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Sample records for manage chronic disease

  1. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sung; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Yoon, Kun Ho

    2015-06-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  2. Mobile phone technology in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Blake, Holly

    Mobile phones are being used to improve nurse-patient communication and monitor health outcomes in chronic disease. Innovative applications of mobile technology are expected to increase over time in community management of cancer, heart disease, asthma and diabetes. This article focuses on mobile phone technology and its contribution to health care.

  3. Home Telecare for Chronic Disease Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD ) is increasingly common. The US experience with effective disease management has seen significant...home admissions [2] • more effective management of asthma, depression , epilepsy and AIDS [3]. Home care and ambulatory care for patients with... COPD is now an established service in many countries of the world and is beginning to demonstrate significant improvements in health care outcomes at

  4. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    PubMed

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  5. Chronic disease management at Intermountain Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Towner, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The care of patients with chronic disease is a significant challenge for any healthcare system. Intermountain Healthcare is trying a variety of approaches to chronic disease management. There are five general areas that have been organized centrally. These areas are provider education, patient education, outcomes data, clinical support (ideas that make it easier to do the right thing), and multidisciplinary coordination of care. Typically within each area a variety of tools are developed. The clinical application of the tools varies from provider to provider and from patient to patient. Innovative tools have come from unexpected sources. Significant improvement in measured outcomes has been demonstrated.

  6. Future of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    D'Urzo, Anthony; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2012-06-01

    Bronchodilators play a pivotal role in the management of symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Inhaled short-acting bronchodilators are used for all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primarily for the immediate relief of symptoms; inhaled long-acting bronchodilators are recommended for maintenance therapy in patients with moderate-to-very severe disease and those with daily symptoms. When symptoms are not adequately controlled by a single bronchodilator, combining bronchodilators of different classes may prove effective. Several long-acting β(2)-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists with 24-h duration of action and inhalers combining different classes of long-acting, once-daily bronchodilators are in development. The place of these agents in the treatment algorithm will be determined by their efficacy and safety profiles and their long-term impact on relevant clinical outcomes.

  7. The vital signs of chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Jahn, Andreas; Enarson, Donald A

    2009-06-01

    The vital signs of pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature and respiratory rate are the 'nub' of individual patient management. At the programmatic level, vital signs could also be used to monitor the burden and treatment outcome of chronic disease. Case detection and treatment outcome constitute the vital signs of tuberculosis control within the WHO's 'DOTS' framework, and similar vital signs could be adapted and used for management of chronic diseases. The numbers of new patients started on therapy in each month or quarter (new incident cases) are sensitive indicators for programme performance and access to services. Using similar reporting cycles, treatment outcomes for all patients can be assessed, the vital signs being: alive and retained on therapy at the respective facility; died; stopped therapy; lost to follow-up; and transferred out to another facility. Retention on treatment constitutes the prevalent number of cases, the burden of disease, and this provides important strategic information for rational drug forecasting and logistic planning. If case numbers and outcomes of chronic diseases were measured reliably and consistently as part of an integrated programmatic approach, this would strengthen the ability of resource-poor countries to monitor and assess their response to these growing epidemics.

  8. The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc B; Holmes, Ann M; Ackermann, Ronald T; Murray, Michael D; Doebbeling, Caroline Carney; Katz, Barry; Li, Jingjin; Zillich, Alan; Prescott, Victoria M; Downs, Stephen M; Inui, Thomas S

    2006-01-01

    The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP) is intended to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of care for Medicaid members with congestive heart failure (chronic heart failure), diabetes, asthma, and other conditions. The ICDMP is being assembled by Indiana Medicaid primarily from state and local resources and has seven components: (1) identification of eligible participants to create regional registries, (2) risk stratification of eligible participants, (3) nurse care management for high-risk participants, (4) telephonic intervention for all participants, (5) an Internet-based information system, (6) quality improvement collaboratives for primary care practices, and (7) program evaluation. The evaluation involves a randomized controlled trial in two inner-city group practices, as well as a statewide observational design. This article describes the ICDMP, highlights challenges, and discusses approaches to its evaluation.

  9. Optimizing Chronic Disease Management Mega-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PATH-THETA Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Background As Ontario’s population ages, chronic diseases are becoming increasingly common. There is growing interest in services and care models designed to optimize the management of chronic disease. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and expected budget impact of interventions in chronic disease cohorts evaluated as part of the Optimizing Chronic Disease Management mega-analysis. Data Sources Sector-specific costs, disease incidence, and mortality were calculated for each condition using administrative databases from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Intervention outcomes were based on literature identified in the evidence-based analyses. Quality-of-life and disease prevalence data were obtained from the literature. Methods Analyses were restricted to interventions that showed significant benefit for resource use or mortality from the evidence-based analyses. An Ontario cohort of patients with each chronic disease was constructed and followed over 5 years (2006–2011). A phase-based approach was used to estimate costs across all sectors of the health care system. Utility values identified in the literature and effect estimates for resource use and mortality obtained from the evidence-based analyses were applied to calculate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Given uncertainty about how many patients would benefit from each intervention, a system-wide budget impact was not determined. Instead, the difference in lifetime cost between an individual-administered intervention and no intervention was presented. Results Of 70 potential cost-effectiveness analyses, 8 met our inclusion criteria. All were found to result in QALY gains and cost savings compared with usual care. The models were robust to the majority of sensitivity analyses undertaken, but due to structural limitations and time constraints, few sensitivity analyses were conducted. Incremental cost savings per patient who received intervention ranged between

  10. Chronic disease management: the primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Pauline; O'Brien, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This response to the essay is a "view from the trenches" by two doctors who have worked over 23 years at the Group Health Centre in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. We would agree wholeheartedly that reducing wait times for selected procedures will not transform our health system, although they are a start that does provide improved quality of life for a relatively small number of people. We have struggled with the care gap between known best practices and the reality of care provided, from the perspectives of both prevention and chronic disease management. This has resulted in an acute awareness of the need for an across-the-system, "bottom-up" approach to the prevention of disease and management of healthcare. Limited resources must be carefully leveraged in innovative ways if we are to eliminate this care gap, decrease morbidity and minimize expensive "rescue" procedures that make our system increasingly unaffordable.

  11. Sustainable chronic disease management in remote Australia.

    PubMed

    Wakerman, John; Chalmers, Elizabeth M; Humphreys, John S; Clarence, Christine L; Bell, Andrew I; Larson, Ann; Lyle, David; Pashen, Dennis R

    2005-11-21

    The Sharing Health Care Initiative (SHCI) demonstration project, which aimed to improve management of chronic diseases, was implemented in four small remote communities in the Katherine region which are serviced by the Katherine West Health Board, a remote Aboriginal-community-controlled health organisation in the Northern Territory. We reviewed the project proposal, final report, evaluation reports and transitional funding proposal, and supplemented these with in-depth interviews with key individuals. We determined factors critical to the sustainability of the SHCI project in relation to context, community engagement, systems flexibility and adaptability, the availability and effect of information systems, and the human nature of health care and policy. The project had a significant impact on community awareness of chronic disease and an improvement in clinic processes. We found that a number of interrelated factors promoted sustainability, including: An implementation strategy sufficiently flexible to take account of local conditions; A high level of community engagement; Appropriate timeframes, timing and congruence between national policy and local readiness to implement a chronic disease project; Effective communication between participating organisations; Project champions (key individuals) in participating organisations; Effective use of monitoring and evaluation data; and Adequate and ongoing funding. The absence of a number of these factors, such as poor communication, inhibited sustainability. Other factors could both promote and inhibit. For example, the impact of key individuals was important, but could be idiosyncratic and have negative effects.

  12. Building the chronic kidney disease management team.

    PubMed

    Spry, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The need to be efficient and the demands for performance-based service are changing how nephrologists deliver care. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in patients with complex medical and social problems. CKD management requires that multidisciplinary professionals provide patient education, disease management, and psychosocial support. To remain cost-efficient, many physicians are training and supervising midlevel practitioners in the delivery of specialized health care. Specialized care that meets present CKD patient needs is best delivered in a CKD clinic. Three models of CKD clinic are identified: (1) anemia management CKD clinic, (2) the basic CKD clinic, and (3) the comprehensive CKD clinic. Each clinic model is based on critical elements of staffing, billable services, and patient-focused health care. Billable services are anemia-management services, physician services that may be provided by midlevel practitioners, and medical nutrition therapy. In some cases, social worker services may be billable. Building a patient-focused clinic that offers CKD management requires planning, familiarity with federal regulations and statutes, and skillful practitioners. Making services cost-efficient and outcome oriented requires careful physician leadership, talented midlevel practitioners, and billing professionals who understand the goals of the CKD clinic. As Medicare payment reforms evolve, a well-organized CKD program can be well poised to meet the requirements of payers and congressional mandates for performance-based purchasing.

  13. Chronic disease management for patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Elizabeth

    National and international awareness of the heavy burden of chronic disease has led to the development of new strategies for managing care. Elisabeth Bryant explains how self-care, education and support for more patients with complex needs should be built into planned care delivery, and emphasises that the patient is the key member of the care team.

  14. Management of hyperkalaemia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-11-01

    Hyperkalaemia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), in part because of the effects of kidney dysfunction on potassium homeostasis and in part because of the cluster of comorbidities (and their associated treatments) that occur in patients with CKD. Owing to its electrophysiological effects, severe hyperkalaemia represents a medical emergency that usually requires prompt intervention, whereas the prevention of hazardous hyperkalaemic episodes in at-risk patients requires measures aimed at the long-term normalization of potassium homeostasis. The options for effective and safe medical interventions to restore chronic potassium balance are few, and long-term management of hyperkalaemia is primarily limited to the correction of modifiable exacerbating factors. This situation can result in a difficult trade-off in patients with CKD, because drugs that are beneficial to these patients (for example, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system antagonists) are often the most prominent cause of their hyperkalaemia. Maintaining the use of these beneficial medications while implementing various strategies to control potassium balance is desirable; however, discontinuation rates remain high. The emergence of new medications that specifically target hyperkalaemia could lead to a therapeutic paradigm shift, emphasizing preventive management over ad hoc treatment of incidentally discovered elevations in serum potassium levels.

  15. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient

  16. Improved management of chronic disease using health information technology.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Samarth, Anita; Starmer, Jack

    2007-10-11

    Technology can be used effectively to improve chronic disease management, impacting health care costs, safety, and quality. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has funded several studies to examine best practices in using technology to impact chronic disease management. These projects have employed a variety of technologies to improve care delivery processes, patient education, and continuity of care. Their stories contain valuable lessons for others looking to enhance chronic disease care.

  17. Designing patient-centric applications for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Barnes, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease are the leading causes of disability and death in the developed world. Technological interventions such as mobile applications have the ability to facilitate and motivate patients in chronic disease management, but these types of interventions present considerable design challenges. The primary objective of this paper is to present the challenges arising from the design and implementation of software applications aiming to assist patients in chronic disease management. We also outline preliminary results regarding a self-management application currently under development targeting young adults suffering from type 1 diabetes.

  18. Chronic disease prevention and management: some uncomfortable questions.

    PubMed

    Trypuc, Joann; Hudson, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Morgan, Zamora and Hindmarsh make a compelling case for a national strategy on chronic disease prevention and management. The truths raised in the lead paper are not particularly inconvenient, but they do raise a number of uncomfortable questions: (1) Why are physicians not taking a more responsible and active role to prevent and manage chronic diseases on behalf of their patients? (Physicians must recognize that it is their professional responsibility and their job to provide their patients with the appropriate level of care for chronic conditions.) (2) Why are non-physician healthcare providers not playing a larger role to prevent and manage chronic diseases? (3) Why is there a greater focus on managing chronic diseases than on preventing or delaying them from happening? (4) Have we forgotten the profound impact of the social determinants of health on illness, life expectancy and death?

  19. Online Health Communities and Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin; Royne, Marla B

    2017-03-01

    This research uses content analysis (N = 1,960) to examine the computer-mediated communication within online health communities for evidence of chronic disease self-management behaviors, including the perceived benefits and perceived barriers to participating in such behaviors. Online health communities act as informal self-management programs led by peers with the same chronic disease through the exchange of health information. Online health communities provide opportunities for health behavior change messages to educate and persuade regarding chronic disease self-management behaviors.

  20. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  1. Chronic disease self-management: improving health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nodhturft, V; Schneider, J M; Hebert, P; Bradham, D D; Bryant, M; Phillips, M; Russo, K; Goettelman, D; Aldahondo, A; Clark, V; Wagener, S

    2000-06-01

    Chronic disease has become pandemic in the United States, and estimates are that it will affect 148 million people by the year 2030. Patients with chronic illnesses cost the health care system over three times more than individuals without chronic conditions. The US Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) Sunshine HealthCare Network, composed of VA health care facilities in Florida and Puerto Rico, recognized that the needs of its increasing number of veterans with chronic diseases were unmet by traditional medical interventions. The Network implemented a chronic disease self-management pilot program to evaluate its value for the veteran population. Results of the pilot indicate that this program will make a positive, lasting change in the health status and quality of life for veterans with chronic disease.

  2. Chronic disease management and the development of virtual communities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    The current volume and expected increases in the number of patients with chronic diseases are concerned significant and substantial. Patients with chronic diseases have a great need to personally manage their health-related behaviour, such as food consumption, and its impact on their health indicators, like blood pressure, body weight, blood sugar, cholesterol, to name a few. Current healthcare systems are unable to meet the needs of patients with chronic diseases for management, due to the need for acute care. An analysis of the needs was performed and recommendations for virtual communities were made to help patients with chronic diseases monitor and manage their health. Virtual communities have the potential to meet the need to assist with monitoring activities, education, community membership, and the sale of products and services. However, they also face risks inherent to accepting and storing any form of personal health information, and of remaining in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accessibility Act of 2001.

  3. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

  4. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety.

  5. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously.

  6. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  7. [Chronic disease management: mistaken approach in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Veras, Renato Peixoto

    2012-12-01

    Lifestyle changes, including unhealthy eating habits and high rates of physical inactivity and stress, along with an increase in life expectancy have been accompanied by increasing rates of chronic non-communicable diseases. Chronic diseases are the main causes of death and disability in Brazil. Chronic disease management is one of the most important challenges facing health managers who are constantly seeking interventions and strategies to reduce costs and hospital admissions and to prevent other conditions. However, most existing models of health care have focused exclusively on disease, but it is a mistaken approach. An integrated approach is required to effectively meet patient needs. The purpose of this article was to further discuss policies and strategies for the development of new models of care for the elderly with an emphasis on prevention and resolution actions.

  8. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    PubMed

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  9. Mobile technologies and the holistic management of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Farhaan; Norris, Tony; Stockdale, Rosemary

    2008-12-01

    Ageing populations and unhealthy lifestyles have led to some chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease reaching epidemic proportions in many developed nations. This paper explores the potential of mobile technologies to improve this situation. The pervasive nature of these technologies can contribute holistically across the whole spectrum of chronic care ranging from public information access and awareness, through monitoring and treatment of chronic disease, to support for patient carers. A related study to determine the perceptions of healthcare providers to m-health confirmed the view that attitudes were likely to be more important barriers to progress than technology. A key finding concerned the importance of seamless and integrated m-health processes across the spectrum of chronic disease management.

  10. Micro Data: Wearable Devices Contribute to Improved Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andria; Parke, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Issues involving chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) are prevalent in today's aging society, and suggestions for improvement are essential to treat this patient demographic effectively. This article addresses the use of wearable devices for the medical community to improve CDPM by relying on the accumulation of micro data. For the patient, we recognize that these devices can be an effective tool to facilitate real-time monitoring of their vital signs and activity levels. With real-time monitoring and earlier responses, individuals can benefit by preventing, delaying or reducing exacerbations of chronic diseases. Use of these devices also has great benefit to the person and has the potential to decrease the individual's emergency room visits, hospital admissions and re-admissions. As patients and their healthcare providers work together to identify cumulative trends in their micro data, transitions in care planning will be enhanced, further contributing to improved chronic disease management.

  11. Self-management education and support in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    With the changing health care environment, prevalence of chronic health conditions, and burgeoning challenges of health literacy, obesity, and homelessness, self-management support provides an opportunity for clinicians to enhance effectiveness and, at the same time, to engage patients to participate in managing their own personal care. This article reviews the differences between patient education and self-management and describes easy-to-use strategies that foster patient self-management and can be used by health care providers in the medical setting. It also highlights the importance of linking patients to nonmedical programs and services in the community.

  12. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  13. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  14. Improving chronic disease management with mobile health platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Youn; Bae, Sungchul; Song, Joon Hyun; Yi, Byoung-Kee; Kim, Il Kon

    2013-01-01

    In modern society, aging and chronic disease is becoming common phenomenon due to the increasing numbers of elderly patients. To best treat this growing segment of the population, medical care should be based on constant vital sign monitoring. In this study, we propose a mobile vital sign measurement and data collection system for chronic disease management.. And we implemented a middle ware using Multi-Agent platform in SOS (Self-Organizing System) platform that transmits patient clinical data for services. We also implemented a HL7 messaging interface for interoperability of clinical data exchange. We propose health services on a self-organized software platform.

  15. [Chronic non-communicable diseases in Brazil: priorities for disease management and research].

    PubMed

    Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Chor, Dóra; Aquino, Estela M L; Bensenor, Isabela M; Mill, José Geraldo; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Vigo, Alvaro; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2012-12-01

    Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases are the main source of disease burden in Brazil. In 2011, the Brazilian Ministry of Health launched the Strategic Plan of Action for Management of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases focusing on population-based interventions to manage cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory diseases mainly through fighting tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and the harmful use of alcohol. Although a significant number of scientific studies on chronic diseases and their risk factors have been undertaken in Brazil, few are of cohort design. In this context, the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a cohort study of 15,105 Brazilian public servants reflects the reality of high prevalences of diabetes, hypertension and the main chronic diseases risk factors. The diversity of information that the Study will produce can provide important input to better understand the causes of chronic diseases and to support public policies for fighting them.

  16. The Empirical Foundations of Telemedicine Interventions for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Alverson, Dale C.; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G.; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M.; Coye, Molly J.; Doarn, Charles R.; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Kvedar, Joseph C.; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C.; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S.; Sanders, Jay H.; Watson, Andrew R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  17. The empirical foundations of telemedicine interventions for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Bashshur, Rashid L; Shannon, Gary W; Smith, Brian R; Alverson, Dale C; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M; Coye, Molly J; Doarn, Charles R; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S; Sanders, Jay H; Watson, Andrew R; Weinstein, Ronald S; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings.

  18. Chronic Disease Self-Management by People With HIV.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Karalyn; Slavin, Sean; Pitts, Marian K; Elliott, Julian H

    2016-05-01

    As HIV has transitioned into a chronic disease, reappraisal of clinical management has occurred with chronic disease self-management (CDSM) as one possibility. However, despite extensive work on CDSM across a range of diseases, little attention has focused on psychosocial contexts of the lives of people for whom programs are intended. This article reports semi-structured interviews used to explore health practices and motivations of 33 people with HIV (PWHIV) in Australia. Within participants' accounts, different forms of subjectivity and agency emerged with implications for how they understood and valued health-related behaviors. Four themes arose: health support and disclosure, social support and stigma, employment/structure, and health decisions beyond HIV. The experience of stigma and its intersection with CDSM remains relatively un-chartered. This study found stigma shapes agency and engagement with health. Decisions concerning health behaviors are often driven by perceived social and emotional benefit embedded in concerns of disclosure and stigma.

  19. Engineering for reliability in at-home chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Logan; Eschler, Jordan; Lozano, Paula; McClure, Jennifer B; Vizer, Lisa M; Ralston, James D; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chronic conditions face challenges with maintaining lifelong adherence to self-management activities. Although reminders can help support the cognitive demands of managing daily and future health tasks, we understand little of how they fit into people's daily lives. Utilizing a maximum variation sampling method, we interviewed and compared the experiences of 20 older adults with diabetes and 19 mothers of children with asthma to understand reminder use for at-home chronic disease management. Based on our participants' experiences, we contend that many self-management failures should be viewed as systems failures, rather than individual failures and non-compliance. Furthermore, we identify key principles from reliability engineering that both explain current behavior and suggest strategies to improve patient reminder systems.

  20. Gastrointestinal chronic graft-versus-host disease: management options.

    PubMed

    Awan, Farrukh; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common and debilitating condition afflicting a number of allogeneic stem cell recipients more than 100 days after their transplant. Limited options are available for the acute management of patients with severe gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms including gastric bleeding. Along with increased immunosuppression and aggressive supportive care, we report here the use of aminocaproic acid in the management of patients with GI bleeding resulting from severe GVHD. The use of aminocaproic acid enabled us to reduce the frequency and number of blood product transfusions required to manage our patient. Anti-fibrinolytic agents may therefore serve as useful adjunctive but underutilized therapy in the management of patients with severe GI chronic GVHD.

  1. Updates in the management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narsingam, Saiprasad; Bozarth, Andrew L; Abdeljalil, Asem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease state characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory process. It is increasingly recognized as a major public health problem, affecting more than 20 million adults in the US. It is also recognized as a leading cause of hospitalizations and is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) operates to promote evidence-based management of COPD, increase awareness and encourage research. In 2011, GOLD published a consensus report detailing evidence-based management strategies for COPD, which were last updated in 2015. In recent years, newer strategies and a growing number of new pharmacologic agents to treat symptoms of COPD have also been introduced and show promise in improving the management of COPD. We aim to provide an evidence-based review of the available and upcoming pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment options for stable COPD, with continued emphasis on evidence-based management.

  2. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  3. Remote home management for chronic kidney disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Liu, Xing; Li, Ying; Wu, Qiaoyu; Liu, Meilin; Yuan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background Remote home management is a new healthcare model that uses information technology to enhance patients' self-management of disease in a home setting. This study is designed to identify the effects of remote home management on patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed in January 2015. The reference listings of the included articles in this review were also manually examined. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the effects of remote home management on patients with CKD were included. Results Eight trials were identified. The results of this study suggest that the quality of life (QOL) enabled by remote home management was higher than typical care in certain dimensions. However, the effects of remote home management on blood pressure (BP) remain inconclusive. The studies that assessed health service utilization demonstrated a significant decrease in hospital readmission, emergency room visits, and number of days in the hospital. Another favorable result of this study is that regardless of their gender, age or nationality, patients tend to comply with remote home management programs and the use of related technologies. Conclusions The available data indicate that remote home management may be a novel and effective disease management strategy for improving CKD patients' QOL and influencing their attitudes and behaviors. And, relatively little is known about BP and cost-effectiveness, so future research should focus on these two aspects for the entire population of patients with CKD.

  4. Collaborative Help in Chronic Disease Management: Supporting Individualized Problems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; Ackerman, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Coping with chronic illness disease is a long and lonely journey, because the burden of managing the illness on a daily basis is placed upon the patients themselves. In this paper, we present our findings for how diabetes patient support groups help one another find individualized strategies for managing diabetes. Through field observations of face-to-face diabetes support groups, content analysis of an online diabetes community, and interviews, we found several help interactions that are critical in helping patients in finding individualized solutions. Those are: (1) patients operationalize their experiences to easily contextualize and share executable strategies; (2) operationalization has to be done within the larger context of sharing illness trajectories; and (3) the support groups develop common understanding towards diabetes management. We further discuss how our findings translate into design implications for supporting chronic illness patients in online community settings.

  5. [Disease management system in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Humar, Franco; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mazzone, Carmine; Giansante, Carlo; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare managers are more and more interested in the role of general practitioners (GP) in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Continuing adjustments of the health organization are the old/new challenge in improving patient care. The European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend a disease-management program for heart failure (HF); moreover, observational studies and randomized controlled trials have reported better patient outcomes if patients are in charge of cardiologists rather than GPs or other physicians. Patients with chronic HF are often very old and affected by multiple comorbid conditions, by themselves associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, too many patients receive neither a correct diagnosis nor treatment until advanced disease occurs. New treatment approaches, some of them requiring the expertise of well-trained cardiologists, are ongoing to improve the clinical outcomes. The optimal management of patients with HF needs teamwork, i.e. GPs, cardiologists, nurses and caregivers, since a multidisciplinary program, only, can embody the best answer for outpatients with chronic HF. Currently, the Cardiovascular Center in Trieste is performing an experimental trial, so far never attempted before, in treating patients with chronic HF using a thorough approach with the full involvement of local cardiologists, GPs and nurses. Such approach is, at the same time, as well a challenge as an opportunity: a challenge because conventional clinical habits must be changed; an opportunity because patients can benefit from a proper whole care-group, aimed at prolonging life and reducing morbidity and symptoms.

  6. Palliative care in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Laura; Mooney, Caroline; Jones, Christine

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a slow, debilitating, progressive disease and, as symptoms worsen, quality of life is affected and issues surrounding end of life arise. There are known difficulties about the healthcare professional's ability to manage this area and this is reflected in the literature. It is recognized that palliative care services for people with non-malignant diseases are not developed but this needs to be addressed. Within a London teaching hospital the COPD team has been working towards improving the standard of service offered to patients with advanced COPD using various strategies. The team's approach to this area of care focuses on quality of life by recognizing when an individual may need further support, and patients have reported that they feel their needs are being addressed. This article aims to review current evidence on the management of palliative care for patients with COPD and identify what steps have been taken by a London teaching hospital to address this issue.

  7. Quantifying functional mobility progress for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Justin; Karunanithi, Mohan; Wark, Tim; Chan, Wilbur; Colavitti, Christine

    2006-01-01

    A method for quantifying improvements in functional mobility is presented based on patient-worn accelerometer devices. For patients with cardiovascular, respiratory, or other chronic disease, increasing the amount of functional mobility is a large component of rehabilitation programs. We have conducted an observational trial on the use of accelerometers for quantifying mobility improvements in a small group of chronic disease patients (n=15, 48 - 86 yrs). Cognitive impairments precluded complex instrumentation of patients, and movement data was obtained from a single 2-axis accelerometer device worn at the hip. In our trial, movement data collected from accelerometer devices was classified into Lying vs Sitting/Standing vs Walking/Activity movements. This classification enabled the amount of walking to be quantified and graphically presented to clinicians and carers for feedback on exercise efficacy. Presenting long term trends in this data to patients also provides valuable feedback for self managed care and assisting with compliance.

  8. Management of chronic kidney disease and dialysis in homeless persons.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeff

    2013-05-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis are complicated illnesses to manage in homeless persons, who often suffer medical comorbidities, psychiatric disease, cognitive impairment and addictions; descriptions of this population and management strategies are lacking. A retrospective review of dialysis patients who were homeless or unstably housed was undertaken at an urban academic Canadian center from 2001 to 2011. Electronic hospital records were analyzed for demographic, housing, medical, and psychiatric history, dialysis history, adherence to treatment, and outcomes. Two detailed cases of homeless patients with chronic kidney disease are presented. Eleven homeless dialysis patients with a mean age of 52.7±12.3 years, mostly men and mostly from minority groups were dialyzed for 41.1±29.2 months. Most resided permanently in shelters, eventually obtained fistula access, and were adherent to dialysis schedules. Patients were often nonadherent to pre-dialysis management, resulting in emergency starts. Many barriers to care for homeless persons with end-stage kidney disease and on dialysis are identified, and management strategies are highlighted. Adherence is optimized with shelter-based health care and intensive team-oriented case management.

  9. [Self-Management in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chou-Ping; Lu, Yung-Chuan; Hung, Shih-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients typically self-manage their disease-care program. Self-management requires the investment of considerable time and energy in health management and in following the multifaceted CKD treatment regimen. CKD, a progressive disease, is classified into five stages that correspond to the five stages of decline in kidney function, as measured using the glomerular filtration rate (GRF). Each of these stages requires that a patient modify his / her lifestyle and shoulder the responsibility for day-to-day health management tasks. Key to promoting self-management is the partnership and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients. Tasks in this partnership include patient assessment and communication, regimen adherence, emotional management, negotiation of care plans, and the enhancement of self-efficacy, with the aims of creating positive changes in behavior, promoting correct symptoms interpretation and reporting, and promoting the appropriate use of resources. Nurses may help patients maneuver this initially frightening and sometimes difficult terrain with strategies that are tailored to each CKD stage.

  10. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making.

  11. Pregnancy management and outcome in women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bili, E; Tsolakidis, D; Stangou, S; Tarlatzis, B

    2013-04-01

    An increasing number of pregnancies occur in the presence of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), mainly including chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), and lupus nephritis (LN). The most important factor affecting fetal and maternal prognosis is the degree of renal function at conception. In the majority of patients with mild renal function impairment, and well-controlled blood pressure, pregnancy is usually successful and does not alter the natural course of maternal renal disease. Conversely, fetal outcome and long-term maternal renal function might be seriously threatened by pregnancy in women with moderate or severe renal function impairment. The last few years, advances in our knowledge about the interaction of pregnancy and renal function resulted in the improvement of fetal outcome in patients with chronic renal failure and also in the management of pregnant women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) maintained on dialysis. However, women with impaired renal function and those on dialysis should be carefully counseled about the risks of pregnancy.

  12. Community-based partnerships for improving chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Plumb, James; Weinstein, Lara Carson; Brawer, Rickie; Scott, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    With the growing burden of chronic disease, the medical and public health communities are re-examining their roles and opportunities for more effective prevention and clinical interventions. The potential to significantly improve chronic disease prevention and have an impact on morbidity and mortality from chronic conditions is enhanced by adopting strategies that incorporate a social ecology perspective, realigning the patient-physician relationship, integrating population health perspectives into the Chronic Care Model, and effectively engaging communities using established principles of community engagement.

  13. Erectile dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Varouktsi, Anna; Lazaridis, Antonios; Boutari, Chrysoula; Doumas, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is encountered in millions of people worldwide, with continuously rising incidence during the past decades, affecting their quality of life despite the increase of life expectancy in these patients. Disturbance of sexual function is common among men with CKD, as both conditions share common pathophysiological causes, such as vascular or hormonal abnormalities and are both affected by similar coexisting comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The estimated prevalence of erectile dysfunction reaches 70% in end stage renal disease patients. Nevertheless, sexual dysfunction remains under-recognized and under-treated in a high proportion of these patients, a fact which should raise awareness among clinicians. A multifactorial approach in management and treatment is undoubtedly required in order to improve patients’ quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26167462

  14. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  15. Chronic disease management: it's time for transformational change!

    PubMed

    Muttitt, Sarah C; Alvarez, Richard C

    2007-01-01

    The authors of the lead essay present a compelling case for the development and implementation of a national strategy on chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM). The literature demonstrates that the Chronic Care Model can improve quality and reduce costs. Substantial evidence supports the role of health information technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) in achieving these goals. However, an interoperable pan-Canadian health infostructure does not exist; funding is required to establish this across the continuum of care. An investment of $350 per capita would provide a robust health technology platform to support a national CDPM strategy. Such an investment would deliver annual benefits of $6-$7.6 billion; this could be leveraged to support national healthcare priorities such as CDPM. EHRs will improve decisions about care, reduce system errors and increase efficiency. They will also improve our ability to measure, assess and manage care. We cannot run a high-performing health system without sound data. This was a key step to enabling progress on wait times management. Leadership is required if a national CDPM strategy is to become reality. The authors made a convincing case for the development of a national strategy; we need to turn their words into actionable events to gain necessary momentum.

  16. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD.

  17. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  18. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary.

  19. The nursing contribution to chronic disease management: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Angus; While, Alison

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the nature of the nursing contribution to chronic disease management (CDM) and identifies a number of key nursing activities within CDM both at the individual patient and care system levels. The activities were identified following a detailed review of the literature (160 reports and studies of nursing practice) relating to three tracer disorders: diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple sclerosis. The paper examines these activities collectively to generate models expressing some of the core functions of nursing within CDM. The paper illustrates some of the changing characteristics of nursing roles within CDM. More fundamentally, the paper questions the position of nursing in relation to the technologies that define CDM systems and proposes four levels of contribution: the nurse as technology; the nurse as technologist; the nurse as system engineer; and the nurse as architect. These different levels reflect distinctions in the nature of the nursing gaze and power relations within the health care workforce. The paper also highlights how nurses are failing to develop the evidence for their practice in CDM. The paper concludes that there is a need for some clear principles to guide clinical practice and encourage innovation in CDM. It is argued that the principles should not be rule-bound but define a distinctive nursing gaze that will position the nursing profession within the health care system and in relation to other professions. The gaze should incorporate the needs of the individual patient and the care system that they inhabit.

  20. Better for ourselves and better for our patients: chronic disease management in primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Every, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, implemented a system-wide chronic disease management model to support people with chronic disease and their primary care physicians. Groups of family physicians, in partnership with the health region, developed primary care networks to provide services that are customized to meet the priorities of the local community. Management of chronic disease is a cornerstone service, and diabetes management is the most fully developed program. Key to its success are standardized protocols, consistent follow-up and patient education by trained primary care nurses. This model will be used as a template for the management of other chronic diseases.

  1. [Case management for school students with chronic disease: the current situation and future direction].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Hsia; Chen, I-Ju; Yu, Shu

    2005-04-01

    This paper aims to investigate the importance of management of chronic illness in schools epidemiological data. By examining the current state of such management, we found that school nurses, family members, mentors and school administrators lack sufficient knowledge to conduct effective case management for students with chronic diseases. This paper seeks to indicate principles for the conduct of case management of chronic disease in Taiwan. Incorporating practices, regulations, information systems, policy, and evaluation systems, recommendations are made with the hope that a well-planned system of case management of chronic disease can be established in schools to further enhance the quality of health care and life generally for school children.

  2. Smart garments in chronic disease management: progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the progress made developments in the area of Smart Garments for chronic disease management over last 10 years. A large number of health monitoring smart garments and wearable sensors have been manufactured to monitor patient's physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation, while patient is not in hospital. In last few years with the advancement in smartphones and cloud computing it is now possible to send the measure physiological data to any desired location. However there are many challenges in the development of smart garment systems. The two major challenges are development of new lightweight power sources and there is a need for global standardization and a road map for development of smart garments. In this paper we will discuss current state-of-theart smart garments and wearable sensor systems. Also discussed will be the new emerging trends in smart garment research and development.

  3. Use of chronic disease management programs for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, David J.T.; Sargious, Peter; Lewanczuk, Richard; McBrien, Kerry; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the types of chronic disease management (CDM) programs offered for patients with diabetes in Alberta's primary care networks (PCNs). Design A survey was administered to PCNs to determine the types of CDM programs offered for patients with diabetes; CDM programs were organized into categories by their resource intensity and effectiveness. Results of the survey were reported using frequencies and percentages. Setting Alberta has recently created PCNs—groups of family physicians who receive additional funds to enable them to support activities that fall outside the typical physician-based fee-for-service model, but which address specified objectives including CDM. It is currently unknown what additional programs are being provided through the PCN supplemental funding. Participants A survey was administered to the individual responsible for CDM in each PCN. This included executive directors, chronic disease managers, and CDM nurses. Main outcome measures We determined the CDM strategies used in each PCN to care for patients with diabetes, whether they were available to all patients, and whether the services were provided exclusively by the PCN or in conjunction with other agencies. Results There was considerable variation across PCNs with respect to the CDM programs offered for people with diabetes. Nearly all PCNs used multidisciplinary teams (which could include nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists) and patient education. Fewer than half of the PCNs permitted personnel other than the primary physician to write or alter prescriptions for medications. Conclusion Alberta's PCNs have successfully established many different types of CDM programs. Multidisciplinary care teams, which are among the most effective CDM strategies, are currently being used by most of Alberta's PCNs. PMID:23418263

  4. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Chan-Yeung, M; Aït-Khaled, N; White, N; Tsang, K W; Tan, W C

    2004-02-01

    This review examines whether the comprehensive programme recommended by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD), developed mostly by physicians in industrialised countries, can be applied in developing countries. In developing countries, there are several major limitations to the implementation of the programme. First, management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is not a priority in competing for health care resources. Second, only major medical centres in developing countries have spirometers; the reliance on spirometric testing for diagnosis, staging and treatment options, as recommended by the GOLD guidelines, makes it almost impossible for the programme to be implemented. Third, in many Asian and African countries, regular monitoring is often restricted to patients with severe COPD who have frequent hospitalisations or clinic visits for exacerbations and complications. Fourth, the choice of therapy usually depends on the availability and cost of drugs. Finally, given the aetiological role of sequelae of lung infections, including tuberculosis, the appropriateness and safety of using intermittent courses of oral steroids during acute exacerbations and of long-term, high-dose inhaled corticosteroids for moderate to severe COPD in developing countries has not been evaluated. Developing countries in Asia and Africa may need to adapt the GOLD guidelines according to varying aetiology, local health care resources, socio-economic and cultural factors and development of health services. Prevention programmes, especially for tobacco control, are of paramount importance. National and international efforts must be directed towards controlling the tobacco epidemic in developing countries to reduce the burden of COPD and other tobacco-induced diseases.

  5. Building a multicenter telehealth network to advance chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Khairat, Saif; Wijesinghe, Namal; Wolfson, Julian; Scott, Rob; Simkus, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The use of telehealth solutions has proved to improve clinical management of chronic diseases, expand access to healthcare services and clinicians, and reduce healthcare-related costs. The project aims at improving Heart Failure (HF) management through the utilization of a Telemedicine and Personal Health Records systems that will assist HF specialist in Colombo, Sri Lanka to monitor and consult with remote HF patients. A telehealth network will be built at an international site that connects five remote telehealth clinics to a central clinic at a major University Hospital in Sri Lanka where HF specialists are located. In this study, 200 HF patients will be recruited for nine months, 100 patients will be randomly selected for the treatment group and the other 100 will be selected for the control group. Pre, mid, and post study surveys will be conducted to assess the efficacy and satisfaction levels of patients with both care models. Moreover, clinical outcomes will be collected to evaluate the impact of the intervention on the treatment patients compared to control patients. The research aims at enhancing Heart Failure management through eliminating current health challenges and healthcare-related financial burdens.

  6. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Simon DS; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury – a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context. PMID:27822135

  7. e_Disease Management. A system for the management of the chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Sergio; Meneu, Maria Teresa; Serafin, Riccardo; Arredondo, Maria Teresa; Castellano, Elena; Valdivieso, Bernardo

    2010-01-01

    Disease Management (DM) is a system of coordinated healthcare intervention and communications for populations with conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. e-DM makes reference to processes of DM based on clinical guidelines sustained in the scientific medical evidence and supported by the intervention of Information and Telecommunication Technology (ICT) in all levels where these plans are developed. This paper discusses the design and implementation of a e-DM system which meets the requirements for the integrated chronic disease management following the recommendations of the Disease Management Association and the American Heart Association.

  8. National Study of Chronic Disease Self-Management: Age Comparison of Outcome Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, Marcia G.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Jiang, Luohua; Lorig, Kate; Whitelaw, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The adult population is increasingly experiencing one or more chronic illnesses and living with such conditions longer. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) helps participants cope with chronic disease-related symptomatology and improve their health-related quality of life. Nevertheless, the long-term effectiveness of…

  9. Physician attitudes towards chronic disease management in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Begley, Charles E

    2012-05-01

    Whereas physician support of disease management (DM) is recognized as important for improving the quality and effectiveness of care of individuals with chronic illness, little is known about physicians' perceptions of the model or their likelihood of adoption. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted of a 2008 nationally representative sample of practising physicians in the USA who had been exposed to DM programmes (n = 1615) to determine their support for DM and how attitudes differ across physicians. Results indicated that the majority of physicians believe in the quality enhancing benefits of DM programmes, but there are systematic differences in the attitudes towards DM of different types of physicians. Physicians affiliated with health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and hospital-based practices are more likely than other physicians to agree that DM programmes improve their ability to provide high-quality care to patients with chronic conditions. Minority physicians and physicians who perceive their market as more competitive, have a more positive attitude towards DM than white physicians and physicians in less competitive markets. International medical graduates hold relatively positive attitudes about the benefits of DM programmes and older physicians are more likely than their young peers to approve of DM and physicians. Physicians with a higher percentage of patients with chronic conditions are more likely to have a favourable view of DM. Specialty physicians are more likely to have a positive view of DM, and DM-exposed physicians are more likely to perceive that DM programmes lead to improved quality of care. Future study is needed to determine the reasons for these differences in attitudes and whether they can be modified by targeted information.

  10. App Chronic Disease Checklist: Protocol to Evaluate Mobile Apps for Chronic Disease Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Background The availability of mobile health apps for self-care continues to increase. While little evidence of their clinical impact has been published, there is general agreement among health authorities and authors that consumers’ use of health apps assist in self-management and potentially clinical decision making. A consumer’s sustained engagement with a health app is dependent on the usability and functionality of the app. While numerous studies have attempted to evaluate health apps, there is a paucity of published methods that adequately recognize client experiences in the academic evaluation of apps for chronic conditions. Objective This paper reports (1) a protocol to shortlist health apps for academic evaluation, (2) synthesis of a checklist to screen health apps for quality and reliability, and (3) a proposed method to theoretically evaluate usability of health apps, with a view towards identifying one or more apps suitable for clinical assessment. Methods A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) flow diagram was developed to guide the selection of the apps to be assessed. The screening checklist was thematically synthesized with reference to recurring constructs in published checklists and related materials for the assessment of health apps. The checklist was evaluated by the authors for face and construct validity. The proposed method for evaluation of health apps required the design of procedures for raters of apps, dummy data entry to test the apps, and analysis of raters’ scores. Results The PRISMA flow diagram comprises 5 steps: filtering of duplicate apps; eliminating non-English apps; removing apps requiring purchase, filtering apps not updated within the past year; and separation of apps into their core functionality. The screening checklist to evaluate the selected apps was named the App Chronic Disease Checklist, and comprises 4 sections with 6 questions in each section. The validity check verified

  11. The South Australia Health Chronic Disease Self-Management Internet Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; Ritter, Philip L.; Plant, Kathryn; Laurent, Diana D.; Kelly, Pauline; Rowe, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an online chronic disease self-management program for South Australia residents. Method: Data were collected online at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. The intervention was an asynchronous 6-week chronic disease self-management program offered online. The authors measured eight health status measures,…

  12. Outpatient Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Management: Going for the GOLD.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Christina R; Peters, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States with a burden of $50 billion in direct health care costs. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) defines airflow obstruction as spirometry where the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity after bronchodilation is less than 0.70. The guidelines also provided graded recommendations on current therapy for COPD. Treatment can be guided based on severity of disease and severity of symptoms. We review the GOLD guidelines to provide an overview of treatment modalities aimed at improving lung function, reducing hospitalization, and reducing mortality.

  13. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  14. "It's not my problem" (yet). With readmissions under the microscope, CIOs know chronic disease management is moving front and center.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Daphne

    2009-09-01

    Chronic disease management is a system initiative, not just for primary care or ambulatory. The business case is currently poor for chronic disease management, but may soon change due to reform. Chronic disease management can help prevent costly readmissions. Care management plans are often a component of an EMR.

  15. A Chronic Disease Prevention and Management Corridor© to Supporting System-Level Transformations for Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sampalli, Tara; Christian, Erin; Edwards, Lynn; Ryer, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Improving care for chronic conditions requires system-level transformations to ensure multiple levels of adoption and sustainability of the implemented improvements. These comprehensive solutions require transformations and supports at various levels, leadership and process changes at service/program level. Recognizing the importance of an organization-wide strategy to mitigate the growing issue of chronic disease prevention and management, a novel system-level approach has been developed in a district health authority in Nova Scotia, Canada. In this paper, the contextual factors and efforts that led to the conceptual framework of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Management (CDPM) "Corridor©" to management of chronic conditions are discussed. The CDPM Corridor© essentially constitutes a system-level redesign process; common elements, tools and resources; and a hub of supports for chronic disease prevention and management. The CDPM Corridor

  16. Diagnosis and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Roy O; Bangalore, Sripal; Lavelle, Michael P; Pellikka, Patricia A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Boden, William E; Asif, Arif

    2016-12-28

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, likely reflecting the presence of traditional risk factors. A greater distinguishing feature of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in CKD is the severity of the disease, which is reflective of an increase in inflammatory mediators and vascular calcification secondary to hyperparathyroidism of renal origin that are unique to patients with CKD. Additional components of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease that are prominent in patients with CKD include microvascular disease and myocardial fibrosis. Therapeutic interventions that minimize cardiovascular events related to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD, as determined by well-designed clinical trials, are limited to statins. Data are lacking regarding other available therapeutic measures primarily due to exclusion of patients with CKD from major trials studying cardiovascular disease. Data from well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to guide clinicians who care for this high-risk population in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease to improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  18. Nutritional and metabolic modulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M W J

    2003-11-01

    In this paper the perspective for nutritional modulation of systemic impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is discussed. Progressive weight loss is characterised by disease-specific elevated energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Weight gain per se can be achieved by caloric supplementation while future studies may prove efficacy of amino acid modulation to stimulate protein synthesis and enhance muscle anabolism. Disproportionate muscle wasting resembles the cachexia syndrome as described in other chronic wasting diseases (cancer, chronic heart failure, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)). There is yet no adequate nutritional strategy available to treat cachexia in COPD. Muscle substrate metabolism has hardly been investigated, but the few data available point towards a decreased fat oxidative capacity that may show similarities with the "metabolic syndrome" as described in type II diabetes and obesity and could theoretically benefit from polyunsaturated fatty acid modulation. To adequately target the different therapeutic options, clearly more clinical (intervention) studies are needed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that are adequately characterised by local and systemic impairment and in which molecular and metabolic markers are linked to functional outcome.

  19. National disease management plans for key chronic non-communicable diseases in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, C C

    2002-07-01

    In Singapore, chronic, non-communicable diseases, namely coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer, account for more than 60% of all deaths and a high burden of disability and healthcare expenditure. The burden of these diseases is likely to rise with our rapidly ageing population and changing lifestyles, and will present profound challenges to our healthcare delivery and financing systems over the next 20 to 30 years. The containment and optimal management of these conditions require a strong emphasis on patient education and the development of integrated models of healthcare delivery in place of the present uncoordinated, compartmentalised way of delivering healthcare. To meet these challenges, the Ministry of Health's major thrusts are disease control measures which focus mainly on primary prevention; and disease management, which coordinates the national effort to reduce the incidence of these key diseases and their predisposing factors and to ameliorate their long-term impact by optimising control to reduce mortality, morbidity and complications, and improving functional status through rehabilitation. The key initiatives include restructuring of the public sector healthcare institutions into two clusters, each comprising a network of primary health care polyclinics, regional hospitals and tertiary institutions. The functional integration of these healthcare elements within each cluster under a common senior administrative and professional management, and the development of common clinical IT systems will greatly facilitate the implementation of disease management programmes. Secondly, the Ministry is establishing National Disease Registries in coronary heart disease, cancer, stroke, myopia and kidney failure, which will be valuable sources of clinical and outcomes data. Thirdly, in partnership with expert groups, national committees and professional agencies, the Ministry will produce clinical practice guidelines which will assist doctors and healthcare

  20. Dyslipidemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: etiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Žutelija, Marta; Mavrinac, Vojko; Orlic, Lidija

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including those with end-stage renal disease, treated with dialysis, or renal transplant recipients have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Dyslipidemia, often present in this patient population, is an important risk factor for CVD development. Specific quantitative and qualitative changes are seen at different stages of renal impairment and are associated with the degree of glomerular filtration rate declining. Patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD have low high-density lipoproteins (HDL), normal or low total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides as well as increased apolipoprotein B (apoB), lipoprotein(a) (Lp (a)), intermediate- and very-low-density lipoprotein (IDL, VLDL; “remnant particles”), and small dense LDL particles. In patients with nephrotic syndrome lipid profile is more atherogenic with increased TC, LDL, and triglycerides. Lipid profile in hemodialysis (HD) patients is usually similar to that in non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients. Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) have more altered dyslipidemia compared to HD patients, which is more atherogenic in nature. These differences may be attributed to PD per se but may also be associated with the selection of dialytic modality. In renal transplant recipients, TC, LDL, VLDL, and triglycerides are elevated, whereas HDL is significantly reduced. Many factors can influence post-transplant dyslipidemia including immunosuppressive agents. This patient population is obviously at high risk; hence, prompt diagnosis and management are required to improve their clinical outcomes. Various studies have shown statins to be effective in the cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with mild-to-moderate CKD as well as in renal transplant recipients. However, according to recent clinical randomized controlled trials (4D, A Study to Evaluate the Use of Rosuvastatin in Subjects on

  1. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  2. Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan Albert; Blanco, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic pulmonary diseases, especially in advanced disease, and is associated with greater mortality and worse clinical course. Patients with symptoms that exceed those expected by their pulmonary disease should be further evaluated by echocardiography. Confirmatory right heart catheterization is indicated in those conditions where the results of the hemodynamic assessment will determine treatment options. The treatment of choice for patients who are hypoxemic and have pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung disease is long-term oxygen therapy. Conventional vasodilators or drugs approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension are not recommended in patients with mild-to-moderate PH because they may impair gas exchange and because there is a lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Patients with severe PH should be considered for referral to a center with expertise in PH and lung diseases. Ideally, these patients should be included in randomized controlled trials to determine which patients are more likely to derive benefit and which therapies are most likely to be successful.

  3. Alberta Healthy Living Program--a model for successful integration of chronic disease management services.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Louise; Britten, Judith; Davachi, Shahnaz; Knight, Holly

    2013-08-01

    The most common presentation of chronic disease is multimorbidity. Disease management strategies are similar across most chronic diseases. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity and the commonality in approaches, fragmented single disease management must be replaced with integrated care of the whole person. The Alberta Healthy Living Program, a community-based chronic disease management program, supports adults with, or at risk for, chronic disease to improve their health and well being. Participants gain confidence and skills in how to manage their chronic disease(s) by learning to understand their health condition, make healthy eating choices, exercise safely and cope emotionally. The program includes 3 service pillars: disease-specific and general health patient education, disease-spanning supervised exercise and Better Choices, Better Health(TM) self-management workshops. Services are delivered in the community by an interprofessional team and can be tailored to target specific diverse and vulnerable populations, such as Aboriginal, ethno-cultural and francophone groups and those experiencing homelessness. Programs may be offered as a partnership between Alberta Health Services, primary care and community organizations. Common standards reduce provincial variation in care, yet maintain sufficient flexibility to meet local and diverse needs and achieve equity in care. The model has been implemented successfully in 108 communities across Alberta. This approach is associated with reduced acute care utilization and improved clinical indicators, and achieves efficiencies through an integrated, disease-spanning patient-centred approach.

  4. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view.

  5. The net fiscal impact of a chronic disease management program: Indiana Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann M; Ackermann, Ronald D; Zillich, Alan J; Katz, Barry P; Downs, Stephen M; Inui, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 the Indiana Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning implemented the Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP). This paper reports on the fiscal impact of the ICDMP from the state's perspective, as estimated from the outcomes of a randomized trial. Medicaid members with congestive heart failure (CHF) or diabetes, or both, were randomly assigned by practice site to chronic disease management services or standard care. The effect of the ICDMP varied by disease group and risk class: while cost savings were achieved in the CHF subgroup, disease management targeted to patients with only diabetes resulted in no significant fiscal impact.

  6. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients.

  7. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Puspitasari, Hanni P.; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5) and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15) in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care. PMID:26445618

  8. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  9. Hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Hadtstein, Charlotte; Schaefer, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is very common in children with all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While fluid overload and activation of the renin-angiotensin system have long been recognized as crucial pathophysiological pathways, sympathetic hyperactivation, endothelial dysfunction and chronic hyperparathyroidism have more recently been identified as important factors contributing to CKD-associated hypertension. Moreover, several drugs commonly administered in CKD, such as erythropoietin, glucocorticoids and cyclosporine A, independently raise blood pressure in a dose-dependent fashion. Because of the deleterious consequences of hypertension on the progression of renal disease and cardiovascular outcomes, an active screening approach should be adapted in patients with all stages of CKD. Before one starts antihypertensive treatment, non-pharmacological options should be explored. In hemodialysis patients a low salt diet, low dialysate sodium and stricter dialysis towards dry weight can often achieve adequate blood pressure control. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are first-line therapy for patients with proteinuria, due to their additional anti-proteinuric properties. Diuretics are a useful alternative for non-proteinuric patients or as an add-on to renin-angiotensin system blockade. Multiple drug therapy is often needed to maintain blood pressure below the 90th percentile target, but adequate blood pressure control is essential for better renal and cardiovascular long-term outcomes.

  10. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and Self-Efficacy at Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community…

  11. IGEA--a chronic disease management project for people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Chronic diseases can be prevented and controlled using available knowledge. Moreover, the solutions are not only effective but can be highly cost-effective. Chronic care model and disease management have emerged, in the last decades, as new models of care delivery. The two models share the objective of improving the quality of care for people with chronic diseases while optimizing health care expenditure. In Italy, within the National Prevention Plan, the Italian Centre for Disease Prevention and Control of the Ministry of Health, and the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) are developing the IGEA project, which defines a comprehensive strategy for implementing a chronic disease management intervention for people with diabetes.

  12. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  13. Unravelling the Tensions Between Chronic Disease Management and End-of-Life Planning.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally; Roberts, Della; Sawatzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    An increasing appreciation for the burden that chronic conditions represent for people and for societies has triggered an evolving body of popular and professional conceptualizations of the nature of the chronic disease challenge. In this discussion article, we trace the trajectory of thinking about chronic illness care, surfacing underlying assumptions and drivers that have shaped current dominant models of service delivery. We note significant gaps in these conceptualizations, especially with respect to the reality that many chronic conditions are life limiting. Contrasting chronic disease theorizing with the conversations that have arisen around end-of-life care for other kinds of health conditions, we argue for a shift in our thinking to accommodate the implications of life limitation in our service delivery planning. We see significant leadership potential in optimizing the role nurses can play across the chronic disease trajectory by integrating the healthy optimism of self-care management with the profound compassion of a person-centered palliative approach.

  14. In the Netherlands, rich interaction among professionals conducting disease management led to better chronic care.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-11-01

    Disease management programs based on the Chronic Care Model are expected to improve the quality of chronic care delivery. However, evidence to date for such improvement and how it is achieved is scarce. In 2010 and again in 2011, we surveyed professionals in twenty-two primary care practices in the Netherlands that had implemented the Chronic Care Model of disease management beginning in 2009. The responses showed that, over time, chronic illness care delivery improved to advanced levels. The gains were attributed primarily to improved relational coordination-that is, raising the quality of communication and task integration among professionals from diverse disciplines who share common objectives. These findings may have implications for other disease management efforts by collaborative care teams, in that they suggest that diverse health care professionals must be strongly connected to provide effective, holistic care.

  15. Using online health communication to manage chronic sorrow: mothers of children with rare diseases speak.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Adriana D

    2015-01-01

    Families affected by rare disease experience psychosocial reactions similar to families with prevalent chronic diseases. The ability to respond and manage the condition depends on psychosocial factors. This phenomenological study of 16 mothers of children with Alagille syndrome explored their lived experience in using online health communications to manage their chronic sorrow. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews analyzed using techniques described by van Manen. Analysis yielded four essential themes: connectedness, online triggers, empowerment, and seasons of online use contributed to online communication essential to a rare disease community. Findings suggest mothers need emotional support and help accessing appropriate online resources.

  16. Adapting Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii's Multicultural Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients' ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the "track changes" tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components…

  17. Chronic disease self-management: views among older adults of Chinese descent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Matthews, Judith Tabolt

    2010-01-01

    To understand how Chinese culture influences chronic disease self-management, we conducted focus groups with older adults of Chinese descent. Specifically, we explored their perceptions and self-management practices regarding treatment adherence, lifestyle decisions, and patient-provider communication within the context of their culture.

  18. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person's ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient's current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient's skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level.

  19. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person’s ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient’s current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient’s skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level. PMID:28182172

  20. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  1. Renocardiovascular Biomarkers: from the Perspective of Managing Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Niizuma, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Takaharu; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    Mortality among the patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains high because of the very high incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as coronary artery disease, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. Identifying CVD in patients with CKD/ESRD remains a significant hurdle and the early diagnosis and therapy for CVD is crucial in these patients. Therefore, it is necessary for the better management to identify and utilize cardiovascular (CV) biomarkers in profiling CVD risk and enabling stratification of early mortality. This review summarizes current evidence about renocardiovascular biomarkers: CV biomarkers in patients with CKD as well as with ESRD, emphasizing on the emerging biomarkers: B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponins, copeptin, the biomarker of renal injury (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), and the mineral and bone disorder hormone/marker (fibroblast growth factor-23). Furthermore, it discusses their potential roles especially in ESRD and in future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for CVD in the context of managing cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:28321399

  2. Chronic disease prevention and management: implications for health human resources in 2020.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Margo; Green, Esther; Sullivan, Terrence; Greenberg, Anna; Mai, Verna

    2008-01-01

    Through improved screening, detection, better and more targeted therapies and the uptake of evidence-based treatment guidelines, cancers are becoming chronic diseases. However, this good-news story has implications for human resource planning and resource allocation. Population-based chronic disease management is a necessary approach to deal with the growing burden of chronic disease in Canada. In this model, an interdisciplinary team works with and educates the patient to monitor symptoms, modify behaviours and self-manage the disease between acute episodes. In addition, the community as a whole is more attuned to disease prevention and risk factor management. Trusted, high-quality evidence-based protocols and healthy public policies that have an impact on the entire population are needed to minimize the harmful effects of chronic disease. Assuming we can overcome the challenges in recruitment, training and new role development, enlightened healthcare teams and community members will work together to maintain the population's health and wellness and to reduce the incidence and burden of chronic disease in Ontario.

  3. New Strategies for Anaemia Management in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and iron therapy are the standard of care for normocytic normochromic anaemia, which is a frequent comorbidity of patients with chronic kidney disease. In a large percentage of patients, ESAs and iron increase haemoglobin levels, thus reducing the risk of blood transfusions and improving patient quality of life. However, randomised trials have raised some concerns about higher haemoglobin targets and/or high ESA dose use. These concerns include higher cardiovascular and thrombosis risk, cancer progression, and increased mortality. A more cautious approach was then advised and partial anaemia correction (haemoglobin 10-12 g/dl) is now strongly suggested. The clinical concerns about ESAs and economic constraints have led to larger intravenous iron use. However, severe anaphylactic reactions, although infrequent, can occur and excessive iron use may be dangerous as well, possibly causing iron overload. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with theoretically better activity and safety, and/or easier manufacturing processes as compared to available ESAs. These include drugs manipulating the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) system, which stimulates the endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) production and avoids unphysiological EPO plasma levels. Several phase I and II studies support the beneficial role of augmenting HIFs to stimulate erythropoiesis. Here we give an update on this new investigational strategy.

  4. The Impact of a Telephone-Based Chronic Disease Management Program on Medical Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Talens, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of a payer-provided telephone-based chronic disease management program on medical expenditures was evaluated using claims data from 126,245 members in employer self-ensured health plans (16,224 with a chronic disease in a group enrolled in the self-management program, 13,509 with a chronic disease in a group not participating in the program). A random effects regression model controlling for retrospective risk, age, sex, and diagnosis with a chronic disease was used to determine the impact of program participation on market-adjusted health care expenditures. Further confirmation of results was obtained by an ordinary least squares model comparing market- and risk-adjusted costs to the length of participation in the program. Participation in the program is associated with an average annual savings of $1157.91 per enrolled member in health care expenditures. Savings increase with the length of participation in the program. The results support the use of telephone-based patient self-management of chronic disease as a cost-effective means to reduce health care expenditures in the working-age population. (Population Health Management 2016;19:156–162) PMID:26348843

  5. The Impact of a Telephone-Based Chronic Disease Management Program on Medical Expenditures.

    PubMed

    Avery, George; Cook, David; Talens, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The impact of a payer-provided telephone-based chronic disease management program on medical expenditures was evaluated using claims data from 126,245 members in employer self-ensured health plans (16,224 with a chronic disease in a group enrolled in the self-management program, 13,509 with a chronic disease in a group not participating in the program). A random effects regression model controlling for retrospective risk, age, sex, and diagnosis with a chronic disease was used to determine the impact of program participation on market-adjusted health care expenditures. Further confirmation of results was obtained by an ordinary least squares model comparing market- and risk-adjusted costs to the length of participation in the program. Participation in the program is associated with an average annual savings of $1157.91 per enrolled member in health care expenditures. Savings increase with the length of participation in the program. The results support the use of telephone-based patient self-management of chronic disease as a cost-effective means to reduce health care expenditures in the working-age population. (Population Health Management 2016;19:156-162).

  6. Pain management in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Chi T.; Toscano, Edgar; Pham, Phuong-Mai T.; Pham, Phuong-Anh T.; Pham, Son V.; Pham, Phuong-Thu T.

    2009-01-01

    Pain has been reported to be a common problem in the general population and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Although similar data for pre-ESRD patients are lacking, we recently reported that the prevalence of pain is also very high (>70%) among pre-ESRD patients at a Los Angeles County tertiary referral centre. The high prevalence of pain in the CKD population is particularly concerning because pain has been shown to be associated with poor quality of life. Of greater concern, poor quality of life, at least in dialysis patients, has been shown to be associated with poor survival. We herein discuss the pathophysiology of common pain conditions, review a commonly accepted approach to the management of pain in the general population, and discuss analgesic-induced renal complications and therapeutic issues specific for patients with reduced renal function. PMID:25949305

  7. [Western and traditional Chinese medicine disease management programs of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhaoming; Sheng, Xiaogang; Pan, Guangming

    2012-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is one of the greatest disease in modem medicine as chronic disease . It cost lots of financial resources to deal with. Western and traditional Chinese medicine Disease management programs (DMP) can notability improve the qualities of life and reduce the expenses for CHF. The disease management programs of CHF have achieved kind of success, but the management programs method witch is of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) characteristic idea carry into testing execution in few TCM hospitals only. This article review the necessary of DMP research, advances in research of DMP research, and relationship between management programs method of Western and traditional Chinese medicine and illness state improvement of CHF patients.

  8. Organizational technologies of chronic disease management programs in large rural multispecialty group practice systems.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Larry; Bolin, Jane Nelson; Kash, Bita A

    2005-01-01

    Four large rural multispecialty group practice systems employ a mix of organizational technologies to provide chronic disease management with measurable impacts on their patient populations and costs. Four technologies-administrative, clinical, information, and social-are proposed as key dimensions for examining disease management programs. The benefits of disease management are recognized by these systems despite marked variability in the organization of the programs. Committees spanning health plans and clinics in the 4 systems and electronic medical records and/or other disease management information systems are important coordinating mechanisms. Increased reliance on nurses for patient education and care coordination in all 4 systems reflects significant extension of clinical and social technologies in the management of patient care. The promise of disease management as offered by these systems and other auspices are considered.

  9. [Using the health literacy concept to promote self-management in a chronic kidney disease patient].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-Hui; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must learn and use self-management skills to control their disease and delay disease progression. Comprehension of instructions is thus critical to integrating self-management principles into daily life. In this case report, the client had difficulty implementing the behavioral changes necessary to control diet and blood sugar due to the lack of proper and sufficient information. The authors applied health literacy concepts to assess the client's knowledge and skills related to disease control and then provided health teaching at a level appropriate to the client's health literacy level. This individualized care enhanced the client's confidence and motivation to implement self-care activities. Healthcare professionals should help patients overcome barriers to reading and verbal communication to help low-health-literacy patients successfully self-manage their chronic disease. Clients may thus learn to report their symptoms clearly and accurately.

  10. CEDRIC: A Computerized Chronic Disease Management System for Urban, Safety Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, Omolola; Mukherjee, Sukrit; Ani, Chizobam; Hindman, David; George, Sheba; Ilapakurthi, Ramarao; Verma, Mary; Dayrit, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    To meet the challenge of improving health care quality in urban, medically underserved areas of the US that have a predominance of chronic diseases such as diabetes, we have developed a new information system called CEDRIC for managing chronic diseases. CEDRIC was developed in collaboration with clinicians at an urban safety net clinic, using a community-participatory partnered research approach, with a view to addressing the particular needs of urban clinics with a high physician turnover and large uninsured/underinsured patient population. The pilot implementation focuses on diabetes management. In this paper, we describe the system’s architecture and features. PMID:20841679

  11. CEDRIC: a computerized chronic disease management system for urban, safety net clinics.

    PubMed

    Ogunyemi, Omolola; Mukherjee, Sukrit; Ani, Chizobam; Hindman, David; George, Sheba; Ilapakurthi, Ramarao; Verma, Mary; Dayrit, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    To meet the challenge of improving health care quality in urban, medically underserved areas of the US that have a predominance of chronic diseases such as diabetes, we have developed a new information system called CEDRIC for managing chronic diseases. CEDRIC was developed in collaboration with clinicians at an urban safety net clinic, using a community-participatory partnered research approach, with a view to addressing the particular needs of urban clinics with a high physician turnover and large uninsured/underinsured patient population. The pilot implementation focuses on diabetes management. In this paper, we describe the system's architecture and features.

  12. Implementing chronic disease self-management in community settings: lessons from Australian demonstration projects.

    PubMed

    Francis, Caitlin F; Feyer, Anne-Marie; Smith, Ben J

    2007-11-01

    The evaluation of the Sharing Health Care Initiative addressed the translation of different models of chronic disease self-management into health and community service contexts in Australia. Across seven projects, four intervention models were adopted: (1) the Stanford Chronic Disease Self Management course; (2) generic disease management planning, training and support; (3) tailored disease management planning, training and support, and; (4) telephone coaching. Targeted recruitment through support groups and patient lists was most successful for reaching high-needs clients. Projects with well developed organisational structures and health system networks demonstrated more effective implementation. Engagement of GPs in recruitment and client support was limited. Future self-management programs will require flexible delivery methods in the primary health care setting, involving practice nurses or the equivalent. After 12 months there was little evidence of potential sustainability, although structures such as consumer resource centres and client support clubs were established in some locations. Only one project was able to use Medicare chronic disease-related items to integrate self-management support into routine general practice. Participants in all projects showed improvements in self-management practices, but those receiving Model 3, flexible and tailored support, and Model 4, telephone coaching, reported the greatest benefits.

  13. Effectiveness of Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan: preliminary report of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Togari, Taisuke; Abbott, Fusae K; Homma, Mieko; Park, Minjeong; Kagawa, Yumi

    2010-12-01

    This is the preliminary report of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan by comparing changes in health outcomes at the baseline and 3-month and 6-month follow-ups. The program is a patient-centered educational program for the self-management of chronic conditions. The study's participants were recruited from among the attendees of the program workshops. During the study period (August 2006 to May 2007), 18 workshops were held and 128 attendees agreed to participate in the study. The health outcomes that were measured included health status, self-management behaviors, utilization of health services, self-efficacy, satisfaction with daily living, and clinical indicators. These indicators were further analyzed by disease type: diabetes, rheumatic disease, and cardiovascular disease/dyslipidemia. The findings indicated statistically significant positive changes in health distress, coping with symptoms, stretching exercises, communication with the physician, and satisfaction with daily living. The positive changes were especially remarkable among the groups with diabetes and rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that the Chronic Disease Self-management Program can be effective for Japanese people with chronic conditions.

  14. Activating patients with chronic disease for self-management: comparison of self-managing patients with those managing by frequent readmissions to hospital.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Sue E; Dennis, Sarah M; Bazeley, Pat; Harris, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors that activate people to self-manage chronic disease is important in improving uptake levels. If the many frequent hospital users who present with acute exacerbations of chronic disease were to self-manage at home, some hospital admissions would be avoided. Patient interview and demographic, psychological, clinical and service utilisation data were compared for two groups of patients with chronic disease: those attending self-management services and those who managed by using hospital services. Data were analysed to see whether there were differences that might explain the two different approaches to managing their conditions. The two groups were similar in terms of comorbidity, age, sex, home services, home support and educational level. Self-managing patients were activated by their clinician, accepted their disease, changed their identity, confronted emotions and learnt the skills to self-manage and avoid hospital. Patients who frequently used hospital services to manage their chronic disease were often in denial about their chronic disease, hung on to their identity and expressed little emotional response. However, they reported a stronger sense of coherence and rated their health more highly than self-managing patients. This study shed light on the process of patient activation for self-management. A better understanding of the process of patient activation would encourage clinicians who come into contact with frequently readmitted chronic disease patients to be more proactive in supporting self-management.

  15. Enhancing chronic disease management: a review of key issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Willison, Kevin D; Williams, Paul; Andrews, Gavin J

    2007-11-01

    This paper highlights three selected issues and potential strategies towards meeting chronic disease management needs. First, the orientation of the biomedical science model often gives insufficient attention to chronic health care needs. A second issue is that the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may offer for some an opportunity to enhance their chronic disease management efforts. A third issue is that our understanding of this potential is limited, as many who use CAM do not disclose such use. With reference to proposed solutions/strategies, first, an improved focus to respect patient/client values and goals may encourage people to disclose their use of CAM. Second, a community-based participatory approach shows promise in enhancing communication plus helps integrate CAM within new models of chronic disease management. Lastly, those in public health could help facilitate such an approach plus be a monitor of CAM practices. Overall, this review provides a springboard for further research and practice in CAM and the management of chronic diseases.

  16. Chronic disease self-management and health literacy in four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie; Torres, Cristina Huebner; Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James

    2012-01-01

    Research from several fields has explored health literacy as a multidimensional construct. The authors' multimethod study, "The Impact of Cultural Differences on Health Literacy and Chronic Disease Outcomes," assessed health literacy and chronic disease self-management among 296 patients from four ethnic groups (Vietnamese, African American, White, Latino) at a Massachusetts community health center between 2006 and 2010. Health literacy was assessed using the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and the Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-speaking Adults (SAHLSA) measures. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews (n = 34), home visits (n = 12), chronic disease diaries (n = 15), and focus groups (n = 47), were completed with a subset of participants. Qualitative interviews indicated a wide range of interpretations of S-TOFHLA questions in which participants substituted their own illness or health care experiences for the abstract examples offered in the instrument, at times leading to incorrect responses. Situating these responses in a broader social and cultural context, this article describes examples of the wide range of chronic disease self-management abilities among participants with limited education and/or low health literacy. It also discusses the culturally variable health beliefs identified among participants interviewed that may play important roles in their chronic disease self-management practices.

  17. Family nurse practitioners: "value add" in outpatient chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Lynn

    2012-12-01

    Nurse practitioners are capable leaders in primary care design as practices nationwide move to consider and adopt the patient-centered medical home. The chronic care model provides a structure to enhance the care of chronic illness. Nurse practitioners are instrumental in many areas of this model as both leaders and caregivers. Safety and quality are basic medical home goals; nurse practitioners enhance both. The addition of a nurse practitioner to a practice is an effective "value add" in every way.

  18. Telehealth for chronic disease management: do we need to RE-AIM?

    PubMed

    Varnfield, Marlien; Karunanithi, Mohan; Ding, Hang; Bird, Dominique; Oldenburg, Brian

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals are living with long term health conditions which they manage most of the time by themselves. This paper evaluates the use of information and communications technology platforms to provide evidence-based programs to help people with chronic disease to self-management these. It describes two different self-management strategies for chronic conditions, and the evaluation of their implementation in clinical trials, specifically in terms of reach, implementation fidelity, adoption and user perceptions. It also discusses the challenges in replicating trial findings in the real world, using the RE-AIM framework.

  19. Remote patient management: technology-enabled innovation and evolving business models for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Coye, Molly Joel; Haselkorn, Ateret; DeMello, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Remote patient management (RPM) is a transformative technology that improves chronic care management while reducing net spending for chronic disease. Broadly deployed within the Veterans Health Administration and in many small trials elsewhere, RPM has been shown to support patient self-management, shift responsibilities to non-clinical providers, and reduce the use of emergency department and hospital services. Because transformative technologies offer major opportunities to advance national goals of improved quality and efficiency in health care, it is important to understand their evolution, the experiences of early adopters, and the business models that may support their deployment.

  20. Chronic disease self-management support: the way forward for Australia.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kraus, Stefan G; Pearce-Brown, Carmen L

    2008-11-17

    We examined research and implementation activities presented at the Centre for Rheumatic Diseases 2007 Conference and other selected literature to identify common themes and posit some "next steps" required to develop self-management programs in the Australian context. Self-management and self-management support are key aspects of optimal chronic disease care, and are effective if implemented appropriately. Health literacy is the foundation for self-management programs and should be fostered within the whole population. We should invest in research and evaluation of self-management because the evidence base is under-developed and inherently difficult to expand. Because patient, carer, clinician and organisational engagement with self-management and self-management support programs are uneven, we need to prioritise activities designed to engage known hard-to-reach groups. We should strive to improve integration of self-management into clinical, educational and workplace contexts. Education and psychological theories can help guide self-management support.

  1. Untangling practice redesign from disease management: how do we best care for the chronically ill?

    PubMed

    Coleman, Katie; Mattke, Soeren; Perrault, Patrick J; Wagner, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a wide spectrum of chronic care improvement interventions has been tried and evaluated to improve health outcomes and reduce costs for chronically ill individuals. On one end of the spectrum are disease-management interventions--often organized by commercial vendors--that work with patients but do little to engage medical practice. On the other end are quality-improvement efforts aimed at redesigning the organization and delivery of primary care and better supporting patient self-management. This qualitative review finds that carve-out disease management interventions that target only patients may be less effective than those that also work to redesign care delivery. Imprecise nomenclature and poor study design methodology limit quantitative analysis. More innovation and research are needed to understand how disease-management components can be more meaningfully embedded within practice to improve patient care.

  2. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  3. Computer assisted chronic disease management: does it work? A pilot study using mixed methods.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kay M; Biezen, Ruby; Piterman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Background. Key factors for the effective chronic disease management (CDM) include the availability of practical and effective computer tools and continuing professional development/education. This study tested the effectiveness of a computer assisted chronic disease management tool, a broadband-based service known as cdmNet in increasing the development of care plans for patients with chronic disease in general practice. Methodology. Mixed methods are the breakthrough series methodology (workshops and plan-do-study-act cycles) and semistructured interviews. Results. Throughout the intervention period a pattern emerged suggesting GPs use of cdmNet initially increased, then plateaued practice nurses' and practice managers' roles expanded as they became more involved in using cdmNet. Seven main messages emerged from the GP interviews. Discussion. The overall use of cdmNet by participating GPs varied from "no change" to "significant change and developing many the GPMPs (general practice management plans) using cdmNet." The variation may be due to several factors, not the least, allowing GPs adequate time to familiarise themselves with the software and recognising the benefit of the team approach. Conclusion. The breakthrough series methodology facilitated upskilling GPs' management of patients diagnosed with a chronic disease and learning how to use the broadband-based service cdmNet.

  4. Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Soan, Esme J; Street, Steven J; Brownie, Sharon M; Hills, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are a growing public health challenge in Australia, accounting for a significant and increasing cost to the health care system. Management of these chronic conditions is aided by interprofessional practice, but models of care require updating to incorporate the latest evidence-based practice. Increasing research evidence reports the benefits of physical activity and exercise on health status and the risk of inactivity to chronic disease development, yet physical activity advice is often the least comprehensive component of care. An essential but as yet underutilized player in NCD prevention and management is the "accredited exercise physiologist," a specialist in the delivery of clinical exercise prescriptions for the prevention or management of chronic and complex conditions. In this article, the existing role of accredited exercise physiologists in interprofessional practice is examined, and an extension of their role proposed in primary health care settings.

  5. Management of Thrombocytopenia in Chronic Liver Disease: Focus on Pharmacotherapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maan, Raoel; de Knegt, Robert J; Veldt, Bart J

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 × 10(9)/L) often complicates chronic liver disease, impeding optimal management of these patients. The prevalence of this manifestation ranges from 6% among non-cirrhotic patients with chronic liver disease to 70% among patients with liver cirrhosis. It has also been shown that the severity of liver disease is associated with both prevalence and level of thrombocytopenia. Its development is often multifactorial, although thrombopoietin is thought to be a major factor. The discovery of and ability to clone thrombopoietin led to new treatment opportunities for this clinical manifestation. This review discusses data on the three most important thrombopoietin receptor agonists: eltrombopag, avatrombopag, and romiplostim. Currently, only eltrombopag is approved for usage among patients with thrombocytopenia and chronic hepatitis C virus infection in order to initiate and maintain interferon-based antiviral treatment. Nevertheless, the optimal management of hematologic abnormalities among patients with chronic liver disease, and its risk for bleeding complications, is still a matter of discussion. Thrombocytopenia definitely contributes to hemostatic defects but is often counterbalanced by the enhanced presence of procoagulant factors. Therefore, a thorough assessment of the patient's risk for thrombotic events is essential when the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists is considered among patients with chronic liver disease and thrombocytopenia.

  6. CHRONIOUS: a wearable platform for monitoring and management of patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Bellos, Christos; Papadopoulos, Athanassios; Rosso, Roberto; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2011-01-01

    The CHRONIOUS system has been developed based on an open architecture design that consists of a set of subsystems which interact in order to provide all the needed services to the chronic disease patients. An advanced multi-parametric expert system is being implemented that fuses information effectively from various sources using intelligent techniques. Data are collected by sensors of a body network controlling vital signals while additional tools record dietary habits and plans, drug intake, environmental and biochemical parameters and activity data. The CHRONIOUS platform provides guidelines and standards for the future generations of "chronic disease management systems" and facilitates sophisticated monitoring tools. In addition, an ontological information retrieval system is being delivered satisfying the necessities for up-to-date clinical information of Chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Moreover, support tools are being embedded in the system, such as the Mental Tools for the monitoring of patient mental health status. The integrated platform provides real-time patient monitoring and supervision, both indoors and outdoors and represents a generic platform for the management of various chronic diseases.

  7. Integrating a mobile health setup in a chronic disease management network.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hang; Ireland, Derek; Jayasena, Rajiv; Curmi, Jamie; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Supporting self management of chronic disease in collaboration with primary healthcare has been a national priority in order to mitigate the emerging disease burden on the already strained healthcare system. However, in practice, the uptake of self-management programs and compliance with clinical guidelines remain poor. Time constraints due to work commitments and lack of efficient monitoring tools have been the major barrier to the uptake and compliance. In this paper, we present a newly integrated mobile health system with a clinical chronic disease management network called cdmNet, which has already been validated to facilitate General Practitioners (GPs) to provide collaborative disease management services. The newly integrated solution takes advantage of the latest mobile web and wireless Bluetooth communication techniques to enable patients to record health data entries through ubiquitous mobile phones, and allows the data to be simultaneously shared by multidisciplinary care teams. This integration would enable patients to self-manage their chronic disease conditions in collaboration with GPs and hence, improve the uptake and compliance. Additionally, the proposed integration will provide a useful framework encouraging the translation of innovative mobile health technologies into highly regulated healthcare systems.

  8. An integrated chronic disease management model: a diagonal approach to health system strengthening in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, Ozayr Haroon; Asmall, Shaidah; Freeman, Melvyn

    2014-11-01

    The integrated chronic disease management model provides a systematic framework for creating a fundamental change in the orientation of the health system. This model adopts a diagonal approach to health system strengthening by establishing a service-linked base to training, supervision, and the opportunity to try out, assess, and implement integrated interventions.

  9. Cyber-Management of People with Chronic Disease: A Potential Solution to eHealth Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laakso, E-Liisa; Armstrong, Kylie; Usher, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The evolving eHealth agenda presents a range of potential opportunities for the management and prevention of chronic disease. This paper identifies issues and barriers to the uptake of eHealth and describes a strategy ("Healthy Outcomes for Australians"[C]-HOFA) for creating a central knowledge filter and cyber space method for tracking…

  10. Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  11. [Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  12. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  13. Outcomes and opportunities: a nurse-led model of chronic disease management in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Eley, Diann S; Patterson, Elizabeth; Young, Jacqui; Fahey, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B; Hegney, Desley G; Synnott, Robyn L; Mahomed, Rosemary; Baker, Peter G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The Australian government's commitment to health service reform has placed general practice at the centre of its agenda to manage chronic disease. Concerns about the capacity of GPs to meet the growing chronic disease burden has stimulated the implementation and testing of new models of care that better utilise practice nurses (PN). This paper reports on a mixed-methods study nested within a larger study that trialled the feasibility and acceptability of a new model of nurse-led chronic disease management in three general practices. Patients over 18 years of age with type 2 diabetes, hypertension or stable ischaemic heart disease were randomised into PN-led or usual GP-led care. Primary outcomes were self-reported quality of life and perceptions of the model's feasibility and acceptability from the perspective of patients and GPs. Over the 12-month study quality of life decreased but the trend between groups was not statistically different. Qualitative data indicate that the PN-led model was acceptable and feasible to GPs and patients. It is possible to extend the scope of PN care to lead the routine clinical management of patients' stable chronic diseases. All GPs identified significant advantages to the model and elected to continue with the PN-led care after our study concluded.

  14. The empowerment of elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Managing life with the disease

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud; Pourhabib, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious health problem that has significant effects on the life status of elderly persons. Use of the empowerment approach is necessary for health promotion in older people with COPD, but little attention has so far been paid to all the dimensions of empowerment in the management of COPD, which would provide useful knowledge regarding elders with COPD. This article reports on a study exploring people’s experiences of the empowerment of older people with COPD. This study adopted an exploratory qualitative design and was carried out using grounded theory methodology. Grounded theory was considered appropriate for this study because of its focus on how people respond to and act on the problems that they encounter. We collected data by conducting in-depth semi-structured interviews and taking field notes. Twenty-four participants were selected through purposive sampling. The results showed that in encountering the complexity of disease and in response to difficulties induced by COPD, three strategies were applied. Elderly persons with COPD, their family caregivers, and professional team members engaged in “managing life with COPD,” “striving to keep abreast of life,” “preparing for battle with disease,” and “helping to stabilize the elder’s life.” The outcome of these strategies was “co-existence with disease.” The potential of “managing life with COPD” was influenced by the following factors: “co-existence with ageing,” “personal potential,” “a challenged health system,” and “weak social support.” “Managing life with COPD” enables the elder to feel in control and live optimally. This is a fragile balance, however, and the unpredictability of COPD can tip the elder into “self-efficacy.” Understanding the experiences of the empowerment process of older people with COPD can help health professionals provide more focused elderly care. PMID:28369069

  15. SIGSAC Software: A tool for the Management of Chronic Disease and Telecare

    PubMed Central

    Claudia, Bustamante; Claudia, Alcayaga; Ilta, Lange; Iñigo, Meza

    2012-01-01

    Chronic disease management is highly complex because multiple interventions are required to improve clinical outcomes. From the patient’s perspective, his main problems are dealing with self-management without support and feeling isolated between clinical visits. A strategy for providing continuous self-management support is the use of communication technologies, such as the telephone. However, to be efficient and effective, an information system is required for telecare planning and follows up. The use of electronic clinical records facilitates the implementation of telecare, but those systems often do not allow to combine usual care (visits to the health clinics) with telecare. This paper presents the experience of developing an application called SIGSAC (Software de Información, Gestión y Seguimiento para el Autocuidado Crónico) for Chronic Disease Management and Telecare follow up. PMID:24199051

  16. Chronic Disease Management in Sub-Saharan Africa: Whose Business Is It?

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Alexander; Ekoe, Tetanye; Perone, Nicolas; Slama, Slim; Loutan, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Public health specialists and clinicians alike agree that Humanity faces a global pandemic of chronic diseases in the 21st century. In this article we discuss the implications of this pandemic on another global issue, the health workforce. Because both issues are particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we will focus on this region and use Cameroon as a case in point. We first gauge the epidemic of chronic conditions in SSA. We then discuss the implications of chronic conditions for the reshaping of health systems and the health workforce. We conclude by making a strong case for the building up and strengthening the health workforce, insisting on the crucial role of nurses, their training, and involvement in chronic disease management. PMID:19742159

  17. Chronic disease management in Sub-Saharan Africa: whose business is it?

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Alexander; Ekoe, Tetanye; Perone, Nicolas; Slama, Slim; Loutan, Louis

    2009-08-01

    Public health specialists and clinicians alike agree that Humanity faces a global pandemic of chronic diseases in the 21(st) century. In this article we discuss the implications of this pandemic on another global issue, the health workforce. Because both issues are particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we will focus on this region and use Cameroon as a case in point. We first gauge the epidemic of chronic conditions in SSA. We then discuss the implications of chronic conditions for the reshaping of health systems and the health workforce. We conclude by making a strong case for the building up and strengthening the health workforce, insisting on the crucial role of nurses, their training, and involvement in chronic disease management.

  18. Chronic disease management in rural and underserved populations: innovation and system improvement help lead to success.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Jane; Gamm, Larry; Kash, Bita; Peck, Mitchell

    2005-03-01

    Successful implementation of disease management (DM) is based on the ability of an organization to overcome a variety of barriers to deliver timely, appropriate care of chronic illnesses. Such programs initiate DM services to patient populations while initiating self-management education among medication-resistant patients who are chronically ill. Despite formidable challenges, rural health care providers have been successful in initiating DM programs and have discovered several ways in which these programs benefit their organizations. This research reports on six DM programs that serve large rural and underserved populations and have demonstrated that DM can be successfully implemented in such areas.

  19. Utilization of Feeding Tubes in the Management of Feline Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sheri

    2016-11-01

    Esophagostomy feeding tubes are useful, and in many cases essential, for the comprehensive management of cats with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). They should be considered a lifelong therapeutic appliance to facilitate the global management of cats with CKD thus providing improved therapeutic efficacy and quality-of-life. Esophagostomy tubes facilitate the maintenance of adequate hydration and increase owner compliance by facilitating the administration of medications. Finally, feeding tubes provide a means to deliver a stage-appropriate dietary prescription for cats with CKD and maintain an adequate nutritional plane in a patient that otherwise would be subject to chronic wasting.

  20. Improving the management of chronic diseases using web-based technologies: an application in hemophilia care.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonor; Saavedra, Vasco; Ferreira, Carlos; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Modern methods of information and communication that use web technologies provide an opportunity to facilitate closer communication between patients and healthcare providers, allowing a joint management of chronic diseases. This paper describes a web-based technological solution to support the management of inherited bleeding disorders integrating, diffusing and archiving large sets of data relating to the clinical practice of hemophilia care, more specifically the clinical practice at the Hematology Service of Coimbra Hospital Center (a Hemophilia Treatment Center located in Portugal).

  1. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Methods Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project’s chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM) and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders’ action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. Results This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1) changing the health care system, (2) patient-centered care, (3) technological systems and barriers, and (4) integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and administration involved

  2. Approaches to chronic disease management for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: strategies through the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Hart, Mary K; Millard, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Investigator-initiated research in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conducted at the Baylor Martha Foster Lung Care Center has sought to improve management throughout the continuum of respiratory care using a multidisciplinary approach. Respiratory care therapists employed in the primary care setting were shown to improve the quality of asthma care: rescue inhaler use decreased by 75% and respiratory symptom score decreased by 49% in patients who were seen by this midlevel specialty provider. In addition to similar results in a geriatric population, patients' diagnosis was changed in 48% of cases and treatment was changed in 76% of cases after the intervention. For pulmonary rehabilitation, an activity of daily living assessment form was created, and rehabilitation-whether traditional or water-based-was shown to improve patients' ability to perform activities of daily living and improve quality of life scores. The Rules of Two((R)), developed by Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to simplify understanding of good asthma control, continues to be taught, and patient education has also been offered through asthma summer camps for children. Finally, a multidisciplinary team worked to develop a protocol for treatment of asthma patients in the emergency department and, through this effort, was able to reduce length of stay from an average of 278 minutes to an average of 168 minutes. These efforts aim to overcome the gap between recommended care and actual practice, so that patients benefit from evidence-based medicine and continuing refinements to diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Implementing chronic disease management in the public healthcare sector in Singapore: the role of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J; Heng, B H

    2001-01-01

    The public health care delivery system in Singapore faces the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, an increasing chronic disease burden, increasing healthcare cost, rising expectations and demand for better health services, and shortage of resources. It is also fragmented, resulting in duplication and lack of coordination between institutions. A disease management approach has been adopted by the National Healthcare Group (NHG) as a critical strategy to provide holistic, cost-effective, seamless and well-coordinated care across the continuum. The framework in the development of the disease management plan included identifying the diseases and defining the target population, organizing a multi-disciplinary team lead by a clinician champion, defining the core components, treatment protocols and evaluation methods, defining the goals, and measuring and managing the outcomes. As disease management and case management for chronic diseases are new approaches adopted in the healthcare delivery system, there is a lack of understanding by healthcare professionals. The leadership and participation of hospital physicians was sought in the planning, design and outcomes monitoring to ensure their 'buy-in' and the successful implementation and effectiveness of the program. The episodic diagnosis related group (DRG)-based framework of funding and subvention for healthcare, and the shortage of step-care care facilities, have been recognized by the Ministry of Health as an impediments to the implementation, and these are currently being addressed.

  4. Regression to the mean: a limited issue in disease management programs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, David; Wilson, Steve

    2008-04-01

    Our objective was to test for evidence of regression to the mean in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related health care utilization in a Colorado Medicaid population that met the criteria for, but were not participating in, a COPD disease management (DM) program. National Jewish Medical and Research Center had enrolled individuals who (1) had a diagnosis of COPD for at least 1 year and (2) were active participants in Colorado Medicaid's 1-year DM program called breatheWise; the present study sought a comparator group for that population. In order to test for evidence of regression to the mean (ie, high utilization from the recruitment period reducing without active intervention) in this case management model, we conducted a case-controlled analysis of total spending for a comparator population that would have met the inclusion criteria for the DM program. The present study assessed health care utilization for fiscal years 2002 and 2003 in terms of total rates of emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalizations for all causes in the comparator group of COPD patients. In addition, total costs related to both ER visits and hospitalizations were compiled. In total, 354 individuals met the inclusion criteria and were identified as the comparator group. ER visits and hospitalizations were consistent for 2002 and 2003. ER visits totaled 314 and 315 in 2002 and 2003, respectively, indicating a 0.3% increase that was not significant. Hospitalizations decreased from 0.53 admissions per patient in 2002 to 0.48 in 2003-a 9.4% reduction that was not significant. With comparable rates of ER visits and hospitalizations, total costs for health care utilization remained virtually unchanged between 2002 and 2003. There is minimal evidence of regression to the mean over 2 consecutive years in the Colorado Medicaid patients with moderate to severe COPD.

  5. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Andrew L.; Nigwekar, Sagar U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. Recent findings The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of bone-mineral disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Summary Mineral-bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway are needed to advance patient care. PMID:26785065

  6. Twenty years of telemedicine in chronic disease management--an evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Richard

    2012-06-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain a high-level view of the value of telemedicine in the management of five common chronic diseases (asthma, COPD, diabetes, heart failure, hypertension). A total of 141 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was identified, in which 148 telemedicine interventions of various kinds had been tested in a total of 37,695 patients. The value of each intervention was categorised in terms of the outcomes specified by the investigators in that trial, i.e. no attempt was made to extract a common outcome from all studies, as would be required for a conventional meta-analysis. Summarizing the value of these interventions shows, first, that most studies have reported positive effects (n = 108), and almost none have reported negative effects (n = 2). This suggests publication bias. Second, there were no significant differences between the chronic diseases, i.e. telemedicine seems equally effective (or ineffective) in the diseases studied. Third, most studies have been relatively short-term (median duration 6 months). It seems unlikely that in a chronic disease, any intervention can have much effect unless applied for a long period. Finally, there have been very few studies of cost-effectiveness. Thus the evidence base for the value of telemedicine in managing chronic diseases is on the whole weak and contradictory.

  7. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This manual contains current guidelines for Illinois school personnel to follow when working with children who have infectious diseases. The first chapter focuses on school district development of policies and procedures and program implementation. The next chapter provides information on characteristics, mode of transmission, prevention, and…

  8. Chronic disease management and the home-care alternative in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter

    2009-08-01

    The pressure on our health-care system to deliver efficient, quality and cost-effective care is increasing. The debate on its sustainability is also expanding. These challenges can be managed with revisions to our health-care policy frameworks governing how and what public health-care services are delivered. Chronic disease management and home care can together ease many of the present and future pressures facing the health-care system. However, the current level of investment and the present policy are not effectively supporting movement in this direction. Updating the Canada Health Act to reflect the realities of our health-care system, and developing policies to support the areas of interdisciplinary teamwork and system integration are needed to facilitate chronic disease management and home care in Canada. This article lays out the challenges, highlights the impending issues and suggests a framework for moving forward.

  9. The missing link: improving quality with a chronic disease management intervention for the primary care office.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, John

    2007-01-01

    Bold steps are necessary to improve quality of care for patients with chronic diseases and increase satisfaction of both primary care physicians and patients. Office-based chronic disease management (CDM) workers can achieve these objectives by offering self-management support, maintaining disease registries, and monitoring compliance from the point of care. CDM workers can provide the missing link by connecting patients, primary care physicans, and CDM services sponsored by health plans or in the community. CDM workers should be supported financially by Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial health plans through reimbursements to physicians for units of service, analogous to California's Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program. Care provided by CDM workers should be standardized, and training requirements should be sufficiently flexible to ensure wide dissemination. CDM workers can potentially improve quality while reducing costs for preventable hospitalizations and emergency department visits, but evaluation at multiple levels is recommended.

  10. An integrated advanced communication and coaching platform for enabling personalized management of chronic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Meneu, Teresa; Martínez-Romero, Álvaro; Martínez-Millana, Antonio; Guillén, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cardiovascular diseases directly account for millions of deaths, billions of Euros and a big number of disabilities affecting the world's population. Even though primary and secondary prevention factors are well known, the awareness and the concern of citizens and patients is not big enough to cause a significant change in lifestyle that modifies the increasing trends. Patients and families, professionals and healthcare systems are not prepared to fight against this burden in an effective and aligned way. Some disease management programmes based on ICT solutions have and are currently being tested around the world but their relative impaction has been very limited. This paper proposes a new turn into Personal Health Systems applied to chronic disease management by increasing the capabilities for personalization, providing the patients with motivation and coaching support and enabling the work of the professionals with intelligent tools for strategic and clinical decision making based on the newest medical evidence.

  11. Optimizing nonpharmacological management following an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Samantha L; Goldstein, Roger; Desveaux, Laura; Tulloch, Verity; Brooks, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Though the guidelines for the optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following an acute exacerbation (AE) are well established, issues associated with poor adherence to nonpharmacological interventions such as self-management advice and pulmonary rehabilitation will impact on hospital readmission rates and health care costs. Systems developed for clinically stable patients with COPD may not be sufficient for those who are post-exacerbation. A redesign of the manner in which such interventions are delivered to patients following an AECOPD is necessary. Addressing two or more components of the chronic care model is effective in reducing health care utilization in patients with COPD, with self-management support contributing a key role. By refining self-management support to incorporate the identification and treatment of psychological symptoms and by providing health care professionals adequate time and training to deliver respiratory-specific advice and self-management strategies, adherence to nonpharmacological therapies following an AE may be enhanced. Furthermore, following up patients in their own homes allows for the tailoring of advice and for the delivery of consistent health care messages which may enable knowledge to be retained. By refining the delivery of nonpharmacological therapies following an AECOPD according to components of the chronic care model, adherence may be improved, resulting in better disease management and possibly reducing health care utilization.

  12. [Chronic obstructive lung disease management programmes do not benefit the coordination of care pathways].

    PubMed

    Gjersøe, Peter; Morsø, Lars; Jensen, Morten Sall; Qvist, Peter

    2014-09-29

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) is a challenging condition for both primary and secondary health-care providers. Disease management programmes (DMP's) have been expected to lead to evident improvements in the continuum of care for COLD. The utility of a COLD management programme was evaluated in a study based on interviews among general practitioners and COLD specialists. Clinicians preferred short practical guidelines to the DMP. The DMP was found useless as a tool to improve the coordination of care pathways. Complimentary interventions to improve clinical cooperation across sectors are recommended.

  13. Preconception care: screening and management of chronic disease and promoting psychological health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A large proportion of women around the world suffer from chronic diseases including mental health diseases. In the United States alone, over 12% of women of reproductive age suffer from a chronic medical condition, especially diabetes and hypertension. Chronic diseases significantly increase the odds for poor maternal and newborn outcomes in pregnant women. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception care for preventing and managing chronic diseases and promoting psychological health on maternal, newborn and child health outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Results Maternal prepregnancy diabetic care is a significant intervention that reduces the occurrence of congenital malformations by 70% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 59-78%) and perinatal mortality by 69% (95% CI: 47-81%). Furthermore, preconception management of epilepsy and phenylketonuria are essential and can optimize maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes if given before conception. Ideally changes in antiepileptic drug therapy should be made at least 6 months before planned conception. Interventions specifically targeting women of reproductive age suffering from a psychiatric condition show that group-counseling and interventions leading to empowerment of women have reported non-significant reduction in depression (economic skill building: Mean Difference (MD) -7.53; 95% CI: -17.24, 2.18; counseling: MD-2.92; 95% CI: -13.17, 7.33). Conclusion While prevention and management of the chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension, through counseling, and other dietary and pharmacological intervention, is important, delivering solutions to prevent and respond to women

  14. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Gevers, Tom J.G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Fijter, J.W.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Peters, D.J.M.; Wetzels, J.; Zietse, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4–6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

  15. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Casteleijn, Niek F; Visser, Folkert W; Drenth, Joost P H; Gevers, Tom J G; Groen, Gerbrand J; Hogan, Marie C; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-09-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed.

  16. [Quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines using the example of the National Disease Management Guideline for "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    PubMed

    Nothacker, Monika Judith; Langer, Thomas; Weinbrenner, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Together with an expert committee a structured approach to determining quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines has been developed. The key steps of this approach include: introducing guideline authors to the methodology at an early stage of the process of guideline development, pre-selecting recommendations of the guideline which are potentially measurable by means of quality indicators, assessing the potentially measurable quality indicators in written form using five criteria (including their importance for the health care system and clarity of definitions) and approving them in a formal consensus process. For lack of a database these quality indicators must be regarded as preliminary. For the National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure" nine rate-based indicators have been chosen. The indicators correspond to important strong recommendations (grade of recommendation: A) from the fields of diagnosis (two), general therapeutic strategy (two), specific treatment (three), clinical monitoring (one) and co-ordination of care (one). In a second step, the quality indicators have to be validated within a pilot project. The determination and assessment of the potential quality indicators have revealed room for improvement of guideline development. In particular, there is a need for more health care data and for specification of recommendations.

  17. Medicare and chronic disease management: integrated care as an exceptional circumstance?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael J; Swerissen, Hal

    2010-05-01

    Chronic disease represents a significant challenge to the design and reform of the Australian healthcare system. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) provides a framework of numerous chronic disease management programs; however, their use at the patient level is complex. This analysis of the MBS chronic disease framework uses a hypothetical case study of a diabetic patient (with disease-related complications and a complex psychosocial background) to illustrate the difficulties in delivering appropriate multidisciplinary chronic disease care under the MBS. The complexities at each step - from care planning, service provision, and monitoring and review - are described, as are the intricacies involved in providing patient care under different MBS programs as well as those in the broader health and community care system. As demonstrated by this case study, under certain circumstances the provision of truly integrated care to this hypothetical patient would constitute an 'exceptional circumstance' under the MBS. Although quality improvement efforts can improve functioning within the limitations of the current system, system-wide reforms are necessary to overcome complexity and fragmentation.

  18. Moderating factors influencing adoption of a mobile chronic disease management system in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhangxiang; Liu, Yongmei; Che, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaohong

    2017-01-09

    Mobile chronic disease management systems (MCDMS) have become increasingly important in recent years, but in China, challenges remain for their adoption. Existing empirical studies have not completely explored the adoption behavior of potential MCDMS users. This article presents a study in which we investigated factors that influence chronically ill patients in China and their families to adopt or decline to use MCDMS. We applied a research model based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) as well as four contextual constructs (perceived disease threat, perceived risk, initial trust, and technology anxiety) to a survey of 279 potential MCDMS service participants in China. Our key findings include: (1) as consistent with current research, both perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use have positive impact on potential users' MCDMS adoption intention; (2) both perceived disease threat and initial trust have positive impact on MCDMS adoption intention; (3) the impact of perceived risk is negative, and technology anxiety has negative impact on perceived ease of use of MCDMS; (4) young people place more importance on their perceptions of usefulness, ease of operation, and disease threat than middle-aged and older users; (5) family members are more influenced by their perception of ease of use and disease threat than chronically ill patients, while chronically ill patients place more importance on perceived usefulness than family members. This article concludes by discussing the implications of our study for research and practice, as well as limitations and future research directions.

  19. Diagnosis and management of chronic lung disease in deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Lucero, Pedro F; Zanders, Thomas B; Zacher, Lisa L

    2013-08-01

    Military personnel are a unique group of individuals referred to the pulmonary physician for evaluation. Despite accession standards that limit entrance into the military for individuals with various pre-existing lung diseases, the most common disorders found in the general population such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remain frequently diagnosed. Military personnel generally tend to be a more physically fit population who are required to exercise on a regular basis and as such may have earlier presentations of disease than their civilian counterparts. Exertional dyspnea is a common complaint; establishing a diagnosis may be challenging given the subtle nature of symptoms and lack of specificity with pulmonary function testing. The conflicts over the past 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan have also given rise to new challenges for deployed military. Various respiratory hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pits, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents and may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and chronic lung disease. In the evaluation of deployed military personnel, establishing the presence of actual pulmonary disease and the relationship of existing disease to deployment is an ongoing issue to both military and civilian physicians. This paper reviews the current evidence for chronic lung disease in the deployed military population and addresses any differences in diagnosis and management.

  20. The emergence of "lifestyle medicine" as a structured approach for management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Egger, Garry J; Binns, Andrew F; Rossner, Stephan R

    2009-02-02

    Chronic diseases with a lifestyle-based aetiology currently make up a significant proportion of primary care consultations, but management often falls between the demands of public and clinical health. A modified clinical approach, based around the concept of "lifestyle medicine", helps fill the gap by adding behavioural, motivational and environmental skills to conventional medical practice. When used in a multidisciplinary setting, lifestyle medicine offers potential cost and effectiveness benefits, which are beginning to be realised.

  1. Integrating telecare for chronic disease management in the community: What needs to be done?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Telecare could greatly facilitate chronic disease management in the community, but despite government promotion and positive demonstrations its implementation has been limited. This study aimed to identify factors inhibiting the implementation and integration of telecare systems for chronic disease management in the community. Methods Large scale comparative study employing qualitative data collection techniques: semi-structured interviews with key informants, task-groups, and workshops; framework analysis of qualitative data informed by Normalization Process Theory. Drawn from telecare services in community and domestic settings in England and Scotland, 221 participants were included, consisting of health professionals and managers; patients and carers; social care professionals and managers; and service suppliers and manufacturers. Results Key barriers to telecare integration were uncertainties about coherent and sustainable service and business models; lack of coordination across social and primary care boundaries, lack of financial or other incentives to include telecare within primary care services; a lack of a sense of continuity with previous service provision and self-care work undertaken by patients; and general uncertainty about the adequacy of telecare systems. These problems led to poor integration of policy and practice. Conclusion Telecare services may offer a cost effective and safe form of care for some people living with chronic illness. Slow and uneven implementation and integration do not stem from problems of adoption. They result from incomplete understanding of the role of telecare systems and subsequent adaption and embeddedness to context, and uncertainties about the best way to develop, coordinate, and sustain services that assist with chronic disease management. Interventions are therefore needed that (i) reduce uncertainty about the ownership of implementation processes and that lock together health and social care agencies

  2. Patients with Complex Chronic Diseases: Perspectives on Supporting Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Trauth, Jeanette M.; Ling, Bruce S.; Anderson, Roger T.; Piatt, Gretchen A.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    A Complex Chronic Disease (CCD) is a condition involving multiple morbidities that requires the attention of multiple health care providers or facilities and possibly community (home)-based care. A patient with CCD presents to the health care system with unique needs, disabilities, or functional limitations. The literature on how to best support self-management efforts in those with CCD is lacking. With this paper, the authors present the case of an individual with diabetes and end-stage renal disease who is having difficulty with self-management. The case is discussed in terms of intervention effectiveness in the areas of prevention, addiction, and self-management of single diseases. Implications for research are discussed. PMID:18026814

  3. Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P.S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Background Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. Objective To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Results Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically

  4. The expert patient: a new approach to chronic disease management for the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Robert L

    2002-01-01

    The expert patient: a new approach to chronic disease management for the twenty-first century, produced by the Department of Health, recommends the introduction of 'user-led self management' for chronic diseases to all areas of the NHS by 2007. The premise is that many patients are expert in managing their disease, and this could be used to encourage others to become 'key decision makers in the treatment process'. Furthermore, these expert patients could 'contribute their skills and insights for the further improvement of services'. It is hypothesised that self-management programmes could reduce the severity of symptoms and improve confidence, resourcefulness and self-efficacy. It is stressed that this is more than just patient education to improve compliance. Instead there should be 'a cultural change...so that user-led self management can be fully valued and understood by healthcare professionals'. I point out that these ideas, while welcome, are not particularly new. Achieving the desired culture change will not be easy.

  5. Management of chronic kidney disease in China calls for the implementation of expert patient program with traditional Chinese medical interventions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-fan; Zhang, La; Hu, Xiao-xuan; Liu, Xu-sheng

    2014-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease was closely related with unhealthy lifestyle; therefore a strategy focused both on daily life and medical process, like the Expert Patients Program, was of great value in the prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease. In China, however, obstacles still existed in the process of implementing the program. Adding traditional Chinese medical interventions to the program assisted both patients and physicians to understand and to accept this new trend in management of chronic disease better. The combination with traditional Chinese medical interventions showed a solution for successfully implementing the Expert Patients Program and provided a new strategy for prevention and control of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Vincent A.; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D.; De Grauw, Wim J.C.; Vervoort, Gerald M.M.; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C.J.; Braspenning, Jozé C.C.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Aim To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Design and setting Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). Method CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Results Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Conclusion Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Key pointsQuality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved.In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal

  7. Integrating co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease management: identifying and resolving failures in self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Detweiler-Bedell, Jerusha B; Friedman, Michael A; Leventhal, Howard; Miller, Ivan W; Leventhal, Elaine A

    2008-12-01

    Research suggests that treatments for depression among individuals with chronic physical disease do not improve disease outcomes significantly, and chronic disease management programs do not necessarily improve mood. For individuals experiencing co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease, demands on the self-regulation system are compounded, leading to a rapid depletion of self-regulatory resources. Because disease and depression management are not integrated, patients lack the understanding needed to prioritize self-regulatory goals in a way that makes disease and depression management synergistic. A framework in which the management of co-morbidity is considered alongside the management of either condition alone offers benefits to researchers and practitioners and may help improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Integrating Co-Morbid Depression and Chronic Physical Disease Management: Identifying and Resolving Failures in Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler-Bedell, Jerusha B.; Friedman, Michael A.; Leventhal, Howard; Miller, Ivan W.; Leventhal, Elaine A.

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that treatments for depression among individuals with chronic physical disease do not improve disease outcomes significantly, and chronic disease management programs do not necessarily improve mood. For individuals experiencing co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease, demands on the self-regulation system are compounded, leading to a rapid depletion of self-regulatory resources. Because disease and depression management are not integrated, patients lack the understanding needed to prioritize self-regulatory goals in a way that makes disease and depression management synergistic. A framework in which the management of co-morbidity is considered alongside the management of either condition alone offers benefits to researchers and practitioners and may help improve clinical outcomes. PMID:18848740

  9. Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Time for a paradigm shift?

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; Bontly, Thomas D; Zuwallack, Richard; Gross, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, centering on an action plan for the exacerbation and enhanced communication between the patient and health care providers, makes good clinical sense. However, five relatively large trials of self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have had inconsistent results: only two demonstrated reductions in health care utilization and one had to be discontinued prematurely because of increased mortality. Do these discordant findings require a paradigm shift in our concept of self-management? Probably not-but an analysis of the negative studies can give us valuable insights. There are data to support the idea that patients in the trial that showed increased mortality did not self-manage appropriately. Only 4.5% of these patients called in before starting treatment for their exacerbation, the time to initiation of antibiotics or steroids was unsatisfactorily long, and the intervention arm used minimally more prednisone and antibiotics than the control arm. The reasons for a higher mortality will likely never be known, but it is possible that these high-risk patients may have needed earlier assessment by a trained professional, or that self-management led to overconfidence and treatment delays. We clearly need more effective ways to implement self-management and better define which groups of patients stand to benefit (or be harmed) by this intervention. This will require an investment in well-thought-out clinical trials.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the clinical management of an acute exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, J; Wedzicha, J

    2004-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impose a considerable burden of morbidity, mortality, and health care cost. Management guidelines outlining best practice, based largely on consensus expert opinion, were produced by a number of organisations during the last decade. Current interest in the field is high. This has resulted in the publication of many further studies which have extended our understanding of the pathology involved and provided, for the first time, an evidence base for many of the therapeutic options. In this review we aim to bring the non-specialist reader up to date with current management principles and the evidence underlying such interventions. PMID:15356350

  11. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure.

  12. Chronic respiratory diseases in developing countries: the burden and strategies for prevention and management.

    PubMed Central

    Aït-Khaled, N.; Enarson, D.; Bousquet, J.

    2001-01-01

    In developing countries, chronic respiratory diseases represent a challenge to public health because of their frequency, severity, projected trends, and economic impact. Health care planners, for example, are faced with a dramatic increase in tobacco use and must establish priorities for the allocation of limited resources. Nevertheless, smoking prevention and standardized management programmes for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should be implemented in developing countries whenever possible. International measures will be required to reverse tobacco smoking trends, and international agencies could define essential drugs and equipment and encourage the use of generic drugs, particularly for corticosteroids inhaled at high dosages. For such programmes to be effective, producers of high-quality generics will need to be identified, and the medications added to national lists of essential drugs and included in procurement procedures. Other recommendations for alleviating the burden of chronic respiratory diseases in developing countries are: adapting guidelines to local contexts and ensuring their distribution; upgrading equipment at district level; purchasing high-quality drugs at low prices; routine training and supervision of health services personnel; and regular monitoring of performance. Social mobilization by professional societies, nongovernmental organizations, and the mass media will also increase government commitment to tobacco control and standardized case management. PMID:11693980

  13. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program

    PubMed Central

    Smidth, Margrethe; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which presented an opportunity to test an active implementation model against the usual implementation model. The aim of the present paper is to describe the development of an active implementation model using the Medical Research Council’s model for complex interventions and the Chronic Care Model. Methods We used the Medical Research Council’s five-stage model for developing complex interventions to design an implementation model for a disease management program for COPD. First, literature on implementing change in general practice was scrutinised and empirical knowledge was assessed for suitability. In phase I, the intervention was developed; and in phases II and III, it was tested in a block- and cluster-randomised study. In phase IV, we evaluated the feasibility for others to use our active implementation model. Results The Chronic Care Model was identified as a model for designing efficient implementation elements. These elements were combined into a multifaceted intervention, and a timeline for the trial in a randomised study was decided upon in accordance with the five stages in the Medical Research Council’s model; this was captured in a PaTPlot, which allowed us to focus on the structure and the timing of the intervention. The implementation strategies identified as efficient were use of the Breakthrough Series, academic detailing, provision of patient material and meetings between providers. The active implementation model was

  14. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  15. The role of dietary phosphorus restriction in the conservative management of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barsotti, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2005-01-01

    Evidence exists that phosphate retention plays a major role in causing secondary hyperparathyroidism, cardiovascular morbidity, and loss of residual renal function in chronic renal disease patients, and that a subtle elevation in serum phosphate occurs at early stages in the course of renal insufficiency. The implementation of a low-phosphorus, low-protein dietary regimen plays a special role in the conservative management of chronic renal disease patients, for the prevention and correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism and for the renal and cardiovascular protection. However, the success and safety of dietary phosphate restriction largely depends on good compliance with dietary recommendations, which must represent a major goal to be regularly pursued in the clinical practice. To this aim, it is crucial that dietitians expert in renal nutrition give education and personalized dietary advice, with the aim of enhancing the patient's adherence to nutritional prescriptions.

  16. Management of acute and post-operative pain in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and patients with many co-morbid conditions frequently have to undergo surgical procedures and, therefore, require effective pain management. The pharmacokinetics of various analgesic agents are not well studied in patients with chronic kidney disease and the risk of accumulation of the main drug or their metabolites, resulting in serious adverse events, is a common scenario on medical and surgical wards. It is common for these patients to be cared for by 'non-nephrologists' who often prescribe the standard dose of the commonly used analgesics, without taking into consideration the patient's kidney function. It is important to recognize the problems and complications associated with the use of standard doses of analgesics, and highlight the importance of adjusting analgesic dosage based on kidney function to avoid complications while still providing adequate pain relief. PMID:24358847

  17. Chronic disease self-management program in the workplace: opportunities for health improvement.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Wilson, Mark G; DeJoy, David M; Padilla, Heather; Zuercher, Heather; Corso, Phaedra; Vandenberg, Robert; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    Disease management is becoming increasingly important in workplace health promotion given the aging workforce, rising chronic disease prevalence, and needs to maintain a productive and competitive American workforce. Despite the widespread availability of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), and its known health-related benefits, program adoption remains low in workplace settings. The primary purpose of this study is to compare personal and delivery characteristics of adults who attended CDSMP in the workplace relative to other settings (e.g., senior centers, healthcare organizations, residential facilities). This study also contrasts characteristics of CDSMP workplace participants to those of the greater United States workforce and provides recommendations for translating CDSMP for use in workplace settings. Data were analyzed from 25,664 adults collected during a national dissemination of CDSMP. Only states and territories that conducted workshops in workplace settings were included in analyses (n = 13 states and Puerto Rico). Chi-squared tests and t-tests were used to compare CDSMP participant characteristics by delivery site type. CDSMP workplace participant characteristics were then compared to reports from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Of the 25,664 CDSMP participants in this study, 1.7% (n = 435) participated in workshops hosted in worksite settings. Compared to CDSMP participants in non-workplace settings, workplace setting participants were significantly younger and had fewer chronic conditions. Differences were also observed based on chronic disease types. On average, CDSMP workshops in workplace settings had smaller class sizes and workplace setting participants attended more workshop sessions. CDSMP participants in workplace settings were substantially older and a larger proportion were female than the general United States workforce. Findings indicate opportunities to translate CDSMP for use in the workplace to

  18. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management considerations for the dental team.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects an estimated 3 million people in the United Kingdom, and is most common among elderly smokers. Patients may present with recurrent coughing of mucoid secretions (chronic bronchitis) or breathlessness caused by destruction of the airways (emphysema). If possible, it is advisable to treat the severely affected patients with them sitting upright in the dental chair as they may find it difficult to breathe when lying in the horizontal position. Periodontal bacteria can be carried into the lung where they can cause respiratory infection; therefore oral hygiene instruction should be emphasised in these patients. The objective of this article is to describe the oral and dental implications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In particular, there have been a number of recent developments in the management of patients with COPD that have direct relevance to the dentist. The drug regime used in the treatment of patients with COPD can have profound implications for clinical dental practice, manifested as dry mouth or oral candidiasis. There is also increasing evidence of a link between COPD and both gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and periodontal disease.

  19. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: GOLD executive summary.

    PubMed

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Hurd, Suzanne S; Agustí, Alvar G; Jones, Paul W; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Martinez, Fernando J; Nishimura, Masaharu; Stockley, Robert A; Sin, Don D; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2013-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem, and since 2001, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) has published its strategy document for the diagnosis and management of COPD. This executive summary presents the main contents of the second 5-year revision of the GOLD document that has implemented some of the vast knowledge about COPD accumulated over the last years. Today, GOLD recommends that spirometry is required for the clinical diagnosis of COPD to avoid misdiagnosis and to ensure proper evaluation of severity of airflow limitation. The document highlights that the assessment of the patient with COPD should always include assessment of (1) symptoms, (2) severity of airflow limitation, (3) history of exacerbations, and (4) comorbidities. The first three points can be used to evaluate level of symptoms and risk of future exacerbations, and this is done in a way that splits patients with COPD into four categories-A, B, C, and D. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management of COPD match this assessment in an evidence-based attempt to relieve symptoms and reduce risk of exacerbations. Identification and treatment of comorbidities must have high priority, and a separate section in the document addresses management of comorbidities as well as COPD in the presence of comorbidities. The revised document also contains a new section on exacerbations of COPD. The GOLD initiative will continue to bring COPD to the attention of all relevant shareholders and will hopefully inspire future national and local guidelines on the management of COPD.

  20. The structure and content of telephonic scripts found useful in a Medicaid Chronic Disease Management Program.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexis M; Ackermann, Ronald T; Downs, Stephen M; Downs, Anne M; Zillich, Alan J; Holmes, Ann M; Katz, Barry P; Murray, Michael D; Inui, Thomas S

    2010-06-01

    In 2003, the Indiana Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning launched the Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP), a programme intended to improve the health and healthcare utilization of 15,000 Aged, Blind and Disabled Medicaid members living with diabetes and/or congestive heart failure in Indiana. Within ICDMP, programme components derived from the Chronic Care Model and education based on an integrated theoretical framework were utilized to create a telephonic care management intervention that was delivered by trained, non-clinical Care Managers (CMs) working under the supervision of a Registered Nurse. CMs utilized computer-assisted health education scripts to address clinically important topics, including medication adherence, diet, exercise and prevention of disease-specific complications. Employing reflective listening techniques, barriers to optimal self-management were assessed and members were encouraged to engage in health-improving actions. ICDMP evaluation results suggest that this low-intensity telephonic intervention shifted utilization and lowered costs. We discuss this patient-centred method for motivating behaviour change, the theoretical constructs underlying the scripts and the branched-logic format that makes them suitable to use as a computer-based application. Our aim is to share these public-domain materials with other programmes.

  1. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine information and advice in chronic disease management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Team, Victoria; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore

    2011-01-01

    The growing evidence on the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its high rate of use (69% of Australians) - particularly for chronic or recurrent conditions - means increasing attention on CAM. However, few people disclose CAM use to their GP, and health professionals tend to inadequately discuss CAM-related issues with their patients, partly due to insufficient knowledge. As clinical and non-clinical chronic condition management guidelines are a means to educate primary health care practitioners, we undertook a content analysis of guidelines relevant to two common chronic conditions - cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - to assess their provision of CAM-related information. Ten current Australian guidelines were reviewed, revealing scant CAM content. When available, the CAM-relevant information was brief, in some cases unclear, inconclusive and lacking in direction to the GP or health care provider. Although we focus on CVD and T2DM, we argue the value of all chronic condition management guidelines integrating relevant evidence-informed information and advice on CAM risks, benefits and referrals, to increase GP awareness and knowledge of appropriate CAM therapies, and potentially to facilitate doctor-client discussion about CAM.

  2. New technologies for chronic disease management and control: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    García-Lizana, Francisca; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of interventions using information and communication technologies (ICTs) for managing and controlling chronic diseases. Electronic databases were searched for randomized clinical trials that assessed the effectiveness of ICTs (except for those that included only telephone communication) and measured some clinical indicator. Information was reviewed and assessed independently by two researchers. Of the 950 clinical trials identified, 56 studies were identified for potential inclusion. Of those, 24 were finally included: 5 studies in asthma, 3 in hypertension, 1 in home telecare, 7 in diabetes, 6 in heart failure and 2 in prevention heart disease. Overall, ICT applications did not show an improvement in clinical outcomes, although no adverse effects were identified. However, ICTs used in the detection and follow up of cardiovascular diseases provided better clinical outcomes, mortality reduction and lower health services utilization. Systems used for improving education and social support were also shown to be effective. At present the evidence about the clinical benefits of ICTs for managing chronic disease is limited.

  3. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic somatic disease cope with these problems at work. The objective of this article is to present the systematic development and content of this programme. Methods The method of intervention mapping (Bartholomew 2006) was used to tailor the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. This paper describes the process of adjusting the CDSMP for this target group. A needs assessment has been carried out by a literature review and qualitative focus groups with employees with a chronic disease and involved health professionals. On the basis of the needs assessment, the relevant determinants of self-management behaviour at work have been identified for the target population and the objectives of the training have been formulated. Furthermore, techniques have been chosen to influence self-management and the determinants of behaviour and a programme plan has been developed. Results The intervention was designed to address general personal factors such as lifestyle, disease-related factors (for example coping with the disease) and work-related personal factors (such as self-efficacy at work). The course consists of six sessions of each two and a half hour and intents to increase the self management and empowerment of employees with a chronic somatic disease. Conclusion Intervention mapping has been found to be a useful tool for tailoring in a systematic way the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. It might be valuable to use IM for the development or adjusting of interventions in occupational health care. PMID:20565925

  4. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  5. The coronary artery disease quality dashboard: a chronic care disease management tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunice; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Li, Qi; Linder, Jeffrey A; Rose, Alan F; Li, Ruzhuo; Eskin, Michael S; Housman, Dan; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2007-10-11

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records (EHRs), may help clinicians understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. The Coronary Artery Disease Quality Dash board (CAD QD) is a secure web report for performance measurement of a chronic care condition delivered through a central data warehouse and custom-built reporting tool. Pilot evaluation of the CAD Quality Dash board indicates that clinicians prefer a quality report that combines not only structured data from EHRs but one that facilitates actions to be taken on individual patients or on a population, i.e., for case management.

  6. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Joint ICS/NCCP (I) recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Maturu, V N; Dhooria, Sahajal; Prasad, K T; Sehgal, Inderpaul S; Yenge, Lakshmikant B; Jindal, Aditya; Singh, Navneet; Ghoshal, A G; Khilnani, G C; Samaria, J K; Gaur, S N; Behera, D

    2013-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem in India. Although several International guidelines for diagnosis and management of COPD are available, yet there are lot of gaps in recognition and management of COPD in India due to vast differences in availability and affordability of healthcare facilities across the country. The Indian Chest Society (ICS) and the National College of Chest Physicians (NCCP) of India have joined hands to come out with these evidence-based guidelines to help the physicians at all levels of healthcare to diagnose and manage COPD in a scientific manner. Besides the International literature, the Indian studies were specifically analyzed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (a) definitions, epidemiology, and disease burden; (b) disease assessment and diagnosis; (c) pharmacologic management of stable COPD; (d) management of acute exacerbations; and (e) nonpharmacologic and preventive measures. The modified grade system was used for classifying the quality of evidence as 1, 2, 3, or usual practice point (UPP). The strength of recommendation was graded as A or B depending upon the level of evidence.

  7. Facilitating superior chronic disease management through a knowledge-based systems development model.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini S; Goldberg, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To date, the adoption and diffusion of technology-enabled solutions to deliver better healthcare has been slow. There are many reasons for this. One of the most significant is that the existing methodologies that are normally used in general for Information and Communications Technology (ICT) implementations tend to be less successful in a healthcare context. This paper describes a knowledge-based adaptive mapping to realisation methodology to traverse successfully from idea to realisation rapidly and without compromising rigour so that success ensues. It is discussed in connection with trying to implement superior ICT-enabled approaches to facilitate superior Chronic Disease Management (CDM).

  8. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  9. Management of refractory breathlessness with morphine in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, N; Le, B; Currow, D; Irving, L; Philip, J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, incurable illness, which leads to significant morbidity over long periods of time and mortality. Treatment aims to reduce symptoms, improve exercise capacity and quality of life, reduce exacerbations, slow disease progression and reduce mortality. However, breathlessness is common in patients with advanced COPD and remains undertreated. As all reversible causes of breathlessness are being optimally managed, consideration should be given to specific non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment strategies for breathlessness. Low dose morphine has been shown to reduce safely and effectively breathlessness in patients with severe COPD and refractory dyspnoea. However, despite numerous guidelines recommending opioids in this clinical setting, many barriers limit their uptake by clinicians. Integration of palliative care earlier in the disease course can help to improve symptom control for people with severe COPD and refractory breathlessness. A multidisciplinary approach involving both respiratory and palliative care teams offers a new model of care for these patients.

  10. Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus: impact on quality of life and current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Shayan; Aina, Olufemi; Park, Youngjun; Chowdhury, Nawsheen; Leger, Kathleen; Hou, Linle; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mathur, Vandana S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) is a distressing, often overlooked condition in patients with CKD and end-stage renal disease. It affects ~40% of patients with end-stage renal disease and has been associated with poor quality of life, poor sleep, depression, and mortality. Prevalence estimates vary based on the instruments used to diagnose CKD-aP, and standardized diagnostic instruments are sorely needed. Treatment studies have often yielded conflicting results. This is likely related to studies that are limited by small sample size, flawed designs, and nonstandardized diagnostic instruments. Several large well-designed treatment trials have recently been completed and may soon influence CKD-aP management. PMID:28176969

  11. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees.

  12. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  13. [National disease management guidelines (NVL) for chronic CAD : What is new, what is particularly important?].

    PubMed

    Werdan, K

    2016-09-01

    Coronary heart disease (CAD) is widespread and affects 1 in 10 of the population in the age group 40-79 years in Germany. The German national management guidelines on chronic CAD comprise evidence and expert-based recommendations for the diagnostics of chronic stable CAD as well as for interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary therapy and care of patients with stable CAD. The focus is on the diagnostics, prevention, medication therapy, revascularization, rehabilitation, general practitioner care and coordination of care. Recommendations for optimizing cooperation between all medical specialties involved as well as the definition of mandatory and appropriate measures are essential aims of the guidelines both to improve the quality of care and to strengthen the position of the patient.

  14. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    PubMed

    Darker, C; Martin, C; O'Dowd, T; O'Kelly, F; O'Shea, B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380/527).The majority of GPs (240/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267/380; 71%), asthma / COPD (279/380; 74%) and hypertension (297/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  15. A game plan: Gamification design principles in mHealth applications for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron S; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Seto, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Effective chronic disease management is essential to improve positive health outcomes, and incentive strategies are useful in promoting self-care with longevity. Gamification, applied with mHealth (mobile health) applications, has the potential to better facilitate patient self-management. This review article addresses a knowledge gap around the effective use of gamification design principles, or mechanics, in developing mHealth applications. Badges, leaderboards, points and levels, challenges and quests, social engagement loops, and onboarding are mechanics that comprise gamification. These mechanics are defined and explained from a design and development perspective. Health and fitness applications with gamification mechanics include: bant which uses points, levels, and social engagement, mySugr which uses challenges and quests, RunKeeper which uses leaderboards as well as social engagement loops and onboarding, Fitocracy which uses badges, and Mango Health, which uses points and levels. Specific design considerations are explored, an example of the efficacy of a gamified mHealth implementation in facilitating improved self-management is provided, limitations to this work are discussed, a link between the principles of gaming and gamification in health and wellness technologies is provided, and suggestions for future work are made. We conclude that gamification could be leveraged in developing applications with the potential to better facilitate self-management in persons with chronic conditions.

  16. Connected health and integrated care: Toward new models for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Chouvarda, Ioanna G; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2015-09-01

    The increasingly aging population in Europe and worldwide brings up the need for the restructuring of healthcare. Technological advancements in electronic health can be a driving force for new health management models, especially in chronic care. In a patient-centered e-health management model, communication and coordination between patient, healthcare professionals in primary care and hospitals can be facilitated, and medical decisions can be made timely and easily communicated. Bringing the right information to the right person at the right time is what connected health aims at, and this may set the basis for the investigation and deployment of the integrated care models. In this framework, an overview of the main technological axes and challenges around connected health technologies in chronic disease management are presented and discussed. A central concept is personal health system for the patient/citizen and three main application areas are identified. The connected health ecosystem is making progress, already shows benefits in (a) new biosensors, (b) data management, (c) data analytics, integration and feedback. Examples are illustrated in each case, while open issues and challenges for further research and development are pinpointed.

  17. Future options for the management of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chidi; Kankam, Charity

    2012-02-01

    The lack of health care infrastructure and prevalence of infectious disease in Nigeria exacerbate the growing problem of diagnosing and treating chronic kidney disease. Nigeria should place more emphasis on chronic kidney disease education, screening, and prevention; propagation of acceptance of peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis; subsidization of renal replacement costs; and advancement of the national renal transplantation program.

  18. Social support: a key variable for health promotion and chronic disease management in Hispanic patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alyssa T; Andrade, Regina E; Middleton, Kimberly R; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases, including rheumatic diseases, can cause immense physical and psychosocial burden for patients. Many Hispanics suffering with arthritis face activity limitations. Social support, or the functional content of relationships, may be important to consider when examining treatment and outcomes for Hispanic individuals. Participants were recruited from an urban community health center (CHC) as part of a larger health behavior study. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods analysis was conducted to explore the role of social support in the sample. Only Hispanic/Latino patients (n = 46) were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. The majority of the sample (87%) perceived some presence of social support in their lives. The two most commonly cited types of social support were emotional and instrumental. The two most common sources of social support were family members other than spouses (52.2%) and spouses (32.6%). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly correlated with the number of perceived sources of support. The presence or absence and the role of social support in supporting optimal health outcomes should be considered for Hispanics with chronic rheumatic diseases. Involving family members and spouses in the plan of care for this population could facilitate health promotion and chronic disease management.

  19. Electronic health records and improved nursing management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengping; Zou, Yeqing; Huang, Qingmei; Zheng, Li; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies evolving trends in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and recommends the integration of nursing strategies in COPD management via widespread implementation of electronic health records. COPD is a complex lung disease with diverse origins, both physical and behavioral, manifested in a wide range of symptoms that further increase the patient's risk for comorbidities. Early diagnosis and effective management of COPD require monitoring of a dizzying array of COPD symptoms over extended periods of time, and nurses are especially well positioned to manage potential progressions of COPD, as frontline health care providers who obtain, record, and organize patient data. Developments in medical technology greatly aid nursing management of COPD, from the deployment of spirometry as a diagnostic tool at the family practice level to newly approved treatment options, including non-nicotine pharmacotherapies that reduce the cravings associated with tobacco withdrawal. Among new medical technologies, electronic health records have proven particularly advantageous in the management of COPD, enabling providers to gather, maintain, and reference more patient data than has ever been possible before. Thus, consistent and widespread implementation of electronic health records facilitates the coordination of diverse treatment strategies, resulting in increased positive health outcomes for patients with COPD.

  20. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  1. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and/or markers of kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with albuminuria and hypertension, hemoglobin A1c ≤7% for patients with diabetes, and correction of CKD-associated metabolic acidosis. To reduce patient safety hazards from medications, the level of eGFR should be considered when prescribing, and nephrotoxins should be avoided, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The main reasons to refer to nephrology specialists are eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), severe albuminuria, and acute kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life.

  2. Patients' self-efficacy within online health communities: facilitating chronic disease self-management behaviors through peer education.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat the growing burden of chronic disease, evidence-based self-management programs have been designed to teach patients about the disease and its affect on their lives. Self-efficacy is a key component in chronic disease self-management. This research used online ethnography and discourse analysis (N = 8,231) to examine self-efficacy within the computer-mediated communication (CMC) of four online health communities used by people with arthritis. Specifically, online opinion leaders were identified for examination. Across the four communities, there was a cyclical process that involved "disease veterans" sharing their experiences and gaining credibility within the community, new(er) members suffering from disease symptoms and sharing their experiences online, and finally, asking others for help with arthritis self-management behaviors. Three themes follow: (1) sharing disease experience, (2) suffering from disease symptoms, and (3) asking for help. Practical implications for health promotion and education are discussed.

  3. Chronic Disease Management Strategies of Early Childhood Caries: Support from the Medical and Dental Literature.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Burton L; Ng, Man Wai

    2015-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine report places chronic disease management (CDM) as an intervention on a treatment spectrum between prevention and acute care. CDM commonly focuses on conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. Framing early childhood caries (ECC) as such a chronic condition invites dentistry to reconsider its approach to caries management and shift gears from a strictly surgical approach to one that also incorporates a medical approach. This paper's purpose was to explore the definition of and concepts inherent in CDM. An explanatory model is introduced to describe the multiple factors that influence ECC-CDM strategies. Reviewed literature suggests that early evidence from ECC-CDM interventions, along with results of pediatric asthma and diabetes CDM, supports CDM of ECC as a valid approach that is independent of both prevention and repair. Early results of ECC-CDM endeavors have demonstrated a reduction in rates of new cavitation, dental pain, and referral to the operating room compared to baseline rates. ECC-CDM strategies hold strong promise to curtail caries activity while complementing dental repair when needed, thereby reducing disease progression and cavity recurrence. Institutionalizing ECC-CDM will both require and benefit from evolving health care delivery and financing systems that reward positive health outcomes.

  4. Implementing a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program into China: The Happy Life Club™

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Colette Joy; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Tuohong; Chapman, Anna; Liu, Shuo; Enticott, Joanne; Thomas, Shane Andrew

    2015-01-01

    China is experiencing population aging, increased prevalence of chronic diseases, and reductions in the frequency of healthy lifestyle behaviors. In response to these significant transitions, China is implementing major reforms in health care services with a focus on strengthening primary health care. In this paper, we describe a 12-month diabetes management program, the Happy Life Club™ (HLC™), implemented in a primary health care setting in Beijing, that uses doctor and nurse health coaches trained in behavior change techniques and motivational interviewing (MI). This paper reports the results of this pilot study and discusses issues involved in the implementation of Chronic Diseases Self-Management Programs in China. The intervention group showed improvements in HbA1c levels at 6 months and both the control and intervention groups showed reductions in waist circumference over time. Systolic blood pressure improved over time in the intervention group. The intervention group showed improvement in quality of life across the intervention period and both groups showed decreases in psychological distress across the intervention. Doctor visits increased between baseline and 6 months, but there was no change in doctor visits between 6 and 12 months for both groups. The effects were modest, and further investigations are required to evaluate the long-term impact of health coach approaches in China. PMID:25964910

  5. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heui-Sug; Kim, Dong Ik; Oh, Moo-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver.

  6. [Case management and complex chronic diseases: concepts, models, evidence and uncertainties].

    PubMed

    Morales-Asencio, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the greatest challenge for Health Care, but the conventional health care models have failed noticeably. Nurses are one of the main providers of the services developed to tackle this challenge, with special emphasis on case management, as one of the most common forms. But, one of the key problems is that case management is poorly conceptualized, and with the diversity of experience available, make its development and comparative evaluation difficult. An in-depth review on case management definition and concepts is presented in this article, with a description of the models, ingredients and the effectiveness reported in various studies. The remaining uncertainties in case management, such as the heterogeneity of designs and target populations, the weak description of the components, and the scarce use of research models for complex interventions, are also discussed. Finally, some key factors for a successful implementation of case management are detailed, such as a clear definition of accountability and roles, the existence of support to guarantee the competence of case managers, the use of valid mechanisms for case finding, adjusted caseload, accessible and team-shared record systems, or the integration of health and social services.

  7. Review: clinical inertia in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Catherine E; Sidel, Michelle; Belletti, Daniel A; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third-leading cause of death in the United States. Despite clinical practice guidelines endorsed by national organizations, the management of COPD deviates from guideline recommendations. Patients with COPD are frequently underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed, due in large part to the lack of spirometry testing. When diagnosed, about one third of patients are not receiving any COPD-related drug therapy. Factors that contribute to suboptimal management include provider, patient, and system factors. Physician factors such as understanding and attitude toward the disease, and awareness of guidelines, may affect appropriate management of COPD. Patient factors include medication non-adherence, understanding of the disease, severity of their symptoms, and access to medications. System factors such as insurance coverage may limit aspects of COPD care. To overcome clinical inertia, a multifaceted approach is required. Provider and patient education, the use of health informatics, changes in provider work-flow and the recent development of performance measures, such as the use of spirometry in patients with COPD, can improve the delivery of recommended care for COPD patients.

  8. Evaluating a Chronic Disease Management Improvement Collaboration: Lessons in Design and Implementation Fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kaye; Amar, Claudia; Elicksen-Jensen, Keesa

    2016-01-01

    For the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), the Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration (AHC) was a pivotal opportunity to build upon its experience and expertise in delivering regional change management training and to apply and refine its evaluation and performance measurement approach. This paper reports on its evaluation principles and approach, as well as the lessons learned as CFHI diligently coordinated and worked with improvement project (IP) teams and a network of stakeholders to design and undertake a suite of evaluative activities. The evaluation generated evidence and learnings about various elements of chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) improvement processes, individual and team capacity building and the role and value of CFHI in facilitating tailored learning activities and networking among teams, coaches and other AHC stakeholders.

  9. A mobile phone based remote patient monitoring system for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Mathieu; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Hamill, Melinda; Igharas, Walter; Tallevi, Kevin; Picton, Peter; Lam, Jack; Rossos, Peter G; Easty, Anthony C; Logan, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Rising concern over the poor state of chronic disease management led to the user-informed design and development of a home tele-monitoring system. Focus groups with patients and primary care providers guided the research team towards a design that would accommodate the workflow and concerns of the healthcare providers and the low use and comfort with technology found among the patient population. The system was trialed in a before-and-after pilot study of 34 patients with diabetes and hypertension. Findings demonstrate a significant improvement in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. An RCT beginning in 2007 is being conducted to confirm these findings. It is hypothesized that this user-centred approach, utilizing focus groups, iterative design and human factors methods of evaluation, will lead to the next-generation of home tele-monitoring applications that are more intuitive, less cumbersome, and ultimately bring about greater patient compliance and better physician management.

  10. The TAR model: use of therapeutic state transitions for quality assurance reporting in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, R; Warren, J; Kenealy, T

    2007-01-01

    Chronic disease management represents one of the challenges for health informatics and demands the appropriate application of information technology for improved patient care. This paper presents an approach to quality assurance reporting wherein the recommendations of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are considered in the context of empirical therapeutic state-transitions (in terms of changes in individual patient prescriptions over time). We apply a Transition-based Audit Report (TAR) model to antihypertensive prescribing and related data as stored in a New Zealand General Practice Management System database. The results provide a set of quality indicators and specific patient cohorts for potential practice quality improvement with strong linkage to the selected guidelines and observed practice patterns. We see the TAR model primarily as a tool to enable internal quality improvement efforts, but also to be of relevance for focusing pay-for-performance programs.

  11. Community-Based Participatory Research With Native American Communities: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird

    2016-01-01

    Health disparities among Native Americans persist despite efforts to translate evidence-based programs from research to practice. Few evidence-based, theory-driven prevention and management interventions have been successfully translated within Native American communities. The use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) has shown promise in this process. This article provides an overview of the use of CBPR with Native American communities and discusses the translation of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, using a CBPR approach, with an urban Native American community. This article highlights not only how the CBPR process facilitates the successful translation of the Stanford program but also how CBPR is used within this community to build community capacity. PMID:19376928

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients' Experiences of an Enhanced Self-Management Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neil; Jones, Pauline; Adamson, Vikki; Spiteri, Monica; Kinmond, Kathryn

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is debilitating and costly. Self-management is championed to empower individuals to better manage their condition and also to efficiently utilize health resources. As a multi-disciplinary team, we conducted focus group research with individuals living with COPD who were participating in a longitudinal study to use an electronic "diary" to monitor, record, and transmit their own health status, plus receiving regular nurse visits. The main aims of the focus groups were to investigate how far individuals embraced the electronic diary and experienced it as an aid to the self-management of their condition. We also looked at the importance of the nurse visits to the process. Thematic analysis revealed that patients responded positively to the use of technology (the electronic diary), including psychological benefits of perceived support offered by the remote symptom surveillance. Findings also showed patients' increased awareness and monitoring of personal symptoms together with an improved understanding of disease self-management. Nurse support emerged as an important "human" factor in the process. In addition, a reduction in hospital admission was observed, thus reducing costs to the health service.

  13. Diabetes as a case study of chronic disease management with a personalized approach: the role of a structured feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Barkai, László; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Czupryniak, Leszek; Gomis, Ramon; Harno, Kari; Kulzer, Bernhard; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Némethyová, Zuzana; Owens, David; Schnell, Oliver; Tankova, Tsvetalina; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Vergès, Bruno; Weitgasser, Raimund; Wens, Johan

    2012-10-01

    As non-communicable or chronic diseases are a growing threat to human health and economic growth, political stakeholders are aiming to identify options for improved response to the challenges of prevention and management of non-communicable diseases. This paper is intended to contribute ideas on personalized chronic disease management which are based on experience with one major chronic disease, namely diabetes mellitus. Diabetes provides a pertinent case of chronic disease management with a particular focus on patient self-management. Despite advances in diabetes therapy, many people with diabetes still fail to achieve treatment targets thus remaining at risk of complications. Personalizing the management of diabetes according to the patient's individual profile can help in improving therapy adherence and treatment outcomes. This paper suggests using a six-step cycle for personalized diabetes (self-)management and collaborative use of structured blood glucose data. E-health solutions can be used to improve process efficiencies and allow remote access. Decision support tools and algorithms can help doctors in making therapeutic decisions based on individual patient profiles. Available evidence about the effectiveness of the cycle's constituting elements justifies expectations that the diabetes management cycle as a whole can generate medical and economic benefit.

  14. Physicians’ perceptions of capacity building for managing chronic disease in seniors using integrated interprofessional care models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; McKelvie, Robert; Jong, Philip; D’Elia, Teresa; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the barriers to and facilitators of adapting and expanding a primary care memory clinic model to integrate care of additional complex chronic geriatric conditions (heart failure, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty) into care processes with the goal of improving outcomes for seniors. Design Mixed-methods study using quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) methods. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians currently working in primary care memory clinic teams and supporting geriatric specialists. Methods Family physicians currently working in memory clinic teams (n = 29) and supporting geriatric specialists (n = 9) were recruited as survey participants. Interviews were conducted with memory clinic lead physicians (n = 16). Statistical analysis was done to assess differences between family physician ratings and geriatric specialist ratings related to the capacity for managing complex chronic geriatric conditions, the role of interprofessional collaboration within primary care, and funding and staffing to support geriatric care. Results from both study methods were compared to identify common findings. Main findings Results indicate overall support for expanding the memory clinic model to integrate care for other complex conditions. However, the current primary care structure is challenged to support optimal management of patients with multiple comorbidities, particularly as related to limited funding and staffing resources. Structured training, interprofessional teams, and an active role of geriatric specialists within primary care were identified as important facilitators. Conclusion The memory clinic model, as applied to other complex chronic geriatric conditions, has the potential to build capacity for high-quality primary care, improve health outcomes, promote efficient use of health care resources, and reduce health care costs. PMID:25932482

  15. A multi-interface adaptive hypermedia system to promote consumer-provider partnership in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Maria; Warren, Jim; Jones, Sara; Chung, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Much of chronic disease management depends on active partnership of consumer and provider. Our system promotes diabetes management through profiling and adaptive support of both consumer and provider. We use a University Podiatry Clinic and diabetes consumer information portal as inter-related contexts that share profile information.

  16. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  17. A guide to the management of tuberculosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Radha K; Saraswat, Vivek A; Rajekar, Harshal; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2012-09-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the 'Captains of the Men of Death' even today, particularly in the developing world. Its frequency is increased 14-fold in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) and liver cirrhosis, more so in those with decompensated disease, probably due to the cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, and case-fatality rates are high. The diagnosis of tuberculosis, particularly the interpretation of the Mantoux test, is also fraught with difficulties in CLD, especially after previous BCG vaccination. However, the greatest challenge in the patient with CLD or liver cirrhosis and tuberculosis is managing their therapy since the best first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs are hepatotoxic and baseline liver function is often deranged. Frequency of hepatotoxicity is increased in those with liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C, possibly related to increased viral loads and may be decreased following antiviral therapy. If hepatotoxicity develops in those with liver cirrhosis, particularly decompensated cirrhosis, the risk of severe liver failure is markedly increased. Currently, there are no established guidelines for anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) in CLD and liver cirrhosis although the need for such guidelines is self-evident. It is proposed that ATT should include no more than 2 hepatotoxic drugs (RIF and INH) in patients with CLD or liver cirrhosis and stable liver function [Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) ≤7], only a single hepatotoxic drug (RIF or INH) in those with advanced liver dysfunction (CTP 8-10) and no hepatotoxic drugs with very advanced liver dysfunction (CTP ≥11). A standard protocol should be followed for monitoring ATT-related hepatotoxicity and for stop rules and reintroduction rules in all these patients, on the lines proposed here. It is hoped that these proposals will introduce uniformity and result in streamlining the management of these difficult patients.

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  19. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  20. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  1. Chronic laminitis: foot management.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Scott

    2010-08-01

    Laminitis is a disease of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx, which can advance to the chronic stage with varying degrees of structural failure. Because the disease may ultimately lead to mechanical failure of the digit, a foot management plan is required to effectively and mechanically treat these cases. Many laminitis cases can be successfully rehabilitated back to athletic soundness, light use, breeding, or pasture soundness, whereas others suffer from permanent instability and never enjoy an acceptable level of comfort. To understand how to minimize damage in the acute laminitic foot or rehabilitate the chronic laminitic foot, the veterinarian should have an understanding of the normal supporting structures of the digit, the biomechanical forces acting on the foot, and the structural failure that results when these otherwise normal forces act on a diseased, damaged foot.

  2. Evaluation of a self-management programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ap; Anderson, Jk; Wallace, Lm; Kennedy-Williams, P

    2014-06-30

    Self-management is becoming an important part of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a longitudinal survey of patients with COPD who attended a 7-week group-based lay and clinician co-delivered COPD self-management programme (SMP)to see whether they became more activated, enjoyed better health status, and quality of life, were less psychologically distressed and improved their self-management abilities. The main analysis was a per-protocol analysis (N = 131), which included only patients who attended ≥5 SMP sessions and who returned a 6-month follow-up questionnaires. Changes in the mean values of the patient outcomes were compared over time using paired t tests and general linear model for repeated measures. Patient activation significantly improved 6 months after the SMP (p < 0.001). There were also significant improvements in COPD mastery (p = 0.001) and significant improvements in a range of self-management abilities (self-monitoring and insight p = 0.03), constructive attitude shift (p = 0.04), skills and technique acquisition, (p < 0.001)). This study showed that a lay and clinician-led SMP for patients with COPD has the potential to produce improvements in important outcomes such as activation, mastery and self-management abilities.

  3. Overview of the prevalence, impact, and management of depression and anxiety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Panagioti, Maria; Scott, Charlotte; Blakemore, Amy; Coventry, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    More than one third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. This review aims to provide an overview of the burden of depression and anxiety in those with COPD and to outline the contemporary advances and challenges in the management of depression and anxiety in COPD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD lead to worse health outcomes, including impaired health-related quality of life and increased mortality risk. Depression and anxiety also increase health care utilization rates and costs. Although the quality of the data varies considerably, the cumulative evidence shows that complex interventions consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation interventions with or without psychological components improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also an effective intervention for managing depression in COPD, but treatment effects are small. Cognitive behavioral therapy could potentially lead to greater benefits in depression and anxiety in people with COPD if embedded in multidisciplinary collaborative care frameworks, but this hypothesis has not yet been empirically assessed. Mindfulness-based treatments are an alternative option for the management of depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions, but their efficacy is unproven in COPD. Beyond pulmonary rehabilitation, the evidence about optimal approaches for managing depression and anxiety in COPD remains unclear and largely speculative. Future research to evaluate the effectiveness of novel and integrated care approaches for the management of depression and anxiety in COPD is warranted. PMID:25419126

  4. Overview of the prevalence, impact, and management of depression and anxiety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Panagioti, Maria; Scott, Charlotte; Blakemore, Amy; Coventry, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    More than one third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. This review aims to provide an overview of the burden of depression and anxiety in those with COPD and to outline the contemporary advances and challenges in the management of depression and anxiety in COPD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD lead to worse health outcomes, including impaired health-related quality of life and increased mortality risk. Depression and anxiety also increase health care utilization rates and costs. Although the quality of the data varies considerably, the cumulative evidence shows that complex interventions consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation interventions with or without psychological components improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also an effective intervention for managing depression in COPD, but treatment effects are small. Cognitive behavioral therapy could potentially lead to greater benefits in depression and anxiety in people with COPD if embedded in multidisciplinary collaborative care frameworks, but this hypothesis has not yet been empirically assessed. Mindfulness-based treatments are an alternative option for the management of depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions, but their efficacy is unproven in COPD. Beyond pulmonary rehabilitation, the evidence about optimal approaches for managing depression and anxiety in COPD remains unclear and largely speculative. Future research to evaluate the effectiveness of novel and integrated care approaches for the management of depression and anxiety in COPD is warranted.

  5. How and when eHealth is a good investment for patients managing chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin J; Dalziel, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we elaborate on the cost-effectiveness of eHealth solutions and the need to evaluate the return on investment as is done routinely with all other major expenditures. To this end, we discuss the theory that exists today to explain some of the usage principles affiliated with information technology implementation in healthcare; namely, we reflect on the Technology Adoption Criteria in Health (TEACH) model and Wagner's Chronic Disease Management model. The basic premise of the TEACH model is that adoption requires work; this work must be recognized at the outset, and the progress to overcome the workload increase must be measured for the adoption to continue. Furthermore, both of these models have emphasized that the trade-off between cost and work and the benefits realized (as seen through measurement) must first be applied to patients that use the system frequently and on an ongoing basis (ie, the chronically ill). We refer to these ongoing users as consumers of healthcare resources-Consumers with Chronic Conditions (the 3C patients). In this article, we show that the benefits outweigh the costs only when we do, in fact, apply the analysis to 3C patients. Once an effective eHealth system has been developed for the 3C patients, then it can be straightforwardly extended to include all patients and other stakeholders.

  6. A 21st Century approach to chronic disease management in the United Kingdom: implications for nurse education.

    PubMed

    Astin, Felicity; Closs, S José; Lascelles, Margaret

    2005-12-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. An ageing population in prosperous countries has led to an increase in the number of people living with one or more chronic conditions; a trend which is predicted to worsen. Other 'new' epidemics such as obesity, combined with scarce economic resources, have provided impetus for a review of care provision for those living with chronic diseases in the UK. The new 'National Health Service (NHS) and Social Care Long Term Conditions Model' represents a cultural shift as patient and carer are scripted as central in managing their chronic disease, supported rather than directed by a health and social care team. The patient as a passive recipient of care is no longer viable in this approach to care delivery. It has been acknowledged that cultural shift within the NHS is required for these initiatives to be successful. Nurse educators have the potential to play a key role in supporting nurses to fully engage in the modernised chronic disease management initiative. This paper outlines the main features of the contemporary approach to chronic disease management, together with relevant UK policy changes. The implications of these changes for nurse education will be considered.

  7. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  8. Self-management interventions in stages 1 to 4 chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Welch, Janet L; Johnson, Michelle; Zimmerman, Lani; Russell, Cynthia L; Perkins, Susan M; Decker, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence, effect on health outcomes, and economic impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have created interest in self-management interventions to help slow disease progression to kidney failure. Seven studies were reviewed to identify knowledge gaps and future directions for research. All studies were published between 2010 and 2013; no investigations were conducted in the United States. Knowledge gaps included the focus on medical self-management tasks with no attention to role or emotional tasks, lack of family involvement during intervention delivery, and an inability to form conclusions about the efficacy of interventions because methodological rigor was insufficient. Educational content varied across studies. Strategies to improve self-management skills and enhance self-efficacy varied and were limited in scope. Further development and testing of theory-based interventions are warranted. There is a critical need for future research using well-designed trials with appropriately powered sample sizes, well-tested instruments, and clear and consistent reporting of results.

  9. The role of home-based information and communications technology interventions in chronic disease management: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Rekha; Warren, Jim

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a systematic literature review done to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of home-based information and communications technology enabled interventions for chronic disease management, with emphasis on their impact on health outcomes and costs. Relevant articles were retrieved from PubMed and evaluated using quality worksheets with pre-identified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 256 articles retrieved, 27 were found to concord with the study criteria. Evaluation of the identified articles was conducted irrespective of study design, type of home-based intervention or chronic disease involved. The review demonstrates that HBIs applied to chronic disease management improve functional and cognitive patient outcomes and reduce healthcare spending. However, further research is needed to assess benefit in terms of evidence-based outcome indicators (that can provide a basis for meta-analysis), to confirm sustainable cost benefits, and to systematically collect data on physician satisfaction with patient management.

  10. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Manjomo, R. C.; Mwagomba, B.; Ade, S.; Ali, E.; Ben-Smith, A.; Khomani, P.; Bondwe, P.; Nkhoma, D.; Douglas, G. P.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Chikosi, L.; Gadabu, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27358797

  11. Empowering citizens for well-being and chronic disease management with wellness diary.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Elina; Korhonen, Ilkka; Salminen, Jukka H; Ahtinen, Aino; Koskinen, Esa; Särelä, Antti; Pärkkä, Juha; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2010-03-01

    Chronic conditions closely related to lifestyles are the major cause of disability and death in the developed world. Behavior change is the key to managing well-being and preventing and managing chronic diseases. Wellness diary (WD) is a mobile application designed to support citizens in learning about their behavior, and both making and maintaining behavior changes. WD has been found acceptable, useful, and suitable for long-term use as a part of an intervention. When used independently, however, it does not seem to have enough engaging and motivating features to support adoption and long-term commitment. The main improvement needs identified based on a review of WD-related studies were: personalization of the application to individual needs, increasing motivation during early use, maintaining motivation, and aiding in relapse recovery in long-term use. We present concepts to improve the personalization of WD as well as improvements to the feedback and interpretation of the self-observation data. We also present usage models on how this type of mobile application could be utilized.

  12. Poststroke chronic disease management: towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications.

    PubMed

    Brainin, Michael; Norrving, Bo; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Goldstein, Larry B; Cramer, Steven C; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Duncan, Pamela W; Francisco, Gerard; Good, David; Graham, Glenn; Kissela, Brett M; Olver, John; Ward, Anthony; Wissel, Jörg; Zorowitz, Richard

    2011-02-01

    This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60% of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10%. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.

  13. Health literacy and chronic disease management: drawing from expert knowledge to set an agenda.

    PubMed

    Poureslami, Iraj; Nimmon, Laura; Rootman, Irving; Fitzgerald, Mark J

    2016-02-11

    Understanding the nature and impact of health literacy is a priority in health promotion and chronic disease prevention and treatment. Health literacy comprises the application of a broad set of skills to access, comprehend, evaluate, communicate and act on health information for improved health and well-being. A complex concept, it involves multiple participants and is enacted across a wide variety of contexts. Health literacy's complexity has given rise to challenges achieving a standard definition and developing means to measure all its dimensions. In May 2013, a group of health literacy experts, clinicians and policymakers convened at an Expert Roundtable to review the current state of health literacy research and practice, and make recommendations about refining its definition, expanding its measurement and integrating best practices into chronic disease management. The four-day knowledge exchange concluded that the successful integration of health literacy into policy and practice depends on the development of a more substantial evidence base. A review of the successes and gaps in health literacy research, education and interventions culminated in the identification of key priorities to further the health literacy agenda. The workshop was funded by the UBC Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, Vancouver.

  14. [Consensus document for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José L; Bover, Jordi; Segura-de la Morena, Julián; Cebollada, Jesús; Escalada, Javier; Esmatjes, Enric; Fácila, Lorenzo; Gamarra, Javier; Gràcia, Silvia; Hernández-Moreno, Julio; Llisterri-Caro, José L; Mazón, Pilar; Montañés, Rosario; Morales-Olivas, Francisco; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro; de Santiago, Ana; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Suárez, Carmen; Tranche, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global health problem, involving to 10% of the Spanish population, promoting high morbidity and mortality for the patient and an elevate consumption of the total health resources for the National Health System. This is a summary of an executive consensus document of ten scientific societies involved in the care of the renal patient, that actualizes the consensus document published in 2007. The central extended document can be consulted in the web page of each society. The aspects included in the document are: Concept, epidemiology and risk factors for CKD. Diagnostic criteria, evaluation and stages of CKD, albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate estimation. Progression factors for renal damage. Patient remission criteria. Follow-up and objectives of each speciality control. Nephrotoxicity prevention. Cardio-vascular damage detection. Diet, life-style and treatment attitudes: hypertension, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycemia, smoking, obesity, hyperuricemia, anemia, mineral and bone disorders. Multidisciplinary management for Primary Care, other specialities and Nephrology. Integrated management of CKD patient in haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and renal transplant patients. Management of the uremic patient in palliative care. We hope that this document may be of help for the multidisciplinary management of CKD patients by summarizing the most updated recommendations.

  15. [Consensus document for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José L; Bover, Jordi; Segura-de la Morena, Julián; Cebollada, Jesús; Escalada, Javier; Esmatjes, Enric; Fácila, Lorenzo; Gamarra, Javier; Gràcia, Silvia; Hernández-Moreno, Julio; Llisterri-Caro, José L; Mazón, Pilar; Montañés, Rosario; Morales-Olivas, Francisco; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro; de Santiago, Ana; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Suárez, Carmen; Tranche, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global health problem, involving to 10% of the Spanish population, promoting high morbidity and mortality for the patient and an elevate consumption of the total health resources for the National Health System. This is a summary of an executive consensus document of ten scientific societies involved in the care of the renal patient, that actualizes the consensus document published in 2007. The central extended document can be consulted in the web page of each society. The aspects included in the document are: Concept, epidemiology and risk factors for CKD. Diagnostic criteria, evaluation and stages of CKD, albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate estimation. Progression factors for renal damage. Patient remission criteria. Follow-up and objectives of each speciality control. Nephrotoxicity prevention. Cardio-vascular damage detection. Diet, life-style and treatment attitudes: hypertension, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycemia, smoking, obesity, hyperuricemia, anemia, mineral and bone disorders. Multidisciplinary management for Primary Care, other specialities and Nephrology. Integrated management of CKD patient in haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and renal transplant patients. Management of the uremic patient in palliative care. We hope that this document may be of help for the multidisciplinary management of CKD patients by summarizing the most updated recommendations.

  16. Utility of the advanced chronic kidney disease patient management tools: case studies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate management of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) delays or limits its progression. The Advanced CKD Patient Management Toolkit was developed using a process-improvement technique to assist patient management and address CKD-specific management issues. We pilot tested the toolkit in 2 community nephrology practices, assessed the utility of individual tools, and evaluated the impact on conformance to an advanced CKD guideline through patient chart abstraction. Tool use was distinct in the 2 sites and depended on the site champion's involvement, the extent of process reconfiguration demanded by a tool, and its perceived value. Baseline conformance varied across guideline recommendations (averaged 54%). Posttrial conformance increased in all clinical areas (averaged 59%). Valuable features of the toolkit in real-world settings were its ability to: facilitate tool selection, direct implementation efforts in response to a baseline performance audit, and allow selection of tool versions and customizing them. Our results suggest that systematically created, multifaceted, and customizable tools can promote guideline conformance.

  17. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monninkhof, E; van der Valk, P; van der Palen, J; van Herwaarden, C; Partridge, M; Zielhuis, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the value of self-management education is not clear. This review was undertaken to clarify the effectiveness of self-management programmes in COPD. Methods: A search was made of the Cochrane Airways Group trial registers, Medline, reference lists, and abstracts of medical conferences for controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD. Two reviewers independently assessed each paper for methodological quality and extracted the data. Results: The reviewers included 12 articles describing eight randomised controlled trials and one controlled clinical trial in which self-management education was compared with usual care. The studies assessed a broad spectrum of outcome measures with different follow up times so meta-analysis could not be undertaken. Self-management education had no effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits, days lost from work, and lung function. Inconclusive results were observed on health related quality of life, COPD symptoms, and use of healthcare facilities such as doctor and nurse visits. Self-management education reduced the need for rescue medication and led to increased use of courses of oral steroids and antibiotics for respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Insufficient data were obtained to make recommendations because of the wide variation in outcome measures used and other limitations to generalisations in the current published literature. Further research in this area is needed. PMID:12728158

  18. Transmission of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer: implications for disease spread and management.

    PubMed

    Jennelle, Christopher S; Henaux, Viviane; Wasserberg, Gideon; Thiagarajan, Bala; Rolley, Robert E; Samuel, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the rate of infection or mode of transmission for wildlife diseases, and the implications of alternative management strategies. We used hunter harvest data from 2002 to 2013 to investigate chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection rate and transmission modes, and address how alternative management approaches affect disease dynamics in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Uncertainty regarding demographic impacts of CWD on cervid populations, human and domestic animal health concerns, and potential economic consequences underscore the need for strategies to control CWD distribution and prevalence. Using maximum-likelihood methods to evaluate alternative multi-state deterministic models of CWD transmission, harvest data strongly supports a frequency-dependent transmission structure with sex-specific infection rates that are two times higher in males than females. As transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are an important and difficult-to-study class of diseases with major economic and ecological implications, our work supports the hypothesis of frequency-dependent transmission in wild deer at a broad spatial scale and indicates that effective harvest management can be implemented to control CWD prevalence. Specifically, we show that harvest focused on the greater-affected sex (males) can result in stable population dynamics and control of CWD within the next 50 years, given the constraints of the model. We also provide a quantitative estimate of geographic disease spread in southern Wisconsin, validating qualitative assessments that CWD spreads relatively slowly. Given increased discovery and distribution of CWD throughout North America, insights from our study are valuable to management agencies and to the general public concerned about the impacts of CWD on white-tailed deer populations.

  19. Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in Wisconsin White-Tailed Deer: Implications for Disease Spread and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jennelle, Christopher S.; Henaux, Viviane; Wasserberg, Gideon; Thiagarajan, Bala; Rolley, Robert E.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the rate of infection or mode of transmission for wildlife diseases, and the implications of alternative management strategies. We used hunter harvest data from 2002 to 2013 to investigate chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection rate and transmission modes, and address how alternative management approaches affect disease dynamics in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Uncertainty regarding demographic impacts of CWD on cervid populations, human and domestic animal health concerns, and potential economic consequences underscore the need for strategies to control CWD distribution and prevalence. Using maximum-likelihood methods to evaluate alternative multi-state deterministic models of CWD transmission, harvest data strongly supports a frequency-dependent transmission structure with sex-specific infection rates that are two times higher in males than females. As transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are an important and difficult-to-study class of diseases with major economic and ecological implications, our work supports the hypothesis of frequency-dependent transmission in wild deer at a broad spatial scale and indicates that effective harvest management can be implemented to control CWD prevalence. Specifically, we show that harvest focused on the greater-affected sex (males) can result in stable population dynamics and control of CWD within the next 50 years, given the constraints of the model. We also provide a quantitative estimate of geographic disease spread in southern Wisconsin, validating qualitative assessments that CWD spreads relatively slowly. Given increased discovery and distribution of CWD throughout North America, insights from our study are valuable to management agencies and to the general public concerned about the impacts of CWD on white-tailed deer populations. PMID:24658535

  20. Time spent by people managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease indicates biographical disruption.

    PubMed

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Yen, Laurann E; Bagheri, Nasser; McRae, Ian S

    2014-01-01

    Since Bury's 1982 proposal that chronic illness creates biographical disruption for those who are living with it, there has been no effort to quantitatively measure such disruption. "Biographical disruption" refers to the substantial and directive influence that chronic illness can have over the course of a person's life. Qualitative research and time use studies have demonstrated that people with chronic illnesses spend considerable amounts of time managing their health, and that these demands may change over time. This study was designed to measure the time that older people with chronic illnesses spend on selected health practices as one indicator of biographical disruption. We look specifically at the time use of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As part of a larger time use survey, a recall questionnaire was mailed to 3,100 members of Lung Foundation Australia in 2011. A total of 681 responses were received (22.0% response rate), 611 of which were from people with COPD. Descriptive analyses were undertaken on the amount of time spent on selected health-related activities including personal care, nonclinical health-related care, and activity relating to health services. Almost all people with COPD report spending some time each day on personal or home-based health-related tasks, with a median time of 15 minutes per day spent on these activities. At the median, people also report spending about 30 minutes per day exercising, 2.2 hours per month (the equivalent of 4.4 minutes per day) on nonclinical health-related activities, and 4.1 hours per month (equivalent to 8.2 minutes per day) on clinical activities. Excluding exercise, the median total time spent on health-related activities was 17.8 hours per month (or 35.6 minutes per day). For people in the top 10% of time use, the total amount of time was more than 64.6 hours per month (or 2.2 hours per day) excluding exercise, and 104 hours per month (or 3.5 hours per day) including exercise

  1. Update on current management of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Nina E; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated chronic kidney disease (CKD) varies geographically and depends on the definition of CKD used, ranging from 4.7% to 38% globally. The incidence, however, has decreased with the use of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). A wide variety of histological patterns are seen in HIV-associated kidney diseases that include glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. In resource-rich settings, there has been a plateau in the incidence of end-stage renal disease secondary to HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, the prevalence of end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive individuals has risen, mainly due to increased longevity on cART. There is a disparity in the occurrence of HIVAN among HIV-positive individuals such that there is an 18- to 50-fold increased risk of developing kidney disease among HIV-positive individuals of African descent aged between 20 and 64 years and who have a poorer prognosis compared with their European descent counterparts, suggesting that genetic factors play a vital role. Other risk factors include male sex, low CD4 counts, and high viral load. Improvement in renal function has been observed after initiation of cART in patients with HIV-associated CKD. Treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker is recommended, when clinically indicated in patients with confirmed or suspected HIVAN or clinically significant albuminuria. Other standard management approaches for patients with CKD are recommended. These include addressing other cardiovascular risk factors (appropriate use of statins and aspirin, weight loss, cessation of smoking), avoidance of nephrotoxins, and management of serum bicarbonate and uric acid, anemia, calcium, and phosphate abnormalities. Early diagnosis of kidney disease by screening of HIV-positive individuals for the presence of kidney disease is critical for the optimal management of these patients. Screening for the presence of kidney

  2. Contemporary management of phosphorus retention in chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2015-12-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is the most common metabolic complications of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Large observational studies have identified hyperphosphatemia as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in dialysis patients and subsequent studies found that subtle increases in serum phosphate levels even within the normal range are also associated with increased risk for death in predialysis and non-kidney disease population. On the basis of these results, current national practice guidelines advocate more aggressive treatment of hyperphosphatemia to lower serum phosphate targets than in the past . Treatment of hyperphosphatemia requires to strict management through dietary restriction, oral phosphate binders, and dialysis. Calcium-based phosphate binders have low cost and widespread use but cause vascular calcification and hypercalcemia. Non-calcium-based phosphate binders are effective but expensive. Bixalomer is a new Ca-free, metal-free, potent phosphate binder, non-hydrochloride, and non-absorptive polymer, which improves metabolic acidosis. FGF-23 appears as a promising target for novel therapeutic approaches to improve clinical outcomes of CKD patients. This review focuses on novel therapeutic approaches dealing with hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease.

  3. Patient perceptions of a remote monitoring intervention for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Holman, John E; Ray, Annette; Scherubel, Melody

    2011-04-01

    Use of telecommunications technology to provide remote monitoring for people with chronic disease is becoming increasingly accepted as a means to improve patient outcomes and reduce resource use. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient perceptions of a nurse-managed remote monitoring intervention to improve outcomes in veterans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension. Postintervention evaluation data were collected using a 12-item questionnaire and an open-ended question. Participants rated the program as generally positive on the questionnaire, but responses to the open-ended question revealed criticisms and suggestions for improvement not captured on the questionnaire. Interviewing participants in these programs may offer richer data for identifying areas for program improvement.

  4. Patients with chronic kidney disease: safety aspects in the preoperative management.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide. Early detection and treatment of CKD can often prevent or delay some of the negative outcomes of CKD. This chapter shows how treatment of hypertension, proteinuria and metabolic disorders slow down the deterioration of renal function. Irrespective of the mode of renal replacement therapy, maintaining the veins in the upper extremities is of vital importance. Below are suggestions on how to protect blood vessels of the upper limbs and when to start preparing for the construction of vascular access. In this chapter, it is also shown how necessary it is to conduct a clinical evaluation of the blood vessels, which is required before the start of vascular access management. The methodology of noninvasive evaluation of vessels by duplex sonography is also presented. This method is very useful, especially if the vessels are not clinically visible, as well as the information concerning the morphological and functional properties of blood vessels.

  5. Linking guidelines to Electronic Health Record design for improved chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Sistine A; Warren, Jim; Goodchild, Andrew; Bird, Linda; Heard, Sam; Stumptner, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The promise of electronic decision support to promote evidence based practice remains elusive in the context of chronic disease management. We examine the problem of achieving a close relationship of Electronic Health Record (EHR) content to other components of a clinical information system (guidelines, decision support and workflow), particularly linking the decisions made by providers back to the guidelines. We use the openEHR architecture, which allows extension of a core Reference Model via Archetypes to refine the detailed information recording options for specific classes of encounter. We illustrate the use of openEHR for tracking the relationship of a series of clinical encounters to a guideline via a case study of guideline-compliant treatment of hypertension in diabetes. This case study shows the contribution guideline content can have on problem-specific EHR structure and demonstrates the potential for a constructive interaction of electronic decision support and the EHR.

  6. Precision medicine in chronic disease management: The multiple sclerosis BioScreen.

    PubMed

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Henry, Roland G; Cree, Bruce A C; Crane, Jason C; Lizee, Antoine; Olson, Marram P; Santaniello, Adam V; Datta, Esha; Zhu, Alyssa H; Bevan, Carolyn J; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Graves, Jennifer S; Goodin, Douglas S; Green, Ari J; von Büdingen, H-Christian; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott S; Crabtree-Hartman, Elizabeth; Nelson, Sarah; Baranzini, Sergio E; Hauser, Stephen L

    2014-11-01

    We present a precision medicine application developed for multiple sclerosis (MS): the MS BioScreen. This new tool addresses the challenges of dynamic management of a complex chronic disease; the interaction of clinicians and patients with such a tool illustrates the extent to which translational digital medicine-that is, the application of information technology to medicine-has the potential to radically transform medical practice. We introduce 3 key evolutionary phases in displaying data to health care providers, patients, and researchers: visualization (accessing data), contextualization (understanding the data), and actionable interpretation (real-time use of the data to assist decision making). Together, these form the stepping stones that are expected to accelerate standardization of data across platforms, promote evidence-based medicine, support shared decision making, and ultimately lead to improved outcomes.

  7. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals.

  8. Precision medicine in chronic disease management: the MS BioScreen

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Henry, Roland; Cree, Bruce AC; Crane, Jason C; Lizee, Antoine; Olson, Marram P; Santaniello, Adam V.; Datta, Esha; Zhu, Alyssa H.; Bevan, Carolyn J.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Graves, Jennifer A.; Goodin, Douglas E.; Green, Ari; von Büdingen, H.-Christian; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott S.; Crabtree-Hartman, Elizabeth; Nelson, Sarah; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Hauser, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a precision medicine application developed for multiple sclerosis (MS): the MS BioScreen. This new tool addresses the challenges of dynamic management of a complex chronic disease; the interaction of clinicians and patients with such a tool illustrates the extent to which translational digital medicine – i.e. the application of information technology to medicine—has the potential to radically transform medical practice. We introduce three key evolutionary phases in displaying data to health care providers, patients, and researchers: visualization (accessing data), contextualization (understanding the data), and actionable interpretation (real-time use of the data to assist decision-making). Together these form the stepping-stones that are expected to accelerate standardization of data across platforms, promote evidence-based medicine, support shared decision-making, and ultimately lead to improved outcomes. PMID:25263997

  9. Organic and inorganic dietary phosphorus and its management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Noori, Nazanin; Sims, John J; Kopple, Joel D; Shah, Anuja; Colman, Sara; Shinaberger, Christian S; Bross, Rachelle; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2010-04-01

    Dietary phosphorus control is often a main strategy in the management of patients with chronic kidney disease. Dietary protein is a major source of phosphorus intake. Recent data indicate that imposed dietary phosphorus restriction may compromise the need for adequate protein intake, leading to protein-energy wasting and possibly to increased mortality. The two main sources of dietary phosphorus are organic, including animal and vegetarian proteins, and inorganic, mostly food preservatives. Animal-based foods and plant are abundant in organic phosphorus. Usually 40% to 60% of animal-based phosphorus is absorbed; this varies by degree of gastrointestinal vitamin-D-receptor activation, whereas plant phosphorus, mostly associated with phytates, is less absorbable by human gastrointestinal tract. Up to 100% of inorganic phosphorus in processed foods may be absorbed; ie, phosphorus in processed cheese and some soda (cola) drinks. A recent study suggests that a higher dietary phosphorus-protein intake ratio is associated with incremental death risk in patients on long-term hemodialysis. Hence, for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease, in addition to absolute dietary phosphorus content, the chemical structure (inorganic versus organic), type (animal versus plant), and phosphorus-protein ratio should be considered. We recommend foods and supplements with no or lowest quantity of inorganic phosphorus additives, more plant-based proteins, and a dietary phosphorus-protein ratio of less than 10 mg/g. Fresh (nonprocessed) egg white (phosphorus-protein ratio less than 2 mg/g) is a good example of desirable food, which contains a high proportion of essential amino acids with low amounts of fat, cholesterol, and phosphorus.

  10. Serving two (or more) masters: accomplishing autonomous nursing practice in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Kimpson, Sally; Purkis, Mary E

    2011-07-01

    The concept of professional autonomy has figured prominently in literature that addresses nursing's project of professionalization. Nursing's capacity to determine the nature and scope of its practice is related in important ways to the location of practice. Within highly structured environments such as acute-care hospitals, nurses' professional autonomy has frequently been contested yet is often implicated by nursing's elite as a necessary condition in the construction of quality work environments. Professional concerns and management practices related to retaining experienced nurses to support sustainability in healthcare delivery systems' impact on the ability of nurses to practice autonomously. Our paper focuses on the emerging field of practice of chronic disease management. We describe the complex relationships negotiated by a nurse in a theoretically autonomous practice setting as she seeks to fulfil both the requirements of a research protocol designed by physician experts representing the specialty of renal medicine, and her professional obligations to respond to the expressed needs of patients with early-stage renal disease. We utilize a case study approach to explore particular contemporary concerns that nurses in practice confront as they attempt to accomplish professional relationships with patients central to achieving prescribed medical outcomes where nursing practice, as an element of the achievement of those outcomes, is constituted as absent or unacknowledged by the medical researchers leading the project. Implications for nursing's discourses on the professional project of autonomy will be discussed.

  11. The use of health status questionnaires in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Thys; Diamant, Zuzana; Kocks, Jan Willem H; Tsiligianni, Ioanna G

    2014-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management based on symptoms or health status assessment and lung function parameters. However, COPD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that needs an individualized approach for proper disease management. A structured consultation including health status assessment tools, such as the Clinical COPD Questionnaire and the COPD Assessment Test should improve the quality of the consultation, providing more information than symptoms alone. Both questionnaires are designed to provide the clinician information enabling a more personalized disease approach and subsequent management. Although both Clinical COPD Questionnaire and COPD Assessment Test have good discriminate properties, their use as prognostic markers of severity and their ability to modify disease management has not yet been fully established. New studies are needed to further determine their value on several disease outcomes.

  12. Implications of chronic wasting disease, cougar predation, and reduced recruitment for elk management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, G.A.; Weber, D.C.; Roddy, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging diseases and expanding carnivore populations may have profound implications for ungulate harvest management and population regulation. To better understand effects of chronic wasting disease (CWD) and cougar (Puma concolor) predation, we studied mortality and recruitment of elk (Cervus elaphus) at Wind Cave National Park (WICA) during 2005-2009. We marked 202 elk (83 subadult M and 119 subadult and ad F) with Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, observed 28 deaths during 74,220 days of monitoring, and investigated 42 additional deaths of unmarked elk found dead. Survival rates were similar for males and females and averaged 0.863 (SE = 0.025) annually. Leading causes of mortality included hunting (0.065, SE = 0.019), CWD (0.034, SE = 0.012), and cougar predation (0.029, SE = 0.012). Marked elk killed by hunters and cougars typically were in good physical condition and not infected with CWD. Effects of mortality on population growth were exacerbated by low rates of pregnancy (subadults = 9.5%, SE = 6.6%; ad = 76.9%, SE = 4.2%) and perinatal survival (0.49, SE = 0.085 from 1 Feb to 1 Sep). Chronic wasting disease, increased predation, and reduced recruitment reduced the rate of increase for elk at WICA to approximately ?? = 1.00 (SE = 0.027) during the past decade. Lower rates of increase are mitigating effects of elk on park vegetation, other wildlife, and neighboring lands and will facilitate population control, but may reduce opportunities for elk hunting outside the park. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  13. Activating Patients for Sustained Chronic Disease Self-Management: Thinking Beyond Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet H

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the impact of an 8-week community program implemented by trained volunteers on the hypertension self-management of 185 patients who were batch randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups. Compared with control group participants, a higher proportion of treatment group participants moved from the cognitive to behavioral stages of motivational readiness for being physically active (P < .001), practicing healthy eating habits (P = .001), handling stress well (P = .001), and living an overall healthy lifestyle (P = .003). They also demonstrated a greater average increase in perceived competence for self-management, F(1.134) = 4.957, P = .028, η2 = .036, and a greater increase in mean hypertension-related knowledge, F(1.160) = 16.571, P < .0005, η(2) = .094. Enduring lifestyle changes necessary for chronic disease self-management require that psychosocial determinants of health behavior are instilled, which is typically beyond standard medical practice. We recommend peer-led, community-based programs as a complement to clinical care and support the increasing health system interest in promoting population health beyond clinical walls.

  14. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asmall, Shaidah

    2016-01-01

    Background An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility) has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation. Setting The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability. Results Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70–79.89) followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96–76.53)) and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17–77.83)). Four facilities (11%) had an overall sustainability score of less than 55. Conclusion The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors), negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model. PMID:28155314

  15. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease heterogeneity: challenges for health risk assessment, stratification and management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and hypothesis Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and disease progression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) lead to consequences for patient health risk assessment, stratification and management. Implicit with the classical "spill over" hypothesis is that COPD heterogeneity is driven by the pulmonary events of the disease. Alternatively, we hypothesized that COPD heterogeneities result from the interplay of mechanisms governing three conceptually different phenomena: 1) pulmonary disease, 2) systemic effects of COPD and 3) co-morbidity clustering, each of them with their own dynamics. Objective and method To explore the potential of a systems analysis of COPD heterogeneity focused on skeletal muscle dysfunction and on co-morbidity clustering aiming at generating predictive modeling with impact on patient management. To this end, strategies combining deterministic modeling and network medicine analyses of the Biobridge dataset were used to investigate the mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction. An independent data driven analysis of co-morbidity clustering examining associated genes and pathways was performed using a large dataset (ICD9-CM data from Medicare, 13 million people). Finally, a targeted network analysis using the outcomes of the two approaches (skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering) explored shared pathways between these phenomena. Results (1) Evidence of abnormal regulation of skeletal muscle bioenergetics and skeletal muscle remodeling showing a significant association with nitroso-redox disequilibrium was observed in COPD; (2) COPD patients presented higher risk for co-morbidity clustering than non-COPD patients increasing with ageing; and, (3) the on-going targeted network analyses suggests shared pathways between skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering. Conclusions The results indicate the high potential of a systems approach to address COPD heterogeneity. Significant knowledge gaps

  16. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report. GOLD Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agustí, Alvar

    2017-03-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017 report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: (1) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; (2) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacologic treatments are proposed; (3) the concept of deescalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; (4) nonpharmacologic therapies are comprehensively presented; and (5) the importance of comorbid conditions in managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is reviewed.

  17. Chronic kidney disease in the neonate: etiologies, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Misurac, Jason

    2016-10-09

    Neonatal chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs with an estimated incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births, whereas the incidence of neonatal end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is about 7.1 per million age-related population. The most frequent etiologies are renal hypoplasia/dysplasia, posterior urethral valves, and other congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Other etiologies include polycystic kidney disease, cortical necrosis, and renal vascular thrombosis. Management of CKD focuses primarily on replacing renal functions such as erythropoietin, 1,25-hydroxylation of vitamin D, electrolyte homeostasis/excretion, and, in ESRD, waste product removal. Nutrition and growth monitoring are of utmost importance, with the majority of ESRD infants requiring gastrostomy tube for nutrition. Outcomes of neonates (<31 days) started on dialysis continue to improve, with large cohort studies showing 2-3-year survival rates of 79-81%. As in other neonatal disciplines, the gestational age and size limits for safe provision of dialysis continue to decrease.

  18. Usability and Interoperability in Wireless Sensor Networks for Patient Telemonitoring in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fernández, Silvia; de Toledo, Paula; del Pozo, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses two key technological barriers to the wider adoption of patient telemonitoring systems for chronic disease management, namely, usability and sensor device interoperability. As a great percentage of chronic patients are elderly patients as well, usability of the system has to be adapted to their needs. This paper identifies (from previous research) a set of design criteria to address these challenges, and describes the resulting system based on a wireless sensor network, and including a node as a custom-made interface that follows usability design criteria stated. This system has been tested with 22 users (mean age 65) and evaluated with a validated usability questionnaire. Results are good and improve those of other systems based on TV or smartphone. Our results suggest that user interfaces alternative to TVs and smartphones could play an important role on the usability of sensor networks for patient monitoring. Regarding interoperability, only very recently a standard has been published (2010, the ISO IEEE 11073 Personal health devices) that can support the needs of limited computational power environments typical of patient monitoring sensor networks.

  19. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and self-efficacy at enrollment.

    PubMed

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community setting. We used data from the Our Pathways to Health program, implemented in Humboldt County, California, from 2008 to 2011. Our conceptual framework is based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory, and we used logistic regression to investigate whether baseline self-efficacy and other members' efficacy are associated with participants dropping out of the CDSMP. Twenty-three percent of the participants did not complete the program similar to previous studies. Lower baseline self-efficacy increased the odds of dropout, but other members' efficacy was not associated with differential odds of dropout. Age, educational difference between the individual and the group, weekday sessions, and social/role activity limitations are also found to be associated with program attrition. Our results suggest that participants with low starting self-efficacy may need extra help to complete the program. Further research is needed to understand how to effectively provide additional support to this group.

  20. Chronic disease management: time for consultant physicians to take more leadership in system redesign.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Scott, I; Greenberg, P; Sargious, P

    2007-09-01

    There is a need for system redesign to meet the needs of individuals with chronic disease. New models of chronic disease care include team-based paradigms that focus on continuous and patient-centred care. In such models the roles of providers and patients must change. In this article we focus on new roles for consultant physicians, as well as barriers and incentives to these roles.

  1. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolíbar, Ignasi; Plaza, Vicente; Llauger, Mariantònia; Amado, Ester; Antón, Pedro A; Espinosa, Ana; Domínguez, Leandra; Fraga, Mar; Freixas, Montserrat; de la Fuente, Josep A; Liguerre, Iskra; Medrano, Casimira; Peiro, Meritxell; Pou, Mariantònia; Sanchis, Joaquin; Solanes, Ingrid; Valero, Carles; Valverde, Pepi

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1) improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2) benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients) and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients). The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of complex cases. PMID

  2. Harvest Health: Translation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Older African Americans in a Senior Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Chernett, Nancy L.; Harris, Lynn Fields; Palmer, Delores; Hopkins, Paul; Dennis, Marie P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the translation of K. R. Lorig and colleagues' Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for delivery in a senior center and evaluate pre-post benefits for African American participants. Design and Methods: Modifications to the CDSMP included a name change; an additional introductory session; and course augmentations…

  3. Health outcomes and related effects of using social media in chronic disease management: a literature review and analysis of affordances.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Whilst the future for social media in chronic disease management appears to be optimistic, there is limited concrete evidence indicating whether and how social media use significantly improves patient outcomes. This review examines the health outcomes and related effects of using social media, while also exploring the unique affordances underpinning these effects. Few studies have investigated social media's potential in chronic disease, but those we found indicate impact on health status and other effects are positive, with none indicating adverse events. Benefits have been reported for psychosocial management via the ability to foster support and share information; however, there is less evidence of benefits for physical condition management. We found that studies covered a very limited range of social media platforms and that there is an ongoing propensity towards reporting investigations of earlier social platforms, such as online support groups (OSG), discussion forums and message boards. Finally, it is hypothesized that for social media to form a more meaningful part of effective chronic disease management, interventions need to be tailored to the individualized needs of sufferers. The particular affordances of social media that appear salient in this regard from analysis of the literature include: identity, flexibility, structure, narration and adaptation. This review suggests further research of high methodological quality is required to investigate the affordances of social media and how these can best serve chronic disease sufferers. Evidence-based practice (EBP) using social media may then be considered.

  4. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  5. Bone Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update in Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Revekka; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a bone disorder that occurs in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and is associated with 2- to 14-fold increased fracture risk compared to the general population. Risk of fractures is also increased in kidney transplant recipients especially within the first 5 years after transplantation. Fractures in CKD patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality; thus, proper screening and management of CKD bone complications is critical to improving clinical outcomes. Tetracycline double-labeled transiliac crest bone biopsy with histomorphometry is the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of ROD. However, bone biopsy is not practical to obtain in all patients. Thus, there is great interest in noninvasive approaches that can be used in the clinic to assess ROD. Here, we discuss the role of surrogate measures of bone health in CKD patients, such as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and novel high-resolution imaging, in conjunction with biochemical biomarkers of bone turnover. Recommended guidelines for diagnosis and management of CKD-MBD are discussed.

  6. Anaemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease: Taiwan practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Wu, Mai-Szu; Huang, Tung-Po

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) markedly improved the lives of many anaemic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In Taiwan, the strategy of management of anaemia in patients with CKD was different from many other parts of the world. In 1996, the National Health Insurance Administration of Taiwan applied a more restrictive reimbursement criteria for ESA use in patients with CKD. ESA is to be initiated when non-dialysis CKD patients have a serum creatinine >6 mg/dL and a hematocrit <28% to maintain a hematocrit level not exceeding 30%. The maximal dose of epoetin-α or β was 20 000 U per month. The target haemoglobin range and dose limitation for ESAs were the same for dialysis CKD patients. Thus, long before randomized controlled trials showing an increased risk for cardiovascular events at nearly normal haemoglobin concentrations and higher ESA doses in CKD, nephrologists in Taiwan had avoided the use of disproportionately high dosages of ESAs to achieve a haemoglobin level of 10-11 g/dL. Moreover, intravenous iron supplementation was encouraged earlier in Taiwan in 1996, when we reached consensus on the diagnostic criteria for iron deficiency (serum ferritin <300 ng/mL and/or transferrin saturation <30%). The experience of CKD anaemia management in Taiwan demonstrated that a reasonable haemoglobin target can be achieved by using the lowest possible ESA dose and intravenous iron supplementation.

  7. General practitioners views and experiences in managing depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2012-12-01

    Up to 40% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suffer from comorbid depression. However, there is little data available on the perceptions and experiences of general practitioners (GPs) on the management of depression in patients with COPD. The study investigated GPs' views about recognizing and treating depression in patients with COPD. A postal survey of 3957 GPs in England about their views on recognizing and treating depression in patients with COPD was conducted. Participants were drawn from the General Medical Services statistics database maintained by the Department of Health. A total of 3957 GPs were mailed. Of these, 857 (22%) complete responses were received. Seventy two percent of the GPs reported screening for depression regularly in patients with COPD. Over 95% of the GPs' views were that depression interferes with the self-management of COPD and 584 (67%) thought that it exacerbates the symptoms of COPD. However, over two-fifths of GPs were concerned that convincing COPD patients with comorbid depression to receive appropriate treatment was a challenge. Barriers for treatment of comorbid depression in patients with COPD include lack of adequate provision of psychological services and long waiting times for psychological treatment. It is encouraging that most GPs were vigilant and proactively screening for depression. However, there is limited immediate access and provision to psychological therapies to refer COPD patients for treatment in the primary care setting. Further study is required.

  8. A multiagent system enhancing home-care health services for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, a multiagent system (MAS) is presented, aiming to enhance monitoring, surveillance, and educational services of a generic medical contact center (MCC) for chronic disease management. In such a home-care scenario, a persistent need arises for efficiently monitoring the patient contacts and the MCC's functionality, in order to effectively manage and interpret the large volume of medical data collected during the patient sessions with the system, and to assess the use of MCC resources. Software agents were adopted to provide the means to accomplish such real-time information-processing tasks, due to their autonomous, reactive and/or proactive nature, and their effectiveness in dynamic environments by incorporating coordination strategies. Specifically, the objective of the MAS is to monitor the MCC environment, detect important cases, and inform the healthcare and administrative personnel via alert messages, notifications, recommendations, and reports, prompting them for actions. The main aim of this paper is to present the overall design and implementation of a proposed MAS, emphasizing its functional model and architecture, as well as on the agent interactions and the knowledge-sharing mechanism incorporated, in the context of a generic MCC.

  9. Role of physiotherapy in the management of chronic lung diseases: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Rachel; Lasserson, Toby

    2007-12-01

    Four Cochrane respiratory reviews of relevance to physiotherapeutic practice are discussed in this overview. Physiotherapists aim to improve ventilation for people with respiratory disease, and approach this using a variety of techniques. As such, the reviews chosen for discussion consider a wide range of interventions commonly used by physiotherapists: breathing exercises, bronchopulmonary hygiene techniques and physical training for peripheral and respiratory muscles. The reviews show that breathing exercises may have beneficial effects on health-related quality of life in asthma, and that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) may improve inspiratory muscle strength. However, the clinical relevance of increased respiratory muscle strength per se is unknown, and the longer-term effects of breathing exercises on morbidity have not been considered. One review clearly shows that bronchopulmonary hygiene techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis increase sputum production. Frequent exacerbation is associated with increased sputum and high bacterial load, suggesting that there may be important therapeutic benefit of improved sputum clearance. Future studies evaluating the long-term effects of bronchopulmonary hygiene techniques on morbidity are recommended. In the third review, the importance of pulmonary rehabilitation in the management of COPD is once again reinforced. Physiotherapists are crucial to the delivery of exercise training programmes, and it is likely that the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation extend to other important outcomes, such as hospital admission and re-admission. On the basis of the evidence provided by these Cochrane reviews, this overview highlights important practice points of relevance to physiotherapy, and recommendations for future studies.

  10. Prediction and management of hyperkalemia across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lazich, Ivana; Bakris, George L

    2014-05-01

    Hyperkalemia commonly limits optimizing treatment to slow stage 3 or higher chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. The risk of hyperkalemia is linked to dietary potassium intake, level of kidney function, concomitant diseases that may affect potassium balance such as diabetes, and use of medications that influence potassium excretion. The risk predictors for developing hyperkalemia are an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and a serum potassium level greater than 4.5 mEq/L in the absence of blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Generally, monotherapy with RAAS blockers does not increase risk substantially unless hypotension or volume depletion occur. Dual RAAS blockade involving any combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin-receptor blocker, renin inhibition, or aldosterone-receptor blocker markedly increases the risk of hyperkalemia in patients with stage 3 or higher CKD. Moreover, dual RAAS blockade further reduces albuminuria by 25% to 30% compared with monotherapy, it has failed to show a benefit on CKD progression or cardiovascular outcome, and thus is not indicated in such patients because of its marked increase in hyperkalemia potential. Although sodium polystyrene resins exist to manage hyperkalemia in patients requiring therapy that increases serum potassium levels, they are not well tolerated. Newer, more predictable, better-tolerated polymers to bind potassium are on the horizon and may be approved within the next 1 to 2 years.

  11. N-Acetylcysteine mucolysis in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Anna M

    2012-06-01

    To develop an efficient therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been tested as a medication that can suppress various pathogenic processes in this disease. NAC is a thiol compound, which provides sulfhydryl groups. NAC can act as a precursor of reduced glutathione and as a direct reactive oxygen species scavenger, hence regulating the redox status in the cells. In this way NAC can interfere with several signaling pathways that play a role in regulating apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell growth and inflammatory response. Mucus hypersecretion has been reported in COPD and in other respiratory conditions. Two pathological processes have been described to play an important role in COPD, namely oxidative stress and inflammation. Both of these processes can induce mucin gene expression leading to mucin production. NAC, therefore, may influence mucin expression by acting on oxidative stress and inflammation, and play a role as a mucolytic agent. In this review we focus on the mucolysis of NAC in the management of COPD.

  12. The management of hyperphosphatemia by lanthanum carbonate in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Nakashima, Yuri; Ohya, Masaki; Tatsuta, Koichi; Koreeda, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Wataru; Yamanaka, Shintaro; Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Hanba, Yoshiyuki; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia has been shown to be involved not only in the onset and progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism but also in vascular calcification. In addition, it influences the clinical course of patients with chronic kidney disease. Phosphate (Pi) binder is required in the management of hyperparaphosphatemia, because dietary Pi restriction and Pi removal by hemodialysis alone are insufficient. Lanthanum carbonate, a powerful Pi binder, has a similar effect to aluminum hydroxide in reducing serum Pi levels. As it is excreted via the liver, lanthanum carbonate has an advantage in patients with renal failure. The effect of lanthanum carbonate on serum Pi levels is almost two times higher than that of calcium (Ca) carbonate, which is commonly used. Lanthanum carbonate and Ca carbonate have an additive effect. Worldwide, there is 6 years worth of clinical treatment data on lanthanum carbonate; however, we have 3 years of clinical use in Japanese patients with hyperphosphatemia. No serious side effects have been reported. However, the most important concern is bone toxicity, which has been observed with use of aluminum hydroxide. For this study, clinical research involved analysis of bone biopsies. Although osteomalacia is the most noticeable side effect, this was not observed. Both the high- and the low-turnover bone disease concentrated into a normal bone turnover state. However, as the authors have less than 10 years' clinical experience with lanthanum carbonate, patients should be monitored carefully. In addition, it is necessary to demonstrate whether potent treatment effects on hyperphosphatemia improve the long-term outcome.

  13. Management of Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Zyga, Sofia; Alikari, Victoria; Sachlas, Athanasios; Stathoulis, John; Aroni, Adamantia; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios

    2015-10-01

    An important dimension that influences the quality of life of hemodialysis patients is the pain they experience. Quality of life and self-efficacy in pain can play an important role in chronic kidney disease and treatment outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine self-efficacy in pain and quality of life among patients with end stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. Between April 2013 and June 2013, 224 hemodialysis patients completed the Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index-15 and the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. The study was conducted in four dialysis units in hospitals of the Peloponnese region. Sociodemographic data of patients and their individual medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 19. The more effective the self-efficacy in pain, the lower the quality of life enjoyed by hemodialysis patients. The majority of respondents described the overall quality of life as "moderate," while the self-efficacy in pain depended on comorbidity or complications that accompany the process of hemodialysis. The findings of this study can be used in the development and improvement of health services for the management of patients. Healthcare professionals should understand the concerns and treat the symptoms of patients that affect quality of life, providing thereby holistic health care.

  14. The effectiveness of telemedicine in the management of chronic heart disease – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Mounica; Pulluri, Deepthi; Nemali, Naga T; Brooks, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of telemedicine in managing chronic heart disease patients concerning improvement in varied health attributes. Design This review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) standard. Setting We adopted a logical search process used in two main research databases, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PubMed (MEDLINE). Four reviewers meticulously screened 151 abstracts to determine relevancy and significance to our research objectives. The final sample in the literature review consisted of 20 articles. Main outcome measures We looked for improved medical outcomes as the main outcome measure. Results Our results indicated that telemedicine is highly associated with the reduction in hospitalisations and readmissions (9 of 20 articles, 45%). The other significant attributes most commonly encountered were improved mortality and cost-effectiveness (both 40%) and improved health outcomes (35%). Patient satisfaction occurred the least in the literature, mentioned in only 2 of 20 articles (10%). There was no significant mention of an increase in patient satisfaction because of telemedicine. Conclusions We concluded that telemedicine is considered to be effective in quality measures such as readmissions, moderately effective in health outcomes, only marginally effective in customer satisfaction. Telemedicine shows promise on an alternative modality of care for cardiovascular disease, but additional exploration should continue to quantify the quality measures. PMID:28321319

  15. Psychosocial and nonclinical factors predicting hospital utilization in patients of a chronic disease management program: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mark W; Weiland, Tracey J; Phillips, Georgina A

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as marital status (odds ratio, 3.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-8.69; P = .006) and nonclinical factors such as outpatient nonattendances (odds ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.23; P = .013) and referrals made (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35; P = .003) predict hospital utilization for patients in a chronic disease management program. Along with optimizing patients' clinical condition by prescribed medical guidelines and supporting patient self-management, addressing psychosocial and nonclinical issues are important in attempting to avoid hospital utilization for people with chronic illnesses.

  16. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  17. The relationship of ethnicity to the prevalence and management of hypertension and associated chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of ethnicity on the prevalence and management of hypertension and associated chronic kidney (CKD) disease in the UK is unknown. Methods We performed a cross sectional study of 49,203 adults with hypertension to establish the prevalence and management of hypertension and associated CKD by ethnicity. Routinely collected data from general practice hypertension registers in 148 practices in London between 1/1/07 and 31/3/08 were analysed. Results The crude prevalence of hypertension was 9.5%, and by ethnicity was 8.2% for White, 11.3% for South Asian and 11.1% for Black groups. The prevalence of CKD stages 3-5 among those with hypertension was 22%. Stage 3 CKD was less prevalent in South Asian groups (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.67 - 0.88) compared to Whites (reference population) with Black groups having similar rates to Whites. The prevalence of severe CKD (stages 4-5) was higher in the South Asian group (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.17 - 2.0) compared to Whites, but did not differ between Black and White groups. In the whole hypertension cohort, achievement of target blood pressure (< 140/90 mmHg) was better in South Asian (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.28 - 1.60) and worse in Black groups (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.74 - 0.84) compared to White patients. Hypertensive medication was prescribed unequally among ethnic groups for any degree of blood pressure control. Conclusions Significant variations exist in the prevalence of hypertension and associated CKD and its management between the major ethnic groups. Among those with CKD less than 50% were treated to a target BP of ≤ 130/80 mmHg. Rates of ACE-I/ARB prescribing for those with CKD were less than optimal, with the lowest rates (58.5%) among Black groups. PMID:21896189

  18. The reach of chronic-disease self-management education programs to rural populations.

    PubMed

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the sociodemographic characteristics of rural residents who participated in chronic-disease self-management education (CDSME) program workshops and the extent to which CDSME programs were utilized by those with limited access to health care services. We analyzed data from the first 100,000 adults who attended CDSME program workshops during a national dissemination spanning 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Approximately 24% of participants lived in rural areas. Overall, 42% of all participants were minorities; urban areas reached more minority participants (48%) than rural areas (25%). The average age of participants was high in rural (age, μ = 66.1) and urban (age, μ = 67.3) areas. In addition, the average number of chronic conditions was higher (p < 0.01) in rural (μ = 2.6 conditions) versus urban (μ = 2.4 conditions) areas. Successful completion of CDSME programs (i.e., attending four or more of the six workshop sessions) was higher (p < 0.01) in rural versus urban areas (78% versus 77%). Factors associated with higher likelihood of successful completion of CDSME programs included being Black (OR = 1.25) versus White and living in rural (versus urban) areas (OR = 1.09). Factors associated with lower likelihood of successful completion included being male (OR = 0.92) and residing in a primary care Health Professional Shortage Area or HPSA (versus a non-HPSA) (OR = 0.93). Findings highlight the capability of CDSME programs to reach rural residents, yet dissemination efforts can be further enhanced to ensure minorities and individuals in a HPSA utilize this program. Tailored strategies are needed to increase participant recruitment and retention in rural areas to overcome traditional barriers to health service access.

  19. Double-disease management or one care manager for two chronic conditions: pilot feasibility study of nurse telephonic disease management for depression and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cole, Steven A; Farber, Nancy C; Weiner, Joseph S; Sulfaro, Michelle; Katzelnick, David J; Blader, Joseph C

    2006-10-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of a telephonic nurse double-disease management program (DDMP) for patients with depression and congestive heart failure. Thirty-five patients with depression and congestive heart failure were entered into a novel DDMP modeled after Wagner's chronic illness care model and implemented as part of a 13-month Breakthrough Series Collaborative administered by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement. Twenty-four patients remained in the program long enough to complete at least one follow-up assessment (ie, 6 weeks or longer). Patients were entered into the program based on depression severity scores from either the interactive voice response (IVR) version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) or the self-administered (or telephonic) Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Because use of the IVR version of the HADS was eliminated after several weeks into the program (because of poor patient acceptance), 19 patients had both entry and follow-up scores on the same instrument (PHQ). Depression "response" was defined as a 50% improvement in PHQ score. Mixed models regression was used to test the statistical significance of change in PHQ scores over time. Patient and clinician reports were obtained to evaluate program acceptability and satisfaction. Eighty-two percent of patients (n = 11) with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) responded, and 75% of patients (n = 8) with "other depression" (PHQ score < 10) responded. Mean change in PHQ scores for the sample as a whole improved significantly over the 24 weeks of the program (p < 0.0003), as well as for those with major depression and other depression considered separately (p < 0.01 for both). In some patients who refused medication, depression seemed to respond to self-management support interventions of the care manager. Based on patient acceptance and clinicians' reports, the program appeared feasible and possibly effective. DDMP appears feasible and possibly effective. Future

  20. Implementation of Patient-Centered Education for Chronic-Disease Management in Uganda: An Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Tracy; Canavan, Maureen E.; Nassali, Faith; Kirchhoff, Phillip; Kalyesubula, Robert; Coca, Steven; Rastegar, Asghar; Knauf, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of non-communicable disease related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Patient-centered care is an essential component of chronic disease management in high income settings. Objective To examine feasibility of implementation of a validated patient-centered education tool among patients with heart failure in Uganda. Design Mixed-methods, prospective cohort. Settings A private and public cardiology clinic in Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Participants Adults with a primary diagnosis of heart failure. Interventions PocketDoktor Educational Booklets with patient-centered health education. Main Measures The primary outcomes were the change in Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13), as well as the acceptability of the PocketDoktor intervention, and feasibility of implementing patient-centered education in outpatient clinical settings. Secondary outcomes included the change in satisfaction with overall clinical care and doctor-patient communication. Key Results A total of 105 participants were enrolled at two different clinics: the Mulago Outpatient Department (public) and the Uganda Heart Institute (private). 93 participants completed follow up at 3 months and were included in analysis. The primary analysis showed improved patient activation measure scores regarding disease-specific knowledge, treatment options and prevention of exacerbations among both groups (mean change 0.94 [SD = 1.01], 1.02 [SD = 1.15], and 0.92 [SD = 0.89] among private paying patients and 1.98 [SD = 0.98], 1.93 [SD = 1.02], and 1.45 [SD = 1.02] among public paying patients, p<0.001 for all values) after exposure to the intervention; this effect was significantly larger among indigent patients. Participants reported that materials were easy to read, that they had improved knowledge of disease, and stated improved communication with physicians. Conclusions Patient-centered medical education can improve confidence in self-management

  1. Applications of mathematical modeling in managing the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild deer under alternative harvesting scenarios.

    PubMed

    Al-Arydah, M; Croteau, M C; Oraby, T; Smith, R J; Krewski, D

    2016-01-01

    The application of a recently developed mathematical model for predicting the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild deer was assessed under different scenarios where harvesting is employed in disease management. A process-based mathematical model for CWD transmission in wild deer populations was recently developed and parameterized by Al-arydah et al. (2011) to provide a scientific basis for understanding the factors that affect spread of CWD and evaluate concomitant disease-control strategies. The impact of gender on CWD transmission was shown to have a significant influence on the spread of the disease in the wild. Our model demonstrates a range of harvesting rates in which CWD is controlled and deer populations survive. However, if harvesting rates are too low, the disease remains endemic for decades. Conversely, the Canadian deer population is eradicated if harvesting rates are excessive. Future investigation includes building the model to assess the spread of CWD under different disease-management scenarios.

  2. Smart self management: assistive technology to support people with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huiru; Nugent, Chris; McCullagh, Paul; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Shumei; Burns, William; Davies, Richard; Black, Norman; Wright, Peter; Mawson, Sue; Eccleston, Christopher; Hawley, Mark; Mountain, Gail

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a personalised self management system to support self management of chronic conditions with support from health-care professionals. Accelerometers are used to measure gross levels of activity, for example walking around the house, and used to infer higher level activity states, such as standing, sitting and lying. A smart phone containing an accelerometer and a global positioning system (GPS) module can be used to monitor outdoor activity, providing both activity and location based information. Heart rate, blood pressure and weight are recorded and input to the system by the user. A decision support system (DSS) detects abnormal activity and distinguishes life style patterns. The DSS is used to assess the self management process, and automates feedback to the user, consistent with the achievement of their life goals. We have found that telecare and assistive technology is feasible to support self management for chronic conditions within the home and local community environments.

  3. Recommendations for the medical management of chronic venous disease: The role of Micronized Purified Flavanoid Fraction (MPFF).

    PubMed

    Bush, Ronald; Comerota, Anthony; Meissner, Mark; Raffetto, Joseph D; Hahn, Steven R; Freeman, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Scope A systematic review of the clinical literature concerning medical management of chronic venous disease with the venoactive therapy Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction was conducted in addition to an investigation of the hemodynamics and mechanism of chronic venous disease. Methods The systematic review of the literature focused on the use of Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction (diosmin) which has recently become available in the US, in the management of chronic venous disease. The primary goal was to assess the level of evidence of the role of Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction in the healing of ulcers, and secondarily on the improvement of the symptoms of chronic venous disease such as edema. An initial search of Medline, Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar databases was conducted. The references of articles obtained in the primary search, including a Cochrane review of phlebotonics for venous insufficiency, were reviewed for additional studies. Studies were included if patients had a diagnosis of chronic venous disease documented with Doppler and Impedance Plethysmography. Studies excluded were those that had patients with arterial insufficiency (Ankle Brachial Index < .6), comorbidity of diabetes, obesity, rheumatological diseases, or if other causes of edema were present (congestive heart failure, renal, hepatic or lymphatic cause), or if the patient population had recent surgery or deep vein thrombosis, or had been using diuretics (in studies of edema). Other elements of the study design were to note specifically the type of compression therapy used in conjunction with Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fraction. Results The literature review yielded 250 abstracts, 65 of which met criteria for further review and 10 papers were selected for consideration in the systematic review. Conclusion In summary, the general level of evidence supports the recommendation that the use of medical therapy with Micronized Purified

  4. Ontologies to improve chronic disease management research and quality improvement studies - a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Harshana; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Kuziemsky, Craig; de Lusignan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing burden of chronic non-communicable disease (CNCD). Managing CNCDs requires use of multiple sources of health and social care data, and information about coordination and outcomes. Many people with CNCDs have multimorbidity. Problems with data quality exacerbate challenges in measuring quality and health outcomes especially where there is multimorbidity. We have developed an ontological toolkit to support research and quality improvement studies in CNCDs using heterogeneous data, with diabetes mellitus as an exemplar. International experts held a workshop meeting, with follow up discussions and consensus building exercise. We generated conceptual statements about problems with a CNCD that ontologies might support, and a generic reference model. There were varying degrees of consensus. We propose a set of tools, and a four step method: (1) Identification and specification of data sources; (2) Conceptualisation of semantic meaning; (3) How available routine data can be used as a measure of the process or outcome of care; (4) Formalisation and validation of the final ontology.

  5. The Role of Personal Health Record Systems in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Prashad, Reshma

    2017-01-01

    Chronic illnesses account for the largest portion of healthcare spending in Canada; they are the leading cause of premature death. As a result, healthcare organizations are focused on improving both health and financial outcomes. Addressing chronic illnesses involves more frequent and impactful interactions with both current patients and those at risk of developing a chronic condition. This transformation requires that healthcare organizations shift from a system based solely on in-person interactions to one that leverages digital solutions that support interactions regardless of the patients' location. Personal health record systems (PHRS) can facilitate patients' access to their health data at any time of the day, anywhere in the world. PHRS also offers a myriad of features to help providers' engage, educate and empower patients to make proactive and preventive care a reality. Discussed in this paper are the ways in which PHRS can support the optimal management of chronic conditions and the current barriers to widespread adoption.

  6. Controversies in Veterinary Nephrology: Differing Viewpoints: Role of Dietary Protein in the Management of Feline Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jennifer A

    2016-11-01

    The role of diet in management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is important. There are different interpretations of the current knowledge on this topic. Neither clinical trials involving product testing, nor prospective research investigating dietary influences on cats with induced kidney disease provide guidance on the utility of specific nutritional strategies. Likewise, data derived from other species also has limitations. More research is needed to further our understanding of this topic. However, practical guidance from current knowledge for the management of individual patients can be utilized with success.

  7. Health related management plans improve sleep disorders of patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunzi; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Yanbo; Zhang, Xiaoning; Sun, Yanyan; Zhou, Lin; Su, Beibei; Wang, Huaming

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: Sleep disorders (SDs) are commonly occurred in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and always bring with uncomfortable experience Lavender hot-bathing, foot-soaking, or progressive relaxation have been widely used to provide comfortable feeling for CLD patients and promote their sleep quality. Aims: Thus, the aim of present study is to investigate effective intervention from above mentioned in the managements of SD and promote sleep quality for CLD patients. Methods: This study was conducted in People's Liberation Army No. 302 Hospital. A total of 317 subjects joined in our research. Initially, 197 CLD patients were enrolled and divided randomly into four groups for receiving lavender hot-bathing and foot-soaking, progressive relaxation, or the combination of both methods, and controls. After that, all of enrolled subjects were given sleep state questionnaires to assess their sleep qualities and other associated factors. Self-rating scores of sleep (SRSS) was sued to assess sleep disorder. Furthermore, another cohort with 120 CLD patients were also investigated for further confirming related findings. Results: The SRSS scores were significantly higher in the patients with CLD (62.94%) than those of domestic common model and internal medicine inpatients. However, all three methods of intervention were effectively decreased SRSS scores. The four mostly influencing factors of sleep states were short sleep, difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep and early morning awakening. Besides, age was identified as one of associating with sleep states. 44.67% of patients suffered from polyuria, abdominal distention or itch of skin. And those factors contributed to major risk factors of sleep disorder. Furthermore, sleep states also influenced by environmental interference (37.06%). Conclusion: The health managements of health education could reduce risk factors and implement intervention strategies, effectively decreased occurrence of sleep disorder related

  8. Behavioral Exercise Programs in the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavior modification, cognitive modification, and cognitive-behavior modification in increasing compliance with an exercise prescription for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (N=96). Although all treatment groups showed improvement, the cognitive-behavior modification strategy produced the most…

  9. Enhancing patient engagement in chronic disease self-management support initiatives in Australia: the need for an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Joanne E; Briggs, Andrew M; Brand, Caroline A; Osborne, Richard H

    2008-11-17

    Although emphasis on the prevention of chronic disease is important, governments in Australia need to balance this with continued assistance to the 77% of Australians reported to have at least one long-term medical condition. Self-management support is provided by health care and community services to enhance patients' ability to care for their chronic conditions in a cooperative framework. In Australia, there is a range of self-management support initiatives that have targeted patients (most notably, chronic disease self-management education programs) and health professionals (financial incentives, education and training). To date, there has been little coordination or integration of these self-management initiatives to enhance the patient-health professional clinical encounter. If self-management support is to work, there is a need to better understand the infrastructure, systems and training that are required to engage the key stakeholders - patients, carers, health professionals, and health care organisations. A coordinated approach is required in implementing these elements within existing and new health service models to enhance uptake and sustainability.

  10. Integration of telehealth and telecare: the implementation model for chronic disease management in the veneto region.

    PubMed

    Mancin, Silvia; Centis, Giorgia

    2014-01-01

    The integration of health and social care is the latest dogma for improving the quality of care for chronic and frail patients. In the Veneto Region, a unique platform has been developed for the provision of both telecare and telehealth to chronic patients that are equipped at home with a personal health system for real time detection of emergencies situations and to measure their clinical parameters according to a plan scheduled by their clinician. The integrated service is centrally managed by a regional eHealth center that represents the point of intermediation between the patient and the health and social care professionals.

  11. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  12. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report: GOLD Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agusti, Alvar

    2017-04-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017 Report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: (i) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; (ii) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacological treatments are proposed; (iii) the concept of de-escalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; (iv)non-pharmacological therapies are comprehensively presented and (v) the importance of co-morbid conditions in managing COPD is reviewed.

  13. A novel community-based model to enhance health promotion, risk factor management and chronic disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Carson, Shannon Ryan; Carr, Caroline; Kohler, Graeme; Edwards, Lynn; Gibson, Rick; Sampalli, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Chronic disease is a highly expensive but preventable problem to the healthcare system. Evidence suggests that impacting modifiable behaviours and risk management factors in the areas of physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, stress and obesity can alleviate the burden of chronic disease problem to a large extent. Despite this recognition, the challenge is embedding these recognized priorities into the community and in primary care in a sustainable and meaningful manner. Primary Health Care in Capital Health responded to this challenge by developing and implementing a free, interprofessional and community-based service, namely, the Community Health Teams (CHTs), that offers health and wellness, risk factor management, wellness navigation and behaviour-based programming. In this paper, the development and implementation of the CHTs are discussed. Preliminary outcomes for the model are significant and promising. Formal and large-scale studies are planned to validate these outcomes with additional research rigour.

  14. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm.

  15. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: A pattern language representation of a general architecture

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10–15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs) to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Methods Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. Results The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community settings, endorsement of self

  16. Using insights from behavioral economics and social psychology to help patients manage chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Mogler, Braden K; Shu, Suzanne B; Fox, Craig R; Goldstein, Noah J; Victor, Ronald G; Escarce, José J; Shapiro, Martin F

    2013-05-01

    Despite a revolution in therapeutics, the ability to control chronic diseases remains elusive. We present here a conceptual model of the potential role of behavioral tools in chronic disease control. Clinicians implicitly accept the assumption that patients will act rationally to maximize their self-interest. However, patients may not always be the rational actors that we imagine. Major behavioral barriers to optimal health behavior include patients' fear of threats to health, unwillingness to think about problems when risks are known or data are ambiguous, the discounting of risks that are far in the future, failure to act due to lack of motivation, insufficient confidence in the ability to overcome a health problem, and inattention due to pressures of everyday life. Financial incentives can stimulate initiation of health-promoting behaviors by reducing or eliminating financial barriers, but may not produce long-term behavior change without additional interventions. Strategies have been developed by behavioral economists and social psychologists to address each of these barriers to better decision-making. These include: labeling positive behaviors in ways consistent with patient life goals and priorities; greater focus on more immediate risks of chronic diseases; intermediate subgoals as steps to a large health goal; and implementation of specific plans as to when, where, and how an action will be taken. Such strategies hold promise for improving health behaviors and disease control, but most have not been studied in medical settings. The effectiveness of these approaches should be evaluated for their potential as tools for the clinician.

  17. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  18. Self-management programs based on the social cognitive theory for Koreans with chronic disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeonsoo; Yoo, Hyera

    2012-02-01

    Self-management programs based on social cognitive theory are useful to improve health care outcomes for patients with chronic diseases in Western culture. The purpose of this review is to identify and synthesize published research on the theory to enhance self-efficacy in disease management and examine its applicability to Korean culture regarding the learning strategies used. Ultimately, it was to identify the optimal use of these learning strategies to improve the self-efficacy of Korean patients in self-management of their hypertension and diabetic mellitus. The authors searched the Korean and international research databases from January 2000 to September 2009. Twenty studies were selected and reviewed. The most frequently used learning strategies of social cognitive theory was skill mastery by practice and feedback (N = 13), followed by social or verbal persuasion by group members (N = 7) and, however, observation learning and reinterpretation of symptoms by debriefing or discussion were not used any of the studies. Eight studies used only one strategy to enhance self-efficacy and six used two. A lack of consistency regarding the content and clinical efficacy of the self-efficacy theory-based self-management programs is found among the reviewed studies on enhancing self-efficacy in Koreans with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Further research on the effectiveness of these theory-based self-management programs for patients with chronic diseases in Korea and other countries is recommended.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... The condition is often discovered very early in childhood. Milder forms may be diagnosed during the teenage ...

  1. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD.

  2. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): part II: programme management and clinical information management.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    This is the second part of a document describing a voluntary certification process based on Joint Commission International (JCI) criteria developed by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) and JCI representatives. In the first part we discussed standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to chronic kidney disease care. Herein (Part II), we complete the description of Performace measurements and CKD care by describing issues related the management and clinical information management.

  3. The role of culture in health literacy and chronic disease screening and management.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Huebner, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Orzech, Kathryn; Orzech, Katherine; Vivian, James

    2009-12-01

    Cultural and language differences and socioeconomic status interact with and contribute to low health literacy, defined as the inability to understand or act on medical/therapeutic instructions. Health literacy is increasingly recognized as an important factor in patient compliance, cancer screening utilization, and chronic disease outcomes. Commendable efforts have been initiated by the American Medical Association and other organizations to address low health literacy among patients. Less work has been done, however, to place health literacy in the broader context of socioeconomic and cultural differences among patients and providers that hinder communication and compliance. This review examines cultural influences on health literacy, cancer screening and chronic disease outcomes. We argue that cultural beliefs around health and illness contribute to an individual's ability to understand and act on a health care provider's instructions. This paper proposes key aspects of the intersection between health literacy and culturally varying beliefs about health which merit further exploration.

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2015-03-06

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity.

  6. Comprehensive self management and routine monitoring in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in general practice: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Akkermans, Reinier; Bourbeau, Jean; van Weel, Chris; Vercoulen, Jan H; Schermer, Tjard R J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the long term effects of two different modes of disease management (comprehensive self management and routine monitoring) on quality of life (primary objective), frequency and patients’ management of exacerbations, and self efficacy (secondary objectives) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in general practice. Design 24 month, multicentre, investigator blinded, three arm, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Setting 15 general practices in the eastern part of the Netherlands. Participants Patients with COPD confirmed by spirometry and treated in general practice. Patients with very severe COPD or treated by a respiratory physician were excluded. Interventions A comprehensive self management programme as an adjunct to usual care, consisting of four tailored sessions with ongoing telephone support by a practice nurse; routine monitoring as an adjunct to usual care, consisting of 2-4 structured consultations a year with a practice nurse; or usual care alone (contacts with the general practitioner at the patients’ own initiative). Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in COPD specific quality of life at 24 months as measured with the chronic respiratory questionnaire total score. Secondary outcomes were chronic respiratory questionnaire domain scores, frequency and patients’ management of exacerbations measured with the Nijmegen telephonic exacerbation assessment system, and self efficacy measured with the COPD self-efficacy scale. Results 165 patients were allocated to self management (n=55), routine monitoring (n=55), or usual care alone (n=55). At 24 months, adjusted treatment differences between the three groups in mean chronic respiratory questionnaire total score were not significant. Secondary outcomes did not differ, except for exacerbation management. Compared with usual care, more exacerbations in the self management group were managed with bronchodilators (odds ratio 2.81, 95% confidence

  7. [Chronic disease and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, U

    1992-01-25

    Chronic disease is not a strictly defined term and includes a large number of illnesses ranging from physical to mental impairment. It is estimated that between 10% and 20% of adolescents have a chronic disease. Independence and new relations, acceptance of a new body image and sexuality, career plans and cognitive maturation are core topics in development to adulthood. Chronic disease may interfere with these developmental tasks. Most often there is no specific psychopathology, but the type of impairment, its influence on family life and functioning, age at onset, gender, and other factors will interact with psychosocial maturation. Because of the important role of the family, not only the adolescent patient him/herself, but also parents and siblings need to be included in all major decisions. As hospitalizations may be disruptive they must be planned, taking in account the patient's plans and opinions. Chronic disease may lead to death during the period of adolescence. It is believed that the concept of one's own mortality develops at age 14 to 17 years, a fact that will influence care during the terminal stage of a disease. Whatever the problems and questions raised by the family, the developmental stage of the adolescent has always to be considered when dealing with specific issues of chronic disease. Periodic reassessment of psychosocial development is therefore one of the main tasks of the primary care physician. Counselling will address not only the disease but also the developmental tasks of any teenager.

  8. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  9. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory.

  10. Use of the nutrition facts label in chronic disease management: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Post, Robert E; Mainous, Arch G; Diaz, Vanessa A; Matheson, Eric M; Everett, Charles J

    2010-04-01

    Dietary modifications are common treatment strategies for patients with various chronic diseases, but it is unclear how often these individuals read food labels. The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with chronic disease who are advised to change their eating habits read nutrition labels more than patients who have not been so advised, and whether that impacts their energy and nutrient intake. Analysis of the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey of the United States population, was performed. Adults (20 years of age or older) who participated in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and who had type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and/or hyperlipidemia were included for analysis. There were 3,748 unweighted participants, which represents 170,958,166 in the US population. Proportions of patients with chronic disease who read nutrition labels were compared by chi(2) analysis, mean values of various components of their diet were compared by the two-sample independent t test, and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were determined by logistic regression. Among patients with chronic disease, the odds of reading food labels when told by their doctor or another health professional to reduce calories or weight was 50% higher than in those without physician intervention (odds ratio=1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 2.00). Those who read food labels consumed less energy, saturated fat, carbohydrates, and sugar, and more fiber than those who did not. These findings point to the value of dietary counseling in chronic disease management.

  11. The Efficacy of a Nurse-Led Disease Management Program in Improving the Quality of Life for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xia; Wen, Yue; Ma, Deng-Yan; Huang, Yue-Yang; Pu, Li; Diao, Yong-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Background The impacts of nurse-led disease management programs on the quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease have not been extensively studied. Furthermore, results of the existing related studies are inconsistent. The focus of the proposed meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy of nurse-led disease management programs in improving the quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Literature survey was performed to identify the eligible studies from PubMed, Current Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with predefined terms. The outcome measured was quality of life. This meta-analysis was conducted in line with recommendations from the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Results Eight studies comprising a total of 1520 patients were included in this meta-analysis, with 766 patients assigned to the nurse-led disease management program. Nurse-led disease management improved the quality of life in terms of symptoms, sleep, staff encouragement, pain, general health perception, energy/fatigue, overall health and mental component summary when evaluated 6 weeks after the beginning of intervention. When evaluated 12 weeks later, the quality of life in terms of symptoms, sleep, staff encouragement, energy/fatigue, and physical component summary was improved. Stratified by the modalities of dialysis, similar results of pooled analyses were observed for patients with peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis, compared with the overall analyses. The results of sensitivity analyses were the same as the primary analyses. The symmetric funnel plot suggested that the possibility of potential publication bias was relatively low. Conclusion Nurse-led disease management program seems effective to improve some parameters of quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the seemingly promising results should be cautiously interpreted and

  12. Chronic Diseases in North-West Tanzania and Southern Uganda. Public Perceptions of Terminologies, Aetiologies, Symptoms and Preferred Management

    PubMed Central

    Nnko, Soori; Bukenya, Dominic; Kavishe, Bazil Balthazar; Biraro, Samuel; Peck, Robert; Kapiga, Saidi; Grosskurth, Heiner; Seeley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has shown that health system utilization is low for chronic diseases (CDs) other than HIV. We describe the knowledge and perceptions of CDs identified from rural and urban communities in north-west Tanzania and southern Uganda. Methods Data were collected through a quantitative population survey, a quantitative health facility survey and focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) in subgroups of population survey participants. The main focus of this paper is the findings from the FGDs and IDIs. Results We conducted 24 FGDs, involving approximately 180 adult participants and IDIs with 116 participants (≥18 years). CDs studied included: asthma/chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, cardiac failure and HIV- related disease. The understanding of most chronic conditions involved a combination of biomedical information, gleaned from health facility visits, local people who had suffered from a complaint or knew others who had and beliefs drawn from information shared in the community. The biomedical contribution shows some understanding of the aetiology of a condition and the management of that condition. However, local beliefs for certain conditions (such as epilepsy) suggest that biomedical treatment may be futile and therefore work counter to biomedical prescriptions for management. Conclusion Current perceptions of selected CDs may represent a barrier that prevents people from adopting efficacious health and treatment seeking behaviours. Interventions to improve this situation must include efforts to improve the quality of existing health services, so that people can access relevant, reliable and trustworthy services. PMID:26555896

  13. Emotional Intelligence: A Novel Outcome Associated with Wellbeing and Self-Management in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Janae L.; Dulohery, Megan M.; Abascal-Bolado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often struggle with diminished autonomy and quality of life. Emotional factors play a crucial role in the well-being of patients with COPD; they are independently associated with critical outcomes such as dyspnea, quality of life, and health care use. Emotional intelligence is the capacity to understand and manage personal thoughts and feelings, as well as to positively influence interpersonal communication and social well-being. Emotional intelligence is a trainable skill that is extensively used in corporate business to improve well-being and performance, and it may also be significant in the self-management of emotions in patients with chronic disease. Importantly, research supports the proposition that emotional intelligence may be developed and learned at any time or any age, and training programs have been associated with increased well-being and better emotional regulation in patients with chronic disease. However, to date, no research has been done to investigate its value in patients with COPD. Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between emotional intelligence and two meaningful outcomes in COPD: quality of life and self-management abilities. Methods: Participants with moderate to severe COPD completed a disease-specific quality of life tool (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire), the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, the Self-Management Abilities Scale, the modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, and pulmonary function tests, and also provided information about living conditions and self-reported health care use. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 310 patients with COPD (mean age, 69 ± 9 yr; 40% female; mean FEV1%, 42.4 ± 15.8) participated in the study. Emotional intelligence was significantly and independently associated with self-management abilities (P < 0.0001) and all domains of quality of life assessed (dyspnea, fatigue

  14. The role for S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hooper, C; Calvert, J

    2008-01-01

    Prescription of mucoactive drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. This development in clinical practice arises, at least in part, from a growing understanding of the important role that exacerbation frequency, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress play in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease. S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) is the most frequently prescribed mucoactive agent for long-term COPD use in the UK. In addition to its mucoregulatory activity, carbocisteine exhibits free-radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. These characteristics have stimulated interest in the potential that this and other mucoactive drugs may offer for modification of the disease processes present in COPD. This article reviews the pharmacology, in vivo and in vitro properties, and clinical trial evidence for carbocisteine in the context of guidelines for its use and the current understanding of the pathogenic processes that underlie COPD.

  15. The role for S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, C; Calvert, J

    2008-01-01

    Prescription of mucoactive drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. This development in clinical practice arises, at least in part, from a growing understanding of the important role that exacerbation frequency, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress play in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease. S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) is the most frequently prescribed mucoactive agent for long-term COPD use in the UK. In addition to its mucoregulatory activity, carbocisteine exhibits free-radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. These characteristics have stimulated interest in the potential that this and other mucoactive drugs may offer for modification of the disease processes present in COPD. This article reviews the pharmacology, in vivo and in vitro properties, and clinical trial evidence for carbocisteine in the context of guidelines for its use and the current understanding of the pathogenic processes that underlie COPD. PMID:19281081

  16. Synergy-COPD: a systems approach for understanding and managing chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases (CD) are generating a dramatic societal burden worldwide that is expected to persist over the next decades. The challenges posed by the epidemics of CD have triggered a novel health paradigm with major consequences on the traditional concept of disease and with a profound impact on key aspects of healthcare systems. We hypothesized that the development of a systems approach to understand CD together with the generation of an ecosystem to transfer the acquired knowledge into the novel healthcare scenario may contribute to a cost-effective enhancement of health outcomes. To this end, we designed the Synergy-COPD project wherein the heterogeneity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was addressed as a use case representative of CD. The current manuscript describes main features of the project design and the strategies put in place for its development, as well the expected outcomes during the project life-span. Moreover, the manuscript serves as introductory and unifying chapter of the different papers associated to the Supplement describing the characteristics, tools and the objectives of Synergy-COPD PMID:25472826

  17. Childhood asthma: considerations for primary care practice and chronic disease management in the village of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Childhood asthma is at historically high levels, with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite more than two decades of improved understanding of childhood asthma care and the evolution of beneficial medications, widespread control remains poor, leading to suboptimal patient outcomes and quality of life. This lack of control results in excessive emergency department use, hospitalizations, and inappropriate and/or unnecessary costs to the health care system. Advanced practice models that incorporate community-based approaches and services for childhood asthma are needed. Innovative, community-included methods of care to address the burden of childhood asthma may provide examples for care of other chronic diseases.

  18. Current concepts in targeting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pharmacotherapy: making progress towards personalised management.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Agusti, Alvar; Roche, Nicolas; Singh, Dave; Martinez, Fernando J

    2015-05-02

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex, and heterogeneous disorder that is responsible for substantial and growing morbidity, mortality, and health-care expense worldwide. Of imperative importance to decipher the complexity of COPD is to identify groups of patients with similar clinical characteristics, prognosis, or therapeutic needs, the so-called clinical phenotypes. This strategy is logical for research but might be of little clinical value because clinical phenotypes can overlap in the same patient and the same clinical phenotype could result from different biological mechanisms. With the goal to match assessment with treatment choices, the latest iteration of guidelines from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reorganised treatment objectives into two categories: to improve symptoms (ie, dyspnoea and health status) and to decrease future risk (as predicted by forced expiratory volume in 1 s level and exacerbations history). This change thus moves treatment closer to individualised medicine with available bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs. Yet, future treatment options are likely to include targeting endotypes that represent subtypes of patients defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism. Specific biomarkers of these endotypes would be particularly useful in clinical practice, especially in patients in which clinical phenotype alone is insufficient to identify the underlying endotype. A few series of potential COPD endotypes and biomarkers have been suggested. Empirical knowledge will be gained from proof-of-concept trials in COPD with emerging drugs that target specific inflammatory pathways. In every instance, specific endotype and biomarker efforts will probably be needed for the success of these trials, because the pathways are likely to be operative in only a subset of patients. Network analysis of human diseases offers the possibility to improve understanding of disease pathobiological

  19. Chronic disease management: implementation and coordination of healthcare systems for depressed elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Severinsson, Elisabeth; Holm, Anne Lise

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of the research-based Chronic Care Model (CCM), discuss methods and summarise research recommendations for improving the care of depressed elderly persons. Interviews were conducted and state-of-the-art reviews employed. Three important areas emerged: (1) barriers to and facilitating factors in the implementation of the CCM; (2) the challenges involved in re-designing the delivery system and interdisciplinary team collaboration; and (3) empirical evidence pertaining to self-management support and how older persons manage to live with depressive ill-health. In conclusion, implementation research requires evidence-based knowledge, staff involvement and familiarity with the context in which development occurs.

  20. Integrated telehealth and care management program for Medicare beneficiaries with chronic disease linked to savings.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Johnson, Scott J; Macaulay, Dendy; Birnbaum, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of chronically ill people constitutes nearly four-fifths of US health care spending, but it is hampered by a fragmented delivery system and discontinuities of care. We examined the impact of a care coordination approach called the Health Buddy Program, which integrates a telehealth tool with care management for chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries. We evaluated the program's impact on spending for patients of two clinics in the US Northwest who were exposed to the intervention, and we compared their experience with that of matched controls. We found significant savings among patients who used the Health Buddy telehealth program, which was associated with spending reductions of approximately 7.7-13.3 percent ($312-$542) per person per quarter. These results suggest that carefully designed and implemented care management and telehealth programs can help reduce health care spending and that such programs merit continued attention by Medicare. Meanwhile, mortality differences in the treatment and control groups suggest that the intervention may have produced noticeable changes in health outcomes, but we leave it to future research to explore these effects fully.

  1. Pharmacological management of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in neonates.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Sorenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are seen more frequently in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as advances in supportive care improve the survival of critically ill infants as well as those with severe, congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Many aspects of the infant's care, including fluid balance, electrolyte and mineral homeostasis, acid-base balance, and growth and nutrition require close monitoring by and collaboration among neonatologists, nephrologists, dieticians, and pharmacologists. This educational review summarizes the therapies widely used for neonates with AKI and CKD. Use of these therapies is extrapolated from data in older children and adults or based on clinical experience and case series. There is a critical need for more research on the use of therapies in infants with kidney disease as well as for the development of drug delivery systems and preparations scaled more appropriately for these small patients.

  2. Chronic Wasting Disease: Transmission Mechanisms and the Possibility of Harvest Management

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alex; Merrill, Evelyn; Pybus, Margo; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model of CWD management by nonselective deer harvest, currently the most feasible approach available for managing CWD in wild populations. We use the model to explore the effects of 6 common harvest strategies on disease prevalence and to identify potential optimal harvest policies for reducing disease prevalence without population collapse. The model includes 4 deer categories (juveniles, adult females, younger adult males, older adult males) that may be harvested at different rates, a food-based carrying capacity, which influences juvenile survival but not adult reproduction or survival, and seasonal force of infection terms for each deer category under differing frequency-dependent transmission dynamics resulting from environmental and direct contact mechanisms. Numerical experiments show that the interval of transmission coefficients β where the disease can be controlled is generally narrow and efficiency of a harvest policy to reduce disease prevalence depends crucially on the details of the disease transmission mechanism, in particular on the intensity of disease transmission to juveniles and the potential differences in the behavior of older and younger males that influence contact rates. Optimal harvest policy to minimize disease prevalence for each of the assumed transmission mechanisms is shown to depend on harvest intensity. Across mechanisms, a harvest that focuses on antlered deer, without distinguishing between age classes reduces disease prevalence most consistently, whereas distinguishing between young and older antlered deer produces higher uncertainty in the harvest effects on disease prevalence. Our results show that, despite uncertainties, a modelling approach can determine classes of harvest strategy that are most likely to be effective in combatting CWD. PMID:26963921

  3. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  4. Comparison of Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease between patients with systemic sclerosis and other chronic conditions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thombs, Brett D; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Riehm, Kira E; Saadat, Nazanin; Fedoruk, Claire

    2017-02-01

    The complexity and burden of systemic sclerosis (SSc) pose challenges to developing and sustaining disease management self-efficacy. The objective of this systematic review was to compare scores on a commonly used self-efficacy measure, the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (SEMCD) Scale, between SSc and other diseases. Data sources included the CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Scopus databases, searched through January 25, 2016, and reference lists of included articles and relevant reviews. Studies in any language that reported total SEMCD scores or individual item scores in adult non-psychiatric medical patients were eligible. We identified one eligible non-intervention study of SSc patients (n = 553), 13 other non-intervention studies, and 21 studies with pre-intervention data for patients enrolled in a self-management program or a trial of a program. Of 13 non-intervention studies with published total score means in cancer, cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries, organ transplant candidates and recipients, dialysis, and lupus, SEMCD scores were statistically significantly lower (poorer self-efficacy) in SSc than 6 other disease samples, not significantly different from 6, and significantly higher than lupus patients. Compared to 18 studies of patients in self-management programs or trials with published total score means, SSc patients were similar or lower than 9 samples and significantly higher than 9 samples. Compared to patients with other diseases not enrolled in programs to improve self-efficacy, SSc patients report lower self-efficacy scores than most patient groups. Rigorously tested self-care interventions designed to meet the unique needs of patients with SSc are needed.

  5. Implementation and quantitative evaluation of chronic disease self-management programme in Shanghai, China: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dongbo; Fu, Hua; McGowan, Patrick; Shen, Yi-e; Zhu, Lizhen; Yang, Huiqin; Mao, Jianguo; Zhu, Shitai; Ding, Yongming; Wei, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Shanghai Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP). METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with six-month follow-up compared patients who received treatment with those who did not receive treatment (waiting-list controls) in five urban communities in Shanghai, China. Participants in the treatment group received education from a lay-led CDSMP course and one copy of a help book immediately; those in the control group received the same education and book six months later. FINDINGS: In total, 954 volunteer patients with a medical record that confirmed a diagnosis of hypertension, heart disease, chronic lung disease, arthritis, stroke, or diabetes who lived in communities were assigned randomly to treatment (n = 526) and control (n = 428) groups. Overall, 430 (81.7%) and 349 (81.5%) patients in the treatment and control groups completed the six-month study. Patients who received treatment had significant improvements in weekly minutes of aerobic exercise, practice of cognitive symptom management, self-efficacy to manage own symptoms, and self-efficacy to manage own disease in general compared with controls. They also had significant improvements in eight indices of health status and, on average, fewer hospitalizations. CONCLUSION: When implemented in Shanghai, the CDSMP was acceptable culturally to Chinese patients. The programme improved participants' health behaviour, self-efficacy, and health status and reduced the number of hospitalizations six months after the course. The locally based delivery model was integrated into the routine of community government organizations and community health services. Chinese lay leaders taught the CDSMP courses as successfully as professionals. PMID:12764513

  6. Adaptation of the chronic disease self-management program for cancer survivors: feasibility, acceptability, and lessons for implementation.

    PubMed

    Risendal, B; Dwyer, A; Seidel, R; Lorig, K; Katzenmeyer, C; Coombs, L; Kellar-Guenther, Y; Warren, L; Franco, A; Ory, M

    2014-12-01

    Self-management in chronic disease has been shown to improve patient-reported and health care-related outcomes. However, relatively little information about its utility in cancer survivorship is known. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of the delivery of an adaptation of the evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-management Program (Stanford) called Cancer Thriving and Surviving (CTS). Triangulated mixed methods were used to capture baseline characteristics and post-program experiences using a combination of closed- and open-ended survey items; emergent coding and simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Twenty-seven workshops were delivered by 22 CTS leaders to 244 participants between August 2011 and January 2013 in a variety of settings (48 % community, 30 % health care, 22 % regional/community cancer center). Representing a variety of cancer types, about half the participants were 1-3 years post-diagnosis and 45 % were 4 or more years from diagnosis. Program attendance was high with 84 % of participants attending four or more of the six sessions in the workshop. Overall, 95 % of the participants were satisfied with the program content and leaders, and would recommend the program to friends and family. These results confirm the feasibility and acceptability of delivery of a high-fidelity, peer-led model for self-management support for cancer survivors. Expansion of the CTS represents a powerful tool toward improving health-related outcomes in this at-risk population.

  7. Development of a questionnaire to evaluate practitioners’ confidence and knowledge in primary care in managing chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the UK, chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD) is largely managed in primary care. We developed a tool to assess practitioner confidence and knowledge in managing CKD compared to other chronic diseases. This questionnaire was part of a cluster randomised quality improvement interventions in chronic kidney disease (QICKD; ISRCTN56023731). Methods The questionnaire was developed by family physicians, primary care nurses, academics and renal specialists. We conducted three focus groups (n = 7, 6, and 8) to refine the questionnaire using groups of general practitioners, practice nurses and trainees in general practice. We used paper based versions to develop the questionnaire and online surveys to test it. Practitioners in a group of volunteer, trial practices received the questionnaire twice. We measured its reliability using Cohen’s Kappa (K). Results The practitioners in the focus groups reached a consensus as to the key elements to include in the instrument. We achieved a 73.1% (n = 57/78) initial response rate for our questionnaire; of these 57, 54 completed the questionnaire a second time. Family physicians made up the largest single group of respondents (47.4%, n = 27). Initial response showed more female (64.9%, n = 37) than male (35.1%, n = 20) respondents. The reliability results from retesting showed that there was moderate agreement (k > 0.4) on all questions; with many showing substantial agreement (k > 0.6). There was substantial agreement in the questions about loop diuretics (k = 0.608, CI 0.432-0.784, p < 0.001), confidence in managing hypertension (k = 0.628, 95%CI 0.452-0.804, p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure treatment thresholds in CKD (k = 0.608, 95%CI 0.436-0.780, p < 0.001) and the rate of decline of eGFR that would prompt referral (k = 0.764, 95%CI 0.603-0.925, p < 0.001). Conclusion The QICKD-CCQ is a reliable instrument for measuring confidence and

  8. [Anaemia and chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Chassagne, Philippe; Amalou, Laetitia; Thillard, Anne-Lyse; Gbaguidi, Xavier; Roca, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of anemia in old patients is 20%. Anemia is mostly multifactorial associated with multiple comorbidities that are frequently observed in people of 65 years or older. Chronic renal failure, inflammatory diseases, nutrient deficiencies and especially iron deficiency are the most associated conditions with anemia. Anemia represents a prognosis marker of general health in old people. Thus anemia is associated with higher rates of morbidities (such as unplanned hospitalizations) and greatest mortality. Therefore anemia could be considered either as a consequence of chronic diseases or a prognosis marker of their severity. The prognosis of chronic cardiac failure is for example worst in anemic patients. Finally anemia is listed as a component of the frailty.

  9. A review of instruments to measure interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management for community-living older adults.

    PubMed

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; McKey, Colleen; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2016-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that chronic disease management (CDM) for community-living older adults (CLOA) is an increasingly complex process. CDM for older adults, who are often living with multiple chronic conditions, requires coordination of various health and social services. Coordination is enabled through interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among individual providers, community organizations, and health sectors. Measuring IPC is complicated given there are multiple conceptualisations and measures of IPC. A literature review of several healthcare, psychological, and social science electronic databases was conducted to locate instruments that measure IPC at the team level and have published evidence of their reliability and validity. Five instruments met the criteria and were critically reviewed to determine their strengths and limitations as they relate to CDM for CLOA. A comparison of the characteristics, psychometric properties, and overall concordance of each instrument with salient attributes of IPC found the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool to be the most appropriate instrument for measuring IPC for CDM in CLOA.

  10. The role of disease management in pay-for-performance programs for improving the care of chronically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Beich, Jeff; Scanlon, Dennis P; Ulbrecht, Jan; Ford, Eric W; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A

    2006-02-01

    To date, pay-for-performance programs targeting the care of persons with chronic conditions have primarily been directed at physicians and provide an alternative to health plan-sponsored chronic disease management (DM) programs. Both approaches require similar infrastructure, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages for program implementation. Pay-for-performance programs use incentives based on patient outcomes; however, an alternative system might incorporate measures of structure and process. Using a conceptual framework, the authors explore the variation in 50 diabetes DM programs using data from the 2002 National Business Coalition on Health's eValue8 Request for Information (RFI). The authors raise issues relevant to the assignment of accountability for patient outcomes to either health plans or physicians. They analyze the association between RFI scores measuring structures and processes, and HEDIS diabetes intermediate outcome measures. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of using the RFI scores as an alternative metric for pay-for-performance programs are discussed.

  11. Recommendations for a Clinical Decision Support for the Management of Individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Meenal B.; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David; Patel, Uptal D.; Matchar, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Care for advanced CKD patients is suboptimal. CKD practice guidelines aim to close gaps in care, but making providers aware of guidelines is an ineffective implementation strategy. The Institute of Medicine has endorsed the use of clinical decision support (CDS) for implementing guidelines. The authors’ objective was to identify the requirements of an optimal CDS system for CKD management. Design, setting, participants, and measurements: The aims of this study expanded on those of previous work that used the facilitated process improvement (FPI) methodology. In FPI, an expert workgroup develops a set of quality improvement tools that can subsequently be utilized by practicing physicians. The authors conducted a discussion with a group of multidisciplinary experts to identify requirements for an optimal CDS system. Results: The panel considered the process of patient identification and management, associated barriers, and elements by which CDS could address these barriers. The panel also discussed specific knowledge needs in the context of a typical scenario in which CDS would be used. Finally, the group developed a set of core requirements that will likely facilitate the implementation of a CDS system aimed at improving the management of any chronic medical condition. Conclusions: Considering the growing burden of CKD and the potential healthcare and resource impact of guideline implementation through CDS, the relevance of this systematic process, consistent with Institute of Medicine recommendations, cannot be understated. The requirements described in this report could serve as a basis for the design of a CKD-specific CDS. PMID:19176797

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. It is important to diagnose CKD early. Diagnosis & TestsHow can my doctor tell if I have CKD?There are three simple tests that your doctor might do if he or she suspects you might have chronic kidney disease:Blood pressure testUrine albumin (a test to see ...

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) COPD is a long-term (chronic) illness. The disease will get worse more quickly if you do not stop smoking. If you have severe COPD, you will be short of breath with most activities. You may be ...

  14. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  15. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  16. Breaking barriers to care: a community of solution for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jim; Solberg, Bill; Gauger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    For 10 years the Medical College of Wisconsin and Columbia St. Mary's Hospital have joined together in a partnership to work within some of Milwaukee's most impoverished neighborhoods. Beginning simply by providing health care through a free clinic, the partnership soon was confronted with numerous examples of barriers to care being experienced by patients. A community-based participatory action process allowed the local population to give voice to the local realities of barriers to care. Here we combine our anecdotal clinical experience, the neighborhood's input, and an example of a successful program from a low-resource international setting to create a novel approach to treating chronic disease in uninsured populations. This model of care has been successful for 2 reasons. First, the model shows good health outcomes at low cost. Second, solid community partnerships with care providers, churches, and other groups have been formed in support of the model, ensuring its credibility and sustainability.

  17. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  18. Impact of a chronic disease management program on hospital admissions and readmissions in an Australian population with heart disease or diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamar, G Brent; Rula, Elizabeth Y; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Larkin, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) were introduced in Australia to reduce unnecessary health care utilization by the growing population with chronic conditions; however, evidence of effectiveness is needed. This study evaluated the impact of a comprehensive CDMP, My Health Guardian (MHG), on rate of hospital admissions, readmissions, and average length of hospital stay (ALOS) for insured individuals with heart disease or diabetes. Primary outcomes were assessed through retrospective comparison of members in MHG (treatment; n=5053) to similar nonparticipating members (comparison; n=23,077) using a difference-in-differences approach with the year before program commencement serving as baseline and the subsequent 12 or 18 months serving as the program periods. All outcomes were evaluated for the total study population and for disease-matched subgroups (heart disease and diabetes). Statistical tests were performed using multivariate regression controlling for age, sex, number of chronic diseases, and past hospitalization status. After both 12 and 18 months, treatment members displayed decreases in admissions (both, P≤0.001) and readmissions (both, P≤0.01), and ALOS after 18 months (P≤0.01) versus the comparison group; magnitude of impact increased over time for these 3 measures. All outcomes for both disease-matched subgroups directionally mirrored the total study group, but the diabetes subgroup did not achieve significance for readmissions or ALOS. Within the treatment group, admissions decreased with increasing care calls to members (12 and 18 months, P<0.0001). These results show that MHG successfully reduced the frequency and duration of hospital admissions and presents a promising approach to reduce the burden associated with hospitalizations in populations with chronic disease.

  19. Canadian Men's Self-Management of Chronic Diseases: A Literature Analysis of Strategies for Dealing With Risks and Promoting Wellness.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Maheu, Christine; Kolisnyk, Olesya; Mohamed, Mohamed; Guruge, Sepali; Kinslikh, Diana; Christopher, Joneet J; Stevenson, Melissa; SanJose, CaroLine; Sizto, Terry; Byam, Aaron

    2015-03-23

    This article reviews the qualitative research on men's self-management of mental and physical chronic diseases, with emphasis on strategies for dealing with risks and promoting wellness. Using Bardin's method of document analysis, it was focused on the findings of Canadian qualitative studies published in French or English from 2005 to 2011. Boltanski's theory on social uses of the body inspired the analysis. Living with a chronic disease threatens men's sense of masculinity and self-image, as well as their perceived ability to fulfill expected social roles. Social images of men's bodies influence how men express their emotions, attributes, and attitudes, or acknowledge the need for and seek social affirmation. Self-management has been documented in Canadian qualitative literature as a complex phenomenon influenced by the social environment, personal capacities, feelings, perceptions, and potentials. The extent of how all these features interact within the scope of men's mental and physical health and illness experiences was partially revealed in this study. The findings underscore the social invisibility of men's bodies, especially those of men facing social inequities. Attending to principles of social justice can ensure that future research on men's health will amplify the range of men's voices and allow them to be heard. Recommendations address also the international scientific community interested in advancing men's health research, especially in those countries that lack a national men's health policy.

  20. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  1. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Raoel; van der Meer, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality rates. In the past few years, treatment has improved considerably by the implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). From 2014 onwards, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Regimens with various combinations of these new drugs, without the use of interferon (IFN), proved to be very effective and well tolerated, even among patients with advanced liver disease. Moreover, treatment duration could be shortened to 12 weeks in the majority of patients. The high costs of these DAAs, however, limit the availability of IFN-free therapy worldwide. Even in wealthy countries, it is deemed necessary to prioritize DAA treatment in order to limit the immediate impact on the health budget. As patients with advanced liver disease are in most need of HCV clearance, many countries decided to treat those patients first. In the current review, we focus on the currently available IFN-free treatment options for patients with cirrhosis. We discuss the virological efficacy as well as the clinical relevance of these regimens among this specific patient population. PMID:27006761

  2. Fibrosis assessment: impact on current management of chronic liver disease and application of quantitative invasive tools.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Hou, Jin-Lin

    2016-05-01

    Fibrosis, a common pathogenic pathway of chronic liver disease (CLD), has long been indicated to be significantly and most importantly associated with severe prognosis. Nowadays, with remarkable advances in understanding and/or treatment of major CLDs such as hepatitis C, B, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, there is an unprecedented requirement for the diagnosis and assessment of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis in various clinical settings. Among the available approaches, liver biopsy remains the one which possibly provides the most direct and reliable information regarding fibrosis patterns and changes in the parenchyma at different clinical stages and with different etiologies. Thus, many endeavors have been undertaken for developing methodologies based on the strategy of quantitation for the invasive assessment. Here, we analyze the impact of fibrosis assessment on the CLD patient care based on the data of recent clinical studies. We discuss and update the current invasive tools regarding their technological features and potentials for the particular clinical applications. Furthermore, we propose the potential resolutions with application of quantitative invasive tools for some major issues in fibrosis assessment, which appear to be obstacles against the nowadays rapid progress in CLD medicine.

  3. Quality indicators for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease in primary care in Canada derived from a modified Delphi panel approach

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Karen; Bevan, Lindsay; Hunter, Katie; Rogers, Jess; Young, Jacqueline; Nesrallah, Gihad

    2017-01-01

    Background: The detection and management of chronic kidney disease lies within primary care; however, performance measures applicable in the Canadian context are lacking. We sought to develop a set of primary care quality indicators for chronic kidney disease in the Canadian setting and to assess the current state of the disease's detection and management in primary care. Methods: We used a modified Delphi panel approach, involving 20 panel members from across Canada (10 family physicians, 7 nephrologists, 1 patient, 1 primary care nurse and 1 pharmacist). Indicators identified from peer-reviewed and grey literature sources were subjected to 3 rounds of voting to develop a set of quality indicators for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease in the primary care setting. The final indicators were applied to primary care electronic medical records in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD) to assess the current state of primary care detection and management of chronic kidney disease in Ontario. Results: Seventeen indicators made up the final list, with 1 under the category Prevalence, Incidence and Mortality; 4 under Screening, Diagnosis and Risk Factors; 11 under Management; and 1 under Referral to a Specialist. In a sample of 139 993 adult patients not on dialysis, 6848 (4.9%) had stage 3 or higher chronic kidney disease, with the average age of patients being 76.1 years (standard deviation [SD] 11.0); 62.9% of patients were female. Diagnosis and screening for chronic kidney disease were poorly performed. Only 27.1% of patients with stage 3 or higher disease had their diagnosis documented in their cumulative patient profile. Albumin-creatinine ratio testing was only performed for 16.3% of patients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and for 28.5% of patients with risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Family physicians performed relatively better with the management of chronic kidney disease

  4. Living with asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease: Using technology to support self-management - An overview.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Deborah; Mair, Frances S; Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Thomas, Mike

    2016-08-10

    Long-term respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common, and cause high levels of morbidity and mortality. Supporting self-management is advocated for both asthma and increasingly so for COPD, and there is growing interest in the potential role of a range of new technologies, such as smartphone apps, the web or telehealth to facilitate and promote self-management in these conditions. Treatment goals for both asthma and COPD include aiming to control symptoms, maintain activities, achieve the best possible quality of life and minimize risks of exacerbation. To do this, health professionals should be (a) helping patients to recognize deteriorating symptoms and act appropriately; (b) promoting adherence to maintenance therapy; (c) promoting a regular review where triggers can be established, and strategies for managing such triggers discussed; and (d) promoting healthy lifestyles and positive self-management of symptoms. In particular, low uptake of asthma action plans is a modifiable contributor to morbidity and possibly also to mortality in those with asthma and should be addressed as a priority. Using technology to support self-management is an evolving strategy that shows promise. This review provides an overview of self-management support and discusses how newer technologies may help patients and health professionals to meet key treatment goals.

  5. A novel personal health system with integrated decision support and guidance for the management of chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Stephan; Schäfer, Michael; Bransch, Marco; Brimmers, Peter; Bartolomé, Diego; Baños, Janie; Orr, James; Jones, Dave; Jara, Maximilian; Stockmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A personal health system platform for the management of patients with chronic liver disease that incorporates a novel approach to integrate decision support and guidance through care pathways for patients and their doctors is presented in this paper. The personal health system incorporates an integrated decision support engine that guides patients and doctors through the management of the disease by issuing tasks and providing recommendations to both the care team and the patient and by controlling the execution of a Care Flow Plan based on the results of tasks and the monitored health status of the patient. This Care Flow Plan represents a formal, business process based model of disease management designed off-line by domain experts on the basis of clinical guidelines, knowledge of care pathways and an organisational model for integrated, patient-centred care. In this way, remote monitoring and treatment are dynamically adapted to the patient's actual condition and clinical symptoms and allow flexible delivery of care with close integration of specialists, therapists and care-givers.

  6. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report: GOLD Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agusti, Alvar

    2017-03-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD (GOLD) 2017 Report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: 1) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; 2) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacological treatments are proposed; 3) the concept of de-escalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; 4) nonpharmacologic therapies are comprehensively presented and; 5) the importance of comorbid conditions in managing COPD is reviewed.

  7. What's in a name? Concordance is better than adherence for promoting partnership and self-management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sue; Neubeck, Lis

    2016-01-01

    The choice of language health professionals use to discuss self-management of chronic disease is important and influences patients' self-management. The words compliance, adherence and concordance are used to discuss patients' agreement with prescribed treatment plans, but have different tone and meanings. Models of care linked to the words compliance and adherence are underpinned by interactions between patients and healthcare providers that merely reinforce instructions about treatments. The 'patient-professional partnership' is introduced as a model by Bodenheimer et al. (2002, p. 2469) whereby true partnership working should be an opportunity to pool the expertise of both parties to arrive at mutually agreed goals in concordance. The impact these words might have on partnership working is important in defining the patient-health professional relationship, and for the patients' healthcare outcomes and the potential effect on healthcare utilisation.

  8. When to consider liver transplant during the management of chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rena K

    2014-01-01

    The decision to perform liver transplantation for a particular patient is never the decision of one single individual, although a single individual could preclude transplant as an option if the opportunity for referral is missed. Every physician treating patients with cirrhosis, including primary care physicians and primary gastroenterologists, should watch for the essential turning points at which a patient may become eligible for a transplant referral. Timing of referral could be assessed according to either the type of liver disease or non–disease-specific measures of disease severity. Although the MELD score is an easily accessible and convenient tool it is not as well known as CTP classification, and many cirrhotic patients under long-term management may not be being allocated a MELD score regularly calculated by their primary physicians. Because a slow progression in MELD score may occur without a change in symptoms, reaching the MELD score acceptable for transplant referral may go unrecognized. As generalists face the rising prevalence of NAFLD and the rising prevalence of cirrhosis and HCC from HCV, there will be an increasing need for education in the management of liver disease. It will be necessary for specialists and health care systems to better inform primary care physicians about the recommendations on criteria for transplant referral and the critical windows of opportunity within which they can act. Although there is a recognized knowledge gap that needs to be addressed, once a patient is in medical care, inadequate physician knowledge should never be the cause for late timing or missing the opportunity for referral.

  9. Diagnoses and Management of Drug Hypersensitivity and Anaphylaxis in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Reactions to Taxanes and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi-Santos, Rafael; Castells, Mariana

    2016-06-08

    Due to the increase in utilization of chemotherapies and antibodies, drug hypersensitivity reactions have increased dramatically worldwide, preventing the use of first-line therapies and impacting patients' survival and quality of life. Some of the more frequently used medications in cancer include taxanes for ovarian, lung, breast, and prostate cancers. Monoclonal antibodies are used in the treatment of neoplastic, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases, and their clinical applications are becoming broader. Monoclonal antibody targets include CD20, HER-2, EGFR, IL-6 receptor, TNF-α, CD30, VEGF-A, IgE, and more, and examples of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases that respond to monoclonal antibodies include rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, and asthma. Neoplastic diseases include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and colorectal, breast, gastric, and lung cancer. The clinical presentation of drug hypersensitivity reactions ranges from mild cutaneous reactions to life-threatening symptoms including anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) has become a groundbreaking approach to the management of immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions IgE and non-IgE mediated. It is the only effective procedure that enables sensitized patients to receive the full treatment dose safely, thus representing an important advance in the patients' treatment and prognosis. The aim of this review is to provide an update on hypersensitivity reactions to commonly used monoclonal and taxanes, their clinical presentations, diagnosis, and the use of RDD for their management.

  10. [Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap].

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla

    2011-01-16

    Asthma bronchiale and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most prevalent lung diseases characterized by inflammation of the airways. International and Hungarian guidelines provide proper definitions for clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of both diseases. However, in everyday clinical practice, overlap of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become more frequent. As guidelines are mainly based on large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials that exclude overlap patients, there is a lack of diagnostic and especially therapeutic strategies for these patients. This review summarizes clinical characteristics of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap, and provides daily practical examples for its management.

  11. Can Chronic Disease Management Programs for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Reduce Productivity-Related Indirect Costs of the Disease? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Jane N.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Phillips, Charles D.; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G.; Forjuoh, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; P<0.001) and persons with greater than high school education were associated with additional productivity losses (+$758/year; P<0.001). Persons with more than 1 comorbid condition were marginally associated with lower productivity losses (-$326/year; P=0.055). No evidence was found that the chronic disease management programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses. (Population Health Management 2014;17:112–120) PMID:24152055

  12. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lange, Peter

    2013-04-15

    The new version of the GOLD document on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), introduces a profound change in the stratification of the patients. In addition to the level of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the new stratification also includes the level of daily symptoms, in particular dyspnoea, and the history of exacerbations. This review describes this stratification and the treatment of stable COPD according to the GOLD document. It focuses on early diagnosis, smoking cessation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

  13. Prevention and management of chronic disease: a litmus test for health-systems strengthening in low-income and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Samb, Badara; Desai, Nina; Nishtar, Sania; Mendis, Shanti; Bekedam, Henk; Wright, Anna; Hsu, Justine; Martiniuk, Alexandra; Celletti, Francesca; Patel, Kiran; Adshead, Fiona; McKee, Martin; Evans, Tim; Alwan, Ala; Etienne, Carissa

    2010-11-20

    National health systems need strengthening if they are to meet the growing challenge of chronic diseases in low-income and middle-income countries. By application of an accepted health-systems framework to the evidence, we report that the factors that limit countries' capacity to implement proven strategies for chronic diseases relate to the way in which health systems are designed and function. Substantial constraints are apparent across each of the six key health-systems components of health financing, governance, health workforce, health information, medical products and technologies, and health-service delivery. These constraints have become more evident as development partners have accelerated efforts to respond to HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, and vaccine-preventable diseases. A new global agenda for health-systems strengthening is arising from the urgent need to scale up and sustain these priority interventions. Most chronic diseases are neglected in this dialogue about health systems, despite the fact that non-communicable diseases (most of which are chronic) will account for 69% of all global deaths by 2030 with 80% of these deaths in low-income and middle-income countries. At the same time, advocates for action against chronic diseases are not paying enough attention to health systems as part of an effective response. Efforts to scale up interventions for management of common chronic diseases in these countries tend to focus on one disease and its causes, and are often fragmented and vertical. Evidence is emerging that chronic disease interventions could contribute to strengthening the capacity of health systems to deliver a comprehensive range of services-provided that such investments are planned to include these broad objectives. Because effective chronic disease programmes are highly dependent on well-functioning national health systems, chronic diseases should be a litmus test for health-systems strengthening.

  14. Translating research findings of chronic kidney disease management to clinical practice: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lesley Ann; Levin, Adeera

    2004-01-01

    Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) has been identified as a public health epidemic, fueled in part by improved outcomes of both diabetic and cardiac patient populations, as well as by the increasing recognition that it is possible to identify CKD at earlier stages. The estimated 8 to 10 million Americans that have CKD, with its concomitant morbidity and mortality, have the potential to overwhelm the current system of specialty practice medicine and health care resources. How can clinicians, clinician scientists, and health care administrators translate research findings into clinical practice in an effective manner to improve the care of this burgeoning patient group? The challenge of translating research into clinical care requires identification of that which we do and do not know, communication of knowledge between those who do and do not know, and efficient collection of information for systematic evaluation. This article will describe the challenges of translating current research findings into clinical practice. There is a need to identify the complexity of CKD disease processes and issues associated with delivery of care and to describe the difficulties in the dissemination of new knowledge to physicians. Because of the propensity of CKD to affect identifiable groups of patients, we will discuss the potential challenges of these strategies given the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity in North America. A potential solution to these challenges is a new paradigm of "process-based medicine" that integrates clinical and basic science research findings with multidisciplinary and shared care models of health care delivery. In this context, attention to advances in information technology, the cognitive processes that underlie physician learning, and the findings of outcome research may ensure true integration of clinical research and clinical practice.

  15. Clinical management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Muscle dysfunction is frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contributing to their exercise limitation and a worsening prognosis. The main factor leading to limb muscle dysfunction is deconditioning, whereas respiratory muscle dysfunction is mostly the result of pulmonary hyperinflation. However, both limb and respiratory muscles are also influenced by other negative factors, including smoking, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exacerbations and some drugs. Limb muscle weakness is generally diagnosed through voluntary isometric maneuvers such as handgrip or quadriceps muscle contraction (dynamometry); while respiratory muscle loss of strength is usually recognized through a decrease in maximal static pressures measured at the mouth. Both types of measurements have validated reference values. Respiratory muscle strength can also be evaluated determining esophageal, gastric and transdiaphragmatic maximal pressures although there is a lack of widely accepted reference equations. Non-volitional maneuvers, obtained through electrical or magnetic stimulation, can be employed in patients unable to cooperate. Muscle endurance can also be assessed, generally using repeated submaximal maneuvers until exhaustion, but no validated reference values are available yet. The treatment of muscle dysfunction is multidimensional and includes improvement in lifestyle habits (smoking abstinence, healthy diet and a good level of physical activity, preferably outside), nutritional measures (diet supplements and occasionally, anabolic drugs), and different modalities of general and muscle training. PMID:28066619

  16. Clinical management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with muscle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-11-01

    Muscle dysfunction is frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contributing to their exercise limitation and a worsening prognosis. The main factor leading to limb muscle dysfunction is deconditioning, whereas respiratory muscle dysfunction is mostly the result of pulmonary hyperinflation. However, both limb and respiratory muscles are also influenced by other negative factors, including smoking, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exacerbations and some drugs. Limb muscle weakness is generally diagnosed through voluntary isometric maneuvers such as handgrip or quadriceps muscle contraction (dynamometry); while respiratory muscle loss of strength is usually recognized through a decrease in maximal static pressures measured at the mouth. Both types of measurements have validated reference values. Respiratory muscle strength can also be evaluated determining esophageal, gastric and transdiaphragmatic maximal pressures although there is a lack of widely accepted reference equations. Non-volitional maneuvers, obtained through electrical or magnetic stimulation, can be employed in patients unable to cooperate. Muscle endurance can also be assessed, generally using repeated submaximal maneuvers until exhaustion, but no validated reference values are available yet. The treatment of muscle dysfunction is multidimensional and includes improvement in lifestyle habits (smoking abstinence, healthy diet and a good level of physical activity, preferably outside), nutritional measures (diet supplements and occasionally, anabolic drugs), and different modalities of general and muscle training.

  17. Guidelines for the assessment and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Canadian Thoracic Society Workshop Group.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fifth commonest cause of death in North America and is the only leading cause of death that is increasing in prevalence. Early detection and prevention through smoking cessation are essential to stem this epidemic. Once COPD is diagnosed there is a compelling rationale for vaccination against influenza and possibly pneumococcal pneumonia, although proof of efficacy is lacking. If airways obstruction is present, inhaled quaternary anticholinergic bronchodilators or inhaled beta 2 agonists or both may be of benefit, the former agents showing fewer side effects and often greater efficacy in elderly patients. Theophylline may enhance the effect or increase the duration of the bronchodilatation produced by an inhaled agent and may offer added nonbronchodilatory effects such as improved respiratory muscle endurance and ventilatory stimulation. If significant airflow obstruction persists, an objectively monitored trial of oral steroid therapy is required. Limitation of activity despite optimum medical therapy may be alleviated in selected patients by a supervised exercise rehabilitation program. If hypoxemia is present supplemental oxygen therapy will improve the patient's survival and quality of life. Additional therapies, from respiratory stimulants to lung transplantation, remain under investigation. PMID:1498754

  18. Dilemmas in the management of atrial fibrillation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Holger; Brand, Eva; Mesters, Rolf; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Fisher, Marc; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Breithardt, Günter

    2009-04-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Little attention has been paid to the problem of atrial fibrillation, although this arrhythmia is very frequent with a prevalence of 13 to 27% in patients on long-term hemodialysis. Because of the large number of pathophysiologic mechanisms involved, these patients have a high risk for both thromboembolic events and hemorrhagic complications. Stroke is a frequent complication in CKD: The US Renal Data System reports an incidence of 15.1% in hemodialysis patients compared with 9.6% in patients with other stages of CKD and 2.6% in a control cohort without CKD. The 2-yr mortality rates after stroke in these subgroups were 74, 55, and 28%, respectively. Although oral coumadin is the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation, its use in patients with CKD is reported only in limited studies, all in hemodialysis patients, and is associated with a markedly increased rate of bleeding compared with patients without CKD. With regard to the high risk for stroke and the conflicting data about oral anticoagulation, an individualized stratification algorithm is presented based on relevant studies.

  19. Emotional management and biological markers of dietetic regimen in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Luciani, Massimiliano; Fazzari, Erika; Cesari, Valerio; Luciano, Stella; Fortini, Antonio; Berloco, Desiderata; Canulla, Francesco; Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Lai, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between psychological characteristics and biological markers of adherence in chronic kidney disease patients receiving conservative therapy, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis (PD), or kidney transplantation. Seventy-nine adult patients were asked to complete the following questionnaires: Toronto Alexithymia scale, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale, and Short Form Health Survey. Biological markers of adherence to treatment were measured. Peritoneal dialysis patients showed a lower capacity to feel pleasure from sensorial experience (p = .011) and a higher values of phosphorus compared to the other patients' groups (p = .0001). The inability to communicate emotions was negatively correlated with hemoglobin levels (r = -(0).69; p = .001) and positively correlated with phosphorus values in the PD patients (r = .45; p = .050). Findings showed higher psychological impairments and a lower adherence to the treatment in PD patients and suggest the implication of emotional competence in adherence to treatment.

  20. Development and implementation of an integrated chronic disease model in South Africa: lessons in the management of change through improving the quality of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Asmall, Shaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background South Africa is facing a complex burden of disease arising from a combination of chronic infectious illness and non-communicable diseases. As the burden of chronic diseases (communicable and non-communicable) increases, providing affordable and effective care to the increasing numbers of chronic patients will be an immense challenge. Methods The framework recommended by the Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom for the development and evaluation of complex health interventions was used to conceptualise the intervention. The breakthrough series was utilised for the implementation process. These two frameworks were embedded within the clinical practice improvement model that served as the overarching framework for the development and implementation of the model. Results The Chronic Care Model was ideally suited to improve the facility component and patient experience; however, the deficiencies in other aspects of the health system building blocks necessitated a hybrid model. An integrated chronic disease management model using a health systems approach was initiated across 42 primary health care facilities. The interventions were implemented in a phased approach using learning sessions and action periods to introduce the planned and targeted changes. Conclusion The implementation of the integrated chronic disease management model is feasible at primary care in South Africa provided that systemic challenges and change management are addressed during the implementation process. PMID:26528101

  1. Can chronic disease management programs for patients with type 2 diabetes reduce productivity-related indirect costs of the disease? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Adepoju, Omolola E; Bolin, Jane N; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Phillips, Charles D; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G; Forjuoh, Samuel N

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; P<0.001) and persons with greater than high school education were associated with additional productivity losses (+$758/year; P<0.001). Persons with more than 1 comorbid condition were marginally associated with lower productivity losses (-$326/year; P=0.055). No evidence was found that the chronic disease management programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses.

  2. The combination of umeclidinium bromide and vilanterol in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current evidence and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Gregory J; Edin, Anton

    2013-12-01

    The defining feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is progressive airflow limitation that causes air trapping and hyperinflation. The increasing hyperinflation results in dyspnea along with associated inability to engage in the activities of daily living. The American Thoracic Society (ATS), European Respiratory Society (ERS) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) treatment guidelines all place bronchodilators as the foundation of pharmacological management of COPD. In patients with moderate-to-very-severe respiratory impairment, adding regular treatment with one or more long-acting bronchodilators is recommended [long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs) or long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs)]. A growing body of evidence shows that LAMA and LABA co-administration is more effective than either drug class alone in managing stable COPD to improve lung function, symptoms and health status. Recently, new drug applications (NDAs) for a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of umeclidinium (UMEC), a LAMA, and vilanterol (VI), a LABA, at UMEC/VI doses of 125/25 and 62.5/25 µg have been submitted by sponsors to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Thus, UMEC/VI has become the first FDC LAMA/LABA product that has reached a regulatory approval stage. Other LAMA/LABA once-daily combinations coming through development include FDCs of tiotropium and olodaterol, glycopyrronium and indacaterol, and twice-daily aclidinium and formoterol. The aim of this review is to explore currently available data for once-daily UMEC/VI in the context of the evolving standards of COPD management.

  3. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. Objective. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. Methods. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. Conclusion. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. PMID:26984994

  4. Harvest Health: Translation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Older African Americans in a Senior Setting

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Chernett, Nancy L.; Harris, Lynn Fields; Palmer, Delores; Hopkins, Paul; Dennis, Marie P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe the translation of K. R. Lorig and colleagues’ Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for delivery in a senior center and evaluate pre–post benefits for African American participants. Design and Methods Modifications to the CDSMP included a name change; an additional introductory session; and course augmentations involving culturally relevant foods, stress reduction techniques, and communicating with racially/ethnically diverse physicians. We recruited participants from senior center members, area churches, and word of mouth. We conducted baseline and 4-month post-interviews. Results A total of 569 African American elders attended an introductory session, with 519 (91%) enrolling in the 6-session program. Of the 519, 444 (86%) completed ≥4 sessions and 414 (79%) completed pre–post interviews. We found small but statistically significant improvements for exercise (p = .001), use of cognitive management strategies (p = .001), energy/fatigue (p = .001), self-efficacy (p = .001), health distress (p = .001), and illness intrusiveness in different life domains (probabilities from .001–.021). We found no changes for health utilization. Outcomes did not differ by gender, number of sessions attended, number and type of chronic conditions, facilitator, leader, or recruitment site. Implications The CDSMP can be translated for delivery by trained senior center personnel to African American elders. Participant benefits compare favorably to original trial outcomes. The translated program is replicable and may help to address health disparities. PMID:18981286

  5. Keto-analogues and essential aminoacids and other supplements in the conservative management of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2017-06-01

    The manipulation of dietary protein intake is the mainstay of nutritional treatment of patients affected by chronic renal insufficiency, with the aim to reduce the burden of uremic toxins in order to decrease uremic toxicity and delay the need for dialysis. Consensus exists regarding the benefit of progressive protein restriction towards delaying the progression of renal failure and the need for dialysis, provided adequate energy supply. Although pivotal, protein restriction is only one aspect of the dietary management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Additional features, though strictly related to proteins, include modifications in sodium, phosphorus and energy intake, as well as in the source (animal or plant derived) of protein and lipids. In addition, supplements play an important role as a means to obtain both beneficial effects and nutritional safety in the renal patient. Essential amino acid and ketoacid mixtures are the most utilized types of supplementation in CKD patients on restricted protein regimens. The essential amino acids plus ketoacid supplementation is mandatory in conjunction with a very low-protein diet in order to assure an adequate essential amino acid supply. It is needed to safely implement a very low protein (and phosphorus) intake, so as to obtain the beneficial effect of a severe protein restriction while preventing malnutrition. Protein-free products and energy supplements are also crucial for the prevention of protein-energy wasting in CKD patients. Calcium, iron, native vitamin D and omega-3 PUFAs are other types of supplementation of potential benefits in the CKD patients on conservative management.

  6. Usability Evaluation of an Online, Tailored Self-Management Intervention for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Incorporating Behavior Change Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Albine; van der Weijden, Trudy; Nagykaldi, Zsolt; de Vries, Hein; Tange, Huibert

    2013-01-01

    Background An eHealth intervention using computer tailored technology including several behavior change techniques was developed to support the self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate and improve the usability of the eHealth intervention. Methods We conducted a usability evaluation with 8 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, with a mixed methods design. We improved the usability through iterative cycles of evaluation and adaptation. Participants were asked to think aloud during the evaluation sessions. Participants then completed a semi-structured interview. The sessions were observed and recorded. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to uncover usability issues. Results Areas for improvement were layout, navigation, and content. Most issues could be solved within 3 iterations of improvement. Overall, participants found the program easy to use. The length of the program urged us to further analyze the appreciation of behavior change techniques. Some were perceived as helpful and easy to use, while others evoked frustration. Conclusions The usability study identified several issues for improvement, confirming the need for usability evaluation during the development of eHealth interventions. The uncovered strengths and limitations of behavior change techniques may lead to optimization of eHealth interventions, but further insight is needed. PMID:23612363

  7. Depression Screening in Chronic Disease Management: A Worksite Health Promotion Initiative.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elizabeth; Dumas, Bonnie P; Edlund, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    This pilot project aimed to improve depression symptoms and quality-of-life measures for individuals in a worksite disease management program. Two hundred forty-three individuals were invited to participate, out of which 69 enrolled. The participants had a history of diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, and demonstrated depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The project consisted of counseling sessions provided every 2 to 4 weeks by a family nurse practitioner. PHQ-9 scores and those of an instrument that measures quality of life, the Veteran's Rand-12 (VR-12), were compared pre-intervention and post-intervention to evaluate the effectiveness of the project. PHQ-9 and VR-12 Mental Health Component (MHC) scores improved significantly after 3 months of nurse practitioner-led individual counseling sessions. This project demonstrated that depression screening and therapeutic management, facilitated by a nurse practitioner, can improve depression and perceived quality of life in individuals with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or type 2 diabetes.

  8. Redesigning Service Delivery for Hypertensive Patients: A Methodological Guideline to Improve the Management of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Adelaide; Cannavacciuolo, Lorella; Ponsiglione, Cristina; De Luca, Nicola; Iaccarino, Guido; Illario, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Best care is not necessarily the most expensive, but the most appropriate, and prevention is the most powerful tool to promote health. A novel approach might envision the reduction of hospital admittance (thus meeting a requirement from long term condition patients: they would rather not being hospitalized!) and the enforcement of peripheral (both on the territory and at home) assistance. In this direction, experiences of reshaping new service deliveries towards an integrated disease management, namely clinical pathways, can be observed in Europe and in different parts of the world. Aim of this paper is to provide a methodological guideline to support the management in planning clinical pathways, also outlining the main barriers limiting the process. In particular, we present the results of planning a clinical pathway at the Centre for Hypertension of the Federico II University Hospital (Naples, Italy). The case study showed that the introduction of a similar service impacts on the organisation of the structure. An analysis of organizational processes “as are” and the re-design of processes “to be” are necessary to integrate the clinical pathway into the actual activities. PMID:24809028

  9. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines on anaemia management in chronic kidney disease: a European Renal Best Practice position statement.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Bárány, Peter; Covic, Adrian; De Francisco, Angel; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Goldsmith, David; Hörl, Walter; London, Gerard; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group has produced comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for the management of anaemia in CKD patients. These guidelines addressed all of the important points related to anaemia management in CKD patients, including therapy with erythropoieis stimulating agents (ESA), iron therapy, ESA resistance and blood transfusion use. Because most guidelines were 'soft' rather than 'strong', and because global guidelines need to be adapted and implemented into the regional context where they are used, on behalf of the European Renal Best Practice Advisory Board some of its members, and other external experts in this field, who were not participants in the KDIGO guidelines group, were invited to participate in this anaemia working group to examine and comment on the KDIGO documents in this position paper. In this article, the group concentrated only on those guidelines which we considered worth amending or adapting. All guidelines not specifically mentioned are fully endorsed.

  10. The Teamwork Study: enhancing the role of non-GP staff in chronic disease management in general practice.

    PubMed

    Black, D A; Taggart, J; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Crookes, P; Beilby, J; Powell-Davis, G; Wilson, L A; Harris, M F

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence for a team-based approach in the management of chronic disease in primary health care. However, the standard of care is variable, probably reflecting the limited organisational capacity of health services to provide the necessary structured and organised care for this group of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a structured intervention involving non-GP staff in GP practices on the quality of care for patients with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A cluster randomised trial was undertaken across 60 GP practices. The intervention was implemented in 30 practices with staff and patients interviewed at baseline and at 12-15 months follow up. The change in team roles was evaluated using a questionnaire completed by practice staff. The quality of care was evaluated using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire. We found that although the team roles of staff improved in the intervention practices and there were significant differences between practices, there was no significant difference between those in the intervention and control groups in patient-assessed quality of care after adjusting for baseline-level score and covariates at the 12-month follow up. Practice team roles were not significantly associated with change in Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scores. Patients with multiple conditions were more likely to assess their quality of care to be better. Thus, although previous research has shown a cross-sectional association between team work and quality of care, we were unable to replicate these findings in the present study. These results may be indicative of insufficient time for organisational change to result in improved patient-assessed quality of care, or because non-GP staff roles were not sufficiently focussed on the aspects of care assessed. The findings provide important information for researchers when designing similar studies.

  11. Type 1 diabetes stigma in China: a call to end the devaluation of individuals living with a manageable chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Jaacks, Lindsay M; Liu, Wei; Ji, Linong; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-02-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to improving care for individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This commentary describes this phenomenon in China, where stigma has led to labeling and devaluing of individuals with T1DM. Difficulties finding a spouse and regulations restricting admission to universities and government employment have forced many individuals to hide their diabetes. The shame, fear, and guilt stemming from stigma may preclude the use of insulin pumps; multiple daily injections, which require pre-meal insulin dosing at school or the workplace; participation in research studies; and general health-seeking behaviors. A multifaceted, multilevel approach is urgently needed and should involve improving public awareness and understanding of T1DM; adoption by health care providers of holistic rather than biomedical approaches to disease management; patient counseling on positive coping skills; and expansion of the scope of research to consider the psychosocial realities of diabetes care in China. Recent media attention in the form of a nationally broadcasted documentary on T1DM is an important step in the right direction. We believe that coordinated action by multiple stakeholders can lead to meaningful improvements in treatment, ultimately leading to better physical and emotional health outcomes for individuals living with this manageable chronic disease.

  12. DIABCARE Quality Network in Europe--a model for quality management in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Piwernetz, K

    2001-04-01

    The DIABCARE Q-Net project developed a complete and integrated information technology system to monitor diabetes care, according to the gold standards of the St Vincent Declaration Action Program. This is the first Telematic platform for standardized documentation on medical quality and evaluation across Europe, which will serve as a model for other chronic diseases. Quality development starts from the comparison of diabetes services, based on the key data on diabetes care in the basic information sheet. This is a 141 field form, which is to be completed once a year for each patient under the care of the diabetes team. The system performs an analysis of the local data and compares the data with peer teams by means of telecommunication of anonymous data. These data are collected regionally. At the next level these regional data are compared on a national basis across Europe using dedicated communication lines. National data can be compared transnationally by the use of the Internet and the DIABCARE benchmarking servers. These different lines are used according to the necessary security standards. Medical data are transferred via dedicated lines, aggregated data via the Internet. The architecture follows the open-platform concept in order to allow for heterogeneous technical environments. Already at the start of the project, the necessity for expanding the quality approach to telemedicine methodology was identified and included. For each level, specific programs are available to improve the performance of diabetes care delivery: DIABCARE data as client and DIABCARE server as regional and DIABCARE 'international server' as transnational server. Functioning pilots were established across all levels. The clients have been linked to the servers on a routine basis. According to the open architecture design, the various countries decided on different systems at the entry point: full system--Portugal; fax systems--Italy, Bavaria; implementation into doctor's office systems

  13. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c disease management functions into the front lines of primary care and the positive impact of those changes on overall diabetes quality of care.

  14. Osteoporosis in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anitha; Carey, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal complication seen in patients with chronic liver disease. Osteoporosis is usually asymptomatic and, if untreated, can result in fractures and impaired quality of life. For this review, we performed a systematic search of the PubMed database, and all recent peer-reviewed articles regarding the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in chronic liver disease were included. The prevalence of osteoporosis varies between 11% and 58% in patients with chronic liver disease and in transplant recipients. The etiology of osteoporosis is multifactorial and only partially understood. Various factors linked to the pathogenesis of bone loss are vitamin D, calcium, insulin growth factor-1, receptor activation of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), bilirubin, fibronectin, leptin, proinflammatory cytokines, and genetic polymorphisms. Management of osteoporosis involves early diagnosis, identifying and minimizing risk factors, general supportive care, nutrition therapy, and pharmacotherapy. Osteoporosis is diagnosed based on the bone mineral density (BMD) assessment using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Measurement of BMD should be considered in all patients with advanced liver disease and in transplant recipients. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation is recommended for all patients with osteoporosis. Specific agents used for treatment of osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, hormonal therapy, and raloxifene. Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of therapy for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Prolonged suppression of bone remodeling resulting in atypical fractures has emerged as a significant complication with long-term use of bisphosphonates. Newer treatment agents and better fracture prevention strategies are necessary to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

  15. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: Contested discourses of ageing

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a ‘natural’ and a ‘normal’ paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses

  16. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: contested discourses of ageing.

    PubMed

    Low, Joe; Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a 'natural' and a 'normal' paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses of ageing

  17. Engaging Patients in Online Self-Care Technologies for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Picton, Peter; Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A common perception is that the use of Internet-based self-care systems is best suited for a younger, tech-proficient population, and that these systems will increase the burden on patients with complex chronic conditions. The study stratified patients with diabetes into three regimens of use of an Internet-based diabetes self-care portal. Results show that patients were more likely to adhere to a diurnal regimen than a variable regimen, and older patients, over the age of 60, were more adherent than younger patients, regardless of regimen. This suggests that common misconceptions should be reconsidered when prescribing Internet-based interventions for patients with chronic illness.

  18. Exploring Changes in Two Types of Self-Efficacy Following Participation in a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kay; Smith, Matthew Lee; Hall, Jori N.; Emerson, Kerstin G.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic conditions and falls are related issues faced by many aging adults. Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) added brief fall-related content to the standardized 6-week workshop; however, no research had examined changes in Fall-related self-efficacy (SE) in response to CDSMP participation. This study explored relationships and changes in SE using the SE to manage chronic disease scale (SEMCD Scale) and the Fall Efficacy Scale (FallE Scale) in participants who successfully completed CDSMP workshops within a Southern state over a 10-month period. SE scale data were compared at baseline and post-intervention for 36 adults (mean age = 74.5, SD = ±9.64). Principal component analysis (PCA), using oblimin rotation was completed at baseline and post-intervention for the individual scales and then for analysis combining both scales as a single scale. Each scale loaded under a single component for the PCA at both baseline and post-intervention. When both scales were entered as single meta-scale, the meta-scale split along two factors with no double loading. SEMCD and FallE Scale scores were significantly correlated at baseline and post-intervention, at least p < 0.05. A significant proportion of participants improved their scores on the FallE Scale post-intervention (p = 0.038). The magnitude of the change was also significant only for the FallE Scale (p = 0.043). The SEMCD Scale scores did not change significantly. Study findings from the exploratory PCA and significant correlations indicated that the SEMCD Scale and the FallE Scale measured two distinct but related types of SE. Though the scale scores were correlated at baseline and post-intervention, only the FallE Scale scores significantly differed post-intervention. Given this relationship and CDSMP’s recent addition of a 10-min fall prevention segment, further exploration of CDSMP’s possible influence on Fall-related SE would provide useful understanding for health

  19. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the Middle East and North Africa: results of the BREATHE study.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Majdy; Koniski, Marie-Louise; Taright, Samya; Shahrour, Naeem; Polatli, Mehmet; Ben Kheder, Ali; Alzaabi, Ashraf; Iraqi, Ghali; Khattab, Adel; Javed, Arshad; Rashid, Nauman; El Hasnaoui, Abdelkader

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a potentially severe chronic progressive respiratory condition requiring long-term treatment and frequently involving episodic hospitalisations to manage exacerbations. The objective of this analysis was to document diagnosis, evaluation, treatment and management of COPD-related respiratory symptoms in 1,392 subjects fulfilling an epidemiological definition of COPD identified in a general population sample of 62,086 individuals aged ≥ 40 years in ten countries in the Middle East and North Africa region (Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates), together with Pakistan. 442 subjects (31.8%) claimed to have received a diagnosis of COPD from a physician and 287 (20.6%) had undergone spirometry in the previous year. Use of specific treatments for respiratory symptoms was reported by 218 subjects (15.7%). Use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators together with corticosteroids (53 subjects; 3.8%) and use of oxygen therapy (31 subjects; 2.3%) was very low. 852 subjects (61.2%) had consulted a physician about their respiratory condition at least once in the previous year, with a mean number of consultations of 3.4 ± 3.6. Moreover, 284 subjects (20.4%) had been hospitalised overnight for their COPD, with a mean of 2.3 ± 3.7 hospitalisations per year. Use of all healthcare resources was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in subjects with CAT scores ≥ 10 than in those with scores < 10, and greater in those with exacerbations than in those without. In conclusion, COPD in the region is under-diagnosed, inadequately evaluated and inadequately treated. Nonetheless, COPD symptoms are responsible for considerable healthcare consumption, with high levels of physician consultation and hospitalisation.

  20. Use of Health Information and Communication Technologies to Promote Health and Manage Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease: Applications in the Field of Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia M.; Wang, Min Qi; Eddy, James M.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2015-01-01

    This special issue provides real-world examples of the diverse methods health education researchers are using to expand existing applications of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for health promotion and chronic disease management. The original and review articles presented in this special issue investigate eHealth, mHealth, and…

  1. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  2. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  3. Attachment in medical care: A review of the interpersonal model in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Xavier F

    2017-03-01

    Objective Patient-physician interaction is continually examined in an era prioritizing patient-centered approaches, yet elaboration beyond aspects of communication and empathy is lacking. Major chronic conditions would benefit tremendously from understanding interpersonal aspects of patient-physician encounters. This review intends to provide a concise introduction to the interpersonal model of attachment theory and how it informs both the patient-physician interaction and medical outcomes in chronic care. Methods A narrative review of the theoretical, neurobiological, epidemiological, investigational, and clinical literature on attachment theory and its impact on medical outcomes was conducted, utilizing a variety of key words as searched on PubMed database. Studies and reviews included were of a variety of sources, including textbooks and peer-reviewed journals. Reports in languages other than English were excluded. Results Measurable, discrete attachment styles and behavioral patterns correlate with poor medical outcomes, including nonadherence in insecure dismissing attachment and care overutilization in insecure preoccupied attachment. Furthermore, insecure dismissing attachment is associated with significant mortality. These variables can be easily assessed, and their effects are reversible, as evidenced by collaborative care outcome data. Discussion Attachment theory is useful a model with application in clinical and investigational aspects of chronic illness care. Implications and guidelines are explored.

  4. A re-evaluation of the role of inhaled corticosteroids in the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    D’Urzo, Anthony; Donohue, James F; Kardos, Peter; Miravitlles, Marc; Price, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) (in fixed combinations with long-acting β2-agonists [LABAs]) are frequently prescribed for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), outside their labeled indications and recommended treatment strategies and guidelines, despite having the potential to cause significant side effects. Areas covered: Although the existence of asthma in patients with asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) clearly supports the use of anti-inflammatory treatment (typically an ICS/LABA combination, as ICS monotherapy is usually not indicated for COPD), the current level of ICS/LABA use is not consistent with the prevalence of ACOS in the COPD population. Data have recently become available showing the comparative efficacy of fixed bronchodilator combinations (long-acting muscarinic antagonist [LAMA]/LABA with ICS/LABA combinations). Additionally, new information has emerged on ICS withdrawal without increased risk of exacerbations, under cover of effective bronchodilation. Expert opinion: For patients with COPD who do not have ACOS, a LAMA/LABA combination may be an appropriate starting therapy, apart from those with mild disease who can be managed with a single long-acting bronchodilator. Patients who remain symptomatic or present with exacerbations despite effectively delivered LAMA/LABA treatment may require additional drug therapy, such as ICS or phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors. When prescribing an ICS/LABA, the risk:benefit ratio should be considered in individual patients. PMID:26194213

  5. Management of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, I.M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major personal, family, and community disaster. The sufferer usually has difficulties in every aspect of life. The key to successful treatment lies in a comprehensive and accurate assessment that must include family, marital, legal, behavioural, mental, and organic considerations. With comprehensive assessment, a logical plan of treatment can be constructed. Non-compliance, substance abuse, doctor shopping and secondary gain, as well as complex psychodynamics, make management of such pain difficult and frustrating. The patients are frequently playing “games” in which they control the rules, and which the physician can never win. Success rates are poor even in specialized centres, and many patients are ultimately injured by inappropriate investigation or treatment. Physicians who have become over-involved with such patients may also be injured by the process, to the detriment of their general care of other patients and themselves. PMID:21248889

  6. Non-disclosure of chronic kidney disease in primary care and the limits of instrumental rationality in chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Daker-White, Gavin; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Blakeman, Thomas; Blickem, Christian; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Early detection of long term conditions is predicated on assumptions that lifestyle changes and medications can be used to reduce or manage the risk of condition progression. However, ambiguity remains about the nature and place of diagnostic disclosure to people in newly recognised or asymptomatic 'pre' conditions such as early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). The disclosure of a diagnosis is relevant to instigating strategies which rely on actively engaging patients as self-managers of their own care. Whilst primary care routinely records a diagnosis of early stage CKD, little is known about how patients learn about the fact that they have CKD or how they respond to this. This study aimed to explore patients' experiences of disclosure of CKD in primary care settings. A nested qualitative study of participants recruited to a trial of an intervention for CKD patients in Greater Manchester, UK was undertaken. A purposive sample of 26 patients, with a mean age of 72 years (range 59-89, median 71), were interviewed during 2012. Interview transcripts were analysed using constant comparative techniques. Narrative accounts reflected limited or partial disclosure of CKD; often cast in vague terms as "nothing to worry about". How patients described themselves in terms of participation and their tendencies towards 'active' or 'passive' involvement in consultations emerged as important components of narratives around disclosure. The findings illuminate the ways in which diagnosis is oriented in a context where it is possible to meet the requirements for remuneration under a pay for performance system of primary care, whilst apparently not disclosing a label or a diagnosis to patients. This challenges the presumptions inherent in wider health policy objectives that are increasingly built on the notion of responsible patients and the ethos of the active support of self-management for pre-conditions.

  7. Integrated care in the management of chronic diseases: an Italian perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Ilario; Scolari, Francesca; Croce, Davide; Mazzone, Antonino

    2016-12-01

    This letter provides a view on the issue of the organizational model of Primary Care Groups (PCGs), which represent a best practice in continuity and appropriateness of care for chronic patients. Our analysis aimed at estimating the impact of PCGs introduction in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. The results of our study showed a better performance of PCGs compared with the other General Practitioners of Local Health Authority Milano 1, supporting the conclusion that good care cannot be delivered without good organization of care.

  8. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  9. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  10. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  11. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients. PMID:25692105

  12. Management of chronic Giardia infection.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Angel A; Hanevik, Kurt; Almirall, Pedro; Cimerman, Sérgio; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Advances in our understanding of chronic giardiasis (CG) may improve our care of patients in this stage of the disease. This review proposes a new concept of CG and highlights the recent advances in our understanding and management of this condition. According to this review, management requires, initially, an accurate diagnosis, which may exclude several conditions that can mimic CG. Optimal treatment requires a tailored approach which includes the recognition of the known modifiable causes of this health condition, assessment of symptoms and potential complications, their treatment utilizing, if necessary, a multidisciplinary team, and an ongoing monitoring for the effect of therapy - weighing the efficacy of individual drugs - all of these together may lead to a successful treatment of CG.

  13. Patient education. Timeless principles of learning: a solid foundation for enhancing chronic disease self-management.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula M; Suter, W Newton

    2008-02-01

    The use of evidence-based principles of learning can contribute to the empowerment of patients as they adopt self-management skills aligned with healthy behaviors. This article, jointly written by a nurse and an educator, describes these timeless principles and how home care clinicians and patients benefit from their use.

  14. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    PubMed Central

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on the acute and chronic exercise responses, along with the beneficial effects of exercise training in these populations, are reviewed. PMID:17932595

  15. The impact of chronic disease self-management programs: healthcare savings through a community-based intervention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among the most studied evidence-based programs, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been shown to help participants improve their health behaviors, health outcomes, and reduce healthcare utilization. However, there is a lack of information on how CDSMP, when nationally disseminated, impacts healthcare utilization and averts healthcare costs. The purposes of this study were to: 1) document reductions in healthcare utilization among national CDSMP participants; 2) calculate potential cost savings associated with emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalizations; and 3) extrapolate the cost savings estimation to the American adults. Methods The national study of CDSMP surveyed 1,170 community-dwelling CDSMP participants at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months from 22 organizations in 17 states. The procedure used to estimate potential cost savings included: 1) examining the pattern of healthcare utilization among CDSMP participants from self-reported healthcare utilization assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months; 2) calculating age-adjusted average costs for persons using the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey; 3) calculating costs saved from reductions in healthcare utilization; 4) estimating per participant program costs; 5) computing potential cost savings by deducting program costs from estimated healthcare savings; and 6) extrapolating savings to national populations using Census data combined with national health statistics. Results Findings from analyses showed significant reductions in ER visits (5%) at both the 6-month and 12-month assessments as well as hospitalizations (3%) at 6 months among national CDSMP participants. This equates to potential net savings of $364 per participant and a national savings of $3.3 billion if 5% of adults with one or more chronic conditions were reached. Conclusions Findings emphasize the value of public health tertiary prevention interventions and the need for policies to support

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2), or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  17. Regular long-term red blood cell transfusions for managing chronic chest complications in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Hambleton, Ian R; Cho, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is a genetic haemoglobin disorder, which can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Sickle cell disease is one of the most common severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. The two most common chronic chest complications due to sickle cell disease are pulmonary hypertension and chronic sickle lung disease. These complications can lead to morbidity (such as reduced exercise tolerance) and increased mortality. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011 and updated in 2014. Objectives We wanted to determine whether trials involving people with sickle cell disease that compare regular long-term blood transfusion regimens with standard care, hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea) any other drug treatment show differences in the following: mortality associated with chronic chest complications; severity of established chronic chest complications; development and progression of chronic chest complications; serious adverse events. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register. Date of the last search: 25 April 2016. We also searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 26 January 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 26 January 2016. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of people of any age with one of four common sickle cell disease genotypes, i.e. Hb SS, Sß0, SC, or Sß+ that compared regular red blood cell transfusion regimens (either simple or exchange transfusions) to hydroxycarbamide, any other drug treatment, or to standard care that were aimed at reducing the development or progression of chronic chest

  18. Research on culturally tailored interventions aimed at improving chronic disease risk factors and management.

    PubMed

    Dorrejo, Xiomara M; Wilson, Paula

    2012-10-01

    High blood pressure (HBP) is a worldwide epidemic with health and economic consequences. Although there is a growing body of knowledge, treatment options, and clinical guidelines, a small percentage of people with hypertension (HTN) achieve optimal control. In addition, HBP disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minorities. Strategies to address the management of HTN among specific populations remain scarce. Evidence shows that successful management of HTN requires pharmacological, educational, and self-care approaches. The first 3 summaries here profile research addressing this issue. The research focuses on the tailoring of interventions for racial and ethnic minority groups, specifically African Americans and Korean Americans. The fourth summary profiles an intervention targeted at a low-literacy group to improve diet. Readers are encouraged to access the full articles to learn more details about the intervention strategies and outcomes of these initiatives.

  19. Intermediate outcomes of chronic disease self-management program offered by members of the Healthy Aging Regional Collaborative in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Michael A; Seff, Laura R; Albatineh, Ahmed N; McCoy, H Virginia; Page, Timothy F; Palmer, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Currently, 80% of adults over the age of 65 have at least one chronic disease. The Chronic Disease Self-management Program (CDSMP) focuses on increasing self-efficacy for managing chronic disease. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of CDSMP when offered by multiple agencies, as a collaborative effort, in community-based settings. Seven agencies delivered 108 CDSMP workshops at 81 sites from October 1, 2008, to December 31, 2010. A total of 811 participants were eligible for analysis. Participants completed surveys at baseline and week 6, the end of instruction. Controlling for agency effect and general health at baseline, the general linear model was used to assess the significance of outcomes at 6 weeks. Outcomes showing significant improvement included self-efficacy to manage disease (p = .001), self-efficacy to manage emotions (p = .026), time spent walking (p = .008), and perceived social/role activities limitations (p = .001). Findings showed that CDSMP is an effective program at improving self-efficacy, increasing physical activity, and decreasing limitations.

  20. A careflow management system for chronic patients.

    PubMed

    Panzarasa, Silvia; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Larizza, Cristiana; Stefanelli, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The management of chronic patients is a complex process, which requires the cooperation of all primary care professionals and their interaction with specialists, laboratories and personnel of different organizations. In this paper we show how a Careflow Management System (CfMS) may represent an essential component of an innovative Health Information System (HIS) able to handle the information and communication needs underlying chronic diseases management. On the basis of a general architecture designed for chronic diseases, we describe a CfMS implementation in the area of diabetes management; such a system embeds EPR and telemedicine functionalities as end-users applications as well as a module for inter-organizational communication based on contracts and on XML messages.

  1. From "retailers" to health care providers: Transforming the role of community pharmacists in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Mossialos, Elias; Courtin, Emilie; Naci, Huseyin; Benrimoj, Shalom; Bouvy, Marcel; Farris, Karen; Noyce, Peter; Sketris, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Community pharmacists are the third largest healthcare professional group in the world after physicians and nurses. Despite their considerable training, community pharmacists are the only health professionals who are not primarily rewarded for delivering health care and hence are under-utilized as public health professionals. An emerging consensus among academics, professional organizations, and policymakers is that community pharmacists, who work outside of hospital settings, should adopt an expanded role in order to contribute to the safe, effective, and efficient use of drugs-particularly when caring for people with multiple chronic conditions. Community pharmacists could help to improve health by reducing drug-related adverse events and promoting better medication adherence, which in turn may help in reducing unnecessary provider visits, hospitalizations, and readmissions while strengthening integrated primary care delivery across the health system. This paper reviews recent strategies to expand the role of community pharmacists in Australia, Canada, England, the Netherlands, Scotland, and the United States. The developments achieved or under way in these countries carry lessons for policymakers world-wide, where progress thus far in expanding the role of community pharmacists has been more limited. Future policies should focus on effectively integrating community pharmacists into primary care; developing a shared vision for different levels of pharmacist services; and devising new incentive mechanisms for improving quality and outcomes.

  2. The Relationship between Organizational Climate and Quality of Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Benzer, Justin K; Young, Gary; Stolzmann, Kelly; Osatuke, Katerine; Meterko, Mark; Caso, Allison; White, Bert; Mohr, David C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the utility of a two-dimensional model of organizational climate for explaining variation in diabetes care between primary care clinics. Data Sources/Study Setting Secondary data were obtained from 223 primary care clinics in the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system. Study Design Organizational climate was defined using the dimensions of task and relational climate. The association between primary care organizational climate and diabetes processes and intermediate outcomes were estimated for 4,539 patients in a cross-sectional study. Data Collection/Extraction Methods All data were collected from administrative datasets. The climate data were drawn from the 2007 VA All Employee Survey, and the outcomes data were collected as part of the VA External Peer Review Program. Climate data were aggregated to the facility level of analysis and merged with patient-level data. Principal Findings Relational climate was related to an increased likelihood of diabetes care process adherence, with significant but small effects for adherence to intermediate outcomes. Task climate was generally not shown to be related to adherence. Conclusions The role of relational climate in predicting the quality of chronic care was supported. Future research should examine the mediators and moderators of relational climate and further investigate task climate. PMID:21210799

  3. Utilization of Telehealth Technology to Develop and Implement a Comprehensive Management Initiative for Chronic Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults, yet it is largely preventable with timely diagnosis and treatment ... Diabetic Retinopathy Study Research Group, 1981; Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Research Group, 1991). Diabetes -related vision loss is often...with mydriatic seven-standard field Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocol photography (Bursell et al., 2001) and with dilated

  4. Utilization of Telehealth Technology to Develop and Implement a Comprehensive Management Initiative for Chronic Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    significantly different from zero for both treatment groups after controlling for A1c level at the time of enrollment, age, gender, and type of diabetes [(a...disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults, yet it is largely preventable with timely diagnosis and treatment ( Diabetic ...Retinopathy Study Research Group, 1981; Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Research Group, 1991). Diabetes -related vision loss is often caused by a

  5. Chronic parotitis: a challenging disease entity.

    PubMed

    Harbison, John M; Liess, Benjamin D; Templer, Jerry W; Zitsch, Robert P; Wieberg, Jessica A

    2011-03-01

    Chronic parotitis is a troubling clinical condition characterized by repeated infection and inflammation of the parotid gland caused by decreased salivary flow or obstruction. Unilateral swelling, pain, and other associated symptoms occur during acute exacerbations of the disease. A variety of laboratory and radiographic tools are available to aid in the diagnosis. Multiple treatment options have been proposed, ranging from conservative medical management to surgical interventions. We present 2 patients with bilateral chronic parotitis who attempted prolonged medical management and ultimately required surgical parotidectomy for control of their disease.

  6. Exploring the nature of power distance on general practitioner and community pharmacist relations in a chronic disease management context.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Allison Margaret

    2014-09-01

    To improve collaboration in Australian primary health care, there is a need to understand aspects of the general practitioner (GP)/community pharmacist relationship, its influence on collaborative chronic disease management (CDM) and if this influence can be explained by a pre-existing theory or concept. Adopting a grounded theory approach, 22 GP and 22 community pharmacist semi-structured interviews were undertaken. Analysis of the transcripts identified common themes regarding the GP/community pharmacist relationship. Trustworthiness of the themes identified was tested through negative case analysis and member checking. Hofstede's (in 1980) phenomenon of power distance was employed to illuminate the nature of GP/community pharmacist relations. The majority of GPs and community pharmacists described the characteristics of this phenomenon. The power distance was based on knowledge and expertise and was shown to be a barrier to collaboration between GPs and community pharmacists because GPs perceived that community pharmacists did not have the required expertise to improve CDM above what the GP could deliver alone. Power distance exists within the GP/community pharmacist relationship and has a negative influence on GP/community pharmacist collaborative CDM. Understanding and improving GP awareness of community pharmacist expertise has important implications for the future success of collaborative CDM.

  7. Heterogeneous data fusion and intelligent techniques embedded in a mobile application for real-time chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Bellos, Christos; Papadopoulos, Athanassios; Rosso, Roberto; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2011-01-01

    CHRONIOUS system is an integrated platform aiming at the management of chronic disease patients. One of the most important components of the system is a Decision Support System (DSS) that has been developed in a Smart Device (SD). This component decides on patient's current health status by combining several data, which are acquired either by wearable sensors or manually inputted by the patient or retrieved from the specific database. In case no abnormal situation has been tracked, the DSS takes no action and remains deactivated until next abnormal situation pack of data are being acquired or next scheduled data being transmitted. The DSS that has been implemented is an integrated classification system with two parallel classifiers, combining an expert system (rule-based system) and a supervised classifier, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM), Random Forests, artificial Neural Networks (aNN like the Multi-Layer Perceptron), Decision Trees and Naïve Bayes. The above categorized system is useful for providing critical information about the health status of the patient.

  8. [Chronic granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cardona, Aristóteles; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2009-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency, a phagocyte defect that appears in 1:200,000 live births and is produced by mutations in the genes that codify for the enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). The inheritance form is X linked (> 60%) or autosomic recesive (30-40%). The NADPH oxidase is responsible for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activated phagocyte ("respiratory burst"). When present, mutations on the NAPDH oxidase genes do not allow the ROS production, making the neutrophils of these patients incapable to destroy pathogens. These patients are especially susceptible to infections by staphylococcus, fungi and some gram-negative bacteria. The main clinical manifestations include recurrent life-threatening episodes of lymphadenitis, abscess, pneumonias, osteomyelitis, granuloma formation and sepsis. The diagnosis is suggested by a history of recurrent infections, familiar cases, fail to grow and confirmed with an altered test of ROS production and the specific mutation. Allogenic stem cells transplant is the curative treatment. The early diagnosis and the treatment with prophylactic antibiotics and interferon-gamma have modified favorably the morbidity and mortality of these patients.

  9. [Establishment and application effect appraisement of community chronic obstructive pulmonary disease integrated management system].

    PubMed

    Zhao, D X; Chen, S Y; Zhou, Y M; Li, X C; Zou, W F; Chen, X M; Ran, P X

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To establish the COPD community integrated management system suitable for our national situation and assess its effects in the prevention and treatment for COPD. Methods: The COPD community integrated management system based on the electronic management system was established, including the functional modules of preliminary screening for COPD, electronic health record, grading management and dual referral system, ect. Two townships were randomly selected from the rural areas in north Guangdong as Observational Community and Control Community, respectively. Resident families were randomly selected from the two communities. One resident aged 40 or higher who was selected randomly from each family was enrolled in the trial and followed up for 2 years.Of a total of 460 participants from the Observational Community, 340 participants accomplished the two-years the follow-up, among whom there were 45 COPD patients, 117 high risk population, 178 common population. Of a total of 380 participants from the Control Community, 212 participants accomplished the follow-up, among whom there were 39 COPD patients, 68 high risk population, 105 common population.According to the COPD community integrated management system, the health cares including preliminary screening for COPD, grading management and dual referral, ect. were implemented in the Observational Community. Essential diagnosis and treatment services were performed in the Control Community. The effects of the system were appraised by comparisons of the pulmonary function change, acute exacerbation, quality of life and change of risk factors, ect. between the two communities. Results: After the intervention, the follow-up rate, smoking-quitting rate, the proportions of decline in current smoking, passive smoking and switching to clean energy for cooking in the Observational Community were significantly greater than those in the Control Community(73.9% vs. 55.8%, 70.8% vs. 9.1%, 24.2% vs. 7.1%, 32.6% vs. 3

  10. Development of a Multi-Agent m-Health Application Based on Various Protocols for Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Sang; Cho, Hune; Kim, Hwa Sun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a mobile health application (Self-Management mobile Personal Health Record: "SmPHR") to ensure the interoperability of various personal health devices (PHDs) and electronic medical record systems (EMRs) for continuous self-management of chronic disease patients. The SmPHR was developed for Android 4.0.3, and implemented according to the optimized standard protocol for each interface of healthcare services adopted by the Continua Health Alliance (CHA). That is, the Personal Area Network (PAN) interface between the application and PHD implements ISO/IEEE 11073-20,601, 10,404, 10,407, 10,415, 10,417, and Bluetooth Health Device Profile (HDP), and EMRs with a wide area network (WAN) interface implement HL7 V2.6; the Health Record Network (HRN) interface implements Continuity of Care Document (CCD) and Continuity of Care Record (CCR). Also, for SmPHR, we evaluated the transmission error rate between the interface using four PHDs and personal health record systems (PHRs) from previous research, with 611 users and elderly people after receiving institutional review board (IRB) approval. In the evaluation, the PAN interface showed 15 (2.4 %) errors, and the WAN and HRN interface showed 13 (2.1 %) errors in a total of 611 transmission attempts. Also, we received opinions regarding SmPHR from 15 healthcare professionals who took part in the clinical trial. Thus, SmPHR can be provided as an interconnected PHR mobile health service to patients, allowing 'plug and play' of PHDs and EMRs through various standard protocols.

  11. Identification of Patients With Diabetes Who Benefit Most From a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Management, Sydney, Australia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Grace; Newlyn, Neroli; Pamplona, Elline; Hocking, Samantha L.; Glastras, Sarah J.; Fulcher, Gregory R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) that include health coaching can facilitate and coordinate diabetes management. The aim of this study was to assess changes in patients’ general knowledge of diabetes, self-reported health status, diabetes distress, body mass index (BMI), and glycemic control after enrollment in a face-to-face CDMP group health coaching session (with telephone follow-up) compared with participation in telephone-only health coaching, during a 12-month period. Methods Patients with diabetes were enrolled in a health coaching program at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, in 2013. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the results were compared with baseline. Glycemic control, measured with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI, were measured at baseline and 12 months. Results Overall, 238 patients attended a face-to-face CDMP session with telephone follow-up (n = 178) or participated in telephone-only health coaching (n = 60). We found no change in BMI in either group; however, HbA1c levels in patients with baseline above the current recommended target (>7%) decreased significantly from 8.5% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%) to 7.9% (SD, 1.0%) (P = .03). Patients with the lowest self-reported health status at baseline improved from 4.4 (SD, 0.5) to 3.7 (SD, 0.9) (P = .001). Diabetes knowledge improved in all patients (24.4 [SD, 2.4] to 25.2 [SD, 2.4]; P < .001), and diabetes distress decreased among those with the highest levels of distress at baseline (3.0 [SD, 0.4] vs 3.8 [SD, 0.6]; P = .003). Conclusion Diabetes health coaching programs can improve glycemic control and reduce diabetes distress in patients with high levels of these at baseline. PMID:28253473

  12. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  13. Levodropropizine in the management of cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schildmann, Eva Katharina; Rémi, Constanze; Bausewein, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease is common and distressing. Levodropropizine, a peripherally acting drug, has been used as an alternative antitussive to opioids. The authors aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of levodropropizine in relieving cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease. The authors searched five databases and hand searched relevant journals to identify randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials assessing the antitussive effect of levodropropizine for cough associated with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, or chronic heart failure. Study quality was assessed using a modified version of the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination criteria. The search yielded 58 references. Six were checked in more detail, and four studies were included. Two were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing levodropropizine against dihydrocodeine and moguisteine, and two were nonrandomized placebo-controlled studies, all with important limitations and high risk of bias. Levodropropizine was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing cough frequency and severity, and equally effective as dihydrocodeine or moguisteine. It was generally well tolerated. The authors conclude that the evidence for the antitussive efficacy of levodropropizine in these patients is scarce, and is further limited by the methodological weaknesses of the primary studies. Further well-designed research is needed to support its use.

  14. Key Features Of Peer Support In Chronic Disease Prevention And Management.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Ballesteros, Juana; Bhushan, Nivedita; Coufal, Muchieh M; Kowitt, Sarah D; McDonough, A Manuela; Parada, Humberto; Robinette, Jennifer B; Sokol, Rebeccah L; Tang, Patrick Y; Urlaub, Diana

    2015-09-01

    Peer support from community health workers, promotores de salud, and others through community and health care organizations can provide social support and other assistance that enhances health. There is substantial evidence for both the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of peer support, as well as for its feasibility, reach, and sustainability. We discuss findings from Peers for Progress, a program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, to examine when peer support does not work, guide dissemination of peer support programs, and help integrate approaches such as e-health into peer support. Success factors for peer support programs include proactive implementation, attention to participants' emotions, and ongoing supervision. Reaching those whom conventional clinical and preventive services too often fail to reach; reaching whole populations, such as people with diabetes, rather than selected samples; and addressing behavioral health are strengths of peer support that can help achieve health care that is efficient and of high quality. Challenges for policy makers going forward include encouraging workforce development, balancing quality control with maintaining key features of peer support, and ensuring that underresourced organizations can develop and manage peer support programs.

  15. Evaluation of the training of Korean community health workers for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Han, Hae-Ra; Kim, K B; Kim, M T

    2007-08-01

    The use of community health workers (CHWs) or lay health advisors has been increasingly popular as an effective means of secondary prevention for cardiovascular health in hard-to-reach, underserved populations. Yet, published evaluations of the CHW training programs are rare. The purpose of this article is to report the results of an evaluation of a CHW training program for hypertension and diabetes management for Korean-American seniors. Forty-eight hours of training was developed and delivered to 12 Korean CHWs. Evaluation of the training program involved CHW surveys, trainer observation and debriefing and CHW focus groups. Testing of CHW knowledge showed that all CHWs met the minimum required knowledge level of 70%. Independent ratings by two trainer observations revealed that the overall CHW performance was satisfactory. Both CHW ratings and focus group data indicated that the training program met their expectation (average 9.3 on a 10-point scale) and was successful in empowering them to assume their role as a 'health initiator', 'health advertising agent' or 'health role model'. While this course is judged to be effective in general, future research is warranted to determine whether CHW provision of care and support will affect health outcomes in the target population.

  16. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms.

  17. Parenteral iron compounds: potent oxidants but mainstays of anemia management in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    Ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are widely used for treating Fe deficiency in patients who are unable to meet their Fe requirements with oral supplements. Intravenous Fe generally is well tolerated and effective in correcting Fe-deficient states. However, the complexing of Fe to carbohydrate polymers does not block its potent pro-oxidant effects; systemic free radical generation and, possibly, tissue damage may result. The purpose of this review is to (1) underscore the capacity of currently used parenteral Fe formulations to induce oxidative stress, (2) compare the severity of these oxidant reactions with those that result from unshielded Fe salts and with each other, and (3) speculate as to the potential of these agents to induce acute renal cell injury and augment systemic inflammatory responses. The experimental data that are reviewed should not be extrapolated to the clinical setting or be used for clinical decision making. Rather, it is hoped that the information provided herein may have utility for clinical hypothesis generation and, hence, future clinical studies. By so doing, a better understanding of Fe's potential protean effects on patients with renal disease may result.

  18. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-γ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  19. Current management of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated chronically with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Melamed, E; Zoldan, J; Galili-Mosberg, R; Ziv, I; Djaldetti, R

    1999-01-01

    effective pharmacological treatment for Parkinson's disease (Melamed, 1987). Undoubtedly, the outstanding therapeutic success of levodopa represents a dramatic and revolutionary breakthrough in medicine, in general, and in neurology, in particular. Although, since the introduction of levodopa, there have been many additional pharmacological and even surgical anti-parkinsonian strategies, it still stands out as a mandatory axis of treatment in the majority of patients (Steigler and Quinn, 1992). Indeed, levodopa therapy improves, sometimes markedly, the motor signs and symptoms of the illness, the functional capacity and quality of life and perhaps also life expectancy of the afflicted patients. It is therefore unfortunate that after an initial problem-free period of successful, smooth and stable clinical benefit from levodopa that lasts about two to five years, the responsiveness of many patients worsens with the emergence of a variety of complications (Marsden et al., 1982; Hardie et al., 1984). These adverse reactions include dyskinesias and dystonias, psychotic problems and, particularly, the troublesome motor fluctuations (Marsden and Parkes, 1977; Marsden, 1994). The latter phenomenon may be particularly complex, limiting and disabling. It is believed that most patients on long-term levodopa therapy will, sooner or later, develop response fluctuations of varying types and severity (Riley and Lang, 1993). Because of the serious impact of these phenomena on the quality of life and function of the patients, many efforts are now being undertaken to identify the responsible mechanisms and to devise preventive and therapeutic measures.

  20. Managing the chronically late patient.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Every practice has patients who are chronically late. This wrecks havoc with your schedule and makes you less productive. Patients can be trained to respect your time and arrive in the office on time. This article discusses several approaches to managing the chronically late patient.

  1. The art and science of chronic disease management come together in a lifestyle-focused approach to primary care.

    PubMed

    Egger, G; Katz, D; Sagner, M; Dixon, J; Stevens, J

    2014-12-01

    Changes in patterns of living result in changes in the nature and causes of disease. The industrial revolution of the late 18th century, and the technological revolution of the late 20th century are cases in point. The former was associated with a decline in infectious diseases; the latter with an increase in lifestyle and environmentally induced chronic diseases . Health practices are typically modified to deal with such changes, hence the recent rise in interest in lifestyle-oriented forms of clinical practice.

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , hepatitis B or hepatitis ... disease Crohn disease Erythropoietin test Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Osteomyelitis Rheumatic fever Ulcerative colitis Review Date 2/1/ ...

  3. An easy to use and affordable home-based personal eHealth system for chronic disease management based on free open source software.

    PubMed

    Burkow, Tatjana M; Vognild, Lars K; Krogstad, Trine; Borch, Njål; Ostengen, Geir; Bratvold, Astrid; Risberg, Marijke Jongsma

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an easy to use home-based eHealth system for chronic disease management. We present the design and implementation of a prototype for home based education, exercises, treatment and following-up, with the TV and a remote control as user interface. We also briefly describe field trials of the system for patients with COPD and diabetes, and their experience with the technology.

  4. Invasive mucormycosis in chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Abdulnasir M.; Al-Shahrani, Dayel A.; Al-Idrissi, Eman M.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in certain immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of invasive mucormycosis due to Rhizopus spp. in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and discuss their clinical presentation, management challenges, and outcomes. PMID:27146621

  5. Dental disease in children with chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Foster, H; Fitzgerald, J

    2005-01-01

    We focus on the role of the general paediatrician in promoting the importance of good dental health for all children and in particular those children "at risk". We present preventive measures, evidence based where available, that may improve dental care and promote the role of paediatric dental services in the multidisciplinary management of chronic disease. PMID:15970611

  6. Innovation in the North: are health service providers ready for the uptake of an internet-based chronic disease management platform?

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Sherri; Lear, Scott; Araki, Yuriko; Horvat, Dan; Prkachin, Ken; Bates, Joanna; Balka, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Remote and rural regions in Canada are faced with unique challenges in the delivery of primary health services. The purpose of this study was to understand how patients and healthcare professionals in northern British Columbia might make use of the Internet to manage cardiovascular diseases. The study used a qualitative methodology. Eighteen health professionals and 6 patients were recruited for a semi-structured interview that explored their experience in managing patients with cardiovascular disease and their opinions and preferences about the use of the Internet in chronic disease management. Key findings from the data suggest that a) use of the Internet helps to maintain continuity of care while a patient moves through various stages of care, b) the Internet may possibly be used as an educational tool in chronic disease self-management, c) there is a need for policy development to support Internet-based consultation processes, and d) while health providers endorse the notion of electronic advancement in their practice, the need for secure and stable electronic systems is essential.

  7. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in Advanced Nursing Practice: A Nonpharmacologic Approach to Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Management, and Symptom Control.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hants; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Tanabe, Paula

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how advanced practice nurses (APNs) can incorporate mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a nonpharmacologic clinical tool in their practice. Over the last 30 years, patients and providers have increasingly used complementary and holistic therapies for the nonpharmacologic management of acute and chronic diseases. Mindfulness-based interventions, specifically MBSR, have been tested and applied within a variety of patient populations. There is strong evidence to support that the use of MBSR can improve a range of biological and psychological outcomes in a variety of medical illnesses, including acute and chronic pain, hypertension, and disease prevention. This article will review the many ways APNs can incorporate MBSR approaches for health promotion and disease/symptom management into their practice. We conclude with a discussion of how nurses can obtain training and certification in MBSR. Given the significant and growing literature supporting the use of MBSR in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, increased attention on how APNs can incorporate MBSR into clinical practice is necessary.

  8. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  9. The MyHealthService approach for chronic disease management based on free open source software and low cost components.

    PubMed

    Vognild, Lars K; Burkow, Tatjana M; Luque, Luis Fernandez

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to building personal health services, supporting following-up, physical exercising, health education, and psychosocial support for the chronically ill, based on free open source software and low-cost computers, mobile devices, and consumer health and fitness devices. We argue that this will lower the cost of the systems, which is important given the increasing number of people with chronicle diseases and limited healthcare budgets.

  10. A customizable model for chronic disease coordination: Lessons learned from the coordinated chronic disease program

    SciTech Connect

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. Furthermore, these elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  11. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  12. Iron management in chronic kidney disease: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bircher, Andreas J; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Obrador, Gregorio T; Pollock, Carol A; Stenvinkel, Peter; Swinkels, Dorine W; Wanner, Christoph; Weiss, Günter; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    Before the introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in 1989, repeated transfusions given to patients with end-stage renal disease caused iron overload, and the need for supplemental iron was rare. However, with the widespread introduction of ESAs, it was recognized that supplemental iron was necessary to optimize hemoglobin response and allow reduction of the ESA dose for economic reasons and recent concerns about ESA safety. Iron supplementation was also found to be more efficacious via intravenous compared to oral administration, and the use of intravenous iron has escalated in recent years. The safety of various iron compounds has been of theoretical concern due to their potential to induce iron overload, oxidative stress, hypersensitivity reactions, and a permissive environment for infectious processes. Therefore, an expert group was convened to assess the benefits and risks of parenteral iron, and to provide strategies for its optimal use while mitigating the risk for acute reactions and other adverse effects.

  13. Chronic disease management: a review of current performance across quality of care domains and opportunities for improving osteoarthritis care.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Bohensky, Megan A; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic joint disease worldwide. The incidence and prevalence are increasing as the population ages and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity increase. There are several evidence-based clinical practice guidelines available to guide clinician decision making, but there is evidence that care provided is suboptimal across all domains of quality: effectiveness, safety, timeliness and appropriateness, patient-centered care, and efficiency. System, clinician, and patient barriers to optimizing care need to be addressed. Innovative models designed to meet patient needs and those that harness social networks must be developed, especially to support those with mild to moderate disease.

  14. Peer-based behavioural strategies to improve chronic disease self-management and clinical outcomes: evidence, logistics, evaluation considerations and needs for future research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic disease such as diabetes generally evokes strong emotions and often brings with it the need to make changes in lifestyle behaviours, such as diet, exercise, medication management and monitoring clinical and metabolic parameters. The diagnosis thus affects not only the person diagnosed but also the family members. Chronic illnesses are largely self-managed with ∼99% of the care becoming the responsibility of patients and their families or others involved in the daily management of their illnesses. While the responsibility for outcomes, such as metabolic control and chronic complications, are shared with the health care team, the daily decisions and behaviours adopted by patients clearly have a strong influence on their future health and well-being. While diabetes self-management education is essential, it is generally not sufficient for patients to sustain behaviours and cope with a lifetime of diabetes. Peers have been proposed as one method for assisting patients to deal with the behavioural and affective components of diabetes and to provide ongoing self-management support. This paper first describes effective behavioural strategies in diabetes, based on multiple studies and/or meta-analyses, and then provides examples of their use by peers or in peer-based programmes in diabetes. A comprehensive search using the MEDLINE® and Cinahl databases was conducted. Key search terms included peer mentors, peer leaders, peer educators, lay health workers and community health workers. Studies that clearly identified behavioural strategies used by peers were included. PMID:19509083

  15. Managing Addiction as a Chronic Condition

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Michael; Scott, Christy K

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews progress in adapting addiction treatment to respond more fully to the chronic nature of most patients’ problems. After reviewing evidence that the natural history of addiction involves recurrent cycles of relapse and recovery, we discuss emerging approaches to recovery management, including techniques for improving the continuity of care, monitoring during periods of abstinence, and early reintervention; recent developments in the field related to self-management, mutual aid, and other recovery supports; and system-level interventions. We also address the importance of adjusting treatment funding and organizational structures to better meet the needs of individuals with a chronic disease. PMID:18292710

  16. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Furman, Richard R; Zent, Clive S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) is usually diagnosed in asymptomatic patients with early-stage disease. The standard management approach is careful observation, irrespective of risk factors unless patients meet the International Workshop on CLL (IWCLL) criteria for "active disease," which requires treatment. The initial standard therapy for most patients combines an anti-CD20 antibody (such as rituximab, ofatumumab, or obinutuzumab) with chemotherapy (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide [FC], bendamustine, or chlorambucil) depending on multiple factors including the physical fitness of the patient. However, patients with very high-risk CLL because of a 17p13 deletion (17p-) with or without mutation of TP53 (17p-/TP53mut) have poor responses to chemoimmunotherapy and require alternative treatment regimens containing B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway inhibitors. The BCR signaling pathway inhibitors (ibrutinib targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase [BTK] and idelalisib targeting phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase delta [PI3K-delta], respectively) are currently approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory CLL and all patients with 17p- (ibrutinib), and in combination with rituximab for relapsed/refractory patients (idelalisib). These agents offer great efficacy, even in chemotherapy refractory CLL, with increased tolerability, safety, and survival. Ongoing studies aim to determine the best therapy combinations with the goal of achieving long-term disease control and the possibility of developing a curative regimen for some patients. CLL is associated with a wide range of infectious, autoimmune, and malignant complications. These complications result in considerable morbidity and mortality that can be minimized by early detection and aggressive management. This active monitoring requires ongoing patient education, provider vigilance, and a team approach to patient care.

  17. Medication management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Slipp, Marlene; Burnham, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of chronic pain is high and increasing. Medication management is an important component of chronic pain management. There is a shortage of physicians who are available and comfortable providing this service. In Alberta, pharmacists have been granted an advanced scope of practice. Given this empowerment, their availability, training and skill set, pharmacists are well positioned to play an expanded role in the medication management of chronic pain sufferers. Objective: To compare the effectiveness and cost of a physician-only vs a pharmacist-physician team model of medication management for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers. Method: Data was analyzed for 89 patients who had received exclusively medication management at a rural Alberta multidisciplinary clinic. 56 were managed by a sole physician. 33 were managed by a team (pharmacist + physician). In the team model, the physician did the medical assessment, diagnosis, and established a treatment plan in consultation with the patient and pharmacist. The pharmacist then provided the ongoing follow-up including education, dose titration and side effect management and consulted with the physician as needed. Change in pain (Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Pain Interference Questionnaire) over the course of treatment were recorded. The treatment duration and number of visits were used to calculate cost of care. Results: Both models of medication management resulted in significant and comparable improvements in pain, disability and patient perception of medication effectiveness. Patients in the physician-only group were seen more frequently and at a greater cost. The pharmacist-physician team approach was markedly more cost-effective, and patients expressed a high level of satisfaction with their medication management. Conclusions: The pharmacist-physician team model of medication management results in significant reductions of pain and disability for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers

  18. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  19. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  20. A longitudinal study to identify the influence of quality of chronic care delivery on productive interactions between patients and (teams of) healthcare professionals within disease management programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Objective The chronic care model is an increasingly used approach to improve the quality of care through system changes in care delivery. While theoretically these system changes are expected to increase productive patient–professional interaction empirical evidence is lacking. This study aims to identify the influence of quality of care on productive patient–professional interaction. Setting Longitudinal study in 18 Dutch regions. Participants Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) in 2010 (2676 (53%) respondents). One year later (T1), 4693 patients still participating in the DMPs received a questionnaire (2191 (47%) respondents) and 2 years later (in 2012; T2) 1722 patients responded (out of 4350; 40% response). Interventions DMPs Primary outcome measure Patients’ perceptions of the productivity of interactions (measured as relational coordination/coproduction of care) with professionals. Patients were asked about communication dimensions (frequent, accurate, and problem-solving communication) and relationship dimensions (shared goals and mutual respect). Findings After controlling for background characteristics these results clearly show that quality of chronic care (T0), first-year changes in quality of chronic care (T1—T0) and second-year changes in quality of chronic care (T2—T1) predicted productive interactions between patients and professionals at T2 (all at p≤0.001). Furthermore, we found a negative relationship between lower educational level and productive interactions between patients and professionals 2 years later. Conclusions We can conclude that successfully dealing with the consequences of chronic illnesses requires proactive patients who are able to make productive decisions together with their healthcare providers. Since patients and professionals share responsibility for management of the chronic illness, they must also share control of interactions and decisions

  1. Evaluating the impact of a disease management program for chronic complex conditions at two large northeast health plans using a control group methodology.

    PubMed

    Schwerner, Henry; Mellody, Timothy; Goldstein, Allan B; Wansink, Daryl; Sullivan, Virginia; Yelenik, Stephan N; Charlton, Warwick; Lloyd, Kelley; Courtemanche, Ted

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe trends in payer expenditures for plan members with one of 14 chronic, complex conditions comparing one group with a disease management program specific to their condition (the intervention group) and the other with no specific disease management program (the control group) for these conditions. The authors used payer claims and membership data to identify members eligible for the program in a 12-month baseline year (October 2001 to September 2002) and a subsequent 12-month program year (October 2002 to September 2003). Two payers were analyzed: one health plan with members primarily in New Jersey (AmeriHealth New Jersey [AHNJ]), where the disease management program was offered, and one affiliated large plan with members primarily in the metro Philadelphia area, where the program was not offered. The claims payment policy for both plans is identical. Intervention and control groups were analyzed for equivalence. The analysis was conducted in both groups over identical time periods. The intervention group showed statistically significant (p < 0.01) differences in total paid claims trend and expenditures when compared to the control group. Intervention group members showed a reduction in expenditures of -8%, while control group members showed an increase of +10% over identical time periods. Subsequent analyses controlling for outliers and product lines served to confirm the overall results. The disease management program is likely responsible for the observed difference between the intervention and control group results. A well-designed, targeted disease management program offered by a motivated, supportive health plan can play an important role in cost improvement strategies for members with complex, chronic conditions.

  2. Intermediate Outcomes of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Spanish-Speaking Older Adults in South Florida, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Seff, Laura R.; Bastida, Elena; Albatineh, Ahmed N.; Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence and negative health effects of chronic diseases are disproportionately high among Hispanics, the largest minority group in the United States. Self-management of chronic conditions by older adults is a public health priority. The objective of this study was to examine 6-week differences in self-efficacy, time spent performing physical activity, and perceived social and role activities limitations for participants in a chronic disease self-management program for Spanish-speaking older adults, Tomando Control de su Salud (TCDS). Methods Through the Healthy Aging Regional Collaborative, 8 area agencies delivered 82 workshops in 62 locations throughout South Florida. Spanish-speaking participants who attended workshops from October 1, 2008, through December 31, 2010, were aged 55 years or older, had at least 1 chronic condition, and completed baseline and post-test surveys were included in analysis (N = 682). Workshops consisted of six, 2.5-hour sessions offered once per week for 6 weeks. A self-report survey was administered at baseline and again at the end of program instruction. To assess differences in outcomes, a repeated measures general linear model was used, controlling for agency and baseline general health. Results All outcomes showed improvement at 6 weeks. Outcomes that improved significantly were self-efficacy to manage disease, perceived social and role activities limitations, time spent walking, and time spent performing other aerobic activities. Conclusion Implementation of TCDS significantly improved 4 of 8 health promotion skills and behaviors of Spanish-speaking older adults in South Florida. A community-based implementation of TCDS has the potential to improve health outcomes for a diverse, Spanish-speaking, older adult population. PMID:23987252

  3. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  4. Factors Associated with Women's Chronic Disease Management: Associations of Healthcare Frustrations, Physician Support, and Self-Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Ahn, Sangnam; Miles, Toni P

    2013-01-01

    Previous research emphasizes the importance of reducing healthcare frustrations and enhancing physician supports to help patients engage in recommended healthcare regimens. However, less is known about how these factors are associated with aging women's knowledge about self-care behavior. This study examined the sociodemographics, health indicators, healthcare-related frustrations, and perceptions of physician support associated with middle-aged and older adult females' self-reported need for help to learn how to take better care of their health. Data were analyzed from 287 females with one or more chronic conditions who completed The National Council on Aging (NCOA) Chronic Care Survey. A logistic regression model was developed. Women who were non-White (OR = 2.26, P = 0.049) were more likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Those who had some college education or more (OR = 0.55, P = 0.044) and lower healthcare-related frustrations (OR = 0.44, P = 0.017) and perceived to have more physician support (OR = 0.49, P = 0.033) were less likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Findings can inform the planning, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of evidence-based self-management programs for middle-aged and older women within and outside of clinical settings.

  5. The Prevalence and Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a common and significant complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its prevalence and current management status has not been studied thoroughly in Korea. We examined the prevalence of anemia, its association with clinical and laboratory factors, and utilization of iron agents and erythropoiesis stimulating agents using the baseline data from the large-scale CKD cohort in Korea. We defined anemia when hemoglobin level was lower than 13.0 g/dL in males and 12.0 g/dL in females, or received by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Overall prevalence of anemia was 45.0% among 2,198 non-dialysis CKD patients from stage 1 to 5. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) as a cause, CKD stages, body mass index (BMI), smoking, leukocyte count, serum albumin, iron markers, calcium, and phosphorus concentration were identified as independent risk factors for anemia. Considering the current coverage of Korean National Health Insurance System, only 7.9% among applicable patients were managed by intravenous iron agents, and 42.7% were managed by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. PMID:28049235

  6. Management of Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Grahame, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Effective treatment of chronic urticaria depends on identification of the etiologic factor, if possible, and its subsequent elimination, although symptoms may be suppressed by appropriate medication. The investigation of the patient who presents with chronic urticaria is discussed, with emphasis on the need for a detailed history, meticulous physical examination (including a search for occult infection) and full routine hematologic, biochemical and radiologic monitoring. The author discusses the use of intradermal skin tests, scratch tests for inhalants and the need for skin biopsy and gastro-intestinal tract screening. Dietary treatments reviewed include the elimination diet and the elemental diet, which is used in combination with gradual re-introduction of foods. Symptomatic treatments, including antihistamines, the newer H1-histamine receptor antagonists, used with tricyclic antidepressants and with combination therapy, and systemic corticosteroid therapy are also discussed. PMID:21263827

  7. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD.

  8. The chronic enteropathogenic disease schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Olveda, David U; Olveda, Remigio M; McManus, Donald P; Cai, Pengfei; Chau, Thao N P; Lam, Alfred K; Li, Yuesheng; Harn, Donald A; Vinluan, Marilyn L; Ross, Allen G P

    2014-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic enteropathogenic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. The disease afflicts approximately 240 million individuals globally, causing approximately 70 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Chronic infections with morbidity and mortality occur as a result of granuloma formation in the intestine, liver, or in the case of Schistosoma haematobium, the bladder. Various methods are utilized to diagnose and evaluate liver fibrosis due to schistosomiasis. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard, but it is invasive. Diagnostic imaging has proven to be an invaluable method in assessing hepatic morbidity in the hospital setting, but has practical limitations in the field. The potential of non-invasive biological markers, serum antibodies, cytokines, and circulating host microRNAs to diagnose hepatic fibrosis is presently undergoing evaluation. This review provides an update on the recent advances made with respect to gastrointestinal disease associated with chronic schistosomiasis.

  9. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  10. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  11. Management of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kalra, K K; Jain, N; Mittal, S K

    1999-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), perceived as a rare cause of chronic diarrhea three decades ago, was diagnosed as a cause of diarrhea in 60 (7.5%) post weaned children among 800 cases of chronic diarrhea. The diagnosis was established on the basis of a detailed clinical history, histopathological studies on small bowel mucosa and a complete recovery on gluten free diets. Thirty four children were followed up for a period of 0.3 to 8.2 years (mean 3.45 +/- 2.28). Catch up growth was seen in all. A rapid gain in height and weight was observed in first year following exclusion of gluten from the diet. However, on subsequent follow up, flattening of growth curve was seen in 9 subjects which was attributed to non-compliance of gluten free diets and dietary inadequacies. Strict dietary compliance is difficult to adhere to with wheat being a staple cereal in India. Other factors affecting compliance include lack of awareness and non availability of gluten free diets as well as contamination of other items with wheat at grocery shops. A few cases may present as celiac crisis which is a medical emergency requiring aggressive management including use of corticosteroids to improve survival in this otherwise life threatening situation. Effective management of CD requires intense family cooperation as well as concerted national efforts to provide these patients easy access to gluten free diets. The evolution of Celiac Societies, and widespread dissemination of knowledge through all available media will greatly help in management of patients with this chronic disease.

  12. Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis: management challenge

    PubMed Central

    Charakorn, Natamon; Snidvongs, Kornkiat

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis is a spectrum of inflammatory diseases in isolated sphenoid sinus which may persist over a period of 12 weeks. It is a different entity from other types of rhinosinusitis because clinical presentations include headache, visual loss or diplopia, and patients may or may not have nasal obstruction or nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopic examination is useful, and computed tomography is mandatory. The disease requires comprehensive knowledge and appropriate imaging technique for diagnosis. To treat patients with chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, surgical treatment with endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy is often required. As there are no recent updated reviews of chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, in this article, we review the anatomy of the sphenoid sinus and its clinical relationship with the clinical signs and symptoms of the disease, the imaging findings of each diagnosis and the comprehensive surgical techniques. PMID:27877057

  13. Evaluating spatial overlap and relatedness of white-tailed deer in a chronic wasting disease management zone.

    PubMed

    Magle, Seth B; Samuel, Michael D; Van Deelen, Timothy R; Robinson, Stacie J; Mathews, Nancy E

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife disease transmission, at a local scale, can occur from interactions between infected and susceptible conspecifics or from a contaminated environment. Thus, the degree of spatial overlap and rate of contact among deer is likely to impact both direct and indirect transmission of infectious diseases such chronic wasting disease (CWD) or bovine tuberculosis. We identified a strong relationship between degree of spatial overlap (volume of intersection) and genetic relatedness for female white-tailed deer in Wisconsin's area of highest CWD prevalence. We used volume of intersection as a surrogate for contact rates between deer and concluded that related deer are more likely to have contact, which may drive disease transmission dynamics. In addition, we found that age of deer influences overlap, with fawns exhibiting the highest degree of overlap with other deer. Our results further support the finding that female social groups have higher contact among related deer which can result in transmission of infectious diseases. We suggest that control of large social groups comprised of closely related deer may be an effective strategy in slowing the transmission of infectious pathogens, and CWD in particular.

  14. Evaluating spatial overlap and relatedness of white-tailed deer in a chronic wasting disease management zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, Michael D.; Magle, Seth B.; Van Deelen, Timothy R.; Robinson, Stacie J.; Mathews, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife disease transmission, at a local scale, can occur from interactions between infected and susceptible conspecifics or from a contaminated environment. Thus, the degree of spatial overlap and rate of contact among deer is likely to impact both direct and indirect transmission of infectious diseases such chronic wasting disease (CWD) or bovine tuberculosis. We identified a strong relationship between degree of spatial overlap (volume of intersection) and genetic relatedness for female white-tailed deer in Wisconsin’s area of highest CWD prevalence. We used volume of intersection as a surrogate for contact rates between deer and concluded that related deer are more likely to have contact, which may drive disease transmission dynamics. In addition, we found that age of deer influences overlap, with fawns exhibiting the highest degree of overlap with other deer. Our results further support the finding that female social groups have higher contact among related deer which can result in transmission of infectious diseases. We suggest that control of large social groups comprised of closely related deer may be an effective strategy in slowing the transmission of infectious pathogens, and CWD in particular.

  15. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  16. The impact of population-based disease management services for selected chronic conditions: the Costs to Australian Private Insurance - Coaching Health (CAPICHe) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent evidence from a large scale trial conducted in the United States indicates that enhancing shared decision-making and improving knowledge, self-management, and provider communication skills to at-risk patients can reduce health costs and utilisation of healthcare resources. Although this trial has provided a significant advancement in the evidence base for disease management programs it is still left for such results to be replicated and/or generalised for populations in other countries and other healthcare environments. This trial responds to the limited analyses on the effectiveness of providing chronic disease management services through telephone health coaching in Australia. The size of this trial and it's assessment of cost utility with respect to potentially preventable hospitalisations adds significantly to the body of knowledge to support policy and investment decisions in Australia as well as to the international debate regarding the effect of disease management programs on financial outcomes. Methods Intention to treat study applying a prospective randomised design comparing usual care with extensive outreach to encourage use of telephone health coaching for those people identified from a risk scoring algorithm as having a higher likelihood of future health costs. The trial population has been limited to people with one or more of the following selected chronic conditions: namely, low back pain, diabetes, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This trial will enrol at least 64,835 sourced from the approximately 3 million Bupa Australia private health insured members located across Australia. The primary outcome will be the total (non-maternity) cost per member as reported to the private health insurer (i.e. charged to the insurer) 12 months following entry into the trial for each person. Study recruitment will be completed in early 2012 and the results will be available in late 2013. Discussion

  17. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  18. Medical management of pediatric chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, L L; Brown, K R

    2000-10-01

    Pediatric sinusitis can be a challenging disease to treat, whether by a primary care physician or an otolaryngologist. When initial appropriate therapy fails to resolve the disorder, frustration may develop on the part of the patient, the family, and the physician. In addition to treatment with appropriate antibiotics for a sufficient length of time, other associated conditions that can exacerbate the condition must be considered and addressed as necessary. These may include viral upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, immune deficiencies, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Unless all associated conditions have been optimized, treatment of chronic sinusitis will often be unsuccessful. Recognition that there may be another factor contributing to the patient's continuing illness should prompt appropriate evaluation and occasionally referral to appropriate specialists. Except for the unusual pediatric patient with a truly anatomic disorder or an underlying chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis, proper medical management will almost always resolve chronic sinusitis.

  19. Surgical Management of Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Benjamin R; Ha, Austin Y; Kwan, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we outline the important role the surgeon plays in the management of chronic wounds. Debridement and washout are required for grossly infected wounds and necrotizing soft tissue infections. Cutaneous cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas may contribute to chronic wounds and vice versa; if diagnosed, these should be treated with wide local excision. Arterial, venous, and even lymphatic flows can be restored in select cases to enhance delivery of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste and promote wound healing. In cases where vital structures, such as bones, joints, tendons, and nerves, are exposed, vascularized tissue transfers are often required. These tissue transfers can be local or remote, the latter of which necessitates anastomoses of arteries and veins. Pressure sores are managed by relieving pressure, treating acute trauma or infection, and using rotation fasciocutaneous flaps. Lastly, the surgeon must always consider the possibility of osteomyelitis and retained foreign body as etiology for chronic wounds.

  20. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  1. The Utility of a Syndemic Framework in Understanding Chronic Disease Management Among HIV-Infected and Type 2 Diabetic Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Byg, Blaire; Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Funk, Danielle; James, Bonface; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Syndemic theory posits that epidemics of multiple physical and psychosocial problems co-occur among disadvantaged groups due to adverse social conditions. Although sexual minority populations are often stigmatized and vulnerable to multiple health problems, the syndemic perspective has been underutilized in understanding chronic disease. To assess the potential utility of this perspective in understanding the management of co-occurring HIV and Type 2 diabetes, we used linear regression to examine glycemic control (A1c) among men who have sex with men (MSM) with both HIV and Type 2 diabetes (n = 88). Bivariable linear regression explored potential syndemic correlates of inadequate glycemic control. Compared to those with adequate glycemic control (A1c ≤ 7.5 %), more men with inadequate glycemic control (A1c > 7.5 %) had hypertension (70 vs. 46 %, p = 0.034), high triglycerides (93 vs. 61 %, p = 0.002), depression (67 vs. 39 %, p = 0.018), current substance abuse (15 vs. 2 %, p = 0.014), and detectable levels of HIV (i.e., viral load ≥75 copies per ml blood; 30 vs. 10 %, p = 0.019). In multivariable regression controlling for age, the factors that were independently associated with higher A1c were high triglycerides, substance use, and detectable HIV viral load, suggesting that chronic disease management among MSM is complex and challenging for patients and providers. Findings also suggest that syndemic theory can be a clarifying lens for understanding chronic disease management among sexual minority stigmatized populations. Interventions targeting single conditions may be inadequate when multiple conditions co-occur; thus, research using a syndemic framework may be helpful in identifying intervention strategies that target multiple co-occurring conditions.

  2. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-08

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Adaptation of the health literacy universal precautions toolkit for rheumatology and cardiology - applications for pharmacy professionals to improve self-management and outcomes in patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Leigh F; Hawk, Victoria; Rudd, Rima; Hackney, Betsy; Bhandari, Sonia; Prizer, Lindsay P; Bauer, Thomas K; Jonas, Beth; Mendys, Philip; DeWalt, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Over a decade of research in health literacy has provided evidence of strong links between literacy skills of patients and health outcomes. At the same time, numerous studies have yielded insight into efficacious action that health providers can take to mitigate the negative effects of limited literacy. This small study focuses on the adaptation, review and use of two new health literacy toolkits for health professionals who work with patients with two of the most prevalent chronic conditions, arthritis and cardiovascular disease. Pharmacists have a key role in communicating with patients and caregivers about various aspects of disease self-management, which frequently includes appropriate use of medications. Participating pharmacists and staff offered suggestions that helped shape revisions and reported positive experiences with brown bag events, suggestions for approaches with patients managing chronic diseases, and with concrete examples related to several medicines [such as Warfarin(©)] as well as to common problems [such as inability to afford needed medicine]. Although not yet tested in community pharmacy sites, these publically available toolkits can inform professionals and staff and offer insights for communication improvement.

  4. Epidemiology of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L; Evans, C; Fowkes, F G R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic venous disease of the legs occurs commonly in the general population in the Western world. Estimates of the prevalence of varicose veins vary widely from 2-56% in men and from 1-60% in women. These variations reflect differences in variability of study populations including age, race and gender, methods of measurement and disease definition. Definitions of chronic venous disease may rely on reports of varicose veins by study participants, based on self-diagnosis or recall of a diagnosis, or on a standardized physical examination. Venous ulceration is less common, affecting approximately 0.3% of the adult population. Age and pregnancy have been established as risk factors for developing varicose veins. Evidence on other risk factors for venous disease is inconclusive. Prolonged standing has been proposed, but results of studies should be interpreted with caution given the difficulty in measuring levels of posture. Obesity has been suggested as a risk factor in women, but appears to be an aggravating factor rather than a primary cause. Other postulated risk factors include dietary intake and smoking, but evidence is lacking. Longitudinal studies using standardized methods of evaluation are required before the true incidence of chronic venous disease and associated risk factors can be determined.

  5. Management of chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S; Aziz, Qasim; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological and psychological interventions, thereby providing a mechanism-orientated approach to treatment. Patients can frequently become disenfranchised, and subsequently disengaged, with healthcare providers leading to repeated consultations. Thus, a key aspect of management is to break this cycle by validating patients' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations in central pain processing.

  6. Integration of chronic disease prevention and management services into primary care: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (PR1MaC)

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Dubois, Marie-France; Bélanger, Martin; Almirall, José; Bouhali, Tarek; Sasseville, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease prevention and management programs are usually single-disease oriented. Our objective was to evaluate an intervention that targeted multiple chronic conditions and risk factors. Methods: We conducted a pragmatic randomized controlled trial involving patients aged 18-75 years with at least 1 of the targeted chronic conditions or risk factors from 8 primary care practices in the Saguenay region of Quebec, Canada, to evaluate an intervention that included self-management support and patient-centred motivational approaches. Self-management (primary outcome) was evaluated using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ). Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy, health-related quality of life, psychological distress and health behaviours. Results: Three hundred thirty-two patients were recruited and randomly assigned (n = 166 for both intervention and control groups) and evaluated after 3 months. The intervention group showed improvement in 6 of the 8 heiQ domains: health-directed behaviour (relative risk [RR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.59), emotional well-being (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.79), self-monitoring and insight (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 4.86), constructive attitudes and approaches (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.21), skill and technique acquisition (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.53), and health service navigation (RR 1.93, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.47). Improvement was also observed in the Physical Component Summary (p = 0.017) and the Single Index (p = 0.041) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (version 2). The intervention group improved in fruit and vegetable consumption (odds ratio [OR] 2.36, 95% CI 1.41 to 3.95) and physical activity (OR 3.81, 95% CI 1.65 to 8.76). One-year improvement was maintained in the intervention group for several outcomes. Interpretation: It is possible to implement an intervention integrating chronic disease prevention and management services into primary care settings. We obtained positive

  7. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD) is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD) is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients. PMID:28251162

  8. [Self-management support for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in ambulatory care--an observational study].

    PubMed

    Hörold, M; Landenberger, M

    2014-12-01

    This cross-sectional study focuses on the status of COPD-related fears and impairments of adult patients receiving ambulant care as well as their use of self-management strategies. On the basis of the COPD Clinical Questionnaire, COPD Disability Index, COPD Assessment Test and the COPD Anxiety Questionnaire, COPD-dependent fears and impairments were determined in a convenience sample. Furthermore, data on important characteristics of the illness experience were gathered by semi-standardised interviews. Altogether, 80 patients (average age: 67.1 ± 8.5 years) took part in the quantitative interviews. In addition, 10 patients (average age: 68.2 ± 4.1 years) took part in qualitative interviews. Results showed that there were disease-related impairments in the areas of respiration, recovery and physical stress as well as in family and domestic obligations. Furthermore, illness-dependent fears had a high relevance in the study population. The management of COPD-related fears and taking into consideration information and counseling needs of these patients are important intervention approaches. On the basis of the presented results, evidence-based, multi-disciplinary, and disease-, situation- and above all, patient' needs-related interventions could be planned to support patients in self-management skills.

  9. Shifting chronic disease management from hospitals to primary care in Estonian health system: analysis of national panel data

    PubMed Central

    Atun, Rifat; Gurol–Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Pell, Lisa; Stokes, Jonathan; Habicht, Triin; Lukka, Kaija; Raaper, Elin; Habicht, Jarno

    2016-01-01

    Background Following independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Estonia introduced a national insurance system, consolidated the number of health care providers, and introduced family medicine centred primary health care (PHC) to strengthen the health system. Methods Using routinely collected health billing records for 2005–2012, we examine health system utilisation for seven ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], depression, Type 2 diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease [IHD]), and by patient characteristics (gender, age, and number of co–morbidities). The data set contained 552 822 individuals. We use patient level data to test the significance of trends, and employ multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the probability of inpatient admission while controlling for patient characteristics, health system supply–side variables, and PHC use. Findings Over the study period, utilisation of PHC increased, whilst inpatient admissions fell. Service mix in PHC changed with increases in phone, email, nurse, and follow–up (vs initial) consultations. Healthcare utilisation for diabetes, depression, IHD and hypertension shifted to PHC, whilst for COPD, heart failure and asthma utilisation in outpatient and inpatient settings increased. Multivariate regression indicates higher probability of inpatient admission for males, older patient and especially those with multimorbidity, but protective effect for PHC, with significantly lower hospital admission for those utilising PHC services. Interpretation Our findings suggest health system reforms in Estonia have influenced the shift of ACSCs from secondary to primary care, with PHC having a protective effect in reducing hospital admissions. PMID:27648258

  10. Lifestyle and Self-Management by Those Who Live It: Patients Engaging Patients in a Chronic Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, Michelle T; Rubinstein, Elizabeth; Eshelman, Anne; Wee, Corinne; Tankasala, Mrunalini; Li, Jia; Abouljoud, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients pursuing organ transplantation have complex medical needs, undergo comprehensive evaluation for possible listing, and require extensive education. However, transplant patients and their supports frequently report the need for more lifestyle and self-management strategies for living with organ transplantation. Objectives: First, to explore feasibility of a successful, patient-run transplant lifestyle educational group (Transplant Living Community), designed to complement medical care and integrated into the clinical setting; and second, to report the major themes of patients’ and supports’ qualitative and quantitative feedback regarding the group. Methods: Informal programmatic review and patient satisfaction surveys. Results: A total of 1862 patient satisfaction surveys were disseminated and 823 were returned (response rate, 44.2%). Patients and their supports reported positive feedback regarding the group, including appreciation that the volunteer was a transplant recipient and gratitude for the lifestyle information. Five areas were associated with the success of Transplant Living Community: 1) a “champion” dedicated to the program and its successful integration into a multidisciplinary team; 2) a health care environment receptive to integration of a patient-led group with ongoing community development; 3) a high level of visibility to physicians and staff, patients, and supports; 4) a clearly presented and manageable lifestyle plan (“Play Your ACES”a [Attitude, Compliance, Exercise, and Support]), and 5) a strong volunteer structure with thoughtful training with the ultimate objective of volunteers taking ownership of the program. Conclusion: It is feasible to integrate a sustainable patient-led lifestyle and self-management educational group into a busy tertiary care clinic for patients with complex chronic illnesses. PMID:27455056

  11. Management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Tendons transmit force between muscles and bones and, when stretched, store elastic energy that contributes to movement.(1) The tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles merge to form the Achilles tendon, which is the largest and strongest in the body, but one of the most frequently injured.(2,3) Conservative management options for chronic Achilles tendinopathy include eccentric (lengthening) exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), topical nitroglycerin, low level laser therapy, orthoses, splints or injections (e.g. corticosteroids, hyperosmolar dextrose, polidocanol, platelet-rich plasma), while a minority of patients require surgery (using open, percutaneous or endoscopic methods).(4-8) Here we assess the management options for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (lasting over 6 weeks).

  12. Chronic wasting disease of cervids.

    PubMed

    Miller, M W; Williams, E S

    2004-01-01

    . Natural transmission to humans or traditional domestic livestock seems relatively unlikely, but the possibility still evokes public concerns; impacts on wildlife resources have not been determined. Consequently, where CWD is not known to occur surveillance programs and regulations that prevent or reduce the likelihood that CWD will be introduced into these jurisdictions should be encouraged. Where CWD is known to occur, affected jurisdictions are conducting surveillance to estimate and monitor trends in geographic distribution and prevalence, managing deer and elk populations in attempts to limit spread, and developing and evaluating techniques for further controlling and perhaps eradicating CWD. Programs for addressing the challenges of CWD management will require interagency cooperation, commitment of funds and personnel, and applied research. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is perhaps the most enigmatic of the naturally occurring prion diseases. Although recognized as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) since the late 1970s (Williams and Young 1980, 1982), interest in and concern about CWD has only recently emerged. CWD most closely resembles scrapie in sheep in most respects, but recent media and public reaction to CWD has been more reminiscent of that afforded to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) less than a decade ago. Yet, with the exception of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), CWD is the rarest of the known animal TSEs: fewer than 1,000 cases have been diagnosed worldwide, and all but two of these occurred in North America. CWD is unique among the TSEs in that it affects free-living species (Spraker et al. 1997; Miller et al. 2000). The three natural host species for CWD, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), are all in the family Cervidae and native to North America. Like scrapie, CWD is contagious: epidemics are self-sustaining in both captive and free

  13. Management of chronic refractory cough.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2015-12-14

    Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise.

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  16. Self-Management and Quality of Life in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): The Mediating Effects of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Benzo, Roberto P.; Abascal-Bolado, Beatriz; Dulohery, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to increase our understanding of general self-management (SM) abilities in COPD by determining if SM can predict disease specific quality of life (QoL), by investigating whether specific SM domains are significant in COPD and by exploring the mediating effect of the positive/negative affect in the association between SM and QoL. Methods Cross-sectional study based on 292 patients with COPD. Measures included demographics, lung function, gait speed, health care utilization, positive/negative affect, SM abilities, breathlessness and disease specific QoL. We performed, correlation, multiple regression models and mediation analysis (positive/negative affect being mediator between SM and QoL association). Results After controlling for breathlessness, living alone, marital status, hospitalization history, age and lung function, SM related to QoL (p< 0.0001). Investment in behaviors (hobbies and social relationships) and self-efficacy are SM domains independently related to QoL in COPD. Positivity measured by the positive/negative affect ratio completely mediates the relationship of SM with QoL. Conclusion SM is independently associated with disease specific QoL in COPD after adjustment significant covariates but positive/negative affect ratio completely mediates the relationship of SM with QoL. Practice implications Measuring positive/negative affect and addressing investment behavior and self-efficacy are important in implementing COPD-SM programs. PMID:26632024

  17. Ursodeoxycholic acid in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Caestecker, J S; Jazrawi, R P; Petroni, M L; Northfield, T C

    1991-01-01

    The hydrophilic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid has recently been shown to reduce biochemical markers of both cholestasis and hepatocellular damage in patients with chronic liver diseases. The most compelling evidence available is for chronic cholestatic liver diseases, in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and cholestasis associated with cystic fibrosis. The effects may be less beneficial in patients with advanced liver disease from these conditions. Data from placebo controlled trials are now available in support of earlier uncontrolled observations, but it is not yet clear whether short term benefit results in an improvement in longterm prognosis. The mechanism of action of the compound seems to reside in its displacement of toxic hydrophobic bile acids from both the bile acid pool and hepatocellular membranes. There may be an independent effect on bile flow, which could be of particular importance in cystic fibrosis, and possibly an effect on the immune system. Ursodeoxycholic acid should now be regarded as occupying a central place in the medical management of chronic cholestatic liver diseases, in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, because it improves cholestasis and reduces hepatocellular damage and it is not toxic. Research should now be targeted on whether treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, initiated early in cholestatic liver conditions, improves the long-term outcome. PMID:1916492

  18. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  19. Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives: persistent but surmountable hurdles in the management of nutrition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives are among the most commonly consumed nutrients in the world. This is because both have diverse applications in processed food manufacturing, leading to their widespread utilization by the food industry. Since most foods are naturally low in salt, sodium additives almost completely account for the excessive consumption of sodium throughout the world. Similarly, phosphorus additives represent a major and “hidden” phosphorus load in modern diets. These factors pose a major barrier to successfully lowering sodium or phosphorus intake in patients with chronic kidney disease. As such, any serious effort to reduce sodium or phosphorus consumption will require reductions in the use of these additives by the food industry. The current regulatory environment governing the use of food additives does not favor this goal, however, in large part because these additives have historically been classified as generally safe for public consumption. To overcome these barriers, coordinated efforts will be needed to demonstrate that high intakes of these additives are not safe for public consumption and as such, should be subject to greater regulatory scrutiny. PMID:23439374

  20. Intravenous iron dextran as a component of anemia management in chronic kidney disease: a report of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Yessayan, Lenar; Sandhu, Ankur; Besarab, Anatole; Yessayan, Alexy; Frinak, Stan; Zasuwa, Gerard; Yee, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to demonstrate safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID) during treatment of anemic stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods. Efficacy data was obtained by retrospective chart review of 150 consecutively enrolled patients. Patients were assigned per protocol to oral or IV iron, with IV iron given to those with lower iron stores and/or hemoglobin. Iron and darbepoetin were administered to achieve and maintain hemoglobin at 10-12 g/dL. Efficacy endpoints were mean hemoglobin and change in iron indices approximately 30 and 60 days after enrollment. Safety data was obtained by retrospective review of reported adverse drug events (ADEs) following 1699 infusions of LMWID (0.5-1.0 g). Results. Mean hemoglobin, iron saturation, and ferritin increased significantly from baseline to 60 days in patients assigned to LMWID (hemoglobin: 11.3 versus 9.4 g/dL; iron saturation: 24% versus 12.9%; ferritin: 294.7 versus 134.7 ng/mL; all P  values < 0.0001). Iron stores and hemoglobin were maintained in the group assigned to oral iron. Of 1699 iron dextran infusions, three ADEs occurred. Conclusions. Treatment of anemia in CKD stages 3 and 4 with LMWID and darbepoetin is efficacious. The serious ADE rate was 0.06% per infusion.

  1. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  2. Asthma disease management and the respiratory therapist.

    PubMed

    Kallstrom, Thomas J; Myers, Timothy R

    2008-06-01

    The role of the respiratory therapist (RT) is expanding with the growing acceptance and use of the disease-management paradigm for managing chronic diseases. RTs are key members of the asthma disease-management team, in acute-care settings, patients' homes, out-patient clinics, emergency departments, and in the community. Utilizing RTs as disease managers allows patients to be treated faster and more appropriately, discharged to home sooner, and decreases hospital admissions. RT are leaders in the emerging field of asthma disease management.

  3. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation.

  4. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  5. [Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Dumont, Frédéric; Yzet, Thierry; Chatelain, Denis; Bartoli, Eacute Ric; Brazier, Franck; Bréhant, Olivier; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Mauvais, François; Delcenserie, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Surgical indications for chronic pancreatitis can be schematically separated into five main groups: pain, effects of fibrosis on adjacent organs, the consequences of main pancreatic duct rupture above an obstruction, and suspected cancer. Finally surgery is also indicated in patients who cannot undergo endoscopic procedures (no accessible papilla) or who have too recently undergone this procedure. Surgical procedures include derivation (pancreatic, cystic, biliary) or mixed procedures combining derivation/resection or pancreatic resection. Finally splanchnicectomy can be discussed. Whatever the indication, surgical treatment must meet several goals: the approach to surgery must be multidisciplinary, surgery must be associated with low morbidity and mortality, preserve as much endocrine function as possible, improve quality of life, and be evaluated in the long term, as well as prospectively if possible. We clarify some important points about the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis before discussing the various treatments in detail.

  6. Management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with combination inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists: a review of comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Mapel, Douglas W; Roberts, Melissa H

    2014-05-01

    The value of combination therapy with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists (ICS/LABA) is well recognized in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite differences in the pharmacological properties between two well-established ICS/LABA products (budesonide/formoterol and fluticasone/salmeterol), data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses suggest that these two products perform similarly under RCT conditions. In contrast, a few recently reported real-world comparative effectiveness studies have suggested that there are substantial differences between ICS/LABA combination treatments in terms of clinical and healthcare outcomes in patients with asthma or COPD. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief review of the benefits, as well as the limitations, of comparative effectiveness research (CER) in the therapeutic area of asthma and COPD. We conducted a structured literature review of the current CER studies on ICS/LABA combinations in asthma and COPD. These articles were then used to illustrate the unique challenges of CER studies, providing a summary of study results and limitations. We focus particularly on difficult biases and confounding factors that may be introduced before, during, and after the initiation of therapy. Beyond being a review of these two ICS/LABA combination treatments, this article is intended to help those who wish to assess the quality of CER published projects in asthma and COPD, or guide investigators who wish to design new CER studies for chronic respiratory disease treatments.

  7. Student-facilitated health promotion intervention for chronic disease self-management in at-risk elders reflections from the field.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Connie J; Cannon, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A student-facilitated and faculty-supervised health promotion program for chronic disease management in at-risk elders was developed based on the belief that individual contact with high-risk elders will facilitate improved health behaviors while enhancing the real-life experiences of students through interdisciplinary collaboration and community-based learning. Subjects were seven students enrolled as health professions academic majors at the university who served as student health advocates in the Healthy Elder Living Program (HELP). The data collected included student reflection questionnaires, field notes from the HELP staff, and communication logs between the HELP coordinator and students. As student health advocates, the students made visits to at-risk elders to reinforce recommendations from health care providers, to review adherence to the Health Promotion Inventory (HPI), and to interact socially with the client through discussion of health- and non-health-related issues. A training model for health promotion was developed based on identification of four common themes of student performance as health advocates. Overall, students demonstrated a greater appreciation for the complexity of social, psychological, and physical aspects of chronic disease as a result of participation in this program for at-risk elders. They were able to apply professional skills learned in the classroom while providing a needed service to elders. At-risk clients also benefited from the HELP intervention, showing improved physical performance and less depression.

  8. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…