Science.gov

Sample records for mammogrid large-scale distributed

  1. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  2. Very Large Scale Distributed Information Processing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    34Reliable Distributed Database Management", Proc. of the IEEE, May 1987, pp. 601-620. [GOTT881 Gottlob , Georg andRoberto Zicari, "Closed World Databases... Gottlob , and Gio Wiederhold, "Interfacing Relational Databases and Prolog Efficiently," in Proceedings 2nd Expert Database Systems Conference, pp. 141

  3. Distribution probability of large-scale landslides in central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Manita; Bhandary, Netra P.; Dahal, Ranjan Kumar; Yatabe, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale landslides in the Himalaya are defined as huge, deep-seated landslide masses that occurred in the geological past. They are widely distributed in the Nepal Himalaya. The steep topography and high local relief provide high potential for such failures, whereas the dynamic geology and adverse climatic conditions play a key role in the occurrence and reactivation of such landslides. The major geoscientific problems related with such large-scale landslides are 1) difficulties in their identification and delineation, 2) sources of small-scale failures, and 3) reactivation. Only a few scientific publications have been published concerning large-scale landslides in Nepal. In this context, the identification and quantification of large-scale landslides and their potential distribution are crucial. Therefore, this study explores the distribution of large-scale landslides in the Lesser Himalaya. It provides simple guidelines to identify large-scale landslides based on their typical characteristics and using a 3D schematic diagram. Based on the spatial distribution of landslides, geomorphological/geological parameters and logistic regression, an equation of large-scale landslide distribution is also derived. The equation is validated by applying it to another area. For the new area, the area under the receiver operating curve of the landslide distribution probability in the new area is 0.699, and a distribution probability value could explain > 65% of existing landslides. Therefore, the regression equation can be applied to areas of the Lesser Himalaya of central Nepal with similar geological and geomorphological conditions.

  4. Distributed Coordinated Control of Large-Scale Nonlinear Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Kundu, Soumya; Anghel, Marian

    2015-11-08

    We provide a distributed coordinated approach to the stability analysis and control design of largescale nonlinear dynamical systems by using a vector Lyapunov functions approach. In this formulation the large-scale system is decomposed into a network of interacting subsystems and the stability of the system is analyzed through a comparison system. However finding such comparison system is not trivial. In this work, we propose a sum-of-squares based completely decentralized approach for computing the comparison systems for networks of nonlinear systems. Moreover, based on the comparison systems, we introduce a distributed optimal control strategy in which the individual subsystems (agents) coordinatemore » with their immediate neighbors to design local control policies that can exponentially stabilize the full system under initial disturbances.We illustrate the control algorithm on a network of interacting Van der Pol systems.« less

  5. Distributed Coordinated Control of Large-Scale Nonlinear Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Soumya; Anghel, Marian

    2015-11-08

    We provide a distributed coordinated approach to the stability analysis and control design of largescale nonlinear dynamical systems by using a vector Lyapunov functions approach. In this formulation the large-scale system is decomposed into a network of interacting subsystems and the stability of the system is analyzed through a comparison system. However finding such comparison system is not trivial. In this work, we propose a sum-of-squares based completely decentralized approach for computing the comparison systems for networks of nonlinear systems. Moreover, based on the comparison systems, we introduce a distributed optimal control strategy in which the individual subsystems (agents) coordinate with their immediate neighbors to design local control policies that can exponentially stabilize the full system under initial disturbances.We illustrate the control algorithm on a network of interacting Van der Pol systems.

  6. Self-* and Adaptive Mechanisms for Large Scale Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, P.; Mastroianni, C.; Montero, R.; Andrjezak, A.; Kondo, D.

    Large-scale distributed computing systems and infrastructure, such as Grids, P2P systems and desktop Grid platforms, are decentralized, pervasive, and composed of a large number of autonomous entities. The complexity of these systems is such that human administration is nearly impossible and centralized or hierarchical control is highly inefficient. These systems need to run on highly dynamic environments, where content, network topologies and workloads are continuously changing. Moreover, they are characterized by the high degree of volatility of their components and the need to provide efficient service management and to handle efficiently large amounts of data. This paper describes some of the areas for which adaptation emerges as a key feature, namely, the management of computational Grids, the self-management of desktop Grid platforms and the monitoring and healing of complex applications. It also elaborates on the use of bio-inspired algorithms to achieve self-management. Related future trends and challenges are described.

  7. Large-scale mass distribution in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M.; Steinhauser, D.; Vogelsberger, M.; Genel, S.; Springel, V.; Torrey, P.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations at low redshifts thus far fail to account for all of the baryons expected in the Universe according to cosmological constraints. A large fraction of the baryons presumably resides in a thin and warm-hot medium between the galaxies, where they are difficult to observe due to their low densities and high temperatures. Cosmological simulations of structure formation can be used to verify this picture and provide quantitative predictions for the distribution of mass in different large-scale structure components. Here we study the distribution of baryons and dark matter at different epochs using data from the Illustris simulation. We identify regions of different dark matter density with the primary constituents of large-scale structure, allowing us to measure mass and volume of haloes, filaments and voids. At redshift zero, we find that 49 per cent of the dark matter and 23 per cent of the baryons are within haloes more massive than the resolution limit of 2 × 108 M⊙. The filaments of the cosmic web host a further 45 per cent of the dark matter and 46 per cent of the baryons. The remaining 31 per cent of the baryons reside in voids. The majority of these baryons have been transported there through active galactic nuclei feedback. We note that the feedback model of Illustris is too strong for heavy haloes, therefore it is likely that we are overestimating this amount. Categorizing the baryons according to their density and temperature, we find that 17.8 per cent of them are in a condensed state, 21.6 per cent are present as cold, diffuse gas, and 53.9 per cent are found in the state of a warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  8. Secure Large-Scale Airport Simulations Using Distributed Computational Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermott, William J.; Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Tran, Peter; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To fully conduct research that will support the far-term concepts, technologies and methods required to improve the safety of Air Transportation a simulation environment of the requisite degree of fidelity must first be in place. The Virtual National Airspace Simulation (VNAS) will provide the underlying infrastructure necessary for such a simulation system. Aerospace-specific knowledge management services such as intelligent data-integration middleware will support the management of information associated with this complex and critically important operational environment. This simulation environment, in conjunction with a distributed network of supercomputers, and high-speed network connections to aircraft, and to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airline and other data-sources will provide the capability to continuously monitor and measure operational performance against expected performance. The VNAS will also provide the tools to use this performance baseline to obtain a perspective of what is happening today and of the potential impact of proposed changes before they are introduced into the system.

  9. The galaxy distribution and the large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. J.; Kurtz, M. J.; De Lapparent, V.

    1986-01-01

    Data related to the large-scale galaxy distribution are discussed. The galaxy counts of Shane-Wirtanen (1967) are analyzed; the effects of residual systematic errors on the galaxy distribution measurements are considered. The analysis reveals that the Shane-Wirtanen data are not applicable to the study of large-scale structure. A model which is capable of measuring galaxy correlation functions on scales greater than about 10 Mpc is evaluated.

  10. Design of Availability-Dependent Distributed Services in Large-Scale Uncooperative Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Ramses Victor

    2009-01-01

    Thesis Statement: "Availability-dependent global predicates can be efficiently and scalably realized for a class of distributed services, in spite of specific selfish and colluding behaviors, using local and decentralized protocols". Several types of large-scale distributed systems spanning the Internet have to deal with availability variations…

  11. Framing Innovation: The Role of Distributed Leadership in Gaining Acceptance of Large-Scale Technology Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation of practice utilized a multiple case-study approach to examine distributed leadership within five school districts that were attempting to gain acceptance of a large-scale 1:1 technology initiative. Using frame theory and distributed leadership theory as theoretical frameworks, this study interviewed each district's…

  12. A Topology Visualization Early Warning Distribution Algorithm for Large-Scale Network Security Incidents

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Fan, Guotao; Ye, Jianwei; Zhang, Weizhe

    2013-01-01

    It is of great significance to research the early warning system for large-scale network security incidents. It can improve the network system's emergency response capabilities, alleviate the cyber attacks' damage, and strengthen the system's counterattack ability. A comprehensive early warning system is presented in this paper, which combines active measurement and anomaly detection. The key visualization algorithm and technology of the system are mainly discussed. The large-scale network system's plane visualization is realized based on the divide and conquer thought. First, the topology of the large-scale network is divided into some small-scale networks by the MLkP/CR algorithm. Second, the sub graph plane visualization algorithm is applied to each small-scale network. Finally, the small-scale networks' topologies are combined into a topology based on the automatic distribution algorithm of force analysis. As the algorithm transforms the large-scale network topology plane visualization problem into a series of small-scale network topology plane visualization and distribution problems, it has higher parallelism and is able to handle the display of ultra-large-scale network topology. PMID:24191145

  13. A topology visualization early warning distribution algorithm for large-scale network security incidents.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Fan, Guotao; Ye, Jianwei; Zhang, Weizhe

    2013-01-01

    It is of great significance to research the early warning system for large-scale network security incidents. It can improve the network system's emergency response capabilities, alleviate the cyber attacks' damage, and strengthen the system's counterattack ability. A comprehensive early warning system is presented in this paper, which combines active measurement and anomaly detection. The key visualization algorithm and technology of the system are mainly discussed. The large-scale network system's plane visualization is realized based on the divide and conquer thought. First, the topology of the large-scale network is divided into some small-scale networks by the MLkP/CR algorithm. Second, the sub graph plane visualization algorithm is applied to each small-scale network. Finally, the small-scale networks' topologies are combined into a topology based on the automatic distribution algorithm of force analysis. As the algorithm transforms the large-scale network topology plane visualization problem into a series of small-scale network topology plane visualization and distribution problems, it has higher parallelism and is able to handle the display of ultra-large-scale network topology.

  14. Galaxy clusters in visible light (I): catalogues, large-scale distribution, and general properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yulin

    1995-12-01

    While the nature, behaviour, and evolution of galaxy clusters is a such wide research field, only some of their optical properties are underlined in the present review. The whole article is divided into two parts, of which this is the first one, contributed to cluster catalogues, large-scale distribution, and some general characteristics of galaxy clusters.

  15. Analysis of Large-Scale Matter Distribution with the Minimal Spanning Tree Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A.; Turchaninov, V.

    The application of the Minimal Spanning Three technique to the description of large scale object distribution in observed and simulated catalogues is demonstrated. We show that it can be roughly described as a system of high density filaments half of which is accumulated by wall-like condensations.

  16. Statistics of density maxima and the large-scale matter distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, N.

    1986-01-01

    High peaks in Gaussian noise display enhanced clustering. The enhancement takes two forms: on large scales one obtains a linear amplification of the correlation function which is independent of scale. On smaller scales, but larger than the mass scale of the peaks themselves, a nonlinear (exponential) enhancement of the number density of high peaks in overdense regions arises. The large-scale correlations of Abell's rich clusters can be understood as a manifestation of this phenomenon. If the formation of bright galaxies favors the high overdensity peaks then the number of galaxies (per unit mass) in clusters and groups may be considerably enhanced. Consequences of these ideas for the density parameter and the large-scale matter distribution are discussed.

  17. NASA's Information Power Grid: Large Scale Distributed Computing and Data Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Vaziri, Arsi; Hinke, Tom; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Feiereisen, William J.; Thigpen, William; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale science and engineering are done through the interaction of people, heterogeneous computing resources, information systems, and instruments, all of which are geographically and organizationally dispersed. The overall motivation for Grids is to facilitate the routine interactions of these resources in order to support large-scale science and engineering. Multi-disciplinary simulations provide a good example of a class of applications that are very likely to require aggregation of widely distributed computing, data, and intellectual resources. Such simulations - e.g. whole system aircraft simulation and whole system living cell simulation - require integrating applications and data that are developed by different teams of researchers frequently in different locations. The research team's are the only ones that have the expertise to maintain and improve the simulation code and/or the body of experimental data that drives the simulations. This results in an inherently distributed computing and data management environment.

  18. Generalizations of the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers for Large-Scale and Distributed Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    global convergence and further show its linear convergence under a variety of scenarios, which cover a wide range of applications . The derived rate of...global convergence and further show its linear convergence under a variety of scenarios, which cover a wide range of applications . The derived rate of...efficiency, flexibility and applicability for large-scale and distributed op- timization problems. We also make important extensions to the convergence

  19. Cost Distribution of Environmental Flow Demands in a Large Scale Multi-Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, G.; Tilmant, A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the recovery of a prescribed flow regime through reservoir system reoperation, focusing on the associated costs and losses imposed on different power plants depending on flows, power plant and reservoir characteristics and systems topology. In large-scale reservoir systems such cost distribution is not trivial, and it should be properly evaluated to identify coordinated operating solutions that avoid penalizing a single reservoir. The methods combine an efficient stochastic dual dynamic programming algorithm for reservoir optimization subject to environmental flow targets with specific magnitude, duration and return period, which effects on fish recruitment are already known. Results indicate that the distribution of the effect of meeting the environmental flow demands throughout the reservoir cascade differs largely, and in some reservoirs power production and revenue are increased, while in others it is reduced. Most importantly, for the example system modeled here (10 reservoirs in the Parana River basin, Brazil) meeting the target environmental flows was possible without reducing the total energy produced in the year, at a cost of $25 Million/year in foregone hydropower revenues (3% reduction). Finally, the results and methods are useful in (a) quantifying the foregone hydropower and revenues resulting from meeting a specific environmental flow demand, (b) identifying the distribution and reallocation of the foregone hydropower and revenue across a large scale system, and (c) identifying optimal reservoir operating strategies to meet environmental flow demands in a large scale multi-reservoir system.

  20. Large-Scale Ichthyoplankton and Water Mass Distribution along the South Brazil Shelf

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27′ and 34°51′S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients. PMID:24614798

  1. Large-Scale Geographic Variation in Distribution and Abundance of Australian Deep-Water Kelp Forests

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Williams, Stefan B.; Babcock, Russell C.; Barrett, Neville S.; Johnson, Craig R.; Jordan, Alan; Kendrick, Gary A.; Pizarro, Oscar R.; Smale, Dan A.; Steinberg, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of marine habitat-forming organisms, little is known about their large-scale distribution and abundance in deeper waters, where they are difficult to access. Such information is necessary to develop sound conservation and management strategies. Kelps are main habitat-formers in temperate reefs worldwide; however, these habitats are highly sensitive to environmental change. The kelp Ecklonia radiate is the major habitat-forming organism on subtidal reefs in temperate Australia. Here, we provide large-scale ecological data encompassing the latitudinal distribution along the continent of these kelp forests, which is a necessary first step towards quantitative inferences about the effects of climatic change and other stressors on these valuable habitats. We used the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) facility of Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) to survey 157,000 m2 of seabed, of which ca 13,000 m2 were used to quantify kelp covers at multiple spatial scales (10–100 m to 100–1,000 km) and depths (15–60 m) across several regions ca 2–6° latitude apart along the East and West coast of Australia. We investigated the large-scale geographic variation in distribution and abundance of deep-water kelp (>15 m depth) and their relationships with physical variables. Kelp cover generally increased with latitude despite great variability at smaller spatial scales. Maximum depth of kelp occurrence was 40–50 m. Kelp latitudinal distribution along the continent was most strongly related to water temperature and substratum availability. This extensive survey data, coupled with ongoing AUV missions, will allow for the detection of long-term shifts in the distribution and abundance of habitat-forming kelp and the organisms they support on a continental scale, and provide information necessary for successful implementation and management of conservation reserves. PMID:25693066

  2. A Web-based Distributed Voluntary Computing Platform for Large Scale Hydrological Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Agliamzanov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed volunteer computing can enable researchers and scientist to form large parallel computing environments to utilize the computing power of the millions of computers on the Internet, and use them towards running large scale environmental simulations and models to serve the common good of local communities and the world. Recent developments in web technologies and standards allow client-side scripting languages to run at speeds close to native application, and utilize the power of Graphics Processing Units (GPU). Using a client-side scripting language like JavaScript, we have developed an open distributed computing framework that makes it easy for researchers to write their own hydrologic models, and run them on volunteer computers. Users will easily enable their websites for visitors to volunteer sharing their computer resources to contribute running advanced hydrological models and simulations. Using a web-based system allows users to start volunteering their computational resources within seconds without installing any software. The framework distributes the model simulation to thousands of nodes in small spatial and computational sizes. A relational database system is utilized for managing data connections and queue management for the distributed computing nodes. In this paper, we present a web-based distributed volunteer computing platform to enable large scale hydrological simulations and model runs in an open and integrated environment.

  3. Multi-agent based control of large-scale complex systems employing distributed dynamic inference engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daili

    Increasing societal demand for automation has led to considerable efforts to control large-scale complex systems, especially in the area of autonomous intelligent control methods. The control system of a large-scale complex system needs to satisfy four system level requirements: robustness, flexibility, reusability, and scalability. Corresponding to the four system level requirements, there arise four major challenges. First, it is difficult to get accurate and complete information. Second, the system may be physically highly distributed. Third, the system evolves very quickly. Fourth, emergent global behaviors of the system can be caused by small disturbances at the component level. The Multi-Agent Based Control (MABC) method as an implementation of distributed intelligent control has been the focus of research since the 1970s, in an effort to solve the above-mentioned problems in controlling large-scale complex systems. However, to the author's best knowledge, all MABC systems for large-scale complex systems with significant uncertainties are problem-specific and thus difficult to extend to other domains or larger systems. This situation is partly due to the control architecture of multiple agents being determined by agent to agent coupling and interaction mechanisms. Therefore, the research objective of this dissertation is to develop a comprehensive, generalized framework for the control system design of general large-scale complex systems with significant uncertainties, with the focus on distributed control architecture design and distributed inference engine design. A Hybrid Multi-Agent Based Control (HyMABC) architecture is proposed by combining hierarchical control architecture and module control architecture with logical replication rings. First, it decomposes a complex system hierarchically; second, it combines the components in the same level as a module, and then designs common interfaces for all of the components in the same module; third, replications

  4. Distributed weighted least-squares estimation with fast convergence for large-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Damián Edgardo; Fu, Minyue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a distributed weighted least-squares estimation problem for a large-scale system consisting of a network of interconnected sub-systems. Each sub-system is concerned with a subset of the unknown parameters and has a measurement linear in the unknown parameters with additive noise. The distributed estimation task is for each sub-system to compute the globally optimal estimate of its own parameters using its own measurement and information shared with the network through neighborhood communication. We first provide a fully distributed iterative algorithm to asymptotically compute the global optimal estimate. The convergence rate of the algorithm will be maximized using a scaling parameter and a preconditioning method. This algorithm works for a general network. For a network without loops, we also provide a different iterative algorithm to compute the global optimal estimate which converges in a finite number of steps. We include numerical experiments to illustrate the performances of the proposed methods.

  5. On distributed wavefront reconstruction for large-scale adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Cornelis C; Brunner, Elisabeth; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The distributed-spline-based aberration reconstruction (D-SABRE) method is proposed for distributed wavefront reconstruction with applications to large-scale adaptive optics systems. D-SABRE decomposes the wavefront sensor domain into any number of partitions and solves a local wavefront reconstruction problem on each partition using multivariate splines. D-SABRE accuracy is within 1% of a global approach with a speedup that scales quadratically with the number of partitions. The D-SABRE is compared to the distributed cumulative reconstruction (CuRe-D) method in open-loop and closed-loop simulations using the YAO adaptive optics simulation tool. D-SABRE accuracy exceeds CuRe-D for low levels of decomposition, and D-SABRE proved to be more robust to variations in the loop gain.

  6. Large-Scale Distributed Computational Fluid Dynamics on the Information Power Grid Using Globus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash; VanderWijngaart, Robertus; Yarrow, Maurice; Zechtzer, Lou; Foster, Ian; Larsson, Olle

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in which a large-scale scientific application development for tightly-coupled parallel machines is adapted to the distributed execution environment of the Information Power Grid (IPG). A brief overview of the IPG and a description of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithm are given. The Globus metacomputing toolkit is used as the enabling device for the geographically-distributed computation. Modifications related to latency hiding and Load balancing were required for an efficient implementation of the CFD application in the IPG environment. Performance results on a pair of SGI Origin 2000 machines indicate that real scientific applications can be effectively implemented on the IPG; however, a significant amount of continued effort is required to make such an environment useful and accessible to scientists and engineers.

  7. New Distributed Multipole Methods for Accurate Electrostatics for Large-Scale Biomolecular Simultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagui, Celeste

    2006-03-01

    An accurate and numerically efficient treatment of electrostatics is essential for biomolecular simulations, as this stabilizes much of the delicate 3-d structure associated with biomolecules. Currently, force fields such as AMBER and CHARMM assign ``partial charges'' to every atom in a simulation in order to model the interatomic electrostatic forces, so that the calculation of the electrostatics rapidly becomes the computational bottleneck in large-scale simulations. There are two main issues associated with the current treatment of classical electrostatics: (i) how does one eliminate the artifacts associated with the point-charges (e.g., the underdetermined nature of the current RESP fitting procedure for large, flexible molecules) used in the force fields in a physically meaningful way? (ii) how does one efficiently simulate the very costly long-range electrostatic interactions? Recently, we have dealt with both of these challenges as follows. In order to improve the description of the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs), a new distributed multipole analysis based on localized functions -- Wannier, Boys, and Edminston-Ruedenberg -- was introduced, which allows for a first principles calculation of the partial charges and multipoles. Through a suitable generalization of the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and multigrid method, one can treat electrostatic multipoles all the way to hexadecapoles all without prohibitive extra costs. The importance of these methods for large-scale simulations will be discussed, and examplified by simulations from polarizable DNA models.

  8. Large-scale galaxy distribution in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Tucker, D. L.; Fong, R.; Turchaninov, V.; Lin, H.

    2001-04-01

    We make use of three-dimensional clustering analysis, inertia tensor methods, and the minimal spanning tree technique to estimate some physical and statistical characteristics of the large-scale galaxy distribution and, in particular, of the sample of overdense regions seen in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). Our investigation provides additional evidence for a network of structures found in our core sampling analysis of the LCRS: a system of rich sheet-like structures, which in turn surround large underdense regions criss-crossed by a variety of filamentary structures. We find that the overdense regions contain ~40-50 per cent of LCRS galaxies and have proper sizes similar to those of nearby superclusters. The formation of such structures can be roughly described as a non-linear compression of protowalls of typical cross-sectional size ~20-25h-1Mpc this scale is ~5 times the conventional value for the onset of non-linear clustering - to wit, r0, the autocorrelation length for galaxies. The comparison with available simulations and theoretical estimates shows that the formation of structure elements with parameters similar to those observed is presently possible only in low-density cosmological models, Ωmh~0.2-0.3, with a suitable large-scale bias between galaxies and dark matter.

  9. The impact of the stratospheric ozone distribution on large-scale tropospheric systems over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, L. A.; Vieira, L. A.; Prestes, A.; Pacini, A. A.; Rigozo, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the large-scale changes of the climate can be attributed to the cumulative impact of the human activities since the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the impact of natural drivers to the present climate change is still under debate, especially on regional scale. These regional changes over South America can potentially affect large vulnerable populations in the near future. Here, we show that the distribution of the stratospheric ozone can affect the climate patterns over South America and adjoin oceans. The impact of the stratospheric ozone distribution was evaluated employing the Global Atmospheric-Ocean Model developed by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Model E). We conducted two numerical experiments. In the first experiment we used a realistic distribution of the stratospheric ozone, while in the second experiment we employed a uniform longitudinal distribution. We have integrated each model over 60 years. We find that the distribution of stratospheric ozone has a strong influence on the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). However, the Upper Tropospheric Cyclonic Vortex (UTCV) is not affected by the ozone's distribution.

  10. Shared and Distributed Memory Parallel Security Analysis of Large-Scale Source Code and Binary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Barany, G; Panas, T

    2007-08-30

    Many forms of security analysis on large scale applications can be substantially automated but the size and complexity can exceed the time and memory available on conventional desktop computers. Most commercial tools are understandably focused on such conventional desktop resources. This paper presents research work on the parallelization of security analysis of both source code and binaries within our Compass tool, which is implemented using the ROSE source-to-source open compiler infrastructure. We have focused on both shared and distributed memory parallelization of the evaluation of rules implemented as checkers for a wide range of secure programming rules, applicable to desktop machines, networks of workstations and dedicated clusters. While Compass as a tool focuses on source code analysis and reports violations of an extensible set of rules, the binary analysis work uses the exact same infrastructure but is less well developed into an equivalent final tool.

  11. cOSPREY: A Cloud-Based Distributed Algorithm for Large-Scale Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuchao; Dong, Yuxi; Zhou, Jingtian; Hallen, Mark; Donald, Bruce R; Zeng, Jianyang; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Finding the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) of a huge combinatorial search space is the key challenge in computational protein design (CPD) problems. Traditional algorithms lack a scalable and efficient distributed design scheme, preventing researchers from taking full advantage of current cloud infrastructures. We design cloud OSPREY (cOSPREY), an extension to a widely used protein design software OSPREY, to allow the original design framework to scale to the commercial cloud infrastructures. We propose several novel designs to integrate both algorithm and system optimizations, such as GMEC-specific pruning, state search partitioning, asynchronous algorithm state sharing, and fault tolerance. We evaluate cOSPREY on three different cloud platforms using different technologies and show that it can solve a number of large-scale protein design problems that have not been possible with previous approaches.

  12. Calibration of a large-scale semi-distributed hydrological model for the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lohmann, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent major flood losses raised the awareness of flood risk worldwide. In large-scale (e.g., country) flood simulation, semi-distributed hydrological model shows its advantage in capturing spatial heterogeneity of hydrological characteristics within a basin with relatively low computational cost. However, it is still very challenging to calibrate the model over large scale and a wide variety of hydroclimatic conditions. The objectives of this study are (1) to compare the effectiveness of state-of-the-art evolutionary multiobjective algorithms in calibrating a semi-distributed hydrological model used in the RMS flood loss model; (2) to calibrate the model over the entire continental United States. Firstly, the computational efficiency of the following four algorithms is evaluated: the Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII), the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2), the Epsilon-Dominance Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (ɛ-NSGAII), and the Epsilon-Dominance Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm (ɛMOEA). The test was conducted on four river basins with a wide variety of hydro-climatic conditions in US. The optimization objectives include RMSE and high-flow RMSE. Results of the analysis indicate that NSGAII has the best performance in terms of effectiveness and stability. Then we applied the modified version of NSGAII to calibrate the hydrological model over the entire continental US. Comparing with the observation and published data shows the performance of the calibrated model is good overall. This well-calibrated model allows a more accurate modeling of flood risk and loss in the continental United States. Furthermore it will allow underwriters to better manage the exposure.

  13. A practical large scale/high speed data distribution system using 8 mm libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Eight mm tape libraries are known primarily for their small size, large storage capacity, and low cost. However, many applications require an additional attribute which, heretofore, has been lacking -- high transfer rate. Transfer rate is particularly important in a large scale data distribution environment -- an environment in which 8 mm tape should play a very important role. Data distribution is a natural application for 8 mm for several reasons: most large laboratories have access to 8 mm tape drives, 8 mm tapes are upwardly compatible, 8 mm media are very inexpensive, 8 mm media are light weight (important for shipping purposes), and 8 mm media densely pack data (5 gigabytes now and 15 gigabytes on the horizon). If the transfer rate issue were resolved, 8 mm could offer a good solution to the data distribution problem. To that end Exabyte has analyzed four ways to increase its transfer rate: native drive transfer rate increases, data compression at the drive level, tape striping, and homogeneous drive utilization. Exabyte is actively pursuing native drive transfer rate increases and drive level data compression. However, for non-transmitted bulk data applications (which include data distribution) the other two methods (tape striping and homogeneous drive utilization) hold promise.

  14. High-Performance Monitoring Architecture for Large-Scale Distributed Systems Using Event Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, K.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring is an essential process to observe and improve the reliability and the performance of large-scale distributed (LSD) systems. In an LSD environment, a large number of events is generated by the system components during its execution or interaction with external objects (e.g. users or processes). Monitoring such events is necessary for observing the run-time behavior of LSD systems and providing status information required for debugging, tuning and managing such applications. However, correlated events are generated concurrently and could be distributed in various locations in the applications environment which complicates the management decisions process and thereby makes monitoring LSD systems an intricate task. We propose a scalable high-performance monitoring architecture for LSD systems to detect and classify interesting local and global events and disseminate the monitoring information to the corresponding end- points management applications such as debugging and reactive control tools to improve the application performance and reliability. A large volume of events may be generated due to the extensive demands of the monitoring applications and the high interaction of LSD systems. The monitoring architecture employs a high-performance event filtering mechanism to efficiently process the large volume of event traffic generated by LSD systems and minimize the intrusiveness of the monitoring process by reducing the event traffic flow in the system and distributing the monitoring computation. Our architecture also supports dynamic and flexible reconfiguration of the monitoring mechanism via its Instrumentation and subscription components. As a case study, we show how our monitoring architecture can be utilized to improve the reliability and the performance of the Interactive Remote Instruction (IRI) system which is a large-scale distributed system for collaborative distance learning. The filtering mechanism represents an Intrinsic component integrated

  15. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  16. Large Scale Asynchronous and Distributed Multi-Dimensional Replica Exchange Molecular Simulations and Efficiency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Gallicchio, Emilio; Zhang, Bin W.; He, Peng; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe methods to perform replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations asynchronously (ASyncRE). The methods are designed to facilitate large scale REMD simulations on grid computing networks consisting of heterogeneous and distributed computing environments as well as on homogeneous high performance clusters. We have implemented these methods on NSF XSEDE clusters and BOINC distributed computing networks at Temple University, and Brooklyn College at CUNY. They are also being implemented on the IBM World Community Grid. To illustrate the methods we have performed extensive (more than 60 microseconds in aggregate) simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system in the context of one and two dimensional ASyncRE and we used the results to estimate absolute binding free energies using the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM). We propose ways to improve the efficiency of REMD simulations: these include increasing the number of exchanges attempted after a specified MD period up to the fast exchange limit, and/or adjusting the MD period to allow sufficient internal relaxation within each thermodynamic state. Although ASyncRE simulations generally require long MD periods (> picoseconds) per replica exchange cycle to minimize the overhead imposed by heterogeneous computing networks, we found that it is possible to reach an efficiency similar to conventional synchronous REMD, by optimizing the combination of the MD period and the number of exchanges attempted per cycle. PMID:26149645

  17. Large-scale asynchronous and distributed multidimensional replica exchange molecular simulations and efficiency analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F; Gallicchio, Emilio; Zhang, Bin W; He, Peng; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-09-05

    We describe methods to perform replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations asynchronously (ASyncRE). The methods are designed to facilitate large scale REMD simulations on grid computing networks consisting of heterogeneous and distributed computing environments as well as on homogeneous high-performance clusters. We have implemented these methods on NSF (National Science Foundation) XSEDE (Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) clusters and BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) distributed computing networks at Temple University and Brooklyn College at CUNY (the City University of New York). They are also being implemented on the IBM World Community Grid. To illustrate the methods, we have performed extensive (more than 60 ms in aggregate) simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system in the context of one- and two-dimensional ASyncRE, and we used the results to estimate absolute binding free energies using the binding energy distribution analysis method. We propose ways to improve the efficiency of REMD simulations: these include increasing the number of exchanges attempted after a specified molecular dynamics (MD) period up to the fast exchange limit and/or adjusting the MD period to allow sufficient internal relaxation within each thermodynamic state. Although ASyncRE simulations generally require long MD periods (>picoseconds) per replica exchange cycle to minimize the overhead imposed by heterogeneous computing networks, we found that it is possible to reach an efficiency similar to conventional synchronous REMD, by optimizing the combination of the MD period and the number of exchanges attempted per cycle.

  18. Distributed weighted least-squares estimation with fast convergence for large-scale systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián Edgardo; Fu, Minyue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a distributed weighted least-squares estimation problem for a large-scale system consisting of a network of interconnected sub-systems. Each sub-system is concerned with a subset of the unknown parameters and has a measurement linear in the unknown parameters with additive noise. The distributed estimation task is for each sub-system to compute the globally optimal estimate of its own parameters using its own measurement and information shared with the network through neighborhood communication. We first provide a fully distributed iterative algorithm to asymptotically compute the global optimal estimate. The convergence rate of the algorithm will be maximized using a scaling parameter and a preconditioning method. This algorithm works for a general network. For a network without loops, we also provide a different iterative algorithm to compute the global optimal estimate which converges in a finite number of steps. We include numerical experiments to illustrate the performances of the proposed methods. PMID:25641976

  19. Large scale patterns of abundance and distribution of parasites in Mexican bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Gallot-Lavallée, Marie; Schmid-Hempel, Regula; Vandame, Rémy; Vergara, Carlos H; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bumblebees are highly valued for their pollination services in natural ecosystems as well as for agricultural crops. These precious pollinators are known to be declining worldwide, and one major factor contributing to this decline are infections by parasites. Knowledge about parasites in wild bumblebee populations is thus of paramount importance for conservation purposes. We here report the geographical distribution of Crithidia and Nosema, two common parasites of bumblebees, in a yet poorly investigated country: Mexico. Based on sequence divergence of the Cytochrome b and Glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate deshydrogenase (gGPDAH) genes, we discovered the presence of a new Crithidia species, which is mainly distributed in the southern half of the country. It is placed by Bayesian inference as a sister species to C. bombi. We suggest the name Crithidia mexicana for this newly discovered organism. A population of C. expoeki was encountered concentrated on the flanks of the dormant volcanic mountain, Iztaccihuatl, and microsatellite data showed evidence of a bottleneck in this population. This study is the first to provide a large-scale insight into the health status of endemic bumblebees in Mexico, based on a large sample size (n=3,285 bees examined) over a variety of host species and habitats.

  20. Large-scale P2P network based distributed virtual geographic environment (DVGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xicheng; Yu, Liang; Bian, Fuling

    2007-06-01

    Virtual Geographic Environment has raised full concern as a kind of software information system that helps us understand and analyze the real geographic environment, and it has also expanded to application service system in distributed environment--distributed virtual geographic environment system (DVGE), and gets some achievements. However, limited by the factor of the mass data of VGE, the band width of network, as well as numerous requests and economic, etc. DVGE still faces some challenges and problems which directly cause the current DVGE could not provide the public with high-quality service under current network mode. The Rapid development of peer-to-peer network technology has offered new ideas of solutions to the current challenges and problems of DVGE. Peer-to-peer network technology is able to effectively release and search network resources so as to realize efficient share of information. Accordingly, this paper brings forth a research subject on Large-scale peer-to-peer network extension of DVGE as well as a deep study on network framework, routing mechanism, and DVGE data management on P2P network.

  1. Tree Age Distributions Reveal Large-Scale Disturbance-Recovery Cycles in Three Tropical Forests.

    PubMed

    Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Groenendijk, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing realization that a large share of apparently 'virgin' or 'old-growth' tropical forests carries a legacy of past natural or anthropogenic disturbances that have a substantial effect on present-day forest composition, structure and dynamics. Yet, direct evidence of such disturbances is scarce and comparisons of disturbance dynamics across regions even more so. Here we present a tree-ring based reconstruction of disturbance histories from three tropical forest sites in Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We studied temporal patterns in tree regeneration of shade-intolerant tree species, because establishment of these trees is indicative for canopy disturbance. In three large areas (140-300 ha), stem disks and increment cores were collected for a total of 1154 trees (>5 cm diameter) from 12 tree species to estimate the age of every tree. Using these age estimates we produced population age distributions, which were analyzed for evidence of past disturbance. Our approach allowed us to reconstruct patterns of tree establishment over a period of around 250 years. In Bolivia, we found continuous regeneration rates of three species and a peaked age distribution of a long-lived pioneer species. In both Cameroon and Thailand we found irregular age distributions, indicating strongly reduced regeneration rates over a period of 10-60 years. Past fires, windthrow events or anthropogenic disturbances all provide plausible explanations for the reported variation in tree age across the three sites. Our results support the recent idea that the long-term dynamics of tropical forests are impacted by large-scale disturbance-recovery cycles, similar to those driving temperate forest dynamics.

  2. Tree Age Distributions Reveal Large-Scale Disturbance-Recovery Cycles in Three Tropical Forests

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Groenendijk, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing realization that a large share of apparently ‘virgin’ or ‘old-growth’ tropical forests carries a legacy of past natural or anthropogenic disturbances that have a substantial effect on present-day forest composition, structure and dynamics. Yet, direct evidence of such disturbances is scarce and comparisons of disturbance dynamics across regions even more so. Here we present a tree-ring based reconstruction of disturbance histories from three tropical forest sites in Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We studied temporal patterns in tree regeneration of shade-intolerant tree species, because establishment of these trees is indicative for canopy disturbance. In three large areas (140–300 ha), stem disks and increment cores were collected for a total of 1154 trees (>5 cm diameter) from 12 tree species to estimate the age of every tree. Using these age estimates we produced population age distributions, which were analyzed for evidence of past disturbance. Our approach allowed us to reconstruct patterns of tree establishment over a period of around 250 years. In Bolivia, we found continuous regeneration rates of three species and a peaked age distribution of a long-lived pioneer species. In both Cameroon and Thailand we found irregular age distributions, indicating strongly reduced regeneration rates over a period of 10–60 years. Past fires, windthrow events or anthropogenic disturbances all provide plausible explanations for the reported variation in tree age across the three sites. Our results support the recent idea that the long-term dynamics of tropical forests are impacted by large-scale disturbance-recovery cycles, similar to those driving temperate forest dynamics. PMID:28105034

  3. Functional and large-scale testing of the ATLAS distributed analysis facilities with Ganga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderster, D. C.; Elmsheuser, J.; Biglietti, M.; Galeazzi, F.; Serfon, C.; Slater, M.

    2010-04-01

    Effective distributed user analysis requires a system which meets the demands of running arbitrary user applications on sites with varied configurations and availabilities. The challenge of tracking such a system requires a tool to monitor not only the functional statuses of each grid site, but also to perform large-scale analysis challenges on the ATLAS grids. This work presents one such tool, the ATLAS GangaRobot, and the results of its use in tests and challenges. For functional testing, the GangaRobot performs daily tests of all sites; specifically, a set of exemplary applications are submitted to all sites and then monitored for success and failure conditions. These results are fed back into Ganga to improve job placements by avoiding currently problematic sites. For analysis challenges, a cloud is first prepared by replicating a number of desired DQ2 datasets across all the sites. Next, the GangaRobot is used to submit and manage a large number of jobs targeting these datasets. The high-loads resulting from multiple parallel instances of the GangaRobot exposes shortcomings in storage and network configurations. The results from a series of cloud-by-cloud analysis challenges starting in fall 2008 are presented.

  4. Rucio - The next generation of large scale distributed system for ATLAS Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garonne, V.; Vigne, R.; Stewart, G.; Barisits, M.; eermann, T. B.; Lassnig, M.; Serfon, C.; Goossens, L.; Nairz, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Rucio is the next-generation Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and "Big Data" computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quijote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 140 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio will deal with these issues by relying on a conceptual data model and new technology to ensure system scalability, address new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. We present the key concepts of Rucio, including its data organization/representation and a model of how to manage central group and user activities. The Rucio design, and the technology it employs, is described, specifically looking at its RESTful architecture and the various software components it uses. We show also the performance of the system.

  5. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Klein, Eduardo; Iken, Katrin; Weinberger, Vanessa; Konar, Brenda; Trott, Tom; Pohle, Gerhard; Bigatti, Gregorio; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Mead, Angela; Palomo, Gabriela; Ortiz, Manuel; Gobin, Judith; Sardi, Adriana; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Knowlton, Ann; Wong, Melisa; Peralta, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1) describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2) identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3) identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME) following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas) standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org). A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2%) appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs) followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs). In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska). No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05). Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  6. Large-Scale Spatial Distribution Patterns of Gastropod Assemblages in Rocky Shores

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Klein, Eduardo; Iken, Katrin; Weinberger, Vanessa; Konar, Brenda; Trott, Tom; Pohle, Gerhard; Bigatti, Gregorio; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Mead, Angela; Palomo, Gabriela; Ortiz, Manuel; Gobin, Judith; Sardi, Adriana; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Knowlton, Ann; Wong, Melisa; Peralta, Ana C.

    2013-01-01

    Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1) describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2) identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3) identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME) following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas) standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org). A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2%) appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs) followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs). In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska). No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05). Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages. PMID

  7. A passive Distributed Temperature Sensing approach to large-scale soil moisture validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Rutten, M. M.; Krzeminksa, D.; van de Giesen, N. C.; Bogaard, T. A.; Selker, J.; Sailhac, P.

    2009-04-01

    Global monitoring of soil moisture is key to quantifying and understanding the exchanges of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission represents the first dedicated space-borne mission to observe soil moisture. To validate the observations from SMOS, in-situ measurements must be made over a wide variety of soil and land cover types. In recent years, Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) has been used in a wide variety of applications including estimating the seepage in polders, to measuring flow into streams. Active DTS, in which the cables observe the response to a heat pulse, has been successfully used to measure soil moisture in several studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of passive Distributed Temperature Sensing as a relatively portable, and inexpensive alternative approach to measuring soil moisture on a large-scale. From June to September 2008, fibre-optic cables were used to monitor temperature at 5cm and 10cm depth at a field site at Monster in the Netherlands. Meteorological data, as well as independent soil temperature and soil moisture profile data were also recorded. Through its impact on diffusivity, soil moisture influences heat transport between the cables. Here, we demonstrate how solving for the optimum parameters of the advection-diffusion equation can yield a time-series of 3-hourly soil moisture. We will also discuss the lessons learned from this experiment, and a new protocol for using this technique in future planned field experiments.

  8. Large-Scale Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderms in Nearshore Rocky Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

    2010-01-01

    This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (<1–5 species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m2 quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m−2. In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m2 quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m−2. Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a

  9. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of echinoderms in nearshore rocky habitats.

    PubMed

    Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

    2010-11-05

    This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (<1-5 species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m(2) quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m(-2). In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m(2) quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m(-2). Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by

  10. Design and implementation of a distributed large-scale spatial database system based on J2EE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianya; Chen, Nengcheng; Zhu, Xinyan; Zhang, Xia

    2003-03-01

    With the increasing maturity of distributed object technology, CORBA, .NET and EJB are universally used in traditional IT field. However, theories and practices of distributed spatial database need farther improvement in virtue of contradictions between large scale spatial data and limited network bandwidth or between transitory session and long transaction processing. Differences and trends among of CORBA, .NET and EJB are discussed in details, afterwards the concept, architecture and characteristic of distributed large-scale seamless spatial database system based on J2EE is provided, which contains GIS client application, web server, GIS application server and spatial data server. Moreover the design and implementation of components of GIS client application based on JavaBeans, the GIS engine based on servlet, the GIS Application server based on GIS enterprise JavaBeans(contains session bean and entity bean) are explained.Besides, the experiments of relation of spatial data and response time under different conditions are conducted, which proves that distributed spatial database system based on J2EE can be used to manage, distribute and share large scale spatial data on Internet. Lastly, a distributed large-scale seamless image database based on Internet is presented.

  11. An Alternative Way to Model Population Ability Distributions in Large-Scale Educational Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Eunike; Xu, Xueli; von Davier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In large-scale educational surveys, a latent regression model is used to compensate for the shortage of cognitive information. Conventionally, the covariates in the latent regression model are principal components extracted from background data. This operational method has several important disadvantages, such as the handling of missing data and…

  12. Geographic distribution, large-scale spatial structure and diversity of parasitoids of the seed-feeding beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Haga, E B; Costa, V A; Rossi, M N

    2016-10-21

    Bruchine beetles are highly host-specific seed feeders during the larval stage. Although some specific parasitoid families have been recorded attacking bruchine beetles, most studies have been done at small spatial scales. Therefore, the current knowledge about the diversity and the geographic distribution of parasitoid species parasitizing bruchines is scarce, especially at a wide geographic area that extends over large distances through a latitudinal cline (i.e. large-scale spatial structure). The present study determined the species richness and evenness of parasitoids attacking the bruchine beetle Acanthoscelides macrophthalmus feeding on Leucaena leucocephala seeds, examined their geographic distribution, and characterized the large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition. A total of 1420 parasitoids (all Hymenoptera) belonging to four families, five subfamilies and eight species were collected (genera: Horismenus, Paracrias, Urosigalphus, Stenocorse, Chryseida, Eupelmus). Most parasitoid species showed wide spatial distribution, high evenness in species abundance and the species richness estimators were close to stabilization (approximately eight species). Overall, greater similarity was observed in the species composition of plant populations near to each other than those farther apart, revealing a large-scale spatial structure in parasitoid species composition.

  13. Large-Scale Genetic Structuring of a Widely Distributed Carnivore - The Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx)

    PubMed Central

    Rueness, Eli K.; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables. PMID:24695745

  14. Large-scale genetic structuring of a widely distributed carnivore--the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Rueness, Eli K; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables.

  15. Tail-scope: Using friends to estimate heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale complex networks.

    PubMed

    Eom, Young-Ho; Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2015-05-11

    Many complex networks in natural and social phenomena have often been characterized by heavy-tailed degree distributions. However, due to rapidly growing size of network data and concerns on privacy issues about using these data, it becomes more difficult to analyze complete data sets. Thus, it is crucial to devise effective and efficient estimation methods for heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale networks only using local information of a small fraction of sampled nodes. Here we propose a tail-scope method based on local observational bias of the friendship paradox. We show that the tail-scope method outperforms the uniform node sampling for estimating heavy tails of degree distributions, while the opposite tendency is observed in the range of small degrees. In order to take advantages of both sampling methods, we devise the hybrid method that successfully recovers the whole range of degree distributions. Our tail-scope method shows how structural heterogeneities of large-scale complex networks can be used to effectively reveal the network structure only with limited local information.

  16. Tail-scope: Using friends to estimate heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    Many complex networks in natural and social phenomena have often been characterized by heavy-tailed degree distributions. However, due to rapidly growing size of network data and concerns on privacy issues about using these data, it becomes more difficult to analyze complete data sets. Thus, it is crucial to devise effective and efficient estimation methods for heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale networks only using local information of a small fraction of sampled nodes. Here we propose a tail-scope method based on local observational bias of the friendship paradox. We show that the tail-scope method outperforms the uniform node sampling for estimating heavy tails of degree distributions, while the opposite tendency is observed in the range of small degrees. In order to take advantages of both sampling methods, we devise the hybrid method that successfully recovers the whole range of degree distributions. Our tail-scope method shows how structural heterogeneities of large-scale complex networks can be used to effectively reveal the network structure only with limited local information.

  17. Tail-scope: Using friends to estimate heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Young-Ho; Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Many complex networks in natural and social phenomena have often been characterized by heavy-tailed degree distributions. However, due to rapidly growing size of network data and concerns on privacy issues about using these data, it becomes more difficult to analyze complete data sets. Thus, it is crucial to devise effective and efficient estimation methods for heavy tails of degree distributions in large-scale networks only using local information of a small fraction of sampled nodes. Here we propose a tail-scope method based on local observational bias of the friendship paradox. We show that the tail-scope method outperforms the uniform node sampling for estimating heavy tails of degree distributions, while the opposite tendency is observed in the range of small degrees. In order to take advantages of both sampling methods, we devise the hybrid method that successfully recovers the whole range of degree distributions. Our tail-scope method shows how structural heterogeneities of large-scale complex networks can be used to effectively reveal the network structure only with limited local information. PMID:25959097

  18. DC-DC Converter Topology Assessment for Large Scale Distributed Photovoltaic Plant Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Agamy, Mohammed S; Harfman-Todorovic, Maja; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan A; Steigerwald, Robert L; Jiang, Yan; Essakiappan, Somasundaram

    2011-07-01

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) plant architectures are emerging as a replacement for the classical central inverter based systems. However, power converters of smaller ratings may have a negative impact on system efficiency, reliability and cost. Therefore, it is necessary to design converters with very high efficiency and simpler topologies in order not to offset the benefits gained by using distributed PV systems. In this paper an evaluation of the selection criteria for dc-dc converters for distributed PV systems is performed; this evaluation includes efficiency, simplicity of design, reliability and cost. Based on this evaluation, recommendations can be made as to which class of converters is best fit for this application.

  19. Empirical distributions of F(ST) from large-scale human polymorphism data.

    PubMed

    Elhaik, Eran

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the apportionment of human genetic variation have long established that most human variation is within population groups and that the additional variation between population groups is small but greatest when comparing different continental populations. These studies often used Wright's F(ST) that apportions the standardized variance in allele frequencies within and between population groups. Because local adaptations increase population differentiation, high-F(ST) may be found at closely linked loci under selection and used to identify genes undergoing directional or heterotic selection. We re-examined these processes using HapMap data. We analyzed 3 million SNPs on 602 samples from eight worldwide populations and a consensus subset of 1 million SNPs found in all populations. We identified four major features of the data: First, a hierarchically F(ST) analysis showed that only a paucity (12%) of the total genetic variation is distributed between continental populations and even a lesser genetic variation (1%) is found between intra-continental populations. Second, the global F(ST) distribution closely follows an exponential distribution. Third, although the overall F(ST) distribution is similarly shaped (inverse J), F(ST) distributions varies markedly by allele frequency when divided into non-overlapping groups by allele frequency range. Because the mean allele frequency is a crude indicator of allele age, these distributions mark the time-dependent change in genetic differentiation. Finally, the change in mean-F(ST) of these groups is linear in allele frequency. These results suggest that investigating the extremes of the F(ST) distribution for each allele frequency group is more efficient for detecting selection. Consequently, we demonstrate that such extreme SNPs are more clustered along the chromosomes than expected from linkage disequilibrium for each allele frequency group. These genomic regions are therefore likely candidates for natural selection.

  20. Analysis of large-scale distributed knowledge sources via autonomous cooperative graph mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, Georgiy; Ortiz, Andres; Yan, Xifeng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a model for processing distributed relational data across multiple autonomous heterogeneous computing resources in environments with limited control, resource failures, and communication bottlenecks. Our model exploits dependencies in the data to enable collaborative distributed querying in noisy data. The collaboration policy for computational resources is efficiently constructed from the belief propagation algorithm. To scale to large data sizes, we employ a combination of priority-based filtering, incremental processing, and communication compression techniques. Our solution achieved high accuracy of analysis results and orders of magnitude improvements in computation time compared to the centralized graph matching solution.

  1. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large-scale precipitation change.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien

    2015-12-28

    The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol-induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol-cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data.

  2. Large-Scale Merging of Histograms using Distributed In-Memory Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomer, Jakob; Ganis, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    Most high-energy physics analysis jobs are embarrassingly parallel except for the final merging of the output objects, which are typically histograms. Currently, the merging of output histograms scales badly. The running time for distributed merging depends not only on the overall number of bins but also on the number partial histogram output files. That means, while the time to analyze data decreases linearly with the number of worker nodes, the time to merge the histograms in fact increases with the number of worker nodes. On the grid, merging jobs that take a few hours are not unusual. In order to improve the situation, we present a distributed and decentral merging algorithm whose running time is independent of the number of worker nodes. We exploit full bisection bandwidth of local networks and we keep all intermediate results in memory. We present benchmarks from an implementation using the parallel ROOT facility (PROOF) and RAMCloud, a distributed key-value store that keeps all data in DRAM.

  3. Large scale patterns in vertical distribution and behaviour of mesopelagic scattering layers

    PubMed Central

    Klevjer, T. A.; Irigoien, X.; Røstad, A.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; Benítez-Barrios, V. M.; Kaartvedt., S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that previous estimates of mesopelagic biomasses are severely biased, with the new, higher estimates underlining the need to unveil behaviourally mediated coupling between shallow and deep ocean habitats. We analysed vertical distribution and diel vertical migration (DVM) of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers (SLs) recorded at 38 kHz across oceanographic regimes encountered during the circumglobal Malaspina expedition. Mesopelagic SLs were observed in all areas covered, but vertical distributions and DVM patterns varied markedly. The distribution of mesopelagic backscatter was deepest in the southern Indian Ocean (weighted mean daytime depth: WMD 590 m) and shallowest at the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern Pacific (WMD 350 m). DVM was evident in all areas covered, on average ~50% of mesopelagic backscatter made daily excursions from mesopelagic depths to shallow waters. There were marked differences in migrating proportions between the regions, ranging from ~20% in the Indian Ocean to ~90% in the Eastern Pacific. Overall the data suggest strong spatial gradients in mesopelagic DVM patterns, with implied ecological and biogeochemical consequences. Our results suggest that parts of this spatial variability can be explained by horizontal patterns in physical-chemical properties of water masses, such as oxygen, temperature and turbidity. PMID:26813333

  4. 'Oorja' in India: Assessing a large-scale commercial distribution of advanced biomass stoves to households.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Mark C; Phadke, Himani; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Shrimali, Gireesh; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    Replacing traditional stoves with advanced alternatives that burn more cleanly has the potential to ameliorate major health problems associated with indoor air pollution in developing countries. With a few exceptions, large government and charitable programs to distribute advanced stoves have not had the desired impact. Commercially-based distributions that seek cost recovery and even profits might plausibly do better, both because they encourage distributors to supply and promote products that people want and because they are based around properly-incentivized supply chains that could more be scalable, sustainable, and replicable. The sale in India of over 400,000 "Oorja" stoves to households from 2006 onwards represents the largest commercially-based distribution of a gasification-type advanced biomass stove. BP's Emerging Consumer Markets (ECM) division and then successor company First Energy sold this stove and the pelletized biomass fuel on which it operates. We assess the success of this effort and the role its commercial aspect played in outcomes using a survey of 998 households in areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka where the stove was sold as well as detailed interviews with BP and First Energy staff. Statistical models based on this data indicate that Oorja purchase rates were significantly influenced by the intensity of Oorja marketing in a region as well as by pre-existing stove mix among households. The highest rate of adoption came from LPG-using households for which Oorja's pelletized biomass fuel reduced costs. Smoke- and health-related messages from Oorja marketing did not significantly influence the purchase decision, although they did appear to affect household perceptions about smoke. By the time of our survey, only 9% of households that purchased Oorja were still using the stove, the result in large part of difficulties First Energy encountered in developing a viable supply chain around low-cost procurement of "agricultural waste" to make

  5. Large-Scale CORBA-Distributed Software Framework for NIF Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, R W; Fong, K W; Sanchez, R J; Tappero, J D; Woodruff, J P

    2001-10-16

    The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) is based on a scalable software framework that is distributed over some 325 computers throughout the NIF facility. The framework provides templates and services at multiple levels of abstraction for the construction of software applications that communicate via CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture). Various forms of object-oriented software design patterns are implemented as templates to be extended by application software. Developers extend the framework base classes to model the numerous physical control points, thereby sharing the functionality defined by the base classes. About 56,000 software objects each individually addressed through CORBA are to be created in the complete ICCS. Most objects have a persistent state that is initialized at system start-up and stored in a database. Additional framework services are provided by centralized server programs that implement events, alerts, reservations, message logging, database/file persistence, name services, and process management. The ICCS software framework approach allows for efficient construction of a software system that supports a large number of distributed control points representing a complex control application.

  6. Cost-Efficient and Multi-Functional Secure Aggregation in Large Scale Distributed Application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Li, Wenjun; Sun, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Secure aggregation is an essential component of modern distributed applications and data mining platforms. Aggregated statistical results are typically adopted in constructing a data cube for data analysis at multiple abstraction levels in data warehouse platforms. Generating different types of statistical results efficiently at the same time (or referred to as enabling multi-functional support) is a fundamental requirement in practice. However, most of the existing schemes support a very limited number of statistics. Securely obtaining typical statistical results simultaneously in the distribution system, without recovering the original data, is still an open problem. In this paper, we present SEDAR, which is a SEcure Data Aggregation scheme under the Range segmentation model. Range segmentation model is proposed to reduce the communication cost by capturing the data characteristics, and different range uses different aggregation strategy. For raw data in the dominant range, SEDAR encodes them into well defined vectors to provide value-preservation and order-preservation, and thus provides the basis for multi-functional aggregation. A homomorphic encryption scheme is used to achieve data privacy. We also present two enhanced versions. The first one is a Random based SEDAR (REDAR), and the second is a Compression based SEDAR (CEDAR). Both of them can significantly reduce communication cost with the trade-off lower security and lower accuracy, respectively. Experimental evaluations, based on six different scenes of real data, show that all of them have an excellent performance on cost and accuracy. PMID:27551747

  7. Investigation of Homogeneity and Matter Distribution on Large Scales Using Large Quasar Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hua

    2015-12-01

    We use 20 large quasar group (LQG) samples in Park et al. (2015) to investigate the homogeneity of the 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 1.6 Universe (z denotes the redshift). For comparison, we also employ the 12 LQGs samples at 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 2 in Komberg et al. (1996) to do the analysis. We calculate the bias factor b and the two-point correlation function ξLQG for such groups for three different density profiles of the LQG dark matter halos, i.e. the isothermal profile, the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, and the (gravitational) lensing profile. We consider the ΛCDM (cold dark matter plus a cosmological constant Λ) underlying matter power spectrum with Ωm = 0.28, ΩΛ = 0.72, the Hubble constant H0 = 100 h·km·s-1· Mpc-1 with h = 0.72. Dividing the samples into three redshift bins, we find that the LQGs with higher redshift are more biased and correlated than those with lower redshift. The homogeneity scale RH of the LQG distribution is also deduced from theory. It is defined as the comoving radius of the sphere inside which the number of LQGs N(< r) is proportional to r3 within 1%, or equivalently above which the correlation dimension of the sample D2 is within 1% of D2 = 3. For Park et al.'s samples and the NFW dark matter halo profile, the homogeneity scales of the LQG distribution are RH ⋍ 247 h-1· Mpc for 0.2 < z ≤ 0.6, RH ⋍ 360 h-1· Mpc for 0.6 < z ≤ 1.2, and RH ⋍ 480 h-1· Mpc for 1.2 < z ≲ 1.6. The maximum extent of the LQG samples are beyond RH in each bin, showing that the LQG samples are not homogeneously distributed on such a scale, i.e. a length range of ˜ 500 h-1. Mpc and a mass scale of ˜1014M⊙. The possibilities of a top-down structure formation process as was predicted by the hot/warm dark matter (WDM) scenarios and the redshift evolution of bias factor b and correlation amplitude ξLQG of the LQGs as a consequence of the cosmic expansion are both discussed. Different results were obtained based on the LQG sample in Komberg et al. (1996

  8. 3D-Simulation Of Concentration Distributions Inside Large-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnewski, R.; Ratschow, L.; Hartge, E. U.; Werthe, J.

    With increasing size of modern CFB combustors the lateral mixing of fuels and secondary air gains more and more importance. Strong concentration gradients, which result from improper lateral mixing, can lead to operational problems, high flue gas emissions and lower boiler efficiencies. A 3D-model for the simulation of local gas and solids concentrations inside industrial-sized CFB boilers has been developed. The model is based on a macroscopic approach and considers all major mechanisms during fuel spreading and subsequent combustion of char and volatiles. Typical characteristics of modern boilers like staged combustion, a smaller cross-sectional area in the lower section of the combustion chamber and the co-combustion of additional fuels with coal can be considered. The 252 MWth combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG is used for the validation of the model. A comprehensive picture of the local conditions inside the combustion chamber is achieved by the combination of local gas measurements and the three-dimensional simulation of concentration distributions.

  9. Reconstruction of air-shower parameters for large-scale radio detectors using the lateral distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostunin, D.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Hiller, R.; Schröder, F. G.; Lenok, V.; Levinson, E.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate features of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air-showers with primary energies Epr > 0.1 EeV and its connection to air-shower parameters such as energy and shower maximum using CoREAS simulations made for the configuration of the Tunka-Rex antenna array. Taking into account all significant contributions to the total radio emission, such as by the geomagnetic effect, the charge excess, and the atmospheric refraction we parameterize the radio LDF. This parameterization is two-dimensional and has several free parameters. The large number of free parameters is not suitable for experiments of sparse arrays operating at low SNR (signal-to-noise ratios). Thus, exploiting symmetries, we decrease the number of free parameters based on the shower geometry and reduce the LDF to a simple one-dimensional function. The remaining parameters can be fit with a small number of points, i.e. as few as the signal from three antennas above detection threshold. Finally, we present a method for the reconstruction of air-shower parameters, in particular, energy and Xmax (shower maximum), which can be reached with a theoretical accuracy of better than 15% and 30 g/cm2, respectively.

  10. An incremental and distributed inference method for large-scale ontologies based on MapReduce paradigm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Huang, Keman; Li, Jianqiang; Zhou, MengChu

    2015-01-01

    With the upcoming data deluge of semantic data, the fast growth of ontology bases has brought significant challenges in performing efficient and scalable reasoning. Traditional centralized reasoning methods are not sufficient to process large ontologies. Distributed reasoning methods are thus required to improve the scalability and performance of inferences. This paper proposes an incremental and distributed inference method for large-scale ontologies by using MapReduce, which realizes high-performance reasoning and runtime searching, especially for incremental knowledge base. By constructing transfer inference forest and effective assertional triples, the storage is largely reduced and the reasoning process is simplified and accelerated. Finally, a prototype system is implemented on a Hadoop framework and the experimental results validate the usability and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Assessing Impact of Large-Scale Distributed Residential HVAC Control Optimization on Electricity Grid Operation and Renewable Energy Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Charles D.

    Demand management is an important component of the emerging Smart Grid, and a potential solution to the supply-demand imbalance occurring increasingly as intermittent renewable electricity is added to the generation mix. Model predictive control (MPC) has shown great promise for controlling HVAC demand in commercial buildings, making it an ideal solution to this problem. MPC is believed to hold similar promise for residential applications, yet very few examples exist in the literature despite a growing interest in residential demand management. This work explores the potential for residential buildings to shape electric demand at the distribution feeder level in order to reduce peak demand, reduce system ramping, and increase load factor using detailed sub-hourly simulations of thousands of buildings coupled to distribution power flow software. More generally, this work develops a methodology for the directed optimization of residential HVAC operation using a distributed but directed MPC scheme that can be applied to today's programmable thermostat technologies to address the increasing variability in electric supply and demand. Case studies incorporating varying levels of renewable energy generation demonstrate the approach and highlight important considerations for large-scale residential model predictive control.

  12. A Capacity Design Method of Distributed Battery Storage for Controlling Power Variation with Large-Scale Photovoltaic Sources in Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Gunji, Keiko; Yamazaki, Jun; Watanabe, Masahiro

    A design method for distributed battery storage capacity has been developed for evaluating battery storage advantage on demand-supply imbalance control in distribution systems with which large-scale home photovoltaic powers connected. The proposed method is based on a linear storage capacity minimization model with design basis demand load and photovoltaic output time series subjective to battery management constraints. The design method has been experimentally applied to a sample distribution system with substation storage and terminal area storage. From the numerical results, the developed method successfully clarifies the charge-discharge control and stored power variation, satisfies peak cut requirement, and pinpoints the minimum distributed storage capacity.

  13. On Event-Triggered Adaptive Architectures for Decentralized and Distributed Control of Large-Scale Modular Systems.

    PubMed

    Albattat, Ali; Gruenwald, Benjamin C; Yucelen, Tansel

    2016-08-16

    The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in physical systems controlled over wireless networks (networked control systems). These systems allow the computation of control signals via processors that are not attached to the physical systems, and the feedback loops are closed over wireless networks. The contribution of this paper is to design and analyze event-triggered decentralized and distributed adaptive control architectures for uncertain networked large-scale modular systems; that is, systems consist of physically-interconnected modules controlled over wireless networks. Specifically, the proposed adaptive architectures guarantee overall system stability while reducing wireless network utilization and achieving a given system performance in the presence of system uncertainties that can result from modeling and degraded modes of operation of the modules and their interconnections between each other. In addition to the theoretical findings including rigorous system stability and the boundedness analysis of the closed-loop dynamical system, as well as the characterization of the effect of user-defined event-triggering thresholds and the design parameters of the proposed adaptive architectures on the overall system performance, an illustrative numerical example is further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed decentralized and distributed control approaches.

  14. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill; Feiereisen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The term "Grid" refers to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. The vision for NASN's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks that will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. IPG development and deployment is addressing requirements obtained by analyzing a number of different application areas, in particular from the NASA Aero-Space Technology Enterprise. This analysis has focussed primarily on two types of users: The scientist / design engineer whose primary interest is problem solving (e.g., determining wing aerodynamic characteristics in many different operating environments), and whose primary interface to IPG will be through various sorts of problem solving frameworks. The second type of user if the tool designer: The computational scientists who convert physics and mathematics into code that can simulate the physical world. These are the two primary users of IPG, and they have rather different requirements. This paper describes the current state of IPG (the operational testbed), the set of capabilities being put into place for the operational prototype IPG, as well as some of the longer term R&D tasks.

  15. On Event-Triggered Adaptive Architectures for Decentralized and Distributed Control of Large-Scale Modular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Albattat, Ali; Gruenwald, Benjamin C.; Yucelen, Tansel

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased interest in physical systems controlled over wireless networks (networked control systems). These systems allow the computation of control signals via processors that are not attached to the physical systems, and the feedback loops are closed over wireless networks. The contribution of this paper is to design and analyze event-triggered decentralized and distributed adaptive control architectures for uncertain networked large-scale modular systems; that is, systems consist of physically-interconnected modules controlled over wireless networks. Specifically, the proposed adaptive architectures guarantee overall system stability while reducing wireless network utilization and achieving a given system performance in the presence of system uncertainties that can result from modeling and degraded modes of operation of the modules and their interconnections between each other. In addition to the theoretical findings including rigorous system stability and the boundedness analysis of the closed-loop dynamical system, as well as the characterization of the effect of user-defined event-triggering thresholds and the design parameters of the proposed adaptive architectures on the overall system performance, an illustrative numerical example is further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed decentralized and distributed control approaches. PMID:27537894

  16. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa: does climate matter?

    PubMed

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope; Hürlimann, Eveline; Schur, Nadine; Saarnak, Christopher F L; Simoonga, Christopher; Mubita, Patricia; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Rahbek, Carsten; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2013-11-01

    The geographical ranges of most species, including many infectious disease agents and their vectors and intermediate hosts, are assumed to be constrained by climatic tolerances, mainly temperature. It has been suggested that global warming will cause an expansion of the areas potentially suitable for infectious disease transmission. However, the transmission of infectious diseases is governed by a myriad of ecological, economic, evolutionary and social factors. Hence, a deeper understanding of the total disease system (pathogens, vectors and hosts) and its drivers is important for predicting responses to climate change. Here, we combine a growing degree day model for Schistosoma mansoni with species distribution models for the intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria spp.) to investigate large-scale environmental determinants of the distribution of the African S. mansoni-Biomphalaria system and potential impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail-parasite model was evaluated against a comprehensive compilation of historical S. mansoni parasitological survey records, and then examined for two climate change scenarios of increasing severity for 2080. Future projections indicate that while the potential S. mansoni transmission area expands, the snail ranges are more likely to contract and/or move into cooler areas in the south and east. Importantly, we also note that even though climate per se matters, the impact of humans on habitat play a crucial role in determining the distribution of the intermediate host snails in Africa. Thus, a future contraction in the geographical range size of the intermediate host snails caused by climatic changes does not necessarily translate into a decrease or zero-sum change in human

  17. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill

    2000-01-01

    We use the term "Grid" to refer to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. This infrastructure includes: (1) Tools for constructing collaborative, application oriented Problem Solving Environments / Frameworks (the primary user interfaces for Grids); (2) Programming environments, tools, and services providing various approaches for building applications that use aggregated computing and storage resources, and federated data sources; (3) Comprehensive and consistent set of location independent tools and services for accessing and managing dynamic collections of widely distributed resources: heterogeneous computing systems, storage systems, real-time data sources and instruments, human collaborators, and communications systems; (4) Operational infrastructure including management tools for distributed systems and distributed resources, user services, accounting and auditing, strong and location independent user authentication and authorization, and overall system security services The vision for NASA's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks. Such Grids will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. Examples of these problems include: (1) Coupled, multidisciplinary simulations too large for single systems (e.g., multi-component NPSS turbomachine simulation); (2) Use of widely distributed, federated data archives (e.g., simultaneous access to metrological, topological, aircraft performance, and flight path scheduling databases supporting a National Air Space Simulation systems}; (3

  18. Global direct pressures on biodiversity by large-scale metal mining: Spatial distribution and implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Murguía, Diego I; Bringezu, Stefan; Schaldach, Rüdiger

    2016-09-15

    Biodiversity loss is widely recognized as a serious global environmental change process. While large-scale metal mining activities do not belong to the top drivers of such change, these operations exert or may intensify pressures on biodiversity by adversely changing habitats, directly and indirectly, at local and regional scales. So far, analyses of global spatial dynamics of mining and its burden on biodiversity focused on the overlap between mines and protected areas or areas of high value for conservation. However, it is less clear how operating metal mines are globally exerting pressure on zones of different biodiversity richness; a similar gap exists for unmined but known mineral deposits. By using vascular plants' diversity as a proxy to quantify overall biodiversity, this study provides a first examination of the global spatial distribution of mines and deposits for five key metals across different biodiversity zones. The results indicate that mines and deposits are not randomly distributed, but concentrated within intermediate and high diversity zones, especially bauxite and silver. In contrast, iron, gold, and copper mines and deposits are closer to a more proportional distribution while showing a high concentration in the intermediate biodiversity zone. Considering the five metals together, 63% and 61% of available mines and deposits, respectively, are located in intermediate diversity zones, comprising 52% of the global land terrestrial surface. 23% of mines and 20% of ore deposits are located in areas of high plant diversity, covering 17% of the land. 13% of mines and 19% of deposits are in areas of low plant diversity, comprising 31% of the land surface. Thus, there seems to be potential for opening new mines in areas of low biodiversity in the future.

  19. The VVDS: Early Results on the Large Scale Structure Distribution of Galaxies out to z ˜ 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Vettolani, G.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bondi, M.; Bottini, D.; Busarello, G.; Cappi, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Charlot, S.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Mellier, Y.; Meneux, B.; Merluzzi, P.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Rizzo, D.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) is an on-going program to map the evolution of galaxies, large scale structures and AGNs from the redshift measurement of more than 100000 objects down to a magnitude IAB=24, in combination with a multi-wavelength dataset from radio to X-rays. We present here the first results obtained from more than 20000 spectra. Dedicated effort has been invested to successfully enter the "redshift desert" 1.5distribution of a well controlled sample of faint galaxies, and show that significant clustering is detected out to z~1.5.

  20. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill

    2000-01-01

    We use the term "Grid" to refer to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. This infrastructure includes: (1) Tools for constructing collaborative, application oriented Problem Solving Environments / Frameworks (the primary user interfaces for Grids); (2) Programming environments, tools, and services providing various approaches for building applications that use aggregated computing and storage resources, and federated data sources; (3) Comprehensive and consistent set of location independent tools and services for accessing and managing dynamic collections of widely distributed resources: heterogeneous computing systems, storage systems, real-time data sources and instruments, human collaborators, and communications systems; (4) Operational infrastructure including management tools for distributed systems and distributed resources, user services, accounting and auditing, strong and location independent user authentication and authorization, and overall system security services The vision for NASA's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks. Such Grids will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. Examples of these problems include: (1) Coupled, multidisciplinary simulations too large for single systems (e.g., multi-component NPSS turbomachine simulation); (2) Use of widely distributed, federated data archives (e.g., simultaneous access to metrological, topological, aircraft performance, and flight path scheduling databases supporting a National Air Space Simulation systems}; (3

  1. Robust scalable stabilisability conditions for large-scale heterogeneous multi-agent systems with uncertain nonlinear interactions: towards a distributed computing architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Sabato

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale dynamic systems are becoming highly pervasive in their occurrence with applications ranging from system biology, environment monitoring, sensor networks, and power systems. They are characterised by high dimensionality, complexity, and uncertainty in the node dynamic/interactions that require more and more computational demanding methods for their analysis and control design, as well as the network size and node system/interaction complexity increase. Therefore, it is a challenging problem to find scalable computational method for distributed control design of large-scale networks. In this paper, we investigate the robust distributed stabilisation problem of large-scale nonlinear multi-agent systems (briefly MASs) composed of non-identical (heterogeneous) linear dynamical systems coupled by uncertain nonlinear time-varying interconnections. By employing Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, new conditions are given for the distributed control design of large-scale MASs that can be easily solved by the toolbox of MATLAB. The stabilisability of each node dynamic is a sufficient assumption to design a global stabilising distributed control. The proposed approach improves some of the existing LMI-based results on MAS by both overcoming their computational limits and extending the applicative scenario to large-scale nonlinear heterogeneous MASs. Additionally, the proposed LMI conditions are further reduced in terms of computational requirement in the case of weakly heterogeneous MASs, which is a common scenario in real application where the network nodes and links are affected by parameter uncertainties. One of the main advantages of the proposed approach is to allow to move from a centralised towards a distributed computing architecture so that the expensive computation workload spent to solve LMIs may be shared among processors located at the networked nodes, thus increasing the scalability of the approach than the network

  2. Which spatial discretization for distributed hydrological models? Proposition of a methodology and illustration for medium to large-scale catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehotin, J.; Braud, I.

    2008-05-01

    discretization). The first part of the paper presents a review about catchment discretization in hydrological models from which we derived the principles of our general methodology. The second part of the paper focuses on the derivation of hydro-landscape units for medium to large scale catchments. For this sub-catchment discretization, we propose the use of principles borrowed from landscape classification. These principles are independent of the catchment size. They allow retaining suitable features required in the catchment description in order to fulfil a specific modelling objective. The method leads to unstructured and homogeneous areas within the sub-catchments, which can be used to derive modelling meshes. It avoids map smoothing by suppressing the smallest units, the role of which can be very important in hydrology, and provides a confidence map (the distance map) for the classification. The confidence map can be used for further uncertainty analysis of modelling results. The final discretization remains consistent with the resolution of input data and that of the source maps. The last part of the paper illustrates the method using available data for the upper Saône catchment in France. The interest of the method for an efficient representation of landscape heterogeneity is illustrated by a comparison with more traditional mapping approaches. Examples of possible models, which can be built on this spatial discretization, are finally given as perspectives for the work.

  3. Impact of Distribution-Connected Large-Scale Wind Turbines on Transmission System Stability during Large Disturbances: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Allen, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    This work examines the dynamic impacts of distributed utility-scale wind power during contingency events on both the distribution system and the transmission system. It is the first step toward investigating high penetrations of distribution-connected wind power's impact on both distribution and transmission stability.

  4. The typical MSW odorants identification and the spatial odorants distribution in a large-scale transfer station.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongtao; Cheng, Zhaowen; Wang, Luochun; Lou, Ziyang; Zhu, Nanwen; Zhou, Xuejun; Feng, Lili

    2017-01-26

    Odorants from municipal solid waste (MSW) were complex variable, and the screening of key offensive odorants was the prerequisite for odor control process. In this study, spatial odor emissions and environmental impacts were investigated based on a large-scale working waste transfer station (LSWTS) using waste container system, and a comprehensive odor characterization method was developed and applied in terms of the odor concentration (OC), theory odor concentration (TOC), total chemical concentration (TCC), and electric nose (EN). The detected odor concentration ranged from 14 to 28 (dimensionless), and MSW container showed the highest OC value of 28, EN of 78, and TCC of 35 (ppm) due to the accumulation of leachate and residual MSW. Ninety-two species odorants were identified, and H2S, NH3, benzene, styrene, ethyl acetate, and dichloromethane were the main contributors in the container, while benzene, m,p,x-xylene, butanone, acetone, isopropanol, and ethyl acetate were predominant in the compression surface (CS) and compression plant (CP). Side of roads (SR) and unload hall (UH) showed low odorous impact. Based on this odor list, 20 species of odor substances were screened for the priority control through the synthetic evaluation method, considering the odorants concentrations, toxicity, threshold values, detection frequency, saturated vapor pressure, and appeared frequency. Graphical abstract.

  5. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  6. An Efficient Framework for Large Scale Multimedia Content Distribution in P2P Network: I2NC

    PubMed Central

    Anandaraj, M.; Ganeshkumar, P.; Vijayakumar, K. P.; Selvaraj, K.

    2015-01-01

    Network coding (NC) makes content distribution more effective and easier in P2P content distribution network and reduces the burden of the original seeder. It generalizes traditional network routing by allowing the intermediate nodes to generate new coded packet by combining the received packets. The randomization introduced by network coding makes all packets equally important and resolves the problem of locating the rarest block. Further, it reduces traffic in the network. In this paper, we analyze the performance of traditional network coding in P2P content distribution network by using a mathematical model and it is proved that traffic reduction has not been fully achieved in P2P network using traditional network coding. It happens due to the redundant transmission of noninnovative information block among the peers in the network. Hence, we propose a new framework, called I2NC (intelligent-peer selection and incremental-network coding), to eliminate the unnecessary flooding of noninnovative coded packets and thereby to improve the performance of network coding in P2P content distribution further. A comparative study and analysis of the proposed system is made through various related implementations and the results show that 10–15% of traffic reduced and improved the average and maximum download time by reducing original seeder's workload. PMID:26605375

  7. Modelling the role of marine particle on large scale 231Pa, 230Th, Iron and Aluminium distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutay, J.-C.; Tagliabue, A.; Kriest, I.; van Hulten, M. M. P.

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of trace elements in the ocean is governed by the combined effects of various processes, and by exchanges with external sources. Modelling these represents an opportunity to better understand and quantify the mechanisms that regulate the oceanic tracer cycles. Observations collected during the GEOTRACES program provide an opportunity to improve our knowledge regarding processes that should be considered in biogeochemical models to adequately represent the distributions of trace elements in the ocean. Here we present a synthesis about the state of the art for simulating selected trace elements in biogeochemical models: Protactinium, Thorium, Iron and Aluminium. In this contribution we pay particular attention on the role of particles in the cycling of these tracers and how they may provide additional constraints on the transfer of matter in the ocean.

  8. Prototyping a large-scale distributed system for the Great Observatories era - NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a distributed information system intended to support research in the Great Observatories era, to simplify access to data, and to enable simultaneous analyses of multispectral data sets. Here, the user agent and interface, its functions, and system components are examined, and the system architecture and infrastructure is addressed. The present status of the system and related future activities are examined.

  9. ‘Oorja’ in India: Assessing a large-scale commercial distribution of advanced biomass stoves to households

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Mark C.; Phadke, Himani; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Shrimali, Gireesh; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    Replacing traditional stoves with advanced alternatives that burn more cleanly has the potential to ameliorate major health problems associated with indoor air pollution in developing countries. With a few exceptions, large government and charitable programs to distribute advanced stoves have not had the desired impact. Commercially-based distributions that seek cost recovery and even profits might plausibly do better, both because they encourage distributors to supply and promote products that people want and because they are based around properly-incentivized supply chains that could more be scalable, sustainable, and replicable. The sale in India of over 400,000 “Oorja” stoves to households from 2006 onwards represents the largest commercially-based distribution of a gasification-type advanced biomass stove. BP's Emerging Consumer Markets (ECM) division and then successor company First Energy sold this stove and the pelletized biomass fuel on which it operates. We assess the success of this effort and the role its commercial aspect played in outcomes using a survey of 998 households in areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka where the stove was sold as well as detailed interviews with BP and First Energy staff. Statistical models based on this data indicate that Oorja purchase rates were significantly influenced by the intensity of Oorja marketing in a region as well as by pre-existing stove mix among households. The highest rate of adoption came from LPG-using households for which Oorja's pelletized biomass fuel reduced costs. Smoke- and health-related messages from Oorja marketing did not significantly influence the purchase decision, although they did appear to affect household perceptions about smoke. By the time of our survey, only 9% of households that purchased Oorja were still using the stove, the result in large part of difficulties First Energy encountered in developing a viable supply chain around low-cost procurement of “agricultural waste” to

  10. FabSim: Facilitating computational research through automation on large-scale and distributed e-infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Derek; Bhati, Agastya P.; Suter, James; Hetherington, James; Zasada, Stefan J.; Coveney, Peter V.

    2016-10-01

    We present FabSim, a toolkit developed to simplify a range of computational tasks for researchers in diverse disciplines. FabSim is flexible, adaptable, and allows users to perform a wide range of tasks with ease. It also provides a systematic way to automate the use of resources, including HPC and distributed machines, and to make tasks easier to repeat by recording contextual information. To demonstrate this, we present three use cases where FabSim has enhanced our research productivity. These include simulating cerebrovascular bloodflow, modelling clay-polymer nanocomposites across multiple scales, and calculating ligand-protein binding affinities.

  11. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  12. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  13. Development of a low-power, low-cost front end electronics module for large scale distributed neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    James J. Beatty Richard D. Kass

    2008-03-08

    A number of concepts have been presented for distributed neutrino detectors formed of large numbers of autonomous detectors. Examples include the Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) [Barwick 2006], as well as proposed radio extensions to the IceCube detector at South Pole Station such as AURA and IceRay. [Besson 2008]. We have focused on key enabling technical developments required by this class of experiments. The radio Cherenkov signal, generated by the Askaryan mechanism [Askaryan 1962, 1965], is impulsive and coherent up to above 1 GHz. In the frequency domain, the impulsive character of the emission results in simultaneous increase of the power detected in multiple frequency bands. This multiband triggering approach has proven fruitful, especially as anthropogenic interference often results from narrowband communications signals. A typical distributed experiment of this type consists of a station responsible for the readout of a cluster of antennas either near the surface of the ice or deployed in boreholes. Each antenna is instrumented with a broadband low-noise amplifier, followed by an array of filters to facilitate multi-band coincidence trigger schemes at the antenna level. The power in each band is detected at the output of each band filter, using either square-law diode detectors or log-power detectors developed for the cellular telephone market. The use of multiple antennas per station allows a local coincidence among antennas to be used as the next stage of the trigger. Station triggers can then be combined into an array trigger by comparing timestamps of triggers among stations and identifying space-time clusters of station triggers. Data from each station is buffered and can be requested from the individual stations when a multi-station coincidence occurs. This approach has been successfully used in distributed experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory. [Abraham et al. 2004] We identified the filters as being especially

  14. Coronal mass ejection rate and the evolution of the large-scale K-coronal density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sime, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Recently reported occurrence rates of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are compared with the time scale for the long-term evolution of the global white light coronal density distribution. This time scale is estimated from the synoptic observations of the corona made from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, by a seies of K-coronameters. The data span a period of more than 20 years and show evolution rates which vary with time roughly in phase with the solar activity cycle. However, there are detailed differences between the sunspot number curve and the long-term behavior of this quantity. When the occurrence rates of CMEs observed from orbiting coronagraphs, available mainly during the descending phase of the activity cycle, are compared with this evolution time, it is found that the two quantities are inversely proportional. From energy considerations, it is unlikely that there is a causal relationship between CMEs and this coronal evolution. Rather, the result indicates that the processes which lead to the global evolution are intimately related to those which give rise to CMEs, a hypothesis consistent with current theories that CMEs arise from preexisting magnetic structures which become stressed by the global magnetic field rearrangement to the point of instability. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  15. Large-scale Distribution of Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected Above 1018 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antiči'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 1018 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 1018 eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 1018 eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  16. LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  17. Large-Scale Distributions of Tropospheric Nitric, Formic, and Acetic acids Over the Westerm Pacific Basin During Wintertime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Lefer, B. L.; Scheuer, E. M.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Smyth, S.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E.; Gregory, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    We report here measurements of the acidic gases nitric (HNO3), formic (HCOOH), and acetic (CH3COOH) over the western Pacific basin during the February-March 1994 Pacific Exploratory Mission-West (PEM-West B). These data were obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft as it flew missions in the altitude range of 0.3 - 12.5 km over equatorial regions near Guam and then further westward encompassing the entire Pacific Rim arc. Aged marine air over the equatorial Pacific generally exhibited mixing ratios of acidic gases less than 100 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Near the Asian continent, discrete plumes encountered below 6 km altitude contained up to 8 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) HNO3 and 10 ppbv HCOOH and CH3COOH. Overall there was a general correlation between mixing ratios of acidic gases with those of CO, C2H2, and C2Cl4, indicative of emissions from combustion and industrial sources. The latitudinal distributions of HNO3 and CO showed that the largest mixing ratios were centered around 15 deg N, while HCOOH, CH3COOH, and C2Cl4 peaked at 25 deg N. The mixing ratios of HCOOH and CH3COOH were highly correlated (r(sup 2) = 0.87) below 6 km altitude, with a slope (0.89) characteristic of the nongrowing season at midlatitudes in the northern hemisphere. Above 6 km altitude, HCOOH and CH3COOH were marginally correlated (r(sup 2) = 0.50), and plumes well defined by CO, C2H2, and C2Cl4 were depleted in acidic gases, most likely due to scavenging during vertical transport of air masses through convective cloud systems over the Asian continent. In stratospheric air masses, HNO, mixing ratios were several parts per billion by volume (ppbv), yielding relationships with 03 and N2O consistent with those previously reported for NO(y).

  18. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  19. Large-scale distribution and activity of prokaryotes in deep-sea surface sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; Molari, Massimiliano; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Baldrighi, Elisa; Pala, Claudia; Manini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The deep-sea represents a substantial portion of the biosphere and has a major influence on carbon cycling and global biogeochemistry. Benthic deep-sea prokaryotes have crucial roles in this ecosystem, with their recycling of organic matter from the photic zone. Despite this, little is known about the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes in the surface deep-sea sediments. To assess the influence of environmental and trophic variables on the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes, we investigated the prokaryotic assemblage composition (Bacteria to Archaea and Euryarchaeota to Crenarchaeota ratio) and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent North Atlantic Ocean. Prokaryotic abundance and biomass did not vary significantly across the Mediterranean Sea; however, there were depth-related trends in all areas. The abundance of prokaryotes was positively correlated with the sedimentary concentration of protein, an indicator of the quality and bioavailability of organic matter. Moving eastwards, the Bacteria contribution to the total prokaryotes decreased, which appears to be linked to the more oligotrophic conditions of the Eastern Mediterranean basins. Despite the increased importance of Archaea, the contributions of Crenarchaeota Marine Group I to the total pool was relatively constant across the investigated stations, with the exception of Matapan-Vavilov Deep, in which Euryarchaeota Marine Group II dominated. Overall, our data suggest that deeper areas of the Mediterranean Sea share more similar communities with each other than with shallower sites. Freshness and quality of sedimentary organic matter were identified through Generalized Additive Model analysis as the major factors for describing the variation in the prokaryotic community structure and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments. Longitude was also important in explaining the observed variability, which suggests that the overlying water masses might have a

  20. A Large-Scale Distribution of Milk-Based Fortified Spreads: Evidence for a New Approach in Regions with High Burden of Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Defourny, Isabelle; Minetti, Andrea; Harczi, Géza; Doyon, Stéphane; Shepherd, Susan; Tectonidis, Milton; Bradol, Jean-Hervé; Golden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background There are 146 million underweight children in the developing world, which contribute to up to half of the world's child deaths. In high burden regions for malnutrition, the treatment of individual children is limited by available resources. Here, we evaluate a large-scale distribution of a nutritional supplement on the prevention of wasting. Methods and Findings A new ready-to-use food (RUF) was developed as a diet supplement for children under three. The intervention consisted of six monthly distributions of RUF during the 2007 hunger gap in a district of Maradi region, Niger, for approximately 60,000 children (length: 60–85 cm). At each distribution, all children over 65 cm had their Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) recorded. Admission trends for severe wasting (WFH<70% NCHS) in Maradi, 2002–2005 show an increase every year during the hunger gap. In contrast, in 2007, throughout the period of the distribution, the incidence of severe acute malnutrition (MUAC<110 mm) remained at extremely low levels. Comparison of year-over-year admissions to the therapeutic feeding program shows that the 2007 blanket distribution had essentially the same flattening effect on the seasonal rise in admissions as the 2006 individualized treatment of almost 60,000 children moderately wasted. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential for distribution of fortified spreads to reduce the incidence of severe wasting in large population of children 6–36 months of age. Although further information is needed on the cost-effectiveness of such distributions, these results highlight the importance of re-evaluating current nutritional strategies and international recommendations for high burden areas of childhood malnutrition. PMID:19421316

  1. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L. |; Rickert, M. |

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Large scale tracking algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  3. The large-scale distribution of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils is driven by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Yuan, Chao-Lei; Zheng, Yong; Wang, Jun-Tao; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Paddy soils distribute widely from temperate to tropical regions, and are characterized by intensive nitrogen fertilization practices in China. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in soil nitrification, but little is known about their biogeographic distribution patterns in paddy ecosystems. Here, we used barcoded pyrosequencing to characterize the effects of climatic, geochemical and spatial factors on the distribution of ammonia oxidizers from 11 representative rice-growing regions (75–1945 km apart) of China. Potential nitrification rates varied greatly by more than three orders of magnitude, and were significantly correlated with the abundances of AOA and AOB. The community composition of ammonia oxidizer was affected by multiple factors, but changes in relative abundances of the major lineages could be best predicted by soil pH. The alpha diversity of AOA and AOB displayed contrasting trends over the gradients of latitude and atmospheric temperature, indicating a possible niche separation between AOA and AOB along the latitude. The Bray–Curtis dissimilarities in ammonia-oxidizing community structure significantly increased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that more geographically distant paddy fields tend to harbor more dissimilar ammonia oxidizers. Variation partitioning analysis revealed that spatial, geochemical and climatic factors could jointly explain majority of the data variation, and were important drivers defining the ecological niches of AOA and AOB. Our findings suggest that both AOA and AOB are of functional importance in paddy soil nitrification, and ammonia oxidizers in paddy ecosystems exhibit large-scale biogeographic patterns shaped by soil pH, geographic distance, and climatic factors. PMID:26388866

  4. The Geographic Distribution of Loa loa in Africa: Results of Large-Scale Implementation of the Rapid Assessment Procedure for Loiasis (RAPLOA)

    PubMed Central

    Zouré, Honorat Gustave Marie; Wanji, Samuel; Noma, Mounkaïla; Amazigo, Uche Veronica; Diggle, Peter J.; Tekle, Afework Hailemariam; Remme, Jan H. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Loiasis is a major obstacle to ivermectin treatment for onchocerciasis control and lymphatic filariasis elimination in central Africa. In communities with a high level of loiasis endemicity, there is a significant risk of severe adverse reactions to ivermectin treatment. Information on the geographic distribution of loiasis in Africa is urgently needed but available information is limited. The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) undertook large scale mapping of loiasis in 11 potentially endemic countries using a rapid assessment procedure for loiasis (RAPLOA) that uses a simple questionnaire on the history of eye worm. Methodology/Principal Findings RAPLOA surveys were done in a spatial sample of 4798 villages covering an area of 2500×3000 km centred on the heartland of loiasis in Africa. The surveys showed high risk levels of loiasis in 10 countries where an estimated 14.4 million people live in high risk areas. There was a strong spatial correlation among RAPLOA data, and kriging was used to produce spatially smoothed contour maps of the interpolated prevalence of eye worm and the predictive probability that the prevalence exceeds 40%. Conclusion/Significance The contour map of eye worm prevalence provides the first global map of loiasis based on actual survey data. It shows a clear distribution with two zones of hyper endemicity, large areas that are free of loiasis and several borderline or intermediate zones. The surveys detected several previously unknown hyperendemic foci, clarified the distribution of loiasis in the Central African Republic and large parts of the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo for which hardly any information was available, and confirmed known loiasis foci. The new maps of the prevalence of eye worm and the probability that the prevalence exceeds the risk threshold of 40% provide critical information for ivermectin treatment programs among millions of people in Africa. PMID:21738809

  5. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality database for the assessment of rotor heat transfer computational techniques. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis of the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating a gas turbine package. The results of this assessment indicate that the procedure has the potential to predict the aerodynamics and the heat transfer in a gas turbine passage and can be used to develop detailed three dimensional turbulence models for the prediction of skin friction and heat transfer in complex three dimensional flow passages.

  6. Towards a Scalable and Adaptive Application Support Platform for Large-Scale Distributed E-Sciences in High-Performance Network Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chase Qishi; Zhu, Michelle Mengxia

    2016-06-06

    The advent of large-scale collaborative scientific applications has demonstrated the potential for broad scientific communities to pool globally distributed resources to produce unprecedented data acquisition, movement, and analysis. System resources including supercomputers, data repositories, computing facilities, network infrastructures, storage systems, and display devices have been increasingly deployed at national laboratories and academic institutes. These resources are typically shared by large communities of users over Internet or dedicated networks and hence exhibit an inherent dynamic nature in their availability, accessibility, capacity, and stability. Scientific applications using either experimental facilities or computation-based simulations with various physical, chemical, climatic, and biological models feature diverse scientific workflows as simple as linear pipelines or as complex as a directed acyclic graphs, which must be executed and supported over wide-area networks with massively distributed resources. Application users oftentimes need to manually configure their computing tasks over networks in an ad hoc manner, hence significantly limiting the productivity of scientists and constraining the utilization of resources. The success of these large-scale distributed applications requires a highly adaptive and massively scalable workflow platform that provides automated and optimized computing and networking services. This project is to design and develop a generic Scientific Workflow Automation and Management Platform (SWAMP), which contains a web-based user interface specially tailored for a target application, a set of user libraries, and several easy-to-use computing and networking toolkits for application scientists to conveniently assemble, execute, monitor, and control complex computing workflows in heterogeneous high-performance network environments. SWAMP will enable the automation and management of the entire process of scientific

  7. Distribution of persistent organic pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in soil and vegetation following a large scale landfill fire in northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Chrysikou, Loukia; Gemenetzis, Panagiotis; Kouras, Athanasios; Manoli, Evangelia; Terzi, Eleni; Samara, Constantini

    2008-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including hexaclorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and DDTs, as well as trace elements were determined in soil and vegetation samples collected from the surrounding area of the landfill "Tagarades", the biggest in northern Greece, following a large scale fire involving approximately 50,000 tons of municipal waste. High concentrations of total PAHs, PCBs and heavy metals were found inside the landfill (1475 microg kg(-1) dw, 399 microg kg(-1) dw and 29.8 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively), whereas concentrations in the surrounding soils were by far lower ranging between 11.2-28.1 microg kg(-1) dw for PAHs, 4.02-11.2 microg kg(-1) dw for PCBs and 575-1207 mg kg(-1) dw for heavy metals. The distribution of HCHs and DDTs were quite different since certain soils exhibited equal or higher concentrations than the landfill. In vegetation, the concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, HCHs and DDTs ranged from 14.1-34.7, 3.64-25.9, 1.41-32.1 and 0.61-4.03 microg kg(-1) dw, respectively, while those of heavy metals from 81 to 159 mg kg(-1) dw. The results of the study indicated soil and vegetation pollution levels in the surroundings of the landfill comparable to those reported for other Greek locations. The impact from the landfill fire was not evident partially due to the presence of recent and past inputs from other activities (agriculture, vehicular transport, earlier landfill fires).

  8. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle, and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Michael F.; Anderson, Olof L.

    1989-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similiar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full-span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The primary objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality data base for the assessment of rotor passage heat transfer computational procedures. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. Heat transfer data were obtained using thermocouple and liquid-crystal techniques to measure temperature distributions on the thin, electrically-heated skin of the rotor passage model. Test data were obtained for various combinations of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and model surface roughness. The data are reported in the form of contour maps of Stanton number. These heat distribution maps revealed numerous local effects produced by the three-dimensional flows within the rotor passage. Of particular importance were regions of local enhancement produced on the airfoil suction surface by the main-passage and tip-leakage vortices and on the hub endwall by the leading-edge horseshoe vortex system. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis to the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating the a gas turbine passage. These cases include a 90 deg turning duct, a gas turbine cascade simulating a stator passage, and a gas turbine rotor passage including Coriolis forces. The calculated results were evaluated using experimental data of the three-dimensional velocity fields, wall static pressures, and wall heat transfer on the suction surface of the turbine airfoil and on the end wall. Particular attention was paid to an

  9. Impact of interannual changes of large scale circulation and hydrography on the spatial distribution of beaked redfish (Sebastes mentella) in the Irminger Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Riboni, Ismael; Kristinsson, Kristján; Bernreuther, Matthias; van Aken, Hendrik M.; Stransky, Christoph; Cisewski, Boris; Rolskiy, Alexey

    2013-12-01

    This study provides evidence of the influence of hydrography and large scale ocean circulation on the geographical distribution of beaked redfish (Sebastes mentella) in the Irminger Sea on the interannual time scale, from 1992 to 2011. The results reveal the average relationship of adult pelagic redfish to their physical habitat from 100 to 800 m depth: the most preferred latitude, longitude, depth, temperature and salinity for redfish are approximately 58°N, 41°W, 557 m, 4.5 °C and 34.87, respectively. The redfish habitat corresponds in a temperature-salinity (TS) diagram to a mixing triangle between East Greenland Current Water (EGCW), Labrador Sea Water (LSW) and Irminger Current Water (ICW). The geographical centre of mass of the redfish distribution (as revealed by acoustic fish density) indicates displacements from year to year. Changes in hydrographic conditions were investigated in detail for possible reasons for these displacements. Empirical Orthogonal Analysis reveals that maximum variations of water mass volume on an interannual time-scale in the study region correspond to ICW and LSW changes, while EGCW remains comparatively stable. Indices of redfish geographical centroid, LSW volume, ICW temperature and Subpolar Gyre (SPG) intensity suggest that the geographical redfish displacements are closely related to interannual changes of ICW modulated by the SPG intensity with a lag of 1 or 2 years. In comparison, LSW seems to have no impact on the redfish distribution at the studied depth range. The time lag between ICW and redfish displacements indicates an indirect influence of temperature on redfish. Hence, changes of chlorophyll-a (from satellite imagery), as a proxy for primary production, were used in a first approach to study the role of food availability. The analysis is based on acoustic and trawl data from nine expeditions coordinated by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), around 71,000 hydrographic stations from the

  10. Overlap of Spoilage-Associated Microbiota between Meat and the Meat Processing Environment in Small-Scale and Large-Scale Retail Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Giuseppina; La Storia, Antonietta; De Filippis, Francesca; Borriello, Giorgia; Villani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. The aims of this study were to learn more about the possible influence of the meat processing environment on initial fresh meat contamination and to investigate the differences between small-scale retail distribution (SD) and large-scale retail distribution (LD) facilities. Samples were collected from butcheries (n = 20), including LD (n = 10) and SD (n = 10) facilities, over two sampling campaigns. Samples included fresh beef and pork cuts and swab samples from the knife, the chopping board, and the butcher's hand. The microbiota of both meat samples and environmental swabs were very complex, including more than 800 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) collapsed at the species level. The 16S rRNA sequencing analysis showed that core microbiota were shared by 80% of the samples and included Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., Brochothrix spp., Psychrobacter spp., and Acinetobacter spp. Hierarchical clustering of the samples based on the microbiota showed a certain separation between meat and environmental samples, with higher levels of Proteobacteria in meat. In particular, levels of Pseudomonas and several Enterobacteriaceae members were significantly higher in meat samples, while Brochothrix, Staphylococcus, lactic acid bacteria, and Psychrobacter prevailed in environmental swab samples. Consistent clustering was also observed when metabolic activities were considered by predictive metagenomic analysis of the samples. An increase in carbohydrate metabolism was predicted for the environmental swabs and was consistently linked to Firmicutes, while increases in pathways related to amino acid and lipid metabolism were predicted for the meat samples and were positively correlated with Proteobacteria. Our results highlighted the importance of the processing environment in contributing to the initial microbial levels of meat and clearly showed that the type

  11. Large-scale cortical networks and cognition.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1995-03-01

    The well-known parcellation of the mammalian cerebral cortex into a large number of functionally distinct cytoarchitectonic areas presents a problem for understanding the complex cortical integrative functions that underlie cognition. How do cortical areas having unique individual functional properties cooperate to accomplish these complex operations? Do neurons distributed throughout the cerebral cortex act together in large-scale functional assemblages? This review examines the substantial body of evidence supporting the view that complex integrative functions are carried out by large-scale networks of cortical areas. Pathway tracing studies in non-human primates have revealed widely distributed networks of interconnected cortical areas, providing an anatomical substrate for large-scale parallel processing of information in the cerebral cortex. Functional coactivation of multiple cortical areas has been demonstrated by neurophysiological studies in non-human primates and several different cognitive functions have been shown to depend on multiple distributed areas by human neuropsychological studies. Electrophysiological studies on interareal synchronization have provided evidence that active neurons in different cortical areas may become not only coactive, but also functionally interdependent. The computational advantages of synchronization between cortical areas in large-scale networks have been elucidated by studies using artificial neural network models. Recent observations of time-varying multi-areal cortical synchronization suggest that the functional topology of a large-scale cortical network is dynamically reorganized during visuomotor behavior.

  12. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  13. On using large scale correlation of the Ly-α forest and redshifted 21-cm signal to probe HI distribution during the post reionization era

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Tapomoy Guha; Datta, Kanan K. E-mail: kanan.physics@presiuniv.ac.in

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting the 3D cross correlation power spectrum of the Ly-α forest and HI 21 cm signal from the post reionization epoch. (The cross-correlation signal is directly dependent on the dark matter power spectrum and is sensitive to the 21-cm brightness temperature and Ly-α forest biases. These bias parameters dictate the strength of anisotropy in redshift space.) We find that the cross-correlation power spectrum can be detected using 400 hrs observation with SKA-mid (phase 1) and a futuristic BOSS like experiment with a quasar (QSO) density of 30 deg{sup −2} at a peak SNR of 15 for a single field experiment at redshift z = 2.5. on large scales using the linear bias model. We also study the possibility of constraining various bias parameters using the cross power spectrum. We find that with the same experiment 1 σ (conditional errors) on the 21-cm linear redshift space distortion parameter β{sub T} and β{sub F} corresponding to the Ly-α  forest are ∼ 2.7 % and ∼ 1.4 % respectively for 01 independent pointings of the SKA-mid (phase 1). This prediction indicates a significant improvement over existing measurements. We claim that the detection of the 3D cross correlation power spectrum will not only ascertain the cosmological origin of the signal in presence of astrophysical foregrounds but will also provide stringent constraints on large scale HI biases. This provides an independent probe towards understanding cosmological structure formation.

  14. Large-scale structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1983-01-01

    Problems encountered by aerospace designers in attempting to optimize whole aircraft are discussed, along with possible solutions. Large scale optimization, as opposed to component-by-component optimization, is hindered by computational costs, software inflexibility, concentration on a single, rather than trade-off, design methodology and the incompatibility of large-scale optimization with single program, single computer methods. The software problem can be approached by placing the full analysis outside of the optimization loop. Full analysis is then performed only periodically. Problem-dependent software can be removed from the generic code using a systems programming technique, and then embody the definitions of design variables, objective function and design constraints. Trade-off algorithms can be used at the design points to obtain quantitative answers. Finally, decomposing the large-scale problem into independent subproblems allows systematic optimization of the problems by an organization of people and machines.

  15. Variations over time in latitudinal distribution of the large-scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere at heights from the photosphere to the source surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Andreyeva, O. A.; Rudenko, G. V.; Stepanian, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Calculations of magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the "potential field-source surface" model have been used to study time variations in several parameters of the large-scale magnetic field at various heights during the last four solar cycles. At ten heights from the solar surface (R = Ro) to the source surface (R = 2.5Ro), we have constructed synoptic charts (SC) of the radial component Br of the estimated magnetic field. For these SC, we have identified 10-degree latitudinal zones. Within these zones, we found values of Sp (positive Br values averaged within the latitudinal zone over latitude and longitude), Sm (averaged modulus of negative Br values) and S + fields (a part of the latitudinal zone area (in %) occupied by positive Br values). At lower latitudes, cyclic variations in the Sp + Sm parameter are demonstrated to be similar (but not in detail) to time variations in Wolf numbers. Latitudes of 55° and higher exhibited virtually no cyclic peculiarities of time variations in this parameter. The authors believe that this indicates the diverse nature of the large-scale magnetic field in the near-equatorial and polar regions of the solar atmosphere. At R = 2.5Ro, Sp + Sm cyclic variations are almost invisible at all latitudes and only slightly apparent near the equator. The analysis of S + fields variations revealed that at low latitudes at R = 2.5Ro during solar cycles 21, 22 and ascending phase of cycle 23 there were almost no mixed-polarity periods. However, beginning from the maximum of cycle 23, in the near-equatorial region the mixed polarity was observed until the end of the long solar activity minimum. An assumption has been made that this might have been one of the forerunners and manifestations of the prolonged minimum between cycles 23 and 24. It has been found that during solar activity minima poleward there appears motion of magnetic fields with polarity opposite to that of the field at the pole. We have estimated the velocity of such a

  16. Large-scale homogeneously distributed Ag-NPs with sub-10 nm gaps assembled on a two-layered honeycomb-like TiO2 film as sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoye; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Xu, Wei; Han, Fangming; Sun, Kexi; Xu, Qiaoling; Wang, Zhaoming

    2012-09-28

    We present a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate featured by large-scale homogeneously distributed Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) with sub-10 nm gaps assembled on a two-layered honeycomb-like TiO(2) film. The two-layered honeycomb-like TiO(2) film was achieved by a two-step anodization of pure Ti foil, with its upper layer consisting of hexagonally arranged shallow nano-bowls of 160 nm in diameter, and the lower layer consisting of arrays of about fifty vertically aligned sub-20 nm diameter nanopores. The shallow nano-bowls in the upper layer divide the whole TiO(2) film into regularly arranged arrays of uniform hexagonal nano-cells, leading to a similar distribution pattern for the ion-sputtered Ag-NPs in each nano-cell. The lower layer with sub-20 nm diameter nanopores prevents the aggregation of the sputtered Ag-NPs, so that the Ag-NPs can get much closer with gaps in the sub-10 nm range. Therefore, large-scale high-density and quasi-ordered sub-10 nm gaps between the adjacent Ag-NPs were achieved, which ensures homogeneously distributed 'hot spots' over a large area for the SERS effect. Moreover, the honeycomb-like structure can also facilitate the capture of target analyte molecules. As expected, the SERS substrate exhibits an excellent SERS effect with high sensitivity and reproducibility. As an example, the SERS substrate was utilized to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a kind of persistent organic pollutants as global environmental hazard) such as 3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-77) with concentrations down to 10(-9) M. Therefore the large-scale Ag-NPs with sub-10 nm gaps assembled on the two-layered honeycomb-like TiO (2) film have potentials in SERS-based rapid trace detection of PCBs.

  17. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in the $E\\gt 8$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$, that has a chance probability $P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.

  18. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  19. Large Scale Distribution of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with Zenith Angles up to 80°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in the E\\gt 8 EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension r1α =(4.4+/- 1.0)× {{10}-2}, that has a chance probability P(≥slant r1α )=6.4× {{10}-5}, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.

  20. Large-scale gene flow in the barnacle Jehlius cirratus and contrasts with other broadly-distributed taxa along the Chilean coast

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baoying

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the population genetic structure of the intertidal barnacle Jehlius cirratus across a broad portion of its geographic distribution using data from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene region. Despite sampling diversity from over 3,000 km of the linear range of this species, there is only slight regional structure indicated, with overall Φ CT of 0.036 (p < 0.001) yet no support for isolation by distance. While these results suggest greater structure than previous studies of J. cirratus had indicated, the pattern of diversity is still far more subtle than in other similarly-distributed species with similar larval and life history traits. We compare these data and results with recent findings in four other intertidal species that have planktotrophic larvae. There are no clear patterns among these taxa that can be associated with intertidal depth or other known life history traits. PMID:28194316

  1. Integrating Remote Sensing Information Into A Distributed Hydrological Model for Improving Water Budget Predictions in Large-scale Basins through Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Changbo; Jia, Yangwen; Su, Z.(Bob); Zhou, Zuhao; Qiu, Yaqin; Suhui, Shen

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates whether remote sensing evapotranspiration estimates can be integrated by means of data assimilation into a distributed hydrological model for improving the predictions of spatial water distribution over a large river basin with an area of 317,800 km2. A series of available MODIS satellite images over the Haihe River basin in China are used for the year 2005. Evapotranspiration is retrieved from these 1×1 km resolution images using the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) algorithm. The physically-based distributed model WEP-L (Water and Energy transfer Process in Large river basins) is used to compute the water balance of the Haihe River basin in the same year. Comparison between model-derived and remote sensing retrieval basin-averaged evapotranspiration estimates shows a good piecewise linear relationship, but their spatial distribution within the Haihe basin is different. The remote sensing derived evapotranspiration shows variability at finer scales. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) data assimilation algorithm, suitable for non-linear problems, is used. Assimilation results indicate that remote sensing observations have a potentially important role in providing spatial information to the assimilation system for the spatially optical hydrological parameterization of the model. This is especially important for large basins, such as the Haihe River basin in this study. Combining and integrating the capabilities of and information from model simulation and remote sensing techniques may provide the best spatial and temporal characteristics for hydrological states/fluxes, and would be both appealing and necessary for improving our knowledge of fundamental hydrological processes and for addressing important water resource management problems. PMID:27879946

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in zooplankton summer distribution in the eastern Chukchi Sea in 2012-2013 as a result of large-scale interactions of water masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, Alexei I.; Eisner, Lisa B.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the Arctic shelf ecosystems has increased in recent years as the climate has rapidly warmed and sea ice declined. These changing conditions prompted the broad-scale multidisciplinary Arctic Ecosystem integrated survey (Arctic Eis) aimed at systematic, comparative analyses of interannual variability of the shelf ecosystem. In this study, we compared zooplankton composition and geographical distribution in relation to water properties on the eastern Chukchi and northern Bering Sea shelves during the summers of 2012 and 2013. In 2012, waters of Pacific origin prevailed over the study area carrying expatriate oceanic species (e.g. copepods Neocalanus spp., Eucalanus bungii) from the Bering Sea outer shelf well onto the northeastern Chukchi shelf. In contrast, in 2013, zooplankton of Pacific origin was mainly distributed over the southern Chukchi shelf, suggesting a change of advection pathways into the Arctic. These changes also manifested in the emergence of large lipid-rich Arctic zooplankton (e.g. Calanus hyperboreus) on the northeastern Chukchi shelf in 2013. The predominant copepod Calanus glacialis was composed of two distinct populations originating from the Bering Sea and from the Arctic, with the Arctic population expanding over a broader range in 2013. The observed interannual variability in zooplankton distribution on the Chukchi Sea shelf may be explained by previously described systematic oceanographic patterns derived from long-term observations. Variability in oceanic circulation and related zooplankton distributions (e.g. changes in southwestward advection of C. hyperboreus) may impact keystone predators such as Arctic Cod (Boreogadus saida) that feed on energy-rich zooplankton.

  3. Integrating Remote Sensing Information Into A Distributed Hydrological Model for Improving Water Budget Predictions in Large-scale Basins through Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Changbo; Jia, Yangwen; Su, Z; Zhou, Zuhao; Qiu, Yaqin; Suhui, Shen

    2008-07-29

    This paper investigates whether remote sensing evapotranspiration estimates can be integrated by means of data assimilation into a distributed hydrological model for improving the predictions of spatial water distribution over a large river basin with an area of 317,800 km2. A series of available MODIS satellite images over the Haihe River basin in China are used for the year 2005. Evapotranspiration is retrieved from these 1×1 km resolution images using the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) algorithm. The physically-based distributed model WEP-L (Water and Energy transfer Process in Large river basins) is used to compute the water balance of the Haihe River basin in the same year. Comparison between model-derived and remote sensing retrieval basin-averaged evapotranspiration estimates shows a good piecewise linear relationship, but their spatial distribution within the Haihe basin is different. The remote sensing derived evapotranspiration shows variability at finer scales. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) data assimilation algorithm, suitable for non-linear problems, is used. Assimilation results indicate that remote sensing observations have a potentially important role in providing spatial information to the assimilation system for the spatially optical hydrological parameterization of the model. This is especially important for large basins, such as the Haihe River basin in this study. Combining and integrating the capabilities of and information from model simulation and remote sensing techniques may provide the best spatial and temporal characteristics for hydrological states/fluxes, and would be both appealing and necessary for improving our knowledge of fundamental hydrological processes and for addressing important water resource management problems.

  4. Size distribution of airborne particulate matter emitted by the front-end processing of municipal solid waste feed material for large-scale anaerobic digesters

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, H.P.; Narasimhan, R.; Daly, E.L. Jr.; Sengupta, S.; Nemerow, N.L.; Wong, K.V.

    1984-07-01

    A 100-ton/day proof-of-concept facility has been constructed in Pompano Beach, Florida, to examine the feasibility of producing methane-rich gas from the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. One of the possible environmental impacts is from the particulate matter emitted into the atmosphere by the secondary shredding and conveying of light fraction feed material to the digesters. It has been found that the amount of particulate matter emitted into the atmosphere by the front-end processing is an order of magnitude higher when the plant is operating compared to when it is not operating. It has been found that the particle size distribution is bimodal both when the plant is operating as well as when it is not operating. Particle concentrations of episodic nature were found in July 1981 which were four times the concentration found during normal plant operation.

  5. Column Store for GWAC: A High-cadence, High-density, Large-scale Astronomical Light Curve Pipeline and Distributed Shared-nothing Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Meng; Wu, Chao; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Yulei; Xin, Liping; Mullender, Sjoerd; Mühleisen, Hannes; Scheers, Bart; Zhang, Ying; Nes, Niels; Kersten, Martin; Huang, Yongpan; Deng, Jinsong; Wei, Jianyan

    2016-11-01

    The ground-based wide-angle camera array (GWAC), a part of the SVOM space mission, will search for various types of optical transients by continuously imaging a field of view (FOV) of 5000 degrees2 every 15 s. Each exposure consists of 36 × 4k × 4k pixels, typically resulting in 36 × ∼175,600 extracted sources. For a modern time-domain astronomy project like GWAC, which produces massive amounts of data with a high cadence, it is challenging to search for short timescale transients in both real-time and archived data, and to build long-term light curves for variable sources. Here, we develop a high-cadence, high-density light curve pipeline (HCHDLP) to process the GWAC data in real-time, and design a distributed shared-nothing database to manage the massive amount of archived data which will be used to generate a source catalog with more than 100 billion records during 10 years of operation. First, we develop HCHDLP based on the column-store DBMS of MonetDB, taking advantage of MonetDB’s high performance when applied to massive data processing. To realize the real-time functionality of HCHDLP, we optimize the pipeline in its source association function, including both time and space complexity from outside the database (SQL semantic) and inside (RANGE-JOIN implementation), as well as in its strategy of building complex light curves. The optimized source association function is accelerated by three orders of magnitude. Second, we build a distributed database using a two-level time partitioning strategy via the MERGE TABLE and REMOTE TABLE technology of MonetDB. Intensive tests validate that our database architecture is able to achieve both linear scalability in response time and concurrent access by multiple users. In summary, our studies provide guidance for a solution to GWAC in real-time data processing and management of massive data.

  6. Changes in the distribution of the grey mangrove Avicennia marina (Forsk.) using large scale aerial color infrared photographs: are the changes related to habitat modification for mosquito control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Dale, P. E. R.; Chandica, A. L.; Breitfuss, M. J.

    2004-09-01

    Runnelling, a method of habitat modification used for mosquito management in intertidal saltmarshes in Australia, alters marsh hydrology. The objective of this research was to assess if runnelling had affected the distribution of the grey mangrove ( Avicennia marina (Forsk.)) at a study site in southeast Queensland. Since runnelling is carried out in diverse marshes a second aim was to assess differences in mangrove colonisation in the two main saltmarsh species in the area. These are marine couch [ Sporobolus virginicus (L.) Kunth.] and samphire [ Sarcocornia quinqueflora (Bunge ex Ung.-Stern.)]. Runnels at the study site were in an area dominated by Sporobolus. The mangrove area was measured by classifying digital color infrared (CIR) data obtained from aerial photographs acquired in 1982, which was 3 years before runnelling, and in 1987, 1991 and 1999, 2-14 years after. Changes in the spatial extent of A. marina were identified using difference images produced from post-classification change detection. The results showed that runnels did not significantly influence the distribution of A. marina at the study site. At a more detailed level differences in A. marina establishment in the Sporobolus and Sarcocornia areas were determined from counts of trees on the aerial photographs. There was a greater proportion of mangroves in Sarcocornia than Sporobolus and this increased over time. This may be related to differences in density between the plant species, to grapsid crab activity or to other edaphic conditions. There may be implications for runnelling in Sarcocornia marshes. The large increase observed in A. marina in the area generally is likely to be related to factors such as catchment modification or tidal/sea-level changes. It is concluded that runnelling has not led to mangrove establishment in the Sporobolus dominated saltmarsh.

  7. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  8. ADHydro: A Parallel Implementation of a Large-scale High-Resolution Multi-Physics Distributed Water Resources Model Using the Charm++ Run Time System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, R. C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lai, W.; Moreno, H. A.; Pureza, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based watershed models are useful tools for hydrologic studies, water resources management and economic analyses in the contexts of climate, land-use, and water-use changes. This poster presents a parallel implementation of a quasi 3-dimensional, physics-based, high-resolution, distributed water resources model suitable for simulating large watersheds in a massively parallel computing environment. Developing this model is one of the objectives of the NSF EPSCoR RII Track II CI-WATER project, which is joint between Wyoming and Utah EPSCoR jurisdictions. The model, which we call ADHydro, is aimed at simulating important processes in the Rocky Mountain west, including: rainfall and infiltration, snowfall and snowmelt in complex terrain, vegetation and evapotranspiration, soil heat flux and freezing, overland flow, channel flow, groundwater flow, water management and irrigation. Model forcing is provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and ADHydro is coupled with the NOAH-MP land-surface scheme for calculating fluxes between the land and atmosphere. The ADHydro implementation uses the Charm++ parallel run time system. Charm++ is based on location transparent message passing between migrateable C++ objects. Each object represents an entity in the model such as a mesh element. These objects can be migrated between processors or serialized to disk allowing the Charm++ system to automatically provide capabilities such as load balancing and checkpointing. Objects interact with each other by passing messages that the Charm++ system routes to the correct destination object regardless of its current location. This poster discusses the algorithms, communication patterns, and caching strategies used to implement ADHydro with Charm++. The ADHydro model code will be released to the hydrologic community in late 2014.

  9. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  10. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Hunt, L.M.; Milligan, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 29??42 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites hadthicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 16??109 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but

  11. Large-scale distribution and activity patterns of an extremely low-light-adapted population of green sulfur bacteria in the Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Evelyn; Jogler, Mareike; Hessge, Uta; Overmann, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    The Black Sea chemocline represents the largest extant habitat of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and harbours a monospecific population of Chlorobium phylotype BS-1. High-sensitivity measurements of underwater irradiance and sulfide revealed that the optical properties of the overlying water column were similar across the Black Sea basin, whereas the vertical profiles of sulfide varied strongly between sampling sites and caused a dome-shaped three-dimensional distribution of the green sulfur bacteria. In the centres of the western and eastern basins the population of BS-1 reached upward to depths of 80 and 95 m, respectively, but were detected only at 145 m depth close to the shelf. Using highly concentrated chemocline samples from the centres of the western and eastern basins, the cells were found to be capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis under in situ light conditions and exhibited a photosynthesis-irradiance curve similar to low-light-adapted laboratory cultures of Chlorobium BS-1. Application of a highly specific RT-qPCR method which targets the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rrn operon of BS-1 demonstrated that only cells at the central station are physiologically active in contrast to those at the Black Sea periphery. Based on the detection of ITS-DNA sequences in the flocculent surface layer of deep-sea sediments across the Black Sea, the population of BS-1 has occupied the major part of the basin for the last decade. The continued presence of intact but non-growing BS-1 cells at the periphery of the Black Sea indicates that the cells can survive long-distant transport and exhibit unusually low maintenance energy requirements. According to laboratory measurements, Chlorobium BS-1 has a maintenance energy requirement of approximately 1.6-4.9.10(-15) kJ cell(-1) day(-1) which is the lowest value determined for any bacterial culture so far. Chlorobium BS-1 thus is particularly well adapted to survival under the extreme low-light conditions

  12. Large-scale PACS implementation.

    PubMed

    Carrino, J A; Unkel, P J; Miller, I D; Bowser, C L; Freckleton, M W; Johnson, T G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to filmless radiology is a much more formidable task than making the request for proposal to purchase a (Picture Archiving and Communications System) PACS. The Department of Defense and the Veterans Administration have been pioneers in the transformation of medical diagnostic imaging to the electronic environment. Many civilian sites are expected to implement large-scale PACS in the next five to ten years. This presentation will related the empirical insights gleaned at our institution from a large-scale PACS implementation. Our PACS integration was introduced into a fully operational department (not a new hospital) in which work flow had to continue with minimal impact. Impediments to user acceptance will be addressed. The critical components of this enormous task will be discussed. The topics covered during this session will include issues such as phased implementation, DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) standard-based interaction of devices, hospital information system (HIS)/radiology information system (RIS) interface, user approval, networking, workstation deployment and backup procedures. The presentation will make specific suggestions regarding the implementation team, operating instructions, quality control (QC), training and education. The concept of identifying key functional areas is relevant to transitioning the facility to be entirely on line. Special attention must be paid to specific functional areas such as the operating rooms and trauma rooms where the clinical requirements may not match the PACS capabilities. The printing of films may be necessary for certain circumstances. The integration of teleradiology and remote clinics into a PACS is a salient topic with respect to the overall role of the radiologists providing rapid consultation. A Web-based server allows a clinician to review images and reports on a desk-top (personal) computer and thus reduce the number of dedicated PACS review workstations. This session

  13. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  14. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  15. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  16. Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

    1995-06-01

    A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  17. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  18. Large-Scale Distributed Coalition Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    such as mobile devices, and constructing hierarchical networks to conform to dynamic constraints. Their system, Chordella, dynamically adjusts the...Proceedings of the IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Intelligent Agent Techonology , IAT, 162–168. China, September 2004. URL http...16(3):617– 627, June 2008. ISSN 1063-6692. 17. Cao, Y. Uny, Alex S. Fukunaga, and Andrew B. Kahng. “Cooperative Mobile Robotics: Antecedents and

  19. Voids in the Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ad, Hagai; Piran, Tsvi

    1997-12-01

    Voids are the most prominent feature of the large-scale structure of the universe. Still, their incorporation into quantitative analysis of it has been relatively recent, owing essentially to the lack of an objective tool to identify the voids and to quantify them. To overcome this, we present here the VOID FINDER algorithm, a novel tool for objectively quantifying voids in the galaxy distribution. The algorithm first classifies galaxies as either wall galaxies or field galaxies. Then, it identifies voids in the wall-galaxy distribution. Voids are defined as continuous volumes that do not contain any wall galaxies. The voids must be thicker than an adjustable limit, which is refined in successive iterations. In this way, we identify the same regions that would be recognized as voids by the eye. Small breaches in the walls are ignored, avoiding artificial connections between neighboring voids. We test the algorithm using Voronoi tesselations. By appropriate scaling of the parameters with the selection function, we apply it to two redshift surveys, the dense SSRS2 and the full-sky IRAS 1.2 Jy. Both surveys show similar properties: ~50% of the volume is filled by voids. The voids have a scale of at least 40 h-1 Mpc and an average -0.9 underdensity. Faint galaxies do not fill the voids, but they do populate them more than bright ones. These results suggest that both optically and IRAS-selected galaxies delineate the same large-scale structure. Comparison with the recovered mass distribution further suggests that the observed voids in the galaxy distribution correspond well to underdense regions in the mass distribution. This confirms the gravitational origin of the voids.

  20. Measurement of the steady surface pressure distribution on a single rotation large scale advanced prop-fan blade at Mach numbers from 0.03 to 0.78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The aerodynamic pressure distribution was determined on a rotating Prop-Fan blade at the S1-MA wind tunnel facility operated by the Office National D'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiale (ONERA) in Modane, France. The pressure distributions were measured at thirteen radial stations on a single rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP/SR7) blade, for a sequence of operating conditions including inflow Mach numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.78. Pressure distributions for more than one power coefficient and/or advanced ratio setting were measured for most of the inflow Mach numbers investigated. Due to facility power limitations the Prop-Fan test installation was a two bladed version of the eight design configuration. The power coefficient range investigated was therefore selected to cover typical power loading per blade conditions which occur within the Prop-Fan operating envelope. The experimental results provide an extensive source of information on the aerodynamic behavior of the swept Prop-Fan blade, including details which were elusive to current computational models and do not appear in the two-dimensional airfoil data.

  1. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.Th.

    1981-04-01

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. One hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analysed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analysed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population.

  2. Needs, opportunities, and options for large scale systems research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    The Office of Energy Research was recently asked to perform a study of Large Scale Systems in order to facilitate the development of a true large systems theory. It was decided to ask experts in the fields of electrical engineering, chemical engineering and manufacturing/operations research for their ideas concerning large scale systems research. The author was asked to distribute a questionnaire among these experts to find out their opinions concerning recent accomplishments and future research directions in large scale systems research. He was also requested to convene a conference which included three experts in each area as panel members to discuss the general area of large scale systems research. The conference was held on March 26--27, 1984 in Pittsburgh with nine panel members, and 15 other attendees. The present report is a summary of the ideas presented and the recommendations proposed by the attendees.

  3. Supporting large scale applications on networks of workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Robert; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    Distributed applications on networks of workstations are an increasingly common way to satisfy computing needs. However, existing mechanisms for distributed programming exhibit poor performance and reliability as application size increases. Extension of the ISIS distributed programming system to support large scale distributed applications by providing hierarchical process groups is discussed. Incorporation of hierarchy in the program structure and exploitation of this to limit the communication and storage required in any one component of the distributed system is examined.

  4. Large Scale Metal Additive Techniques Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nycz, Andrzej; Adediran, Adeola I; Noakes, Mark W; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years additive manufacturing made long strides toward becoming a main stream production technology. Particularly strong progress has been made in large-scale polymer deposition. However, large scale metal additive has not yet reached parity with large scale polymer. This paper is a review study of the metal additive techniques in the context of building large structures. Current commercial devices are capable of printing metal parts on the order of several cubic feet compared to hundreds of cubic feet for the polymer side. In order to follow the polymer progress path several factors are considered: potential to scale, economy, environment friendliness, material properties, feedstock availability, robustness of the process, quality and accuracy, potential for defects, and post processing as well as potential applications. This paper focuses on current state of art of large scale metal additive technology with a focus on expanding the geometric limits.

  5. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  6. Efficient On-Demand Operations in Large-Scale Infrastructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Steven Y.

    2009-01-01

    In large-scale distributed infrastructures such as clouds, Grids, peer-to-peer systems, and wide-area testbeds, users and administrators typically desire to perform "on-demand operations" that deal with the most up-to-date state of the infrastructure. However, the scale and dynamism present in the operating environment make it challenging to…

  7. Extracting Useful Semantic Information from Large Scale Corpora of Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Ray Padilla, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Extracting and representing semantic information from large scale corpora is at the crux of computer-assisted knowledge generation. Semantic information depends on collocation extraction methods, mathematical models used to represent distributional information, and weighting functions which transform the space. This dissertation provides a…

  8. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ΛCDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ζ. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ζ, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ζ. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  9. PKI security in large-scale healthcare networks.

    PubMed

    Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios; Komninos, Nikos

    2012-06-01

    During the past few years a lot of PKI (Public Key Infrastructures) infrastructures have been proposed for healthcare networks in order to ensure secure communication services and exchange of data among healthcare professionals. However, there is a plethora of challenges in these healthcare PKI infrastructures. Especially, there are a lot of challenges for PKI infrastructures deployed over large-scale healthcare networks. In this paper, we propose a PKI infrastructure to ensure security in a large-scale Internet-based healthcare network connecting a wide spectrum of healthcare units geographically distributed within a wide region. Furthermore, the proposed PKI infrastructure facilitates the trust issues that arise in a large-scale healthcare network including multi-domain PKI infrastructures.

  10. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  11. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  12. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  13. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  14. A Cloud Computing Platform for Large-Scale Forensic Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, Vassil; Wang, Liqiang; Richard, Golden; Marziale, Lodovico

    The timely processing of massive digital forensic collections demands the use of large-scale distributed computing resources and the flexibility to customize the processing performed on the collections. This paper describes MPI MapReduce (MMR), an open implementation of the MapReduce processing model that outperforms traditional forensic computing techniques. MMR provides linear scaling for CPU-intensive processing and super-linear scaling for indexing-related workloads.

  15. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  16. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  17. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows of a given wave number K are investigated using three-dimensional Floquet numerical computations. In the Floquet formalism the unstable field is expanded in modes of different spacial periodicity. This allows us (i) to clearly distinguish large from small scale instabilities and (ii) to study modes of wave number q of arbitrarily large-scale separation q ≪K . Different flows are examined including flows that exhibit small-scale turbulence. The growth rate σ of the most unstable mode is measured as a function of the scale separation q /K ≪1 and the Reynolds number Re. It is shown that the growth rate follows the scaling σ ∝q if an AKA effect [Frisch et al., Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987), 10.1016/0167-2789(87)90026-1] is present or a negative eddy viscosity scaling σ ∝q2 in its absence. This holds both for the Re≪1 regime where previously derived asymptotic results are verified but also for Re=O (1 ) that is beyond their range of validity. Furthermore, for values of Re above a critical value ReSc beyond which small-scale instabilities are present, the growth rate becomes independent of q and the energy of the perturbation at large scales decreases with scale separation. The nonlinear behavior of these large-scale instabilities is also examined in the nonlinear regime where the largest scales of the system are found to be the most dominant energetically. These results are interpreted by low-order models.

  18. Large-Scale Aerosol Modeling and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    aerosol species up to six days in advance anywhere on the globe. NAAPS and COAMPS are particularly useful for forecasts of dust storms in areas...impact cloud processes globally. With increasing dust storms due to climate change and land use changes in desert regions, the impact of the...bacteria in large-scale dust storms is expected to significantly impact warm ice cloud formation, human health, and ecosystems globally. In Niemi et al

  19. Economically viable large-scale hydrogen liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, U.; Decker, L.; Klein, H.

    2017-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen demand, particularly driven by clean energy applications, will rise in the near future. As industrial large scale liquefiers will play a major role within the hydrogen supply chain, production capacity will have to increase by a multiple of today’s typical sizes. The main goal is to reduce the total cost of ownership for these plants by increasing energy efficiency with innovative and simple process designs, optimized in capital expenditure. New concepts must ensure a manageable plant complexity and flexible operability. In the phase of process development and selection, a dimensioning of key equipment for large scale liquefiers, such as turbines and compressors as well as heat exchangers, must be performed iteratively to ensure technological feasibility and maturity. Further critical aspects related to hydrogen liquefaction, e.g. fluid properties, ortho-para hydrogen conversion, and coldbox configuration, must be analysed in detail. This paper provides an overview on the approach, challenges and preliminary results in the development of efficient as well as economically viable concepts for large-scale hydrogen liquefaction.

  20. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  1. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers.

  2. Large-scale biodiversity patterns in freshwater phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Stomp, Maayke; Huisman, Jef; Mittelbach, Gary G; Litchman, Elena; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2011-11-01

    Our planet shows striking gradients in the species richness of plants and animals, from high biodiversity in the tropics to low biodiversity in polar and high-mountain regions. Recently, similar patterns have been described for some groups of microorganisms, but the large-scale biogeographical distribution of freshwater phytoplankton diversity is still largely unknown. We examined the species diversity of freshwater phytoplankton sampled from 540 lakes and reservoirs distributed across the continental United States and found strong latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal gradients in phytoplankton biodiversity, demonstrating that microorganisms can show substantial geographic variation in biodiversity. Detailed analysis using structural equation models indicated that these large-scale biodiversity gradients in freshwater phytoplankton diversity were mainly driven by local environmental factors, although there were residual direct effects of latitude, longitude, and altitude as well. Specifically, we found that phytoplankton species richness was an increasing saturating function of lake chlorophyll a concentration, increased with lake surface area and possibly increased with water temperature, resembling effects of productivity, habitat area, and temperature on diversity patterns commonly observed for macroorganisms. In turn, these local environmental factors varied along latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal gradients. These results imply that changes in land use or climate that affect these local environmental factors are likely to have major impacts on large-scale biodiversity patterns of freshwater phytoplankton.

  3. The CLASSgal code for relativistic cosmological large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dio, Enea Di; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Francesco.Montanari@unige.ch E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2013-11-01

    We present accurate and efficient computations of large scale structure observables, obtained with a modified version of the CLASS code which is made publicly available. This code includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum C{sub ℓ}(z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ,z{sub 1},z{sub 2}) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. For Gaussian initial perturbations, these quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory. We illustrate the usefulness of our code for cosmological parameter estimation through a few simple examples.

  4. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  5. Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willcox, Karen; Marzouk, Youssef

    2013-11-12

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimization) Project focused on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimization and inversion methods. The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, the University of Texas at Austin, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Sandia National Laboratories. The research was directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. The MIT--Sandia component of the SAGUARO Project addressed the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas--Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to-observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as ``reduce then sample'' and ``sample then reduce.'' In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their

  6. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  7. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  8. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  9. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  10. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  11. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  12. Large-scale Heterogeneous Network Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    Data for Multi-Player Influence Maximization on Social Networks.” KDD 2012 (Demo).  Po-Tzu Chang , Yen-Chieh Huang, Cheng-Lun Yang, Shou-De Lin, Pu...Jen Cheng. “Learning-Based Time-Sensitive Re-Ranking for Web Search.” SIGIR 2012 (poster)  Hung -Che Lai, Cheng-Te Li, Yi-Chen Lo, and Shou-De Lin...Exploiting and Evaluating MapReduce for Large-Scale Graph Mining.” ASONAM 2012 (Full, 16% acceptance ratio).  Hsun-Ping Hsieh , Cheng-Te Li, and Shou

  13. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  14. Equivalent common path method in large-scale laser comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingzhao; Li, Jianshuang; Miao, Dongjing

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale laser comparator is main standard device that providing accurate, reliable and traceable measurements for high precision large-scale line and 3D measurement instruments. It mainly composed of guide rail, motion control system, environmental parameters monitoring system and displacement measurement system. In the laser comparator, the main error sources are temperature distribution, straightness of guide rail and pitch and yaw of measuring carriage. To minimize the measurement uncertainty, an equivalent common optical path scheme is proposed and implemented. Three laser interferometers are adjusted to parallel with the guide rail. The displacement in an arbitrary virtual optical path is calculated using three displacements without the knowledge of carriage orientations at start and end positions. The orientation of air floating carriage is calculated with displacements of three optical path and position of three retroreflectors which are precisely measured by Laser Tracker. A 4th laser interferometer is used in the virtual optical path as reference to verify this compensation method. This paper analyzes the effect of rail straightness on the displacement measurement. The proposed method, through experimental verification, can improve the measurement uncertainty of large-scale laser comparator.

  15. Reliability assessment for components of large scale photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Amir; Ghadimi, Noradin; Mirabbasi, Davar

    2014-10-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems have significantly shifted from independent power generation systems to a large-scale grid-connected generation systems in recent years. The power output of PV systems is affected by the reliability of various components in the system. This study proposes an analytical approach to evaluate the reliability of large-scale, grid-connected PV systems. The fault tree method with an exponential probability distribution function is used to analyze the components of large-scale PV systems. The system is considered in the various sequential and parallel fault combinations in order to find all realistic ways in which the top or undesired events can occur. Additionally, it can identify areas that the planned maintenance should focus on. By monitoring the critical components of a PV system, it is possible not only to improve the reliability of the system, but also to optimize the maintenance costs. The latter is achieved by informing the operators about the system component's status. This approach can be used to ensure secure operation of the system by its flexibility in monitoring system applications. The implementation demonstrates that the proposed method is effective and efficient and can conveniently incorporate more system maintenance plans and diagnostic strategies.

  16. Large-scale flow generation by inhomogeneous helicity.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, N; Brandenburg, A

    2016-03-01

    The effect of kinetic helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation) on turbulent momentum transport is investigated. The turbulent kinetic helicity (pseudoscalar) enters the Reynolds stress (mirror-symmetric tensor) expression in the form of a helicity gradient as the coupling coefficient for the mean vorticity and/or the angular velocity (axial vector), which suggests the possibility of mean-flow generation in the presence of inhomogeneous helicity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect, which was previously confirmed at the level of a turbulence- or closure-model simulation, is examined with the aid of direct numerical simulations of rotating turbulence with nonuniform helicity sustained by an external forcing. The numerical simulations show that the spatial distribution of the Reynolds stress is in agreement with the helicity-related term coupled with the angular velocity, and that a large-scale flow is generated in the direction of angular velocity. Such a large-scale flow is not induced in the case of homogeneous turbulent helicity. This result confirms the validity of the inhomogeneous helicity effect in large-scale flow generation and suggests that a vortex dynamo is possible even in incompressible turbulence where there is no baroclinicity effect.

  17. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    this number every week, resulting in billions of objects. At such scales, even linear-time analysis operations present challenges, particularly since statistical analyses are inherently interactive processes, requiring that computations complete within some reasonable human attention span. The quadratic (or worse) runtimes of straightforward implementations become quickly unbearable. Examples of applications. These analysis subroutines occur ubiquitously in astrostatistical work. We list just a few examples. The need to cross-match objects across different catalogs has led to various algorithms, which at some point perform an AllNN computation. 2-point and higher-order spatial correlations for the basis of spatial statistics, and are utilized in astronomy to compare the spatial structures of two datasets, such as an observed sample and a theoretical sample, for example, forming the basis for two-sample hypothesis testing. Friends-of-friends clustering is often used to identify halos in data from astrophysical simulations. Minimum spanning tree properties have also been proposed as statistics of large-scale structure. Comparison of the distributions of different kinds of objects requires accurate density estimation, for which KDE is the overall statistical method of choice. The prediction of redshifts from optical data requires accurate regression, for which kernel regression is a powerful method. The identification of objects of various types in astronomy, such as stars versus galaxies, requires accurate classification, for which KDA is a powerful method. Overview. In this chapter, we will briefly sketch the main ideas behind recent fast algorithms which achieve, for example, linear runtimes for pairwise-distance problems, or similarly dramatic reductions in computational growth. In some cases, the runtime orders for these algorithms are mathematically provable statements, while in others we have only conjectures backed by experimental observations for the time being

  18. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  19. Large-scale parametric survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Cheng, Jerry Q; Burd, Randall S

    2013-10-15

    Survival analysis has been a topic of active statistical research in the past few decades with applications spread across several areas. Traditional applications usually consider data with only a small numbers of predictors with a few hundreds or thousands of observations. Recent advances in data acquisition techniques and computation power have led to considerable interest in analyzing very-high-dimensional data where the number of predictor variables and the number of observations range between 10(4) and 10(6). In this paper, we present a tool for performing large-scale regularized parametric survival analysis using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent method. Through our experiments on two real data sets, we show that application of regularized models to high-dimensional data avoids overfitting and can provide improved predictive performance and calibration over corresponding low-dimensional models.

  20. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  1. Large scale preparation of pure phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Padgett, M P; Krogmann, D W

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes simple procedures for the purification of large amounts of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A homogeneous natural bloom of this organism provided hundreds of kilograms of cells. Large samples of cells were broken by freezing and thawing. Repeated extraction of the broken cells with distilled water released phycocyanin first, then allophycocyanin, and provides supporting evidence for the current models of phycobilisome structure. The very low ionic strength of the aqueous extracts allowed allophycocyanin release in a particulate form so that this protein could be easily concentrated by centrifugation. Other proteins in the extract were enriched and concentrated by large scale membrane filtration. The biliproteins were purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Purity was established by HPLC and by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The proteins were examined for stability at various pHs and exposures to visible light.

  2. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  3. Efficient, large scale separation of coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Dyrkacz, G.R.; Bloomquist, C.A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors believe that the separation of macerals by continuous flow centrifugation offers a simple technique for the large scale separation of macerals. With relatively little cost (/approximately/ $10K), it provides an opportunity for obtaining quite pure maceral fractions. Although they have not completely worked out all the nuances of this separation system, they believe that the problems they have indicated can be minimized to pose only minor inconvenience. It cannot be said that this system completely bypasses the disagreeable tedium or time involved in separating macerals, nor will it by itself overcome the mental inertia required to make maceral separation an accepted necessary fact in fundamental coal science. However, they find their particular brand of continuous flow centrifugation is considerably faster than sink/float separation, can provide a good quality product with even one separation cycle, and permits the handling of more material than a conventional sink/float centrifuge separation.

  4. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  5. Large-scale optimization of neuron arbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Christopher; Changizi, Mark; Won Kang, Du

    1999-05-01

    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors-both dendrites and axons-appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume-rather than, for example, surface area or branch length. In addition, the arbors perform well at generating the cheapest topology interconnecting their terminals: their large-scale layouts are among the best of all such possible connecting patterns, approaching 5% of optimum. This model also applies comparably to arterial and river networks.

  6. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  7. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  8. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  9. Modeling the Internet's large-scale topology

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Soon-Hyung; Jeong, Hawoong; Barabási, Albert-László

    2002-01-01

    Network generators that capture the Internet's large-scale topology are crucial for the development of efficient routing protocols and modeling Internet traffic. Our ability to design realistic generators is limited by the incomplete understanding of the fundamental driving forces that affect the Internet's evolution. By combining several independent databases capturing the time evolution, topology, and physical layout of the Internet, we identify the universal mechanisms that shape the Internet's router and autonomous system level topology. We find that the physical layout of nodes form a fractal set, determined by population density patterns around the globe. The placement of links is driven by competition between preferential attachment and linear distance dependence, a marked departure from the currently used exponential laws. The universal parameters that we extract significantly restrict the class of potentially correct Internet models and indicate that the networks created by all available topology generators are fundamentally different from the current Internet. PMID:12368484

  10. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  11. Improving Recent Large-Scale Pulsar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rogerio Fernando; Ransom, S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are unique in that they act as celestial laboratories for precise tests of gravity and other extreme physics (Kramer 2004). There are approximately 2000 known pulsars today, which is less than ten percent of pulsars in the Milky Way according to theoretical models (Lorimer 2004). Out of these 2000 known pulsars, approximately ten percent are known millisecond pulsars, objects used for their period stability for detailed physics tests and searches for gravitational radiation (Lorimer 2008). As the field and instrumentation progress, pulsar astronomers attempt to overcome observational biases and detect new pulsars, consequently discovering new millisecond pulsars. We attempt to improve large scale pulsar surveys by examining three recent pulsar surveys. The first, the Green Bank Telescope 350MHz Drift Scan, a low frequency isotropic survey of the northern sky, has yielded a large number of candidates that were visually inspected and identified, resulting in over 34.000 thousands candidates viewed, dozens of detections of known pulsars, and the discovery of a new low-flux pulsar, PSRJ1911+22. The second, the PALFA survey, is a high frequency survey of the galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. We created a processing pipeline for the PALFA survey at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville- VA, in addition to making needed modifications upon advice from the PALFA consortium. The third survey examined is a new GBT 820MHz survey devoted to find new millisecond pulsars by observing the target-rich environment of unidentified sources in the FERMI LAT catalogue. By approaching these three pulsar surveys at different stages, we seek to improve the success rates of large scale surveys, and hence the possibility for ground-breaking work in both basic physics and astrophysics.

  12. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  13. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  14. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  15. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

  16. Statistical analysis of large-scale neuronal recording data

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Jamie L.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2010-01-01

    Relating stimulus properties to the response properties of individual neurons and neuronal networks is a major goal of sensory research. Many investigators implant electrode arrays in multiple brain areas and record from chronically implanted electrodes over time to answer a variety of questions. Technical challenges related to analyzing large-scale neuronal recording data are not trivial. Several analysis methods traditionally used by neurophysiologists do not account for dependencies in the data that are inherent in multi-electrode recordings. In addition, when neurophysiological data are not best modeled by the normal distribution and when the variables of interest may not be linearly related, extensions of the linear modeling techniques are recommended. A variety of methods exist to analyze correlated data, even when data are not normally distributed and the relationships are nonlinear. Here we review expansions of the Generalized Linear Model designed to address these data properties. Such methods are used in other research fields, and the application to large-scale neuronal recording data will enable investigators to determine the variable properties that convincingly contribute to the variances in the observed neuronal measures. Standard measures of neuron properties such as response magnitudes can be analyzed using these methods, and measures of neuronal network activity such as spike timing correlations can be analyzed as well. We have done just that in recordings from 100-electrode arrays implanted in the primary somatosensory cortex of owl monkeys. Here we illustrate how one example method, Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, is a useful method to apply to large-scale neuronal recordings. PMID:20472395

  17. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  18. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the "separate universe" paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  19. Large-scale autostereoscopic outdoor display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Schmid, Gerhard; Gartner, Wolfgang; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art autostereoscopic displays are often limited in size, effective brightness, number of 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances, all of which are mandatory requirements for large-scale outdoor displays. Conventional autostereoscopic indoor concepts like lenticular lenses or parallax barriers cannot simply be adapted for these screens due to the inherent loss of effective resolution and brightness, which would reduce both image quality and sunlight readability. We have developed a modular autostereoscopic multi-view laser display concept with sunlight readable effective brightness, theoretically up to several thousand 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances of up to 60 meters. For proof-of-concept purposes a prototype display with two pixels was realized. Due to various manufacturing tolerances each individual pixel has slightly different optical properties, and hence the 3D image quality of the display has to be calculated stochastically. In this paper we present the corresponding stochastic model, we evaluate the simulation and measurement results of the prototype display, and we calculate the achievable autostereoscopic image quality to be expected for our concept.

  20. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  1. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  2. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  3. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  4. Large-scale implementation of disease control programmes: a cost-effectiveness analysis of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed net distribution channels in a malaria-endemic area of western Kenya—a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Elvis; Were, Vincent; Ouma, Peter; Desai, Meghna; Niessen, Louis; Buff, Ann M; Kariuki, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Historically, Kenya has used various distribution models for long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs) with variable results in population coverage. The models presently vary widely in scale, target population and strategy. There is limited information to determine the best combination of distribution models, which will lead to sustained high coverage and are operationally efficient and cost-effective. Standardised cost information is needed in combination with programme effectiveness estimates to judge the efficiency of LLIN distribution models and options for improvement in implementing malaria control programmes. The study aims to address the information gap, estimating distribution cost and the effectiveness of different LLIN distribution models, and comparing them in an economic evaluation. Methods and analysis Evaluation of cost and coverage will be determined for 5 different distribution models in Busia County, an area of perennial malaria transmission in western Kenya. Cost data will be collected retrospectively from health facilities, the Ministry of Health, donors and distributors. Programme-effectiveness data, defined as the number of people with access to an LLIN per 1000 population, will be collected through triangulation of data from a nationally representative, cross-sectional malaria survey, a cross-sectional survey administered to a subsample of beneficiaries in Busia County and LLIN distributors’ records. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis will be used for the evaluation. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from a health-systems perspective, and cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated using bootstrapping techniques. Ethics and dissemination The study has been evaluated and approved by Kenya Medical Research Institute, Scientific and Ethical Review Unit (SERU number 2997). All participants will provide written informed consent. The findings of this economic evaluation will be disseminated through

  5. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  6. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  7. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  8. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  9. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  10. Large-scale quantum networks based on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-05-01

    Society relies and depends increasingly on information exchange and communication. In the quantum world, security and privacy is a built-in feature for information processing. The essential ingredient for exploiting these quantum advantages is the resource of entanglement, which can be shared between two or more parties. The distribution of entanglement over large distances constitutes a key challenge for current research and development. Due to losses of the transmitted quantum particles, which typically scale exponentially with the distance, intermediate quantum repeater stations are needed. Here we show how to generalise the quantum repeater concept to the multipartite case, by describing large-scale quantum networks, i.e. network nodes and their long-distance links, consistently in the language of graphs and graph states. This unifying approach comprises both the distribution of multipartite entanglement across the network, and the protection against errors via encoding. The correspondence to graph states also provides a tool for optimising the architecture of quantum networks.

  11. Large scale structure of the globular cluster population in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Alexander T.; O'Neill, Conor; Madrid, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    A search for globular cluster candidates in the Coma Cluster was carried out using Hubble Space Telescope data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We combine different observing programs including the Coma Treasury Survey in order to obtain the large scale distribution of globular clusters in Coma. Globular cluster candidates were selected through careful morphological inspection and a detailed analysis of their magnitude and colors in the two available wavebands, F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I). Color Magnitude Diagrams, radial density plots and density maps were then created to characterize the globular cluster population in Coma. Preliminary results show the structure of the intergalactic globular cluster system throughout Coma, among the largest globular clusters catalogues to date. The spatial distribution of globular clusters shows clear overdensities, or bridges, between Coma galaxies. It also becomes evident that galaxies of similar luminosity have vastly different numbers of associated globular clusters.

  12. Global Behavior in Large Scale Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    Sinopoli, and J. Moura, “ Distributed detection over time varying networks: Large deviations analysis,” in Communication, Control , and Computing...and J. Moura, “ Distributed detection via gaussian running consensus : Large deviations asymptotic analysis,” Signal Processing, IEEE Transactions on... Distributed detection via Gaussian running consensus : large deviations asymptotic analysis,” IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, vol. 59, no. 9, pp

  13. The combustion behavior of large scale lithium titanate battery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peifeng; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ke; Ping, Ping; Sun, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    Safety problem is always a big obstacle for lithium battery marching to large scale application. However, the knowledge on the battery combustion behavior is limited. To investigate the combustion behavior of large scale lithium battery, three 50 Ah Li(NixCoyMnz)O2/Li4Ti5O12 batteries under different state of charge (SOC) were heated to fire. The flame size variation is depicted to analyze the combustion behavior directly. The mass loss rate, temperature and heat release rate are used to analyze the combustion behavior in reaction way deeply. Based on the phenomenon, the combustion process is divided into three basic stages, even more complicated at higher SOC with sudden smoke flow ejected. The reason is that a phase change occurs in Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 material from layer structure to spinel structure. The critical temperatures of ignition are at 112–121°C on anode tab and 139 to 147°C on upper surface for all cells. But the heating time and combustion time become shorter with the ascending of SOC. The results indicate that the battery fire hazard increases with the SOC. It is analyzed that the internal short and the Li+ distribution are the main causes that lead to the difference. PMID:25586064

  14. Semantic overlay network for large-scale spatial information indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yue; Cao, Kai; Qu, Tianshan; Wang, Zhongmin

    2013-08-01

    The increased demand for online services of spatial information poses new challenges to the combined filed of Computer Science and Geographic Information Science. Amongst others, these include fast indexing of spatial data in distributed networks. In this paper we propose a novel semantic overlay network for large-scale multi-dimensional spatial information indexing, called SON_LSII, which has a hybrid structure integrating a semantic quad-tree and Chord ring. The SON_LSII is a small world overlay network that achieves a very competitive trade-off between indexing efficiency and maintenance overhead. To create SON_LSII, we use an effective semantic clustering strategy that considers two aspects, i.e., the semantic of spatial information that peer holds in overlay network and physical network performances. Based on SON_LSII, a mapping method is used to reduce the multi-dimensional features into a single dimension and an efficient indexing algorithm is presented to support complex range queries of the spatial information with a massive number of concurrent users. The results from extensive experiments demonstrate that SON_LSII is superior to existing overlay networks in various respects, including scalability, maintenance, rate of indexing hits, indexing logical hops, and adaptability. Thus, the proposed SON_LSII can be used for large-scale spatial information indexing.

  15. The combustion behavior of large scale lithium titanate battery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peifeng; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ke; Ping, Ping; Sun, Jinhua

    2015-01-14

    Safety problem is always a big obstacle for lithium battery marching to large scale application. However, the knowledge on the battery combustion behavior is limited. To investigate the combustion behavior of large scale lithium battery, three 50 Ah Li(Ni(x)Co(y)Mn(z))O2/Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) batteries under different state of charge (SOC) were heated to fire. The flame size variation is depicted to analyze the combustion behavior directly. The mass loss rate, temperature and heat release rate are used to analyze the combustion behavior in reaction way deeply. Based on the phenomenon, the combustion process is divided into three basic stages, even more complicated at higher SOC with sudden smoke flow ejected. The reason is that a phase change occurs in Li(Ni(x)Co(y)Mn(z))O2 material from layer structure to spinel structure. The critical temperatures of ignition are at 112-121 °C on anode tab and 139 to 147 °C on upper surface for all cells. But the heating time and combustion time become shorter with the ascending of SOC. The results indicate that the battery fire hazard increases with the SOC. It is analyzed that the internal short and the Li(+) distribution are the main causes that lead to the difference.

  16. Wall turbulence manipulation by large-scale streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuso, Gaetano; Onorato, Michele; Spazzini, Pier Giorgio; di Cicca, Gaetano Maria

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of the manipulation of a fully developed turbulent channel flow through large-scale streamwise vortices originated by vortex generator jets distributed along the wall in the spanwise direction. Apart from the interest in flow management itself, an important aim of the research is to observe the response of the flow to external perturbations as a technique for investigating the structure of turbulence. Considerable mean and fluctuating skin friction reductions, locally as high as 30% and 50% respectively, were measured for an optimal forcing flow intensity. Mean and fluctuating velocity profiles are also greatly modified by the manipulating large-scale vortices; in particular, attenuation of the turbulence intensity was measured. Moreover the flow manipulation caused an increase in longitudinal coherence of the wall organized motions, accompanied by a reduced frequency of burst events, demonstrated by a reduction of the velocity time derivative PDFs and by an higher intermittency. A strong transversal periodic organization of the flow field was observed, including some typical behaviours in each of the periodic boxes originated by the interaction of the vortex pairs. Results are interpreted and discussed in terms of management of the near-wall turbulent structures and with reference to the wall turbulence regeneration mechanisms suggested in the literature.

  17. Ecohydrological modeling for large-scale environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Woznicki, Sean A; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Abouali, Mohammad; Herman, Matthew R; Esfahanian, Elaheh; Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Ecohydrological models are frequently used to assess the biological integrity of unsampled streams. These models vary in complexity and scale, and their utility depends on their final application. Tradeoffs are usually made in model scale, where large-scale models are useful for determining broad impacts of human activities on biological conditions, and regional-scale (e.g. watershed or ecoregion) models provide stakeholders greater detail at the individual stream reach level. Given these tradeoffs, the objective of this study was to develop large-scale stream health models with reach level accuracy similar to regional-scale models thereby allowing for impacts assessments and improved decision-making capabilities. To accomplish this, four measures of biological integrity (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa (EPT), Family Index of Biotic Integrity (FIBI), Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), and fish Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI)) were modeled based on four thermal classes (cold, cold-transitional, cool, and warm) of streams that broadly dictate the distribution of aquatic biota in Michigan. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to simulate streamflow and water quality in seven watersheds and the Hydrologic Index Tool was used to calculate 171 ecologically relevant flow regime variables. Unique variables were selected for each thermal class using a Bayesian variable selection method. The variables were then used in development of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) models of EPT, FIBI, HBI, and IBI. ANFIS model accuracy improved when accounting for stream thermal class rather than developing a global model.

  18. Systematic renormalization of the effective theory of Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-05-31

    A perturbative description of Large Scale Structure is a cornerstone of our understanding of the observed distribution of matter in the universe. Renormalization is an essential and defining step to make this description physical and predictive. Here we introduce a systematic renormalization procedure, which neatly associates counterterms to the UV-sensitive diagrams order by order, as it is commonly done in quantum field theory. As a concrete example, we renormalize the one-loop power spectrum and bispectrum of both density and velocity. In addition, we present a series of results that are valid to all orders in perturbation theory. First, we show that while systematic renormalization requires temporally non-local counterterms, in practice one can use an equivalent basis made of local operators. We give an explicit prescription to generate all counterterms allowed by the symmetries. Second, we present a formal proof of the well-known general argument that the contribution of short distance perturbations to large scale density contrast δ and momentum density π(k) scale as k{sup 2} and k, respectively. Third, we demonstrate that the common practice of introducing counterterms only in the Euler equation when one is interested in correlators of δ is indeed valid to all orders.

  19. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  20. Large Scale Hierarchical K-Means Based Image Retrieval With MapReduce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    LARGE SCALE HIERARCHICAL K-MEANS BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL WITH MAPREDUCE THESIS William E. Murphy, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENG-14-M-56 DEPARTMENT...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-14-M-56 LARGE SCALE HIERARCHICAL K-MEANS BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL WITH MAPREDUCE THESIS

  1. Algorithms for Large-Scale Astronomical Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Modern astronomical datasets are getting larger and larger, which already include...of data, which raises the following question: How can we use modern computer science techniques to help astronomers better analyze large datasets? To...indexing and sorting further reduce the processing time of user queries.  We processed large data using modern distributed computing frameworks

  2. Tracing the origin of green macroalgal blooms based on the large scale spatio-temporal distribution of Ulva microscopic propagules and settled mature Ulva vegetative thalli in coastal regions of the Yellow Sea, China.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuanzi; Han, Hongbin; Hua, Liang; Wei, Zhangliang; Yu, Kefeng; Shi, Honghua; Kim, Jang Kyun; Yarish, Charles; He, Peimin

    2016-11-01

    From 2008 to 2016, massive floating green macroalgal blooms occurred annually during the summer months in the Yellow Sea. The original source of these blooms was traced based on the spatio-temporal distribution and species composition of Ulva microscopic propagules and settled Ulva vegetative thalli monthly from December 2012 to May 2013 in the Yellow Sea. High quantities of Ulva microscopic propagules in both the water column and sediments were found in the Pyropia aquaculture area along the Jiangsu coast before a green macroalgal bloom appeared in the Yellow Sea. The abundance of Ulva microscopic propagules was significantly lower in outer areas compared to in Pyropia aquaculture areas. A molecular phylogenetic analysis suggested that Ulva prolifera microscopic propagules were the dominant microscopic propagules present during the study period. The extremely low biomass of settled Ulva vegetative thalli along the coast indicated that somatic cells of settled Ulva vegetative thalli did not provide a propagule bank for the green macroalgal blooms in the Yellow Sea. The results of this study provide further supporting evidence that the floating green macroalgal blooms originate from green macroalgae attached to Pyropia aquaculture rafts along the Jiangsu coastline of the southern Yellow Sea.

  3. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  4. Investigation of flow fields within large scale hypersonic inlet models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnos, A. V.; Watson, E. C.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Sanator, R. J.; Decarlo, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to determine the internal flow characteristics in model passages representative of hypersonic inlets for use at Mach numbers to about 12. The passages were large enough to permit measurements to be made in both the core flow and boundary layers. The analytical techniques for designing the internal contours and predicting the internal flow-field development accounted for coupling between the boundary layers and inviscid flow fields by means of a displacement-thickness correction. Three large-scale inlet models, each having a different internal compression ratio, were designed to provide high internal performance with an approximately uniform static-pressure distribution at the throat station. The models were tested in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 7.4 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 8.86 X one million per meter.

  5. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  6. Unfolding large-scale online collaborative human dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yilong; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale interacting human activities underlie all social and economic phenomena, but quantitative understanding of regular patterns and mechanism is very challenging and still rare. Self-organized online collaborative activities with a precise record of event timing provide unprecedented opportunity. Our empirical analysis of the history of millions of updates in Wikipedia shows a universal double–power-law distribution of time intervals between consecutive updates of an article. We then propose a generic model to unfold collaborative human activities into three modules: (i) individual behavior characterized by Poissonian initiation of an action, (ii) human interaction captured by a cascading response to previous actions with a power-law waiting time, and (iii) population growth due to the increasing number of interacting individuals. This unfolding allows us to obtain an analytical formula that is fully supported by the universal patterns in empirical data. Our modeling approaches reveal “simplicity” beyond complex interacting human activities. PMID:27911766

  7. Modeling Failure Propagation in Large-Scale Engineering Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, Markus; Shapiro, Jonathan L.

    The simultaneous unavailability of several technical components within large-scale engineering systems can lead to high stress, rendering them prone to cascading events. In order to gain qualitative insights into the failure propagation mechanisms resulting from independent outages, we adopt a minimalistic model representing the components and their interdependencies by an undirected, unweighted network. The failure dynamics are modeled by an anticipated accelerated “wearout” process being dependent on the initial degree of a node and on the number of failed nearest neighbors. The results of the stochastic simulations imply that the influence of the network topology on the speed of the cascade highly depends on how the number of failed nearest neighbors shortens the life expectancy of a node. As a formal description of the decaying networks we propose a continuous-time mean field approximation, estimating the average failure rate of the nearest neighbors of a node based on the degree-degree distribution.

  8. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  9. Modelling large-scale halo bias using the bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Jennifer E.; Smith, Robert E.; Porciani, Cristiano

    2012-03-01

    We study the relation between the density distribution of tracers for large-scale structure and the underlying matter distribution - commonly termed bias - in the Λ cold dark matter framework. In particular, we examine the validity of the local model of biasing at quadratic order in the matter density. This model is characterized by parameters b1 and b2. Using an ensemble of N-body simulations, we apply several statistical methods to estimate the parameters. We measure halo and matter fluctuations smoothed on various scales. We find that, whilst the fits are reasonably good, the parameters vary with smoothing scale. We argue that, for real-space measurements, owing to the mixing of wavemodes, no smoothing scale can be found for which the parameters are independent of smoothing. However, this is not the case in Fourier space. We measure halo and halo-mass power spectra and from these construct estimates of the effective large-scale bias as a guide for b1. We measure the configuration dependence of the halo bispectra Bhhh and reduced bispectra Qhhh for very large-scale k-space triangles. From these data, we constrain b1 and b2, taking into account the full bispectrum covariance matrix. Using the lowest order perturbation theory, we find that for Bhhh the best-fitting parameters are in reasonable agreement with one another as the triangle scale is varied, although the fits become poor as smaller scales are included. The same is true for Qhhh. The best-fitting values were found to depend on the discreteness correction. This led us to consider halo-mass cross-bispectra. The results from these statistics supported our earlier findings. We then developed a test to explore whether the inconsistency in the recovered bias parameters could be attributed to missing higher order corrections in the models. We prove that low-order expansions are not sufficiently accurate to model the data, even on scales k1˜ 0.04 h Mpc-1. If robust inferences concerning bias are to be drawn

  10. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. IV - The discrete model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, S. J.; Chao, W. C.; Arakawa, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Arakawa-Schubert (1974) parameterization is applied to a prognostic model of large-scale atmospheric circulations and used to analyze data in a general circulation model (GCM). The vertical structure of the large-scale model and the solution for the cloud subensemble thermodynamical properties are examined to choose cloud levels and representative regions. A mass flux distribution equation is adapted to formulate algorithms for calculating the large-scale forcing and the mass flux kernel, using either direct solution or linear programming. Finally, the feedback of the cumulus ensemble on the large-scale environment for a given subensemble mass flux is calculated. All cloud subensemble properties were determined from the conservation of mass, moist static energy, and total water.

  11. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  12. Locating inefficient links in a large-scale transportation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Liu, Like; Xu, Zhongzhi; Jie, Yang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Pu

    2015-02-01

    Based on data from geographical information system (GIS) and daily commuting origin destination (OD) matrices, we estimated the distribution of traffic flow in the San Francisco road network and studied Braess's paradox in a large-scale transportation network with realistic travel demand. We measured the variation of total travel time Δ T when a road segment is closed, and found that | Δ T | follows a power-law distribution if Δ T < 0 or Δ T > 0. This implies that most roads have a negligible effect on the efficiency of the road network, while the failure of a few crucial links would result in severe travel delays, and closure of a few inefficient links would counter-intuitively reduce travel costs considerably. Generating three theoretical networks, we discovered that the heterogeneously distributed travel demand may be the origin of the observed power-law distributions of | Δ T | . Finally, a genetic algorithm was used to pinpoint inefficient link clusters in the road network. We found that closing specific road clusters would further improve the transportation efficiency.

  13. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  14. Managing large-scale multi-voltage distribution system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    The challenge for electricity utilities in the 90`s to deliver ever more reliable service at reduced cost and with fewer technical staff is the driver towards the next generation of automated network analysis tools. The paper discusses the application of an Automatic Loss Minimiser (ALM) and Fault Study Package (FSP) under the control of a Sequence Processor to an existing high resolution graphics network analysis package. Automated, sorted management summaries enable limited resources and system automation to be directed at those networks with the poorest performance and/or the largest potential savings from reduced system losses. The impact regular automatic monitoring has on the quality of the database and the scope for integration of the modules with other System Automation initiatives is also considered.

  15. Large Scale Self-Organizing Information Distribution System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-31

    record-breaking experiment utilizes Abilene ( Internet2 backbone and the trans-Atlantic high-energy physics network between Chicago PoP and CERN in...Jim Pool, CACR, Caltech * Les Cottrell of SLAC, Stanford University * Guy Almes of Internet2 (now NSF) * David Lapsley of Haystack Observatory, MIT

  16. High Fidelity Simulations of Large-Scale Wireless Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Onunkwo, Uzoma; Benz, Zachary

    2015-11-01

    The worldwide proliferation of wireless connected devices continues to accelerate. There are 10s of billions of wireless links across the planet with an additional explosion of new wireless usage anticipated as the Internet of Things develops. Wireless technologies do not only provide convenience for mobile applications, but are also extremely cost-effective to deploy. Thus, this trend towards wireless connectivity will only continue and Sandia must develop the necessary simulation technology to proactively analyze the associated emerging vulnerabilities. Wireless networks are marked by mobility and proximity-based connectivity. The de facto standard for exploratory studies of wireless networks is discrete event simulations (DES). However, the simulation of large-scale wireless networks is extremely difficult due to prohibitively large turnaround time. A path forward is to expedite simulations with parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) techniques. The mobility and distance-based connectivity associated with wireless simulations, however, typically doom PDES and fail to scale (e.g., OPNET and ns-3 simulators). We propose a PDES-based tool aimed at reducing the communication overhead between processors. The proposed solution will use light-weight processes to dynamically distribute computation workload while mitigating communication overhead associated with synchronizations. This work is vital to the analytics and validation capabilities of simulation and emulation at Sandia. We have years of experience in Sandia’s simulation and emulation projects (e.g., MINIMEGA and FIREWHEEL). Sandia’s current highly-regarded capabilities in large-scale emulations have focused on wired networks, where two assumptions prevent scalable wireless studies: (a) the connections between objects are mostly static and (b) the nodes have fixed locations.

  17. Evolution of baryons in cosmic large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali

    We introduce a new self-consistent structure finding algorithm that parses large scale cosmological structure into clusters, filaments and voids. This algorithm probes the structure at multiple scales and classifies the appropriate regions with the most probable structure type and size. We use this structure finding algorithm to parse and follow the evolution of poor clusters, filaments and voids in large scale simulations. We trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find the majority of star formation occurs in cold condensed gas in filaments at all redshifts and that it peaks at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to high contrast regions or the inner parts of filaments. Since filaments bridge between void and cluster regions, this suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion onto poor clusters. We find that at the present epoch, the gas phase distribution is 43.1%, 30.0%, 24.7% and 2.2% in the diffuse, WHIM, hot halo and condensed phases, respectively. Most of the WHIM is found to be in filamentary structures. Moreover 8.77%, 79.1%, 2.11% and 9.98% of the gas is located in poor clusters, filaments, voids and unassigned regions respectively. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments at redshift z = 0.

  18. Response of deep and shallow tropical maritime cumuli to large-scale processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, M.; Chu, J.-H.; Stark, T. E.; Nitta, T.

    1976-01-01

    The bulk diagnostic method of Yanai et al. (1973) and a simplified version of the spectral diagnostic method of Nitta (1975) are used for a more quantitative evaluation of the response of various types of cumuliform clouds to large-scale processes, using the same data set in the Marshall Islands area for a 100-day period in 1956. The dependence of the cloud mass flux distribution on radiative cooling, large-scale vertical motion, and evaporation from the sea is examined. It is shown that typical radiative cooling rates in the tropics tend to produce a bimodal distribution of mass spectrum exhibiting deep and shallow clouds. The bimodal distribution is further enhanced when the large-scale vertical motion is upward, and a nearly unimodal distribution of shallow clouds prevails when the relative cooling is compensated by the heating due to the large-scale subsidence. Both deep and shallow clouds are modulated by large-scale disturbances. The primary role of surface evaporation is to maintain the moisture flux at the cloud base.

  19. Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale Social Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-15

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale...Automation Incorporated Progress Report No. 3 Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale Social Data Submitted in accordance with...also gathers information about entities from all news articles and displays it on over one million entity pages [5][6], and the information is made

  20. Statistical analysis of mesoscale rainfall: Dependence of a random cascade generator on large-scale forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Thomas, M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1994-01-01

    Under the theory of independent and identically distributed random cascades, the probability distribution of the cascade generator determines the spatial and the ensemble properties of spatial rainfall. Three sets of radar-derived rainfall data in space and time are analyzed to estimate the probability distribution of the generator. A detailed comparison between instantaneous scans of spatial rainfall and simulated cascades using the scaling properties of the marginal moments is carried out. This comparison highlights important similarities and differences between the data and the random cascade theory. Differences are quantified and measured for the three datasets. Evidence is presented to show that the scaling properties of the rainfall can be captured to the first order by a random cascade with a single parameter. The dependence of this parameter on forcing by the large-scale meteorological conditions, as measured by the large-scale spatial average rain rate, is investigated for these three datasets. The data show that this dependence can be captured by a one-to-one function. Since the large-scale average rain rate can be diagnosed from the large-scale dynamics, this relationship demonstrates an important linkage between the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and the statistical cascade theory of mesoscale rainfall. Potential application of this research to parameterization of runoff from the land surface and regional flood frequency analysis is briefly discussed, and open problems for further research are presented.

  1. Accuracy improvement in laser stripe extraction for large-scale triangulation scanning measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Fan; Gao, Peng; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale triangulation scanning measurement systems are widely used to measure the three-dimensional profile of large-scale components and parts. The accuracy and speed of the laser stripe center extraction are essential for guaranteeing the accuracy and efficiency of the measuring system. However, in the process of large-scale measurement, multiple factors can cause deviation of the laser stripe center, including the spatial light intensity distribution, material reflectivity characteristics, and spatial transmission characteristics. A center extraction method is proposed for improving the accuracy of the laser stripe center extraction based on image evaluation of Gaussian fitting structural similarity and analysis of the multiple source factors. First, according to the features of the gray distribution of the laser stripe, evaluation of the Gaussian fitting structural similarity is estimated to provide a threshold value for center compensation. Then using the relationships between the gray distribution of the laser stripe and the multiple source factors, a compensation method of center extraction is presented. Finally, measurement experiments for a large-scale aviation composite component are carried out. The experimental results for this specific implementation verify the feasibility of the proposed center extraction method and the improved accuracy for large-scale triangulation scanning measurements.

  2. White-Light Polarization and Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, O. G.; Livshits, M. A.; Sýkora, J.

    1997-06-01

    The results of the white-light polarization measurements performed during three solar eclipses (1973, 1980, 1991) are presented. The eclipse images were processed and analysed by the same technique and method and, consequently, the distributions of the polarization and coronal intensity around the Sun were obtained in unified form for all three solar eclipses. The mutual comparisons of our results, and their comparison with the distributions found by other authors, allowed the real accuracy of the current measurements of the white-light corona polarization, which is not worse than +/-5%, to be estimated. We have investigated the behaviour of the polarization in dependence on heliocentric distance in helmet streamers and coronal holes. Simultaneous interpretation of the data on polarization and intensity in white-light helmet streamers is only possible if a considerable concentration of coronal matter (plasma) towards the plane of the sky is assumed. The values obtained for the coronal hole regions can be understood within the framework of a spherically symmetrical model of the low density solar atmosphere. A tendency towards increasing polarization in coronal holes, connected with the decrease of the hole's size and with the transition from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle, was noticed. The problem of how the peculiarities of the large-scale coronal structures are related to the orientation of the global (dipole) solar magnetic field and to the degree of the goffer character of the coronal and interplanetary current sheet is discussed briefly.

  3. SALSA - a Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Makkonen, R.; Asmi, A.; Järvenoja, S.; Anttila, T.; Partanen, A.-I.; Kulmala, M.; Järvinen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2007-12-01

    The sectional aerosol module SALSA is introduced. The model has been designed to be implemented in large scale climate models, which require both accuracy and computational efficiency. We have used multiple methods to reduce the computational burden of different aerosol processes to optimize the model performance without losing physical features relevant to problematics of climate importance. The optimizations include limiting the chemical compounds and physical processes available in different size sections of aerosol particles; division of the size distribution into size sections using size sections of variable width depending on the sensitivity of microphysical processing to the particles sizes; the total amount of size sections to describe the size distribution is kept to the minimum; furthermore, only the relevant microphysical processes affecting each size section are calculated. The ability of the module to describe different microphysical processes was evaluated against explicit microphysical models and several microphysical models used in air quality models. The results from the current module show good consistency when compared to more explicit models. Also, the module was used to simulate a new particle formation event typical in highly polluted conditions with comparable results to a more explicit model setup.

  4. SALSA - a Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Makkonen, R.; Asmi, A.; Järvenoja, S.; Anttila, T.; Partanen, A.-I.; Kulmala, M.; Järvinen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2008-05-01

    The sectional aerosol module SALSA is introduced. The model has been designed to be implemented in large scale climate models, which require both accuracy and computational efficiency. We have used multiple methods to reduce the computational burden of different aerosol processes to optimize the model performance without losing physical features relevant to problematics of climate importance. The optimizations include limiting the chemical compounds and physical processes available in different size sections of aerosol particles; division of the size distribution into size sections using size sections of variable width depending on the sensitivity of microphysical processing to the particles sizes; the total amount of size sections to describe the size distribution is kept to the minimum; furthermore, only the relevant microphysical processes affecting each size section are calculated. The ability of the module to describe different microphysical processes was evaluated against explicit microphysical models and several microphysical models used in air quality models. The results from the current module show good consistency when compared to more explicit models. Also, the module was used to simulate a new particle formation event typical in highly polluted conditions with comparable results to more explicit model setup.

  5. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; ...

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate itsmore » efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.« less

  6. Large Scale Relationship between Aquatic Insect Traits and Climate

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Schäfer, Ralf B.

    2015-01-01

    Climate is the predominant environmental driver of freshwater assemblage pattern on large spatial scales, and traits of freshwater organisms have shown considerable potential to identify impacts of climate change. Although several studies suggest traits that may indicate vulnerability to climate change, the empirical relationship between freshwater assemblage trait composition and climate has been rarely examined on large scales. We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices. The data comprised 782 species and 395 genera sampled in 4,752 stream sites during 2006 and 2007 in Germany (~357,000 km² spatial extent). We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices. Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern. Regarding individual traits, insects in general and ephemeropterans preferring very cold temperature showed the highest response, and the insects preferring cold and trichopterans preferring moderate temperature showed the highest potential for changing distribution. We showed that the seasonal radiation and moisture are the most influential bioclimatic aspects, and thus changes in these aspects may affect the most responsive traits and orders and drive a change in their spatial distribution pattern. Our findings support the development of trait-based metrics to predict and detect climate

  7. Large Scale Relationship between Aquatic Insect Traits and Climate.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2015-01-01

    Climate is the predominant environmental driver of freshwater assemblage pattern on large spatial scales, and traits of freshwater organisms have shown considerable potential to identify impacts of climate change. Although several studies suggest traits that may indicate vulnerability to climate change, the empirical relationship between freshwater assemblage trait composition and climate has been rarely examined on large scales. We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices. The data comprised 782 species and 395 genera sampled in 4,752 stream sites during 2006 and 2007 in Germany (~357,000 km² spatial extent). We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices. Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern. Regarding individual traits, insects in general and ephemeropterans preferring very cold temperature showed the highest response, and the insects preferring cold and trichopterans preferring moderate temperature showed the highest potential for changing distribution. We showed that the seasonal radiation and moisture are the most influential bioclimatic aspects, and thus changes in these aspects may affect the most responsive traits and orders and drive a change in their spatial distribution pattern. Our findings support the development of trait-based metrics to predict and detect climate

  8. Dominant modes of variability in large-scale Birkeland currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, E. D. P.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Richmond, A. D.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-08-01

    Properties of variability in large-scale Birkeland currents are investigated through empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of 1 week of data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). Mean distributions and dominant modes of variability are identified for both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Differences in the results from the two hemispheres are observed, which are attributed to seasonal differences in conductivity (the study period occurred near solstice). A universal mean and set of dominant modes of variability are obtained through combining the hemispheric results, and it is found that the mean and first three modes of variability (EOFs) account for 38% of the total observed squared magnetic perturbations (δB2) from both hemispheres. The mean distribution represents a standard Region 1/Region 2 (R1/R2) morphology of currents and EOF 1 captures the strengthening/weakening of the average distribution and is well correlated with the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). EOF 2 captures a mixture of effects including the expansion/contraction and rotation of the (R1/R2) currents; this mode correlates only weakly with possible external driving parameters. EOF 3 captures changes in the morphology of the currents in the dayside cusp region and is well correlated with the dawn-dusk component of the IMF. The higher-order EOFs capture more complex, smaller-scale variations in the Birkeland currents and appear generally uncorrelated with external driving parameters. The results of the EOF analysis described here are used for describing error covariance in a data assimilation procedure utilizing AMPERE data, as described in a companion paper.

  9. Large-scale analysis of microRNA evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In animals, microRNAs (miRNA) are important genetic regulators. Animal miRNAs appear to have expanded in conjunction with an escalation in complexity during early bilaterian evolution. Their small size and high-degree of similarity makes them challenging for phylogenetic approaches. Furthermore, genomic locations encoding miRNAs are not clearly defined in many species. A number of studies have looked at the evolution of individual miRNA families. However, we currently lack resources for large-scale analysis of miRNA evolution. Results We addressed some of these issues in order to analyse the evolution of miRNAs. We perform syntenic and phylogenetic analysis for miRNAs from 80 animal species. We present synteny maps, phylogenies and functional data for miRNAs across these species. These data represent the basis of our analyses and also act as a resource for the community. Conclusions We use these data to explore the distribution of miRNAs across phylogenetic space, characterise their birth and death, and examine functional relationships between miRNAs and other genes. These data confirm a number of previously reported findings on a larger scale and also offer novel insights into the evolution of the miRNA repertoire in animals, and it’s genomic organization. PMID:22672736

  10. Large-scale clustering of CAGE tag expression data

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Kazuro; Okamura-Oho, Yuko; Kurita, Takio; Frith, Martin C; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent analyses have suggested that many genes possess multiple transcription start sites (TSSs) that are differentially utilized in different tissues and cell lines. We have identified a huge number of TSSs mapped onto the mouse genome using the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) method. The standard hierarchical clustering algorithm, which gives us easily understandable graphical tree images, has difficulties in processing such huge amounts of TSS data and a better method to calculate and display the results is needed. Results We use a combination of hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering to cluster expression profiles of TSSs based on a large amount of CAGE data to profit from the best of both methods. We processed the genome-wide expression data, including 159,075 TSSs derived from 127 RNA samples of various organs of mouse, and succeeded in categorizing them into 70–100 clusters. The clusters exhibited intriguing biological features: a cluster supergroup with a ubiquitous expression profile, tissue-specific patterns, a distinct distribution of non-coding RNA and functional TSS groups. Conclusion Our approach succeeded in greatly reducing the calculation cost, and is an appropriate solution for analyzing large-scale TSS usage data. PMID:17517134

  11. Methods for Ranking and Selection in Large-Scale Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Nicholas C.

    This thesis addresses two distinct problems: one related to ranking and selection for large-scale inference and another related to latent class modeling of longitudinal count data. The first part of the thesis focuses on the problem of identifying leading measurement units from a large collection with a focus on settings with differing levels of estimation precision across measurement units. The main approach presented is a Bayesian ranking procedure that populates the list of top units in a way that maximizes the expected overlap between the true and reported top lists for all list sizes. This procedure relates unit-specific posterior upper tail probabilities with their empirical distribution to yield a ranking variable. It discounts high-variance units less than other common methods and thus achieves improved operating characteristics in the models considered. In the second part of the thesis, we introduce and describe a finite mixture model for longitudinal count data where, conditional on the class label, the subject-specific observations are assumed to arise from a discrete autoregressive process. This approach offers notable computational advantages over related methods due to the within-class closed form of the likelihood function and, as we describe, has a within-class correlation structure which improves model identifiability. We also outline computational strategies for estimating model parameters, and we describe a novel measure of the underlying separation between latent classes and discuss its relation to posterior classification.

  12. Large Scale Applications of HTS in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimbush, Stuart C.

    New Zealand has one of the longest-running and most consistently funded (relative to GDP) programmes in high temperature superconductor (HTS) development and application worldwide. As a consequence, it has a sustained breadth of involvement in HTS technology development stretching from the materials discovery right through to burgeoning commercial exploitation. This review paper outlines the present large scale projects of the research team at the newly-established Robinson Research Institute of Victoria University of Wellington. These include the construction and grid-based testing of a three-phase 1 MVA 2G HTS distribution transformer utilizing Roebel cable for its high-current secondary windings and the development of a cryogen-free conduction-cooled 1.5 T YBCO-based human extremity magnetic resonance imaging system. Ongoing activities supporting applications development such as low-temperature full-current characterization of commercial superconducting wires and the implementation of inductive flux-pump technologies for efficient brushless coil excitation in superconducting magnets and rotating machines are also described.

  13. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  14. Large scale stochastic spatio-temporal modelling with PCRaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karssenberg, Derek; Drost, Niels; Schmitz, Oliver; de Jong, Kor; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-04-01

    software from the eScience Technology Platform (eSTeP), developed at the Netherlands eScience Center. This will allow us to scale up to hundreds of machines, with thousands of compute cores. A key requirement is not to change the user experience of the software. PCRaster operations and the use of the Python framework classes should work in a similar manner on machines ranging from a laptop to a supercomputer. This enables a seamless transfer of models from small machines, where model development is done, to large machines used for large-scale model runs. Domain specialists from a large range of disciplines, including hydrology, ecology, sedimentology, and land use change studies, currently use the PCRaster Python software within research projects. Applications include global scale hydrological modelling and error propagation in large-scale land use change models. The software runs on MS Windows, Linux operating systems, and OS X.

  15. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  16. Local and Regional Impacts of Large Scale Wind Energy Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakes, J.; Hammond, S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P.; Robinson, M.

    2010-12-01

    resources and upscaling large scale wind farm impact on local and regional climate. It will bridge localized and larger scale interactions of renewable energy generation with energy resource and grid management system control. By 2030, when 20 percent wind energy penetration is planned and exascale computing resources have become commonplace, we envision such a system spanning the entire mesoscale to sub-millimeter range of scales to provide a real-time computational and systems control capability to optimize renewable based generating and grid distribution for efficiency and with minimizing environmental impact.

  17. Learning networks for sustainable, large-scale improvement.

    PubMed

    McCannon, C Joseph; Perla, Rocco J

    2009-05-01

    Large-scale improvement efforts known as improvement networks offer structured opportunities for exchange of information and insights into the adaptation of clinical protocols to a variety of settings.

  18. Modified gravity and large scale flows, a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    Large scale flows have been a challenging feature of cosmography ever since galaxy scaling relations came on the scene 40 years ago. The next generation of surveys will offer a serious test of the standard cosmology.

  19. Large-scale simulations of layered double hydroxide nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyveetil, Mary-Ann

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have the ability to intercalate a multitude of anionic species. Atomistic simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics have provided considerable insight into the behaviour of these materials. We review these techniques and recent algorithmic advances which considerably improve the performance of MD applications. In particular, we discuss how the advent of high performance computing and computational grids has allowed us to explore large scale models with considerable ease. Our simulations have been heavily reliant on computational resources on the UK's NGS (National Grid Service), the US TeraGrid and the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA). In order to utilise computational grids we rely on grid middleware to launch, computationally steer and visualise our simulations. We have integrated the RealityGrid steering library into the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) 1 . which has enabled us to perform re mote computational steering and visualisation of molecular dynamics simulations on grid infrastruc tures. We also use the Application Hosting Environment (AHE) 2 in order to launch simulations on remote supercomputing resources and we show that data transfer rates between local clusters and super- computing resources can be considerably enhanced by using optically switched networks. We perform large scale molecular dynamics simulations of MgiAl-LDHs intercalated with either chloride ions or a mixture of DNA and chloride ions. The systems exhibit undulatory modes, which are suppressed in smaller scale simulations, caused by the collective thermal motion of atoms in the LDH layers. Thermal undulations provide elastic properties of the system including the bending modulus, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios. To explore the interaction between LDHs and DNA. we use molecular dynamics techniques to per form simulations of double stranded, linear and plasmid DNA up

  20. Formation of large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of large-scale structure formation from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos are described. The linear power spectrum in this model resembles the cold-dark-matter power spectrum. Galaxy formation begins early, and the final distribution consists of isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, leading to a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. The distribution of clustered matter has a filamentary appearance with large voids.

  1. Bayesian hierarchical model for large-scale covariance matrix estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxiao; Hero, Alfred O

    2007-12-01

    Many bioinformatics problems implicitly depend on estimating large-scale covariance matrix. The traditional approaches tend to give rise to high variance and low accuracy due to "overfitting." We cast the large-scale covariance matrix estimation problem into the Bayesian hierarchical model framework, and introduce dependency between covariance parameters. We demonstrate the advantages of our approaches over the traditional approaches using simulations and OMICS data analysis.

  2. Finite Mixture Multilevel Multidimensional Ordinal IRT Models for Large Scale Cross-Cultural Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Martijn G.; Steenkamp, Jan-Benedict E. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a class of finite mixture multilevel multidimensional ordinal IRT models for large scale cross-cultural research. Our model is proposed for confirmatory research settings. Our prior for item parameters is a mixture distribution to accommodate situations where different groups of countries have different measurement operations, while…

  3. Strategic Leadership for Large-Scale Reform: The Case of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris; Earl, Lorna; Watson, Nancy; Levin, Benjamin; Fullan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Both 'strategic' and 'distributed' forms of leadership are considered promising responses to the demands placed on school systems by large-scale reform initiatives. Using observation, interview and survey data collected as part of a larger evaluation of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies, this study inquired about sources of…

  4. Modeling Booklet Effects for Nonequivalent Group Designs in Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Martin; Weirich, Sebastian; Siegle, Thilo; Frey, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Multiple matrix designs are commonly used in large-scale assessments to distribute test items to students. These designs comprise several booklets, each containing a subset of the complete item pool. Besides reducing the test burden of individual students, using various booklets allows aligning the difficulty of the presented items to the assumed…

  5. Analytical model of the statistical properties of contrast of large-scale ionospheric inhomogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vsekhsvyatskaya, I. S.; Evstratova, E. A.; Kalinin, Yu. K.; Romanchuk, A. A.

    1989-08-01

    A new analytical model is proposed for the distribution of variations of the relative electron-density contrast of large-scale ionospheric inhomogeneities. The model is characterized by other-than-zero skewness and kurtosis. It is shown that the model is applicable in the interval of horizontal dimensions of inhomogeneities from hundreds to thousands of kilometers.

  6. The Large-Scale Structure of Semantic Networks: Statistical Analyses and a Model of Semantic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyvers, Mark; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    We present statistical analyses of the large-scale structure of 3 types of semantic networks: word associations, WordNet, and Roget's Thesaurus. We show that they have a small-world structure, characterized by sparse connectivity, short average path lengths between words, and strong local clustering. In addition, the distributions of the number of…

  7. A study of MLFMA for large-scale scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastriter, Michael Larkin

    This research is centered in computational electromagnetics with a focus on solving large-scale problems accurately in a timely fashion using first principle physics. Error control of the translation operator in 3-D is shown. A parallel implementation of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) was studied as far as parallel efficiency and scaling. The large-scale scattering program (LSSP), based on the ScaleME library, was used to solve ultra-large-scale problems including a 200lambda sphere with 20 million unknowns. As these large-scale problems were solved, techniques were developed to accurately estimate the memory requirements. Careful memory management is needed in order to solve these massive problems. The study of MLFMA in large-scale problems revealed significant errors that stemmed from inconsistencies in constants used by different parts of the algorithm. These were fixed to produce the most accurate data possible for large-scale surface scattering problems. Data was calculated on a missile-like target using both high frequency methods and MLFMA. This data was compared and analyzed to determine possible strategies to increase data acquisition speed and accuracy through multiple computation method hybridization.

  8. Satellite measurements of large-scale air pollution: Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, Y.J.; Fraser, R.S.; Ferrare, R.A. )

    1990-06-20

    A method is presented for simultaneous determination of the aerosol optical thickness ({tau}{sub a}), particle size (r{sub m}, geometric mean mass radius for a lognormal distribution) and the single scattering albedo ({omega}{sub 0}, ratio between scattering and scattering + absorption) from satellite imagery. The method is based on satellite images of the surface (land and water) in the visible and near-IR bands and is applied here to the first two channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor. The aerosol characteristics are obtained from the difference in the upward radiances, detected by the satellite, between a clear and a hazy day. Therefore the method is mainly useful for remote sensing of large-scale air pollution (e.g., smoke from a large fire or concentrated anthropogenic pollution), which introduces dense aerosol into the atmosphere (aerosol optical thickness {ge}0.4) on top of an existing aerosol. The method is very sensitive to the stability of the surface reflectance between the clear day and the hazy day. It also requires accurate satellite calibration (preferably not more than 5% error) and stable calibration with good relative values between the two bands used in the analysis. With these requirements, the aerosol optical thickness can be derived with an error of {Delta}{tau}{sub a} = 0.08-0.15. For an assumed lognormal size distribution, the particle geometrical mean mass radius r{sub m} can be derived (if good calibration is available) with an error of {Delta}r{sub m} = {plus minus}(0.10-0.20){mu}m, and {omega}{sub 0} with {Delta}{omega}{sub 0} = {plus minus}0.03 for {omega}{sub 0} close to 1 and {Delta}{sub omega}{sub 0} = {plus minus}(0.03-0.07) for {omega}{sub 0} about 0.8. The method was applied to AVHRR images of a forest fire smoke.

  9. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Fasiello, Matteo; Jeong, Donghui; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: mrf65@case.edu E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  10. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are documented through flow visualization and hot wire measurements. The boundary layer manipulator was designed to manage the large scale structures of turbulence leading to a reduction in surface drag. The differences in the turbulent structure of the boundary layer are summarized to demonstrate differences in various flow properties. The manipulator inhibited the intermittent large scale structure of the turbulent boundary layer for at least 70 boundary layer thicknesses downstream. With the removal of the large scale, the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall were reduced. The downstream distribution of the skin friction was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator.

  11. Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, David A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Hanson, Timothy L.; Dimitrov, Dragan F.; Lehew, Gary; Meloy, Jim; Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Subramanian, Vivek; Ifft, Peter J.; Li, Zheng; Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Tate, Andrew; Zhuang, Katie; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 units per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years), and recording of a broad range of behaviors, e.g. social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research, while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses. PMID:24776634

  12. Recursive architecture for large-scale adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahara, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko

    1994-09-01

    'Large scale' is one of major trends in the research and development of recent engineering, especially in the field of aerospace structural system. This term expresses the large scale of an artifact in general, however, it also implies the large number of the components which make up the artifact in usual. Considering a large scale system which is especially used in remote space or deep-sea, such a system should be adaptive as well as robust by itself, because its control as well as maintenance by human operators are not easy due to the remoteness. An approach to realizing this large scale, adaptive and robust system is to build the system as an assemblage of components which are respectively adaptive by themselves. In this case, the robustness of the system can be achieved by using a large number of such components and suitable adaptation as well as maintenance strategies. Such a system gathers many research's interest and their studies such as decentralized motion control, configurating algorithm and characteristics of structural elements are reported. In this article, a recursive architecture concept is developed and discussed towards the realization of large scale system which consists of a number of uniform adaptive components. We propose an adaptation strategy based on the architecture and its implementation by means of hierarchically connected processing units. The robustness and the restoration from degeneration of the processing unit are also discussed. Two- and three-dimensional adaptive truss structures are conceptually designed based on the recursive architecture.

  13. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ~ 50 - 800 h 70 -1 Mpc). We found that the shape of the K-band luminosity function is relatively constant as a function of distance and environment. We derive a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h 70 -1 Mpc) K-band luminosity density that agrees well with previously published studies. At z > 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  14. KA-SB: from data integration to large scale reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-García, María del Mar; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Molina-Castro, Joaquín; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background The analysis of information in the biological domain is usually focused on the analysis of data from single on-line data sources. Unfortunately, studying a biological process requires having access to disperse, heterogeneous, autonomous data sources. In this context, an analysis of the information is not possible without the integration of such data. Methods KA-SB is a querying and analysis system for final users based on combining a data integration solution with a reasoner. Thus, the tool has been created with a process divided into two steps: 1) KOMF, the Khaos Ontology-based Mediator Framework, is used to retrieve information from heterogeneous and distributed databases; 2) the integrated information is crystallized in a (persistent and high performance) reasoner (DBOWL). This information could be further analyzed later (by means of querying and reasoning). Results In this paper we present a novel system that combines the use of a mediation system with the reasoning capabilities of a large scale reasoner to provide a way of finding new knowledge and of analyzing the integrated information from different databases, which is retrieved as a set of ontology instances. This tool uses a graphical query interface to build user queries easily, which shows a graphical representation of the ontology and allows users o build queries by clicking on the ontology concepts. Conclusion These kinds of systems (based on KOMF) will provide users with very large amounts of information (interpreted as ontology instances once retrieved), which cannot be managed using traditional main memory-based reasoners. We propose a process for creating persistent and scalable knowledgebases from sets of OWL instances obtained by integrating heterogeneous data sources with KOMF. This process has been applied to develop a demo tool , which uses the BioPax Level 3 ontology as the integration schema, and integrates UNIPROT, KEGG, CHEBI, BRENDA and SABIORK databases. PMID:19796402

  15. Testing gravity using large-scale redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Pietrobon, Davide; Schmidt, Fabian; Samushia, Lado; Bartolo, Nicola; Doré, Olivier; Matarrese, Sabino; Percival, Will J.

    2013-11-01

    We use luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II to test the cosmological structure growth in two alternatives to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM)+general relativity (GR) cosmological model. We compare observed three-dimensional clustering in SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) with theoretical predictions for the standard vanilla ΛCDM+GR model, unified dark matter (UDM) cosmologies and the normal branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (nDGP). In computing the expected correlations in UDM cosmologies, we derive a parametrized formula for the growth factor in these models. For our analysis we apply the methodology tested in Raccanelli et al. and use the measurements of Samushia et al. that account for survey geometry, non-linear and wide-angle effects and the distribution of pair orientation. We show that the estimate of the growth rate is potentially degenerate with wide-angle effects, meaning that extremely accurate measurements of the growth rate on large scales will need to take such effects into account. We use measurements of the zeroth and second-order moments of the correlation function from SDSS DR7 data and the Large Suite of Dark Matter Simulations (LasDamas), and perform a likelihood analysis to constrain the parameters of the models. Using information on the clustering up to rmax = 120 h-1 Mpc, and after marginalizing over the bias, we find, for UDM models, a speed of sound c∞ ≤ 6.1e-4, and, for the nDGP model, a cross-over scale rc ≥ 340 Mpc, at 95 per cent confidence level.

  16. Modulation analysis of large-scale discrete vortices.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis A; Minzoni, Antonmaria A; Panayotaros, Panayotis; Smyth, Noel F

    2008-09-01

    The behavior of large-scale vortices governed by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation is studied. Using a discrete version of modulation theory, it is shown how vortices are trapped and stabilized by the self-consistent Peierls-Nabarro potential that they generate in the lattice. Large-scale circular and polygonal vortices are studied away from the anticontinuum limit, which is the limit considered in previous studies. In addition numerical studies are performed on large-scale, straight structures, and it is found that they are stabilized by a nonconstant mean level produced by standing waves generated at the ends of the structure. Finally, numerical evidence is produced for long-lived, localized, quasiperiodic structures.

  17. Large-scale simulations of complex physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belić, A.

    2007-04-01

    Scientific computing has become a tool as vital as experimentation and theory for dealing with scientific challenges of the twenty-first century. Large scale simulations and modelling serve as heuristic tools in a broad problem-solving process. High-performance computing facilities make possible the first step in this process - a view of new and previously inaccessible domains in science and the building up of intuition regarding the new phenomenology. The final goal of this process is to translate this newly found intuition into better algorithms and new analytical results. In this presentation we give an outline of the research themes pursued at the Scientific Computing Laboratory of the Institute of Physics in Belgrade regarding large-scale simulations of complex classical and quantum physical systems, and present recent results obtained in the large-scale simulations of granular materials and path integrals.

  18. Large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, X L; Tong, P

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of large-scale velocity structures in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in three different aspect-ratio cells filled with water. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the velocity profiles and statistics over varying Rayleigh numbers Ra and at various spatial positions across the whole convection cell. Large velocity fluctuations are found both in the central region and near the cell boundary. Despite the large velocity fluctuations, the flow field still maintains a large-scale quasi-two-dimensional structure, which rotates in a coherent manner. This coherent single-roll structure scales with Ra and can be divided into three regions in the rotation plane: (1) a thin viscous boundary layer, (2) a fully mixed central core region with a constant mean velocity gradient, and (3) an intermediate plume-dominated buffer region. The experiment reveals a unique driving mechanism for the large-scale coherent rotation in turbulent convection.

  19. Acoustic Studies of the Large Scale Ocean Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris

    1999-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of ocean circulation and its transport properties is prerequisite to an understanding of the earth's climate and of important biological and chemical cycles. Results from two recent experiments, THETIS-2 in the Western Mediterranean and ATOC in the North Pacific, illustrate the use of ocean acoustic tomography for studies of the large scale circulation. The attraction of acoustic tomography is its ability to sample and average the large-scale oceanic thermal structure, synoptically, along several sections, and at regular intervals. In both studies, the acoustic data are compared to, and then combined with, general circulation models, meteorological analyses, satellite altimetry, and direct measurements from ships. Both studies provide complete regional descriptions of the time-evolving, three-dimensional, large scale circulation, albeit with large uncertainties. The studies raise serious issues about existing ocean observing capability and provide guidelines for future efforts.

  20. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  1. Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Swen; Elwasif, Wael R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R

    2014-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  3. Large-scale motions in the universe: Using clusters of galaxies as tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramann, Mirt; Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gott, J. Richard

    1995-01-01

    Can clusters of galaxies be used to trace the large-scale peculiar velocity field of the universe? We answer this question by using large-scale cosmological simulations to compare the motions of rich clusters of galaxies with the motion of the underlying matter distribution. Three models are investigated: Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 cold dark matter (CDM), and Omega = 0.3 primeval baryonic isocurvature (PBI) models, all normalized to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) background fluctuations. We compare the cluster and mass distribution of peculiar velocities, bulk motions, velocity dispersions, and Mach numbers as a function of scale for R greater than or = 50/h Mpc. We also present the large-scale velocity and potential maps of clusters and of the matter. We find that clusters of galaxies trace well the large-scale velocity field and can serve as an efficient tool to constrain cosmological models. The recently reported bulk motion of clusters 689 +/- 178 km/s on approximately 150/h Mpc scale (Lauer & Postman 1994) is larger than expected in any of the models studied (less than or = 190 +/- 78 km/s).

  4. Large scale purification of RNA nanoparticles by preparative ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Daniel L; Schwartz, Chad T; Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Purification of large quantities of supramolecular RNA complexes is of paramount importance due to the large quantities of RNA needed and the purity requirements for in vitro and in vivo assays. Purification is generally carried out by liquid chromatography (HPLC), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), or agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE). Here, we describe an efficient method for the large-scale purification of RNA prepared by in vitro transcription using T7 RNA polymerase by cesium chloride (CsCl) equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation and the large-scale purification of RNA nanoparticles by sucrose gradient rate-zonal ultracentrifugation or cushioned sucrose gradient rate-zonal ultracentrifugation.

  5. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  6. [Issues of large scale tissue culture of medicinal plant].

    PubMed

    Lv, Dong-Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Zhan, Zhi-Lai

    2014-09-01

    In order to increase the yield and quality of the medicinal plant and enhance the competitive power of industry of medicinal plant in our country, this paper analyzed the status, problem and countermeasure of the tissue culture of medicinal plant on large scale. Although the biotechnology is one of the most efficient and promising means in production of medicinal plant, it still has problems such as stability of the material, safety of the transgenic medicinal plant and optimization of cultured condition. Establishing perfect evaluation system according to the characteristic of the medicinal plant is the key measures to assure the sustainable development of the tissue culture of medicinal plant on large scale.

  7. Large-Scale Graph Processing Analysis using Supercomputer Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildario, Alfrido; Fitriyani; Nugraha Nurkahfi, Galih

    2017-01-01

    Graph implementation is widely use in various sector such as automotive, traffic, image processing and many more. They produce graph in large-scale dimension, cause the processing need long computational time and high specification resources. This research addressed the analysis of implementation large-scale graph using supercomputer cluster. We impelemented graph processing by using Breadth-First Search (BFS) algorithm with single destination shortest path problem. Parallel BFS implementation with Message Passing Interface (MPI) used supercomputer cluster at High Performance Computing Laboratory Computational Science Telkom University and Stanford Large Network Dataset Collection. The result showed that the implementation give the speed up averages more than 30 times and eficiency almost 90%.

  8. Corridors Increase Plant Species Richness at Large Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.; Haddad, Nick M.; Orrock,John L.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2006-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the largest threats to biodiversity. Landscape corridors, which are hypothesized to reduce the negative consequences of fragmentation, have become common features of ecological management plans worldwide. Despite their popularity, there is little evidence documenting the effectiveness of corridors in preserving biodiversity at large scales. Using a large-scale replicated experiment, we showed that habitat patches connected by corridors retain more native plant species than do isolated patches, that this difference increases over time, and that corridors do not promote invasion by exotic species. Our results support the use of corridors in biodiversity conservation.

  9. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  10. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  11. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  12. Large-scale search for dark-matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Kinion, D; van Bibber, K

    2000-08-30

    We review the status of two ongoing large-scale searches for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our Milky Way halo. The experiments are based on the microwave cavity technique proposed by Sikivie, and marks a ''second-generation'' to the original experiments performed by the Rochester-Brookhaven-Fermilab collaboration, and the University of Florida group.

  13. Measurement, Sampling, and Equating Errors in Large-Scale Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    In large-scale assessments, such as state-wide testing programs, national sample-based assessments, and international comparative studies, there are many steps involved in the measurement and reporting of student achievement. There are always sources of inaccuracies in each of the steps. It is of interest to identify the source and magnitude of…

  14. Resilience of Florida Keys coral communities following large scale disturbances

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean over the last 40 years has been attributed to multiple chronic stressors and episodic large-scale disturbances. This study assessed the resilience of coral communities in two different regions of the Florida Keys reef system between 199...

  15. Large-Scale Machine Learning for Classification and Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, nowadays tremendous amounts of data including images and videos, up to millions or billions, can be collected for training machine learning models. Inspired by this trend, this thesis is dedicated to developing large-scale machine learning techniques for the purpose of making classification and nearest…

  16. Assuring Quality in Large-Scale Online Course Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parscal, Tina; Riemer, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Student demand for online education requires colleges and universities to rapidly expand the number of courses and programs offered online while maintaining high quality. This paper outlines two universities respective processes to assure quality in large-scale online programs that integrate instructional design, eBook custom publishing, Quality…

  17. Large-Scale Assessments and Educational Policies in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damiani, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Despite Italy's extensive participation in most large-scale assessments, their actual influence on Italian educational policies is less easy to identify. The present contribution aims at highlighting and explaining reasons for the weak and often inconsistent relationship between international surveys and policy-making processes in Italy.…

  18. Improving the Utility of Large-Scale Assessments in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, W. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Principals and teachers do not use large-scale assessment results because the lack of distinct and reliable subtests prevents identifying strengths and weaknesses of students and instruction, the results arrive too late to be used, and principals and teachers need assistance to use the results to improve instruction so as to improve student…

  19. Current Scientific Issues in Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics in large scale atmospheric dynamics are discussed. Aspects of atmospheric blocking, the influence of transient baroclinic eddies on planetary-scale waves, cyclogenesis, the effects of orography on planetary scale flow, small scale frontal structure, and simulations of gravity waves in frontal zones are discussed.

  20. Large-Scale Innovation and Change in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on challenges universities face as they respond to change. It reviews current theories and models of change management, discusses why universities are particularly difficult environments in which to achieve large scale, lasting change and reports on a recent attempt by the UK JISC to enable a range of UK universities to employ…

  1. Mixing Metaphors: Building Infrastructure for Large Scale School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peurach, Donald J.; Neumerski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to increase understanding of the possibilities and challenges of building educational infrastructure--the basic, foundational structures, systems, and resources--to support large-scale school turnaround. Building educational infrastructure often exceeds the capacity of schools, districts, and state education…

  2. Large-Scale Environmental Influences on Aquatic Animal Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the latter portion of the 20th century, North America experienced numerous large-scale mortality events affecting a broad diversity of aquatic animals. Short-term forensic investigations of these events have sometimes characterized a causative agent or condition, but have rare...

  3. A bibliographical surveys of large-scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    A limited, partly annotated bibliography was prepared on the subject of large-scale system control. Approximately 400 references are divided into thirteen application areas, such as large societal systems and large communication systems. A first-author index is provided.

  4. Probabilistic Cuing in Large-Scale Environmental Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alastair D.; Hood, Bruce M.; Gilchrist, Iain D.

    2010-01-01

    Finding an object in our environment is an important human ability that also represents a critical component of human foraging behavior. One type of information that aids efficient large-scale search is the likelihood of the object being in one location over another. In this study we investigated the conditions under which individuals respond to…

  5. Newton Methods for Large Scale Problems in Machine Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Samantha Leigh

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on practical ways of designing optimization algorithms for minimizing large-scale nonlinear functions with applications in machine learning. Chapter 1 introduces the overarching ideas in the thesis. Chapters 2 and 3 are geared towards supervised machine learning applications that involve minimizing a sum of loss…

  6. Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ EL T R -1 2 - 2 5 Army Range Technology Program Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil E nv ir on m en ta l...Separation ................................................................................................................ 2   Project Background...5  2   Materials and Methods

  7. Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M.

    2012-06-01

    In general, large-scale integration studies in Europe and the United States find that high penetrations of renewable generation are technically feasible with operational changes and increased access to transmission. This paper describes other key findings such as the need for fast markets, large balancing areas, system flexibility, and the use of advanced forecasting.

  8. Computational Complexity, Efficiency and Accountability in Large Scale Teleprocessing Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    COMPLEXITY, EFFICIENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN LARGE SCALE TELEPROCESSING SYSTEMS DAAG29-78-C-0036 STANFORD UNIVERSITY JOHN T. GILL MARTIN E. BELLMAN...solve but easy to check. Ve have also suggested howy sucb random tapes can be simulated by determin- istically generating "pseudorandom" numbers by a

  9. Large-scale silicon optical switches for optical interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lei; Tang, Weijie; Chu, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Large-scale optical switches are greatly demanded in building optical interconnections in data centers and high performance computers (HPCs). Silicon optical switches have advantages of being compact and CMOS process compatible, which can be easily monolithically integrated. However, there are difficulties to construct large ports silicon optical switches. One of them is the non-uniformity of the switch units in large scale silicon optical switches, which arises from the fabrication error and causes confusion in finding the unit optimum operation points. In this paper, we proposed a method to detect the optimum operating point in large scale switch with limited build-in power monitors. We also propose methods for improving the unbalanced crosstalk of cross/bar states in silicon electro-optical MZI switches and insertion losses. Our recent progress in large scale silicon optical switches, including 64 × 64 thermal-optical and 32 × 32 electro-optical switches will be introduced. To the best our knowledge, both of them are the largest scale silicon optical switches in their sections, respectively. The switches were fabricated on 340-nm SOI substrates with CMOS 180- nm processes. The crosstalk of the 32 × 32 electro-optic switch was -19.2dB to -25.1 dB, while the value of the 64 × 64 thermal-optic switch was -30 dB to -48.3 dB.

  10. The large scale microwave background anisotropy in decaying particle cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, M.

    1987-06-01

    We investigate the large-scale anisotropy of the microwave background radiation in cosmological models with decaying particles. The observed value of the quadrupole moment combined with other constraints gives an upper limit on the redshift of the decay z/sub d/ < 3-5. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. DESIGN OF LARGE-SCALE AIR MONITORING NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effects of air pollution on human health have received much attention in recent years. In the U.S. and other countries, there are extensive large-scale monitoring networks designed to collect data to inform the public of exposure risks to air pollution. A major crit...

  12. Large Scale Survey Data in Career Development Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diemer, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Large scale survey datasets have been underutilized but offer numerous advantages for career development scholars, as they contain numerous career development constructs with large and diverse samples that are followed longitudinally. Constructs such as work salience, vocational expectations, educational expectations, work satisfaction, and…

  13. The Large-Scale Structure of Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosso, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The standard textbook description of the nature of science describes the proposal, testing, and acceptance of a theoretical idea almost entirely in isolation from other theories. The resulting model of science is a kind of piecemeal empiricism that misses the important network structure of scientific knowledge. Only the large-scale description of…

  14. Ecosystem resilience despite large-scale altered hydro climatic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change is predicted to increase both drought frequency and duration, and when coupled with substantial warming, will establish a new hydroclimatological paradigm for many regions. Large-scale, warm droughts have recently impacted North America, Africa, Europe, Amazonia, and Australia result...

  15. US National Large-scale City Orthoimage Standard Initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, G.; Song, C.; Benjamin, S.; Schickler, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early procedures and algorithms for National digital orthophoto generation in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP) were based on earlier USGS mapping operations, such as field control, aerotriangulation (derived in the early 1920's), the quarter-quadrangle-centered (3.75 minutes of longitude and latitude in geographic extent), 1:40,000 aerial photographs, and 2.5 D digital elevation models. However, large-scale city orthophotos using early procedures have disclosed many shortcomings, e.g., ghost image, occlusion, shadow. Thus, to provide the technical base (algorithms, procedure) and experience needed for city large-scale digital orthophoto creation is essential for the near future national large-scale digital orthophoto deployment and the revision of the Standards for National Large-scale City Digital Orthophoto in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP). This paper will report our initial research results as follows: (1) High-precision 3D city DSM generation through LIDAR data processing, (2) Spatial objects/features extraction through surface material information and high-accuracy 3D DSM data, (3) 3D city model development, (4) Algorithm development for generation of DTM-based orthophoto, and DBM-based orthophoto, (5) True orthophoto generation by merging DBM-based orthophoto and DTM-based orthophoto, and (6) Automatic mosaic by optimizing and combining imagery from many perspectives.

  16. Developing and Understanding Methods for Large-Scale Nonlinear Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-24

    algorithms for large-scale uncon- strained and constrained optimization problems, including limited-memory methods for problems with -2- many thousands...34Published in peer-reviewed journals" E. Eskow, B. Bader, R. Byrd, S. Crivelli, T. Head-Gordon, V. Lamberti and R. Schnabel, "An optimization approach to the

  17. International Large-Scale Assessments: What Uses, What Consequences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background: International large-scale assessments (ILSAs) are a much-debated phenomenon in education. Increasingly, their outcomes attract considerable media attention and influence educational policies in many jurisdictions worldwide. The relevance, uses and consequences of these assessments are often the focus of research scrutiny. Whilst some…

  18. Large scale structure of the sun's radio corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Results of studies of large scale structures of the corona at long radio wavelengths are presented, using data obtained with the multifrequency radioheliograph of the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. It is shown that features corresponding to coronal streamers and coronal holes are readily apparent in the Clark Lake maps.

  19. Moon-based Earth Observation for Large Scale Geoscience Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huadong; Liu, Guang; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    The capability of Earth observation for large-global-scale natural phenomena needs to be improved and new observing platform are expected. We have studied the concept of Moon as an Earth observation in these years. Comparing with manmade satellite platform, Moon-based Earth observation can obtain multi-spherical, full-band, active and passive information,which is of following advantages: large observation range, variable view angle, long-term continuous observation, extra-long life cycle, with the characteristics of longevity ,consistency, integrity, stability and uniqueness. Moon-based Earth observation is suitable for monitoring the large scale geoscience phenomena including large scale atmosphere change, large scale ocean change,large scale land surface dynamic change,solid earth dynamic change,etc. For the purpose of establishing a Moon-based Earth observation platform, we already have a plan to study the five aspects as follows: mechanism and models of moon-based observing earth sciences macroscopic phenomena; sensors' parameters optimization and methods of moon-based Earth observation; site selection and environment of moon-based Earth observation; Moon-based Earth observation platform; and Moon-based Earth observation fundamental scientific framework.

  20. Large-scale screening by the automated Wassermann reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, W.; Firth, R.; Booth, J. R.; Bowley, C. C.

    1969-01-01

    In view of the drawbacks in the use of the Kahn test for large-scale screening of blood donors, mainly those of human error through work overload and fatiguability, an attempt was made to adapt an existing automated complement-fixation technique for this purpose. This paper reports the successful results of that adaptation. PMID:5776559

  1. Large-scale societal changes and intentionality - an uneasy marriage.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Péter; Fokas, Nikos

    2014-08-01

    Our commentary focuses on juxtaposing the proposed science of intentional change with facts and concepts pertaining to the level of large populations or changes on a worldwide scale. Although we find a unified evolutionary theory promising, we think that long-term and large-scale, scientifically guided - that is, intentional - social change is not only impossible, but also undesirable.

  2. Variability in large-scale wind power generation: Variability in large-scale wind power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiviluoma, Juha; Holttinen, Hannele; Weir, David; Scharff, Richard; Söder, Lennart; Menemenlis, Nickie; Cutululis, Nicolaos A.; Danti Lopez, Irene; Lannoye, Eamonn; Estanqueiro, Ana; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Bai, Jianhua; Wan, Yih-Huei; Milligan, Michael

    2015-10-25

    The paper demonstrates the characteristics of wind power variability and net load variability in multiple power systems based on real data from multiple years. Demonstrated characteristics include probability distribution for different ramp durations, seasonal and diurnal variability and low net load events. The comparison shows regions with low variability (Sweden, Spain and Germany), medium variability (Portugal, Ireland, Finland and Denmark) and regions with higher variability (Quebec, Bonneville Power Administration and Electric Reliability Council of Texas in North America; Gansu, Jilin and Liaoning in China; and Norway and offshore wind power in Denmark). For regions with low variability, the maximum 1 h wind ramps are below 10% of nominal capacity, and for regions with high variability, they may be close to 30%. Wind power variability is mainly explained by the extent of geographical spread, but also higher capacity factor causes higher variability. It was also shown how wind power ramps are autocorrelated and dependent on the operating output level. When wind power was concentrated in smaller area, there were outliers with high changes in wind output, which were not present in large areas with well-dispersed wind power.

  3. Disentangling the dynamic core: a research program for a neurodynamics at the large-scale.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2003-01-01

    My purpose in this paper is to sketch a research direction based on Francisco Varela's pioneering work in neurodynamics (see also Rudrauf et al. 2003, in this issue). Very early on he argued that the internal coherence of every mental-cognitive state lies in the global self-organization of the brain activities at the large-scale, constituting a fundamental pole of integration called here a "dynamic core". Recent neuroimaging evidence appears to broadly support this hypothesis and suggests that a global brain dynamics emerges at the large scale level from the cooperative interactions among widely distributed neuronal populations. Despite a growing body of evidence supporting this view, our understanding of these large-scale brain processes remains hampered by the lack of a theoretical language for expressing these complex behaviors in dynamical terms. In this paper, I propose a rough cartography of a comprehensive approach that offers a conceptual and mathematical framework to analyze spatio-temporal large-scale brain phenomena. I emphasize how these nonlinear methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and where one might productively proceed for the future. This paper is dedicated, with respect and affection, to the memory of Francisco Varela.

  4. Toward Large-Scale Continuous EDA: A Random Matrix Theory Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kabán, A; Bootkrajang, J; Durrant, R J

    2016-01-01

    Estimations of distribution algorithms (EDAs) are a major branch of evolutionary algorithms (EA) with some unique advantages in principle. They are able to take advantage of correlation structure to drive the search more efficiently, and they are able to provide insights about the structure of the search space. However, model building in high dimensions is extremely challenging, and as a result existing EDAs may become less attractive in large-scale problems because of the associated large computational requirements. Large-scale continuous global optimisation is key to many modern-day real-world problems. Scaling up EAs to large-scale problems has become one of the biggest challenges of the field. This paper pins down some fundamental roots of the problem and makes a start at developing a new and generic framework to yield effective and efficient EDA-type algorithms for large-scale continuous global optimisation problems. Our concept is to introduce an ensemble of random projections to low dimensions of the set of fittest search points as a basis for developing a new and generic divide-and-conquer methodology. Our ideas are rooted in the theory of random projections developed in theoretical computer science, and in developing and analysing our framework we exploit some recent results in nonasymptotic random matrix theory.

  5. Constraints on the dark energy dipole from large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurier, G.

    2016-11-01

    The high-significance measurement of large-scale structure signals enables testing the isotropy of the Universe. The measurement of cosmological parameters through the large-scale distribution of matter is now a mature domain. This approach is mainly limited by our knowledge of astrophysical processes that are used to observe the large-scale structure. However, when we assume that these astrophysical processes are the same across the Universe, then it is possible to tightly constrain the isotropy of cosmological parameters across the sky. Particularly the X-SZ cross-correlation has been shown to be a probe of the large scale structures that has a high signal-to-noise ratio and low bias. For this analysis, we used a localized measurement of the X-SZ cross-correlation as a test of the cosmological parameter isotropy. Using the scatter of the X-SZ cross-correlation across the sky, we derive cosmological constraints σ8(Ωm/ 0.28)0.34 = 0.78 ± 0.02 and tight isotropy constraints on the dark energy dipole ΔΩΛ < 0.07 at 95% confidence level.

  6. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  7. Large-scale seismic waveform quality metric calculation using Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana-Zook, S.; Gaylord, J. M.; Knapp, D. R.; Dodge, D. A.; Ruppert, S. D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we investigated the suitability of Hadoop MapReduce and Apache Spark for large-scale computation of seismic waveform quality metrics by comparing their performance with that of a traditional distributed implementation. The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) provided 43 terabytes of broadband waveform data of which 5.1 TB of data were processed with the traditional architecture, and the full 43 TB were processed using MapReduce and Spark. Maximum performance of 0.56 terabytes per hour was achieved using all 5 nodes of the traditional implementation. We noted that I/O dominated processing, and that I/O performance was deteriorating with the addition of the 5th node. Data collected from this experiment provided the baseline against which the Hadoop results were compared. Next, we processed the full 43 TB dataset using both MapReduce and Apache Spark on our 18-node Hadoop cluster. These experiments were conducted multiple times with various subsets of the data so that we could build models to predict performance as a function of dataset size. We found that both MapReduce and Spark significantly outperformed the traditional reference implementation. At a dataset size of 5.1 terabytes, both Spark and MapReduce were about 15 times faster than the reference implementation. Furthermore, our performance models predict that for a dataset of 350 terabytes, Spark running on a 100-node cluster would be about 265 times faster than the reference implementation. We do not expect that the reference implementation deployed on a 100-node cluster would perform significantly better than on the 5-node cluster because the I/O performance cannot be made to scale. Finally, we note that although Big Data technologies clearly provide a way to process seismic waveform datasets in a high-performance and scalable manner, the technology is still rapidly changing, requires a high degree of investment in personnel, and will likely

  8. Large-scale seismic waveform quality metric calculation using Hadoop

    DOE PAGES

    Magana-Zook, Steven; Gaylord, Jessie M.; Knapp, Douglas R.; ...

    2016-05-27

    Here in this work we investigated the suitability of Hadoop MapReduce and Apache Spark for large-scale computation of seismic waveform quality metrics by comparing their performance with that of a traditional distributed implementation. The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) provided 43 terabytes of broadband waveform data of which 5.1 TB of data were processed with the traditional architecture, and the full 43 TB were processed using MapReduce and Spark. Maximum performance of ~0.56 terabytes per hour was achieved using all 5 nodes of the traditional implementation. We noted that I/O dominated processing, and that I/Omore » performance was deteriorating with the addition of the 5th node. Data collected from this experiment provided the baseline against which the Hadoop results were compared. Next, we processed the full 43 TB dataset using both MapReduce and Apache Spark on our 18-node Hadoop cluster. We conducted these experiments multiple times with various subsets of the data so that we could build models to predict performance as a function of dataset size. We found that both MapReduce and Spark significantly outperformed the traditional reference implementation. At a dataset size of 5.1 terabytes, both Spark and MapReduce were about 15 times faster than the reference implementation. Furthermore, our performance models predict that for a dataset of 350 terabytes, Spark running on a 100-node cluster would be about 265 times faster than the reference implementation. We do not expect that the reference implementation deployed on a 100-node cluster would perform significantly better than on the 5-node cluster because the I/O performance cannot be made to scale. Finally, we note that although Big Data technologies clearly provide a way to process seismic waveform datasets in a high-performance and scalable manner, the technology is still rapidly changing, requires a high degree of investment in personnel, and will

  9. Large-scale seismic waveform quality metric calculation using Hadoop

    SciTech Connect

    Magana-Zook, Steven; Gaylord, Jessie M.; Knapp, Douglas R.; Dodge, Douglas A.; Ruppert, Stanley D.

    2016-05-27

    Here in this work we investigated the suitability of Hadoop MapReduce and Apache Spark for large-scale computation of seismic waveform quality metrics by comparing their performance with that of a traditional distributed implementation. The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) provided 43 terabytes of broadband waveform data of which 5.1 TB of data were processed with the traditional architecture, and the full 43 TB were processed using MapReduce and Spark. Maximum performance of ~0.56 terabytes per hour was achieved using all 5 nodes of the traditional implementation. We noted that I/O dominated processing, and that I/O performance was deteriorating with the addition of the 5th node. Data collected from this experiment provided the baseline against which the Hadoop results were compared. Next, we processed the full 43 TB dataset using both MapReduce and Apache Spark on our 18-node Hadoop cluster. We conducted these experiments multiple times with various subsets of the data so that we could build models to predict performance as a function of dataset size. We found that both MapReduce and Spark significantly outperformed the traditional reference implementation. At a dataset size of 5.1 terabytes, both Spark and MapReduce were about 15 times faster than the reference implementation. Furthermore, our performance models predict that for a dataset of 350 terabytes, Spark running on a 100-node cluster would be about 265 times faster than the reference implementation. We do not expect that the reference implementation deployed on a 100-node cluster would perform significantly better than on the 5-node cluster because the I/O performance cannot be made to scale. Finally, we note that although Big Data technologies clearly provide a way to process seismic waveform datasets in a high-performance and scalable manner, the technology is still rapidly changing, requires a high degree of investment in personnel, and will likely

  10. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-05

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  11. Large-scale WDM passive optical network based on cyclical AWG.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowen; Cheng, Xiaofei; Yeo, Yong-Kee; Shao, Xu; Zhou, Luying; Zhang, Hongguang

    2012-06-18

    A large scale wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. 124 bidirectional optical channels with 10-Gb/s downstream and 1.25-Gb/s upstream transmission are simultaneously distributed by a single 32*32 cyclic AWG. The effect of the extinction ratio and seeding power to BER performance are experimentally investigated. The selection of the subcarrier frequency is also analyzed by simulation.

  12. The BAHAMAS project: calibrated hydrodynamical simulations for large-scale structure cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Bird, Simeon; Le Brun, Amandine M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of the large-scale distribution of matter is sensitive to a variety of fundamental parameters that characterize the dark matter, dark energy, and other aspects of our cosmological framework. Since the majority of the mass density is in the form of dark matter that cannot be directly observed, to do cosmology with large-scale structure, one must use observable (baryonic) quantities that trace the underlying matter distribution in a (hopefully) predictable way. However, recent numerical studies have demonstrated that the mapping between observable and total mass, as well as the total mass itself, are sensitive to unresolved feedback processes associated with galaxy formation, motivating explicit calibration of the feedback efficiencies. Here, we construct a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations (called BAHAMAS, for BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems), where subgrid models of stellar and active galactic nucleus feedback have been calibrated to reproduce the present-day galaxy stellar mass function and the hot gas mass fractions of groups and clusters in order to ensure the effects of feedback on the overall matter distribution are broadly correct. We show that the calibrated simulations reproduce an unprecedentedly wide range of properties of massive systems, including the various observed mappings between galaxies, hot gas, total mass, and black holes, and represent a significant advance in our ability to mitigate the primary systematic uncertainty in most present large-scale structure tests.

  13. The Large Scale Synthesis of Aligned Plate Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Nash, Philip; Liu, Tian; Zhao, Naiqin; Zhu, Shengli

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel technique for the large-scale synthesis of aligned-plate nanostructures that are self-assembled and self-supporting. The synthesis technique involves developing nanoscale two-phase microstructures through discontinuous precipitation followed by selective etching to remove one of the phases. The method may be applied to any alloy system in which the discontinuous precipitation transformation goes to completion. The resulting structure may have many applications in catalysis, filtering and thermal management depending on the phase selection and added functionality through chemical reaction with the retained phase. The synthesis technique is demonstrated using the discontinuous precipitation of a γ‧ phase, (Ni, Co)3Al, followed by selective dissolution of the γ matrix phase. The production of the nanostructure requires heat treatments on the order of minutes and can be performed on a large scale making this synthesis technique of great economic potential.

  14. Large-scale linear nonparallel support vector machine solver.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingjie; Ping, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Twin support vector machines (TWSVMs), as the representative nonparallel hyperplane classifiers, have shown the effectiveness over standard SVMs from some aspects. However, they still have some serious defects restricting their further study and real applications: (1) They have to compute and store the inverse matrices before training, it is intractable for many applications where data appear with a huge number of instances as well as features; (2) TWSVMs lost the sparseness by using a quadratic loss function making the proximal hyperplane close enough to the class itself. This paper proposes a Sparse Linear Nonparallel Support Vector Machine, termed as L1-NPSVM, to deal with large-scale data based on an efficient solver-dual coordinate descent (DCD) method. Both theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that our method is not only suitable for large scale problems, but also performs as good as TWSVMs and SVMs.

  15. Prototype Vector Machine for Large Scale Semi-Supervised Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Kwok, James T.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Practicaldataminingrarelyfalls exactlyinto the supervisedlearning scenario. Rather, the growing amount of unlabeled data poses a big challenge to large-scale semi-supervised learning (SSL). We note that the computationalintensivenessofgraph-based SSLarises largely from the manifold or graph regularization, which in turn lead to large models that are dificult to handle. To alleviate this, we proposed the prototype vector machine (PVM), a highlyscalable,graph-based algorithm for large-scale SSL. Our key innovation is the use of"prototypes vectors" for effcient approximation on both the graph-based regularizer and model representation. The choice of prototypes are grounded upon two important criteria: they not only perform effective low-rank approximation of the kernel matrix, but also span a model suffering the minimum information loss compared with the complete model. We demonstrate encouraging performance and appealing scaling properties of the PVM on a number of machine learning benchmark data sets.

  16. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  17. Instrumentation Development for Large Scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology is currently being considered for multiple atmospheric entry applications as the limitations of traditional entry vehicles have been reached. The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) has successfully demonstrated this technology as a viable candidate with a 3.0 m diameter vehicle sub-orbital flight. To further this technology, large scale HIADs (6.0 8.5 m) must be developed and tested. To characterize the performance of large scale HIAD technology new instrumentation concepts must be developed to accommodate the flexible nature inflatable aeroshell. Many of the concepts that are under consideration for the HIAD FY12 subsonic wind tunnel test series are discussed below.

  18. The workshop on iterative methods for large scale nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H.F.; Pernice, M.

    1995-12-01

    The aim of the workshop was to bring together researchers working on large scale applications with numerical specialists of various kinds. Applications that were addressed included reactive flows (combustion and other chemically reacting flows, tokamak modeling), porous media flows, cardiac modeling, chemical vapor deposition, image restoration, macromolecular modeling, and population dynamics. Numerical areas included Newton iterative (truncated Newton) methods, Krylov subspace methods, domain decomposition and other preconditioning methods, large scale optimization and optimal control, and parallel implementations and software. This report offers a brief summary of workshop activities and information about the participants. Interested readers are encouraged to look into an online proceedings available at http://www.usi.utah.edu/logan.proceedings. In this, the material offered here is augmented with hypertext abstracts that include links to locations such as speakers` home pages, PostScript copies of talks and papers, cross-references to related talks, and other information about topics addresses at the workshop.

  19. GAIA: A WINDOW TO LARGE-SCALE MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo; Davis, Marc E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2012-08-10

    Using redshifts as a proxy for galaxy distances, estimates of the two-dimensional (2D) transverse peculiar velocities of distant galaxies could be obtained from future measurements of proper motions. We provide the mathematical framework for analyzing 2D transverse motions and show that they offer several advantages over traditional probes of large-scale motions. They are completely independent of any intrinsic relations between galaxy properties; hence, they are essentially free of selection biases. They are free from homogeneous and inhomogeneous Malmquist biases that typically plague distance indicator catalogs. They provide additional information to traditional probes that yield line-of-sight peculiar velocities only. Further, because of their 2D nature, fundamental questions regarding vorticity of large-scale flows can be addressed. Gaia, for example, is expected to provide proper motions of at least bright galaxies with high central surface brightness, making proper motions a likely contender for traditional probes based on current and future distance indicator measurements.

  20. The Large Scale Synthesis of Aligned Plate Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Nash, Philip; Liu, Tian; Zhao, Naiqin; Zhu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for the large-scale synthesis of aligned-plate nanostructures that are self-assembled and self-supporting. The synthesis technique involves developing nanoscale two-phase microstructures through discontinuous precipitation followed by selective etching to remove one of the phases. The method may be applied to any alloy system in which the discontinuous precipitation transformation goes to completion. The resulting structure may have many applications in catalysis, filtering and thermal management depending on the phase selection and added functionality through chemical reaction with the retained phase. The synthesis technique is demonstrated using the discontinuous precipitation of a γ′ phase, (Ni, Co)3Al, followed by selective dissolution of the γ matrix phase. The production of the nanostructure requires heat treatments on the order of minutes and can be performed on a large scale making this synthesis technique of great economic potential. PMID:27439672

  1. Long gradient mode and large-scale structure observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.

    2017-03-01

    We extend the study of long-mode perturbations to other large-scale observables such as cosmic rulers, galaxy-number counts, and halo bias. The long mode is a pure gradient mode that is still outside an observer's horizon. We insist that gradient-mode effects on observables vanish. It is also crucial that the expressions for observables are relativistic. This allows us to show that the effects of a gradient mode on the large-scale observables vanish identically in a relativistic framework. To study the potential modulation effect of the gradient mode on halo bias, we derive a consistency condition to the first order in gradient expansion. We find that the matter variance at a fixed physical scale is not modulated by the long gradient mode perturbations when the consistency condition holds. This shows that the contribution of long gradient modes to bias vanishes in this framework.

  2. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao E-mail: lh399@columbia.edu

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  3. Large Scale Deformation of the Western US Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Destructive earthquakes occur throughout the western US Cordillera (WUSC), not just within the San Andreas fault zone. But because we do not understand the present-day large-scale deformations of the crust throughout the WUSC, our ability to assess the potential for seismic hazards in this region remains severely limited. To address this problem, we are using a large collection of Global Positioning System (GPS) networks which spans the WUSC to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work can roughly be divided into an analysis of the GPS observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics.

  4. In the fast lane: large-scale bacterial genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Tamás; Burland, Valerie; Pósfai, György

    2012-07-31

    The last few years have witnessed rapid progress in bacterial genome engineering. The long-established, standard ways of DNA synthesis, modification, transfer into living cells, and incorporation into genomes have given way to more effective, large-scale, robust genome modification protocols. Expansion of these engineering capabilities is due to several factors. Key advances include: (i) progress in oligonucleotide synthesis and in vitro and in vivo assembly methods, (ii) optimization of recombineering techniques, (iii) introduction of parallel, large-scale, combinatorial, and automated genome modification procedures, and (iv) rapid identification of the modifications by barcode-based analysis and sequencing. Combination of the brute force of these techniques with sophisticated bioinformatic design and modeling opens up new avenues for the analysis of gene functions and cellular network interactions, but also in engineering more effective producer strains. This review presents a summary of recent technological advances in bacterial genome engineering.

  5. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W. F.

    2015-08-21

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a factor twomore » faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.« less

  6. LARGE-SCALE MOTIONS IN THE PERSEUS GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Mantz, A.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2012-10-01

    By combining large-scale mosaics of ROSAT PSPC, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observations, we present evidence for large-scale motions in the intracluster medium of the nearby, X-ray bright Perseus Cluster. These motions are suggested by several alternating and interleaved X-ray bright, low-temperature, low-entropy arcs located along the east-west axis, at radii ranging from {approx}10 kpc to over a Mpc. Thermodynamic features qualitatively similar to these have previously been observed in the centers of cool-core clusters, and were successfully modeled as a consequence of the gas sloshing/swirling motions induced by minor mergers. Our observations indicate that such sloshing/swirling can extend out to larger radii than previously thought, on scales approaching the virial radius.

  7. The beginning of observations of large-scale solar magnetic fields at the Sayan Observatory - Instrument, plans, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. M.; Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.

    A telescope and a system for measuring large-scale magnetic fields and the large-scale field of line-of-sight velocities in the sun photosphere have been constructed at the Sayan Observatory (USSR). The instrument permits the following synoptic observations of large-scale structures: (1) magnetograms of a large-scale magnetic field with a 3-arcmin resolution and 0.1-0.2 Gs sensitivity; (2) solar disk magnetograms in the form of half-tone images of the magnetic field distribution with 15 Gs sensitivity and 8 x 8 arcsec resolution; and (3) measurement of the mean magnetic field of the sun as a star with about 0.1 Gs sensitivity. Preliminary results of toroidal magnetic field observations are briefly discussed.

  8. Large-Scale Weather Disturbances in Mars’ Southern Extratropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, Melinda A.

    2015-11-01

    Between late autumn and early spring, Mars’ middle and high latitudes within its atmosphere support strong mean thermal gradients between the tropics and poles. Observations from both the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) indicate that this strong baroclinicity supports intense, large-scale eastward traveling weather systems (i.e., transient synoptic-period waves). These extratropical weather disturbances are key components of the global circulation. Such wave-like disturbances act as agents in the transport of heat and momentum, and generalized scalar/tracer quantities (e.g., atmospheric dust, water-vapor and ice clouds). The character of large-scale, traveling extratropical synoptic-period disturbances in Mars' southern hemisphere during late winter through early spring is investigated using a moderately high-resolution Mars global climate model (Mars GCM). This Mars GCM imposes interactively lifted and radiatively active dust based on a threshold value of the surface stress. The model exhibits a reasonable "dust cycle" (i.e., globally averaged, a dustier atmosphere during southern spring and summer occurs). Compared to their northern-hemisphere counterparts, southern synoptic-period weather disturbances and accompanying frontal waves have smaller meridional and zonal scales, and are far less intense. Influences of the zonally asymmetric (i.e., east-west varying) topography on southern large-scale weather are examined. Simulations that adapt Mars’ full topography compared to simulations that utilize synthetic topographies emulating key large-scale features of the southern middle latitudes indicate that Mars’ transient barotropic/baroclinic eddies are highly influenced by the great impact basins of this hemisphere (e.g., Argyre and Hellas). The occurrence of a southern storm zone in late winter and early spring appears to be anchored to the western hemisphere via orographic influences from the Tharsis highlands, and the Argyre

  9. Health-Terrain: Visualizing Large Scale Health Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0020 TITLE: Health-Terrain: Visualizing Large Scale Health Data PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ph.D. Fang, Shiaofen...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE April 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 7 MAR 2014 – 6 MAR 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Health-Terrain: Visualizing ...1) creating a concept space data model, which represents a schema tailored to support diverse visualizations and provides a uniform ontology that

  10. A Holistic Management Architecture for Large-Scale Adaptive Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE FOR LARGE-SCALE ADAPTIVE NETWORKS by Michael R. Clement September 2007 Thesis Advisor: Alex Bordetsky Second Reader...TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2007 Author: Michael R. Clement Approved by: Dr. Alex ...achieve in life is by His will. Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam. To my parents, my family, and Caitlin: For supporting me, listening to me when I got

  11. Large-scale detection of recombination in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Beiko, Robert G.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic recombination following a genetic transfer event can produce heterogeneous phylogenetic histories within sets of genes that share a common ancestral origin. Delineating recombination events will enhance our understanding in genome evolution. However, the task of detecting recombination is not trivial due to effect of more-recent evolutionary changes that can obscure such event from detection. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a two-phase strategy for detecting recombination events on a large-scale dataset.

  12. Multimodel Design of Large Scale Systems with Multiple Decision Makers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    virtue. 5- , Lead me from darkneu to light. - Lead me from death to eternal Life. ( Vedic Payer) p. I, MULTIMODEL DESIGN OF LARGE SCALE SYSTEMS WITH...guidance during the course of *: this research . He would also like to thank Professors W. R. Perkins, P. V. Kokotovic, T. Basar, and T. N. Trick for...thesis concludes with Chapter 7 where we summarize the results obtained, outline the main contributions, and indicate directions for future research . 7- I

  13. Turbulent amplification of large-scale magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Chen, H.

    1984-01-01

    Previously-introduced methods for analytically estimating the effects of small-scale turbulent fluctuations on large-scale dynamics are extended to fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. The problem becomes algebraically tractable in the presence of sufficiently large spectral gaps. The calculation generalizes 'alpha dynamo' calculations, except that the velocity fluctuations and magnetic fluctuations are treated on an independent and equal footing. Earlier expressions for the 'alpha coefficients' of turbulent magnetic field amplification are recovered as a special case.

  14. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  15. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  16. The large-scale anisotropy with the PAMELA calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krut'kov, S.; Kvashnin, A.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S.; Sarkar, R.; Simon, M.; Scotti, V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The large-scale anisotropy (or the so-called star-diurnal wave) has been studied using the calorimeter of the space-born experiment PAMELA. The cosmic ray anisotropy has been obtained for the Southern and Northern hemispheres simultaneously in the equatorial coordinate system for the time period 2006-2014. The dipole amplitude and phase have been measured for energies 1-20 TeV n-1.

  17. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  18. Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large Scale Social Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-15

    Social Data Progress Report No. 2 Reporting Period: December 16, 2015 – March 15, 2016 Contract No. N00014-15-P-5138 Sponsored by ONR...Intelligent Automation Incorporated Progress Report No. 2 Information Tailoring Enhancements for Large-Scale Social Data Submitted in accordance with...robustness. We imporoved the (i) messaging architecture, (ii) data redundancy, and (iii) service availability of Scraawl computational framework

  19. Host Immunity via Mutable Virtualized Large-Scale Network Containers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-25

    system for host immunity that combines virtualization , emulation, and mutable network configurations. This system is deployed on a single host, and...entire !Pv4 address space within 5 Host Immunity via Mutable Virtualized Large-Scale Network Containers 45 minutes from a single machine. Second, when...URL, and we call it URL marker. A URL marker records the information about its parent web page’s URL and the user ID who collects the URL. Thus, when

  20. Concurrent Programming Using Actors: Exploiting Large-Scale Parallelism,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-07

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK* Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA Is WORK UNIT NUMBERS 545 Technology Square...D-R162 422 CONCURRENT PROGRMMIZNG USING f"OS XL?ITP TEH l’ LARGE-SCALE PARALLELISH(U) NASI AC E Al CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE L. G AGHA ET AL...RESOLUTION TEST CHART N~ATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDA.RDS - -96 A -E. __ _ __ __’ .,*- - -- •. - MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL

  1. Developing and Understanding Methods for Large Scale Nonlinear Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    development of new algorithms for large-scale uncon- strained and constrained optimization problems, including limited-memory methods for problems with...analysis of tensor and SQP methods for singular con- strained optimization", to appear in SIAM Journal on Optimization. Published in peer-reviewed...Mathematica, Vol III, Journal der Deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung, 1998. S. Crivelli, B. Bader, R. Byrd, E. Eskow, V. Lamberti , R.Schnabel and T

  2. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-15

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  3. Analysis plan for 1985 large-scale tests. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to assist DNA in planning for large-scale (upwards of 5000 tons) detonations of conventional explosives in the 1985 and beyond time frame. Primary research objectives were to investigate potential means to increase blast duration and peak pressures. This report identifies and analyzes several candidate explosives. It examines several charge designs and identifies advantages and disadvantages of each. Other factors including terrain and multiburst techniques are addressed as are test site considerations.

  4. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  5. Impact of Large-scale Geological Architectures On Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troldborg, L.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Engesgaard, P.; Jensen, K. H.

    Geological and hydrogeological data constitutes the basis for assessment of ground- water flow pattern and recharge zones. The accessibility and applicability of hard ge- ological data is often a major obstacle in deriving plausible conceptual models. Nev- ertheless focus is often on parameter uncertainty caused by the effect of geological heterogeneity due to lack of hard geological data, thus neglecting the possibility of alternative conceptualizations of the large-scale geological architecture. For a catchment in the eastern part of Denmark we have constructed different geologi- cal models based on different conceptualization of the major geological trends and fa- cies architecture. The geological models are equally plausible in a conceptually sense and they are all calibrated to well head and river flow measurements. Comparison of differences in recharge zones and subsequently well protection zones emphasize the importance of assessing large-scale geological architecture in hydrological modeling on regional scale in a non-deterministic way. Geostatistical modeling carried out in a transitional probability framework shows the possibility of assessing multiple re- alizations of large-scale geological architecture from a combination of soft and hard geological information.

  6. Line segment extraction for large scale unorganized point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangbin; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Jun; Chen, Bili; Jia, Fukai; Chen, Zhonggui; Li, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Line segment detection in images is already a well-investigated topic, although it has received considerably less attention in 3D point clouds. Benefiting from current LiDAR devices, large-scale point clouds are becoming increasingly common. Most human-made objects have flat surfaces. Line segments that occur where pairs of planes intersect give important information regarding the geometric content of point clouds, which is especially useful for automatic building reconstruction and segmentation. This paper proposes a novel method that is capable of accurately extracting plane intersection line segments from large-scale raw scan points. The 3D line-support region, namely, a point set near a straight linear structure, is extracted simultaneously. The 3D line-support region is fitted by our Line-Segment-Half-Planes (LSHP) structure, which provides a geometric constraint for a line segment, making the line segment more reliable and accurate. We demonstrate our method on the point clouds of large-scale, complex, real-world scenes acquired by LiDAR devices. We also demonstrate the application of 3D line-support regions and their LSHP structures on urban scene abstraction.

  7. Learning Short Binary Codes for Large-scale Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yu, Mengyang; Shao, Ling

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale visual information retrieval has become an active research area in this big data era. Recently, hashing/binary coding algorithms prove to be effective for scalable retrieval applications. Most existing hashing methods require relatively long binary codes (i.e., over hundreds of bits, sometimes even thousands of bits) to achieve reasonable retrieval accuracies. However, for some realistic and unique applications, such as on wearable or mobile devices, only short binary codes can be used for efficient image retrieval due to the limitation of computational resources or bandwidth on these devices. In this paper, we propose a novel unsupervised hashing approach called min-cost ranking (MCR) specifically for learning powerful short binary codes (i.e., usually the code length shorter than 100 b) for scalable image retrieval tasks. By exploring the discriminative ability of each dimension of data, MCR can generate one bit binary code for each dimension and simultaneously rank the discriminative separability of each bit according to the proposed cost function. Only top-ranked bits with minimum cost-values are then selected and grouped together to compose the final salient binary codes. Extensive experimental results on large-scale retrieval demonstrate that MCR can achieve comparative performance as the state-of-the-art hashing algorithms but with significantly shorter codes, leading to much faster large-scale retrieval.

  8. Homogenization of Large-Scale Movement Models in Ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garlick, M.J.; Powell, J.A.; Hooten, M.B.; McFarlane, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    A difficulty in using diffusion models to predict large scale animal population dispersal is that individuals move differently based on local information (as opposed to gradients) in differing habitat types. This can be accommodated by using ecological diffusion. However, real environments are often spatially complex, limiting application of a direct approach. Homogenization for partial differential equations has long been applied to Fickian diffusion (in which average individual movement is organized along gradients of habitat and population density). We derive a homogenization procedure for ecological diffusion and apply it to a simple model for chronic wasting disease in mule deer. Homogenization allows us to determine the impact of small scale (10-100 m) habitat variability on large scale (10-100 km) movement. The procedure generates asymptotic equations for solutions on the large scale with parameters defined by small-scale variation. The simplicity of this homogenization procedure is striking when compared to the multi-dimensional homogenization procedure for Fickian diffusion,and the method will be equally straightforward for more complex models. ?? 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  9. Large-scale quantization from local correlations in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George; McComas, David J.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the large-scale quantization that can characterize the phase space of certain physical systems. Plasmas are such systems where large-scale quantization, ħ*, is caused by Debye shielding that structures correlations between particles. The value of ħ* is constant—some 12 orders of magnitude larger than the Planck constant—across a wide range of space plasmas, from the solar wind in the inner heliosphere to the distant plasma in the inner heliosheath and the local interstellar medium. This paper develops the foundation and advances the understanding of the concept of plasma quantization; in particular, we (i) show the analogy of plasma to Planck quantization, (ii) show the key points of plasma quantization, (iii) construct some basic quantum mechanical concepts for the large-scale plasma quantization, (iv) investigate the correlation between plasma parameters that implies plasma quantization, when it is approximated by a relation between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency, (v) analyze typical space plasmas throughout the heliosphere and show the constancy of plasma quantization over many orders of magnitude in plasma parameters, (vi) analyze Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) solar wind measurements to develop another measurement of the value of ħ*, and (vii) apply plasma quantization to derive unknown plasma parameters when some key observable is missing.

  10. Channel capacity of next generation large scale MIMO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshammari, A.; Albdran, S.; Matin, M.

    2016-09-01

    Information rate that can be transferred over a given bandwidth is limited by the information theory. Capacity depends on many factors such as the signal to noise ratio (SNR), channel state information (CSI) and the spatial correlation in the propagation environment. It is very important to increase spectral efficiency in order to meet the growing demand for wireless services. Thus, Multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technology has been developed and applied in most of the wireless standards and it has been very successful in increasing capacity and reliability. As the demand is still increasing, attention now is shifting towards large scale multiple input multiple output (MIMO) which has a potential of bringing orders of magnitude of improvement in spectral and energy efficiency. It has been shown that users channels decorrelate after increasing the number of antennas. As a result, inter-user interference can be avoided since energy can be focused on precise directions. This paper investigates the limits of channel capacity for large scale MIMO. We study the relation between spectral efficiency and the number of antenna N. We use time division duplex (TDD) system in order to obtain CSI using training sequence in the uplink. The same CSI is used for the downlink because the channel is reciprocal. Spectral efficiency is measured for channel model that account for small scale fading while ignoring the effect of large scale fading. It is shown the spectral efficiency can be improved significantly when compared to single antenna systems in ideal circumstances.

  11. Sparse approximation through boosting for learning large scale kernel machines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Yao, Xin

    2010-06-01

    Recently, sparse approximation has become a preferred method for learning large scale kernel machines. This technique attempts to represent the solution with only a subset of original data points also known as basis vectors, which are usually chosen one by one with a forward selection procedure based on some selection criteria. The computational complexity of several resultant algorithms scales as O(NM(2)) in time and O(NM) in memory, where N is the number of training points and M is the number of basis vectors as well as the steps of forward selection. For some large scale data sets, to obtain a better solution, we are sometimes required to include more basis vectors, which means that M is not trivial in this situation. However, the limited computational resource (e.g., memory) prevents us from including too many vectors. To handle this dilemma, we propose to add an ensemble of basis vectors instead of only one at each forward step. The proposed method, closely related to gradient boosting, could decrease the required number M of forward steps significantly and thus a large fraction of computational cost is saved. Numerical experiments on three large scale regression tasks and a classification problem demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Alteration of Large-Scale Chromatin Structure by Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Anne C.; Rajendran, Ramji R.; Stenoien, David L.; Mancini, Michael A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2002-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily important in human physiology and disease, recruits coactivators which modify local chromatin structure. Here we describe effects of ER on large-scale chromatin structure as visualized in live cells. We targeted ER to gene-amplified chromosome arms containing large numbers of lac operator sites either directly, through a lac repressor-ER fusion protein (lac rep-ER), or indirectly, by fusing lac repressor with the ER interaction domain of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator 1. Significant decondensation of large-scale chromatin structure, comparable to that produced by the ∼150-fold-stronger viral protein 16 (VP16) transcriptional activator, was produced by ER in the absence of estradiol using both approaches. Addition of estradiol induced a partial reversal of this unfolding by green fluorescent protein-lac rep-ER but not by wild-type ER recruited by a lac repressor-SRC570-780 fusion protein. The chromatin decondensation activity did not require transcriptional activation by ER nor did it require ligand-induced coactivator interactions, and unfolding did not correlate with histone hyperacetylation. Ligand-induced coactivator interactions with helix 12 of ER were necessary for the partial refolding of chromatin in response to estradiol using the lac rep-ER tethering system. This work demonstrates that when tethered or recruited to DNA, ER possesses a novel large-scale chromatin unfolding activity. PMID:11971975

  13. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  14. Assessing salivary cortisol in large-scale, epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emma K; Kumari, Meena

    2009-11-01

    Salivary cortisol measures are increasingly being incorporated into large-scale, population-based, or epidemiological research, in which participants are selected to be representative of particular communities or populations of interest, and sample sizes are in the order of hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. These approaches to studying salivary cortisol provide important advantages but pose a set of challenges. The representative nature of sampling, and large samples sizes associated with population-based research offer high generalizability and power, and the ability to examine cortisol functioning in relation to: (a) a wide range of social environments; (b) a diverse array individuals and groups; and (c) a broad set of pre-disease and disease outcomes. The greater importance of high response rates (to maintain generalizability) and higher costs associated with this type of large-scale research, however, requires special adaptations of existing ambulatory cortisol protocols. These include: using the most efficient sample collection protocol possible that still adequately address the specific cortisol-related questions at hand, and ensuring the highest possible response and compliance rates among those individuals invited to participate. Examples of choices made, response rates obtained, and examples of results obtained from existing epidemiological cortisol studies are offered, as are suggestions for the modeling and interpretation of salivary cortisol data obtained in large-scale epidemiological research.

  15. Large-scale investigation of genomic markers for severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Asami; Ji, Guijin; Numabe, Yukihiro; Ishii, Keisuke; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Kamoi, Kyuichi

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the genomic markers for periodontitis, using large-scale single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association studies comparing healthy volunteers and patients with periodontitis. Genomic DNA was obtained from 19 healthy volunteers and 22 patients with severe periodontitis, all of whom were Japanese. The subjects were genotyped at 637 SNPs in 244 genes on a large scale, using the TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Statistically significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies were analyzed with Fisher's exact test. We found statistically significant differences (P < 0.01) between the healthy volunteers and patients with severe periodontitis in the following genes; gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GNRH1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulatory 1 (PIK3R1), dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (DPP4), fibrinogen-like 2 (FGL2), and calcitonin receptor (CALCR). These results suggest that SNPs in the GNRH1, PIK3R1, DPP4, FGL2, and CALCR genes are genomic markers for severe periodontitis. Our findings indicate the necessity of analyzing SNPs in genes on a large scale (i.e., genome-wide approach), to identify genomic markers for periodontitis.

  16. Large-scale data mining pilot project in human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R.; Fidelis, R.; Slezak, T.

    1997-05-01

    This whitepaper briefly describes a new, aggressive effort in large- scale data Livermore National Labs. The implications of `large- scale` will be clarified Section. In the short term, this effort will focus on several @ssion-critical questions of Genome project. We will adapt current data mining techniques to the Genome domain, to quantify the accuracy of inference results, and lay the groundwork for a more extensive effort in large-scale data mining. A major aspect of the approach is that we will be fully-staffed data warehousing effort in the human Genome area. The long term goal is strong applications- oriented research program in large-@e data mining. The tools, skill set gained will be directly applicable to a wide spectrum of tasks involving a for large spatial and multidimensional data. This includes applications in ensuring non-proliferation, stockpile stewardship, enabling Global Ecology (Materials Database Industrial Ecology), advancing the Biosciences (Human Genome Project), and supporting data for others (Battlefield Management, Health Care).

  17. A model of plasma heating by large-scale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Boldyrev, S.; Mason, J.; Perez, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we study the process of energy dissipation triggered by a slow large-scale motion of a magnetized conducting fluid. Our consideration is motivated by the problem of heating the solar corona, which is believed to be governed by fast reconnection events set off by the slow motion of magnetic field lines anchored in the photospheric plasma. To elucidate the physics governing the disruption of the imposed laminar motion and the energy transfer to small scales, we propose a simplified model where the large-scale motion of magnetic field lines is prescribed not at the footpoints but rather imposed volumetrically. As a result, the problem can be treated numerically with an efficient, highly accurate spectral method, allowing us to use a resolution and statistical ensemble exceeding those of the previous work. We find that, even though the large-scale deformations are slow, they eventually lead to reconnection events that drive a turbulent state at smaller scales. The small-scale turbulence displays many of the universal features of field-guided magnetohydrodynamic turbulence like a well-developed inertial range spectrum. Based on these observations, we construct a phenomenological model that gives the scalings of the amplitude of the fluctuations and the energy-dissipation rate as functions of the input parameters. We find good agreement between the numerical results and the predictions of the model.

  18. Large-scale flow experiments for managing river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Olden, Julian D.; Lytle, David A.; Melis, Theodore S.; Schmidt, John C.; Bray, Erin N.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Kennard, Mark J.; McMullen, Laura E.; Mims, Meryl C.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Williams, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of streamflow have been used globally in recent decades to mitigate the impacts of dam operations on river systems. Rivers are challenging subjects for experimentation, because they are open systems that cannot be isolated from their social context. We identify principles to address the challenges of conducting effective large-scale flow experiments. Flow experiments have both scientific and social value when they help to resolve specific questions about the ecological action of flow with a clear nexus to water policies and decisions. Water managers must integrate new information into operating policies for large-scale experiments to be effective. Modeling and monitoring can be integrated with experiments to analyze long-term ecological responses. Experimental design should include spatially extensive observations and well-defined, repeated treatments. Large-scale flow manipulations are only a part of dam operations that affect river systems. Scientists can ensure that experimental manipulations continue to be a valuable approach for the scientifically based management of river systems.

  19. New probes of Cosmic Microwave Background large-scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiola, Simone

    Fifty years of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data played a crucial role in constraining the parameters of the LambdaCDM model, where Dark Energy, Dark Matter, and Inflation are the three most important pillars not yet understood. Inflation prescribes an isotropic universe on large scales, and it generates spatially-correlated density fluctuations over the whole Hubble volume. CMB temperature fluctuations on scales bigger than a degree in the sky, affected by modes on super-horizon scale at the time of recombination, are a clean snapshot of the universe after inflation. In addition, the accelerated expansion of the universe, driven by Dark Energy, leaves a hardly detectable imprint in the large-scale temperature sky at late times. Such fundamental predictions have been tested with current CMB data and found to be in tension with what we expect from our simple LambdaCDM model. Is this tension just a random fluke or a fundamental issue with the present model? In this thesis, we present a new framework to probe the lack of large-scale correlations in the temperature sky using CMB polarization data. Our analysis shows that if a suppression in the CMB polarization correlations is detected, it will provide compelling evidence for new physics on super-horizon scale. To further analyze the statistical properties of the CMB temperature sky, we constrain the degree of statistical anisotropy of the CMB in the context of the observed large-scale dipole power asymmetry. We find evidence for a scale-dependent dipolar modulation at 2.5sigma. To isolate late-time signals from the primordial ones, we test the anomalously high Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect signal generated by superstructures in the universe. We find that the detected signal is in tension with the expectations from LambdaCDM at the 2.5sigma level, which is somewhat smaller than what has been previously argued. To conclude, we describe the current status of CMB observations on small scales, highlighting the

  20. Robust large-scale parallel nonlinear solvers for simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, Brett William; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2005-11-01

    This report documents research to develop robust and efficient solution techniques for solving large-scale systems of nonlinear equations. The most widely used method for solving systems of nonlinear equations is Newton's method. While much research has been devoted to augmenting Newton-based solvers (usually with globalization techniques), little has been devoted to exploring the application of different models. Our research has been directed at evaluating techniques using different models than Newton's method: a lower order model, Broyden's method, and a higher order model, the tensor method. We have developed large-scale versions of each of these models and have demonstrated their use in important applications at Sandia. Broyden's method replaces the Jacobian with an approximation, allowing codes that cannot evaluate a Jacobian or have an inaccurate Jacobian to converge to a solution. Limited-memory methods, which have been successful in optimization, allow us to extend this approach to large-scale problems. We compare the robustness and efficiency of Newton's method, modified Newton's method, Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and our limited-memory Broyden method. Comparisons are carried out for large-scale applications of fluid flow simulations and electronic circuit simulations. Results show that, in cases where the Jacobian was inaccurate or could not be computed, Broyden's method converged in some cases where Newton's method failed to converge. We identify conditions where Broyden's method can be more efficient than Newton's method. We also present modifications to a large-scale tensor method, originally proposed by Bouaricha, for greater efficiency, better robustness, and wider applicability. Tensor methods are an alternative to Newton-based methods and are based on computing a step based on a local quadratic model rather than a linear model. The advantage of Bouaricha's method is that it can use any existing linear solver, which makes it simple to write

  1. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  2. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L.

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  3. 75 FR 51843 - In the Matter of Certain Large Scale Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Chips and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Matter of Certain Large Scale Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Chips and Products Containing the Same... certain large scale integrated circuit semiconductor chips and products containing same by reason...

  4. Performance modeling and analysis of consumer classes in large scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shukri, Sh.; Lenin, R. B.; Ramaswamy, S.; Anand, A.; Narasimhan, V. L.; Abraham, J.; Varadan, Vijay

    2009-03-01

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks have been used efficiently as building blocks as overlay networks for large-scale distributed network applications with Internet Protocol (IP) based bottom layer networks. With large scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) becoming increasingly realistic, it is important to overlay networks with WSNs in the bottom layer. The suitable mathematical (stochastic) model that can model the overlay network over WSNs is Queuing Networks with Multi-Class customers. In this paper, we discuss how these mathematical network models can be simulated using the object oriented simulation package OMNeT++. We discuss the Graphical User Interface (GUI) which is developed to accept the input parameter files and execute the simulation using this interface. We compare the simulation results with analytical formulas available in the literature for these mathematical models.

  5. Large-scale peculiar velocity field in flat models of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Vittorio, N.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The inflationary universe scenario predicts a flat universe and both adiabatic and isocurvature primordial density perturbations with the Zel'dovich spectrum. The two simplest realizations, models dominated by hot or cold dark matter, seem to be in conflict with observations. Flat models with two components of mass density, where one of the components of mass density is smoothly distributed, are examined, and the large-scale peculiar velocity field for these models is computed. For the smooth component the authors consider relativistic particles, a relic cosmological term, and light strings. At present the observational situation is unsettled, but, in principle, the large-scale peculiar velocity field is a very powerful discriminator between these different models. 66 references.

  6. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing

  7. Final Report: Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattas, Omar

    2013-10-15

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimiza- tion) Project focuses on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimiza- tion and inversion methods. Our research is directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. Our efforts are integrated in the context of a challenging testbed problem that considers subsurface reacting flow and transport. The MIT component of the SAGUARO Project addresses the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas-Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to- observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as "reduce then sample" and "sample then reduce." In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

  8. Large-Scale Hybrid Motor Testing. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid rocket motors can be successfully demonstrated at a small scale virtually anywhere. There have been many suitcase sized portable test stands assembled for demonstration of hybrids. They show the safety of hybrid rockets to the audiences. These small show motors and small laboratory scale motors can give comparative burn rate data for development of different fuel/oxidizer combinations, however questions that are always asked when hybrids are mentioned for large scale applications are - how do they scale and has it been shown in a large motor? To answer those questions, large scale motor testing is required to verify the hybrid motor at its true size. The necessity to conduct large-scale hybrid rocket motor tests to validate the burn rate from the small motors to application size has been documented in several place^'^^.^. Comparison of small scale hybrid data to that of larger scale data indicates that the fuel burn rate goes down with increasing port size, even with the same oxidizer flux. This trend holds for conventional hybrid motors with forward oxidizer injection and HTPB based fuels. While the reason this is occurring would make a great paper or study or thesis, it is not thoroughly understood at this time. Potential causes include the fact that since hybrid combustion is boundary layer driven, the larger port sizes reduce the interaction (radiation, mixing and heat transfer) from the core region of the port. This chapter focuses on some of the large, prototype sized testing of hybrid motors. The largest motors tested have been AMROC s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Edwards Air Force Base and the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Stennis Space Center. Numerous smaller tests were performed to support the burn rate, stability and scaling concepts that went into the development of those large motors.

  9. Large-scale smart passive system for civil engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyung-Jo; Jang, Dong-Doo; Lee, Heon-Jae; Cho, Sang-Won

    2008-03-01

    The smart passive system consisting of a magnetorheological (MR) damper and an electromagnetic induction (EMI) part has been recently proposed. An EMI part can generate the input current for an MR damper from vibration of a structure according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. The control performance of the smart passive system has been demonstrated mainly by numerical simulations. It was verified from the numerical results that the system could be effective to reduce the structural responses in the cases of civil engineering structures such as buildings and bridges. On the other hand, the experimental validation of the system is not sufficiently conducted yet. In this paper, the feasibility of the smart passive system to real-scale structures is investigated. To do this, the large-scale smart passive system is designed, manufactured, and tested. The system consists of the large-capacity MR damper, which has a maximum force level of approximately +/-10,000N, a maximum stroke level of +/-35mm and the maximum current level of 3 A, and the large-scale EMI part, which is designed to generate sufficient induced current for the damper. The applicability of the smart passive system to large real-scale structures is examined through a series of shaking table tests. The magnitudes of the induced current of the EMI part with various sinusoidal excitation inputs are measured. According to the test results, the large-scale EMI part shows the possibility that it could generate the sufficient current or power for changing the damping characteristics of the large-capacity MR damper.

  10. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J. E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 10{sup 9}M{sub s}un/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 10{sup 11}M{sub s}un/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  11. Infectious diseases in large-scale cat hoarding investigations.

    PubMed

    Polak, K C; Levy, J K; Crawford, P C; Leutenegger, C M; Moriello, K A

    2014-08-01

    Animal hoarders accumulate animals in over-crowded conditions without adequate nutrition, sanitation, and veterinary care. As a result, animals rescued from hoarding frequently have a variety of medical conditions including respiratory infections, gastrointestinal disease, parasitism, malnutrition, and other evidence of neglect. The purpose of this study was to characterize the infectious diseases carried by clinically affected cats and to determine the prevalence of retroviral infections among cats in large-scale cat hoarding investigations. Records were reviewed retrospectively from four large-scale seizures of cats from failed sanctuaries from November 2009 through March 2012. The number of cats seized in each case ranged from 387 to 697. Cats were screened for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in all four cases and for dermatophytosis in one case. A subset of cats exhibiting signs of upper respiratory disease or diarrhea had been tested for infections by PCR and fecal flotation for treatment planning. Mycoplasma felis (78%), calicivirus (78%), and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (55%) were the most common respiratory infections. Feline enteric coronavirus (88%), Giardia (56%), Clostridium perfringens (49%), and Tritrichomonas foetus (39%) were most common in cats with diarrhea. The seroprevalence of FeLV and FIV were 8% and 8%, respectively. In the one case in which cats with lesions suspicious for dermatophytosis were cultured for Microsporum canis, 69/76 lesional cats were culture-positive; of these, half were believed to be truly infected and half were believed to be fomite carriers. Cats from large-scale hoarding cases had high risk for enteric and respiratory infections, retroviruses, and dermatophytosis. Case responders should be prepared for mass treatment of infectious diseases and should implement protocols to prevent transmission of feline or zoonotic infections during the emergency response and when

  12. The Large-Scale Current System During Auroral Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The substorm process has been discussed for more than four decades and new empirical large-scale models continue to be published. The continued activity implies both the importance and the complexity of the problem. We recently published a new model of the large-scale substorm current system (Gjerloev and Hoffman, JGR, 2014). Based on data from >100 ground magnetometers (obtained from SuperMAG), 116 isolated substorms, global auroral images (obtained by the Polar VIS Earth Camera) and a careful normalization technique we derived an empirical model of the ionospheric equivalent current system. Our model yield some unexpected features that appear inconsistent with the classical single current wedge current system. One of these features is a distinct latitudinal shift of the westward electrojet (WEJ) current between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that these two WEJ regions are quasi disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a modified 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (bulge current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). The two wedge systems are shifted in latitude but overlap in local time in the midnight region. Our model is at considerable variance with previous global models and conceptual schematics of the large-scale substorm current system. We speculate that the data coverage, the methodologies and the techniques used in these previous global studies are the cause of the differences in solutions. In this presentation we present our model, compare with other published models and discuss possible causes for the differences.

  13. Solving large scale structure in ten easy steps with COLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2013-06-01

    We present the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method: an N-body method for solving for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). Unlike standard N-body methods, the COLA method can straightforwardly trade accuracy at small-scales in order to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing, as those catalogs are essential for performing detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS. As an illustration, we ran a COLA-based N-body code on a box of size 100 Mpc/h with particles of mass ≈ 5 × 109Msolar/h. Running the code with only 10 timesteps was sufficient to obtain an accurate description of halo statistics down to halo masses of at least 1011Msolar/h. This is only at a modest speed penalty when compared to mocks obtained with LPT. A standard detailed N-body run is orders of magnitude slower than our COLA-based code. The speed-up we obtain with COLA is due to the fact that we calculate the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT, while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos. Achieving a similar level of accuracy in halo statistics without the COLA method requires at least 3 times more timesteps than when COLA is employed.

  14. Improving Design Efficiency for Large-Scale Heterogeneous Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Anthony

    Despite increases in logic density, many Big Data applications must still be partitioned across multiple computing devices in order to meet their strict performance requirements. Among the most demanding of these applications is high-energy physics (HEP), which uses complex computing systems consisting of thousands of FPGAs and ASICs to process the sensor data created by experiments at particles accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Designing such computing systems is challenging due to the scale of the systems, the exceptionally high-throughput and low-latency performance constraints that necessitate application-specific hardware implementations, the requirement that algorithms are efficiently partitioned across many devices, and the possible need to update the implemented algorithms during the lifetime of the system. In this work, we describe our research to develop flexible architectures for implementing such large-scale circuits on FPGAs. In particular, this work is motivated by (but not limited in scope to) high-energy physics algorithms for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC. To make efficient use of logic resources in multi-FPGA systems, we introduce Multi-Personality Partitioning, a novel form of the graph partitioning problem, and present partitioning algorithms that can significantly improve resource utilization on heterogeneous devices while also reducing inter-chip connections. To reduce the high communication costs of Big Data applications, we also introduce Information-Aware Partitioning, a partitioning method that analyzes the data content of application-specific circuits, characterizes their entropy, and selects circuit partitions that enable efficient compression of data between chips. We employ our information-aware partitioning method to improve the performance of the hardware validation platform for evaluating new algorithms for the CMS experiment. Together, these research efforts help to improve the efficiency

  15. LARGE-SCALE CO2 TRANSPORTATION AND DEEP OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Sarv

    1999-03-01

    Technical and economical feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and ocean sequestration at depths of 3000 meters or grater was investigated. Two options were examined for transporting and disposing the captured CO{sub 2}. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through long pipelines laid on the ocean floor. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating structure for vertical injection to the ocean floor. In the latter case, a novel concept based on subsurface towing of a 3000-meter pipe, and attaching it to the offshore structure was considered. Budgetary cost estimates indicate that for distances greater than 400 km, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a 3000-meter vertical pipe provides the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions. For shorter distances, CO{sub 2} delivery by parallel-laid, subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines and tankers were 1.5 and 1.4 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}, respectively. At these prices, economics of ocean disposal are highly favorable. Future work should focus on addressing technical issues that are critical to the deployment of a large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and disposal system. Pipe corrosion, structural design of the transport pipe, and dispersion characteristics of sinking CO{sub 2} effluent plumes have been identified as areas that require further attention. Our planned activities in the next Phase include laboratory-scale corrosion testing, structural analysis of the pipeline, analytical and experimental simulations of CO{sub 2} discharge and dispersion, and the conceptual economic and engineering evaluation of large-scale implementation.

  16. ISIS observations of auroral particles and large-scale Birkeland currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneous electron and positive ion observations made with single-component magnetic perturbations on the ISIS-2 satellite are used to compare and contrast the relationships between primary and secondary auroral particle distributions at 5 eV-15 keV, and the large-scale Birkeland currents, in the pre- and post-midnight local time sectors. No unique relation is found between the regions of the Birkeland current system and regions of auroral particle distribution, though repeatable systematics in the region of upward-directed current are observed, and little evidence exists in either local time sector for the direct detection of the downward current-associated current carriers.

  17. Large-Scale periodic solar velocities: An observational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmer, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. Observations were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.

  18. UAV Data Processing for Large Scale Topographical Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampubolon, W.; Reinhardt, W.

    2014-06-01

    Large scale topographical mapping in the third world countries is really a prominent challenge in geospatial industries nowadays. On one side the demand is significantly increasing while on the other hand it is constrained by limited budgets available for mapping projects. Since the advent of Act Nr.4/yr.2011 about Geospatial Information in Indonesia, large scale topographical mapping has been on high priority for supporting the nationwide development e.g. detail spatial planning. Usually large scale topographical mapping relies on conventional aerial survey campaigns in order to provide high resolution 3D geospatial data sources. Widely growing on a leisure hobby, aero models in form of the so-called Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) bring up alternative semi photogrammetric aerial data acquisition possibilities suitable for relatively small Area of Interest (AOI) i.e. <5,000 hectares. For detail spatial planning purposes in Indonesia this area size can be used as a mapping unit since it usually concentrates on the basis of sub district area (kecamatan) level. In this paper different camera and processing software systems will be further analyzed for identifying the best optimum UAV data acquisition campaign components in combination with the data processing scheme. The selected AOI is covering the cultural heritage of Borobudur Temple as one of the Seven Wonders of the World. A detailed accuracy assessment will be concentrated within the object feature of the temple at the first place. Feature compilation involving planimetric objects (2D) and digital terrain models (3D) will be integrated in order to provide Digital Elevation Models (DEM) as the main interest of the topographic mapping activity. By doing this research, incorporating the optimum amount of GCPs in the UAV photo data processing will increase the accuracy along with its high resolution in 5 cm Ground Sampling Distance (GSD). Finally this result will be used as the benchmark for alternative geospatial

  19. Large scale obscuration and related climate effects open literature bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.A.; Geitgey, J.; Behl, Y.K.; Zak, B.D.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale obscuration and related climate effects of nuclear detonations first became a matter of concern in connection with the so-called ``Nuclear Winter Controversy`` in the early 1980`s. Since then, the world has changed. Nevertheless, concern remains about the atmospheric effects of nuclear detonations, but the source of concern has shifted. Now it focuses less on global, and more on regional effects and their resulting impacts on the performance of electro-optical and other defense-related systems. This bibliography reflects the modified interest.

  20. Water-based scintillators for large-scale liquid calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, D.R.; Raftery, D.

    1985-02-01

    We have investigated primary and secondary solvent intermediates in search of a recipe to create a bulk liquid scintillator with water as the bulk solvent and common fluors as the solutes. As we are not concerned with energy resolution below 1 MeV in large-scale experiments, light-output at the 10% level of high-quality organic solvent based scintillators is acceptable. We have found encouraging performance from industrial surfactants as primary solvents for PPO and POPOP. This technique may allow economical and environmentally safe bulk scintillator for kiloton-sized high energy calorimetry.

  1. Enabling Large-Scale Biomedical Analysis in the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Yu, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Yen-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput instrumentations has led to an astonishing growth in both volume and complexity of biomedical data collected from various sources. The planet-size data brings serious challenges to the storage and computing technologies. Cloud computing is an alternative to crack the nut because it gives concurrent consideration to enable storage and high-performance computing on large-scale data. This work briefly introduces the data intensive computing system and summarizes existing cloud-based resources in bioinformatics. These developments and applications would facilitate biomedical research to make the vast amount of diversification data meaningful and usable. PMID:24288665

  2. Large-Scale Measurement of Absolute Protein Glycosylation Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui

    2015-07-07

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most important protein modifications. Glycosylation site occupancy alteration has been implicated in human diseases and cancers. However, current glycoproteomic methods focus on the identification and quantification of glycosylated peptides and glycosylation sites but not glycosylation occupancy or glycoform stoichiometry. Here we describe a method for large-scale determination of the absolute glycosylation stoichiometry using three independent relative ratios. Using this method, we determined 117 absolute N-glycosylation occupancies in OVCAR-3 cells. Finally, we investigated the possible functions and the determinants for partial glycosylation.

  3. Large scale mortality of nestling ardeids caused by nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Wiese, J H; Davidson, W R; Nettles, V F

    1977-10-01

    During the summer of 1976, an epornitic of verminous peritonitis caused by Eustrongylides ignotus resulted in large scale mortality of young herons and egrets on Pea Patch Island, Delaware. Mortality was highest (84%) in snowy egret nestlings ( Egretta thula ) and less severe in great egrets ( Casmerodius albus ), Louisiana herons ( Hydranassa tricolor ), little blue herons ( Florida caerulea ), and black crowned night herons ( Nycticorax nycticorax ). Most deaths occured within the first 4 weeks after hatching. Migration of E. ignotus resulted in multiple perforations of the visceral organs, escape of intestinal contents into the body cavity and subsequent bacterial peritonitis. Killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) served as the source of infective larvae.

  4. Integrated High Accuracy Portable Metrology for Large Scale Structural Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaas, Andrej; Richardson, Paul; Burguete, Richard; Harris, Linden

    2014-06-01

    As the performance and accuracy of analysis tools increases bespoke solutions are more regularly being requested to perform high-accuracy measurement on structural tests to validate these methods. These can include optical methods and full-field techniques in place of the more traditional point measurements. As each test is unique it presents its own individual challenges.In this paper two recent, large scale tests performed by Airbus, will be presented and the metrology solutions that were identified for them will be discussed.

  5. Large-scale normal fluid circulation in helium superflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galantucci, Luca; Sciacca, Michele; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2017-01-01

    We perform fully coupled numerical simulations of helium II pure superflows in a channel, with vortex-line density typical of experiments. Peculiar to our model is the computation of the back-reaction of the superfluid vortex motion on the normal fluid and the presence of solid boundaries. We recover the uniform vortex-line density experimentally measured employing second sound resonators and we show that pure superflow in helium II is associated with a large-scale circulation of the normal fluid which can be detected using existing particle-tracking visualization techniques.

  6. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment.

    PubMed Central

    Hose, J E

    1994-01-01

    There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. PMID:7713029

  7. Towards large scale production and separation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Noe T.

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have boosted the research and applications of nanotechnology; however, many applications of CNTs are inaccessible because they depend upon large-scale CNT production and separations. Type, chirality and diameter control of CNTs determine many of their physical properties, and such control is still not accesible. This thesis studies the fundamentals for scalable selective reactions of HiPCo CNTs as well as the early phase of routes to an inexpensive approach for large-scale CNT production. In the growth part, this thesis covers a complete wet-chemistry process of catalyst and catalyst support deposition for growth of vertically aligned (VA) CNTs. A wet-chemistry preparation process has significant importance for CNT synthesis through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CVD is by far, the most suitable and inexpensive process for large-scale CNT production when compared to other common processes such as laser ablation and arc discharge. However, its potential has been limited by low-yielding and difficult preparation processes of catalyst and its support, therefore its competitiveness has been reduced. The wet-chemistry process takes advantage of current nanoparticle technology to deposit the catalyst and the catalyst support as a thin film of nanoparticles, making the protocol simple compared to electron beam evaporation and sputtering processes. In the CNT selective reactions part, this thesis studies UV irradiation of individually dispersed HiPCo CNTs that generates auto-selective reactions in the liquid phase with good control over their diameter and chirality. This technique is ideal for large-scale and continuous-process of separations of CNTs by diameter and type. Additionally, an innovative simple catalyst deposition through abrasion is demonstrated. Simple friction between the catalyst and the substrates deposit a high enough density of metal catalyst particles for successful CNT growth. This simple approach has

  8. Clusters as cornerstones of large-scale structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1997-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are one of the best tracers of large-scale structure in the Universe on scales well above 100 Mpc. The authors investigate here the clustering properties of a redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters and compare the observational sample with mock samples constructed from N-body simulations on the basis of four different cosmological models. The authors discuss the power spectrum, the Minkowski functionals and the void statistics of these samples and conclude, that the SCDM and TCDM models are ruled out whereas the ACDM and BSI models are in agreement with the observational data.

  9. Large-Scale Patterns of Filament Channels and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    In this review the properties and large-scale patterns of filament channels and filaments will be considered. Initially, the global formation locations of filament channels and filaments are discussed, along with their hemispheric pattern. Next, observations of the formation of filament channels and filaments are described where two opposing views are considered. Finally, the wide range of models that have been constructed to consider the formation of filament channels and filaments over long time-scales are described, along with the origin of the hemispheric pattern of filaments.

  10. Quantum computation for large-scale image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yue; Chen, Hanwu; Tan, Jianing; Li, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Due to the lack of an effective quantum feature extraction method, there is currently no effective way to perform quantum image classification or recognition. In this paper, for the first time, a global quantum feature extraction method based on Schmidt decomposition is proposed. A revised quantum learning algorithm is also proposed that will classify images by computing the Hamming distance of these features. From the experimental results derived from the benchmark database Caltech 101, and an analysis of the algorithm, an effective approach to large-scale image classification is derived and proposed against the background of big data.

  11. Large Scale Composite Manufacturing for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stavana, Jacob; Cohen, Leslie J.; Houseal, Keth; Pelham, Larry; Lort, Richard; Zimmerman, Thomas; Sutter, James; Western, Mike; Harper, Robert; Stuart, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Risk reduction for the large scale composite manufacturing is an important goal to produce light weight components for heavy lift launch vehicles. NASA and an industry team successfully employed a building block approach using low-cost Automated Tape Layup (ATL) of autoclave and Out-of-Autoclave (OoA) prepregs. Several large, curved sandwich panels were fabricated at HITCO Carbon Composites. The aluminum honeycomb core sandwich panels are segments of a 1/16th arc from a 10 meter cylindrical barrel. Lessons learned highlight the manufacturing challenges required to produce light weight composite structures such as fairings for heavy lift launch vehicles.

  12. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hose, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Solving Large-scale Eigenvalue Problems in SciDACApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2005-06-29

    Large-scale eigenvalue problems arise in a number of DOE applications. This paper provides an overview of the recent development of eigenvalue computation in the context of two SciDAC applications. We emphasize the importance of Krylov subspace methods, and point out its limitations. We discuss the value of alternative approaches that are more amenable to the use of preconditioners, and report the progression using the multi-level algebraic sub-structuring techniques to speed up eigenvalue calculation. In addition to methods for linear eigenvalue problems, we also examine new approaches to solving two types of non-linear eigenvalue problems arising from SciDAC applications.

  14. Analysis Plan for 1985 Large-Scale Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necessary mnd Identify by block number) Large-Scale Blasting Agents Multiburst ANFO S:,ock Waves 20. ABSTRACT...CONSIDERATIONS 6 1.5 MULTIBURST TECHNIQUES 6 1.6 TEST SITE CONSIDERATIONS 6 2 CANDIDATE EXPLOSIVES 8 2.1 INTRODUCTION 82.2 ANFO 8 2.2.1 Bulk (Loose) ANFO 11...2.2.2 Bagged ANFO 13 2.3 APEX 1360 15 2.4 NITRIC ACID AND NITROPROPANE 17 2.5 NITROPROPANENITRATE (NPN) 19 2.6 DBA - 22M 21 2.7 HARDENING EMULSION 22 2.8

  15. Frequency domain multiplexing for large-scale bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2002-05-31

    The development of planar fabrication techniques for superconducting transition-edge sensors has brought large-scale arrays of 1000 pixels or more to the realm of practicality. This raises the problem of reading out a large number of sensors with a tractable number of connections. A possible solution is frequency-domain multiplexing. I summarize basic principles, present various circuit topologies, and discuss design trade-offs, noise performance, cross-talk and dynamic range. The design of a practical device and its readout system is described with a discussion of fabrication issues, practical limits and future prospects.

  16. A Modular Ring Architecture for Large Scale Neural Network Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jump, Lance B.; Ligomenides, Panos A.

    1989-11-01

    Constructing fully parallel, large scale, neural networks is complicated by the problems of providing for massive interconnectivity and of overcoming fan in/out limitations in area-efficient VLSI/WSI realizations. A modular, bus switched, neural ring architecture employing primitive ring (pRing) processors is proposed, which solves the fan in/out and connectivity problems by a dynamically reconfigurable communication ring that synchronously serves identical, radially connected, processing elements. It also allows cost versus performance trade-offs by the assignment of variable numbers of logical neurons to each physical processing element.

  17. Design of a large-scale CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S.; Li, S.

    1997-12-31

    Many CFB boilers sized 100--150 MWe are in operation, and several others sized 150--250 MWe are in operation or under construction. The next step for CFB technology is the 300--400 MWe size range. This paper will describe Foster Wheeler`s large-scale CFB boiler experience and the design for a 300 MWe CFB boiler. The authors will show how the design incorporates Foster Wheeler`s unique combination of extensive utility experience and CFB boiler experience. All the benefits of CFB technology which include low emissions, fuel flexibility, low maintenance and competitive cost are now available in the 300--400 MWe size range.

  18. Simplified DGS procedure for large-scale genome structural study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Chul; Xu, Jia; Chen, Jun; Kim, Yeong; Winchester, David; Wang, San Ming

    2009-11-01

    Ditag genome scanning (DGS) uses next-generation DNA sequencing to sequence the ends of ditag fragments produced by restriction enzymes. These sequences are compared to known genome sequences to determine their structure. In order to use DGS for large-scale genome structural studies, we have substantially revised the original protocol by replacing the in vivo genomic DNA cloning with in vitro adaptor ligation, eliminating the ditag concatemerization steps, and replacing the 454 sequencer with Solexa or SOLiD sequencers for ditag sequence collection. This revised protocol further increases genome coverage and resolution and allows DGS to be used to analyze multiple genomes simultaneously.

  19. Large-Scale Compton Imaging for Wide-Area Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, D J; Manini, H A; Wright, D M

    2006-03-01

    We study the performance of a large-scale Compton imaging detector placed in a low-flying aircraft, used to search wide areas for rad/nuc threat sources. In this paper we investigate the performance potential of equipping aerial platforms with gamma-ray detectors that have photon sensitivity up to a few MeV. We simulate the detector performance, and present receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for a benchmark scenario using a {sup 137}Cs source. The analysis uses a realistic environmental background energy spectrum and includes air attenuation.

  20. Decentrally stabilizable linear and bilinear large-scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Vukcevic, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two classes of large-scale systems are identified, which can always be stabilized by decentralized feedback control. For the class of systems composed of interconnected linear subsystems, we can choose local controllers for the subsystems to achieve stability of the overall system. The same linear feedback scheme can be used to stabilize a class of linear systems with bilinear interconnections. In this case, however, the scheme is used to establish a finite region of stability for the overall system. The stabilization algorithm is applied to the design of a control system for the Large-Space Telescope.

  1. Large-scale structure from wiggly cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Vilenkin, Alexander

    1991-08-01

    Recent simulations of the evolution of cosmic strings indicate the presence of small-scale structure on the strings. It is shown that wakes produced by such 'wiggly' cosmic strings can result in the efficient formation of large-scale structure and large streaming velocities in the universe without significantly affecting the microwave-background isotropy. It is also argued that the motion of strings will lead to the generation of a primordial magnetic field. The most promising version of this scenario appears to be the one in which the universe is dominated by light neutrinos.

  2. Structure and function of large-scale brain systems.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the functional neuroanatomy of large-scale brain systems. Both the structure and functions of these brain networks are presented. All human behavior is the result of interactions within and between these brain systems. This system of brain function completely changes our understanding of how cognition and behavior are organized within the brain, replacing the traditional lesion model. Understanding behavior within the context of brain network interactions has profound implications for modifying abstract constructs such as attention, learning, and memory. These constructs also must be understood within the framework of a paradigm shift, which emphasizes ongoing interactions within a dynamically changing environment.

  3. Evolution of Large-Scale Circulation during TOGA COARE: Model Intercomparison and Basic Features.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Sheu, P. J.; Schubert, S.; Ledvina, D.; Weng, H.

    1996-05-01

    An intercomparison study of the evolution of large-scale circulation features during TOGA COARE has been carried out using data from three 4D assimilation systems: the National Meteorological Center (NMC, currently known as the National Center for Environmental Prediction), the Navy Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center, and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Results show that the preliminary assimilation products, though somewhat crude, can provide important information concerning the evolution of the large-scale atmospheric circulation over the tropical western Pacific during TOGA COARE. Large-scale features such as sea level pressure, rotational wind field, and temperature are highly consistent among models. However, the rainfall and wind divergence distributions show poor agreement among models, even though some useful information can still be derived. All three models shows a continuous background rain over the Intensive Flux Area (IFA), even during periods with suppressed convection, in contrast to the radar-estimated rainfall that is more episodic. This may reflect a generic deficiency in the oversimplified representation of large-scale rain in all three models.Based on the comparative model diagnostics, a consistent picture of large-scale evolution and multiscale interaction during TOGA COARF emerges. The propagation of the Madden and Julian Oscillation (MJO) from the equatorial Indian Ocean region into the western Pacific foreshadows the establishment of westerly wind events over the COARE region. The genesis and maintenance of the westerly wind (WW) events during TOGA COARE are related to the establishment of a large-scale east-west pressure dipole between the Maritime Continent and the equatorial central Pacific. This pressure dipole could be identified in part with the ascending (low pressure) and descending (high pressure) branches of the MJO and in part with the fluctuations of the austral summer monsoon.Accompanying the development of WW over the

  4. Very large-scale motions in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Hwa; Jang, Seong Jae; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent pipe flow with ReD=35000 was performed to investigate the spatially coherent structures associated with very large-scale motions. The corresponding friction Reynolds number, based on pipe radius R, is R+=934, and the computational domain length is 30 R. The computed mean flow statistics agree well with previous DNS data at ReD=44000 and 24000. Inspection of the instantaneous fields and two-point correlation of the streamwise velocity fluctuations showed that the very long meandering motions exceeding 25R exist in logarithmic and wake regions, and the streamwise length scale is almost linearly increased up to y/R ~0.3, while the structures in the turbulent boundary layer only reach up to the edge of the log-layer. Time-resolved instantaneous fields revealed that the hairpin packet-like structures grow with continuous stretching along the streamwise direction and create the very large-scale structures with meandering in the spanwise direction, consistent with the previous conceptual model of Kim & Adrian (1999). This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives of NRF/MEST of Korea (No. 2011-0000423).

  5. Topographically Engineered Large Scale Nanostructures for Plasmonic Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Pradhan, Sangram K.; Santiago, Kevin C.; Rutherford, Gugu N.; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a nanostructured metal thin film can achieve enhanced transmission efficiency and sharp resonances and use a large-scale and high-throughput nanofabrication technique for the plasmonic structures. The fabrication technique combines the features of nanoimprint and soft lithography to topographically construct metal thin films with nanoscale patterns. Metal nanogratings developed using this method show significantly enhanced optical transmission (up to a one-order-of-magnitude enhancement) and sharp resonances with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~15nm in the zero-order transmission using an incoherent white light source. These nanostructures are sensitive to the surrounding environment, and the resonance can shift as the refractive index changes. We derive an analytical method using a spatial Fourier transformation to understand the enhancement phenomenon and the sensing mechanism. The use of real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions in microfluidic cells integrated with these nanostructures is demonstrated to be effective for biosensing. The perpendicular transmission configuration and large-scale structures provide a feasible platform without sophisticated optical instrumentation to realize label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing. PMID:27072067

  6. Maestro: An Orchestration Framework for Large-Scale WSN Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Riliskis, Laurynas; Osipov, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have evolved into large and complex systems and are one of the main technologies used in cyber-physical systems and the Internet of Things. Extensive research on WSNs has led to the development of diverse solutions at all levels of software architecture, including protocol stacks for communications. This multitude of solutions is due to the limited computational power and restrictions on energy consumption that must be accounted for when designing typical WSN systems. It is therefore challenging to develop, test and validate even small WSN applications, and this process can easily consume significant resources. Simulations are inexpensive tools for testing, verifying and generally experimenting with new technologies in a repeatable fashion. Consequently, as the size of the systems to be tested increases, so does the need for large-scale simulations. This article describes a tool called Maestro for the automation of large-scale simulation and investigates the feasibility of using cloud computing facilities for such task. Using tools that are built into Maestro, we demonstrate a feasible approach for benchmarking cloud infrastructure in order to identify cloud Virtual Machine (VM)instances that provide an optimal balance of performance and cost for a given simulation. PMID:24647123

  7. Large-Scale Low-Boom Inlet Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides a high level overview of the Large-Scale Low-Boom Inlet Test and was presented at the Fundamental Aeronautics 2011 Technical Conference. In October 2010 a low-boom supersonic inlet concept with flow control was tested in the 8'x6' supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The primary objectives of the test were to evaluate the inlet stability and operability of a large-scale low-boom supersonic inlet concept by acquiring performance and flowfield validation data, as well as evaluate simple, passive, bleedless inlet boundary layer control options. During this effort two models were tested: a dual stream inlet intended to model potential flight hardware and a single stream design to study a zero-degree external cowl angle and to permit surface flow visualization of the vortex generator flow control on the internal centerbody surface. The tests were conducted by a team of researchers from NASA GRC, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Virginia

  8. Power suppression at large scales in string inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Downes, Sean; Dutta, Bhaskar E-mail: sddownes@physics.tamu.edu

    2013-12-01

    We study a possible origin of the anomalous suppression of the power spectrum at large angular scales in the cosmic microwave background within the framework of explicit string inflationary models where inflation is driven by a closed string modulus parameterizing the size of the extra dimensions. In this class of models the apparent power loss at large scales is caused by the background dynamics which involves a sharp transition from a fast-roll power law phase to a period of Starobinsky-like slow-roll inflation. An interesting feature of this class of string inflationary models is that the number of e-foldings of inflation is inversely proportional to the string coupling to a positive power. Therefore once the string coupling is tuned to small values in order to trust string perturbation theory, enough e-foldings of inflation are automatically obtained without the need of extra tuning. Moreover, in the less tuned cases the sharp transition responsible for the power loss takes place just before the last 50-60 e-foldings of inflation. We illustrate these general claims in the case of Fibre Inflation where we study the strength of this transition in terms of the attractor dynamics, finding that it induces a pivot from a blue to a redshifted power spectrum which can explain the apparent large scale power loss. We compute the effects of this pivot for example cases and demonstrate how magnitude and duration of this effect depend on model parameters.

  9. Knocking down highly-ordered large-scale nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, Alexander; Engel, Yoni; Elnathan, Roey; Ducobni, Tamir; Ben-Ishai, Moshit; Reddy, Koteeswara; Shpaisman, Nava; Tsukernik, Alexander; Oksman, Mark; Patolsky, Fernando

    2010-04-14

    The large-scale assembly of nanowire elements with controlled and uniform orientation and density at spatially well-defined locations on solid substrates presents one of the most significant challenges facing their integration in real-world electronic applications. Here, we present the universal "knocking-down" approach, based on the controlled in-place planarization of nanowire elements, for the formation of large-scale ordered nanowire arrays. The controlled planarization of the nanowires is achieved by the use of an appropriate elastomer-covered rigid-roller device. After being knocked down, each nanowire in the array can be easily addressed electrically, by a simple single photolithographic step, to yield a large number of nanoelectrical devices with an unprecedented high-fidelity rate. The approach allows controlling, in only two simple steps, all possible array parameters, that is, nanowire dimensions, chemical composition, orientation, and density. The resulting knocked-down arrays can be further used for the creation of massive nanoelectronic-device arrays. More than million devices were already fabricated with yields over 98% on substrate areas of up, but not limited to, to 10 cm(2).

  10. IP over optical multicasting for large-scale video delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaohui; Hu, Weisheng; Sun, Weiqiang; Guo, Wei

    2007-11-01

    In the IPTV systems, multicasting will play a crucial role in the delivery of high-quality video services, which can significantly improve bandwidth efficiency. However, the scalability and the signal quality of current IPTV can barely compete with the existing broadcast digital TV systems since it is difficult to implement large-scale multicasting with end-to-end guaranteed quality of service (QoS) in packet-switched IP network. China 3TNet project aimed to build a high performance broadband trial network to support large-scale concurrent streaming media and interactive multimedia services. The innovative idea of 3TNet is that an automatic switched optical networks (ASON) with the capability of dynamic point-to-multipoint (P2MP) connections replaces the conventional IP multicasting network in the transport core, while the edge remains an IP multicasting network. In this paper, we will introduce the network architecture and discuss challenges in such IP over Optical multicasting for video delivery.

  11. Evaluating Unmanned Aerial Platforms for Cultural Heritage Large Scale Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.; Oikonomou, C.; Adamopoulos, E.; Stathopoulou, E. K.

    2016-06-01

    When it comes to large scale mapping of limited areas especially for cultural heritage sites, things become critical. Optical and non-optical sensors are developed to such sizes and weights that can be lifted by such platforms, like e.g. LiDAR units. At the same time there is an increase in emphasis on solutions that enable users to get access to 3D information faster and cheaper. Considering the multitude of platforms, cameras and the advancement of algorithms in conjunction with the increase of available computing power this challenge should and indeed is further investigated. In this paper a short review of the UAS technologies today is attempted. A discussion follows as to their applicability and advantages, depending on their specifications, which vary immensely. The on-board cameras available are also compared and evaluated for large scale mapping. Furthermore a thorough analysis, review and experimentation with different software implementations of Structure from Motion and Multiple View Stereo algorithms, able to process such dense and mostly unordered sequence of digital images is also conducted and presented. As test data set, we use a rich optical and thermal data set from both fixed wing and multi-rotor platforms over an archaeological excavation with adverse height variations and using different cameras. Dense 3D point clouds, digital terrain models and orthophotos have been produced and evaluated for their radiometric as well as metric qualities.

  12. High Speed Networking and Large-scale Simulation in Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Gary, Patrick; Seablom, Michael; Truszkowski, Walt; Odubiyi, Jide; Jiang, Weiyuan; Liu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale numerical simulation has been one of the most important approaches for understanding global geodynamical processes. In this approach, peta-scale floating point operations (pflops) are often required to carry out a single physically-meaningful numerical experiment. For example, to model convective flow in the Earth's core and generation of the geomagnetic field (geodynamo), simulation for one magnetic free-decay time (approximately 15000 years) with a modest resolution of 150 in three spatial dimensions would require approximately 0.2 pflops. If such a numerical model is used to predict geomagnetic secular variation over decades and longer, with e.g. an ensemble Kalman filter assimilation approach, approximately 30 (and perhaps more) independent simulations of similar scales would be needed for one data assimilation analysis. Obviously, such a simulation would require an enormous computing resource that exceeds the capacity of a single facility currently available at our disposal. One solution is to utilize a very fast network (e.g. 10Gb optical networks) and available middleware (e.g. Globus Toolkit) to allocate available but often heterogeneous resources for such large-scale computing efforts. At NASA GSFC, we are experimenting with such an approach by networking several clusters for geomagnetic data assimilation research. We shall present our initial testing results in the meeting.

  13. Maestro: an orchestration framework for large-scale WSN simulations.

    PubMed

    Riliskis, Laurynas; Osipov, Evgeny

    2014-03-18

    Contemporary wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have evolved into large and complex systems and are one of the main technologies used in cyber-physical systems and the Internet of Things. Extensive research on WSNs has led to the development of diverse solutions at all levels of software architecture, including protocol stacks for communications. This multitude of solutions is due to the limited computational power and restrictions on energy consumption that must be accounted for when designing typical WSN systems. It is therefore challenging to develop, test and validate even small WSN applications, and this process can easily consume significant resources. Simulations are inexpensive tools for testing, verifying and generally experimenting with new technologies in a repeatable fashion. Consequently, as the size of the systems to be tested increases, so does the need for large-scale simulations. This article describes a tool called Maestro for the automation of large-scale simulation and investigates the feasibility of using cloud computing facilities for such task. Using tools that are built into Maestro, we demonstrate a feasible approach for benchmarking cloud infrastructure in order to identify cloud Virtual Machine (VM)instances that provide an optimal balance of performance and cost for a given simulation.

  14. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  15. Brief Mental Training Reorganizes Large-Scale Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Tang, Yan; Tang, Rongxiang; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidences have shown that one form of mental training—mindfulness meditation, can improve attention, emotion regulation and cognitive performance through changing brain activity and structural connectivity. However, whether and how the short-term mindfulness meditation alters large-scale brain networks are not well understood. Here, we applied a novel data-driven technique, the multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data to identify changes in brain activity patterns and assess the neural mechanisms induced by a brief mindfulness training—integrative body–mind training (IBMT), which was previously reported in our series of randomized studies. Whole brain rsfMRI was performed on an undergraduate group who received 2 weeks of IBMT with 30 min per session (5 h training in total). Classifiers were trained on measures of functional connectivity in this fMRI data, and they were able to reliably differentiate (with 72% accuracy) patterns of connectivity from before vs. after the IBMT training. After training, an increase in positive functional connections (60 connections) were detected, primarily involving bilateral superior/middle occipital gyrus, bilateral frontale operculum, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right superior temporal pole, bilateral insula, caudate and cerebellum. These results suggest that brief mental training alters the functional connectivity of large-scale brain networks at rest that may involve a portion of the neural circuitry supporting attention, cognitive and affective processing, awareness and sensory integration and reward processing. PMID:28293180

  16. Large Scale Organization of a Near Wall Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislas, Michel; Dekou Tiomajou, Raoul Florent; Foucaut, Jean Marc

    2016-11-01

    This study lies in the context of large scale coherent structures investigation in a near wall turbulent boundary layer. An experimental database at high Reynolds numbers (Re θ = 9830 and Re θ = 19660) was obtained in the LML wind tunnel with stereo-PIV at 4 Hz and hot wire anemometry at 30 kHz. A Linear Stochastic Estimation procedure, is used to reconstruct a 3 component field resolved in space and time. Algorithms were developed to extract coherent structures from the reconstructed field. A sample of 3D view of the structures is depicted in Figure 1. Uniform momentum regions are characterized with their mean hydraulic diameter in the YZ plane, their life time and their contribution to Reynolds stresses. The vortical motions are characterized by their position, radius, circulation and vorticity in addition to their life time and their number computed at a fixed position from the wall. The spatial organization of the structures was investigated through a correlation of their respective indicative functions in the spanwise direction. The simplified large scale model that arise is compared to the ones available in the literature. Streamwise low (green) and high (yellow) uniform momentum regions with positive (red) and negative (blue) vortical motions. This work was supported by Campus International pour la Sécurité et l'Intermodalité des Transports.

  17. The Impact of Large Scale Environments on Cluster Entropy Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trierweiler, Isabella; Su, Yuanyuan

    2017-01-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of 21 clusters imaged by the Suzaku satellite to determine the relation between the richness of cluster environments and entropy at large radii. Entropy profiles for clusters are expected to follow a power-law, but Suzaku observations show that the entropy profiles of many clusters are significantly flattened beyond 0.3 Rvir. While the entropy at the outskirts of clusters is thought to be highly dependent on the large scale cluster environment, the exact nature of the environment/entropy relation is unclear. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 6dF Galaxy Survey, we study the 20 Mpc large scale environment for all clusters in our sample. We find no strong relation between the entropy deviations at the virial radius and the total luminosity of the cluster surroundings, indicating that accretion and mergers have a more complex and indirect influence on the properties of the gas at large radii. We see a possible anti-correlation between virial temperature and richness of the cluster environment and find that density excess appears to play a larger role in the entropy flattening than temperature, suggesting that clumps of gas can lower entropy.

  18. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  19. Large-scale Direct Targeting for Drug Repositioning and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunli; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Wu, Ziyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Xuetong; Fu, Yingxue; Ru, Jinlong; Ali Shar, Piar; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    A system-level identification of drug-target direct interactions is vital to drug repositioning and discovery. However, the biological means on a large scale remains challenging and expensive even nowadays. The available computational models mainly focus on predicting indirect interactions or direct interactions on a small scale. To address these problems, in this work, a novel algorithm termed weighted ensemble similarity (WES) has been developed to identify drug direct targets based on a large-scale of 98,327 drug-target relationships. WES includes: (1) identifying the key ligand structural features that are highly-related to the pharmacological properties in a framework of ensemble; (2) determining a drug’s affiliation of a target by evaluation of the overall similarity (ensemble) rather than a single ligand judgment; and (3) integrating the standardized ensemble similarities (Z score) by Bayesian network and multi-variate kernel approach to make predictions. All these lead WES to predict drug direct targets with external and experimental test accuracies of 70% and 71%, respectively. This shows that the WES method provides a potential in silico model for drug repositioning and discovery. PMID:26155766

  20. Modulation of energetic coherent motions by large-scale topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wing; Hamed, Ali M.; Troolin, Dan; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The distinctive characteristics and dynamics of the large-scale coherent motions induced over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were explored experimentally with time-resolved volumetric PIV, and selected wall-normal high-resolution stereo PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall consists of a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The ?ow was characterized at Re 8000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls are such that the amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio is a/ δ99 0.1, which resemble geophysical-like topography. Insight on the dynamics of the coherent motions, Reynolds stress and spatial interaction of sweep and ejection events will be discussed in terms of the wall topography modulation.

  1. Very-large-scale coherent motions in open channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiang; Hussain, Fazle; Li, Dan-Xun

    2016-11-01

    Very-large-scale coherent structures (VLSSs) - whose characteristic length is of the order of 10 h (h is the water depth) - are found to exist in the log and outer layers near the bed of open channel flows. For decades researchers have speculated that large coherent structures may exist in open channel flows. However, conclusive evidence is still lacking. The present study employed pre-multiplied velocity power spectral and co-spectral analyses of time-resolved PIV data obtained in open channel flows. In all cases, two modes - large-scale structures (of the order of h) and VLSSs - dominate the log and outer layers of the turbulent boundary layer. More than half of TKE and 40% of the Reynolds shear stress in the log and outer layers are contributed by VLSSs. The strength difference of VLSSs between open and closed channel flows leads to pronounced redistribution of TKE near the free surface of open channel flows, which is a unique phenomenon that sets the open channel flows apart from other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Funded by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No.2015M580105), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51127006).

  2. Resonant plankton patchiness induced by large-scale turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKiver, William J.; Neufeld, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Here we study how large-scale variability of oceanic plankton is affected by mesoscale turbulence in a spatially heterogeneous environment. We consider a phytoplankton-zooplankton (PZ) ecosystem model, with different types of zooplankton grazing functions, coupled to a turbulent flow described by the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, representing large-scale horizontal transport in the ocean. We characterize the system using a dimensionless parameter, γ=TB/TF, which is the ratio of the ecosystem biological time scale TB and the flow time scale TF. Through numerical simulations, we examine how the PZ system depends on the time-scale ratio γ and find that the variance of both species changes significantly, with maximum phytoplankton variability at intermediate mixing rates. Through an analysis of the linearized population dynamics, we find an analytical solution based on the forced harmonic oscillator, which explains the behavior of the ecosystem, where there is resonance between the advection and the ecosystem predator-prey dynamics when the forcing time scales match the ecosystem time scales. We also examine the dependence of the power spectra on γ and find that the resonance behavior leads to different spectral slopes for phytoplankton and zooplankton, in agreement with observations.

  3. Resonant plankton patchiness induced by large-scale turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    McKiver, William J; Neufeld, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Here we study how large-scale variability of oceanic plankton is affected by mesoscale turbulence in a spatially heterogeneous environment. We consider a phytoplankton-zooplankton (PZ) ecosystem model, with different types of zooplankton grazing functions, coupled to a turbulent flow described by the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, representing large-scale horizontal transport in the ocean. We characterize the system using a dimensionless parameter, γ=T(B)/T(F), which is the ratio of the ecosystem biological time scale T(B) and the flow time scale T(F). Through numerical simulations, we examine how the PZ system depends on the time-scale ratio γ and find that the variance of both species changes significantly, with maximum phytoplankton variability at intermediate mixing rates. Through an analysis of the linearized population dynamics, we find an analytical solution based on the forced harmonic oscillator, which explains the behavior of the ecosystem, where there is resonance between the advection and the ecosystem predator-prey dynamics when the forcing time scales match the ecosystem time scales. We also examine the dependence of the power spectra on γ and find that the resonance behavior leads to different spectral slopes for phytoplankton and zooplankton, in agreement with observations.

  4. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; Pouquet, A.

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up to $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $\\approx 1000$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.

  5. Large-scale anisotropy in stably stratified rotating flows

    DOE PAGES

    Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rosenberg, D. L.; ...

    2014-08-28

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of the Boussinesq equations in the presence of rotation and/or stratification, both in the vertical direction. The runs are forced isotropically and randomly at small scales and have spatial resolutions of up tomore » $1024^3$ grid points and Reynolds numbers of $$\\approx 1000$$. We first show that solutions with negative energy flux and inverse cascades develop in rotating turbulence, whether or not stratification is present. However, the purely stratified case is characterized instead by an early-time, highly anisotropic transfer to large scales with almost zero net isotropic energy flux. This is consistent with previous studies that observed the development of vertically sheared horizontal winds, although only at substantially later times. However, and unlike previous works, when sufficient scale separation is allowed between the forcing scale and the domain size, the total energy displays a perpendicular (horizontal) spectrum with power law behavior compatible with $$\\sim k_\\perp^{-5/3}$$, including in the absence of rotation. In this latter purely stratified case, such a spectrum is the result of a direct cascade of the energy contained in the large-scale horizontal wind, as is evidenced by a strong positive flux of energy in the parallel direction at all scales including the largest resolved scales.« less

  6. The effect of large scale inhomogeneities on the luminosity distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouzakis, Nikolaos; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Eleftheria

    2007-02-01

    We study the form of the luminosity distance as a function of redshift in the presence of large scale inhomogeneities, with sizes of order 10 Mpc or larger. We approximate the Universe through the Swiss-cheese model, with each spherical region described by the Lemaitre Tolman Bondi metric. We study the propagation of light beams in this background, assuming that the locations of the source and the observer are random. We derive the optical equations for the evolution of the beam area and shear. Through their integration we determine the configurations that can lead to an increase of the luminosity distance relative to the homogeneous cosmology. We find that this can be achieved if the Universe is composed of spherical void-like regions, with matter concentrated near their surface. For inhomogeneities consistent with the observed large scale structure, the relative increase of the luminosity distance is of the order of a few per cent at redshifts near 1, and falls short of explaining the substantial increase required by the supernova data. On the other hand, the effect we describe is important for the correct determination of the energy content of the Universe from observations.

  7. Exact-Differential Large-Scale Traffic Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanai, Masatoshi; Suzumura, Toyotaro; Theodoropoulos, Georgios; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing large-scale traffics by simulation needs repeating execution many times with various patterns of scenarios or parameters. Such repeating execution brings about big redundancy because the change from a prior scenario to a later scenario is very minor in most cases, for example, blocking only one of roads or changing the speed limit of several roads. In this paper, we propose a new redundancy reduction technique, called exact-differential simulation, which enables to simulate only changing scenarios in later execution while keeping exactly same results as in the case of whole simulation. The paper consists of two main efforts: (i) a key idea and algorithm of the exact-differential simulation, (ii) a method to build large-scale traffic simulation on the top of the exact-differential simulation. In experiments of Tokyo traffic simulation, the exact-differential simulation shows 7.26 times as much elapsed time improvement in average and 2.26 times improvement even in the worst case as the whole simulation.

  8. Halo detection via large-scale Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merson, Alexander I.; Jasche, Jens; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Wandelt, Benjamin; Jones, D. Heath; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present a proof-of-concept of a novel and fully Bayesian methodology designed to detect haloes of different masses in cosmological observations subject to noise and systematic uncertainties. Our methodology combines the previously published Bayesian large-scale structure inference algorithm, HAmiltonian Density Estimation and Sampling algorithm (HADES), and a Bayesian chain rule (the Blackwell-Rao estimator), which we use to connect the inferred density field to the properties of dark matter haloes. To demonstrate the capability of our approach, we construct a realistic galaxy mock catalogue emulating the wide-area 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey, which has a median redshift of approximately 0.05. Application of HADES to the catalogue provides us with accurately inferred three-dimensional density fields and corresponding quantification of uncertainties inherent to any cosmological observation. We then use a cosmological simulation to relate the amplitude of the density field to the probability of detecting a halo with mass above a specified threshold. With this information, we can sum over the HADES density field realisations to construct maps of detection probabilities and demonstrate the validity of this approach within our mock scenario. We find that the probability of successful detection of haloes in the mock catalogue increases as a function of the signal to noise of the local galaxy observations. Our proposed methodology can easily be extended to account for more complex scientific questions and is a promising novel tool to analyse the cosmic large-scale structure in observations.

  9. Brief Mental Training Reorganizes Large-Scale Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Tang, Yan; Tang, Rongxiang; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidences have shown that one form of mental training-mindfulness meditation, can improve attention, emotion regulation and cognitive performance through changing brain activity and structural connectivity. However, whether and how the short-term mindfulness meditation alters large-scale brain networks are not well understood. Here, we applied a novel data-driven technique, the multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data to identify changes in brain activity patterns and assess the neural mechanisms induced by a brief mindfulness training-integrative body-mind training (IBMT), which was previously reported in our series of randomized studies. Whole brain rsfMRI was performed on an undergraduate group who received 2 weeks of IBMT with 30 min per session (5 h training in total). Classifiers were trained on measures of functional connectivity in this fMRI data, and they were able to reliably differentiate (with 72% accuracy) patterns of connectivity from before vs. after the IBMT training. After training, an increase in positive functional connections (60 connections) were detected, primarily involving bilateral superior/middle occipital gyrus, bilateral frontale operculum, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right superior temporal pole, bilateral insula, caudate and cerebellum. These results suggest that brief mental training alters the functional connectivity of large-scale brain networks at rest that may involve a portion of the neural circuitry supporting attention, cognitive and affective processing, awareness and sensory integration and reward processing.

  10. Large-scale columnar vortices in rotating turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Naoto; Takaoka, Masanori

    2016-11-01

    In the rotating turbulence, flow structures are affected by the angular velocity of the system's rotation. When the angular velocity is small, three-dimensional statistically-isotropic flow, which has the Kolmogorov spectrum all over the inertial subrange, is formed. When the angular velocity increases, the flow becomes two-dimensional anisotropic, and the energy spectrum has a power law k-2 in the small wavenumbers in addition to the Kolmogorov spectrum in the large wavenumbers. When the angular velocity decreases, the flow returns to the isotropic one. It is numerically found that the transition between the isotropic and anisotropic flows is hysteretic; the critical angular velocity at which the flow transitions from the anisotropic one to the isotropic one, and that of the reverse transition are different. It is also observed that the large-scale columnar structures in the anisotropic flow depends on the external force which maintains a statistically-steady state. In some cases, small-scale anticyclonic structures are aligned in a columnar structure apart from the cyclonic Taylor column. The formation mechanism of the large-scale columnar structures will be discussed. This work was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI.

  11. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Ringeval, Christophe; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Bouchet, François R. E-mail: yamauchi@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: bouchet@iap.fr

    2016-02-01

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = O(1) × 10{sup −6} match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  12. A visual backchannel for large-scale events.

    PubMed

    Dörk, Marian; Gruen, Daniel; Williamson, Carey; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of a Visual Backchannel as a novel way of following and exploring online conversations about large-scale events. Microblogging communities, such as Twitter, are increasingly used as digital backchannels for timely exchange of brief comments and impressions during political speeches, sport competitions, natural disasters, and other large events. Currently, shared updates are typically displayed in the form of a simple list, making it difficult to get an overview of the fast-paced discussions as it happens in the moment and how it evolves over time. In contrast, our Visual Backchannel design provides an evolving, interactive, and multi-faceted visual overview of large-scale ongoing conversations on Twitter. To visualize a continuously updating information stream, we include visual saliency for what is happening now and what has just happened, set in the context of the evolving conversation. As part of a fully web-based coordinated-view system we introduce Topic Streams, a temporally adjustable stacked graph visualizing topics over time, a People Spiral representing participants and their activity, and an Image Cloud encoding the popularity of event photos by size. Together with a post listing, these mutually linked views support cross-filtering along topics, participants, and time ranges. We discuss our design considerations, in particular with respect to evolving visualizations of dynamically changing data. Initial feedback indicates significant interest and suggests several unanticipated uses.

  13. Development of Large-Scale Functional Brain Networks in Children

    PubMed Central

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Musen, Mark; Menon, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7–9 y) and 22 young-adults (ages 19–22 y). Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar “small-world” organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. PMID:19621066

  14. Scalable WIM: effective exploration in large-scale astrophysical environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinggang; Fu, Chi-Wing; Hanson, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Navigating through large-scale virtual environments such as simulations of the astrophysical Universe is difficult. The huge spatial range of astronomical models and the dominance of empty space make it hard for users to travel across cosmological scales effectively, and the problem of wayfinding further impedes the user's ability to acquire reliable spatial knowledge of astronomical contexts. We introduce a new technique called the scalable world-in-miniature (WIM) map as a unifying interface to facilitate travel and wayfinding in a virtual environment spanning gigantic spatial scales: Power-law spatial scaling enables rapid and accurate transitions among widely separated regions; logarithmically mapped miniature spaces offer a global overview mode when the full context is too large; 3D landmarks represented in the WIM are enhanced by scale, positional, and directional cues to augment spatial context awareness; a series of navigation models are incorporated into the scalable WIM to improve the performance of travel tasks posed by the unique characteristics of virtual cosmic exploration. The scalable WIM user interface supports an improved physical navigation experience and assists pragmatic cognitive understanding of a visualization context that incorporates the features of large-scale astronomy.

  15. Extending SME to Handle Large-Scale Cognitive Modeling.

    PubMed

    Forbus, Kenneth D; Ferguson, Ronald W; Lovett, Andrew; Gentner, Dedre

    2016-06-20

    Analogy and similarity are central phenomena in human cognition, involved in processes ranging from visual perception to conceptual change. To capture this centrality requires that a model of comparison must be able to integrate with other processes and handle the size and complexity of the representations required by the tasks being modeled. This paper describes extensions to Structure-Mapping Engine (SME) since its inception in 1986 that have increased its scope of operation. We first review the basic SME algorithm, describe psychological evidence for SME as a process model, and summarize its role in simulating similarity-based retrieval and generalization. Then we describe five techniques now incorporated into the SME that have enabled it to tackle large-scale modeling tasks: (a) Greedy merging rapidly constructs one or more best interpretations of a match in polynomial time: O(n(2) log(n)); (b) Incremental operation enables mappings to be extended as new information is retrieved or derived about the base or target, to model situations where information in a task is updated over time; (c) Ubiquitous predicates model the varying degrees to which items may suggest alignment; (d) Structural evaluation of analogical inferences models aspects of plausibility judgments; (e) Match filters enable large-scale task models to communicate constraints to SME to influence the mapping process. We illustrate via examples from published studies how these enable it to capture a broader range of psychological phenomena than before.

  16. A study of synthetic large scales in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Luhar, Mitul; Barnard, Casey; Sheplak, Mark; McKeon, Beverley

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic spanwise-constant spatio-temporal disturbances are excited in a turbulent boundary layer through a spatially impulsive patch of dynamic wall-roughness. The downstream flow response is studied through hot wire anemometry, pressure measurements at the wall and direct measurements of wall-shear-stress made using a novel micro-machined capacitive floating element sensor. These measurements are phase-locked to the input perturbation to recover the synthetic large-scale motion and characterize its structure and wall signature. The phase relationship between the synthetic large scale and small scale activity provides further insights into the apparent amplitude modulation effect between them, and the dynamics of wall-bounded turbulent flows in general. Results from these experiments will be discussed in the context of the critical-layer behavior revealed by the resolvent analysis of McKeon & Sharma (J Fluid Mech, 2010), and compared with similar earlier work by Jacobi & McKeon (J Fluid Mech, 2011). Model predictions are shown to be in broad agreement with experiments. The support of AFOSR grant #FA 9550-12-1-0469, Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) and Sandia Graduate Fellowship (C.B.) are gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Exploiting multi-scale parallelism for large scale numerical modelling of laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Vieira, J.; Fiuza, F.; Davidson, A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA), supported by the extreme accelerating fields generated in the interaction of PW-Class lasers and underdense targets, promises the production of high quality electron beams in short distances for multiple applications. Achieving this goal will rely heavily on numerical modelling to further understand the underlying physics and identify optimal regimes, but large scale modelling of these scenarios is computationally heavy and requires the efficient use of state-of-the-art petascale supercomputing systems. We discuss the main difficulties involved in running these simulations and the new developments implemented in the OSIRIS framework to address these issues, ranging from multi-dimensional dynamic load balancing and hybrid distributed/shared memory parallelism to the vectorization of the PIC algorithm. We present the results of the OASCR Joule Metric program on the issue of large scale modelling of LWFA, demonstrating speedups of over 1 order of magnitude on the same hardware. Finally, scalability to over ˜106 cores and sustained performance over ˜2 P Flops is demonstrated, opening the way for large scale modelling of LWFA scenarios.

  18. Latest COBE results, large-scale data, and predictions of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the predictions of the inflationary scenario of cosmology is that the initial spectrum of primordial density fluctuations (PDFs) must have the Harrison-Zeldovich (HZ) form. Here, in order to test the inflationary scenario, predictions of the microwave background radiation (MBR) anisotropies measured by COBE are computed based on large-scale data for the universe and assuming Omega-1 and the HZ spectrum on large scales. It is found that the minimal scale where the spectrum can first enter the HZ regime is found, constraining the power spectrum of the mass distribution to within the bias factor b. This factor is determined and used to predict parameters of the MBR anisotropy field. For the spectrum of PDFs that reaches the HZ regime immediately after the scale accessible to the APM catalog, the numbers on MBR anisotropies are consistent with the COBE detections and thus the standard inflation can indeed be considered a viable theory for the origin of the large-scale structure in the universe.

  19. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  20. Modeling dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peili; Guo, Lei; Hu, Xintao; Li, Xiang; Jin, Changfeng; Han, Junwei; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence from the functional neuroimaging field suggests that human brain functions are realized via dynamic functional interactions on large-scale structural networks. Even in resting state, functional brain networks exhibit remarkable temporal dynamics. However, it has been rarely explored to computationally model such dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks. In this paper, we present a novel computational framework to explore this problem using multimodal resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Basically, recent literature reports including our own studies have demonstrated that the resting state brain networks dynamically undergo a set of distinct brain states. Within each quasi-stable state, functional information flows from one set of structural brain nodes to other sets of nodes, which is analogous to the message package routing on the Internet from the source node to the destination. Therefore, based on the large-scale structural brain networks constructed from DTI data, we employ a dynamic programming strategy to infer functional information transition routines on structural networks, based on which hub routers that most frequently participate in these routines are identified. It is interesting that a majority of those hub routers are located within the default mode network (DMN), revealing a possible mechanism of the critical functional hub roles played by the DMN in resting state. Also, application of this framework on a post trauma stress disorder (PTSD) dataset demonstrated interesting difference in hub router distributions between PTSD patients and healthy controls.

  1. Incipient multiple fault diagnosis in real time with applications to large-scale systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.Y.; Bien, Z.; Park, J.H.; Seon, P.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    By using a modified signed directed graph (SDG) together with the distributed artificial neutral networks and a knowledge-based system, a method of incipient multi-fault diagnosis is presented for large-scale physical systems with complex pipes and instrumentations such as valves, actuators, sensors, and controllers. The proposed method is designed so as to (1) make a real-time incipient fault diagnosis possible for large-scale systems, (2) perform the fault diagnosis not only in the steady-state case but also in the transient case as well by using a concept of fault propagation time, which is newly adopted in the SDG model, (3) provide with highly reliable diagnosis results and explanation capability of faults diagnosed as in an expert system, and (4) diagnose the pipe damage such as leaking, break, or throttling. This method is applied for diagnosis of a pressurizer in the Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) unit 2 in Korea under a transient condition, and its result is reported to show satisfactory performance of the method for the incipient multi-fault diagnosis of such a large-scale system in a real-time manner.

  2. Application of Large-Scale Inversion Algorithms to Hydraulic Tomography in an Alluvial Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Jardani, A; Soueid Ahmed, A; Abbas, M; Wang, X; Jourde, H; Lecoq, N

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale inversion methods have been recently developed and permitted now to considerably reduce the computation time and memory needed for inversions of models with a large amount of parameters and data. In this work, we have applied a deterministic geostatistical inversion algorithm to a hydraulic tomography investigation conducted in an experimental field site situated within an alluvial aquifer in Southern France. This application aims to achieve a 2-D large-scale modeling of the spatial transmissivity distribution of the site. The inversion algorithm uses a quasi-Newton iterative process based on a Bayesian approach. We compared the results obtained by using three different methodologies for sensitivity analysis: an adjoint-state method, a finite-difference method, and a principal component geostatistical approach (PCGA). The PCGA is a large-scale adapted method which was developed for inversions with a large number of parameters by using an approximation of the covariance matrix, and by avoiding the calculation of the full Jacobian sensitivity matrix. We reconstructed high-resolution transmissivity fields (composed of up to 25,600 cells) which generated good correlations between the measured and computed hydraulic heads. In particular, we show that, by combining the PCGA inversion method and the hydraulic tomography method, we are able to substantially reduce the computation time of the inversions, while still producing high-quality inversion results as those obtained from the other sensitivity analysis methodologies.

  3. Large-scale machine learning and evaluation platform for real-time traffic surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichel, Justin A.; Mishra, Akshaya; Miller, Nicholas; Jankovic, Nicholas; Thomas, Mohan A.; Abbott, Tyler; Swanson, Douglas; Keller, Joel

    2016-09-01

    In traffic engineering, vehicle detectors are trained on limited datasets, resulting in poor accuracy when deployed in real-world surveillance applications. Annotating large-scale high-quality datasets is challenging. Typically, these datasets have limited diversity; they do not reflect the real-world operating environment. There is a need for a large-scale, cloud-based positive and negative mining process and a large-scale learning and evaluation system for the application of automatic traffic measurements and classification. The proposed positive and negative mining process addresses the quality of crowd sourced ground truth data through machine learning review and human feedback mechanisms. The proposed learning and evaluation system uses a distributed cloud computing framework to handle data-scaling issues associated with large numbers of samples and a high-dimensional feature space. The system is trained using AdaBoost on 1,000,000 Haar-like features extracted from 70,000 annotated video frames. The trained real-time vehicle detector achieves an accuracy of at least 95% for 1/2 and about 78% for 19/20 of the time when tested on ˜7,500,000 video frames. At the end of 2016, the dataset is expected to have over 1 billion annotated video frames.

  4. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  5. A Computationally Efficient Parallel Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Large-Scale Big-Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observed state variables. However, for many practical problems due to the facts that the observed data sets are often large and model parameters are often numerous, conventional methods for solving the inverse modeling can be computationally expensive. We have developed a new, computationally-efficient Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving large-scale inverse modeling. Levenberg-Marquardt methods require the solution of a dense linear system of equations which can be prohibitively expensive to compute for large-scale inverse problems. Our novel method projects the original large-scale linear problem down to a Krylov subspace, such that the dimensionality of the measurements can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, instead of solving the linear system for every Levenberg-Marquardt damping parameter, we store the Krylov subspace computed when solving the first damping parameter and recycle it for all the following damping parameters. The efficiency of our new inverse modeling algorithm is significantly improved by using these computational techniques. We apply this new inverse modeling method to invert for a random transitivity field. Our algorithm is fast enough to solve for the distributed model parameters (transitivity) at each computational node in the model domain. The inversion is also aided by the use regularization techniques. The algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). Julia is an advanced high-level scientific programing language that allows for efficient memory management and utilization of high-performance computational resources. By comparing with a Levenberg-Marquardt method using standard linear inversion techniques, our Levenberg-Marquardt method yields speed-up ratio of 15 in a multi-core computational environment and a speed-up ratio of 45 in a single-core computational environment. Therefore, our new inverse modeling method is a

  6. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  7. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  8. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  9. Large-scale dimension densities for heart rate variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Wessel, Niels; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    In this work, we reanalyze the heart rate variability (HRV) data from the 2002 Computers in Cardiology (CiC) Challenge using the concept of large-scale dimension densities and additionally apply this technique to data of healthy persons and of patients with cardiac diseases. The large-scale dimension density (LASDID) is estimated from the time series using a normalized Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm, which leads to a suitable correction of systematic errors produced by boundary effects in the rather large scales of a system. This way, it is possible to analyze rather short, nonstationary, and unfiltered data, such as HRV. Moreover, this method allows us to analyze short parts of the data and to look for differences between day and night. The circadian changes in the dimension density enable us to distinguish almost completely between real data and computer-generated data from the CiC 2002 challenge using only one parameter. In the second part we analyzed the data of 15 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), 15 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), 15 elderly healthy subjects (EH), as well as 18 young and healthy persons (YH). With our method we are able to separate completely the AF (ρlsμ=0.97±0.02) group from the others and, especially during daytime, the CHF patients show significant differences from the young and elderly healthy volunteers (CHF, 0.65±0.13 ; EH, 0.54±0.05 ; YH, 0.57±0.05 ; p<0.05 for both comparisons). Moreover, for the CHF patients we find no circadian changes in ρlsμ (day, 0.65±0.13 ; night, 0.66±0.12 ; n.s.) in contrast to healthy controls (day, 0.54±0.05 ; night, 0.61±0.05 ; p=0.002 ). Correlation analysis showed no statistical significant relation between standard HRV and circadian LASDID, demonstrating a possibly independent application of our method for clinical risk stratification.

  10. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  11. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  12. Challenges of Modeling Flood Risk at Large Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, J.; Simic, M.; Rowe, J.

    2009-04-01

    algorithm propagates the flows for each simulated event. The model incorporates a digital terrain model (DTM) at 10m horizontal resolution, which is used to extract flood plain cross-sections such that a one-dimensional hydraulic model can be used to estimate extent and elevation of flooding. In doing so the effect of flood defenses in mitigating floods are accounted for. Finally a suite of vulnerability relationships have been developed to estimate flood losses for a portfolio of properties that are exposed to flood hazard. Historical experience indicates that a for recent floods in Great Britain more than 50% of insurance claims occur outside the flood plain and these are primarily a result of excess surface flow, hillside flooding, flooding due to inadequate drainage. A sub-component of the model addresses this issue by considering several parameters that best explain the variability of claims off the flood plain. The challenges of modeling such a complex phenomenon at a large scale largely dictate the choice of modeling approaches that need to be adopted for each of these model components. While detailed numerically-based physical models exist and have been used for conducting flood hazard studies, they are generally restricted to small geographic regions. In a probabilistic risk estimation framework like our current model, a blend of deterministic and statistical techniques have to be employed such that each model component is independent, physically sound and is able to maintain the statistical properties of observed historical data. This is particularly important because of the highly non-linear behavior of the flooding process. With respect to vulnerability modeling, both on and off the flood plain, the challenges include the appropriate scaling of a damage relationship when applied to a portfolio of properties. This arises from the fact that the estimated hazard parameter used for damage assessment, namely maximum flood depth has considerable uncertainty. The

  13. Rapid large-scale oligonucleotide selection for microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rahmann, Sven

    2002-01-01

    We present the first algorithm that selects oligonucleotide probes (e.g. 25-mers) for microarray experiments on a large scale. For example, oligos for human genes can be found within 50 hours. This becomes possible by using the longest common substring as a specificity measure for candidate oligos. We present an algorithm based on a suffix array with additional information that is efficient both in terms of memory usage and running time to rank all candidate oligos according to their specificity. We also introduce the concept of master sequences to describe the sequences from which oligos are to be selected. Constraints such as oligo length, melting temperature, and self-complementarity are incorporated in the master sequence at a preprocessing stage and thus kept separate from the main selection problem. As a result, custom oligos can now be designed for any sequenced genome, just as the technology for on-site chip synthesis is becoming increasingly mature.

  14. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  15. Solving large scale traveling salesman problems by chaotic neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mikio; Ikeguch, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2002-03-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving large scale traveling salesman problems (TSPs) by chaotic dynamics. First, we realize the tabu search on a neural network, by utilizing the refractory effects as the tabu effects. Then, we extend it to a chaotic neural network version. We propose two types of chaotic searching methods, which are based on two different tabu searches. While the first one requires neurons of the order of n2 for an n-city TSP, the second one requires only n neurons. Moreover, an automatic parameter tuning method of our chaotic neural network is presented for easy application to various problems. Last, we show that our method with n neurons is applicable to large TSPs such as an 85,900-city problem and exhibits better performance than the conventional stochastic searches and the tabu searches.

  16. Atypical Behavior Identification in Large Scale Network Traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Best, Daniel M.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Olsen, Bryan K.; Pike, William A.

    2011-10-23

    Cyber analysts are faced with the daunting challenge of identifying exploits and threats within potentially billions of daily records of network traffic. Enterprise-wide cyber traffic involves hundreds of millions of distinct IP addresses and results in data sets ranging from terabytes to petabytes of raw data. Creating behavioral models and identifying trends based on those models requires data intensive architectures and techniques that can scale as data volume increases. Analysts need scalable visualization methods that foster interactive exploration of data and enable identification of behavioral anomalies. Developers must carefully consider application design, storage, processing, and display to provide usability and interactivity with large-scale data. We present an application that highlights atypical behavior in enterprise network flow records. This is accomplished by utilizing data intensive architectures to store the data, aggregation techniques to optimize data access, statistical techniques to characterize behavior, and a visual analytic environment to render the behavioral trends, highlight atypical activity, and allow for exploration.

  17. Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Violette, John A.; Sullivan, William E.; Turnberg, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the design analysis of a very thin, highly swept, propeller blade to be used in the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) test program. The report includes: design requirements and goals, a description of the blade configuration which meets requirements, a description of the analytical methods utilized/developed to demonstrate compliance with the requirements, and the results of these analyses. The methods described include: finite element modeling, predicted aerodynamic loads and their application to the blade, steady state and vibratory response analyses, blade resonant frequencies and mode shapes, bird impact analysis, and predictions of stalled and unstalled flutter phenomena. Summarized results include deflections, retention loads, stress/strength comparisons, foreign object damage resistance, resonant frequencies and critical speed margins, resonant vibratory mode shapes, calculated boundaries of stalled and unstalled flutter, and aerodynamic and acoustic performance calculations.

  18. Recovery Act - Large Scale SWNT Purification and Solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gemano; Dr. Linda B. McGown

    2010-10-07

    The goal of this Phase I project was to establish a quantitative foundation for development of binary G-gels for large-scale, commercial processing of SWNTs and to develop scientific insight into the underlying mechanisms of solubilization, selectivity and alignment. In order to accomplish this, we performed systematic studies to determine the effects of G-gel composition and experimental conditions that will enable us to achieve our goals that include (1) preparation of ultra-high purity SWNTs from low-quality, commercial SWNT starting materials, (2) separation of MWNTs from SWNTs, (3) bulk, non-destructive solubilization of individual SWNTs in aqueous solution at high concentrations (10-100 mg/mL) without sonication or centrifugation, (4) tunable enrichment of subpopulations of the SWNTs based on metallic vs. semiconductor properties, diameter, or chirality and (5) alignment of individual SWNTs.

  19. Engineering large-scale agent-based systems with consensus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokma, A.; Slade, A.; Kerridge, S.; Johnson, K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the consensus method for the development of large-scale agent-based systems. Systems can be developed as networks of knowledge based agents (KBA) which engage in a collaborative problem solving effort. The method provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to the development of this type of system. This includes a systematic analysis of user requirements as well as a structured approach to generating a system design which exhibits the desired functionality. There is a direct correspondence between system requirements and design components. The benefits of this approach are that requirements are traceable into design components and code thus facilitating verification. The use of the consensus method with two major test applications showed it to be successful and also provided valuable insight into problems typically associated with the development of large systems.

  20. Large Scale Bacterial Colony Screening of Diversified FRET Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Litzlbauer, Julia; Schifferer, Martina; Ng, David; Fabritius, Arne; Thestrup, Thomas; Griesbeck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between fluorescent protein mutants have started to revolutionize physiology and biochemistry. However, many types of FRET biosensors show relatively small FRET changes, making measurements with these probes challenging when used under sub-optimal experimental conditions. Thus, a major effort in the field currently lies in designing new optimization strategies for these types of sensors. Here we describe procedures for optimizing FRET changes by large scale screening of mutant biosensor libraries in bacterial colonies. We describe optimization of biosensor expression, permeabilization of bacteria, software tools for analysis, and screening conditions. The procedures reported here may help in improving FRET changes in multiple suitable classes of biosensors. PMID:26061878

  1. Towards Online Multiresolution Community Detection in Large-Scale Networks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianbin; Sun, Heli; Liu, Yaguang; Song, Qinbao; Weninger, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of community structure in networks has aroused great interest in multiple disciplines. One of the challenges is to find local communities from a starting vertex in a network without global information about the entire network. Many existing methods tend to be accurate depending on a priori assumptions of network properties and predefined parameters. In this paper, we introduce a new quality function of local community and present a fast local expansion algorithm for uncovering communities in large-scale networks. The proposed algorithm can detect multiresolution community from a source vertex or communities covering the whole network. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is efficient and well-behaved in both real-world and synthetic networks. PMID:21887325

  2. Large-scale characterization of the murine cardiac proteome.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Jake; Emili, Andrew; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart that result in impaired cardiac muscle function. This dysfunction can progress to an inability to supply blood to the body. Cardiovascular diseases play a large role in overall global morbidity. Investigating the protein changes in the heart during disease can uncover pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Establishing a global protein expression "footprint" can facilitate more targeted studies of diseases of the heart.In the technical review presented here, we present methods to elucidate the heart's proteome through subfractionation of the cellular compartments to reduce sample complexity and improve detection of lower abundant proteins during multidimensional protein identification technology analysis. Analysis of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial subproteomes separately in order to characterize the murine cardiac proteome is advantageous by simplifying complex cardiac protein mixtures. In combination with bioinformatic analysis and genome correlation, large-scale protein changes can be identified at the cellular compartment level in this animal model.

  3. Nuclear-pumped lasers for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Leonard, E.M.; Shea, R.E.; Berggren, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient initiation of large-volume chemical lasers may be achieved by neutron induced reactions which produce charged particles in the final state. When a burst mode nuclear reactor is used as the neutron source, both a sufficiently intense neutron flux and a sufficient short initiation pulse may be possible. Proof-of-principle experiments are planned to demonstrate lasing in a direct nuclear-pumped large-volume system: to study the effects of various neutron absorbing materials on laser performance; to study the effects of long initiation pulse lengths; to determine the performance of large-scale optics and the beam quality that may bo obtained; and to assess the performance of alternative designs of burst systems that increase the neutron output and burst repetition rate. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Western U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  5. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Westem U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  6. Galaxy clustering and the origin of large-scale flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, R.; Yahil, A.

    1989-01-01

    Peebles's 'cosmic virial theorem' is extended from its original range of validity at small separations, where hydrostatic equilibrium holds, to large separations, in which linear gravitational stability theory applies. The rms pairwise velocity difference at separation r is shown to depend on the spatial galaxy correlation function xi(x) only for x less than r. Gravitational instability theory can therefore be tested by comparing the two up to the maximum separation for which both can reliably be determined, and there is no dependence on the poorly known large-scale density and velocity fields. With the expected improvement in the data over the next few years, however, this method should yield a reliable determination of omega.

  7. Mass Efficiencies for Common Large-Scale Precision Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a mass-based trade study for large-scale deployable triangular trusses, where the longerons can be monocoque tubes, isogrid tubes, or coilable longeron trusses. Such structures are typically used to support heavy reflectors, solar panels, or other instruments, and are subject to thermal gradients that can vary a great deal based on orbital altitude, location in orbit, and self-shadowing. While multi layer insulation (MLI) blankets are commonly used to minimize the magnitude of these thermal disturbances, they subject the truss to a nonstructural mass penalty. This paper investigates the impact of these add-on thermal protection layers on selecting the lightest precision structure for a given loading scenario.

  8. Large scale self energy calculations for ion-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürpick, P.; Thumm, U.

    1996-03-01

    We present large scale non-perturbative self energy calculations for the interaction of an ion with a metal surface. Using both the simple jellium potential and more sophisticated ab initio potentials(P. J. Jennings, R. O. Jones and M. Weinert, Phys. Rev. B, 37), 6113 (1988)., we study the complex self energy matrix for various n-manifolds allowing for the calculation of diabatic and adiabatic non-perturbative level shifts and widths, and hybrid orbitals(P. Kürpick and U.Thumm, to be published.). Besides this self energy calculations a new adiabatic close--coupling calculation is being developed that will be applied to the interaction of ions in various charge states with metal surfaces.

  9. In-line unit for large-scale condensate pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Tazetdinov, A.G.

    1983-09-01

    An in-line unit has been tested in the VNIIAEN for a screw centrifugal stage, Three alternative preincorporated axial impellers designed by the Voznesenskii-Pekin method for the sleeve action were tested with two types of centrifugal impellers. The optimum values of relative vortex current, mean peripheral component of the absolute velocity, and mean peripheral velocity are obtained. The existence of an optimum value for the mean relative vortex is explained. Results of tests lead to the design of a third alternative CI and AI No. 4 as specified. As a result of the tests, a screw centrifugal state with high energy and cavitational indices, a unit needed for the development of large scale condensate pumps, was obtained.

  10. Grid infrastructure to support science portals for large scale instruments.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Foster, I.

    1999-09-29

    Soon, a new generation of scientific workbenches will be developed as a collaborative effort among various research institutions in the US. These scientific workbenches will be accessed in the Web via portals. Reusable components are needed to build such portals for different scientific disciplines, allowing uniform desktop access to remote resources. Such components will include tools and services enabling easy collaboration, job submission, job monitoring, component discovery, and persistent object storage. Based on experience gained from Grand Challenge applications for large-scale instruments, we demonstrate how Grid infrastructure components can be used to support the implementation of science portals. The availability of these components will simplify the prototype implementation of a common portal architecture.

  11. Computational solutions to large-scale data management and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schadt, Eric E.; Linderman, Michael D.; Sorenson, Jon; Lee, Lawrence; Nolan, Garry P.

    2011-01-01

    Today we can generate hundreds of gigabases of DNA and RNA sequencing data in a week for less than US$5,000. The astonishing rate of data generation by these low-cost, high-throughput technologies in genomics is being matched by that of other technologies, such as real-time imaging and mass spectrometry-based flow cytometry. Success in the life sciences will depend on our ability to properly interpret the large-scale, high-dimensional data sets that are generated by these technologies, which in turn requires us to adopt advances in informatics. Here we discuss how we can master the different types of computational environments that exist — such as cloud and heterogeneous computing — to successfully tackle our big data problems. PMID:20717155

  12. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  13. Optical modulation of aqueous metamaterial properties at large scale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sui; Wang, Yuan; Ni, Xingjie; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-11-02

    Dynamical control of metamaterials by adjusting their shape and structures has been developed to achieve desired optical functionalities and to enable modulation and selection of spectra responses. However it is still challenging to realize such a manipulation at large scale. Recently, it has been shown that the desired high (or low) symmetry metamaterials structure in solution can be self-assembled under external light stimuli. Using the this approach, we systematically investiagted the optical controlling process and report here a dynamical manipulation of magnetic properties of metamaterials. Under external laser excitations, we demonstrated that selected magnetic properties of metamaterials can be tuned with the freedom of chosen wavelength ranges. The magnetic dipole selectivity and tunability were further quantified by in situ spectral measurement.

  14. Studies on Editing Patterns in Large-scale Wikis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulain, Philip; Shadbolt, Nigel; Gibbins, Nicholas

    Wiki systems have developed over the past years as lightweight, community-editable, web-based hypertext systems. With the emergence of Semantic Wikis, these collections of interlinked documents have also gained a dual role as ad-hoc RDF graphs. However, their roots lie at the limited hypertext capabilities of the World Wide Web: embedded links, without support for composite objects or transclusion. In this chapter, we present experimental evidence that hyperstructure changes, as opposed to content changes, form a substantial proportion of editing effort on a large-scale wiki.We then follow this with a in-detail experiment, studying how individual editors work to edit articles on the wiki. These experiments are set in the wider context of a study of how the technologies developed during decades of hypertext research may be applied to improve management of wiki document structure and, with semantic wikis, knowledge structure.

  15. Successful Physician Training Program for Large Scale EMR Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, L.A.; Mailes, E.S.; Goad, B.A.; Longhurst, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary End-user training is an essential element of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation and frequently suffers from minimal institutional investment. In addition, discussion of successful EMR training programs for physicians is limited in the literature. The authors describe a successful physician-training program at Stanford Children’s Health as part of a large scale EMR implementation. Evaluations of classroom training, obtained at the conclusion of each class, revealed high physician satisfaction with the program. Free-text comments from learners focused on duration and timing of training, the learning environment, quality of the instructors, and specificity of training to their role or department. Based upon participant feedback and institutional experience, best practice recommendations, including physician engagement, curricular design, and assessment of proficiency and recognition, are suggested for future provider EMR training programs. The authors strongly recommend the creation of coursework to group providers by common workflow. PMID:25848415

  16. Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of Painting Arts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images – the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances. PMID:25501877

  17. U-shaped Vortex Structures in Large Scale Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yantao; Peng, Xiaoxing; Xu, Lianghao; Hong, Fangwen

    2015-12-01

    The control of cloud cavitation, especially large scale cloud cavitation(LSCC), is always a hot issue in the field of cavitation research. However, there has been little knowledge on the evolution of cloud cavitation since it is associated with turbulence and vortex flow. In this article, the structure of cloud cavitation shed by sheet cavitation around different hydrofoils and a wedge were observed in detail with high speed camera (HSC). It was found that the U-shaped vortex structures always existed in the development process of LSCC. The results indicated that LSCC evolution was related to this kind of vortex structures, and it may be a universal character for LSCC. Then vortex strength of U-shaped vortex structures in a cycle was analyzed with numerical results.

  18. Large scale ocean circulation from the GRACE GGM01 Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Chambers, D. P.; Bettadpur, S.; Ries, J. C.

    2003-11-01

    The GRACE Gravity Model 01 (GGM01), computed from 111 days of GRACE K-band ranging (KBR) data, is differenced from a global mean sea surface (MSS) computed from a decade of satellite altimetry to determine a mean dynamic ocean topography (DOT). As a test of the GGM01 gravity model, large-scale zonal and meridional surface geostrophic currents are computed from the topography and are compared with those derived from a mean hydrographic surface. Reduction in residual RMS between the two by 30-60% (and increased correlation) indicates that the GGM01 geoid represents a dramatic improvement over older geoid models, which were developed from multiple satellite tracking data, altimetry, and surface gravity measurements. For the first time, all major current systems are clearly observed in the DOT from space-based measurements.

  19. The dynamics of large-scale arrays of coupled resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Chaitanya; Pyles, Conor S.; Wetherton, Blake A.; Quinn, D. Dane; Rhoads, Jeffrey F.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an analytical framework suitable for the analysis of large-scale arrays of coupled resonators, including those which feature amplitude and phase dynamics, inherent element-level parameter variation, nonlinearity, and/or noise. In particular, this analysis allows for the consideration of coupled systems in which the number of individual resonators is large, extending as far as the continuum limit corresponding to an infinite number of resonators. Moreover, this framework permits analytical predictions for the amplitude and phase dynamics of such systems. The utility of this analytical methodology is explored through the analysis of a system of N non-identical resonators with global coupling, including both reactive and dissipative components, physically motivated by an electromagnetically-transduced microresonator array. In addition to the amplitude and phase dynamics, the behavior of the system as the number of resonators varies is investigated and the convergence of the discrete system to the infinite-N limit is characterized.

  20. Honeycomb: Visual Analysis of Large Scale Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ham, Frank; Schulz, Hans-Jörg; Dimicco, Joan M.

    The rise in the use of social network sites allows us to collect large amounts of user reported data on social structures and analysis of this data could provide useful insights for many of the social sciences. This analysis is typically the domain of Social Network Analysis, and visualization of these structures often proves invaluable in understanding them. However, currently available visual analysis tools are not very well suited to handle the massive scale of this network data, and often resolve to displaying small ego networks or heavily abstracted networks. In this paper, we present Honeycomb, a visualization tool that is able to deal with much larger scale data (with millions of connections), which we illustrate by using a large scale corporate social networking site as an example. Additionally, we introduce a new probability based network metric to guide users to potentially interesting or anomalous patterns and discuss lessons learned during design and implementation.