across the horizontal visual field for objects located at the foveal far point is achieved with rigid lenses, whereas soft contact lenses reduce image quality. Conclusions Second order aberrations limit image quality more than higher-order aberrations in the periphery. Although second-order aberrations are reduced by contact lenses, the resulting gain in image quality is partially offset by increased amounts of higher-order aberrations. To fully realize the benefits of correcting higher-order aberrations in the peripheral field requires improved correction of second-order aberrations as well. PMID:21873925

  18. Thematic Mapper image quality: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Card, D. H.; Hlavka, C. A.; Likens, W. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on images analyzed so far, the band to band registration accuracy of the thematic mapper is very good. For bands within the same focal plane, the mean misregistrations are well within the specification, 0.2 pixels. For bands between the cooled and uncooled focal planes, there is a consistent mean misregistration of 0.5 pixels along-scan and 0.2-0.3 pixels across-scan. It exceeds the permitted 0.3 pixels for registration of bands between focal planes. If the mean misregistrations were removed by the data processing software, an analysis of the standard deviation of the misregistration indicates all band combinations would meet the registration specifications except for those including the thermal band. Analysis of the periodic noise in one image indicates a noise component in band 1 with a spatial frequency equivalent to 3.2 pixels in the along-scan direction.

  19. Characterization of the image quality in neutron radioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, J.; Engelhardt, M.; Frei, G.; Gildemeister, A.; Lehmann, E.; Hillenbach, A.; Schillinger, B.

    2005-04-01

    Neutron radioscopy, or dynamic neutron radiography, is a non-destructive testing method, which has made big steps in the last years. Depending on the neutron flux, the object and the detector, for single events a time resolution down to a few milliseconds is possible. In the case of repetitive processes the object can be synchronized with the detector and better statistics in the image can be reached by adding radiographies of the same phase with a time resolution down to 100 μs. By stepwise delaying the trigger signal a radiography movie can be composed. Radiography images of a combustion engine and an injection nozzle were evaluated quantitatively by different methods trying to characterize the image quality of an imaging system. The main factors which influence the image quality are listed and discussed.

  20. Method for image quality monitoring on digital television networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretillon, Pierre; Baina, Jamal; Jourlin, Michel; Goudezeune, Gabriel

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a method designed to monitor image quality. The emphasis is given here to the monitoring in digital television broadcasting networks, in order for the providers to ensure a 'user-oriented' Quality of Service. Most objective image quality assessment methods are technically very difficult to apply in this context because of bandwidth limitations. We propose a parametric, reduced reference method that relies on the evaluation of characteristic coding and transmission impairments with a set of features. We show that quality can be predicted with a satisfying correlation to a subjective evaluation by the combination of several impairment features in an appropriate model. The method has been implemented and tested in a range of situations on simulated and real DVB networks. This allows to conclude on the usefulness of the approach and our future developments for quality of service monitoring in digital television.

  1. First breast cancer mammography screening program in Mexico: initial results 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia worldwide. In emergent countries as Mexico, an increase has been shown in frequency and mortality, unfortunately, most cases in advanced loco-regional stages developed in young women. The success of breast screening in mortality reduction has been observed since 1995 in Western Europe and the United States, where as many as 40% mortality reduction has been achieved. Most countries guidelines recommends an annual or biannual mammography for all women >40 years of age. In 2005, FUCAM, a nonlucrative civil foundation in Mexico join with Mexico City government, initiated the first voluntary mammography screening program for women >40 years of age residing in Mexico City's Federal District. Mammographies were carried out with analogical mammographs in specially designed mobile units and were performed in the area of women's domiciles. This report includes data from the first 96,828 mammographies performed between March 2005 and December 2006. There were 1% of mammographies in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 0, 4, or 5 and 208 out of 949 women with abnormal mammographies (27.7%) had breast cancer, a rate of 2.1 per thousand, most of them in situ or stage I (29.4%) or stage II (42.2%) nevertheless 21% of those women with abnormal mammography did not present for further clinical and radiologic evaluation despite being personally notified at their home addresses. The breast cancer rate of Mexican women submitted to screening mammography is lower than in European or North American women. Family history of breast cancer, nulliparity, absence of breast feeding, and increasing age are factors that increase the risk of breast cancer. Most cancers were diagnosed in women's age below 60 years (68.5%) with a mean age of 53.55 corroborating previous data published. It is mandatory to sensitize and educate our population with regard to accepting to visit the Specialized Breast Centers.

  2. Level of awareness of mammography among women attending outpatient clinics in a teaching hospital in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammography has been used in developed countries with considerable success but very little is known about this imaging modality in low resource settings. This study examined the level of awareness of mammography and determined factors influencing the level of awareness. Methods We conducted a hospital based cross sectional study to investigate the level of awareness of mammography among 818 randomly selected women attending the General Outpatient clinics (GOP) of the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Independent predictors of level of awareness of mammography were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The proportion of women who ever heard of mammography was 5%, and they demonstrated poor knowledge of the procedure. Those with primary or secondary levels of education were about three times less likely to be aware of mammography when compared with those with tertiary level of education (OR = 0.3, 95% CI, 0.12 – 0.73). Also, participation in community breast cancer prevention activities (OR = 3.4, 95% CI, 1.39 – 8.36), and previous clinical breast examination (OR = 2.34, 95% CI, 1.10 – 4.96) independently predicted mammography awareness. Newspapers and magazines appeared to be the most important sources of information about mammography screening. Conclusion The level of awareness of mammography is poor among women attending outpatient clinics in the studied population. Interventions promoting awareness of this screening procedure should give particular attention to the illiterate and older women while clinicians performing breast examinations should utilize the opportunity to inform women about the mammography procedure. Promotion of educational articles on breast cancer and its screening methods via media remains vital for the literate. PMID:23324312

  3. Toward the development of an image quality tool for active millimeter wave imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Jeffrey; Weatherall, James C.; Greca, Joseph; Smith, Barry T.

    2015-05-01

    Preliminary design considerations for an image quality tool to complement millimeter wave imaging systems are presented. The tool is planned for use in confirming operating parameters; confirmation of continuity for imaging component design changes, and analysis of new components and detection algorithms. Potential embodiments of an image quality tool may contain materials that mimic human skin in order to provide a realistic signal return for testing, which may also help reduce or eliminate the need for mock passengers for developmental testing. Two candidate materials, a dielectric liquid and an iron-loaded epoxy, have been identified and reflection measurements have been performed using laboratory systems in the range 18 - 40 GHz. Results show good agreement with both laboratory and literature data on human skin, particularly in the range of operation of two commercially available millimeter wave imaging systems. Issues related to the practical use of liquids and magnetic materials for image quality tools are discussed.

  4. Body image and quality of life in a Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Lobera, Ignacio Jáuregui; Ríos, Patricia Bolaños

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure, and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP) as well as its test–retest reliability. Further objectives were to analyze different relationships with key dimensions of psychosocial functioning (ie, self-esteem, presence of psychopathological symptoms, eating and body image-related problems, and perceived stress) and to evaluate differences in body image quality of life due to gender. Patients and methods The sample comprised 417 students without any psychiatric history, recruited from the Pablo de Olavide University and the University of Seville. There were 140 men (33.57%) and 277 women (66.43%), and the mean age was 21.62 years (standard deviation = 5.12). After obtaining informed consent from all participants, the following questionnaires were administered: BIQLI, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results The BIQLI-SP shows adequate psychometric properties, and it may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different physical conditions. A more positive body image quality of life is associated with better self-esteem, better psychological wellbeing, and fewer eating-related dysfunctional attitudes, this being more evident among women. Conclusion The BIQLI-SP may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different contexts with regard to dermatology, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and endocrinology, among others. In these fields of study, a new trend has emerged to assess body image-related quality of life. PMID:21403794

  5. Analysis of image quality for laser display scanner test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, H.; Kurth, S.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2009-02-01

    The scanning laser display technology is one of the most promising technologies for highly integrated projection display applications (e. g. in PDAs, mobile phones or head mounted displays) due to its advantages regarding image quality, miniaturization level and low cost potential. As a couple of research teams found during their investigations on laser scanning projections systems, the image quality of such systems is - beside from laser source and video signal processing - crucially determined by the scan engine, including MEMS scanner, driving electronics, scanning regime and synchronization. Even though a number of technical parameters can be measured with high accuracy, the test procedure is challenging because the influence of these parameters on image quality is often insufficiently understood. Thus, in many cases it is not clear how to define limiting values for characteristic parameters. In this paper the relationship between parameters characterizing the scan engine and their influence on image quality will be discussed. Those include scanner topography, geometry of the path of light as well as trajectory parameters. Understanding this enables a new methodology for testing and characterization of the scan engine, based on evaluation of one or a series of projected test images. Due to the fact that the evaluation process can be easily automated by digital image processing this methodology has the potential to become integrated into the production process of laser displays.

  6. Automatic exposure control for a slot scanning full field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakri, Idris A.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.; Tesic, Mike M.

    2005-09-15

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) is an important feature in mammography. It enables consistently optimal image exposure despite variations in tissue density and thickness, and user skill level. Full field digital mammography systems cannot employ conventional AEC methods because digital receptors fully absorb the x-ray beam. In this paper we describe an AEC procedure for slot scanning mammography. With slot scanning detectors, our approach uses a fast low-resolution and low-exposure prescan to acquire an image of the breast. Tube potential depends on breast thickness, and the prescan histogram provides the necessary information to calculate the required tube current. We validate our approach with simulated prescan images and phantom measurements. We achieve accurate exposure tracking with thickness and density, and expect this method of AEC to reduce retakes and improve workflow.

  7. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed. Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  8. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Verdun, F R; Marshall, N W

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed.Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  9. Faster, higher quality volume visualization for 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Ting

    2008-03-01

    The two major volume visualization methods used in biomedical applications are Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and Volume Rendering (VR), both of which involve the process of creating sets of 2D projections from 3D images. We have developed a new method for very fast, high-quality volume visualization of 3D biomedical images, based on the fact that the inverse of this process (transforming 2D projections into a 3D image) is essentially equivalent to tomographic image reconstruction. This new method uses the 2D projections acquired by the scanner, thereby obviating the need for the two computationally expensive steps currently required in the complete process of biomedical visualization, that is, (i) reconstructing the 3D image from 2D projection data, and (ii) computing the set of 2D projections from the reconstructed 3D image As well as improvements in computation speed, this method also results in improvements in visualization quality, and in the case of x-ray CT we can exploit this quality improvement to reduce radiation dosage. In this paper, demonstrate the benefits of developing biomedical visualization techniques by directly processing the sensor data acquired by body scanners, rather than by processing the image data reconstructed from the sensor data. We show results of using this approach for volume visualization for tomographic modalities, like x-ray CT, and as well as for MRI.

  10. Ultrasound as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusions We found no evidence that evaluated the comparative effectiveness or diagnostic accuracy of screening breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography among average-risk women aged 50 years and over. In women at high risk of developing breast cancer, there is low-quality evidence that screening with mammography and adjunct ultrasound detects additional cases of disease, with improved sensitivity compared to mammography alone. Screening with adjunct ultrasound also increases the number of false-positive findings and subsequent biopsy recommendations. It is unclear if the use of screening breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography will reduce breast cancer–related mortality among high-risk women. The annual cost burden of using adjunct ultrasound to screen high-risk women who cannot receive MRI in Ontario would be small. PMID:27468326

  11. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  12. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  13. The influence of noise on image quality in phase-diverse coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittler, H. P. A.; van Riessen, G. A.; Jones, M. W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Phase-diverse coherent diffraction imaging provides a route to high sensitivity and resolution with low radiation dose. To take full advantage of this, the characteristics and tolerable limits of measurement noise for high quality images must be understood. In this work we show the artefacts that manifest in images recovered from simulated data with noise of various characteristics in the illumination and diffraction pattern. We explore the limits at which images of acceptable quality can be obtained and suggest qualitative guidelines that would allow for faster data acquisition and minimize radiation dose.

  14. 75 FR 68200 - Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... controls). The device type is intended to produce planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast; this... digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography... 892.1715. The final rule uses the term ``planar'' instead of ``full- field'' to describe digital...

  15. No-reference image quality assessment for horizontal-path imaging scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Carlos; Gladysz, Szymon

    2013-05-01

    There exist several image-enhancement algorithms and tasks associated with imaging through turbulence that depend on defining the quality of an image. Examples include: "lucky imaging", choosing the width of the inverse filter for image reconstruction, or stopping iterative deconvolution. We collected a number of image quality metrics found in the literature. Particularly interesting are the blind, "no-reference" metrics. We discuss ways of evaluating the usefulness of these metrics, even when a fully objective comparison is impossible because of the lack of a reference image. Metrics are tested on simulated and real data. Field data comes from experiments performed by the NATO SET 165 research group over a 7 km distance in Dayton, Ohio.

  16. Perceived Image Quality Improvements from the Application of Image Deconvolution to Retinal Images from an Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Nemeth, S. C.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Yang, S. Y.

    Aim: The objective of this project was to apply an image restoration methodology based on wavefront measurements obtained with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and evaluating the restored image quality based on medical criteria.Methods: Implementing an adaptive optics (AO) technique, a fundus imager was used to achieve low-order correction to images of the retina. The high-order correction was provided by deconvolution. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measures aberrations. The wavefront measurement is the basis for activating a deformable mirror. Image restoration to remove remaining aberrations is achieved by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or a blind deconvolution. The PSF is estimated using measured wavefront aberrations. Direct application of classical deconvolution methods such as inverse filtering, Wiener filtering or iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) to the AO retinal images obtained from the adaptive optical imaging system is not satisfactory because of the very large image size, dificulty in modeling the system noise, and inaccuracy in PSF estimation. Our approach combines direct and blind deconvolution to exploit available system information, avoid non-convergence, and time-consuming iterative processes. Results: The deconvolution was applied to human subject data and resulting restored images compared by a trained ophthalmic researcher. Qualitative analysis showed significant improvements. Neovascularization can be visualized with the adaptive optics device that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. The individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved as are melanin structures in the choroid. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that computer-enhanced, adaptive optic images have greater detail of anatomical and pathological structures.

  17. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  18. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  19. Determination of pasture quality using airborne hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, Ian J.; Irwin, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Pasture quality is a critical determinant which influences animal performance (live weight gain, milk and meat production) and animal health. Assessment of pasture quality is therefore required to assist farmers with grazing planning and management, benchmarking between seasons and years. Traditionally, pasture quality is determined by field sampling which is laborious, expensive and time consuming, and the information is not available in real-time. Hyperspectral remote sensing has potential to accurately quantify biochemical composition of pasture over wide areas in great spatial detail. In this study an airborne imaging spectrometer (AisaFENIX, Specim) was used with a spectral range of 380-2500 nm with 448 spectral bands. A case study of a 600 ha hill country farm in New Zealand is used to illustrate the use of the system. Radiometric and atmospheric corrections, along with automatized georectification of the imagery using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), were applied to the raw images to convert into geocoded reflectance images. Then a multivariate statistical method, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to estimate pasture quality such as crude protein (CP) and metabolisable energy (ME) from canopy reflectance. The results from this study revealed that estimates of CP and ME had a R2 of 0.77 and 0.79, and RMSECV of 2.97 and 0.81 respectively. By utilizing these regression models, spatial maps were created over the imaged area. These pasture quality maps can be used for adopting precision agriculture practices which improves farm profitability and environmental sustainability.

  20. Achieving quality in cardiovascular imaging: proceedings from the American College of Cardiology-Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela; Iskandrian, Ami E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Jollis, James; Peterson, Eric; Chen, Jersey; Masoudi, Frederick; Mohler, Emile; McNamara, Robert L; Patel, Manesh R; Spertus, John

    2006-11-21

    Cardiovascular imaging has enjoyed both rapid technological advances and sustained growth, yet less attention has been focused on quality than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met, and this report provides an overview of the discussions. A consensus definition of quality in imaging and a convergence of opinion on quality measures across imaging modalities was achieved and are intended to be the start of a process culminating in the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality measures for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  1. Dose and diagnostic image quality in digital tomosynthesis imaging of facial bones in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Hickling, S.; Elbakri, I. A.; Reed, M.; Wrogemann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of digital tomosynthesis (DT) for pediatric facial bone imaging. We compared the eye lens dose and diagnostic image quality of DT facial bone exams relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), and investigated whether we could modify our current DT imaging protocol to reduce patient dose while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. We measured the dose to the eye lens for all three modalities using high-sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an anthropomorphic skull phantom. To assess the diagnostic image quality of DT compared to the corresponding DR and CT images, we performed an observer study where the visibility of anatomical structures in the DT phantom images were rated on a four-point scale. We then acquired DT images at lower doses and had radiologists indicate whether the visibility of each structure was adequate for diagnostic purposes. For typical facial bone exams, we measured eye lens doses of 0.1-0.4 mGy for DR, 0.3-3.7 mGy for DT, and 26 mGy for CT. In general, facial bone structures were visualized better with DT then DR, and the majority of structures were visualized well enough to avoid the need for CT. DT imaging provides high quality diagnostic images of the facial bones while delivering significantly lower doses to the lens of the eye compared to CT. In addition, we found that by adjusting the imaging parameters, the DT effective dose can be reduced by up to 50% while maintaining sufficient image quality.

  2. Presence capture cameras - a new challenge to the image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2016-04-01

    Commercial presence capture cameras are coming to the markets and a new era of visual entertainment starts to get its shape. Since the true presence capturing is still a very new technology, the real technical solutions are just passed a prototyping phase and they vary a lot. Presence capture cameras have still the same quality issues to tackle as previous phases of digital imaging but also numerous new ones. This work concentrates to the quality challenges of presence capture cameras. A camera system which can record 3D audio-visual reality as it is has to have several camera modules, several microphones and especially technology which can synchronize output of several sources to a seamless and smooth virtual reality experience. Several traditional quality features are still valid in presence capture cameras. Features like color fidelity, noise removal, resolution and dynamic range create the base of virtual reality stream quality. However, co-operation of several cameras brings a new dimension for these quality factors. Also new quality features can be validated. For example, how the camera streams should be stitched together with 3D experience without noticeable errors and how to validate the stitching? The work describes quality factors which are still valid in the presence capture cameras and defines the importance of those. Moreover, new challenges of presence capture cameras are investigated in image and video quality point of view. The work contains considerations how well current measurement methods can be used in presence capture cameras.

  3. Compressed image quality metric based on perceptually weighted distortion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sudeng; Jin, Lina; Wang, Hanli; Zhang, Yun; Kwong, Sam; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2015-12-01

    Objective quality assessment for compressed images is critical to various image compression systems that are essential in image delivery and storage. Although the mean squared error (MSE) is computationally simple, it may not be accurate to reflect the perceptual quality of compressed images, which is also affected dramatically by the characteristics of human visual system (HVS), such as masking effect. In this paper, an image quality metric (IQM) is proposed based on perceptually weighted distortion in terms of the MSE. To capture the characteristics of HVS, a randomness map is proposed to measure the masking effect and a preprocessing scheme is proposed to simulate the processing that occurs in the initial part of HVS. Since the masking effect highly depends on the structural randomness, the prediction error from neighborhood with a statistical model is used to measure the significance of masking. Meanwhile, the imperceptible signal with high frequency could be removed by preprocessing with low-pass filters. The relation is investigated between the distortions before and after masking effect, and a masking modulation model is proposed to simulate the masking effect after preprocessing. The performance of the proposed IQM is validated on six image databases with various compression distortions. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other benchmark IQMs. PMID:26415170

  4. Flattening filter removal for improved image quality of megavoltage fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, James D.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Removal of the linear accelerator (linac) flattening filter enables a high rate of dose deposition with reduced treatment time. When used for megavoltage imaging, an unflat beam has reduced primary beam scatter resulting in sharper images. In fluoroscopic imaging mode, the unflat beam has higher photon count per image frame yielding higher contrast-to-noise ratio. The authors’ goal was to quantify the effects of an unflat beam on the image quality of megavoltage portal and fluoroscopic images.Methods: 6 MV projection images were acquired in fluoroscopic and portal modes using an electronic flat-panel imager. The effects of the flattening filter on the relative modulation transfer function (MTF) and contrast-to-noise ratio were quantified using the QC3 phantom. The impact of FF removal on the contrast-to-noise ratio of gold fiducial markers also was studied under various scatter conditions.Results: The unflat beam had improved contrast resolution, up to 40% increase in MTF contrast at the highest frequency measured (0.75 line pairs/mm). The contrast-to-noise ratio was increased as expected from the increased photon flux. The visualization of fiducial markers was markedly better using the unflat beam under all scatter conditions, enabling visualization of thin gold fiducial markers, the thinnest of which was not visible using the unflat beam.Conclusions: The removal of the flattening filter from a clinical linac leads to quantifiable improvements in the image quality of megavoltage projection images. These gains enable observers to more easily visualize thin fiducial markers and track their motion on fluoroscopic images.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Combined Digital Mammography and Tomosynthesis Screening for Women with Dense Breasts

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Mucahit; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Sprague, Brian L.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Stout, Natasha K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Lehman, Constance D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of combined biennial digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening, compared with biennial digital mammography screening alone, among women with dense breasts. Materials and Methods An established, discrete-event breast cancer simulation model was used to estimate the comparative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of biennial screening with both digital mammography and tomosynthesis versus digital mammography alone among U.S. women aged 50–74 years with dense breasts from a federal payer perspective and a lifetime horizon. Input values were estimated for test performance, costs, and health state utilities from the National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, Medicare reimbursement rates, and medical literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the implications of varying key model parameters, including combined screening sensitivity and specificity, transient utility decrement of diagnostic work-up, and additional cost of tomosynthesis. Results For the base-case analysis, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained by adding tomosynthesis to digital mammography screening was $53 893. An additional 0.5 deaths were averted and 405 false-positive findings avoided per 1000 women after 12 rounds of screening. Combined screening remained cost-effective (less than $100 000 per quality-adjusted life year gained) over a wide range of incremental improvements in test performance. Overall, cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to the additional cost of tomosynthesis. Conclusion Biennial combined digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening for U.S. women aged 50–74 years with dense breasts is likely to be cost-effective if priced appropriately (up to $226 for combined examinations vs $139 for digital mammography alone) and if reported interpretive performance metrics of improved specificity with tomosynthesis are met in routine practice. © RSNA, 2014 Online

  6. Image-Processing Techniques for the Creation of Presentation-Quality Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis A.; Levay, Zoltan G.; Frattare, Lisa M.; English, Jayanne; Pu'uohau-Pummill, Kirk

    2007-02-01

    The quality of modern astronomical data and the agility of current image-processing software enable the visualization of data in a way that exceeds the traditional definition of an astronomical image. Two developments in particular have led to a fundamental change in how astronomical images can be assembled. First, the availability of high-quality multiwavelength and narrowband data allow for images that do not correspond to the wavelength sensitivity of the human eye, thereby introducing ambiguity in the usage and interpretation of color. Second, many image-processing software packages now use a layering metaphor that allows for any number of astronomical data sets to be combined into a color image. With this technique, images with as many as eight data sets have been produced. Each data set is intensity-scaled and colorized independently, creating an immense parameter space that can be used to assemble the image. Since such images are intended for data visualization, scaling and color schemes must be chosen that best illustrate the science. A practical guide is presented on how to use the layering metaphor to generate publication-ready astronomical images from as many data sets as desired. A methodology is also given on how to use intensity scaling, color, and composition to create contrasts in an image that highlight the scientific detail. Examples of image creation are discussed.

  7. Body image quality of life in eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Bolaños Ríos, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to examine how body image affects quality of life in an eating-disorder (ED) clinical sample, a non-ED clinical sample, and a nonclinical sample. We hypothesized that ED patients would show the worst body image quality of life. We also hypothesized that body image quality of life would have a stronger negative association with specific ED-related variables than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, mainly among ED patients. On the basis of previous studies, the influence of gender on the results was explored, too. Patients and methods: The final sample comprised 70 ED patients (mean age 22.65 ± 7.76 years; 59 women and 11 men); 106 were patients with other psychiatric disorders (mean age 28.20 ± 6.52; 67 women and 39 men), and 135 were university students (mean age 21.57 ± 2.58; 81 women and 54 men), with no psychiatric history. After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Image Quality of Life Inventory-Spanish version (BIQLI-SP), Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Results: The ED patients’ ratings on the BIQLI-SP were the lowest and negatively scored (BIQLI-SP means: +20.18, +5.14, and −6.18, in the student group, the non-ED patient group, and the ED group, respectively). The effect of body image on quality of life was more negative in the ED group in all items of the BIQLI-SP. Body image quality of life was negatively associated with specific ED-related variables, more than with other psychological and psychopathological variables, but not especially among ED patients. Conclusion: Body image quality of life was affected not only by specific pathologies related to body image disturbances, but also by other psychopathological syndromes. Nevertheless, the greatest effect was related to ED, and seemed to be more negative among men. This finding is the

  8. Image quality testing of assembled IR camera modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Daniel; Erichsen, Patrik

    2013-10-01

    Infrared (IR) camera modules for the LWIR (8-12_m) that combine IR imaging optics with microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) sensors with readout electronics are becoming more and more a mass market product. At the same time, steady improvements in sensor resolution in the higher priced markets raise the requirement for imaging performance of objectives and the proper alignment between objective and FPA. This puts pressure on camera manufacturers and system integrators to assess the image quality of finished camera modules in a cost-efficient and automated way for quality control or during end-of-line testing. In this paper we present recent development work done in the field of image quality testing of IR camera modules. This technology provides a wealth of additional information in contrast to the more traditional test methods like minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) which give only a subjective overall test result. Parameters that can be measured are image quality via the modulation transfer function (MTF) for broadband or with various bandpass filters on- and off-axis and optical parameters like e.g. effective focal length (EFL) and distortion. If the camera module allows for refocusing the optics, additional parameters like best focus plane, image plane tilt, auto-focus quality, chief ray angle etc. can be characterized. Additionally, the homogeneity and response of the sensor with the optics can be characterized in order to calculate the appropriate tables for non-uniformity correction (NUC). The technology can also be used to control active alignment methods during mechanical assembly of optics to high resolution sensors. Other important points that are discussed are the flexibility of the technology to test IR modules with different form factors, electrical interfaces and last but not least the suitability for fully automated measurements in mass production.

  9. Image quality-based adaptive illumination normalisation for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2009-05-01

    Automatic face recognition is a challenging task due to intra-class variations. Changes in lighting conditions during enrolment and identification stages contribute significantly to these intra-class variations. A common approach to address the effects such of varying conditions is to pre-process the biometric samples in order normalise intra-class variations. Histogram equalisation is a widely used illumination normalisation technique in face recognition. However, a recent study has shown that applying histogram equalisation on well-lit face images could lead to a decrease in recognition accuracy. This paper presents a dynamic approach to illumination normalisation, based on face image quality. The quality of a given face image is measured in terms of its luminance distortion by comparing this image against a known reference face image. Histogram equalisation is applied to a probe image if its luminance distortion is higher than a predefined threshold. We tested the proposed adaptive illumination normalisation method on the widely used Extended Yale Face Database B. Identification results demonstrate that our adaptive normalisation produces better identification accuracy compared to the conventional approach where every image is normalised, irrespective of the lighting condition they were acquired.

  10. Clear-PEM, a dedicated PET camera for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, P.; Varela, J.

    2002-06-01

    Preliminary results suggest that Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) can offer a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques and aid in expeditiously establishing the diagnosis of cancer. A dedicated machine seems to offer better perspectives in terms of position resolution and sensitivity. This paper describes the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN for an evaluation of this approach. This device is based on new crystals introduced by the Crystal Clear as well as on modern data acquisition techniques developed for the large experiments in high energy physics experiments.

  11. Knowledge discovery from structured mammography reports using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Elizabeth S; Davis, Jesse; Costa, Victor Santos; Dutra, Inês de Castro; Kahn, Charles E; Fine, Jason; Page, David

    2005-01-01

    The development of large mammography databases provides an opportunity for knowledge discovery and data mining techniques to recognize patterns not previously appreciated. Using a database from a breast imaging practice containing patient risk factors, imaging findings, and biopsy results, we tested whether inductive logic programming (ILP) could discover interesting hypotheses that could subsequently be tested and validated. The ILP algorithm discovered two hypotheses from the data that were 1) judged as interesting by a subspecialty trained mammographer and 2) validated by analysis of the data itself.

  12. Knowledge Discovery from Structured Mammography Reports Using Inductive Logic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Davis, Jesse; Costa, Vítor Santos; de Castro Dutra, Inês; Kahn, Charles E.; Fine, Jason; Page, David

    2005-01-01

    The development of large mammography databases provides an opportunity for knowledge discovery and data mining techniques to recognize patterns not previously appreciated. Using a database from a breast imaging practice containing patient risk factors, imaging findings, and biopsy results, we tested whether inductive logic programming (ILP) could discover interesting hypotheses that could subsequently be tested and validated. The ILP algorithm discovered two hypotheses from the data that were 1) judged as interesting by a subspecialty-trained mammographer and 2) validated by analysis of the data itself. PMID:16779009

  13. Comparison of contrast enhancement methods using photon counting detector in spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyemi; Park, Su-Jin; Jo, Byungdu; Kim, Dohyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    The photon counting detector with energy discrimination capabilities provides the spectral information and energy of each photon with single exposure. The energy-resolved photon counting detector makes it possible to improve the visualization of contrast agent by selecting the appropriate energy window. In this study, we simulated the photon counting spectral mammography system using a Monte Carlo method and compared three contrast enhancement methods (K-edge imaging, projection-based energy weighting imaging, and dual energy subtraction imaging). For the quantitative comparison, we used the homogeneous cylindrical breast phantom as a reference and the heterogeneous XCAT breast phantom. To evaluate the K-edge imaging methods, we obtained images by increasing the energy window width based on K-edge absorption energy of iodine. The iodine which has the K-edge discontinuity in the attenuation coefficient curve can be separated from the background. The projection-based energy weighting factor was defined as the difference in the transmissions between the contrast agent and the background. Each weighting factor as a function of photon energy was calculated and applied to the each energy bin. For the dual energy subtraction imaging, we acquired two images with below and above the iodine K-edge energy using single exposure. To suppress the breast tissue in high energy images, the weighting factor was applied as the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast tissue at high and low energies. Our results demonstrated the CNR improvement of the K-edge imaging was the highest among the three methods. These imaging techniques based on the energy-resolved photon counting detector improved image quality with the spectral information.

  14. Quality assurance results from a breast screening pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thiele, D L

    1991-09-01

    A mammography quality assurance programme has been established as part of the breast cancer screening pilot project based in south-east Queensland. Prospective radiology clinics are required to participate in the quality assurance programme as part of the project's accreditation requirements. The programme follows the ACPSEM position paper on quality assurance in mammography and is divided into radiographer and physicist tests. Radiographer tests include film processor sensitometry (daily), image quality (weekly) and focal spot measurements (monthly). Physicist tests occur annually. The programme has been running successfully for 12 months on 17 machines from 6 manufacturers. Of the radiographer tests, sensitometry has proved the most beneficial with a number of chemistry problems detected early. Physicist tests have found x-ray/light field misalignment and poor automatic exposure control performance as the most common machine problems. Results also show that our kVp measuring system requires recalibration. PMID:1953503

  15. Quality assurance methodology and applications to abdominal imaging PQI.

    PubMed

    Paushter, David M; Thomas, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Quality assurance has increasingly become an integral part of medicine, with tandem goals of increasing patient safety and procedural quality, improving efficiency, lowering cost, and ultimately improving patient outcomes. This article reviews quality assurance methodology, ranging from the PDSA cycle to the application of lean techniques, aimed at operational efficiency, to continually evaluate and revise the health care environment. Alignment of goals for practices, hospitals, and healthcare organizations is critical, requiring clear objectives, adequate resources, and transparent reporting. In addition, there is a significant role played by regulatory bodies and oversight organizations in determining external benchmarks of quality, practice, and individual certification and reimbursement. Finally, practical application of quality principles to practice improvement projects in abdominal imaging will be presented.

  16. SCID: full reference spatial color image quality metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouni, S.; Chambah, M.; Herbin, M.; Zagrouba, E.

    2009-01-01

    The most used full reference image quality assessments are error-based methods. Thus, these measures are performed by pixel based difference metrics like Delta E ( E), MSE, PSNR, etc. Therefore, a local fidelity of the color is defined. However, these metrics does not correlate well with the perceived image quality. Indeed, they omit the properties of the HVS. Thus, they cannot be a reliable predictor of the perceived visual quality. All this metrics compute the differences pixel to pixel. Therefore, a local fidelity of the color is defined. However, the human visual system is rather sensitive to a global quality. In this paper, we present a novel full reference color metric that is based on characteristics of the human visual system by considering the notion of adjacency. This metric called SCID for Spatial Color Image Difference, is more perceptually correlated than other color differences such as Delta E. The suggested full reference metric is generic and independent of image distortion type. It can be used in different application such as: compression, restoration, etc.

  17. Image quality, space-qualified UV interference filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    The progress during the contract period is described. The project involved fabrication of image quality, space-qualified bandpass filters in the 200-350 nm spectral region. Ion-assisted deposition (IAD) was applied to produce stable, reasonably durable filter coatings on space compatible UV substrates. Thin film materials and UV transmitting substrates were tested for resistance to simulated space effects.

  18. Visual relevance of display image quality testing by photometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andren, Boerje; Breidne, Magnus; Hansson, L. A.; Persson, Bo

    1993-09-01

    The two major international test methods for evaluation of the image quality of video display terminals are the ISO 9241-3 international standard and the MPR test. In this paper we make an attempt to compare the visual relevance of these two test methods.

  19. Spectral lesion characterization on a photon-counting mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Fredenberg, Erik; Homann, Hanno; Roessl, Ewald

    2014-03-01

    Spectral X-ray imaging allows to differentiate between two given tissue types, provided their spectral absorption characteristics differ measurably. In mammography, this method is used clinically to determine a decomposition of the breast into adipose and glandular tissue compartments, from which the glandular tissue fraction and, hence, the volumetric breast density (VBD) can be computed. Another potential application of this technique is the characterization of lesions by spectral mammography. In particular, round lesions are relatively easily detected by experienced radiologists, but are often difficult to characterize. Here, a method is described that aims at discriminating cystic from solid lesions directly on a spectral mammogram, obtained with a calibrated spectral mammography system and using a hypothesis-testing algorithm based on a maximum likelihood approach. The method includes a parametric model describing the lesion shape, compression height variations and breast composition. With the maximum likelihood algorithm, the model parameters are estimated separately under the cyst and solid hypothesis. The resulting ratio of the maximum likelihood values is used for the final tissue characterization. Initial results using simulations and phantom measurements are presented.

  20. Mammography in asymptomatic women aged 40-49 years

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Flávio Xavier; Katz, Leila; Souza, Alex Sandro Rolland; Amorim, Melania Maria Ramos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess findings of mammography of and interventions resulting from breast cancer screening in women aged 40-49 years with no increased risk (typical risk) of breast cancer. METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated women aged 40-49 years who underwent mammography screening in a mastology reference center in Recife, PE, Northeastern Brazil, between January 2010 and October 2011. Women with breast-related complaints, positive findings in the physical examination, or high risk of breast cancer were excluded. RESULTS The 1,000 mammograms performed were classified into the following Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories BI-RADS 0, 232; BI-RADS 1, 294; BI-RADS 2, 294; BI-RADS 3, 16; BI-RADS 4A, 2; BI-RADS 5, 1. There was one case of grade II invasive ductal carcinoma and various interventions, including 469 ultrasound scans, 53 referrals to mastologists, 11 cytological examinations, and 8 biopsies. CONCLUSIONS Mammography screening in women aged 40-49 years with typical risk of breast cancer led to the performance of other interventions. However, it also resulted in increased costs without demonstrable efficacy in decreasing mortality. PMID:26039396

  1. Simultaneous Analysis and Quality Assurance for Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Carolyn B.; Asman, Andrew J.; Esparza, Michael L.; Burns, Scott S.; Fan, Qiuyun; Gao, Yurui; Anderson, Adam W.; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enables non-invasive, cyto-architectural mapping of in vivo tissue microarchitecture through voxel-wise mathematical modeling of multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions, each differently sensitized to water diffusion. DTI computations are fundamentally estimation processes and are sensitive to noise and artifacts. Despite widespread adoption in the neuroimaging community, maintaining consistent DTI data quality remains challenging given the propensity for patient motion, artifacts associated with fast imaging techniques, and the possibility of hardware changes/failures. Furthermore, the quantity of data acquired per voxel, the non-linear estimation process, and numerous potential use cases complicate traditional visual data inspection approaches. Currently, quality inspection of DTI data has relied on visual inspection and individual processing in DTI analysis software programs (e.g. DTIPrep, DTI-studio). However, recent advances in applied statistical methods have yielded several different metrics to assess noise level, artifact propensity, quality of tensor fit, variance of estimated measures, and bias in estimated measures. To date, these metrics have been largely studied in isolation. Herein, we select complementary metrics for integration into an automatic DTI analysis and quality assurance pipeline. The pipeline completes in 24 hours, stores statistical outputs, and produces a graphical summary quality analysis (QA) report. We assess the utility of this streamlined approach for empirical quality assessment on 608 DTI datasets from pediatric neuroimaging studies. The efficiency and accuracy of quality analysis using the proposed pipeline is compared with quality analysis based on visual inspection. The unified pipeline is found to save a statistically significant amount of time (over 70%) while improving the consistency of QA between a DTI expert and a pool of research associates. Projection of QA metrics to a low

  2. Imaging through turbid media via sparse representation: imaging quality comparison of three projection matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Li, Huijuan; Wu, Tengfei; Dai, Weijia; Bi, Xiangli

    2015-05-01

    The incident light will be scattered away due to the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in many materials which will greatly reduce the imaging depth and degrade the imaging quality. Many exciting methods have been presented in recent years for solving this problem and realizing imaging through a highly scattering medium, such as the wavefront modulation technique and reconstruction technique. The imaging method based on compressed sensing (CS) theory can decrease the computat