Science.gov

Sample records for management evolution special

  1. A purview of waste management evolution: special emphasis on USA.

    PubMed

    Kollikkathara, Naushad; Feng, Huan; Stern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    The generation of waste in urban regions over time is seen to impact the balance of anthropogenic and natural resources. Various national and international initiatives to manage urban solid waste are in place and has thus have evolved at present to form an assortment of different subcomponents involving environmental, administrative, regulatory, scientific, market, technology, and socio-economic factors, which has increasing bearing on the US due to its volume and nature of discards. This paper draws together the various aspects of municipal solid waste (MSW) management as it evolved, particularly in the American society through reviewing works and findings. In many parts of the country, waste management at present, primarily involves landfilling, incineration with and without energy recovery, recycling and composting. Legislation, nature of wastes and market trends continue to redefine management operations and its responsibilities and impacts. Complexities are added to it by the nature of urban development as well. New studies and concepts like 3Rs, cradle-to-cradle, industrial ecology, and integrated waste management are adding new dimensions for solving waste problems towards achieving sustainable resource use. Local initiatives, both public and private are in the forefront of adopting alternate waste management procedures. The assistance from various government and private bodies, supporting shifts in waste management approaches, have immense value, as according to the new paradigms, nothing goes to waste. PMID:18796347

  2. A purview of waste management evolution: Special emphasis on USA

    SciTech Connect

    Kollikkathara, Naushad Feng, Huan; Stern, Eric

    2009-02-15

    The generation of waste in urban regions over time is seen to impact the balance of anthropogenic and natural resources. Various national and international initiatives to manage urban solid waste are in place and has thus have evolved at present to form an assortment of different subcomponents involving environmental, administrative, regulatory, scientific, market, technology, and socio-economic factors, which has increasing bearing on the US due to its volume and nature of discards. This paper draws together the various aspects of municipal solid waste (MSW) management as it evolved, particularly in the American society through reviewing works and findings. In many parts of the country, waste management at present, primarily involves landfilling, incineration with and without energy recovery, recycling and composting. Legislation, nature of wastes and market trends continue to redefine management operations and its responsibilities and impacts. Complexities are added to it by the nature of urban development as well. New studies and concepts like 3Rs, cradle-to-cradle, industrial ecology, and integrated waste management are adding new dimensions for solving waste problems towards achieving sustainable resource use. Local initiatives, both public and private are in the forefront of adopting alternate waste management procedures. The assistance from various government and private bodies, supporting shifts in waste management approaches, have immense value, as according to the new paradigms, nothing goes to waste.

  3. A purview of waste management evolution: special emphasis on USA.

    PubMed

    Kollikkathara, Naushad; Feng, Huan; Stern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    The generation of waste in urban regions over time is seen to impact the balance of anthropogenic and natural resources. Various national and international initiatives to manage urban solid waste are in place and has thus have evolved at present to form an assortment of different subcomponents involving environmental, administrative, regulatory, scientific, market, technology, and socio-economic factors, which has increasing bearing on the US due to its volume and nature of discards. This paper draws together the various aspects of municipal solid waste (MSW) management as it evolved, particularly in the American society through reviewing works and findings. In many parts of the country, waste management at present, primarily involves landfilling, incineration with and without energy recovery, recycling and composting. Legislation, nature of wastes and market trends continue to redefine management operations and its responsibilities and impacts. Complexities are added to it by the nature of urban development as well. New studies and concepts like 3Rs, cradle-to-cradle, industrial ecology, and integrated waste management are adding new dimensions for solving waste problems towards achieving sustainable resource use. Local initiatives, both public and private are in the forefront of adopting alternate waste management procedures. The assistance from various government and private bodies, supporting shifts in waste management approaches, have immense value, as according to the new paradigms, nothing goes to waste.

  4. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  5. Cutback Management for Special Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of a management technique that combats the impact of organizational retrenchment and its practical applications within special libraries and as an aid to survival of the parent organization. Five major classes of strategies are outlined--resource development, productivity, economy measures, interorganizational…

  6. [Metalworking industry management evolution].

    PubMed

    Mattucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the evolution drivers of the management systems in the metalworking industry, mainly characterized as "automotive", starting with the "mass production" model, followed for the development of Italian industry in the '50. Through the socio-economic changes of the '90/10, the metalworking plants were deeply restructured with the introduction of computers in the production systems, and then with the first global benchmarks such as the "lean production", towards the needed operational flexibility to respond to the market dynamics. Plants change radically, company networks become real, ICT services are fundamental elements for the integration. These trends help visualizing a new "Factory of the Future" for the years 2020/30, where the competition will be based on the socio-economical, technological and environmental factors included in the "Competitive Sustainable Manufacturing" paradigm. PMID:22073665

  7. The initiation and evolution of SPECIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Michael J.; Füllekrug, Martin

    2004-09-01

    This paper outlines the way in which the ESF Scientific Network ``Space Processes and Electrical Changes Influencing Atmospheric Layers'' (SPECIAL) came into being, and how the ideas involved have evolved via discussions in the network. Both the organisational structure and some scientific themes are covered to assist readers of this SPECIAL special issue of the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. Previously at Institut für Geophysik, Feldberstraße 47, 60323 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

  8. A Scientific Approach to Teaching about Evolution and Special Creation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson that addresses the scientific aspects of the evolution versus special creation controversy by having students gather evidence from the fossil record and analyze that evidence using critical-thinking skills. Contains 13 references. (WRM)

  9. Managing Special and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Steve G.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a guide to special and inclusive education and provides a comprehensive overview of this complex field. Author Stephen Rayner examines context, policy, and practice, and shows how to successfully navigate the managerial challenges involved, while contributing to the way forward through leadership in a diverse field. The author…

  10. Special Population Planner for Emergency Management

    2003-04-17

    The SPP is a tool for use by emergency management agencies in creating plans for possible events requiring their attention. It incorporates extensive data including those on special needs populations so that this segment of the population will be considered in general plans.

  11. [Special surfaces for the management of pressure].

    PubMed

    Palma, Manuel Rodríguez; Casanova, Pablo López

    2007-09-01

    Summary Bedsores (UPPs) should be viewed as a multifaceted problem, but the direct relationship which exists between these lesions and the pressure which is exercised between the surface one rests on and a zone having a prominent bone bears significant weight. Therefore, the following are some basic measures which can prevent bedsores: mobility posture changes, local protection and the use of special surfaces for the management of pressure.

  12. Managing thyroid dysfunction in selected special situations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Managing thyroid dysfunction is simple at first glance, the idea is to bring hormone levels in the euthyroid range, treat with antithyroid drugs, radio-iodine or surgery if toxic and replace with thyroxine or T3 if hypothyroid. Complexities arise when there are coexisting conditions that affect the thyroid or are affected by thyroid dysfunction and this review will deal with the special situations that need care when correcting thyroid hormone levels. PMID:23379325

  13. Special event planning for the emergency manager.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Peter T

    2009-11-01

    In the domain of emergency management and homeland security there is a lack of a formal planning process at the local level when it comes to special event planning. The unique nature of special event planning demands an understanding of the planning process for both traditional and non-traditional planning partners. This understanding will make certain that local governments apply due diligence when planning for the safety of the public. This paper offers a practical roadmap for planning at the local level. It will address those 'special events' that are beyond routine local events but not of a sufficient scale to be granted National Special Security Event status. Due to the infrequency of 'special events' in most communities, it is imperative that deliberate planning takes place. Upon conclusion, the reader will be able to construct a planning process tailored to the needs of their community, guide both traditional and non-traditional planning partners through the planning process, determine priorities, explore alternatives, plan for contingencies, conduct a confirmation brief, facilitate operations and assemble an after-action report and improvement plan. PMID:20378490

  14. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J

    2014-11-22

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change.

  15. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change. PMID:25274369

  16. Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Maria Fernanda; Wiens, John J

    2014-11-22

    The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change. PMID:25274369

  17. Platform Management System (PMS) evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, Mike; Hartley, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    In fiscal year 1988 a study was begun to define the platform management system (PMS) functions required for the mature platform operations era. The objectives of the task include: (1) defining how to increase the operational productivity of the platform by providing enhanced capability for responding to changing events, (2) influencing the initial PMS design by identifying required 'hooks and scars', and (3) evaluation potential automation techniques that are appropriate given predicted onboard computing resources. Initial platform operations scenarios were defined. The focus was on PMS-related functions where operations enhancements are likely to occur. Operations productivity was defined in terms of scientific productivity of the platform as well as the level of automation of the ground system. The Platform Operations Productivity Enhancement Report was completed earlier this year documenting system enhancements to increase science productivity and ground system automation. Using the baseline PMS defined in the PMS Definition Document as a starting point, the resulting PMS-specific enhancements were molded into a sequence of progressively more sophisticated operations management capabilities. This sequence of upgrades to the PMS has been documented in a PMS Evolution Plan. The plan includes enhancements in the areas of resources scheduling, resource modeling, system and payload anomaly management, and transaction sequence interpretation. A plan for migration of functions from the ground portion of the PMS to the flight portion is also included. The impacts of this plan on the platform are now being documented to ensure that the required 'hooks and scars' are included in the baseline system. Future plans include a prototype of some of the PMS enhancements to address the feasibility of and techniques for implementing these enhancements in the onboard computing environment.

  18. Quality assurance management plan special analytical support

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.L.

    1997-01-30

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), WDOE or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  19. Caste evolution and ecology: a special worker for novel prey.

    PubMed

    Powell, Scott; Franks, Nigel R

    2005-10-22

    Individual specialization underpins the division of labour within ant societies, but only in a small minority do morphological specialists, or physical castes, exist in the workforce. The genetic conditions that allow such castes to evolve are well understood, but the ecological pressures that select for them are not. We provide compelling evidence that the task of transporting novel prey selected for an exaggerated transport caste, or 'submajor', in the army ant Eciton burchellii. This species is the only Eciton that preys upon large arthropods as well as ants, the ancestral prey type, and by comparing load-transport among Eciton species and within E. burchellii, we show that this mixed diet significantly constrains transport efficiency. Crucially, however, we also show that E. burchellii submajors are highly specialized on transporting non-ant prey, and we demonstrate experientially that it is specifically this prey type that constrains prey-transport efficiency. Our study also suggests that phylogenetic constraints associated with the Eciton lifestyle intensified selection for the exaggerated submajor of E. burchellii. Thus, we propose that a novel task may only select for a special caste when phylogenetic constraints preclude the evolution of alternative solutions. This identifies a new and potentially general scenario for the evolution of physical castes.

  20. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  1. Evolution of Self-Organized Task Specialization in Robot Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Eliseo; Turgut, Ali Emre; Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar; Dorigo, Marco; Wenseleers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Division of labor is ubiquitous in biological systems, as evidenced by various forms of complex task specialization observed in both animal societies and multicellular organisms. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which division of labor first evolved remains enigmatic, as it requires the simultaneous co-occurrence of several complex traits to achieve the required degree of coordination. Recently, evolutionary swarm robotics has emerged as an excellent test bed to study the evolution of coordinated group-level behavior. Here we use this framework for the first time to study the evolutionary origin of behavioral task specialization among groups of identical robots. The scenario we study involves an advanced form of division of labor, common in insect societies and known as “task partitioning”, whereby two sets of tasks have to be carried out in sequence by different individuals. Our results show that task partitioning is favored whenever the environment has features that, when exploited, reduce switching costs and increase the net efficiency of the group, and that an optimal mix of task specialists is achieved most readily when the behavioral repertoires aimed at carrying out the different subtasks are available as pre-adapted building blocks. Nevertheless, we also show for the first time that self-organized task specialization could be evolved entirely from scratch, starting only from basic, low-level behavioral primitives, using a nature-inspired evolutionary method known as Grammatical Evolution. Remarkably, division of labor was achieved merely by selecting on overall group performance, and without providing any prior information on how the global object retrieval task was best divided into smaller subtasks. We discuss the potential of our method for engineering adaptively behaving robot swarms and interpret our results in relation to the likely path that nature took to evolve complex sociality and task specialization. PMID:26247819

  2. Evolution of Self-Organized Task Specialization in Robot Swarms.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Eliseo; Turgut, Ali Emre; Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar; Dorigo, Marco; Wenseleers, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Division of labor is ubiquitous in biological systems, as evidenced by various forms of complex task specialization observed in both animal societies and multicellular organisms. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which division of labor first evolved remains enigmatic, as it requires the simultaneous co-occurrence of several complex traits to achieve the required degree of coordination. Recently, evolutionary swarm robotics has emerged as an excellent test bed to study the evolution of coordinated group-level behavior. Here we use this framework for the first time to study the evolutionary origin of behavioral task specialization among groups of identical robots. The scenario we study involves an advanced form of division of labor, common in insect societies and known as "task partitioning", whereby two sets of tasks have to be carried out in sequence by different individuals. Our results show that task partitioning is favored whenever the environment has features that, when exploited, reduce switching costs and increase the net efficiency of the group, and that an optimal mix of task specialists is achieved most readily when the behavioral repertoires aimed at carrying out the different subtasks are available as pre-adapted building blocks. Nevertheless, we also show for the first time that self-organized task specialization could be evolved entirely from scratch, starting only from basic, low-level behavioral primitives, using a nature-inspired evolutionary method known as Grammatical Evolution. Remarkably, division of labor was achieved merely by selecting on overall group performance, and without providing any prior information on how the global object retrieval task was best divided into smaller subtasks. We discuss the potential of our method for engineering adaptively behaving robot swarms and interpret our results in relation to the likely path that nature took to evolve complex sociality and task specialization.

  3. Evolution of Self-Organized Task Specialization in Robot Swarms.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Eliseo; Turgut, Ali Emre; Duéñez-Guzmán, Edgar; Dorigo, Marco; Wenseleers, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Division of labor is ubiquitous in biological systems, as evidenced by various forms of complex task specialization observed in both animal societies and multicellular organisms. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which division of labor first evolved remains enigmatic, as it requires the simultaneous co-occurrence of several complex traits to achieve the required degree of coordination. Recently, evolutionary swarm robotics has emerged as an excellent test bed to study the evolution of coordinated group-level behavior. Here we use this framework for the first time to study the evolutionary origin of behavioral task specialization among groups of identical robots. The scenario we study involves an advanced form of division of labor, common in insect societies and known as "task partitioning", whereby two sets of tasks have to be carried out in sequence by different individuals. Our results show that task partitioning is favored whenever the environment has features that, when exploited, reduce switching costs and increase the net efficiency of the group, and that an optimal mix of task specialists is achieved most readily when the behavioral repertoires aimed at carrying out the different subtasks are available as pre-adapted building blocks. Nevertheless, we also show for the first time that self-organized task specialization could be evolved entirely from scratch, starting only from basic, low-level behavioral primitives, using a nature-inspired evolutionary method known as Grammatical Evolution. Remarkably, division of labor was achieved merely by selecting on overall group performance, and without providing any prior information on how the global object retrieval task was best divided into smaller subtasks. We discuss the potential of our method for engineering adaptively behaving robot swarms and interpret our results in relation to the likely path that nature took to evolve complex sociality and task specialization. PMID:26247819

  4. The evolution of information management

    SciTech Connect

    Moak, E.; Reding, T.

    1993-12-01

    Historical problems faced by records managers and data managers are described. Differences between the two roles are delineated. Future impacts of new technology on the two groups are discussed. Coordination efforts that could be made are outlined.

  5. Evolution of Elections Management in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, A. S.; Mdegella, O. M.; Lubawa, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a discussion on the evolution of elections management in Tanzania with a focus on technological advancement in administering registration of voters. The paper provides the merits that permanent voters register has brought over the thumb practice. It traces the management of elections during colonialism, after independence…

  6. Experimental evolution of the grain of metabolic specialization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Samani, Pedram; Bell, Graham

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation to any given environment may be accompanied by a cost in terms of reduced growth in the ancestral or some alternative environment. Ecologists explain the cost of adaptation through the concept of a trade-off, by which gaining a new trait involves losing another trait. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain the evolution of trade-offs in ecological systems, mutational degradation, and functional interference. Mutational degradation occurs when a gene coding a specific trait is not under selection in the resident environment; therefore, it may be degraded through the accumulation of mutations that are neutral in the resident environment but deleterious in an alternative environment. Functional interference evolves if the gene or a set of genes have antagonistic effects in two or more ecologically different traits. Both mechanisms pertain to a situation where the selection and the alternative environments are ecologically different. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an experiment in which 12 experimental populations of wild yeast were each grown in a minimal medium supplemented with a single substrate. We chose 12 different carbon substrates that were metabolized through similar and different pathways in order to represent a wide range of ecological conditions. We found no evidence for trade-offs between substrates on the same pathway. The indirect response of substrates on other pathways, however, was consistently negative, with little correlation between the direct and indirect responses. We conclude that the grain of specialization in this case is the metabolic pathway and that specialization appears to evolve through mutational degradation. PMID:27516854

  7. Managing Decisions on Changes in the Virtual Enterprise Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen-Silva, Marcus Vinicius; Rabelo, Ricardo José

    VE evolution deals with problems that happen during the VE operation and that put on risk planned results. This requires the application of problem-solving mechanisms to guarantee the construction of a new but feasible VE plan. Grounded on Project Management and Decision Support Systems foundations, this paper proposes a distributed collaborative decision support system to manage the VE evolution. Its main rationale is that VE’s members are autonomous and hence that all the affected partners should discuss about the necessary changes on the current VE’s plan. In the proposed approach, this discussion is guided by a decision protocol, and the impact of decisions can be evaluated. Results of a first prototype implementation are presented and discussed, with a special focus on the part which regulates the argumentation, voting and comparison of possible solutions.

  8. 50 CFR 648.85 - Special management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special management programs. 648.85 Section 648.85 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and...

  9. 50 CFR 648.85 - Special management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special management programs. 648.85 Section 648.85 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and...

  10. 50 CFR 648.85 - Special management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special management programs. 648.85 Section 648.85 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and...

  11. 50 CFR 648.85 - Special management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special management programs. 648.85 Section 648.85 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and...

  12. 50 CFR 648.85 - Special management programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special management programs. 648.85 Section 648.85 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and...

  13. Data Management System (DMS) Evolution Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Katherine

    1990-01-01

    The all encompassing goal for the Data Management System (DMS) Evolution Analysis task is to develop an advocacy for ensuring that growth and technology insertion issues are properly and adequately addressed during DMS requirements specification, design, and development. The most efficient methods of addressing those issues are via planned and graceful evolution, technology transparency, and system growth margins. It is necessary that provisions, such as those previously mentioned, are made to accommodate advanced missions requirements (e.g., Human Space Exploration Programs) in addition to evolving Space Station Freedom operations and user requirements .

  14. Teacher Manageability: Do Special and Regular Educators Agree?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Stephen P.

    1986-01-01

    Comparison of special educators' (N=65) and elementary and secondary school teachers' (N=44) ratings of behavior problems (in terms of manageability) revealed no significant differences between the groups. Both groups rated social withdrawal, inattention, and work organization behavioral clusters as most difficult to manage. (Author/CB)

  15. Behavior Management of Special Needs Learners: Positive Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper addresses behavior management strategies for developing new behaviors in special needs learners, strategies for changing existing behaviors, and strategies for developing behavioral generalization. An introductory overview identifies five basic principles of behavior management. Fourteen behavioral terms are then defined (e.g.,…

  16. 50 CFR 648.148 - Special management zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the MAFMC, NMFS Northeast Region, and NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center will evaluate the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special management zones. 648.148 Section 648.148 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND...

  17. [ROLE AND EVOLUTION OF A SPECIALIZED SCIENCE LIBRARY].

    PubMed

    PREOBRAJENSKYJ DE

    1964-01-01

    This paper deals with the present position of a specialized scientific library, the increase in the number of such libraries, and their development in conjunction with that of the institutes and laboratories to which they belong. It describes the danger for these libraries of too great expansion and the need to restrict themselves to a well-defined area. The different categories of specialized scientific libraries are reviewed, as well as the role of each of these categories vis-à-vis overburdened university libraries. There is an account of the assistance given [by specialized scientific libraries] to university libraries now and in the near future.

  18. Detecting and managing fisheries-induced evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Merilä, Juha

    2007-12-01

    Exploitation of fish populations can induce evolutionary responses in life histories. For example, fisheries targeting large individuals are expected to select for early maturation at smaller sizes, leading to reduced fecundity and thus also reduced fisheries yield. These predicted phenotypic shifts have been observed in several fish stocks, but disentangling the environmental and genetic causes behind them has proved difficult. Here, we review recent studies investigating phenotypic shifts in exploited populations and strategies for minimizing fisheries-induced evolution. Responses to selective harvesting will depend on species-specific life-history traits, and on community-level and environmental processes. Therefore, the detection of fisheries-induced evolution and successful fish stock management requires routine population monitoring, and a good understanding of genetics, relevant ecological processes and changing environmental conditions.

  19. Special considerations for managing food allergies.

    PubMed

    Hays, Tiffani

    2012-01-01

    When caring for patients with severe, multiple food allergies, special considerations are necessary for achieving the best quality of care. The most important consideration is to confirm all food allergies so that the patient does not unnecessarily restrict foods. Retest or challenge any foods with a questionable diagnosis. Second, because strict allergen avoidance remains the appropriate treatment for food allergy, provide the patient and family with adequate education about allergen avoidance and include plans for reintroduction of foods during follow-up care. Following a strict allergen avoidance diet often places the patient at nutrition risk. Another consideration includes conducting a complete nutrition assessment and monitoring for nutrient deficiencies on an ongoing basis. Food substitutions and hypoallergenic formulas and supplements are often required to meet the patient's needs. Last, consider evaluating medication ingredients as causes of persistent symptoms in extremely sensitive food allergic patients. Including the above considerations will result in food allergic patients enjoying the safest variety of foods and reaching their full growth potential.

  20. Itch in Special Skin Locations Management.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Itch management can be particularly complicated in some small areas like the scalp or the anogenital region for many reasons: the frequently poor diagnosis of the causes of itch in these areas, the dense innervation of these areas, and the symbolic value of these areas for the human psyche. The diagnosis of itchy scalp is easier than that of anogenital pruritus. Clinical examination and a careful inventory of all diseases of the patient and of the local environment are necessary. Localized treatments are frequently used at both sites, whereas specific pharmaceutical formulations are necessary for the pilose or the mucous environment. Nonetheless, systemic treatments or psychological interventions can be very useful. PMID:27578079

  1. Itch in Special Skin Locations Management.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Itch management can be particularly complicated in some small areas like the scalp or the anogenital region for many reasons: the frequently poor diagnosis of the causes of itch in these areas, the dense innervation of these areas, and the symbolic value of these areas for the human psyche. The diagnosis of itchy scalp is easier than that of anogenital pruritus. Clinical examination and a careful inventory of all diseases of the patient and of the local environment are necessary. Localized treatments are frequently used at both sites, whereas specific pharmaceutical formulations are necessary for the pilose or the mucous environment. Nonetheless, systemic treatments or psychological interventions can be very useful.

  2. Trophic specialization influences the rate of environmental niche evolution in damselfishes (Pomacentridae).

    PubMed

    Litsios, Glenn; Pellissier, Loïc; Forest, Félix; Lexer, Christian; Pearman, Peter B; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Salamin, Nicolas

    2012-09-22

    The rate of environmental niche evolution describes the capability of species to explore the available environmental space and is known to vary among species owing to lineage-specific factors. Trophic specialization is a main force driving species evolution and is responsible for classical examples of adaptive radiations in fishes. We investigate the effect of trophic specialization on the rate of environmental niche evolution in the damselfish, Pomacentridae, which is an important family of tropical reef fishes. First, phylogenetic niche conservatism is not detected in the family using a standard test of phylogenetic signal, and we demonstrate that the environmental niches of damselfishes that differ in trophic specialization are not equivalent while they still overlap at their mean values. Second, we estimate the relative rates of niche evolution on the phylogenetic tree and show the heterogeneity among rates of environmental niche evolution of the three trophic groups. We suggest that behavioural characteristics related to trophic specialization can constrain the evolution of the environmental niche and lead to conserved niches in specialist lineages. Our results show the extent of influence of several traits on the evolution of the environmental niche and shed new light on the evolution of damselfishes, which is a key lineage in current efforts to conserve biodiversity in coral reefs.

  3. A hierarchical model of the evolution of human brain specializations

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, H. Clark

    2012-01-01

    The study of information-processing adaptations in the brain is controversial, in part because of disputes about the form such adaptations might take. Many psychologists assume that adaptations come in two kinds, specialized and general-purpose. Specialized mechanisms are typically thought of as innate, domain-specific, and isolated from other brain systems, whereas generalized mechanisms are developmentally plastic, domain-general, and interactive. However, if brain mechanisms evolve through processes of descent with modification, they are likely to be heterogeneous, rather than coming in just two kinds. They are likely to be hierarchically organized, with some design features widely shared across brain systems and others specific to particular processes. Also, they are likely to be largely developmentally plastic and interactive with other brain systems, rather than canalized and isolated. This article presents a hierarchical model of brain specialization, reviewing evidence for the model from evolutionary developmental biology, genetics, brain mapping, and comparative studies. Implications for the search for uniquely human traits are discussed, along with ways in which conventional views of modularity in psychology may need to be revised. PMID:22723350

  4. Implementing Special Education. School Management Handbook Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Elementary School Principals, Arlington, VA.

    This part of the School Management Handbook provides elementary school administrators with an overview of some of the special education regulations mandated in Public Law 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. Section 1 of the document defines screening and evaluation procedures for identifying handicapping conditions of children…

  5. Routine management and special problems of diabetic children.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M J

    1983-12-01

    Guidelines for the prescription, initiation, and adjustment of insulin plans in diabetic children are outlined, with an emphasis on patient education and active participation in the treatment regimen. The management of special situations--sick days, surgery, noncompliance, and travel--is also discussed. PMID:6371862

  6. Management of Hematologic Malignancies: Special Considerations in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Amit, Odelia; Barzilai, Merav; Avivi, Irit

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of hematologic malignancy during pregnancy is a significant challenge. This is due to both medical and ethical considerations regarding when and how to treat this special sub-group of patients. Recurring uncertainties remain around appropriate imaging techniques, timing and dosage of chemotherapy, and timing of delivery. In this article we examine and summarize current literature in this field to assist physicians in their understanding and management of this patient group. Special attention has been given to diagnostic and staging procedures, risks associated with chemotherapy at different stages of gestation, and chemotherapy-dose adaption during pregnancy. In addition, recommended guidelines for management of lymphoma, leukemia, and planning delivery are discussed. A multidisciplinary team approach is critical for patient care, as is shared decision making with the patient and family.

  7. Adaptive specializations, social exchange, and the evolution of human intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Cosmides, Leda; Barrett, H. Clark; Tooby, John

    2010-01-01

    Blank-slate theories of human intelligence propose that reasoning is carried out by general-purpose operations applied uniformly across contents. An evolutionary approach implies a radically different model of human intelligence. The task demands of different adaptive problems select for functionally specialized problem-solving strategies, unleashing massive increases in problem-solving power for ancestrally recurrent adaptive problems. Because exchange can evolve only if cooperators can detect cheaters, we hypothesized that the human mind would be equipped with a neurocognitive system specialized for reasoning about social exchange. Whereas humans perform poorly when asked to detect violations of most conditional rules, we predicted and found a dramatic spike in performance when the rule specifies an exchange and violations correspond to cheating. According to critics, people's uncanny accuracy at detecting violations of social exchange rules does not reflect a cheater detection mechanism, but extends instead to all rules regulating when actions are permitted (deontic conditionals). Here we report experimental tests that falsify these theories by demonstrating that deontic rules as a class do not elicit the search for violations. We show that the cheater detection system functions with pinpoint accuracy, searching for violations of social exchange rules only when these are likely to reveal the presence of someone who intends to cheat. It does not search for violations of social exchange rules when these are accidental, when they do not benefit the violator, or when the situation would make cheating difficult. PMID:20445099

  8. Growth form evolution and shifting habitat specialization in annual plants.

    PubMed

    Bonser, S P; Geber, M A

    2005-07-01

    Optimal plant growth form should vary across environments. We examined the potential for mutations causing large changes in growth form to produce new optimal phenotypes across light environments. We predicted that the upright growth form would be favoured in a light limiting environment as leaves were in a position to maximize light interception, while a rosette (leaves in a basal position) growth form would be favoured in a high light environment. Growth form genotypes of Brassica rapa (upright wild-type and rosette mutants) and Arabidopsis thaliana (large rosette wild-type and increasingly upright growth form mutants) were grown in a greenhouse in control (ambient) and filtered (low) light treatments. Compared to upright genotypes, rosette genotypes had relatively high fitness in control light but had a relatively large fitness reduction in filtered light. Our results demonstrate the potential importance of rapid growth form evolution in plant adaptation to new or changing environments.

  9. Evolution of host specialization in gut microbes: the bee gut as a model

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Waldan K; Moran, Nancy A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts of eukaryotes often give up generalist lifestyles to specialize to particular hosts. The eusocial honey bees and bumble bees harbor two such specialized gut symbionts, Snodgrassella alvi and Gilliamella apicola. Not only are these microorganisms specific to bees, but different strains of these bacteria tend to assort according to host species. By using in-vivo microbial transplant experiments, we show that the observed specificity is, at least in part, due to evolved physiological barriers that limit compatibility between a host and a potential gut colonizer. How and why such specialization occurs is largely unstudied for gut microbes, despite strong evidence that it is a general feature in many gut communities. Here, we discuss the potential factors that favor the evolution of host specialization, and the parallels that can be drawn with parasites and other symbiont systems. We also address the potential of the bee gut as a model for exploring gut community evolution. PMID:26011669

  10. Special Session 2: Cosmic Evolution of Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    During the past decade observations across the electromagnetic spectrum have led to broad progress in the understanding of galaxy clusters and their far more abundant smaller siblings, groups. From the X-rays, where Chandra and XMM have illuminated old phenomena such as cooling cores and discovered new ones such as shocks, cold fronts, bubbles and cavities, through rich collections of optical data (including vast and growing arrays of redshifts), to the imaging of AGN outbursts of various ages through radio observations, our access to cluster and group measurements has leaped forward, while parallel advances in theory and modeling have kept pace. This Special Session offered a survey of progress to this point, an assessment of outstanding problems, and a multiwavelength overview of the uses of the next generation of observatories. Holding the symposium in conjuction with the XXVIIIth General Assembly provided the significant advantage of involving not only a specialist audience, but also interacting with a broad cross-section of the world astronomical community.

  11. Polygenic evolution of a sugar specialization tradeoff in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roop, Jeremy I.; Chang, Kyu Chul; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of novel traits can involve many mutations scattered throughout the genome1,2. Detecting and validating such a suite of alleles, particularly if they arose long ago, remains a key challenge in evolutionary genetics1-3. Here we dissect an evolutionary tradeoff of unprecedented genetic complexity between long-diverged species. When cultured in 1% glucose medium supplemented with galactose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not S. bayanus or other Saccharomyces species, delayed commitment to galactose metabolism until glucose was exhausted. Promoters of seven galactose (GAL) metabolic genes from S. cerevisiae, when introduced together into S. bayanus, largely recapitulated the delay phenotype in 1% glucose-galactose medium, and most had partial effects when tested in isolation. Variation in GAL coding regions also contributed to the delay when tested individually in 1% glucose-galactose medium. When combined, S. cerevisiae GAL coding regions gave rise to profound growth defects in the S. bayanus background. In medium containing 2.5% glucose supplemented with galactose, wild-type S. cerevisiae repressed GAL gene expression and had a robust growth advantage relative to S. bayanus; transgenesis of S. cerevisiae GAL promoter alleles or GAL coding regions was sufficient for partial reconstruction of these phenotypes. S. cerevisiae GAL genes thus encode a regulatory program of slow induction and avid repression, and a fitness detriment during the glucose-galactose transition but a benefit when glucose is in excess. Together, these results make clear that genetic mapping of complex phenotypes is within reach, even in deeply diverged species. PMID:26863195

  12. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-05-20

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  13. Case management for special populations. Moving beyond categorical distinctions.

    PubMed

    Falik, M; Lipson, D; Lewis-Idema, D; Ulmer, C; Kaplan, K; Robinson, G; Hickey, E; Veiga, R

    1993-01-01

    Case management has evolved as a flexible, pragmatic, and compassionate strategy for improving client access and care continuity within fragmented systems of health and social services. The first-generation case management programs have been designed for various settings that serve different "target" populations with varying social, medical, and psychological needs. This proliferation of categorical case management programs is a mixed blessing. While a categorical focus reflects both historical and public financing priorities, it creates a potentially duplicative and inefficient system in an era of limited resources. As the federal government assumes a more substantial role in supporting case management, greater attention is being given to accountability--demonstrating value-added benefits and identifying best practices for structuring case management. The essential first step is reaching agreement on two critical dimensions of case management, major goals and essential services. This article, based on a review of the literature, examines the extent to which seemingly disparate programs for special populations share common attributes, and thus present opportunities for structuring client-focused rather than categorical case management programs. The authors seek to stimulate a dialogue that would lead to specification of common goals and essential services, and a cross-cutting framework for designing client-focused case management programs. PMID:8130742

  14. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Last, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks.

  15. Management of trauma in special populations after a disaster.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Daya J; van de Put, Willem A C M

    2006-01-01

    Special populations are particularly vulnerable to mental health problems in the aftermath of a disaster. Efficient delivery of mental health services, the integrated use of psychosocial services and mental health facilities, and the active intervention of trained community health care workers can offer effective management of the psychosocial problems of special populations. Women, children, adolescents, the poor, the elderly, and individuals with preexisting health problems have been identified as special populations who often suffer psychological morbidity as a result of a catastrophic disaster. Understanding the cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic factors in a postdisaster situation is crucial to helping special populations overcome debilitating mental illness and declining quality of life. Planning the delivery of mental health services is critical and includes hazard mapping to identify vulnerable geographic and social areas, screening instruments to identify at-risk populations, and education of community leaders and health care workers. An integrated approach using psychosocial and institutionalized interventions can provide better outcomes than either approach alone. A community-based approach with trained grassroots health care workers can provide effective psychosocial support and rehabilitation services.

  16. Special Education Management Information Systems: Nature, Scope, and Guidelines for System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Charles A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper focuses on the utilization of management information system technology for special education decision making. The nature of special education management information systems is discussed and general guidelines for designing management information systems for special education units offered. Standards for assessing the utility of an…

  17. Evolution of the special senses in primates: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Dominy, Nathaniel J; Ross, Callum F; Smith, Timothy D

    2004-11-01

    The present special issue of The Anatomical Record is the result of a symposium entitled Evolution of the Special Senses in Primates. Considered together, the special senses of primates are remarkable because they constitute a singular and definitive suite of mammalian characteristics. Examining their evolution is pivotal for understanding the origin and present-day variation of primate behavior and ecology. Accordingly, the 14 articles assembled here consider the different constraints and opportunities associated with the uptake and use of physical and chemical stimuli. The present issue brings together experts on different primate sensory modalities and stresses events at the sensory periphery, where the organism is exposed to and comes into contact with its environment. Key topics include color vision, the genetics of olfaction, the morphological basis and significance of chemical communication, and the neural organization and scaling of primate sensory systems. The result is a special issue that both reflects our current understanding of primate sensory modalities and challenges certain fundamental assumptions concerning their evolution.

  18. Evolution of autonomous selfing accompanies increased specialization in the pollination system of Schizanthus (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Fernanda; Arroyo, Mary T K; Armesto, Juan J

    2009-06-01

    The co-occurrence of elaborate flowers visited by specific groups of pollinators and capacity for autonomous selfing in the same plant species has puzzled evolutionary biologists since the time of Charles Darwin. To examine whether autonomous selfing and floral specialization evolved in association, we quantified the autofertility level (AFI) in nine Schizanthus species characterized by a wide range of pollination specialization, revealing AFI values of 0.02 to complete selfing. An independent contrasts analysis conducted on AFIs and number of functional pollinator groups showed that autonomous selfing evolved from an ancestral outcrossing system as plants became increasingly specialized (r = -0.82). To assess whether autonomous selfing together with specialization acts as a reproductive assurance mechanism, we estimated spatial and interannual variation in fruit set due to pollinator failure in two closely related high Andean Schizanthus species differing in their specialization levels. Variation in pollinator failure rate was more pronounced and autonomous selfing increased fruit production over biotically assisted pollination in the more specialized species. Our study suggests that specialized pollination deems species more vulnerable to pollinator fluctuation thus promoting the evolution of delayed autonomous selfing.

  19. Evolution of autonomous selfing accompanies increased specialization in the pollination system of Schizanthus (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Fernanda; Arroyo, Mary T K; Armesto, Juan J

    2009-06-01

    The co-occurrence of elaborate flowers visited by specific groups of pollinators and capacity for autonomous selfing in the same plant species has puzzled evolutionary biologists since the time of Charles Darwin. To examine whether autonomous selfing and floral specialization evolved in association, we quantified the autofertility level (AFI) in nine Schizanthus species characterized by a wide range of pollination specialization, revealing AFI values of 0.02 to complete selfing. An independent contrasts analysis conducted on AFIs and number of functional pollinator groups showed that autonomous selfing evolved from an ancestral outcrossing system as plants became increasingly specialized (r = -0.82). To assess whether autonomous selfing together with specialization acts as a reproductive assurance mechanism, we estimated spatial and interannual variation in fruit set due to pollinator failure in two closely related high Andean Schizanthus species differing in their specialization levels. Variation in pollinator failure rate was more pronounced and autonomous selfing increased fruit production over biotically assisted pollination in the more specialized species. Our study suggests that specialized pollination deems species more vulnerable to pollinator fluctuation thus promoting the evolution of delayed autonomous selfing. PMID:21628267

  20. Managing natural resources for sustainable development. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, S.; Irving, E.; Long, N.; Pinkelman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents an overview of A.I.D. efforts, which encompass a wide range of environmental issues and support environmental training, research, and institutional development. The report's opening section details A.I.D.'s efforts to enlist host-country support for environmental programs, with specific emphasis on improving natural resource management (especially in Africa), encouraging policy change, strengthening the private sector's environmental role, and preparing environmental profiles of host countries and helping them develop conservation strategies. The ensuing sections recount A.I.D. efforts in particular topics of environmental concern (biological diversity and environmental health and safety), critical ecological areas (coastal areas and forests and fragile lands), and specific country programs (reforestation in Haiti). A brief history of the evolution of the Agency's environmental strategy since 1976 is included.

  1. Evolution of specialization and ecological character displacement of herbivores along a gradient of plant quality.

    PubMed

    Egas, Martijn; Sabelis, Maurice W; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2005-03-01

    We study the combined evolutionary dynamics of herbivore specialization and ecological character displacement, taking into account foraging behavior of the herbivores, and a quality gradient of plant types. Herbivores can adapt by changing two adaptive traits: their level of specialization in feeding efficiency and their point of maximum feeding efficiency along the plant gradient. The number of herbivore phenotypes, their levels of specialization, and the amount of character displacement among them are the result of the evolutionary dynamics, which is driven by the underlying population dynamics, which in turn is driven by the underlying foraging behavior. Our analysis demonstrates broad conditions for the diversification of a herbivore population into many specialized phenotypes, for basically any foraging behavior focusing use on highest gains while also including errors. Our model predicts two characteristic phases in the adaptation of herbivore phenotypes: a fast character-displacement phase and a slow coevolutionary niche-shift phase. This two-phase pattern is expected to be of wide relevance in various consumer-resource systems. Bringing together ecological character displacement and the evolution of specialization in a single model, our study suggests that the foraging behavior of herbivorous arthropods is a key factor promoting specialist radiation. PMID:15856694

  2. Management evolution in the LSST project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Donald; Claver, Charles; Jacoby, Suzanne; Kantor, Jeffrey; Krabbendam, Victor; Kurita, Nadine

    2010-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project has evolved from just a few staff members in 2003 to about 100 in 2010; the affiliation of four founding institutions has grown to 32 universities, government laboratories, and industry. The public private collaboration aims to complete the estimated $450 M observatory in the 2017 timeframe. During the design phase of the project from 2003 to the present the management structure has been remarkably stable. At the same time, the funding levels, staffing levels and scientific community participation have grown dramatically. The LSSTC has introduced project controls and tools required to manage the LSST's complex funding model, technical structure and distributed work force. Project controls have been configured to comply with the requirements of federal funding agencies. Some of these tools for risk management, configuration control and resource-loaded schedule have been effective and others have not. Technical tasks associated with building the LSST are distributed into three subsystems: Telescope & Site, Camera, and Data Management. Each sub-system has its own experienced Project Manager and System Scientist. Delegation of authority is enabling and effective; it encourages a strong sense of ownership within the project. At the project level, subsystem management follows the principle that there is one Board of Directors, Director, and Project Manager who have overall authority.

  3. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  4. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies.

    PubMed

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  5. Molecular phylogenetics of the siphonophora (Cnidaria), with implications for the evolution of functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Casey W; Pugh, Philip R; Haddock, Steven H D

    2005-12-01

    Siphonophores are a group of pelagic colonial hydrozoans (Cnidaria) that have long been of general interest because of the division of labor between the polyps and medusae that make up these "superorganisms." These polyps and medusae are each homologous to free living animals but are generated by an incomplete asexual budding process that leaves them physiologically integrated. They are functionally specialized for different tasks and are precisely organized within each colony. The number of functional types of polyps and medusae varies across taxa, and different authors have used this character to construct phylogenies polarized in opposite directions, depending on whether they thought siphonophore evolution proceeded by a reduction or an increase in functional specialization. We have collected taxa across all major groups of siphonophores, many of which are found exclusively in the deep sea, using remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) and by SCUBA diving from ships in the open ocean. We have used 52 siphonophores and four outgroup taxa to estimate the siphonophore phylogeny with molecular data from the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S) and the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (16S). Parsimony reconstructions indicate that functionally specialized polyps and medusae have been gained and lost across the phylogeny. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of morphological data suggest that the transition rate for decreased functional specialization is greater than the transition rate for increased functional specialization for three out of the four investigated categories of polyps and medusae. The present analysis also bears on several long-standing questions about siphonophore systematics. It indicates that the cystonects are sister to all other siphonophores, a group that we call the Codonophora. We also find that the Calycophorae are nested within the Physonectae, and that the Brachystelia, a historically recognized grouping of

  6. Sockeye salmon evolution, ecology, and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    This collection of articles and photographs gives managers a good idea of recent research into what the sockeye salmon is and does, covering such topics as the vulnerability and value of sockeye salmon ecotypes, their homing ability, using new technologies to monitor reproduction, DNA and a founder event in the Lake Clark sockeye salmon, marine-derived nutrients, the exploitation of large prey, dynamic lake spawning migrations by females, variability of sockeye salmon residence, expression profiling using cDNA microarray technology, learning from stable isotropic records of native otolith hatcheries, the amount of data needed to manage sockeye salmon and estimating salmon "escapement." 

  7. Pre-adaptations and the evolution of pollination by sexual deception: Cope's rule of specialization revisited.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, Nicolas J; Wilson, Carol A; Hötling, Susann; Schulz, Stefan; Banketov, Sergey A; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Pollination by sexual deception is arguably one of the most unusual liaisons linking plants and insects, and perhaps the most illustrative example of extreme floral specialization in angiosperms. While considerable progress has been made in understanding the floral traits involved in sexual deception, less is known about how this remarkable mimicry system might have arisen, the role of pre-adaptations in promoting its evolution and its extent as a pollination mechanism outside the few groups of plants (primarily orchids) where it has been described to date. In the Euro-Mediterranean region, pollination by sexual deception is traditionally considered to be the hallmark of the orchid genus Ophrys. Here, we introduce two new cases outside of Ophrys, in plant groups dominated by generalized, shelter-mimicking species. On the basis of phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral pollination strategies, we provide evidence for independent and bidirectional evolutionary transitions between generalized (shelter mimicry) and specialized (sexual deception) pollination strategies in three groups of flowering plants, and suggest that pseudocopulation has evolved from pre-adaptations (floral colours, shapes and odour bouquets) that selectively attract male pollinators through shelter mimicry. These findings, along with comparative analyses of floral traits (colours and scents), shed light on particular phenotypic changes that might have fuelled the parallel evolution of these extraordinary pollination strategies. Collectively, our results provide the first substantive insights into how pollination sexual deception might have evolved in the Euro-Mediterranean region, and demonstrate that even the most extreme cases of pollinator specialization can reverse to more generalized interactions, breaking 'Cope's rule of specialization'.

  8. Evolution of Specialization of Cassida rubiginosa on Cirsium arvense (Compositae, Cardueae).

    PubMed

    Cripps, Michael G; Jackman, Sarah D; Roquet, Cristina; van Koten, Chikako; Rostás, Michael; Bourdôt, Graeme W; Susanna, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects are specialized feeders restricted to a plant family, genus, or species. The evolution of specialized insect-plant interactions is generally considered to be a result of trade-offs in fitness between possible hosts. Through the course of natural selection, host plants that maximize insect fitness should result in optimal, specialized, insect-plant associations. However, the extent to which insects are tracking plant phylogeny or key plant traits that act as herbivore resistance or acceptance characters is uncertain. Thus, with regard to the evolution of host plant specialization, we tested if insect performance is explained by phylogenetic relatedness of potential host plants, or key plant traits that are not phylogenetically related. We tested the survival (naive first instar to adult) of the oligophagous leaf-feeding beetle, Cassida rubiginosa, on 16 selected representatives of the Cardueae tribe (thistles and knapweeds), including some of the worst weeds in temperate grasslands of the world in terms of the economic impacts caused by lost productivity. Leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf pubescence, flavonoid concentration, carbon and nitrogen content) were measured as explanatory variables and tested in relation to survival of the beetle, and the phylogenetic signal of the traits were examined. The survival of C. rubiginosa decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the known primary host plant, C. arvense, suggesting that specialization is a conserved character, and that insect host range, to a large degree is constrained by evolutionary history. The only trait measured that clearly offered some explanatory value for the survival of C. rubiginosa was specific leaf area. This trait was not phylogenetically dependant, and when combined with phylogenetic distance from C. arvense gave the best model explaining C. rubiginosa survival. We conclude that the specialization of the beetle is explained by a combination of

  9. Evolution of Specialization of Cassida rubiginosa on Cirsium arvense (Compositae, Cardueae)

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Michael G.; Jackman, Sarah D.; Roquet, Cristina; van Koten, Chikako; Rostás, Michael; Bourdôt, Graeme W.; Susanna, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects are specialized feeders restricted to a plant family, genus, or species. The evolution of specialized insect–plant interactions is generally considered to be a result of trade-offs in fitness between possible hosts. Through the course of natural selection, host plants that maximize insect fitness should result in optimal, specialized, insect–plant associations. However, the extent to which insects are tracking plant phylogeny or key plant traits that act as herbivore resistance or acceptance characters is uncertain. Thus, with regard to the evolution of host plant specialization, we tested if insect performance is explained by phylogenetic relatedness of potential host plants, or key plant traits that are not phylogenetically related. We tested the survival (naive first instar to adult) of the oligophagous leaf-feeding beetle, Cassida rubiginosa, on 16 selected representatives of the Cardueae tribe (thistles and knapweeds), including some of the worst weeds in temperate grasslands of the world in terms of the economic impacts caused by lost productivity. Leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf pubescence, flavonoid concentration, carbon and nitrogen content) were measured as explanatory variables and tested in relation to survival of the beetle, and the phylogenetic signal of the traits were examined. The survival of C. rubiginosa decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the known primary host plant, C. arvense, suggesting that specialization is a conserved character, and that insect host range, to a large degree is constrained by evolutionary history. The only trait measured that clearly offered some explanatory value for the survival of C. rubiginosa was specific leaf area. This trait was not phylogenetically dependant, and when combined with phylogenetic distance from C. arvense gave the best model explaining C. rubiginosa survival. We conclude that the specialization of the beetle is explained by a combination

  10. Evolution of Specialization of Cassida rubiginosa on Cirsium arvense (Compositae, Cardueae).

    PubMed

    Cripps, Michael G; Jackman, Sarah D; Roquet, Cristina; van Koten, Chikako; Rostás, Michael; Bourdôt, Graeme W; Susanna, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects are specialized feeders restricted to a plant family, genus, or species. The evolution of specialized insect-plant interactions is generally considered to be a result of trade-offs in fitness between possible hosts. Through the course of natural selection, host plants that maximize insect fitness should result in optimal, specialized, insect-plant associations. However, the extent to which insects are tracking plant phylogeny or key plant traits that act as herbivore resistance or acceptance characters is uncertain. Thus, with regard to the evolution of host plant specialization, we tested if insect performance is explained by phylogenetic relatedness of potential host plants, or key plant traits that are not phylogenetically related. We tested the survival (naive first instar to adult) of the oligophagous leaf-feeding beetle, Cassida rubiginosa, on 16 selected representatives of the Cardueae tribe (thistles and knapweeds), including some of the worst weeds in temperate grasslands of the world in terms of the economic impacts caused by lost productivity. Leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf pubescence, flavonoid concentration, carbon and nitrogen content) were measured as explanatory variables and tested in relation to survival of the beetle, and the phylogenetic signal of the traits were examined. The survival of C. rubiginosa decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the known primary host plant, C. arvense, suggesting that specialization is a conserved character, and that insect host range, to a large degree is constrained by evolutionary history. The only trait measured that clearly offered some explanatory value for the survival of C. rubiginosa was specific leaf area. This trait was not phylogenetically dependant, and when combined with phylogenetic distance from C. arvense gave the best model explaining C. rubiginosa survival. We conclude that the specialization of the beetle is explained by a combination of

  11. Evolution of Specialization of Cassida rubiginosa on Cirsium arvense (Compositae, Cardueae)

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Michael G.; Jackman, Sarah D.; Roquet, Cristina; van Koten, Chikako; Rostás, Michael; Bourdôt, Graeme W.; Susanna, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects are specialized feeders restricted to a plant family, genus, or species. The evolution of specialized insect–plant interactions is generally considered to be a result of trade-offs in fitness between possible hosts. Through the course of natural selection, host plants that maximize insect fitness should result in optimal, specialized, insect–plant associations. However, the extent to which insects are tracking plant phylogeny or key plant traits that act as herbivore resistance or acceptance characters is uncertain. Thus, with regard to the evolution of host plant specialization, we tested if insect performance is explained by phylogenetic relatedness of potential host plants, or key plant traits that are not phylogenetically related. We tested the survival (naive first instar to adult) of the oligophagous leaf-feeding beetle, Cassida rubiginosa, on 16 selected representatives of the Cardueae tribe (thistles and knapweeds), including some of the worst weeds in temperate grasslands of the world in terms of the economic impacts caused by lost productivity. Leaf traits (specific leaf area, leaf pubescence, flavonoid concentration, carbon and nitrogen content) were measured as explanatory variables and tested in relation to survival of the beetle, and the phylogenetic signal of the traits were examined. The survival of C. rubiginosa decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the known primary host plant, C. arvense, suggesting that specialization is a conserved character, and that insect host range, to a large degree is constrained by evolutionary history. The only trait measured that clearly offered some explanatory value for the survival of C. rubiginosa was specific leaf area. This trait was not phylogenetically dependant, and when combined with phylogenetic distance from C. arvense gave the best model explaining C. rubiginosa survival. We conclude that the specialization of the beetle is explained by a combination

  12. Evolutions and stakes of genetic resources management.

    PubMed

    Planchenault, Dominique; Mounolou, Jean-Claude

    2011-03-01

    For hundreds of years, intuitively or deliberately, farmers and breeders have taken advantage of the slow and constant renewal of genetic diversity in their domesticated plants or animals. Their management efficiently combines selection to maintain existing varieties or breeds and selection to extract new biological items meeting incoming necessities and environmental changes. The traditional practice is now criticized for three main reasons. The fear that it might not follow the accelerated occurrence of new demands and changes is one. The second derives from advances in biology and technology that indeed offer the expected answers provided the existence of residual diversity in present stocks. At last, the management of genetic resources is no longer the concern of specialists. Interest in the issue has been taken up by public opinions when they realized that genetic diversity is a component of overall biodiversity and that its intimate knowledge and uses transforms the vision of our relation to the living world. What is at stake today in genetic resources management is combining three selection approaches. The two traditional are still thoroughly relevant. A third one offers a process aiming at constant and random enrichment of the existing variety of diversity in domesticated plants and animals, and giving a major and renewed place to men' imagination and innovation. PMID:21377621

  13. Evolution, molecular epidemiology and perspectives on the research of taeniid parasites with special emphasis on Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Raúl J; Fragoso, Gladis; Fleury, Agnès; García-Varela, Martín; Sciutto, Edda; Larralde, Carlos; Laclette, Juan P

    2014-04-01

    Human cysticercosis is known since old historical times in Greece and China; however, human infections by tapeworms have accompanied human beings for more that hundred thousand years. The disease is tightly bound to poverty and lack of hygiene, and has been eradicated in developed countries, but continues being a public health problem in developing countries of Latin-American, Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, and is also remerging in a number of non endemic countries. It is considered a neglected disease. Here we revise a number of key scientific contributions on taeniid biology that open new avenues for more effective approaches to the control of cysticercosis. The evolution of flatworms and class Cestoda is analyzed, with special emphasis on the emergence of taeniid parasites and the colonization of the human species by tapeworms. The complex molecular host-parasite interplay in this relationship as result of co-evolution between two distantly related organisms. The relevant host and parasite's factors, in the prospect of identifying species-specific molecular markers useful in epidemiological studies carried out in endemic countries. The new possibilities arising with the characterization of the genomes for several species of tapeworms, including a deeper understanding of these organisms, as well as improved tools for diagnosis, vaccination and drug treatment. The need to revise the current control and management strategies for this tropical neglected disease.

  14. Cranial morphology of Javanese Homo erectus: new evidence for continuous evolution, specialization, and terminal extinction.

    PubMed

    Kaifu, Yousuke; Aziz, Fachroel; Indriati, Etty; Jacob, Teuku; Kurniawan, Iwan; Baba, Hisao

    2008-10-01

    Our current knowledge of the evolution of Homo during the early to middle Pleistocene is far from complete. This is not only because of the small number of fossil samples available, but also due to the scarcity of standardized datasets which are reliable in terms of landmark identification, interobserver error, and other distorting factors. This study aims to accurately describe the cranial morphological changes of H. erectus in Java using a standardized set of measurements taken by the authors from 18 adult crania from Sangiran, Trinil, Sambungmacan, and Ngandong. The identification of some obscure landmarks was aided by the use of micro-CT imaging. While recent studies tend to emphasize evolutionary conservatism in Javanese H. erectus, our results reinforce the theory that chronologically later groups experienced distinct morphological changes in a number of cranial traits. Some of these changes, particularly those related to brain size expansion, are similar to those observed for the genus Homo as a whole, whereas others are apparently unique specializations restricted to Javanese H. erectus. Such morphological specializations in Java include previously undescribed anteroposterior lengthening of the midcranial base and an anterior shift of the posterior temporal muscle, which might have influenced the morphology of the angular torus and supramastoid sulcus. Analyses of morphological variation indicate that the three crania from Sambungmacan variously fill the morphological gap between the chronologically earlier (Bapang-AG, Bapang Formation above the Grenzbank zone in Sangiran) and later (Ngandong) morphotypes of Java. At least one of the Bapang-AG crania, Sangiran 17, also exhibits a few characteristics which potentially indicate evolution toward the Ngandong condition. These strongly suggest the continuous, gradual morphological evolution of Javanese H. erectus from the Bapang-AG to Ngandong periods. The development of some unique features in later Javanese H

  15. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  16. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-3 - Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special considerations... Negotiation 970.1504-1-3 Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation. (a) For the management... contracted effort; (3) Facilities capital or capital equipment acquisition plans; (4) Other funding needs,...

  17. Five Drosophila genomes reveal nonneutral evolution and the signature of host specialization in the chemoreceptor superfamily.

    PubMed

    McBride, Carolyn S; Arguello, J Roman; O'Meara, Brian C

    2007-11-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily comprises the olfactory receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) multigene families. These families give insects the ability to smell and taste chemicals in the environment and are thus rich resources for linking molecular evolutionary and ecological processes. Although dramatic differences in family size among distant species and high divergence among paralogs have led to the belief that the two families evolve rapidly, a lack of evolutionary data over short time scales has frustrated efforts to identify the major forces shaping this evolution. Here, we investigate patterns of gene loss/gain, divergence, and polymorphism in the entire repertoire of approximately 130 chemoreceptor genes from five closely related species of Drosophila that share a common ancestor within the past 12 million years. We demonstrate that the overall evolution of the Or and Gr families is nonneutral. We also show that selection regimes differ both between the two families as wholes and within each family among groups of genes with varying functions, patterns of expression, and phylogenetic histories. Finally, we find that the independent evolution of host specialization in Drosophila sechellia and D. erecta is associated with a fivefold acceleration of gene loss and increased rates of amino acid evolution at receptors that remain intact. Gene loss appears to primarily affect Grs that respond to bitter compounds while elevated Ka/Ks is most pronounced in the subset of Ors that are expressed in larvae. Our results provide strong evidence that the observed phenomena result from the invasion of a novel ecological niche and present a unique synthesis of molecular evolutionary analyses with ecological data.

  18. The Evolution of Host Specialization in the Vertebrate Gut Symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri

    SciTech Connect

    Frese, Steven A.; Benson, Andrew K.; Tannock, Gerald W.; Loach, Diane M.; Kim, Jaehyoung; Zhang, Min; Oh, Phaik Lyn; Heng, Nicholas C. K.; Patil, Prabhu; Juge, Nathalie; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Pearson, Bruce M.; Lapidus, Alla L.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Goltsman, Eugene; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Walter, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided mechanistic insight into the important contributions of the gut microbiota to vertebrate biology, but questions remain about the evolutionary processes that have shaped this symbiosis. In the present study, we showed in experiments with gnotobiotic mice that the evolution of Lactobacillus reuteri with rodents resulted in the emergence of host specialization. To identify genomic events marking adaptations to the murine host, we compared the genome of the rodent isolate L. reuteri 100-23 with that of the human isolate L. reuteri F275, and we identified hundreds of genes that were specific to each strain. In order to differentiate true host-specific genome content from strain-level differences, comparative genome hybridizations were performed to query 57 L. reuteri strains originating from six different vertebrate hosts in combination with genome sequence comparisons of nine strains encompassing five phylogenetic lineages of the species. This approach revealed that rodent strains, although showing a high degree of genomic plasticity, possessed a specific genome inventory that was rare or absent in strains from other vertebrate hosts. The distinct genome content of L. reuteri lineages reflected the niche characteristics in the gastrointestinal tracts of their respective hosts, and inactivation of seven out of eight representative rodent-specific genes in L. reuteri 100-23 resulted in impaired ecological performance in the gut of mice. The comparative genomic analyses suggested fundamentally different trends of genome evolution in rodent and human L. reuteri populations, with the former possessing a large and adaptable pan-genome while the latter being subjected to a process of reductive evolution. In conclusion, this study provided experimental evidence and a molecular basis for the evolution of host specificity in a vertebrate gut symbiont, and it identified genomic events that have shaped this process.

  19. The Evolution of Host Specialization in the Vertebrate Gut Symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Steven A.; Benson, Andrew K.; Tannock, Gerald W.; Loach, Diane M.; Kim, Jaehyoung; Zhang, Min; Oh, Phaik Lyn; Heng, Nicholas C. K.; Patil, Prabhu B.; Juge, Nathalie; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Pearson, Bruce M.; Lapidus, Alla; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Goltsman, Eugene; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Walter, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided mechanistic insight into the important contributions of the gut microbiota to vertebrate biology, but questions remain about the evolutionary processes that have shaped this symbiosis. In the present study, we showed in experiments with gnotobiotic mice that the evolution of Lactobacillus reuteri with rodents resulted in the emergence of host specialization. To identify genomic events marking adaptations to the murine host, we compared the genome of the rodent isolate L. reuteri 100-23 with that of the human isolate L. reuteri F275, and we identified hundreds of genes that were specific to each strain. In order to differentiate true host-specific genome content from strain-level differences, comparative genome hybridizations were performed to query 57 L. reuteri strains originating from six different vertebrate hosts in combination with genome sequence comparisons of nine strains encompassing five phylogenetic lineages of the species. This approach revealed that rodent strains, although showing a high degree of genomic plasticity, possessed a specific genome inventory that was rare or absent in strains from other vertebrate hosts. The distinct genome content of L. reuteri lineages reflected the niche characteristics in the gastrointestinal tracts of their respective hosts, and inactivation of seven out of eight representative rodent-specific genes in L. reuteri 100-23 resulted in impaired ecological performance in the gut of mice. The comparative genomic analyses suggested fundamentally different trends of genome evolution in rodent and human L. reuteri populations, with the former possessing a large and adaptable pan-genome while the latter being subjected to a process of reductive evolution. In conclusion, this study provided experimental evidence and a molecular basis for the evolution of host specificity in a vertebrate gut symbiont, and it identified genomic events that have shaped this process. PMID:21379339

  20. Five Drosophila genomes reveal nonneutral evolution and the signature of host specialization in the chemoreceptor superfamily.

    PubMed

    McBride, Carolyn S; Arguello, J Roman; O'Meara, Brian C

    2007-11-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily comprises the olfactory receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) multigene families. These families give insects the ability to smell and taste chemicals in the environment and are thus rich resources for linking molecular evolutionary and ecological processes. Although dramatic differences in family size among distant species and high divergence among paralogs have led to the belief that the two families evolve rapidly, a lack of evolutionary data over short time scales has frustrated efforts to identify the major forces shaping this evolution. Here, we investigate patterns of gene loss/gain, divergence, and polymorphism in the entire repertoire of approximately 130 chemoreceptor genes from five closely related species of Drosophila that share a common ancestor within the past 12 million years. We demonstrate that the overall evolution of the Or and Gr families is nonneutral. We also show that selection regimes differ both between the two families as wholes and within each family among groups of genes with varying functions, patterns of expression, and phylogenetic histories. Finally, we find that the independent evolution of host specialization in Drosophila sechellia and D. erecta is associated with a fivefold acceleration of gene loss and increased rates of amino acid evolution at receptors that remain intact. Gene loss appears to primarily affect Grs that respond to bitter compounds while elevated Ka/Ks is most pronounced in the subset of Ors that are expressed in larvae. Our results provide strong evidence that the observed phenomena result from the invasion of a novel ecological niche and present a unique synthesis of molecular evolutionary analyses with ecological data. PMID:18039874

  1. Replicated evolution of trophic specializations in an endemic cichlid fish lineage from Lake Tanganyika

    PubMed Central

    Rüber, Lukas; Verheyen, Erik; Meyer, Axel

    1999-01-01

    The current phylogenetic hypothesis for the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes of the tribe Eretmodini is based solely on morphology and suggests that more complex trophic morphologies derived only once from a less specialized ancestral condition. A molecular phylogeny of eretmodine cichlids based on partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b and control-region sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary sequence of trophic adaptations and to test alternative models of morphological divergence. The six mitochondrial lineages found disagree with the current taxonomy and the morphology-based phylogeny. Mitochondrial lineages with similar trophic morphologies are not grouped monophyletically but are typically more closely related to lineages with different trophic phenotypes currently assigned to other genera. Our results indicate multiple independent origins of similar trophic specializations in these cichlids. A pattern of repeated divergent morphological evolution becomes apparent when the phylogeography of the mitochondrial haplotypes is analyzed in the context of the geological and paleoclimatological history of Lake Tanganyika. In more than one instance within Lake Tanganyika, similar morphological divergence of dentitional traits occurred in sympatric species pairs. Possibly, resource-based divergent selective regimes led to resource partitioning and brought about similar trophic morphologies independently and repeatedly. PMID:10468591

  2. Independent evolution of the specialized pharyngeal jaw apparatus in cichlid and labrid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Kohji; Miya, Masaki; Azuma, Yoichiro; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-01-01

    Background Fishes in the families Cichlidae and Labridae provide good probable examples of vertebrate adaptive radiations. Their spectacular trophic radiations have been widely assumed to be due to structural key innovation in pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA), but this idea has never been tested based on a reliable phylogeny. For the first step of evaluating the hypothesis, we investigated the phylogenetic positions of the components of the suborder Labroidei (including Pomacentridae and Embiotocidae in addition to Cichlidae and Labridae) within the Percomorpha, the most diversified (> 15,000 spp) crown clade of teleosts. We examined those based on 78 whole mitochondrial genome sequences (including 12 newly determined sequences) through partitioned Bayesian analyses with concatenated sequences (13,933 bp). Results The resultant phylogenies indicated that the Labridae and the remaining three labroid families have diverged basally within the Percomorpha, and monophyly of the suborder was confidently rejected by statistical tests using Bayes factors. Conclusion The resultant phylogenies indicated that the specified PJA evolved independently at least twice, once in Labridae and once in the common ancestor of the remaining three labroid families (including the Cichlidae). Because the independent evolution of pharyngeal jaws appears to have been followed by trophic radiations, we consider that our result supports, from the aspect of historical repeatability, the idea that the evolution of the specialized PJA provided these lineages with the morphological potential for their spectacular trophic radiations. The present result will provide a new framework for the study of functional morphology and genetic basis of their PJA. PMID:17263894

  3. The signal environment is more important than diet or chemical specialization in the evolution of warning coloration.

    PubMed

    Prudic, Kathleen L; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Sperling, Felix A H

    2007-12-01

    Aposematic coloration, or warning coloration, is a visual signal that acts to minimize contact between predator and unprofitable prey. The conditions favoring the evolution of aposematic coloration remain largely unidentified. Recent work suggests that diet specialization and resultant toxicity may play a role in facilitating the evolution and persistence of warning coloration. Using a phylogenetic approach, we investigated the evolution of larval warning coloration in the genus Papilio (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae). Our results indicate that there are at least four independent origins of aposematic larval coloration within Papilio. Controlling for phylogenetic relatedness among Papilio taxa, we found no evidence supporting the hypothesis that either diet specialization or chemical specialization facilitated the origin of aposematic larvae. However, there was a significant relationship between the signal environment and the evolution of aposematic larvae. Specifically, Papilio lineages feeding on herbaceous or narrow-leaved plants, regardless of the plants' taxonomic affiliation, were more likely to evolve aposematic larvae than were lineages feeding only on trees/shrubs or broad-leaved plants. These results demonstrate that factors other than diet specialization, such as the signal environment of predator-prey interactions, may play a large role in the initial evolution and persistence of aposematic coloration.

  4. Risk evaluation mitigation strategies: the evolution of risk management policy.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Kristen; Toscani, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the primary regulatory responsibility to ensure that medications are safe and effective both prior to drug approval and while the medication is being actively marketed by manufacturers. The responsibility for safe medications prior to marketing was signed into law in 1938 under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; however, a significant risk management evolution has taken place since 1938. Additional federal rules, entitled the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act, were established in 2007 and extended the government's oversight through the addition of a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) for certain drugs. REMS is a mandated strategy to manage a known or potentially serious risk associated with a medication or biological product. Reasons for this extension of oversight were driven primarily by the FDA's movement to ensure that patients and providers are better informed of drug therapies and their specific benefits and risks prior to initiation. This article provides an historical perspective of the evolution of medication risk management policy and includes a review of REMS programs, an assessment of the positive and negative aspects of REMS, and provides suggestions for planning and measuring outcomes. In particular, this publication presents an overview of the evolution of the REMS program and its implications.

  5. Aquatic Plants: Management and Control. Special Circular 222.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingard, R. G.; And Others

    This publication, produced by the Pennsylvania Cooperative Extension Service, is a non-technical guide to chemical control of aquatic vegetation. The purpose of this circular is to aid the land owner or manager in managing ponds, streams, and other water bodies for desired uses by managing the vegetation in, on, and around the water. Among the…

  6. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-3 - Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Laboratory management and operation. 970.1504-1-3 Section 970.1504-1-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contracting by Negotiation 970.1504-1-3 Special considerations: Laboratory management and operation. (a) For the...

  7. 76 FR 34248 - Equestrian Stables at Meadowood Special Recreation Management Area, VA; Information Sharing Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Management Eastern States has scheduled a public meeting to share information about the condition of the... Equestrian Stables at Meadowood Special Recreation Management Area, VA; Information Sharing Meeting AGENCY... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: E. Lynn Burkett, BLM-ES Lower Potomac Field Station Manager; phone:...

  8. Geographic distribution of suitable hosts explains the evolution of specialized gentes in the European cuckoo Cuculus canorus

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Juan J; Vivaldi, Manuel Martín; Møller, Anders Pape

    2009-01-01

    Background Several types of selective forces can act to promote parasite specialization. Parasites might specialize on some suitable hosts at the cost of decreasing effectiveness when exploiting other species of hosts, and specialization can be more easily selected for in hosts that the parasites will easily find. Thus demographic characteristics of suitable hosts such as population density and its spatial consistency could be key factors predicting probability of parasite specialization and speciation. Here, we explore this hypothesis by studying the relationship between occurence of specialized races of the European cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) (i.e. gentes) and mean and coefficient of variation in population density estimated for 12 different European regions. Results The results were in accordance with the hypothesis because specialized cuckoo egg morphs were more common in suitable hosts with high population density and low variation in population density at the level of host species or genera. Conclusion We have presented evidence suggesting that population density and homogeneity of geographic distribution of hosts explain, at least partly, the evolution of specialized egg-morphs of the European cuckoo. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that resource (i.e., host) predictability explains the evolution of host races and species of parasites. PMID:19405966

  9. Guidelines for the Training of Engineers in Specialized Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Jean

    As part of its General Information Programme, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has for many years concerned itself with training in the use of information by preparing guides and organizing meetings and seminars on the subject. There are now an enormous number of specialized information users whose…

  10. Optimizing Special Educator Wellness and Job Performance through Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansley, Brandis M.; Houchins, David; Varjas, Kris

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the stressors common to many K-12 teachers, such as high-stakes testing, a lack of autonomy, and high mental and emotional demands, special educators also address the unique needs of their students, team-teach, and maintain caseload responsibilities (Emery & Vandenberg, 2010). Many who enter the profession are fulfilled by the…

  11. 78 FR 39314 - Notice of Availability of the Decision Record for the Delta River Special Recreation Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Decision Record for the Delta River Special... the availability of the Decision Record (DR) for the Delta River Special Recreation Management Area... Assessment (EA) for the Delta River Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) Plan and East Alaska...

  12. The Evolution of Special Education in Iowa: As Told through the Voices of Those Who Created It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Jeff; Stumme, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a historical perspective of the evolution of special education in Iowa through the voices of the people who created the system of support for individuals with disabilities. In addition to the interviews, extensive historical literature reviews were conducted. One hundred and thirty individuals were…

  13. Self-Management Skills: An Important Link to Successful Special Education Postsecondary Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Sharon D.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated the process of teaching the self-management strategies, self-determination, and self-monitoring to chronically misbehaved students from the perspective of a secondary special education teacher. The investigation used a purposeful sample to select an urban high school setting and a tenured special education…

  14. The Arrowhead Student Information System: Managing Information on Special Education Referrals in a Rural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannenbring, Gary L.; Krueger, Frederick H.

    A computerized referral management system, the Arrowhead Student Information System, has enhanced communication among special education staff members in rural Iowa. The system serves a 45-district intermediate level service unit which identifies and serves children from birth to 21 years who require special education from a student and preschool…

  15. Tools and Equipment for Managing Special Care Patients Anywhere.

    PubMed

    Levy, Harvey; Rotenberg, Lena R

    2016-07-01

    This article describes many of the tools and equipment used by dental professionals to successfully treat special care patients in a variety of settings. Such equipment can be used in the dental office, operating room, hospital, surgical center, nursing home, private home, institution, hospice, and even in the field without electricity. Equipment discussed includes seating, laughing gas and sedation systems, body wraps and mouth props, lighting, radiographic exposure and imaging systems, dental isolation devices, and other tools the authors use. PMID:27264851

  16. Youth sport specialization: how to manage competition and training?

    PubMed

    Capranica, Laura; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L

    2011-12-01

    A prevailing theory (and practical application) is that elite performance requires early childhood skill development and training across various domains, including sport. Debate continues whether children specializing early (ie, training/competition in a single sport) have true advantage compared with those who sample various sports early and specialize in a single sport later (adolescence). Retrospective data and case studies suggest either model yields elite status depending upon the sport category (ie, situational: ball games, martial arts, fencing; quantitative: track and field, swimming, skiing; or qualitative: gymnastics, diving, figure skating). However, potential risks of early specialization include greater attrition and adverse physical/emotional health outcomes. With the advent of the IOC Youth Olympic Games, increased emphasis on global youth competition has unknown implications but also represents a potential platform for investigation. Modification of youth competition formats should be based upon multidisciplinary research on psychophysiological responses, and technical-tactical behaviors during competition. The assumption that a simple scaled-down approach of adult competitions facilitates the development of technical/tactical skills of youth athletes is not necessarily substantiated with field-based research. Relatively little evidence exists regarding the long-term effects of rigorous training and competitive schedules on children in specific sports. It is clear that more prospective studies are needed to understand the training dose that optimally develops adaptations in youth without inducing dropout, overtraining syndrome, and/or injury. Such an approach should be sport specific as well as gender based. Until such evidence exists, coaches and sport administrators will continue to rely upon their sport-specific dogma to influence programmatic development of our most vulnerable population.

  17. Youth sport specialization: how to manage competition and training?

    PubMed

    Capranica, Laura; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L

    2011-12-01

    A prevailing theory (and practical application) is that elite performance requires early childhood skill development and training across various domains, including sport. Debate continues whether children specializing early (ie, training/competition in a single sport) have true advantage compared with those who sample various sports early and specialize in a single sport later (adolescence). Retrospective data and case studies suggest either model yields elite status depending upon the sport category (ie, situational: ball games, martial arts, fencing; quantitative: track and field, swimming, skiing; or qualitative: gymnastics, diving, figure skating). However, potential risks of early specialization include greater attrition and adverse physical/emotional health outcomes. With the advent of the IOC Youth Olympic Games, increased emphasis on global youth competition has unknown implications but also represents a potential platform for investigation. Modification of youth competition formats should be based upon multidisciplinary research on psychophysiological responses, and technical-tactical behaviors during competition. The assumption that a simple scaled-down approach of adult competitions facilitates the development of technical/tactical skills of youth athletes is not necessarily substantiated with field-based research. Relatively little evidence exists regarding the long-term effects of rigorous training and competitive schedules on children in specific sports. It is clear that more prospective studies are needed to understand the training dose that optimally develops adaptations in youth without inducing dropout, overtraining syndrome, and/or injury. Such an approach should be sport specific as well as gender based. Until such evidence exists, coaches and sport administrators will continue to rely upon their sport-specific dogma to influence programmatic development of our most vulnerable population. PMID:22174125

  18. Intelligent Resource Management for Local Area Networks: Approach and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meike, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The Data Management System network is a complex and important part of manned space platforms. Its efficient operation is vital to crew, subsystems and experiments. AI is being considered to aid in the initial design of the network and to augment the management of its operation. The Intelligent Resource Management for Local Area Networks (IRMA-LAN) project is concerned with the application of AI techniques to network configuration and management. A network simulation was constructed employing real time process scheduling for realistic loads, and utilizing the IEEE 802.4 token passing scheme. This simulation is an integral part of the construction of the IRMA-LAN system. From it, a causal model is being constructed for use in prediction and deep reasoning about the system configuration. An AI network design advisor is being added to help in the design of an efficient network. The AI portion of the system is planned to evolve into a dynamic network management aid. The approach, the integrated simulation, project evolution, and some initial results are described.

  19. Evolution of shuttle avionics redundancy management/fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, J. C.; Thibodeau, J. R.; Schneider, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The challenge of providing redundancy management (RM) and fault tolerance to meet the Shuttle Program requirements of fail operational/fail safe for the avionics systems was complicated by the critical program constraints of weight, cost, and schedule. The basic and sometimes false effectivity of less than pure RM designs is addressed. Evolution of the multiple input selection filter (the heart of the RM function) is discussed with emphasis on the subtle interactions of the flight control system that were found to be potentially catastrophic. Several other general RM development problems are discussed, with particular emphasis on the inertial measurement unit RM, indicative of the complexity of managing that three string system and its critical interfaces with the guidance and control systems.

  20. Recommendations for the management of retarded ejaculation: BASHH Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Daniel; Goldmeier, David

    2006-01-01

    We present the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) special interest group in sexual dysfunction recommendations for the management of retarded ejaculation. The recommendations outline the physiology, prevalence, definitions, aetiological factors and patient assessment for this sexual problem. We suggest treatment strategies, recommendations for management and an auditable outcome. PMID:16409671

  1. Behavior Management Skills as Predictors of Retention among South Texas Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ann; Arnold, Mitylene

    2004-01-01

    A survey of South Texas Special Education teachers was conducted to determine how they perceived their behavior management skills in the classroom and what effect, if any, this had on their job satisfaction. The majority of teachers were confident in their ability to accomplish the management demands of the classroom. The teachers who showed the…

  2. The Special Educational Needs Coordinator's Role in Managing Teaching Assistants: The Greenwich Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerschel, Liz

    2005-01-01

    In this article Liz Gerschel explores some aspects of the role of the special educational needs coordinator (SENCO) in the management of teaching assistants (TAs) in mainstream schools, drawing on the experience of professionals working in the London Borough of Greenwich. The SENCO's responsibilities for managing TAs are discussed and issues of…

  3. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  4. Special Issue: Biography in Management and Organisational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sarah; And Others

    1992-01-01

    "Autobiographical Awareness as a Catalyst" (Torbert, Fisher); "Biography in Management and Organisational Development [OD]" (Jones); "Careers" (Davies); "Biography Work and Women's Development" (Farrell); "Biography as a Research Method for Investigating OD" (Salama); "Biographical Approach to Business Strategy" (Leary); "Biographical Research"…

  5. 42 CFR 438.706 - Special rules for temporary management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 438.706 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) There is continued egregious behavior by the MCO, including but not limited to behavior that is... terminate temporary management until it determines that the MCO can ensure that the sanctioned behavior...

  6. 42 CFR 438.706 - Special rules for temporary management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 438.706 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) There is continued egregious behavior by the MCO, including but not limited to behavior that is... terminate temporary management until it determines that the MCO can ensure that the sanctioned behavior...

  7. 42 CFR 438.706 - Special rules for temporary management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 438.706 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) There is continued egregious behavior by the MCO, including but not limited to behavior that is... terminate temporary management until it determines that the MCO can ensure that the sanctioned behavior...

  8. 42 CFR 438.706 - Special rules for temporary management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 438.706 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) There is continued egregious behavior by the MCO, including but not limited to behavior that is... terminate temporary management until it determines that the MCO can ensure that the sanctioned behavior...

  9. Special features in managing European Training Networks (ETN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Drossou-Berendes, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    The Marie Skłodowska-Curie European Training Networks (ETN) within Horizon 2020, the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, aim to train a new generation of creative and innovative early-stage researchers with focus on both scientific excellence and researchers' career development extending the traditional academic research training, and providing researchers with tools to develop scientific expertise and transferable skills needed to establish career perspectives in academia as well as non-academia. This profile is different from what we know from "typical" collaborative projects, and project consortia face specific challenges with regard to international recruitment, joint organization of network activities, financial regulations, etc. The poster will give an overview of the main ETN features emphasizing special requirements and needs, and identifying main challenges, which may rise.

  10. A theoretical examination of the relative importance of evolution management and drug development for managing resistance.

    PubMed

    McClure, Nathan S; Day, Troy

    2014-12-22

    Drug resistance is a serious public health problem that threatens to thwart our ability to treat many infectious diseases. Repeatedly, the introduction of new drugs has been followed by the evolution of resistance. In principle, there are two complementary ways to address this problem: (i) enhancing drug development and (ii) slowing the evolution of drug resistance through evolutionary management. Although these two strategies are not mutually exclusive, it is nevertheless worthwhile considering whether one might be inherently more effective than the other. We present a simple mathematical model that explores how interventions aimed at these two approaches affect the availability of effective drugs. Our results identify an interesting feature of evolution management that, all else equal, tends to make it more effective than enhancing drug development. Thus, although enhancing drug development will necessarily be a central part of addressing the problem of resistance, our results lend support to the idea that evolution management is probably a very significant component of the solution as well.

  11. A theoretical examination of the relative importance of evolution management and drug development for managing resistance

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Nathan S.; Day, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious public health problem that threatens to thwart our ability to treat many infectious diseases. Repeatedly, the introduction of new drugs has been followed by the evolution of resistance. In principle, there are two complementary ways to address this problem: (i) enhancing drug development and (ii) slowing the evolution of drug resistance through evolutionary management. Although these two strategies are not mutually exclusive, it is nevertheless worthwhile considering whether one might be inherently more effective than the other. We present a simple mathematical model that explores how interventions aimed at these two approaches affect the availability of effective drugs. Our results identify an interesting feature of evolution management that, all else equal, tends to make it more effective than enhancing drug development. Thus, although enhancing drug development will necessarily be a central part of addressing the problem of resistance, our results lend support to the idea that evolution management is probably a very significant component of the solution as well. PMID:25377456

  12. Special Report Management Challenges at the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    With an annual appropriation of approximately $24 billion, the Department of Energy (Department) is a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of national security, scientific, and environmental activities. Since the passage of the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. In recent years, the Department has refocused its efforts in areas such as energy efficiency and conservation, environmental cleanup, nuclear nonproliferation, and weapons stewardship. In order to accomplish its mission, the Department employs approximately 110,000 Federal and contractor personnel and manages assets valued at more than $134 billion, including a complex of national laboratories.

  13. Evolution of the management of colorectal cancer using integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Tang; Chi, Pan

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. In recent years, the development of new and effective management options, such as fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), total mesorectal excision (TME) and monoclonal antibody novel "targeted" therapies has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. In China, studies on CRC using integrative medicine (IM) have made remarkable progress. We therefore review the recent developments in CRC treatment through IM and Western medicine, including research studies such as the exploitation of Chinese herbs for the disruption of the tumor cell cycle or inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, induction of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of the immune system, and the curative effect of chemotherapy. We also examine clinical studies such as those on special prescriptions and medicines and IM in anti-cancer therapy. Particularly, we analyze the advantages and disadvantages of management with IM, and propose a suggestion for the management of colorectal cancer with IM, such as screening for effective prescriptions. We also analyze Chinese medicine, studying the pharmacologic mechanism of its anti-cancer effect, further strengthening the study of IM on CRC.

  14. The three-dimensional matrix -- An evolution in project management

    SciTech Connect

    Glidewell, D.

    1996-09-01

    In the Functional Department Dimension, functional departments such as project management, design, and construction would be maintained to maximize consistency among project teams, evenly allocate training opportunities, and facilitate the crossfeeding of lessons learned and innovative ideas. Functional departments were also determined to be the surest way of complying uniformly with all project control systems required by the Department of Energy (Sandia`s primary external customer). The Technical Discipline dimension was maintained to enhance communication within the technical disciplines, such as electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, etc., and to evenly allocate technical training opportunities, reduce technical obsolescence, and enhance design standards. The third dimension, the Project Dimension, represents the next step in the project management evolution at Sandia, and together with Functional Department and Technical Discipline Dimensions constitutes the three-dimensional matrix. It is this Project Dimension that will be explored thoroughly in this paper, including a discussion of the specific roles and responsibilities of both management and the project team.

  15. 42 CFR 21.51 - Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or experience in administration and management. 21.51 Section 21.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management. The... specialized training or experience in administration and management relating to the functions of the...

  16. Strengthening Business Management in the Division of Special Education and Public Personnel Services: Management Paper Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Special Education and Pupil Personnel Services.

    Reported are the preliminary findings of a review of the financial and program oriented systems of the Division of Special Education and Pupil Personnel Services (DSEPPS) in New York City, and preliminary recommendations for the development of new business management and information gathering systems for DSEPPS. Sections cover the following…

  17. Evolution of CMS Workload Management Towards Multicore Job Support

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Hernández, J. M.; Khan, F. A.; Letts, J.; Majewski, K.; Rodrigues, A. M.; McCrea, A.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-23

    The successful exploitation of multicore processor architectures is a key element of the LHC distributed computing system in the coming era of the LHC Run 2. High-pileup complex-collision events represent a challenge for the traditional sequential programming in terms of memory and processing time budget. The CMS data production and processing framework is introducing the parallel execution of the reconstruction and simulation algorithms to overcome these limitations. CMS plans to execute multicore jobs while still supporting singlecore processing for other tasks difficult to parallelize, such as user analysis. The CMS strategy for job management thus aims at integrating single and multicore job scheduling across the Grid. This is accomplished by employing multicore pilots with internal dynamic partitioning of the allocated resources, capable of running payloads of various core counts simultaneously. An extensive test programme has been conducted to enable multicore scheduling with the various local batch systems available at CMS sites, with the focus on the Tier-0 and Tier-1s, responsible during 2015 of the prompt data reconstruction. Scale tests have been run to analyse the performance of this scheduling strategy and ensure an efficient use of the distributed resources. This paper presents the evolution of the CMS job management and resource provisioning systems in order to support this hybrid scheduling model, as well as its deployment and performance tests, which will enable CMS to transition to a multicore production model for the second LHC run.

  18. Evolution of CMS workload management towards multicore job support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Hernández, J. M.; Khan, F. A.; Letts, J.; Majewski, K.; Rodrigues, A. M.; McCrea, A.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The successful exploitation of multicore processor architectures is a key element of the LHC distributed computing system in the coming era of the LHC Run 2. High-pileup complex-collision events represent a challenge for the traditional sequential programming in terms of memory and processing time budget. The CMS data production and processing framework is introducing the parallel execution of the reconstruction and simulation algorithms to overcome these limitations. CMS plans to execute multicore jobs while still supporting singlecore processing for other tasks difficult to parallelize, such as user analysis. The CMS strategy for job management thus aims at integrating single and multicore job scheduling across the Grid. This is accomplished by employing multicore pilots with internal dynamic partitioning of the allocated resources, capable of running payloads of various core counts simultaneously. An extensive test programme has been conducted to enable multicore scheduling with the various local batch systems available at CMS sites, with the focus on the Tier-0 and Tier-1s, responsible during 2015 of the prompt data reconstruction. Scale tests have been run to analyse the performance of this scheduling strategy and ensure an efficient use of the distributed resources. This paper presents the evolution of the CMS job management and resource provisioning systems in order to support this hybrid scheduling model, as well as its deployment and performance tests, which will enable CMS to transition to a multicore production model for the second LHC run.

  19. Special Education Management System Project Document. 2. Santa Cruz BCP Observation Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented in booklet and chart form is the Behavioral Characteristics Progression (BCP), part of the Santa Cruz Special Education Management Project, consisting of 2400 observable traits grouped into 50 behavioral strands. The BCP is seen to be a nonstandardized criterion referenced tool which replaces conventional age and disability labels with…

  20. A Guide for the Management of Special Education Programs. 6.0 BCP Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    The sixth document in an eight-part series on a task-based management system for special education programs presents the Behavioral Characteristics Progression, a listing of 1,800 behavioral characteristics of mentally and behaviorally handicapped pupils which have been grouped into 45 categories of behavior called behavior strands. Behavior…

  1. Analysis of Alternative Management Information Systems Appropriate for Special Education Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Harry J.; And Others

    The report covers three interrelated studies which pertain to the utilization of computer based management information systems in reporting special education data to the state and federal governments. Two of the studies reflect certain aspects of actual computer use by California school districts and county offices of education, and the third…

  2. Developing and Implementing a Stress Management Program for Special Educators in a Juvenile Detention Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Joan R.

    This paper describes a practicum designed to increase the stress management skills of 10 special educators working in a juvenile detention center. Teachers at the juvenile detention center were taking an inordinate amount of sick leave and engaging in behaviors that were counter-productive to their delivery of educational services to detained…

  3. Recommendations for the management of premature ejaculation: BASHH Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Daniel; Goldmeier, David; Green, John; Lamba, Harpal; Harris, J R W

    2006-01-01

    We present the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH), Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction updated recommendations for the management of premature ejaculation. The recommendations outline the physiology, prevalence, definitions, aetiological factors and patient assessment for this common sexual problem. Behavioural, local and systemic pharmacological treatments are discussed along with general recommendations and auditable outcomes. PMID:16409670

  4. A Soft Sell for Hardware: The Use of Microcomputer Technology for Cost Effective Special Education Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rosemary; Ragghianti, Suzanne

    The role of the computer as manager of instruction in special education is discussed. In Part 1, basic computer terms are introduced under the major headings of data measurement, hardware, and software. Part 2 focuses on selection criteria for microcomputers. Suggestions for evaluating software are given in terms of ease of use, documentation,…

  5. Special Education Management System Project Document. 3. Santa Cruz TBC Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented in chart form with accompanying booklet is the Task Base Composite (TBC), part of the Santa Cruz Special Education Management System Project, which lists 700 staff tasks to aid in the administrative determination of personnel needs, deployment, and program costs. Listed tasks are either "Learner Line" (tasks directly involving or…

  6. Special Education Management-by-Information: A Resource Guide for State and Local Education Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Management Analysis Center, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The document offers guidelines for developing a management by information system for special education services, a system that organizes people, equipment, procedures, and communications to collect and present accurate data that administrators can use to make decisions and to provide information to state and federal governments. Following a…

  7. 8. The development and evolution of division of labor and foraging specialization in a social insect (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Page, Robert E; Scheiner, Ricarda; Erber, Joachim; Amdam, Gro V

    2006-01-01

    How does complex social behavior evolve? What are the developmental building blocks of division of labor and specialization, the hallmarks of insect societies? Studies have revealed the developmental origins in the evolution of division of labor and specialization in foraging worker honeybees, the hallmarks of complex insect societies. Selective breeding for a single social trait, the amount of surplus pollen stored in the nest (pollen hoarding) revealed a phenotypic architecture of correlated traits at multiple levels of biological organization in facultatively sterile female worker honeybees. Verification of this phenotypic architecture in "wild-type" bees provided strong support for a "pollen foraging syndrome" that involves increased senso-motor responses, motor activity, associative learning, reproductive status, and rates of behavioral development, as well as foraging behavior. This set of traits guided further research into reproductive regulatory systems that were co-opted by natural selection during the evolution of social behavior. Division of labor, characterized by changes in the tasks performed by bees, as they age, is controlled by hormones linked to ovary development. Foraging specialization on nectar and pollen results also from different reproductive states of bees where nectar foragers engage in pre-reproductive behavior, foraging for nectar for self-maintenance, while pollen foragers perform foraging tasks associated with reproduction and maternal care, collecting protein.

  8. Quantifiably secure power grid operation, management, and evolution :

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Genetha Anne.; Watson, Jean-Paul; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Gramacy, Robert B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes findings and results of the Quantifiably Secure Power Grid Operation, Management, and Evolution LDRD. The focus of the LDRD was to develop decisionsupport technologies to enable rational and quantifiable risk management for two key grid operational timescales: scheduling (day-ahead) and planning (month-to-year-ahead). Risk or resiliency metrics are foundational in this effort. The 2003 Northeast Blackout investigative report stressed the criticality of enforceable metrics for system resiliency the grids ability to satisfy demands subject to perturbation. However, we neither have well-defined risk metrics for addressing the pervasive uncertainties in a renewable energy era, nor decision-support tools for their enforcement, which severely impacts efforts to rationally improve grid security. For day-ahead unit commitment, decision-support tools must account for topological security constraints, loss-of-load (economic) costs, and supply and demand variability especially given high renewables penetration. For long-term planning, transmission and generation expansion must ensure realized demand is satisfied for various projected technological, climate, and growth scenarios. The decision-support tools investigated in this project paid particular attention to tailoriented risk metrics for explicitly addressing high-consequence events. Historically, decisionsupport tools for the grid consider expected cost minimization, largely ignoring risk and instead penalizing loss-of-load through artificial parameters. The technical focus of this work was the development of scalable solvers for enforcing risk metrics. Advanced stochastic programming solvers were developed to address generation and transmission expansion and unit commitment, minimizing cost subject to pre-specified risk thresholds. Particular attention was paid to renewables where security critically depends on production and demand prediction accuracy. To address this

  9. Syncope management unit: evolution of the concept and practice implementation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Win K; Traub, Stephen J; Decker, Wyatt W

    2013-01-01

    Syncope, a clinical syndrome, has many potential causes. The prognosis of a patient experiencing syncope varies from benign outcome to increased risk of mortality or sudden death, determined by the etiology of syncope and the presence of underlying disease. Because a definitive diagnosis often cannot be established immediately, hospital admission is frequently recommended as the "default" approach to ensure patient's safety and an expedited evaluation. Hospital care is costly while no studies have shown that clinical outcomes are improved by the in-patient practice approach. The syncope unit is an evolving practice model based on the hypothesis that a multidisciplinary team of physicians and allied staff with expertise in syncope management, working together and equipped with standard clinical tools could improve clinical outcomes. Preliminary data have demonstrated that a specialized syncope unit can improve diagnosis in a timely manner, reduce hospital admission and decrease the use of unnecessary diagnostic tests. In this review, models of syncope units in the emergency department, hospital and outpatient clinics from different practices in different countries are discussed. Similarities and differences of these syncope units are compared. Outcomes and endpoints from these studies are summarized. Developing a syncope unit with a standardized protocol applicable to most practice settings would be an ultimate goal for clinicians and investigators who have interest, expertise, and commitment to improve care for this large patient population.

  10. Effectively managing partnership evolution: a case study from Chicago.

    PubMed

    Tishuk, Brian S

    Given the continued proliferation of public/ private partnerships as vehicles for sharing best practices, lessons learned and actionable information, the keys to their success become more important to identify. Effective partnerships enhance the resilience of their respective members, which, in turn, improves community resilience. Thus, identifying the attributes of a successful partnership should be a high priority for those looking to foster collaboration between the public and private sectors. This paper will illustrate with two case studies how successful partnerships creatively leverage opportunities and manage the evolution of public/private relationships, while always seeking to institutionalise these collaborative efforts. The first will discuss briefly the development of the most important national partnership within the financial sector. The other focuses on a public/private task force in Chicago, composed of public safety agencies and representatives of critical infrastructure, which owes its existence to an unexpected research project and that needed to be restructured in light of experience. The manner in which the task force formed and evolved yields many lessons for partnerships interested in remaining relevant and effective. PMID:23315246

  11. Different genetic algorithms and the evolution of specialization: a study with groups of simulated neural robots.

    PubMed

    Ferrauto, Tomassino; Parisi, Domenico; Di Stefano, Gabriele; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Organisms that live in groups, from microbial symbionts to social insects and schooling fish, exhibit a number of highly efficient cooperative behaviors, often based on role taking and specialization. These behaviors are relevant not only for the biologist but also for the engineer interested in decentralized collective robotics. We address these phenomena by carrying out experiments with groups of two simulated robots controlled by neural networks whose connection weights are evolved by using genetic algorithms. These algorithms and controllers are well suited to autonomously find solutions for decentralized collective robotic tasks based on principles of self-organization. The article first presents a taxonomy of role-taking and specialization mechanisms related to evolved neural network controllers. Then it introduces two cooperation tasks, which can be accomplished by either role taking or specialization, and uses these tasks to compare four different genetic algorithms to evaluate their capacity to evolve a suitable behavioral strategy, which depends on the task demands. Interestingly, only one of the four algorithms, which appears to have more biological plausibility, is capable of evolving role taking or specialization when they are needed. The results are relevant for both collective robotics and biology, as they can provide useful hints on the different processes that can lead to the emergence of specialization in robots and organisms. PMID:23514239

  12. Different genetic algorithms and the evolution of specialization: a study with groups of simulated neural robots.

    PubMed

    Ferrauto, Tomassino; Parisi, Domenico; Di Stefano, Gabriele; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Organisms that live in groups, from microbial symbionts to social insects and schooling fish, exhibit a number of highly efficient cooperative behaviors, often based on role taking and specialization. These behaviors are relevant not only for the biologist but also for the engineer interested in decentralized collective robotics. We address these phenomena by carrying out experiments with groups of two simulated robots controlled by neural networks whose connection weights are evolved by using genetic algorithms. These algorithms and controllers are well suited to autonomously find solutions for decentralized collective robotic tasks based on principles of self-organization. The article first presents a taxonomy of role-taking and specialization mechanisms related to evolved neural network controllers. Then it introduces two cooperation tasks, which can be accomplished by either role taking or specialization, and uses these tasks to compare four different genetic algorithms to evaluate their capacity to evolve a suitable behavioral strategy, which depends on the task demands. Interestingly, only one of the four algorithms, which appears to have more biological plausibility, is capable of evolving role taking or specialization when they are needed. The results are relevant for both collective robotics and biology, as they can provide useful hints on the different processes that can lead to the emergence of specialization in robots and organisms.

  13. Presentation of special series with computed recurrently coefficients of solutions of nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, M.; Masih, A.

    2016-06-01

    One of the analytical methods of presenting solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations is the method of special series in powers of specially selected functions called basis functions. The coefficients of such series are found successively as solutions of linear differential equations. To find recurrence, the coefficient is achieved by the choice of basis functions, which may also contain arbitrary functions. By using such functional arbitrariness, it allows in some cases to prove the global convergence of the corresponding constructed series, as well as the solvability of the boundary value problem.

  14. Evolution of hospital industrial engineering: from scientific management to total quality management.

    PubMed

    Sahney, V K

    1993-01-01

    Industrial engineering applications in the hospital industry first began in 1910. This paper traces the evolution of hospital industrial engineering in five distinct phases. For each of the major phases, this paper presents the contributions made by industrial engineers. Many of the techniques advocated by industrial engineers are now being taught to hospital employees as hospitals introduce total quality management (TQM) within the health-care industry. TQM introduction has meant a new role for industrial engineers, as that of a teacher, coach, and a facilitator. This new role holds much promise for the improvement of quality and productivity in health care.

  15. Evolution of specialization: a phylogenetic study of host range in the red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetraophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2011-06-01

    Specialization is common in most lineages of insect herbivores, one of the most diverse groups of organisms on earth. To address how and why specialization is maintained over evolutionary time, we hypothesized that plant defense and other ecological attributes of potential host plants would predict the performance of a specialist root-feeding herbivore (the red milkweed beetle, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus). Using a comparative phylogenetic and functional trait approach, we assessed the determinants of insect host range across 18 species of Asclepias. Larval survivorship decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the true host, Asclepias syriaca, suggesting that adaptation to plant traits drives specialization. Among several root traits measured, only cardenolides (toxic defense chemicals) correlated with larval survival, and cardenolides also explained the phylogenetic distance effect in phylogenetically controlled multiple regression analyses. Additionally, milkweed species having a known association with other Tetraopes beetles were better hosts than species lacking Tetraopes herbivores, and milkweeds with specific leaf area values (a trait related to leaf function and habitat affiliation) similar to those of A. syriaca were better hosts than species having divergent values. We thus conclude that phylogenetic distance is an integrated measure of phenotypic and ecological attributes of Asclepias species, especially defensive cardenolides, which can be used to explain specialization and constraints on host shifts over evolutionary time. PMID:21597250

  16. Collaboration in Special Education: Its History, Evolution, and Critical Factors Necessary for Successful Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration in education is seen as a legal mandate, best practice in teacher practice, and necessary for the inclusion of children with special needs. Over the years, there have been a number of evolutionary incarnations of the collaborative model, each possessing various ingredients identified as important, if not essential, components of a…

  17. Specialization of the DNA-Cleaving Activity of a Group I Ribozyme Through In Vitro Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Joyce; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study, an in vitro evolution procedure was applied to a large population of variants of the Tetrahymena group 1 ribozyme to obtain individuals with a 10(exp 5)-fold improved ability to cleave a target single-stranded DNA substrate under simulated physiological conditions. The evolved ribozymes also showed a twofold improvement, compared to the wild-type, in their ability to cleave a single-stranded RNA substrate. Here, we report continuation of the in vitro evolution process using a new selection strategy to achieve both enhanced DNA and diminished RNA-cleavage activity. Our strategy combines a positive selection for DNA cleavage with a negative selection against RNA binding. After 36 "generations" of in vitro evolution, the evolved population showed an approx. 100-fold increase in the ratio of DNA to RNA-cleavage activity. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment confirmed the selective advantage of two covarying mutations within the catalytic core of ribozyme that are largely responsible for this modified behavior. The population of ribozymes has now undergone a total of 63 successive generations of evolution, resulting in an average 28 mutations relative to the wild-type that are responsible for the altered phenotype.

  18. Common urologic problems in the elderly. Prostate cancer, outlet obstruction, and incontinence require special management.

    PubMed

    Reznicek, S B

    2000-01-01

    Urologic problems in elderly patients often require special management that considers life expectancy, general health, and the clinical significance of the disorder. For men with prostate carcinoma or outlet obstruction, new therapies have proliferated in the last 10 years. For elderly women with incontinence, an orderly evaluation process usually results in directed and effective treatment. Finally, long-term use of Foley catheters requires careful attention to detail so that serious problems can be avoided.

  19. Best Practices In The Emergency Department Management Of Children With Special Needs.

    PubMed

    Behar, Solomon; Cooper, John

    2015-06-01

    Children with special needs have a wide variety of physical and developmental challenges. These children often have medical devices, subtle presentations, and behavioral or psychiatric issues that demand consideration when delivering emergency care. Some of the more common issues include the evaluation and management of complications in devices such a gastrostomy/jejunostomy feeding tubes, cerebroventricular shunts, and tracheostomy tubes, as well as impediments to the performance of common emergency procedures (eg, laceration repair, sedation for imaging) on children with developmental or behavioral disorders. This review will examine each of these circumstances and provide guidance on the best approaches to managing these patients.

  20. Artificial neural networks in models of specialization, guild evolution and sympatric speciation.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Noél M A; Norrström, Niclas; Getz, Wayne M

    2007-03-29

    Sympatric speciation can arise as a result of disruptive selection with assortative mating as a pleiotropic by-product. Studies on host choice, employing artificial neural networks as models for the host recognition system in exploiters, illustrate how disruptive selection on host choice coupled with assortative mating can arise as a consequence of selection for specialization. Our studies demonstrate that a generalist exploiter population can evolve into a guild of specialists with an 'ideal free' frequency distribution across hosts. The ideal free distribution arises from variability in host suitability and density-dependent exploiter fitness on different host species. Specialists are less subject to inter-phenotypic competition than generalists and to harmful mutations that are common in generalists exploiting multiple hosts. When host signals used as cues by exploiters coevolve with exploiter recognition systems, our studies show that evolutionary changes may be continuous and cyclic. Selection changes back and forth between specialization and generalization in the exploiters, and weak and strong mimicry in the hosts, where non-defended hosts use the host investing in defence as a model. Thus, host signals and exploiter responses are engaged in a red-queen mimicry process that is ultimately cyclic rather then directional. In one phase, evolving signals of exploitable hosts mimic those of hosts less suitable for exploitation (i.e. the model). Signals in the model hosts also evolve through selection to escape the mimic and its exploiters. Response saturation constraints in the model hosts lead to the mimic hosts finally perfecting its mimicry, after which specialization in the exploiter guild is lost. This loss of exploiter specialization provides an opportunity for the model hosts to escape their mimics. Therefore, this cycle then repeats. We suggest that a species can readily evolve sympatrically when disruptive selection for specialization on hosts is the

  1. Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ernst

    1978-01-01

    Traces the history of evolution theory from Lamarck and Darwin to the present. Discusses natural selection in detail. Suggests that, besides biological evolution, there is also a cultural evolution which is more rapid than the former. (MA)

  2. Advances in plant virus evolution: Translating evolutionary insights into better disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Revolutionary theoretical concepts derived from experimental evolution have reached the realm of plant viruses, and their empirical demonstration is opening new avenues for disease management. From a populational standpoint, plant viruses and viroids constitute dynamic spectra of variants. The frequ...

  3. Clinical management of resistance evolution in a bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Robert J.; Read, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a chronic bacterial infection that could not be cured. Drug treatment became progressively less effective due to antibiotic resistance, and the patient died, in effect from overwhelming evolution. Even though the evolution of drug resistance was recognized as a major threat, and the fundamentals of drug resistance evolution are well understood, it was impossible to make evidence-based decisions about the evolutionary risks associated with the various treatment options. We present this case to illustrate the urgent need for translational research in the evolutionary medicine of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26454762

  4. Preferences, specialization, and management attitudes of trout anglers fishing in Tennessee tailwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, C.P.; Bettoli, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Efforts to manage several trout fisheries in Tennessee have been stymied by conflicts between management agencies and angler groups. To assist in preventing such conflicts in the future, we examined attitudes and motivations of trout anglers who fished eight tailwater fisheries in Tennessee during 2001-2002. Using a stratified random sampling design, anglers were contacted and interviewed on site (n = 2,643). Those anglers who agreed to complete a questionnaire (n = 1,942) were mailed a 10-page survey. Response rate to the mail survey was 55% after excluding surveys that were undeliverable. Angler subgroups were created using hierarchical cluster analyses of 14 variables related to experience, resource use, investment, and centrality of fishing to their lifestyle. Five subgroups of minimally to highly specialized anglers were identified, and nonhierarchical cluster analysis determined the size of each group (n = 178-369 anglers/group). Subgroups differed in the importance they attached to harvesting trout and catching trophy trout. The most disparate mean ratings among subgroups were for the motive of "obtaining fish to eat." Specialized anglers placed greater importance on catching a trophy fish, experiencing the catch, developing their skills, releasing fish, and restrictive regulations than did less-specialized anglers. Mean ratings for most of nine fishing regulations presented to anglers differed among tailwaters; however, bait restrictions and closed seasons received little support across all rivers. The Caney Fork, Clinch, and Hiwassee rivers had the most uniform distributions of anglers among the five subgroups and thus had a relatively high potential for conflicts over management decisions. The fisheries on the Elk, South Fork Holston, and Watauga rivers were dominated by the most specialized subgroups, indicating that the majority of anglers on those rivers would accept restrictive regulations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  5. The diverse applications of cladistic analysis of molecular evolution, with special reference to nested clade analysis.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    The genetic variation found in small regions of the genomes of many species can be arranged into haplotype trees that reflect the evolutionary genealogy of the DNA lineages found in that region and the accumulation of mutations on those lineages. This review demonstrates some of the many ways in which clades (branches) of haplotype trees have been applied in recent years, including the study of genotype/phenotype associations at candidate loci and in genome-wide association studies, the phylogeographic history of species, human evolution, the conservation of endangered species, and the identification of species.

  6. The Diverse Applications of Cladistic Analysis of Molecular Evolution, with Special Reference to Nested Clade Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    The genetic variation found in small regions of the genomes of many species can be arranged into haplotype trees that reflect the evolutionary genealogy of the DNA lineages found in that region and the accumulation of mutations on those lineages. This review demonstrates some of the many ways in which clades (branches) of haplotype trees have been applied in recent years, including the study of genotype/phenotype associations at candidate loci and in genome-wide association studies, the phylogeographic history of species, human evolution, the conservation of endangered species, and the identification of species. PMID:20162005

  7. Tectonics, orbital forcing, global climate change, and human evolution in Africa: introduction to the African paleoclimate special volume.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark A; Christensen, Beth

    2007-11-01

    The late Cenozoic climate of Africa is a critical component for understanding human evolution. African climate is controlled by major tectonic changes, global climate transitions, and local variations in orbital forcing. We introduce the special African Paleoclimate Issue of the Journal of Human Evolution by providing a background for and synthesis of the latest work relating to the environmental context for human evolution. Records presented in this special issue suggest that the regional tectonics, appearance of C(4) plants in East Africa, and late Cenozoic global cooling combined to produce a long-term drying trend in East Africa. Of particular importance is the uplift associated with the East African Rift Valley formation, which altered wind flow patterns from a more zonal to more meridinal direction. Results in this volume suggest a marked difference in the climate history of southern and eastern Africa, though both are clearly influenced by the major global climate thresholds crossed in the last 3 million years. Papers in this volume present lake, speleothem, and marine paleoclimate records showing that the East African long-term drying trend is punctuated by episodes of short, alternating periods of extreme wetness and aridity. These periods of extreme climate variability are characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of large, deep lakes in the East African Rift Valley and paralleled by low and high wind-driven dust loads reaching the adjacent ocean basins. Dating of these records show that over the last 3 million years such periods only occur at the times of major global climatic transitions, such as the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (2.7-2.5 Ma), intensification of the Walker Circulation (1.9-1.7 Ma), and the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (1-0.7 Ma). Authors in this volume suggest this onset occurs as high latitude forcing in both Hemispheres compresses the Intertropical Convergence Zone so that East Africa

  8. The evolution of surgery in the management of neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Chiesa, F; Lyubaev, V; Aidarbekova, A; Brzhezovskiy, V

    2006-01-01

    Summary In spite of advancement in science, molecular medicine and target therapies, surgical treatment of metastases using different techniques, from selective neck dissection to extended radical neck dissections, form a major part in the management of neck metastases. This is due to the fact that, so far, there is no treatment more effective for resectable neck metastases, than surgery. Since most head and neck cancer patients die due to loco-regional progression of disease, and a very large majority of them do not live long enough to develop distant metastases, the status of neck lymph nodes remains the single most important prognostic factor, in these cases. In the 100 years since George Washington Crile described Radical Neck Dissection, we now have a much better understanding of the biological and clinical behaviour of neck metastases. This has ultimately led to the conservative approaches of selective neck dissections depending on the primary site of the tumour, type of tumour and the characteristic features of the metastases themselves. A search of the literature on neck lymph nodes and neck dissections, on the internet and in old publications, not available in the electronic media, has been carried out. Using this as the basis, we arranged, in sequence, the dates of various landmarks in the treatment of head and neck cancer related to neck dissections to emphasize the overall process of evolution of neck dissection thereby showing how the field of head and neck surgery has travelled a long way from radical neck dissection to its modifications and further to selective neck dissections and sentinel node biopsies. The present understanding of the patterns of neck metastases enables us not only to adequately treat the neck metastases, but also to diagnose metastases from unknown primaries. Therefore, depending on the site of the primary tumour, it is now easy to predict the most probable route of metastatic spread and vice versa. This has enabled us to adopt

  9. Dietary Specialization during the Evolution of Western Eurasian Hominoids and the Extinction of European Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    DeMiguel, Daniel; Alba, David M.; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Given the central adaptive role of diet, paleodietary inference is essential for understanding the relationship between evolutionary and paleoenvironmental change. Here we rely on dental microwear analysis to investigate the role of dietary specialization in the diversification and extinction of Miocene hominoids from Western Eurasian between 14 and 7 Ma. New microwear results for five extinct taxa are analyzed together with previous data for other Western Eurasian genera. Except Pierolapithecus (that resembles hard-object feeders) and Oreopithecus (a soft-frugivore probably foraging opportunistically on other foods), most of the extinct taxa lack clear extant dietary analogues. They display some degee of sclerocarpy, which is most clearly expressed in Griphopithecus and Ouranopithecus (adapted to more open and arid environments), whereas Anoiapithecus, Dryopithecus and, especially, Hispanopithecus species apparently relied more strongly on soft-frugivory. Thus, contrasting with the prevailing sclerocarpic condition at the beginning of the Eurasian hominoid radiation, soft- and mixed-frugivory coexisted with hard-object feeding in the Late Miocene. Therefore, despite a climatic trend towards cooling and increased seasonality, a progressive dietary diversification would have occurred (probably due to competitive exclusion and increased environmental heterogeneity), although strict folivory did not evolve. Overall, our analyses support the view that the same dietary specializations that enabled Western Eurasian hominoids to face progressive climatic deterioration were the main factor ultimately leading to their extinction when more drastic paleoenvironmental changes took place. PMID:24848272

  10. Evolution of Mhc Class i Complex Region with Special Reference to Fragmentary Line Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yoshio; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-03-01

    We reviewed the origin and evolution of the two pairs of immune genes, (MHC-B and MHC-C) and (MICA and MICB) in man, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey based mainly on our previous work. Since those genes were well known to have been subject to strong natural selection in evolution, they themselves were not suitable for our study. We thus took another approach to use fragmented and nonfunctional LINEs that had coevolved with the two pairs in the same genomic fragments. Our results showed that MHC-B and MHC-C duplicated about 22 Mry (million years) ago, and MICA and MICB duplicated about 14 Myr ago. Interestingly, rhesus monkey was found not to have either pair but many repeats similar to MHC-B. Therefore, we estimated the divergence time of the monkey, and found that it diverged out from a common ancestor of man and chimpanzee about 30 Myr ago. The divergence time was consistent with the duplication times of the two pairs of immune genes. Based on our results we would predict that orangutan and gorilla also have the two pairs, because the both primate species are considered to have diverged less than 14 Myr ago.

  11. Introduction to Special Edition (of the Journal of Nuclear Materials Management) on Reducing the Threat from Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2007-03-01

    Introductory article for special edition of the JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT outlining the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technical Division. In particular the International Nuclear and Radiological Security Standing Committee and its initial focus covering four topical areas--Radiological Threat Reduction, Nuclear Smuggling and Illicit Trafficking, Countering Nuclear Terrorism, and Radioligical Terrorism Consequence Management.

  12. Introduction to special issue. Careful conversations: adolescents managing their parents' access to information.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Loes; Laird, Robert D

    2010-04-01

    Stattin and Kerr's (2000; Kerr & Stattin, 2000) seminal work challenged our understanding of parental monitoring, shifted attention to adolescents' agency as information managers, and pushed researchers to focus more on their measures and to think more about the interactional and relational processes that keep, or fail to keep, parents informed. Spurred by this reinterpretation of "parental monitoring", research has shifted in the last decade from a nearly exclusive focus on parents' role in socializing adolescents through monitoring their whereabouts, friendships, and activities, to a broader recognition of, and appreciation for, adolescents' active role in strategically managing their parents' access to information. This special issue showcases this new perspective by gathering a set of studies focusing collectively on a wide variety of information management strategies and exploring bidirectional links with indicators of youths' psychosocial adjustment and parent-child relationship qualities. PMID:19897234

  13. Genetic changes accompanying the evolution of host specialization in Drosophila sechellia.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Ian; Jones, Corbin D

    2009-02-01

    Changes in host specialization contribute to the diversification of phytophagous insects. When shifting to a new host, insects evolve new physiological, morphological, and behavioral adaptations. Our understanding of the genetic changes responsible for these adaptations is limited. For instance, we do not know how often host shifts involve gain-of-function vs. loss-of-function alleles. Recent work suggests that some genes involved in odor recognition are lost in specialists. Here we show that genes involved in detoxification and metabolism, as well as those affecting olfaction, have reduced gene expression in Drosophila sechellia-a specialist on the fruit of Morinda citrifolia. We screened for genes that differ in expression between D. sechellia and its generalist sister species, D. simulans. We also screened for genes that are differentially expressed in D. sechellia when these flies chose their preferred host vs. when they were forced onto other food. D. sechellia increases expression of genes involved with oogenesis and fatty acid metabolism when on its host. The majority of differentially expressed genes, however, appear downregulated in D. sechellia. For several functionally related genes, this decrease in expression is associated with apparent loss-of-function alleles. For example, the D. sechellia allele of Odorant binding protein 56e (Obp56e) harbors a premature stop codon. We show that knockdown of Obp56e activity significantly reduces the avoidance response of D. melanogaster toward M. citrifolia. We argue that apparent loss-of-function alleles like Obp56e potentially contributed to the initial adaptation of D. sechellia to its host. Our results suggest that a subset of genes reduce or lose function as a consequence of host specialization, which may explain why, in general, specialist insects tend to shift to chemically similar hosts.

  14. Insect herbivores, chemical innovation, and the evolution of habit specialization in Amazonian trees.

    PubMed

    Fine, Paul V A; Metz, Margaret R; Lokvam, John; Mesones, Italo; Zuñiga, J Milagros Ayarza; Lamarre, Greg P A; Pilco, Magno Vásquez; Baraloto, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Herbivores are often implicated in the generation of the extraordinarily diverse tropical flora. One hypothesis linking enemies to plant diversification posits that the evolution of novel defenses allows plants to escape their enemies and expand their ranges. When range expansion involves entering a new habitat type, this could accelerate defense evolution if habitats contain different assemblages of herbivores and/or divergent resource availabilities that affect plant defense allocation. We evaluated this hypothesis by investigating two sister habitat specialist ecotypes of Protium subserratum (Burseraceae), a common Amazonian tree that occurs in white-sand and terra firme forests. We collected insect herbivores feeding on the plants, assessed whether growth differences between habitats were genetically based using a reciprocal transplant experiment, and sampled multiple populations of both lineages for defense chemistry. Protium subserratum plants were attacked mainly by chrysomelid beetles and cicadellid hemipterans. Assemblages of insect herbivores were dissimilar between populations of ecotypes from different habitats, as well as from the same habitat 100 km distant. Populations from terra firme habitats grew significantly faster than white-sand populations; they were taller, produced more leaf area, and had more chlorophyll. White-sand populations expressed more dry mass of secondary compounds and accumulated more flavone glycosides and oxidized terpenes, whereas terra firme populations produced a coumaroylquinic acid that was absent from white-sand populations. We interpret these results as strong evidence that herbivores and resource availability select for divergent types and amounts of defense investment in white-sand and terra firme lineages of Protium subserratum, which may contribute to habitat-mediated speciation in these trees.

  15. A Review of Enrollment Management: Issues and Strategies. Management/Marketing Special Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ed; And Others

    This report presents findings and recommendations from a project undertaken by the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) to determine reasons for a decline in business course enrollments and develop strategies to increase enrollments in management and marketing programs throughout the district. Following background information on the…

  16. Evolution of neuronal mechanisms for echolocation: specializations for target-range computation in bats of the genus Pteronotus.

    PubMed

    Hechavarría, Julio C; Macías, Silvio; Vater, Marianne; Mora, Emanuel C; Kössl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Delay tuning was studied in the auditory cortex of Pteronotus quadridens. All the 136 delay-tuned units that were studied responded strongly to heteroharmonic pulse-echo pairs presented at specific delays. In the heteroharmonic pairs, the first sonar call harmonic marks the timing of pulse emission while one of the higher harmonics (second or third) indicates the timing of the echo. Delay-tuned units are organized chronotopically along a rostrocaudal axis according to their characteristic delay. There is no obvious indication of multiple cortical axes specialized in the processing of different harmonic combinations of pulse and echo. Results of this study serve for a straight comparison of cortical delay-tuning between P. quadridens and the well-studied mustached bat, Pteronotus parnellii. These two species stem from the most recent and most basal nodes in the Pteronotus lineage, respectively. P. quadridens and P. parnellii use comparable heteroharmonic target-range computation strategies even though they do not use biosonar calls of a similar design. P. quadridens uses short constant-frequency (CF)/frequency-modulated (FM) echolocation calls, while P. parnellii uses long CF/FM calls. The ability to perform "heteroharmonic" target-range computations might be an ancestral neuronal specialization of the genus Pteronotus that was subjected to positive Darwinian selection in the evolution.

  17. Recurrent evolution of host-specialized races in a globally distributed parasite

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Karen D; Chapuis, Elodie; Tirard, Claire; Boulinier, Thierry; Michalakis, Yannis; Bohec, Céline Le; Maho, Yvon Le; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The outcome of coevolutionary interactions is predicted to vary across landscapes depending on local conditions and levels of gene flow, with some populations evolving more extreme specializations than others. Using a globally distributed parasite of colonial seabirds, the tick Ixodes uriae, we examined how host availability and geographic isolation influences this process. In particular, we sampled ticks from 30 populations of six different seabird host species, three in the Southern Hemisphere and three in the Northern Hemisphere. We show that parasite races have evolved independently on hosts of both hemispheres. Moreover, the degree of differentiation between tick races varied spatially within each region and suggests that the divergence of tick races is an ongoing process that has occurred multiple times across isolated areas. As I. uriae is vector to the bacterium responsible for Lyme disease Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, these results may have important consequence for the epidemiology of this disease. With the increased occurrence of novel interspecific interactions due to global change, these results also stress the importance of the combined effects of gene flow and selection for parasite diversification. PMID:16243689

  18. Why is Madagascar special? The extraordinarily slow evolution of pelican spiders (Araneae, Archaeidae).

    PubMed

    Wood, Hannah M; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Griswold, Charles E; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-02-01

    Although Madagascar is an ancient fragment of Gondwana, the majority of taxa studied thus far appear to have reached the island through dispersal from Cenozoic times. Ancient lineages may have experienced a different history compared to more recent Cenozoic arrivals, as such lineages would have encountered geoclimatic shifts over an extended time period. The motivation for this study was to unravel the signature of diversification in an ancient lineage by comparing an area known for major geoclimatic upheavals (Madagascar) versus other areas where the environment has been relatively stable. Archaeid spiders are an ancient paleoendemic group with unusual predatory behaviors and spectacular trophic morphology that likely have been on Madagascar since its isolation. We examined disparities between Madagascan archaeids and their non-Madagascan relatives regarding timing of divergence, rates of trait evolution, and distribution patterns. Results reveal an increased rate of adaptive trait diversification in Madagascan archaeids. Furthermore, geoclimatic events in Madagascar over long periods of time may have facilitated high species richness due to montane refugia and stability, rainforest refugia, and also ecogeographic shifts, allowing for the accumulation of adaptive traits. This research suggests that time alone, coupled with more ancient geoclimatic events allowed for the different patterns in Madagascar. PMID:25491087

  19. Why is Madagascar special? The extraordinarily slow evolution of pelican spiders (Araneae, Archaeidae).

    PubMed

    Wood, Hannah M; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Griswold, Charles E; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-02-01

    Although Madagascar is an ancient fragment of Gondwana, the majority of taxa studied thus far appear to have reached the island through dispersal from Cenozoic times. Ancient lineages may have experienced a different history compared to more recent Cenozoic arrivals, as such lineages would have encountered geoclimatic shifts over an extended time period. The motivation for this study was to unravel the signature of diversification in an ancient lineage by comparing an area known for major geoclimatic upheavals (Madagascar) versus other areas where the environment has been relatively stable. Archaeid spiders are an ancient paleoendemic group with unusual predatory behaviors and spectacular trophic morphology that likely have been on Madagascar since its isolation. We examined disparities between Madagascan archaeids and their non-Madagascan relatives regarding timing of divergence, rates of trait evolution, and distribution patterns. Results reveal an increased rate of adaptive trait diversification in Madagascan archaeids. Furthermore, geoclimatic events in Madagascar over long periods of time may have facilitated high species richness due to montane refugia and stability, rainforest refugia, and also ecogeographic shifts, allowing for the accumulation of adaptive traits. This research suggests that time alone, coupled with more ancient geoclimatic events allowed for the different patterns in Madagascar.

  20. Polygenic evolution of a sugar specialization trade-off in yeast.

    PubMed

    Roop, Jeremy I; Chang, Kyu Chul; Brem, Rachel B

    2016-02-18

    The evolution of novel traits can involve many mutations scattered throughout the genome. Detecting and validating such a suite of alleles, particularly if they arose long ago, remains a key challenge in evolutionary genetics. Here we dissect an evolutionary trade-off of unprecedented genetic complexity between long-diverged species. When cultured in 1% glucose medium supplemented with galactose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not S. bayanus or other Saccharomyces species, delayed commitment to galactose metabolism until glucose was exhausted. Promoters of seven galactose (GAL) metabolic genes from S. cerevisiae, when introduced together into S. bayanus, largely recapitulated the delay phenotype in 1% glucose-galactose medium, and most had partial effects when tested in isolation. Variation in GAL coding regions also contributed to the delay when tested individually in 1% glucose-galactose medium. When combined, S. cerevisiae GAL coding regions gave rise to profound growth defects in the S. bayanus background. In medium containing 2.5% glucose supplemented with galactose, wild-type S. cerevisiae repressed GAL gene expression and had a robust growth advantage relative to S. bayanus; transgenesis of S. cerevisiae GAL promoter alleles or GAL coding regions was sufficient for partial reconstruction of these phenotypes. S. cerevisiae GAL genes thus encode a regulatory program of slow induction and avid repression, and a fitness detriment during the glucose-galactose transition but a benefit when glucose is in excess. Together, these results make clear that genetic mapping of complex phenotypes is within reach, even in deeply diverged species.

  1. The evolution of Crew Resource Management training in commercial aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Merritt, A. C.; Wilhelm, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we describe changes in the nature of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in commercial aviation, including its shift from cockpit to crew resource management. Validation of the impact of CRM is discussed. Limitations of CRM, including lack of cross-cultural generality are considered. An overarching framework that stresses error management to increase acceptance of CRM concepts is presented. The error management approach defines behavioral strategies taught in CRM as error countermeasures that are employed to avoid error, to trap errors committed, and to mitigate the consequences of error.

  2. Evolution of anatomical and physiological specialization in the compound eyes of stomatopod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Porter, Megan L; Zhang, Yunfei; Desai, Shivani; Caldwell, Roy L; Cronin, Thomas W

    2010-10-15

    Stomatopod crustaceans have complex and diverse visual systems. Among their many unique features are a specialized ommatidial region (the midband) that enables the eye to have multiple overlapping visual fields, as well as sets of spectral filters that are intercalated at two levels between tiers of photoreceptors involved in polychromatic color vision. Although the physiology and visual function of stomatopod eyes have been studied for many years, how these unique visual features originated and diversified is still an open question. In order to investigate how stomatopods have attained the current complexity in visual function, we have combined physiological and morphological information (e.g. number of midband rows, number of filters in the retina, and the spectral properties of filters) with new phylogenetic analyses of relationships among species based on nucleotide sequence data from two nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and two mitochondrial [16S and cytochrome oxidase I (COI)] genes. Based on our recovered phylogenetic relationships among species, we propose two new superfamilies within the Stomatopoda: Hemisquilloidea and Pseudosquillodea. Maximum likelihood ancestral state reconstructions indicate that ancestral stomatopod eyes contained six midband rows and four intrarhabdomal filters, illustrating that the visual physiological complexity originated early in stomatopod evolutionary history. While the two distal filters contain conservative sets of filter pigments, the proximal filters show more spectral diversity in filter types, particularly in midband row 2, and are involved in tuning the color vision system to the photic environment. In particular, a set of related gonodactyloid families (Gonodactylidae, Protosquillidae, Takuidae) inhabiting shallow, brightly lit coral reef waters contain the largest diversity of filter pigments, which are spectrally placed relative to the underlying photoreceptors to take advantage of the broad spectrum of light available in

  3. Hydrophobic Core Variations Provide a Structural Framework for Tyrosine Kinase Evolution and Functional Specialization.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Oruganty, Krishnadev; Kwon, Annie; Byrne, Dominic P; Ferries, Samantha; Ruan, Zheng; Hanold, Laura E; Katiyar, Samiksha; Kennedy, Eileen J; Eyers, Patrick A; Kannan, Natarajan

    2016-02-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are a group of closely related enzymes that have evolutionarily diverged from serine/threonine kinases (STKs) to regulate pathways associated with multi-cellularity. Evolutionary divergence of PTKs from STKs has occurred through accumulation of mutations in the active site as well as in the commonly conserved hydrophobic core. While the functional significance of active site variations is well understood, relatively little is known about how hydrophobic core variations contribute to PTK evolutionary divergence. Here, using a combination of statistical sequence comparisons, molecular dynamics simulations, mutational analysis and in vitro thermostability and kinase assays, we investigate the structural and functional significance of key PTK-specific variations in the kinase core. We find that the nature of residues and interactions in the hydrophobic core of PTKs is strikingly different from other protein kinases, and PTK-specific variations in the core contribute to functional divergence by altering the stability and dynamics of the kinase domain. In particular, a functionally critical STK-conserved histidine that stabilizes the regulatory spine in STKs is selectively mutated to an alanine, serine or glutamate in PTKs, and this loss-of-function mutation is accommodated, in part, through compensatory PTK-specific interactions in the core. In particular, a PTK-conserved phenylalanine in the I-helix appears to structurally and functionally compensate for the loss of STK-histidine by interacting with the regulatory spine, which has far-reaching effects on enzyme activity, inhibitor sensing, and stability. We propose that hydrophobic core variations provide a selective advantage during PTK evolution by increasing the conformational flexibility, and therefore the allosteric potential of the kinase domain. Our studies also suggest that Tyrosine Kinase Like kinases such as RAF are intermediates in PTK evolutionary divergence inasmuch as they

  4. Hydrophobic Core Variations Provide a Structural Framework for Tyrosine Kinase Evolution and Functional Specialization

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Annie; Byrne, Dominic P.; Ferries, Samantha; Ruan, Zheng; Hanold, Laura E.; Katiyar, Samiksha; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Eyers, Patrick A.; Kannan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are a group of closely related enzymes that have evolutionarily diverged from serine/threonine kinases (STKs) to regulate pathways associated with multi-cellularity. Evolutionary divergence of PTKs from STKs has occurred through accumulation of mutations in the active site as well as in the commonly conserved hydrophobic core. While the functional significance of active site variations is well understood, relatively little is known about how hydrophobic core variations contribute to PTK evolutionary divergence. Here, using a combination of statistical sequence comparisons, molecular dynamics simulations, mutational analysis and in vitro thermostability and kinase assays, we investigate the structural and functional significance of key PTK-specific variations in the kinase core. We find that the nature of residues and interactions in the hydrophobic core of PTKs is strikingly different from other protein kinases, and PTK-specific variations in the core contribute to functional divergence by altering the stability and dynamics of the kinase domain. In particular, a functionally critical STK-conserved histidine that stabilizes the regulatory spine in STKs is selectively mutated to an alanine, serine or glutamate in PTKs, and this loss-of-function mutation is accommodated, in part, through compensatory PTK-specific interactions in the core. In particular, a PTK-conserved phenylalanine in the I-helix appears to structurally and functionally compensate for the loss of STK-histidine by interacting with the regulatory spine, which has far-reaching effects on enzyme activity, inhibitor sensing, and stability. We propose that hydrophobic core variations provide a selective advantage during PTK evolution by increasing the conformational flexibility, and therefore the allosteric potential of the kinase domain. Our studies also suggest that Tyrosine Kinase Like kinases such as RAF are intermediates in PTK evolutionary divergence inasmuch as they

  5. ADHD in school-aged youth: Management and special treatment considerations in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Weed, Elizabeth D

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is considered one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. Primary care providers are in the unique position of providing comprehensive care-routine care, well child visits, immunizations, and other healthcare needs-to a majority of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. As such, primary care providers are pivotal in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of this population. This article will address special treatment considerations to aid in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the primary care setting, including substance use disorders and diversion, cardiac issues and stimulant medication, medication holidays and follow-up monitoring. The database of PubMed was searched using keywords that included attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children, prevalence, medication holidays, safety, cardiovascular, cardiac, blood pressure, substance use, diversion, adverse drug reactions; inclusion dates were January 1, 2011 to September 30, 2015.

  6. Special report writer: A flexible information management system. Documentation and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A special report writer (SSR) was developed which performs multiple correlations on files containing several data hierarchies. Output reports are specified in a simple notation, readily learned by persons having limited familarity with ADP. The SRR system can be adopted by other NASA installations while the basic techniques themselves are compatible with the information management needs of a wide range of organizations. Specifically, the program lends itself to generalization and can be readily adapted for other file management purposes. Extensive details on the characteristics of the SRR program are presented along with a full explanation of the system for those contemplating its application to other data bases. The complete COBOL program and documentation are available.

  7. Ethical Issues in Managed Care: Perspectives in Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belar, Cynthia D.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Challenges that many issues addressed by Cooper and Gottlieb have been longstanding in the profession. Argues against the belief that the managed care environment is fraught with more ethical…

  8. Product self-management: evolution in recycling and reuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Valerie M

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the potential to make product recycling and reuse easier by shifting responsibility for product management toward the product itself. Examples range from barcode-enabled Internet sales of used products to RFID-enabled garbage trucks that identify recyclable items and provide rebates. Initial steps toward product self-management have made opportunistic use of product bar codes and Internet markets. In the United States, Internet markets are driving increased reuse of products. In the European Union, recycling and waste management policy is driving the use of radio electronics in waste management. Prospects for product self-management are assessed from both a technological and an economic perspective. The technological analysis indicates that radio-frequency tags offer some advantages over bar codes, but their application to product self-management requires considerable investment in the waste management infrastructure. This suggests that early applications of advanced product tags are most suitable for Germany and other countries where the waste management industry has already integrated information technology into its operations. The economic analysis indicates that increased reuse of products can reduce consumption of new products and materials, although on a less than one-to-one basis, simultaneously reducing costs for consumers and deriving more value from existing products.

  9. Product self-management: evolution in recycling and reuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Valerie M

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the potential to make product recycling and reuse easier by shifting responsibility for product management toward the product itself. Examples range from barcode-enabled Internet sales of used products to RFID-enabled garbage trucks that identify recyclable items and provide rebates. Initial steps toward product self-management have made opportunistic use of product bar codes and Internet markets. In the United States, Internet markets are driving increased reuse of products. In the European Union, recycling and waste management policy is driving the use of radio electronics in waste management. Prospects for product self-management are assessed from both a technological and an economic perspective. The technological analysis indicates that radio-frequency tags offer some advantages over bar codes, but their application to product self-management requires considerable investment in the waste management infrastructure. This suggests that early applications of advanced product tags are most suitable for Germany and other countries where the waste management industry has already integrated information technology into its operations. The economic analysis indicates that increased reuse of products can reduce consumption of new products and materials, although on a less than one-to-one basis, simultaneously reducing costs for consumers and deriving more value from existing products. PMID:14700313

  10. Sustainable natural resource management and environmental assessment in the Salt Lake (Tuz Golu) Specially Protected Area.

    PubMed

    Dengiz, Orhan; Ozcan, Hesna; Koksal, E Selim; Baskan, Oguz; Kosker, Yakup

    2010-02-01

    The Salt Lake Specially Protected Area is a unique ecosystem for both agricultural activities and natural life in Turkey. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a conceptual land use strategy and methodology, taking into account ecological factors for regional development in the Salt Lake Specially Protected Area. A detailed Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis was done to create a comprehensive database including land use, land suitability, and environmental factors (soil, climate, water quality, fertilizing status, and heavy metal and pesticide pollution). The results of the land suitability survey for agricultural use showed that, while 62.6% of the study area soils were classified as best and relatively good, about 15% were classified as problematic and restricted lands, only 22.2% of the study area soils were not suitable for agricultural uses. However, this is not enough to derive maximum benefit with minimum degradation. Therefore, environmental factors and ecological conditions were combined to support this aim and to protect the ecosystem. Excessive irrigation practices, fertilizer and pesticide application, and incorrect management practices all accelerate salinization and degradation. In addition to this, it was found that a multi-layer GIS analysis made it easy to develop a framework for optimum land use and could increase the production yield preserving the environmental conditions. Finally, alternative management and crop patterns were undertaken to sustain this unique ecosystem, considering water, soil, climate, land use characteristics, and to provide guidance for planners or decision makers.

  11. Revisiting Cost-Benefit Relationships of Behavior Management Strategies: What Special Educators Say about Usefulness, Intensity, and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaff, Marilyn S.; Zabel, Robert H.; Milham, Morgan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors determine special educators' judgments of the use, intensity, and effectiveness of communication and behavior management strategies. In an earlier study, F. H. Wood (1991) examined general educators' cost-benefit considerations in managing behavior of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. As an extension of…

  12. Preparing for Managed Care in Children's Services: A Guide for Mental Health, Child Welfare, Juvenile Justice and Special Education Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mordock, John B.

    Leaders in the fields of child mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, and special education face the challenge of incorporating managed care practices into their service delivery systems. This manual discusses the introduction of managed care practices in these fields and is intended to assist staff of agencies to become familiar with…

  13. CROWNWeb--the evolution of kidney data management (Part I).

    PubMed

    McDonough, Matthew J

    2008-03-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is developing a Web-based application, Consolidated Renal Operations in a Web-Enabled Network (CROWNWeb), which is designed to facilitate data entry, updating, and retrieval for dialysis facilities nationwide. Part 1 of this three-part series outlines the history of end-stage renal disease and Medicare, and covers the rapid growth of ESRD data management as well as other events that require progression to an online data collection and management system.

  14. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Ham, Kenneth; Kszos, Lynn A; Loar, James M; McCracken, Kitty; Morris, Gail Wright; Peterson, Mark J; Ryon, Michael G; Smith, John G; Southworth, George R; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  15. Evolution in clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs.

  16. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  17. Newspaper Ethics and Managing Editors: The Evolution of APME's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mott, John

    A review of the 42-year development of the professional code of ethics of the Associated Press Managing Editors (APME) demonstrates an effort to elevate newspaper ethical standards around the country. Following the example of the American Society of Newspaper Editors in establishing its "Canons of Journalism" in 1923, the APME formed a criteria…

  18. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  19. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  20. Space Station Freedom data management system growth and evolution report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R.; Davis, G.; Grant, T. L.; Gibson, J.; Hedges, R.; Johnson, M. J.; Liu, Y. K.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Sliwa, N.; Sowizral, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Information Sciences Division at the NASA Ames Research Center has completed a 6-month study of portions of the Space Station Freedom Data Management System (DMS). This study looked at the present capabilities and future growth potential of the DMS, and the results are documented in this report. Issues have been raised that were discussed with the appropriate Johnson Space Center (JSC) management and Work Package-2 contractor organizations. Areas requiring additional study have been identified and suggestions for long-term upgrades have been proposed. This activity has allowed the Ames personnel to develop a rapport with the JSC civil service and contractor teams that does permit an independent check and balance technique for the DMS.

  1. Evolution in Clinical Knowledge Management Strategy at Intermountain Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Nathan C.; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs. PMID:23304309

  2. Evolution in clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs. PMID:23304309

  3. The Evolution of Information Management in Oceanographic Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reser, B.; Mesick, S.; Lobecker, E.

    2012-12-01

    Emerging technologies in data collection, processing, and telecommunication have made data management a vital and ever evolving component of scientific research and exploration. Automation and streamlining of these technologies have enabled a paradigm shift in the approach to ocean research aboard the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Telepresence technologies allow the real time collaboration of at sea technicians and scientists with shore side scientists as well as near real time access to the datasets being collected. This approach has allowed for a large team of shore side experts in various fields to drive at-sea collection and exploration efforts, enabling the analysis and evaluation of as high quality data as possible. Automated and standardized data management efforts that have been integrated into this model allow for the rapid and efficient collection, processing, and archival of the information in national public archives. As new sampling and survey technologies are developed they have been, and will continue to be, adapted into the existing end-to-end information management model. Most recently this was accomplished in a collaborative effort between NOAA, NSF, WHOI, Duke, URI, and the USGS in a cruise along the Blake Ridge and Cape Fear Diapirs. This cruise successfully integrated shipboard data collection with the Sentry AUV in the search for, and exploration of, cold seep communities along the US Atlantic Margin.

  4. Anal squamous cell carcinoma: An evolution in disease and management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Marc C; Maykel, Justin; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer represents less than 1% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Yet, despite the relative paucity of cases, the incidence of anal cancer has seen a steady about 2% rise each year over the last decade. As such, all healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the evaluation and treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma. While chemoradiation remains the mainstay of therapy for most patients with anal cancer, surgery may still be required in recurrent, recalcitrant and palliative disease. In this manuscript, we will explore the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. PMID:25278699

  5. Evolution of imaging and management systems in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chester H; Randazzo, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontists have long been among the most progressive of the dental specialists, quick to embrace new technologies for enhancing clinical efficiencies and practice workflow. Orthodontic software innovations, whether for imaging and clinical applications or for managing the business side of a practice, have led the consistent need for more powerful computing requirements for more than 4 decades. This article recounts the history of how computers and orthodontic software have been used in America from their nascence to today and provides an outlook for the future. PMID:27241988

  6. ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL WASTE CONFIGURATIONS AT THE SRS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V; Raymond Dewberry, R

    2007-05-14

    Job Control Waste (JCW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Solid Waste Management Facilities (SWMF) may be disposed of in special containers, and the analysis of these containers requires developing specific analysis methodologies. A method has been developed for the routine assay of prohibited items (liquids, etc.) contained in a 30-gallon drum that is then placed into a 55-gallon drum. Method development consisted of system calibration with a NIST standard at various drum-to-detector distances, method verification with a liquid sample containing a known amount of Pu-238, and modeling the inner container using Ortec Isotopic software. Using this method for measurement of the known standard in the drum-in-drum configuration produced excellent agreement (within 15%) with the known value. Savannah River Site Solid Waste Management also requested analysis of waste contained in large black boxes (commonly 18-feet x 12-feet x 7-feet) stored at the SWMF. These boxes are frequently stored in high background areas and background radiation must be considered for each analysis. A detection limit of less than 150 fissile-gram-equivalents (FGE) of TRU waste is required for the black-box analyses. There is usually excellent agreement for the measurements at different distances and measurement uncertainties of about 50% are obtained at distances of at least twenty feet from the box. This paper discusses the experimental setup, analysis and data evaluation for drum-in-drum and black box waste configurations at SRS.

  7. Emergency medical consequence planning and management for national special security events after September 11: Boston 2004.

    PubMed

    Kade, Kristy A; Brinsfield, Kathryn H; Serino, Richard A; Savoia, Elena; Koh, Howard K

    2008-10-01

    The post-September 11 era has prompted unprecedented attention to medical preparations for national special security events (NSSE), requiring extraordinary planning and coordination among federal, state, and local agencies. For an NSSE, the US Secret Service (USSS) serves as the lead agency for all security operations and coordinates with relevant partners to provide for the safety and welfare of participants. For the 2004 Democratic National Convention (DNC), designated an NSSE, the USSS tasked the Boston Emergency Medical Services (BEMS) of the Boston Public Health Commission with the design and implementation of health services related to the Convention. In this article, we describe the planning and development of BEMS' robust 2004 DNC Medical Consequence Management Plan, addressing the following activities: public health surveillance, on-site medical care, surge capacity in the event of a mass casualty incident, and management of federal response assets. Lessons learned from enhanced medical planning for the 2004 DNC may serve as an effective model for future mass gathering events. PMID:18688202

  8. Performance evolution and expectations management: lessons from Tevatron and other machines

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    We review the LHC luminosity progress in 2010, discuss the luminosity evolution of the Tevatron collider at different stages of the Collider Runs, emphasize general dynamics of the process, compare with the performance of the other colliders analyze planned and delivered luminosity integrals, and discuss the expectation management lessons.

  9. The Continuing Evolution of Water Management in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udall, B.

    2011-12-01

    Since the early 1990s Australia has pursued a broad national agenda of water reform which includes full cost pricing, sufficient water for the environment, water conservation, irrigation infrastructure improvements, and clear delineation of roles and responsibilities of different water institutions among other reforms. A series of substantial changes to commonwealth and state law has resulted from these major initiatives. This reform effort was capped by groundbreaking commonwealth legislation in 2007 and 2008 that to large extent federalized the operation of the nation's largest river system, the Murray-Darling. A new basin wide authority, the MDBA, was created to manage the river via the concept of sustainable diversion limits (SDLs) to be promulgated through additional federal legislation. The October 2010 initial plan for these SDLs suggested cuts in use of up to 40% in the basin and was met with widespread opposition by irrigators. Subsequently, top leadership in the MDBA resigned, a number of parliamentary inquiries were begun, and the entire process has been delayed. How did Australia get to its current position with respect to water reform, and what is the likely outcome of the current delay? How has water management evolved in Australia over the last 20 years? What lessons exist for the Western United States?

  10. Convergent Evolution of Health Information Management and Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, C. J.; Abrams, K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clearly defined boundaries are disappearing among the activities, sources, and uses of health care data and information managed by health information management (HIM) and health informatics (HI) professionals. Definitions of the professional domains and scopes of practice for HIM and HI are converging with the proliferation of information and communication technologies in health care settings. Convergence is changing both the roles that HIM and HI professionals serve in their organizations as well as the competencies necessary for training future professionals. Many of these changes suggest a blurring of roles and responsibilities with increasingly overlapping curricula, job descriptions, and research agendas. Blurred lines in a highly competitive market create confusion for students and employers. In this essay, we provide some perspective on the changing landscape and suggest a course for the future. First we review the evolving definitions of HIM and HI. We next compare the current domains and competencies, review the characteristics as well as the education and credentialing of both disciplines, and examine areas of convergence. Given the current state, we suggest a path forward to strengthen the contributions HIM and HI professionals and educators make to the evolving health care environment. PMID:25848421

  11. Frequency and inheritance of non-male producing clones in Daphnia magna: evolution towards sex specialization in a cyclical parthenogen?

    PubMed

    Galimov, Y; Walser, B; Haag, C R

    2011-07-01

    In Daphnia (Cladocera, Crustacea), parthenogenetic reproduction alternates with sexual reproduction. Individuals of both sexes that belong to the same parthenogenetic line are genetically identical, and their sex is determined by the environment. Previously, non-male producing (NMP) genotypes have been described in species of the Daphnia pulex group. Such genotypes can only persist through phases of sexual reproduction if they co-occur with normal (MP) genotypes that produce both males and females, and thus the breeding system polymorphism is similar to gynodioecy (coexistence of females with hermaphrodites), which is well known in plants. Here we show that the same breeding system polymorphism also occurs in Daphnia magna, a species that has diverged from D. pulex more than 100 MY ago. Depending on the population, between 0% and 40% of D. magna females do not produce males when experimentally exposed to a concentration of the putative sex hormone methyl farnesoate that normally leads to male-only clutches. Natural broods of these NMP females never contained males, contrasting with high proportions of male offspring in MP females from the same populations. The results from a series of crossing experiments suggest that NMP is determined by a dominant allele at a single nuclear locus (or a several closely linked loci): NMP × MP crosses always yielded 50% NMP and 50% MP offspring, whereas MP × MP crosses always yielded 100% MP offspring. Based on cytochrome c oxidase subunit I-sequences, we found that NMP genotypes from different populations belong to three highly divergent mitochondrial lineages, potentially representing three independent evolutionary origins of NMP in D. magna. Thus, the evolution of NMP genotypes in cyclical parthenogens may be more common than previously thought. Moreover, MP genotypes that coexist with NMP genotypes may have responded to the presence of the latter by partially specializing on male production. Hence, these populations of D

  12. Coping with Stress in the Special Education Classroom: Can Individual Teachers More Effectively Manage Stress?. ERIC Digest #E545.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Mary

    This digest discusses why special education teachers may become stressed by role overload and lack of autonomy, and presents strategies for successfully managing stresses related to teaching. Strategies include: (1) setting realistic expectations; (2) making distinctions between job and personal life; (3) finding ways to exercise professional…

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Short Anger Management Group for Special Education Teachers in Greece: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Tsiligiannis, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a psychoeducational group for Greek special education teachers, all but one of whom reported experiencing anger in class. An anger management program was designed, which included a short, four-session package to be given within two weeks. The results of a pretest-posttest comparison revealed reductions in…

  14. Examining the Perceptions of Secondary School General Education Administrators Regarding the Supervision and Management of Special Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes a report of the results of a quantitative and qualitative research project that examined the perceptions of 58 secondary general education administrators regarding the supervision and management of special education programs in their buildings. Data were gathered through an online survey that requested participants to…

  15. Education and Training of Nurse Teachers and Managers with Special Regard to Primary Health Care. Technical Report Series 708.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    A 1983 committee report is presented of the World Health Organization Expert Committee on the Education and Training of Nurse Teachers and Managers with Special Regard to Primary Health Care. After discussing the changing context of health care and trends in primary health care, changes required in education and training in health systems based on…

  16. Report: future industrial solid waste management in pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ), Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarani, Babak; Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza Alavi; Mokhtarani, Nader; Khaledi, Hossein Jomeh

    2006-06-01

    The Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ) is located in the south of Iran, on the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf. This area was established in 1998 for the utilization of south Pars field oil and gas resources. This field is one of the largest gas resources in the world and contains about 6% of the total fossil fuels known. Petrochemical industries, gas refineries and downstream industries are being constructed in this area. At present there are three gas refineries in operation and five more gas refineries are under construction. In this study, different types of solid waste including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial wastes were investigated separately. The aim of the study was to focus on the management of the industrial wastes in order to minimize the environmental impact. In the first stage, the types and amounts of industrial waste in PSEEZ were evaluated by an inventory. The main types of industrial waste are oil products (fuel oil, light oil, lubricating oil), spent catalysts, adsorbents, resins, coke, wax and packaging materials. The waste management of PSEEZ is quite complex because of the different types of industry and the diversity of industrial residues. In some cases recycling/reuse of waste is the best option, but treatment and disposal are also necessary tools. Recently a design has been prepared for a disposal site in PSEEZ for the industrial waste that cannot be reused or recycled. The total surface area of this disposal site where the industrial waste should be tipped for the next 20 years was estimated to be about 42 000 m2.

  17. Report: future industrial solid waste management in pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ), Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarani, Babak; Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza Alavi; Mokhtarani, Nader; Khaledi, Hossein Jomeh

    2006-06-01

    The Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (PSEEZ) is located in the south of Iran, on the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf. This area was established in 1998 for the utilization of south Pars field oil and gas resources. This field is one of the largest gas resources in the world and contains about 6% of the total fossil fuels known. Petrochemical industries, gas refineries and downstream industries are being constructed in this area. At present there are three gas refineries in operation and five more gas refineries are under construction. In this study, different types of solid waste including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial wastes were investigated separately. The aim of the study was to focus on the management of the industrial wastes in order to minimize the environmental impact. In the first stage, the types and amounts of industrial waste in PSEEZ were evaluated by an inventory. The main types of industrial waste are oil products (fuel oil, light oil, lubricating oil), spent catalysts, adsorbents, resins, coke, wax and packaging materials. The waste management of PSEEZ is quite complex because of the different types of industry and the diversity of industrial residues. In some cases recycling/reuse of waste is the best option, but treatment and disposal are also necessary tools. Recently a design has been prepared for a disposal site in PSEEZ for the industrial waste that cannot be reused or recycled. The total surface area of this disposal site where the industrial waste should be tipped for the next 20 years was estimated to be about 42 000 m2. PMID:16784172

  18. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery.

  19. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery. PMID:25459347

  20. Evolution of quality management: integration of quality assurance functions into operations, or "quality is everyone's responsibility".

    PubMed

    Foss, Mary L; Breanndan Moore, S

    2003-09-01

    The management of quality in the Division of Transfusion Medicine at our institution has undergone a lengthy, sometimes painful but always progressive evolution over nearly four decades. Initially, it consisted of one laboratory technologist who was assigned the task of performing certain basic QC checks on a predetermined list of laboratory, collection, and processing steps. This technologist reported directly to the medical director. The tasks gradually grew in volume and complexity so that a four-person quality unit was established, administratively quite separate from the operations and accountable only to the Medical Director. The next stage in the evolutionary process was more revolutionary in scope because it involved a comprehensive cultural shift toward the concept of "quality is everyone's responsibility." The evolutionary process in our institution to date and the planning and organization involved in the direction and management of the evolution itself are described.

  1. Health-related quality of life and quality of care in specialized medicare-managed care plans.

    PubMed

    Grace, Susan C; Elliott, Marc N; Giordano, Laura A; Burroughs, James N; Malinoff, Rochelle L

    2013-01-01

    Special needs plans (SNPs) were created under the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 to focus on Medicare beneficiaries who required more coordination of care than most beneficiaries served through the Medicare Advantage program. This research indicates that beneficiaries in 3 types of SNPs show evidence of worse health-related quality of life. Special needs plans demonstrated worse plan performance on the HEDIS osteoporosis testing in older women measure compared with non-SNP Medicare Advantage beneficiaries, but better plan performance on the HEDIS fall risk management measure. Future research should consider broader measures of plan performance, quality of care, and cost.

  2. Quality management tools: facilitating clinical research data integrity by utilizing specialized reports with electronic case report forms.

    PubMed

    Trocky, N M; Fontinha, M

    2005-01-01

    Data collected throughout the course of a clinical research trial must be reviewed for accuracy and completeness continually. The Oracle Clinical (OC) data management application utilized to capture clinical data facilitates data integrity through pre-programmed validations, edit and range checks, and discrepancy management modules. These functions were not enough. Coupled with the use of specially created reports in Oracle Discoverer and Integrated Review, both ad-hoc query and reporting tools, research staff have enhanced their ability to clean, analyze and report more accurate data captured within and among Case Report Forms (eCRFs) by individual study or across multiple studies.

  3. Quality Management Tools: Facilitating Clinical Research Data Integrity by Utilizing Specialized Reports with Electronic Case Report Forms

    PubMed Central

    Trocky, NM; Fontinha, M

    2005-01-01

    Data collected throughout the course of a clinical research trial must be reviewed for accuracy and completeness continually. The Oracle Clinical® (OC) data management application utilized to capture clinical data facilitates data integrity through pre-programmed validations, edit and range checks, and discrepancy management modules. These functions were not enough. Coupled with the use of specially created reports in Oracle Discoverer® and Integrated Review TM, both ad-hoc query and reporting tools, research staff have enhanced their ability to clean, analyze and report more accurate data captured within and among Case Report Forms (eCRFs) by individual study or across multiple studies. PMID:16779428

  4. The evolution of case management for service members injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Patricia Watts; Kenny, Deborah J; Gordon, Deborah R; Benner, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    In this article we describe the nursing care needs of wounded service members (WSMs) from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the evolving role of the nurse case manager (CM). New types of injuries, in-field treatment, immediate transport to multiple care centers, and new technologies have created a new patient population of WSMs that requires new types of nursing care and knowledge. We interviewed 235 nurses, including CMs from nine military treatment facilities (MTFs) and the Veterans Administration (VA), on actual patient care experiences and new knowledge development, and 67 WSMs about their experiences of care. New military and VA nurse case management roles are essential for the effective functioning of the evolving, highly specialized, and transport-based health care system. Working effectively with WSMs required that the CM role be expanded beyond health care management to include family support, re-entry, and life coaching for the extremely altered life circumstances of WSMs.

  5. The evolution of case management for service members injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Patricia Watts; Kenny, Deborah J; Gordon, Deborah R; Benner, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    In this article we describe the nursing care needs of wounded service members (WSMs) from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the evolving role of the nurse case manager (CM). New types of injuries, in-field treatment, immediate transport to multiple care centers, and new technologies have created a new patient population of WSMs that requires new types of nursing care and knowledge. We interviewed 235 nurses, including CMs from nine military treatment facilities (MTFs) and the Veterans Administration (VA), on actual patient care experiences and new knowledge development, and 67 WSMs about their experiences of care. New military and VA nurse case management roles are essential for the effective functioning of the evolving, highly specialized, and transport-based health care system. Working effectively with WSMs required that the CM role be expanded beyond health care management to include family support, re-entry, and life coaching for the extremely altered life circumstances of WSMs. PMID:25288405

  6. The joint evolution of traits and habitat: ontogenetic shifts in leaf morphology and wetland specialization in Lasthenia.

    PubMed

    Forrestel, Elisabeth J; Ackerly, David D; Emery, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    The interplay between functional traits and habitat associations drives species' evolutionary responses to environmental heterogeneity, including processes such as adaptation, ecological speciation, and niche evolution. Seasonal variation is an aspect of the environment that varies across habitats, and could result in adaptive shifts in trait values across the life cycle of a plant. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative methods to evaluate the joint evolution of plant traits and habitat associations in Lasthenia (Asteraceae), a small clade of predominantly annual plants that have differentiated into an ecologically diverse range of habitats, including seasonal ephemeral wetlands known as vernal pools. Our results support the hypothesis that there is a link between the evolution of leaf morphology and the ecohydrological niche in Lasthenia, and, in the formation of aerenchyma (air space), differentiation between vernal pool and terrestrial taxa is fine-tuned to specific stages of plant ontogeny that reflects the evolution of heterophylly. Our findings demonstrate how the relationships between traits and habitat type can vary across the development of an organism, while highlighting a carefully considered comparative approach for examining correlated trait and niche evolution in a recently diversified and ecologically diverse plant clade.

  7. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special Report: 1993 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, ED (Editor); Kishiyama, Jenny S. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the seventh in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1993 Conference: perspectives in NASA program/project management; the best job in aerospace; improvements in project management at NASA; strategic planning...mapping the way to NASA's future; new NASA procurement initiatives; international cooperation; and industry, government and university partnership. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  8. Functional genomics analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) with special reference to the evolution of non-target-site glyphosate resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of glyphosate resistance in weedy species places an environmentally benign herbicide in peril. The first report of a dicot plant with evolved glyphosate resistance was horseweed, which occurred in 2001. Since then, several species have evolved glyphosate resistance and genomic informat...

  9. Issues in NASA program and project management. Special report: 1995 conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the tenth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the 1996 Conference as follows: international partnerships; industry/interagency collaboration; technology transfer; and project management development process. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  10. The Evolution of Distal Radius Fracture Management – A Historical Treatise

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius fractures have been a common affliction for millennia, but their treatment is a more recent development as a result of human erudition. While immobilization has served as the only available treatment for most of our history, many advances have been made in the management of distal radius fractures over the last century as the field of orthopedics has grown. Yet, the topic remains hotly contested in the literature, and research continues to focus upon it given the frequency of the injury. In this article, we chronicle the evolution of distal radius fracture treatment in hopes of providing context for the future that lies ahead. PMID:22554653

  11. Field-based insights to the evolution of specialization: plasticity and fitness across habitats in a specialist/generalist species pair.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Timothy; Sultan, Sonia E

    2012-04-01

    Factors promoting the evolution of specialists versus generalists have been little studied in ecological context. In a large-scale comparative field experiment, we studied genotypes from naturally evolved populations of a closely related generalist/specialist species pair (Polygonum persicaria and P. hydropiper), reciprocally transplanting replicates of multiple lines into open and partially shaded sites where the species naturally co-occur. We measured relative fitness, individual plasticity, herbivory, and genetic variance expressed in the contrasting light habitats at both low and high densities. Fitness data confirmed that the putative specialist out-performed the generalist in only one environment, the favorable full sun/low-density environment to which it is largely restricted in nature, while the generalist had higher lifetime reproduction in both canopy and dense neighbor shade. The generalist, P. persicaria, also expressed greater adaptive plasticity for biomass allocation and leaf size in shaded conditions than the specialist. We found no evidence that the ecological specialization of P. hydropiper reflects either genetically based fitness trade-offs or maintenance costs of plasticity, two types of genetic constraint often invoked to prevent the evolution of broadly adaptive genotypes. However, the patterns of fitness variance and herbivore damage revealed how release from herbivory in a new range can cause an introduced species to evolve as a specialist in that range, a surprising finding with important implications for invasion biology. Patterns of fitness variance between and within sites are also consistent with a possible role for the process of mutation accumulation (in this case, mutations affecting shade-expressed phenotypes) in the evolution and/or maintenance of specialization in P. hydropiper.

  12. Field-based insights to the evolution of specialization: plasticity and fitness across habitats in a specialist/generalist species pair

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Timothy; Sultan, Sonia E

    2012-01-01

    Factors promoting the evolution of specialists versus generalists have been little studied in ecological context. In a large-scale comparative field experiment, we studied genotypes from naturally evolved populations of a closely related generalist/specialist species pair (Polygonum persicaria and P. hydropiper), reciprocally transplanting replicates of multiple lines into open and partially shaded sites where the species naturally co-occur. We measured relative fitness, individual plasticity, herbivory, and genetic variance expressed in the contrasting light habitats at both low and high densities. Fitness data confirmed that the putative specialist out-performed the generalist in only one environment, the favorable full sun/low-density environment to which it is largely restricted in nature, while the generalist had higher lifetime reproduction in both canopy and dense neighbor shade. The generalist, P. persicaria, also expressed greater adaptive plasticity for biomass allocation and leaf size in shaded conditions than the specialist. We found no evidence that the ecological specialization of P. hydropiper reflects either genetically based fitness trade-offs or maintenance costs of plasticity, two types of genetic constraint often invoked to prevent the evolution of broadly adaptive genotypes. However, the patterns of fitness variance and herbivore damage revealed how release from herbivory in a new range can cause an introduced species to evolve as a specialist in that range, a surprising finding with important implications for invasion biology. Patterns of fitness variance between and within sites are also consistent with a possible role for the process of mutation accumulation (in this case, mutations affecting shade-expressed phenotypes) in the evolution and/or maintenance of specialization in P. hydropiper. PMID:22837826

  13. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Report: 1997 Conference. Project Management Now and in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics Considered Include: NASA's Shared Experiences Program; Core Issues for the Future of the Agency; National Space Policy Strategic Management; ISO 9000 and NASA; New Acquisition Initiatives; Full Cost Initiative; PM Career Development; PM Project Database; NASA Fast Track Studies; Fast Track Projects; Earned Value Concept; Value-Added Metrics; Saturn Corporation Lessons Learned; Project Manager Credibility.

  14. Evolution of an experiential learning partnership in emergency management higher education.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly; Harris, Alan S

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning allows students to step outside the classroom and into a community setting to integrate theory with practice, while allowing the community partner to reach goals or address needs within their organization. Emergency Management and Homeland Security scholars recognize the importance, and support the increased implementation, of this pedagogical method in the higher education curriculum. Yet challenges to successful implementation exist including limited resources and time. This longitudinal study extends the literature by detailing the evolution of a partnership between a university and office of emergency management in which a functional exercise is strategically integrated into an undergraduate course. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of lessons learned from throughout the multiyear process.

  15. Evolution of an experiential learning partnership in emergency management higher education.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly; Harris, Alan S

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning allows students to step outside the classroom and into a community setting to integrate theory with practice, while allowing the community partner to reach goals or address needs within their organization. Emergency Management and Homeland Security scholars recognize the importance, and support the increased implementation, of this pedagogical method in the higher education curriculum. Yet challenges to successful implementation exist including limited resources and time. This longitudinal study extends the literature by detailing the evolution of a partnership between a university and office of emergency management in which a functional exercise is strategically integrated into an undergraduate course. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of lessons learned from throughout the multiyear process. PMID:27438962

  16. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-07-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel discrete pest population growth models with both impulsive chemical control and the evolution of pesticide resistance. Strong and weak threshold conditions which guarantee the extinction of the pest population, based on the threshold values of the analytical formula for the optimal switching time, were derived. Further, we addressed switching strategies in the light of chosen economic injury levels. Moreover, the effects of the complex dynamical behaviour of the pest population on the pesticide switching times were also studied. The pesticide application period, the evolution of pesticide resistance and the dynamic complexity of the pest population may result in complex outbreak patterns, with consequent effects on the pesticide switching strategies.

  17. Outcomes of Specialized Foster Care in a Managed Child Welfare Services Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore P.; Leavey, Joseph; Mosley, Peggy R.; White, Andrew W.; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic

    2004-01-01

    This study (N = 384) presents results from outcome measurement in a services network providing specialized foster care (SFC) to children in child protective service custody. A majority of participants improved on most outcomes. Global improvement was associated with increased length of stay up to two years, five months, and with younger age, fewer…

  18. Planning a Needs Assessment Management System: PANAMS. Personnel Preparation for Special Education Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundschuh, Ernest

    A manual and software package explain the development and use of the Special Education Survey, an instrument intended to aid states in developing inservice training and professional preparation programs. The instrument is based on the comprehensive system of personnel development as described by Public Law 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped…

  19. [Dental retention and its orthodontic management in a special case report].

    PubMed

    Dénes, Z; Razouk, G; Kaán, M

    1999-11-01

    The authors present the incidence of ankylosed teeth and the general guidelines of treatment based on the scientific data and their clinical experience. They show the psycho-social relations mostly during adult therapy by presenting the treatment of a special case of incisor retention.

  20. Needs Assessment Management in Special Physical Education. Comprehensive System of Personnel Development in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baber, Deb; Crowley, Shirley

    The text and accompanying software are for use by state education agency personnel concerned with needs assessment under the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) as it relates to special physical education. "Book One," devoted to strategic planning, contains background information and directions for the development of effective…

  1. Delivery and Evaluation of Training for School Nutrition Administrators and Managers on Meeting Special Food and Nutrition Needs of Students in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Charlotte B.; Knight, Kathy; Hobbs, Margie; Dodd, Lacy M.; Cole, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to complete a formal evaluation of a project that provided specialized training for school nutrition (SN) administrators and managers on meeting children's special dietary needs in the school setting. Methods: The training was provided as part of the "Eating Good and Moving Like We Should"…

  2. Stress Management for Special Educators: The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Krista; Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR) is a stress management strategy designed to facilitate awareness of the physical, mental, emotional, and physiological effects of stress through the interconnectedness of the brain, body, and emotions. The purpose of this article is to present a stress-management model for teachers,…

  3. Organizing a Special Education Program Utilizing the Theory Z Model of Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, David P.; And Others

    An alternative management model was implemented to increase teacher productivity in an institutional school for 185 mildly to severely mentally retarded children. The model included three components: a management structure that allowed for problem solving while still motivating staff; an inservice program for staff; and an evaluation system to…

  4. The evolution of shortcomings in Incident Command System: Revisions have allowed critical management functions to atrophy.

    PubMed

    Stambler, Kimberly S; Barbera, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    The original Incident Command System (ICS) was created through the federally funded Firefighting Resources of Southern California Organized for Potential Emergencies (FIRESCOPE) program. Initially developed as one element of multiagency coordination for managing severe wildfires, the FIRESCOPE ICS guidance was adopted and evolved through increasingly routine wildl and firefighting. It then was modified for all hazards for the fire service. Only later, through the National Incident Management System (NIMS), was ICS officially adopted for all hazards and all responders. Over this multidecade evolution, the current NIMS ICS version became simplified in several key areas compared to the original, robust FIRESCOPE ICS. NIMS ICS is now promulgated as guidance for managing today's novel, complex, and lengthy disasters involving multidisciplinary response but experiences recurrent problems in key functions. This article examines the history of the subtle, yet critical differences in current ICS compared to the original system design, and focuses on information dissemination and intermediate, long-range and contingency planning. ICS transitions resulted in simplification and consolidation of positions and functions, without recognizing and maintaining critical position tasks necessary for managing complex, extended incidents. PMID:26750813

  5. Human cell type diversity, evolution, development, and classification with special reference to cells derived from the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Hall, Brian K

    2006-08-01

    Metazoans are composed of a finite number of recognisable cell types. Similar to the relationship between species and ecosystems, knowledge of cell type diversity contributes to studies of complexity and evolution. However, as with other units of evolution, the cell type often resists definition. This review proposes guidelines for characterising cell types and discusses cell homology and the various developmental pathways by which cell types arise, including germ layers, blastemata (secondary development/neurulation), stem cells, and transdifferentiation. An updated list of cell types is presented for a familiar, albeit overlooked model taxon, adult Homo sapiens, with 411 cell types, including 145 types of neurons, recognised. Two methods for organising these cell types are explored. One is the artificial classification technique, clustering cells using commonly accepted criteria of similarity. The second approach, an empirical method modeled after cladistics, resolves the classification in terms of shared features rather than overall similarity. While the results of each scheme differ, both methods address important questions. The artificial classification provides compelling (and independent) support for the neural crest as the fourth germ layer, while the cladistic approach permits the evaluation of cell type evolution. Using the cladistic approach we observe a correlation between the developmental and evolutionary origin of a cell, suggesting that this method is useful for predicting which cell types share common (multipotential) progenitors. Whereas the current effort is restricted by the availability of phenotypic details for most cell types, the present study demonstrates that a comprehensive cladistic classification is practical, attainable, and warranted. The use of cell types and cell type comparative classification schemes has the potential to offer new and alternative models for therapeutic evaluation. PMID:16790079

  6. Maintenance manager's manual for small transit agencies. Special report 1985-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, W.

    1988-03-01

    This publication contains information to assist operators of transit agencies providing public transportation in rural and smaller urban areas to better manage their vehicle maintenance programs. The report includes discussions of maintenance management, maintenance programs preventive maintenance, recordkeeping, selection of type of maintenance operation, in-house maintenance, and maintenance practices. Also included are appendixes giving supplementary information about tire loads; lubrication oil; mechanic hand tools; shop tools; mechanic aptitude tests; technical training resources; maintenance management training resources; and lists of manufacturers of air-conditioning systems, wheelchair lifts and wheelchair ramps.

  7. An ecological problem-solving process for managing special-interest species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Short, H.L.; Williamson, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    We present a structured problem-solving process that can help resolve wildlife management issues. Management goals for wildlife species are expressed in terms of populations to be attained and maintained. Habitat quantity and quality necessary to achieve those population goals can then be determined. Proposed land-use changes are evaluated in terms of how they will contribute toward recovery of extinction of the species of interest.

  8. Eating without hands or tongue: specialization, elaboration and the evolution of prey processing mechanisms in cartilaginous fishes

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Mason N; Wilga, Cheryl D; Summers, Adam P

    2005-01-01

    The ability to separate edible from inedible portions of prey is integral to feeding. However, this is typically overlooked in favour of prey capture as a driving force in the evolution of vertebrate feeding mechanisms. In processing prey, cartilaginous fishes appear handicapped because they lack the pharyngeal jaws of most bony fishes and the muscular tongue and forelimbs of most tetrapods. We argue that the elaborate cranial muscles of some cartilaginous fishes allow complex prey processing in addition to their usual roles in prey capture. The ability to manipulate prey has evolved twice along different mechanical pathways. Batoid chondrichthyans (rays and relatives) use elaborate lower jaw muscles to process armored benthic prey, separating out energetically useless material. In contrast, megacarnivorous carcharhiniform and lamniform sharks use a diversity of upper jaw muscles to control the jaws while gouging, allowing for reduction of prey much larger than the gape. We suggest experimental methods to test these hypotheses empirically. PMID:17148206

  9. 100th anniversary special paper: Sedimentary mineral deposits and the evolution of earth's near-surface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, H.D.

    2005-12-15

    The nature of sedimentary mineral deposits has evolved during Earth's history in concert with changes in the oxidation (redo) state of the ocean-atmosphere system, biological evolution, and the growing importance of geologically young accumulations of ore-grade material. There is now strong evidence that the atmosphere and the oceans were anoxic, or essentially anoxic, before 2.4 Ga. Banded iron formations (BIF) and the detrital uranium ores formed prior to 2.4 Ga are consistent with such a state. The period between 2.4 and 2.0 Ga is called the Great Oxidation Event by some. Its ores bear unmistakable marks of the presence of atmospheric O{sub 2}. Between 1.8 and 0.8 Ga the Earth system seems to have been remarkably stable. Sedimentary ore deposits of this period were influenced by the presence of O{sub 2}. BIF, sedimentary manganese, and phosphorites disappeared ca. 1.8 Ga, but sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) deposits and unconformity-type uranium deposits flourished, and nonsulfide zinc deposits put in an appearance. The period between 0.8 Ga and the end of the Proterozoic at 0.54 Ga was as turbulent or more so than the Paleoproterozoic. BIF returned, as did sedimentary manganese deposits and phosphorites. A further rise in the O{sub 2} content of the atmosphere and an increase in the sulfate concentration of seawater during this period brought the composition of the atmosphere and of seawater close to their present redox state. The last 540 m.y. of Earth's history have seen the system pass through two supercycles of roughly equal length. Climate, the redox stratification of the oceans ocean mixing, and the nature of sedimentary ores were influenced by tectonically and volcanically driven changes during these supercycles. The evolution of the higher land plants gave rise to coal deposits and sandstone-type uranium ores and was important for the formation of bauxites.

  10. On the vagal cardiac nerves, with special reference to the early evolution of the head-trunk interface.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Hyodo, Susumu; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    The vagus nerve, or the tenth cranial nerve, innervates the heart in addition to other visceral organs, including the posterior visceral arches. In amniotes, the anterior and posterior cardiac branches arise from the branchial and intestinal portions of the vagus nerve to innervate the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. The evolution of this innervation pattern has yet to be elucidated, due mainly to the lack of morphological data on the vagus in basal vertebrates. To investigate this topic, we observed the vagus nerves of the lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), and mouse (Mus musculus), focusing on the embryonic patterns of the vagal branches in the venous pole. In the lamprey, no vagus branch was found in the venous pole throughout development, whereas the arterial pole was innervated by a branch from the branchial portion. In contrast, the vagus innervated the arterial and venous poles in the mouse and elephant shark. Based on the morphological patterns of these branches, the venous vagal branches of the mouse and elephant shark appear to belong to the intestinal part of the vagus, implying that the cardiac nerve pattern is conserved among crown gnathostomes. Furthermore, we found a topographical shift of the structures adjacent to the venous pole (i.e., the hypoglossal nerve and pronephros) between the extant gnathostomes and lamprey. Phylogenetically, the lamprey morphology is likely to be the ancestral condition for vertebrates, suggesting that the evolution of the venous branch occurred early in the gnathostome lineage, in parallel with the remodeling of the head-trunk interfacial domain during the acquisition of the neck. J. Morphol. 277:1146-1158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27216138

  11. Classroom Behaviour Management Strategies in Response to Problematic Behaviours of Primary School Children with Special Educational Needs: Views of Special Educational Needs Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Elizabeth; Gardner, Frances; Hansford, Lorraine; Edwards, Vanessa; Hayes, Rachel; Ford, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Children identified with special educational needs (SEN) and behavioural difficulties present extra challenges to educators and require additional supports in school. This paper presents views from special educational needs coordinators (SENCos) on various strategies used by educators to support children identified with SEN and problematic…

  12. Role of nanotechnology in agriculture with special reference to management of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash

    2012-04-01

    Nanotechnology is a promising field of interdisciplinary research. It opens up a wide array of opportunities in various fields like medicine, pharmaceuticals, electronics and agriculture. The potential uses and benefits of nanotechnology are enormous. These include insect pests management through the formulations of nanomaterials-based pesticides and insecticides, enhancement of agricultural productivity using bio-conjugated nanoparticles (encapsulation) for slow release of nutrients and water, nanoparticle-mediated gene or DNA transfer in plants for the development of insect pest-resistant varieties and use of nanomaterials for preparation of different kind of biosensors, which would be useful in remote sensing devices required for precision farming. Traditional strategies like integrated pest management used in agriculture are insufficient, and application of chemical pesticides like DDT have adverse effects on animals and human beings apart from the decline in soil fertility. Therefore, nanotechnology would provide green and efficient alternatives for the management of insect pests in agriculture without harming the nature. This review is focused on traditional strategies used for the management of insect pests, limitations of use of chemical pesticides and potential of nanomaterials in insect pest management as modern approaches of nanotechnology.

  13. What kind of memory has evolution wrought? Introductory article for the special issue of memory: adaptive memory: the emergence and nature of proximate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    It is without question that our memory system evolved through a process of natural selection. However, basic research into the evolutionary foundations of memory has begun in earnest only recently. This is quite peculiar as the majority, perhaps even all, of memory research relates to whether memory is adaptive or not. In this Special Issue of Memory we have assembled a variety of papers that represent the cutting edge in research on the evolution of memory. These papers are centred on issues about the ultimate and proximate explanations of memory, the development of the adaptive functions of memory, as well as the positive consequences that arise from the current evolutionary form that our memory has taken. In this introductory article we briefly outline these different areas and indicate why they are vital for a more complete theory of memory. Further we argue that, by adopting a more applied stance in the area of the evolution of memory, one of the many future directions in this field could be a new branch of psychology that addresses questions in evolutionary legal psychology.

  14. Special article: airway management in reconstructive surgery for noma (cancrum oris).

    PubMed

    Coupe, Michael Howard; Johnson, Doug; Seigne, Patrick; Hamlin, Bill

    2013-07-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a disease of poverty and malnutrition, which predominantly affects children younger than 10 years in developing countries. Although the majority of sufferers die of sepsis at the time of the initial infection, or of subsequent starvation due to severe trismus and an inability to eat, a small minority of patients survive and require reconstructive surgery for severe facial scarring and deformity. These patients present significant problems to the anesthesiologist with regard to airway management. We present a series of 26 patients undergoing primary and subsequent reconstructive surgery, with particular focus on airway management. We show that airway management, while challenging, can be performed safely and successfully by using individualized airway plans but may require advanced techniques and equipment. Traditional tests focusing on the anterior/superior airway are helpful in assessing patients with facial deformity due to noma.

  15. Management of rodent viral disease outbreaks: one institutions (r)evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail L

    2010-01-01

    At first blush, an outbreak of mouse hepatitis virus or epizootic diarrhea of infant mice virus in a research colony of laboratory mice may not seem like a disaster. However, irrespective of magnitude, such an outbreak at an academic institution is disruptive for researchers at all levels. It can be a disaster for the graduate student who may have just a few experiments to finish before writing the thesis or for the postdoctoral fellow who is in the lab for only 1 or 2 years. Infectious disease outbreaks also limit the ability of principal investigators to share their animals with collaborators at their home institution as well as with those at extramural sites, thereby thwarting the expectation that research materials supported by federal funds will be made readily available to colleagues. This article traces the evolution of a change in culture at a large, well-funded academic institution with over 1,800 active IACUC protocols, more than 1,000 of which include mice. During a period of less than 5 years, the institution evolved from virtual paralysis in the face of such outbreaks to the implementation of policies and practices that enable effective outbreak management and the timely resumption of research functionality. This evolution required not only support from the highest levels of leadership in the university and its school of medicine but also a huge outlay of financial resources.

  16. A Behavior Management Seminar for Special or General Education Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindelheim, Franklin D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify the classroom management needs of graduate education students in one college, and develop a seminar that emerged from the research. Researchers have shown that professional development provided for graduate education students typically deals with curriculum and instructional methodologies…

  17. Risk Management in Adventure Programs with Special Populations: Two Hidden Dangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas; Gaylor, Michael S.

    The paper addresses two significant risk management considerations in conducting an adventure program in a therapeutic setting: the potential hazards of psychiatric medications and psychological emergencies. Focusing on the potential hazards of psychiatric medications, the first section discusses climatic conditions (heat, cold, and sun) and the…

  18. Waste Management, Treatment, and Disposal for the Food Processing Industry. Special Circular 113.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooding, N. Henry

    This publication contains information relating to waste prevention, treatment and disposal, and waste product utilization. Its primary purpose is to provide information that will help the food industry executive recognize waste problems and make wise management decisions. The discussion of the methods, techniques, and the state-of-the-art is…

  19. Preventive Interventions under Managed Care: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Sharon L.

    Programs and services that prevent substance abuse and mental health disorders have the potential to lessen an enormous burden of suffering and to reduce both the cost of future treatment and lost productivity at work and home. The availability and accessibility of these interventions to Americans whose health care is provided by managed care…

  20. A Special Education Management System: ESEA Title III, Project No. 1328. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the final report on a 3-year project sponsored by the Santa Cruz County, California Office of Education to develop a pupil assessment instrument listing behavioral characteristics of physically exceptional children (K-12) and to implement a program management system to serve 1,200 mentally retarded, educationally handicapped…

  1. Education and Training for Public Sector Management in Developing Countries. A Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifel, Laurence D., Ed.; And Others

    The primary objective of a conference held in Bellagio, Italy, and of this follow-up volume is to assess various educational and training models and strategies for improving the effectiveness with which top- and middle-level public management functions are performed in developing countries. The volume concentrates particularly on management…

  2. HB-Line Special Nuclear Material Campaigns: Model-Based Project Management

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG, ROBERT

    2004-03-24

    This study is to show how a model was used to enable management to better estimate production capabilities to ensure contract milestones/commitments are met, to cope with fast changing project baselines and project missions, to ensure the project will meet the negotiated throughput, and to eliminate unnecessary but costly design changes.

  3. Behavior Management in Vocational Education Laboratories. Technical Assistance Services: Illinois Special Needs Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erekson, Thomas L.; Schultz, Robert

    This guide is intended to help vocational teachers to manage student behavior, including that of students with handicaps and behavioral problems, in vocational educational laboratories. The guide is organized into three sections. The first section explains the different types of vocational laboratories (active and passive) and what types of…

  4. INFORMATION: Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-01

    Responsible for some of the Nation's most important and technically advanced missions, the Department of Energy faces an array of challenges that are more wide-ranging and complex than at any time in its history. While its origins can be largely traced to the Manhattan Project, the Department has evolved into a multi-faceted agency that encompasses a broad range of scientific, environmental, and national security activities. Since its creation under the Department of Energy Organization Act in 1977, the Department has shifted its emphasis and priorities over time as the energy and security needs of the Nation have changed. The Department has recently refocused these efforts, adding particular emphasis on the science and renewable energy components of its portfolio. In this regard, the Department has taken a lead role in the implementation and execution of the energy technology initiatives related to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). As a means of accomplishing these initiatives, the Department received a substantial increase in its annual appropriation, rising from nearly $25 billion in 2008 to approximately $34 billion in 2009 as a result of additional funding in the Department's loan program and numerous science, energy, and national security initiatives. In addition, the Department was provided more than $36 billion in Recovery Act funding to be used over a two to three year period. Further, the Department, through existing authorities and those expanded by the Recovery Act, has been authorized to provide more than $100 billion in loan guarantees for innovative, clean energy technologies. To accomplish its vital missions, the Department employs approximately 115,000 Federal and contractor personnel and manages assets valued at more than $189 billion, including the 17 national laboratories at the heart of its science program. On an annual basis, the Office of Inspector General is required to identify what it considers to be the

  5. Why Go There? Evolution of Mobility and Spatial Cognition in Women and Men : An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Cashdan, Elizabeth; Gaulin, Steven J C

    2016-03-01

    Males in many non-monogamous species have larger ranges than females do, a sex difference that has been well documented for decades and seems to be an aspect of male mating competition. Until recently, parallel data for humans have been mostly anecdotal and qualitative, but this is now changing as human behavioral ecologists turn their attention to matters of individual mobility. Sex differences in spatial cognition were among the first accepted psychological sex differences and, like differences in ranging behavior, are documented for a growing set of species. This special issue is dedicated to exploring the possible adaptive links between these cognitive and ranging traits. Multiple hypotheses, at various levels of analysis, are considered. At the functional (ultimate) level, a mating-competition hypothesis suggests that range expansion may augment mating opportunities, and a fertility-and-parental-care hypothesis suggests that range contraction may facilitate offspring provisioning. At a more mechanistic (proximate) level, differences in cue availability may support or inhibit particular sex-specific navigation strategies, and spatial anxiety may usefully inhibit travel that would not justify its costs. Studies in four different cultures-Twe, Tsimane, Yucatec Maya, and Faroese-as well as an experimental study using virtual reality tools are the venue for testing these hypotheses. Our hope is to stimulate more research on the evolutionary and developmental processes responsible for this suite of linked behavioral and cognitive traits.

  6. Pathogen evolution across the agro-ecological interface: implications for disease management.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Infectious disease is a major causal factor in the demography of human, plant and animal populations. While it is generally accepted in medical, veterinary and agricultural contexts that variation in host resistance and pathogen virulence and aggressiveness is of central importance to understanding patterns of infection, there has been remarkably little effort to directly investigate causal links between population genetic structure and disease dynamics, and even less work on factors influencing host-pathogen coevolution. The lack of empirical evidence is particularly surprising, given the potential for such variation to not only affect disease dynamics and prevalence, but also when or where new diseases or pathotypes emerge. Increasingly, this lack of knowledge has led to calls for an integrated approach to disease management, incorporating both ecological and evolutionary processes. Here, we argue that plant pathogens occurring in agro-ecosystems represent one clear example where the application of evolutionary principles to disease management would be of great benefit, as well as providing model systems for advancing our ability to generalize about the long-term coevolutionary dynamics of host-pathogen systems. We suggest that this is particularly the case given that agro-ecological host-pathogen interactions represent a diversity of situations ranging from those that only involve agricultural crops through to those that also include weedy crop relatives or even unrelated native plant communities. We begin by examining some of the criteria that are important in determining involvement in agricultural pathogen evolution by noncrop plants. Throughout we use empirical examples to illustrate the fact that different processes may dominate in different systems, and suggest that consideration of life history and spatial structure are central to understanding dynamics and direction of the interaction. We then discuss the implications that such interactions have for

  7. Eculizumab in the management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Al-Ani, Fatimah; Chin-Yee, Ian; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a nonmalignant clonal disorder resulting from somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of the membrane-anchoring molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The lack of expression of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins involved in the regulation of the complement system renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. Clinical manifestations include thromboembolic disease, chronic kidney injury, pulmonary hypertension, smooth muscle dysfunction, and chronic hemolysis. Until recently, treatment was mainly supportive with most patients suffering from significant morbidity and shortened survival compared to age-matched controls. The development of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the terminal complement protein C5, has resulted in dramatic improvements of survival and reduction in complications. In this paper, we review some special considerations pertaining to the use of eculizumab for PNH. PMID:27536121

  8. Reorganization of medical specialization. Beyond the law of management of health professions.

    PubMed

    Pujol, R; Conthe, P; Garcia Alegría, J

    2014-12-01

    More than 30 years after the creation of postgraduate medical training program in Spain supported by the MIR system, a thorough review of it becomes essential. This was the goal of the LOPS law enacted in 2003. The development of the LOPS is being slow and difficult to enforce, because master lines have to be achieved in order to develop the training of specialists in accordance with internationals standards and, simultaneously, with the reform that is taking place in the undergraduate education. The start up of the medical core will be the cornerstone of this project. The principles of the LOPS provide an opportunity for the training of competent physician in basic general medical practice followed by a progressive specialization supported on a solid foundation. And these principles have to prevail over corporate interests.

  9. General practitioners with a special clinical interest: a model for improving respiratory disease management.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Siân; Ryan, Dermot; Price, David; Langley, Carol; Fletcher, Monica; Everden, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Health care technology is continuously moving forward with great advances in all fields of medicine. The way in which health care is delivered has been stuck in a primary care/secondary care model, which is failing to meet patients' needs. Existing structures are inefficient because they do not maximise use of skills. A new way of delivering services is proposed using an intermediate level specialist--a general practitioner with a special clinical interest (GPSCI), to increase access at a location close to the patient while giving support to the wider primary health community. We explore how the role of GPSCI might work using the field of respiratory medicine as an exemplar. The concept is transferable to other therapeutic areas. PMID:12392127

  10. Eculizumab in the management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ani, Fatimah; Chin-Yee, Ian; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a nonmalignant clonal disorder resulting from somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of the membrane-anchoring molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The lack of expression of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins involved in the regulation of the complement system renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. Clinical manifestations include thromboembolic disease, chronic kidney injury, pulmonary hypertension, smooth muscle dysfunction, and chronic hemolysis. Until recently, treatment was mainly supportive with most patients suffering from significant morbidity and shortened survival compared to age-matched controls. The development of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the terminal complement protein C5, has resulted in dramatic improvements of survival and reduction in complications. In this paper, we review some special considerations pertaining to the use of eculizumab for PNH. PMID:27536121

  11. Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary management of Tinnitus at a specialized Tinnitus centre

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Rilana; Joore, Manuela; Maes, Iris; Scheyen, Dyon; Refaie, Amr El; Baguley, David M; Vlaeyen, Johan WS; Anteunis, Lucien

    2009-01-01

    Background Tinnitus is a common chronic health condition that affects 10% to 20% of the general population. Among severe sufferers it causes disability in various areas. As a result of the tinnitus, quality of life is often impaired. At present there is no cure or uniformly effective treatment, leading to fragmentized and costly tinnitus care. Evidence suggests that a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach in treating tinnitus is effective. The main objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness, costs, and cost-effectiveness of a comprehensive treatment provided by a specialized tinnitus center versus usual care. This paper describes the study protocol. Methods/Design In a randomized controlled clinical trial 198 tinnitus patients will be randomly assigned to a specialized tinnitus care group or a usual care group. Adult tinnitus sufferers referred to the audiological centre are eligible. Included patients will be followed for 12 months. Primary outcome measure is generic quality of life (measured with the Health Utilities Index Mark III). Secondary outcomes are severity of tinnitus, general distress, tinnitus cognitions, tinnitus specific fear, and costs. Based on health state utility outcome data the number of patients to include is 198. Economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective. Discussion This is, to our knowledge, the first randomized controlled trial that evaluates a comprehensive treatment of tinnitus and includes a full economic evaluation from a societal perspective. If this intervention proves to be effective and cost-effective, implementation of this intervention is considered and anticipated. Trial Registration The trial has been registered at ClinicalTrial.gov. The trial registration number is NCT00733044 PMID:19210767

  12. Evolution of mammalian Opn5 as a specialized UV-absorbing pigment by a single amino acid mutation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yumoto, Akane; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Tomonari, Sayuri; Sakai, Kazumi; Fujita, Hirofumi; Imamoto, Yasushi; Noji, Sumihare; Nakamura, Katsuki; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-02-14

    Opn5 is one of the recently identified opsin groups that is responsible for nonvisual photoreception in animals. We previously showed that a chicken homolog of mammalian Opn5 (Opn5m) is a Gi-coupled UV sensor having molecular properties typical of bistable pigments. Here we demonstrated that mammalian Opn5m evolved to be a more specialized photosensor by losing one of the characteristics of bistable pigments, direct binding of all-trans-retinal. We first confirmed that Opn5m proteins in zebrafish, Xenopus tropicalis, mouse, and human are also UV-sensitive pigments. Then we found that only mammalian Opn5m proteins lack the ability to directly bind all-trans-retinal. Mutational analysis showed that these characteristics were acquired by a single amino acid replacement at position 168. By comparing the expression patterns of Opn5m between mammals and chicken, we found that, like chicken Opn5m, mammalian Opn5m was localized in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer of the retina. However, the mouse and primate (common marmoset) opsins were distributed not in the posterior hypothalamus (including the region along the third ventricle) where chicken Opn5m is localized, but in the preoptic hypothalamus. Interestingly, RPE65, an essential enzyme for forming 11-cis-retinal in the visual cycle is expressed near the preoptic hypothalamus of the mouse and common marmoset brain but not near the region of the chicken brain where chicken Opn5m is expressed. Therefore, mammalian Opn5m may work exclusively as a short wavelength sensor in the brain as well as in the retina with the assistance of an 11-cis-retinal-supplying system. PMID:24403072

  13. Evolution of Sulfur Binding by Hemoglobin in Siboglinidae (Annelida) with Special Reference to Bone-Eating Worms, Osedax.

    PubMed

    Waits, Damien S; Santos, Scott R; Thornhill, Daniel J; Li, Yuanning; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Most members of Siboglinidae (Annelida) harbor endosymbiotic bacteria that allow them to thrive in extreme environments such as hydrothermal vents, methane seeps, and whale bones. These symbioses are enabled by specialized hemoglobins (Hbs) that are able to bind hydrogen sulfide for transportation to their chemosynthetic endosymbionts. Sulfur-binding capabilities are hypothesized to be due to cysteine residues at key positions in both vascular and coelomic Hbs, especially in the A2 and B2 chains. Members of the genus Osedax, which live on whale bones, do not have chemosynthetic endosymbionts, but instead harbor heterotrophic bacteria capable of breaking down complex organic compounds. Although sulfur-binding capabilities are important in other siboglinids, we questioned whether Osedax retained these cysteine residues and the potential ability to bind hydrogen sulfide. To answer these questions, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing to isolate and analyze Hb sequences from 8 siboglinid lineages. For Osedax mucofloris, we recovered three (A1, A2, and B1) Hb chains, but the B2 chain was not identified. Hb sequences from gene subfamilies A2 and B2 were translated and aligned to determine conservation of cysteine residues at previously identified key positions. Hb linker sequences were also compared to determine similarity between Osedax and siboglinids/sulfur-tolerant annelids. For O. mucofloris, our results found conserved cysteines within the Hb A2 chain. This finding suggests that Hb in O. mucofloris has retained some capacity to bind hydrogen sulfide, likely due to the need to detoxify this chemical compound that is abundantly produced within whale bones.

  14. Evolution of Sulfur Binding by Hemoglobin in Siboglinidae (Annelida) with Special Reference to Bone-Eating Worms, Osedax.

    PubMed

    Waits, Damien S; Santos, Scott R; Thornhill, Daniel J; Li, Yuanning; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Most members of Siboglinidae (Annelida) harbor endosymbiotic bacteria that allow them to thrive in extreme environments such as hydrothermal vents, methane seeps, and whale bones. These symbioses are enabled by specialized hemoglobins (Hbs) that are able to bind hydrogen sulfide for transportation to their chemosynthetic endosymbionts. Sulfur-binding capabilities are hypothesized to be due to cysteine residues at key positions in both vascular and coelomic Hbs, especially in the A2 and B2 chains. Members of the genus Osedax, which live on whale bones, do not have chemosynthetic endosymbionts, but instead harbor heterotrophic bacteria capable of breaking down complex organic compounds. Although sulfur-binding capabilities are important in other siboglinids, we questioned whether Osedax retained these cysteine residues and the potential ability to bind hydrogen sulfide. To answer these questions, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing to isolate and analyze Hb sequences from 8 siboglinid lineages. For Osedax mucofloris, we recovered three (A1, A2, and B1) Hb chains, but the B2 chain was not identified. Hb sequences from gene subfamilies A2 and B2 were translated and aligned to determine conservation of cysteine residues at previously identified key positions. Hb linker sequences were also compared to determine similarity between Osedax and siboglinids/sulfur-tolerant annelids. For O. mucofloris, our results found conserved cysteines within the Hb A2 chain. This finding suggests that Hb in O. mucofloris has retained some capacity to bind hydrogen sulfide, likely due to the need to detoxify this chemical compound that is abundantly produced within whale bones. PMID:27100359

  15. Perspective in the Evolution of Human MicroRNAs:Copy Number Expansion and Acquisition of Target Gene Specialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Tomita, M.; Kanai, A.

    A novel class of small, noncoding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs) wasrecently identified, and up to 20\\ regulated by the members of this class of RNA. miRNAs regulate their target genes by imperfect binding to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the gene transcript, and computational predictions of the binding between miRNAs and target gene transcripts have been performed in order to determine which genes are regulated by these RNAs. Phylogenetic analysis has also been used as a powerful tool to predict miRNA target genes. Much emphasis has therefore been placed on studying the phylogenetic conservation and evolution of this novel type of gene regulator, although there still is much that is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis of how human miRNAs optimized their gene regulation by adjusting their transcript levels, and how they evolved through specific selection of their target genes. We analyzed the correlation between the conservation of miRNAs among species and three features: the number of transcripts, the formation of duplicates, and the number of target genes. The number of miRNA transcripts and the formation of duplicates increased as the conservation rate increased. In contrast, the number of target genes decreased as the conservation rate increased. Therefore, we propose that miRNAs gradually gain an ability to regulate specific target genes when such regulation has a positive effect on the organism. As its pool of target genes is refined, the ability of an miRNA to regulate the genes may be stabilized by an increase in the miRNA transcript number and the formation of duplicates.

  16. Is health care a special challenge to quality management? Insights from the Danderyd Hospital case.

    PubMed

    Striem, Jörgen; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats

    2003-01-01

    A 10-year quality journey of a Swedish university hospital is described in this case study based on a variety of data sources. A series of quality initiatives were implemented according to total quality management (TQM) "best practice." Many projects were successful, but still a majority of those did not meet the staff's requirement of practical relevance, and they provoked scepticism toward instruments introduced and resistance to service-related quality definitions. The hospital's incentive structures did not reward an engagement in improvement activities. The findings are interpreted as demonstrating that the programs were viewed upon as part of a "management" rather than "professional" agenda, despite the underlying philosophy of TQM. It is suggested that applying professional practice development approaches to improvement initiatives might help to overcome the barrier thus created.

  17. Modeling the bathymetry of Catahoula Lake: Specialized technology for wetland management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, T.W.; Michot, T.C.; Wells, C.

    2002-01-01

    Catahoula Lake is the largest natural freshwater lake in Louisiana, covering more than 46 square miles (120 km2) (fig. 1). The lake is a principal stopover and wintering site for hundreds of thousands of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds. Scientists from the USGS National Wetlands Research Center are applying some of the research facility's specialties?wetland plant research, aerial and ground surveys, digital mapping, and computer modeling?to facilitate wetland management at Catahoula Lake.

  18. Review of Special Standards in Quality Management Systems Audits in Automotive Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šurinová, Yulia

    2013-12-01

    Quality management systems (QMS) in automotive industry generally have several differences in comparison with other industrial branches. Different customers have their own specific requirements, including requirements for quality audits. Audits are one of the coretools of quality management to make the PDCA (Plan - Do - Check - Act) cycle work. As a matter of fact, compliance with ISO/TS 16949:2009 requirements is a condition for supplying the automotive industry. However, there are some standards which co-exist together with the ISO 9001 based management systems and technical specification for QMS in automotive ISO/TS16949. Which are those specific standards in automotive industry and what standard to use and why - those are the questions to be answered in this paper. The aim of the paper is to review what standards are used for audits implementation in automotive industry in the Slovak Republic, and why the organizations keep following those "extra" standards even if certification for ISO/TS 16949 is required by all the car makers. The paper is structured as follows: after short introduction to the topic and related terms, presented is our methodology. . In the third section, the achieved results are discussed. And finally, the principal findings of the paper, limitations and conclusions are presented.

  19. Pain management procedures used by dental and maxillofacial surgeons: an investigation with special regard to odontalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wirz, Stefan; Wartenberg, Hans Christian; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Background Little is known about the procedures used by German dental and maxillofacial surgeons treating patients suffering from chronic orofacial pain (COP). This study aimed to evaluate the ambulatory management of COP. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire we collected data of dental and maxillofacial surgeons treating patients with COP. Therapists described variables as patients' demographics, chronic pain disorders and their aetiologies, own diagnostic and treatment principles during a period of 3 months. Results Although only 13.5% of the 520 addressed therapists returned completely evaluable questionnaires, 985 patients with COP could be identified. An orofacial pain syndrome named atypical odontalgia (17.0 %) was frequent. Although those patients revealed signs of chronification, pain therapists were rarely involved (12.5%). For assessing pain the use of Analogue Scales (7%) or interventional diagnostics (4.6%) was uncommon. Despite the fact that surgical procedures are cofactors of COP therapists preferred further surgery (41.9%) and neglected the prescription of analgesics (15.7%). However, most therapists self-evaluated the efficacy of their pain management as good (69.7 %). Conclusion Often ambulatory dental and maxillofacial surgeons do not follow guidelines for COP management despite a high prevalence of severe orofacial pain syndromes. PMID:16372908

  20. Ethical considerations in the prevention and management of genetic disorders with special emphasis on religious considerations.

    PubMed

    Albar, Mohammed A

    2002-06-01

    Genetic diseases include not only single gene disorders, but multifactorial, somatic cell genetic disorders, mitochondrial and even chromosomal. One in 4 adults will suffer from a multifactorial or a somatic cell genetic disease. The common diseases in the community have a hereditary component namely diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart diseases and many types of cancer. Even monogenic diseases which affect a small number of the newborns (2%-3%), have a greater impact on childhood diseases up to age 15 years. Therefore, it is imperative to scrutinize the available methods of prevention and management of genetic disorders, their ethical implications, and since east Mediterranean region is mainly occupied by Arabs and muslims, religious considerations become of paramount importance. Islam differs from many other religions in providing a complete code of life, which encompasses the secular with spiritual, the mundane with the celestial and hence forms the basis of the ethical, moral and even juridical attitudes and laws towards any problem or situation. Islamic teachings carry a great deal of instructions for health promotion and disease prevention including hereditary and genetic disorders. This review discusses how the Islamic teachings play an important role in the prevention and management of genetic disorders and the type of ethical implications involved in such management namely premarital medical examination, the question of consanguinity, the genetic counseling, the question of preimplantation diagnosis, the question of abortion and the offering of alternative ways of reproduction.

  1. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information report for Greater-Than-Class C and DOE equivalent special case waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1993-07-01

    This Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) report for Greater-Than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) and DOE equivalent special case waste contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities needed for management of GTCC LLW and DOE equivalent waste. The report contains information on 16 facilities (referred to as cost modules). These facilities are treatment facility front-end and back-end support functions (administration support, and receiving, preparation, and shipping cost modules); seven treatment concepts (incineration, metal melting, shredding/compaction, solidification, vitrification, metal sizing and decontamination, and wet/air oxidation cost modules); two storage concepts (enclosed vault and silo); disposal facility front-end functions (disposal receiving and inspection cost module); and four disposal concepts (shallow-land, engineered shallow-land, intermediate depth, and deep geological cost modules). Data in this report allow the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also included in this report.

  2. Systematics, biogeography, and character evolution of the legume tribe Fabeae with special focus on the middle-Atlantic island lineages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tribe Fabeae comprises about 380 legume species, including some of the most ancient and important crops like lentil, pea, and broad bean. Breeding efforts in legume crops rely on a detailed knowledge of closest wild relatives and geographic origin. Relationships within the tribe, however, are incompletely known and previous molecular results conflicted with the traditional morphology-based classification. Here we analyse the systematics, biogeography, and character evolution in the tribe based on plastid and nuclear DNA sequences. Results Phylogenetic analyses including c. 70% of the species in the tribe show that the genera Vicia and Lathyrus in their current circumscription are not monophyletic: Pisum and Vavilovia are nested in Lathyrus, the genus Lens is nested in Vicia. A small, well-supported clade including Vicia hirsuta, V. sylvatica, and some Mediterranean endemics, is the sister group to all remaining species in the tribe. Fabeae originated in the East Mediterranean region in the Miocene (23–16 million years ago (Ma)) and spread at least 39 times into Eurasia, seven times to the Americas, twice to tropical Africa and four times to Macaronesia. Broad bean (V. faba) and its sister V. paucijuga originated in Asia and might be sister to V. oroboides. Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris) is of Mediterranean origin and together with eight very close relatives forms a clade that is nested in the core Vicia, where it evolved c. 14 Ma. The Pisum clade is nested in Lathyrus in a grade with the Mediterranean L. gloeosperma, L. neurolobus, and L. nissolia. The extinct Azorean endemic V. dennesiana belongs in section Cracca and is nested among Mediterranean species. According to our ancestral character state reconstruction results, ancestors of Fabeae had a basic chromosome number of 2n=14, an annual life form, and evenly hairy, dorsiventrally compressed styles. Conclusions Fabeae evolved in the Eastern Mediterranean in the middle Miocene and spread

  3. EDITORIAL: Special issue on near surface geophysics for the study and the management of historical resources Special issue on near surface geophysics for the study and the management of historical resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.; Masini, N.; Soldovieri, F.

    2010-06-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Geophysics and Engineering hosts a selection of the papers that were presented at the session entitled `Near surface geophysics for the study and the management of historical resources: past, present and future', organized within the framework of the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (Vienna, Austria, 19-24 April 2009). As the conveners, we invited the active participants of this session to prepare papers reflecting their presentations and submit them for publication in the Journal of Geophysics and Engineering. This special issue presents the papers which have passed through the prolonged and stringent reviewing process. The papers presented in this issue illustrate the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented both to new archaeological targets characterization and cultural heritage conservation. In this field, increasing interest has been observed in recent years in non-destructive and non-invasive geophysical test methods. They allow one to overcome the subjectivity and ambiguity arising from the number and locations of the sites chosen to perform the destructive examination. In addition, very recently, much attention has been given to the integration of the classical geophysical techniques (GPR, magnetic, ERT, IP) with new emerging surface and subsurface sensing techniques (optical sensors, lidar, microwave tomography, MASW) for a combined monitoring of archaeological constructions and artefacts. We hope that the presented research papers will be interesting for readers in the different branches of environmental and cultural heritage sciences and will attract new potential contributors to the important topics of archaeological targets recognition, cultural heritage monitoring and diagnostics. Statistically, every day several tens of significant archaeological objects are destroyed and damaged throughout the Earth, and we hope

  4. Evolution and Relation of Students' Homework Management Strategies and Their Parents' Help in Homework During the Transition to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deslandes, Rollande; Rousseau, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the evolution and the relation between students' homework management strategies, their parents' help in homework and school and homework achievement across the transition to high school. Data were drawn on 101 student-parent dyads who participated in a two-year longitudinal study. Findings indicate parent…

  5. The unique challenge of managing an undergraduate Get-Away-Special experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Williams, Memorie K.

    1992-01-01

    A group of Bringham Young University (BYU) undergraduate students has undertaken an experiment to design and build a normal incidence soft x ray robotics telescope for solar observations. The design phase of this, GOLDHELOX project, has now been completed and final construction and modifications are in progress. The design and manufacture of the payload is under the direction of team leaders and a system's integrator. A goal of this project is educating and furnishing experiences in space engineering and physics for undergraduate students. Our main source of funding is NASA and the BYU Colleges of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering and Technology. This project is possible because of the NASA Get-Away Special (GAS) program. The only feasible alternative is using an expensive sounding rocket. We estimate the sun tracking and guidance package alone would cost upwards of a million dollars -- at least ten times our entire budget. Because of the GAS program, we simplified the construction, operation, and programming of the instruments with resulting savings in weight, cost, and time spent.

  6. A specialized database manager for interpretation of NMR spectra of synthetic glucides: JPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicki, J.; Ponthus, C.

    1998-02-01

    The current communication presents a program, written specifically to create and handle a specialized database, containing NMR spectral patterns of various monosaccharidic units. The program's database format is compatible with that of the Aurelia/Amix Bruker software package. The software facilitates the search for J patterns included in the database and their comparison with an experimental spectrum, in order to identify the components of the studied system, including the contaminants. Nous présentons ici un logiciel écrit spécifiquement pour créer et gérer une base de données spécialisées, contenant les motifs du couplage J des unités monosaccharidiques différentes. Le format de la base de données est compatible avec le format utilisé par le logiciel Aurelia/Amix de Bruker. Le logiciel facilite la recherche des motifs J inclus dans la base de données de leurs comparaisons avec un spectre expérimental, afin d'identifier les constituants de l'échantillon étudié, et ses éventuelles impuretés.

  7. Managing Chronic Pain in Special Populations with Emphasis on Pediatric, Geriatric, and Drug Abuser Populations.

    PubMed

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; Young, Erin E; Starkweather, Angela R; Guite, Jessica W; Russell, Beth S; Manworren, Renee C B

    2016-01-01

    In the adult population chronic pain can lead to loss of productivity and earning potential, and decreased quality of life. There are distinct groups with increased vulnerability for the emergence of chronic pain. These groups may be defined by developmental status and/or life circumstances. Within the pediatric, geriatric, and drug abuser populations, chronic pain represents a significant health issue. This article focuses on known anatomic, physiologic, and genetic mechanisms underlying chronic pain in these populations, and highlights the need for a multimodal approach from multiple health care professionals for management of chronic pain in those with the most risk.

  8. Managing Chronic Pain in Special Populations with Emphasis on Pediatric, Geriatric, and Drug Abuser Populations.

    PubMed

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; Young, Erin E; Starkweather, Angela R; Guite, Jessica W; Russell, Beth S; Manworren, Renee C B

    2016-01-01

    In the adult population chronic pain can lead to loss of productivity and earning potential, and decreased quality of life. There are distinct groups with increased vulnerability for the emergence of chronic pain. These groups may be defined by developmental status and/or life circumstances. Within the pediatric, geriatric, and drug abuser populations, chronic pain represents a significant health issue. This article focuses on known anatomic, physiologic, and genetic mechanisms underlying chronic pain in these populations, and highlights the need for a multimodal approach from multiple health care professionals for management of chronic pain in those with the most risk. PMID:26614727

  9. Women with epilepsy in reproductive age group: special issues and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shehanaaz; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2013-08-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE) have several gender based problems pertaining to social and biological domains. The stigma of epilepsy and its consequences appear to be more for women than men. They have more difficulty in getting married and sustaining a married life. The cyclical variations in the reproductive hormones can adversely impact the seizure pattern in WWE. Epileptiform discharges in the brain can influence the hypothalamic functions and lead to sexual dysfunction. The Antiepileptic drugs (AED) may alter their metabolic and hormone profile and contribute to this disorder. Most WWE tend to have uneventful pregnancies and healthy babies. Nevertheless, the risk of fetal malformations appears to be increased when AEDs are used during pregnancy. This risk is higher for those who are on polytherapy, or using valproate. Recent studies have also demonstrated that antenatal exposure to AEDs could lead to neurocognitive and developmental impairment, low IQ or language problems in exposed infants. Clinicians need to consider these special issues while initiating AED therapy in adolescent girls. All WWE need to have a detailed pre conception evaluation wherein the need to continue AEDs, the ideal AED and dosage are reassessed. The AED therapy would have to be individualized according to the clinical situations, obstetric background and family concerns. Folic acid should be prescribed to all women who could potentially become pregnant. Detailed screening for fetal malformations by estimation of serum alpha fetoprotein and fetal ultrasonography need to be carried out between 14 - 18 weeks of pregnancy. The dosage of AEDs may have to be escalated in the second half of pregnancy in selected patients. The family should be provided detailed counseling and information on how to cope with the pregnancy, childbirth, lactation, and contraception. PMID:24818330

  10. Pathogen evolution across the agro-ecological interface: implications for disease management

    PubMed Central

    Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Infectious disease is a major causal factor in the demography of human, plant and animal populations. While it is generally accepted in medical, veterinary and agricultural contexts that variation in host resistance and pathogen virulence and aggressiveness is of central importance to understanding patterns of infection, there has been remarkably little effort to directly investigate causal links between population genetic structure and disease dynamics, and even less work on factors influencing host–pathogen coevolution. The lack of empirical evidence is particularly surprising, given the potential for such variation to not only affect disease dynamics and prevalence, but also when or where new diseases or pathotypes emerge. Increasingly, this lack of knowledge has led to calls for an integrated approach to disease management, incorporating both ecological and evolutionary processes. Here, we argue that plant pathogens occurring in agro-ecosystems represent one clear example where the application of evolutionary principles to disease management would be of great benefit, as well as providing model systems for advancing our ability to generalize about the long-term coevolutionary dynamics of host–pathogen systems. We suggest that this is particularly the case given that agro-ecological host–pathogen interactions represent a diversity of situations ranging from those that only involve agricultural crops through to those that also include weedy crop relatives or even unrelated native plant communities. We begin by examining some of the criteria that are important in determining involvement in agricultural pathogen evolution by noncrop plants. Throughout we use empirical examples to illustrate the fact that different processes may dominate in different systems, and suggest that consideration of life history and spatial structure are central to understanding dynamics and direction of the interaction. We then discuss the implications that such

  11. Technology-based interventions for the treatment and recovery management of substance use disorders: a JSAT special issue.

    PubMed

    Marsch, Lisa A; Carroll, Kathleen M; Kiluk, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of research has highlighted the promising role that interactive web and mobile technologies may play in improving the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and reach of efforts to assess, prevent, treat, and support the recovery management of substance use disorders and other risk behavior. Manuscripts in this special issue of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment focus on the application of technology to the delivery of interventions for the treatment and recovery management of substance use disorders. These manuscripts are intended to highlight the diversity and current state of the science of empirically-supported innovations in this area of intervention delivery. The included manuscripts range from experimental evaluations of a variety of types of technology-based interventions (brief interventions, behavior therapy, medication adherence tools, and HIV prevention interventions) and technology platforms (mobile, Web, videoconferencing, and telephone-based interactive voice response), for an array of populations (adults, adolescents, criminal justice populations, and post-partum women), in a number of different settings (addiction specialty treatment programs, schools, emergency rooms, and criminal justice settings). They additionally reflect a variety of experimental research designs, including those focused on the design, development, and clinical evaluation of these technology-based therapeutic tools, as well as research focused on models for their successful implementation and sustained use.

  12. Management of type-2 diabetes with anti-platelet therapies: special reference to aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gundu H R

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset diabetes currently affects 380 million individuals worldwide and is expected to affect 380 million by 2025. Major defects contributing to this complex disease are insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. More than 80% of patients professing to type-2 diabetes are insulin resistant. Recent studies have shown that the Indian subcontinent ranks very high in the occurrence of Diabetes and Coronary artery disease (1, 2, 3). Patients with Type 2 diabetes carry an equivalent cardiovascular risk to that of a non-diabetic individual who has already experienced a coronary event. The risk of coronary artery disease in any given population seems to be 2-3 times higher in diabetics than non-diabetics. Inflammation, platelet activation, endothelial dysfunction and coagulation are the four processes, whose interplay determines the development of cardiovascular disease. In this article, we provide a brief overview on platelet physiology, vascular dysfunction, platelet hyper-function, and the role of platelet related clinical complications in diabetes mellitus and what is know about the management of this complex disease with anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin and Clopidogrel.

  13. The Challenge of Managing Roles: Understanding the Needs of Novice Special Education Teachers. Induction Insights. Supporting Special Education Teachers - Administrators [AII-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center to Inform Policy and Practice in Special Education Professional Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The learning curve is high for novice special education teachers. They must assume full teaching responsibilities, while at the same time become familiar with district and school policies, curriculum, and assessment policies and procedures. They are expected to build relationships with administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, families, and…

  14. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 2: Data Management System/Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of the workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 2 consists of the technology discipline sections for the Data Management System and the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the invited papers.

  15. Introduction to a special section: Ecology, culture, and management of Burbot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Madenjian, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    The Burbot Lota lota is the only truly freshwater member of the cod family (Gadidae) and one of only two species of freshwater fish that have a circumpolar range (McPhail and Lindsey 1970; McPhail and Paragamian 2000). Two subspecies of Lota lota have been documented: Lota lota maculosa, which is found exclusively in North America from south of Great Slave Lake in Canada to the southern limit of its range; and Lota lota lota, which is found over the remainder of the species’ Nearctic range and its entire Eurasian range (Hubbs and Schultz 1941; Van Houdt et al. 2003). However, many recent authorities (e.g., Scott and Crossman 1973) do not designate subspecies. Burbot occupy the widest range of depths of all fishes found in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin (i.e., from small streams to at least 300 m in Lake Superior; Boyer et al. 1989). Worldwide, many Burbot populations are threatened or endangered or have been extirpated (reviewed by Stapanian et al. 2010). Due in part to its unpopularity as a sport and commercial fish in much of its range, the species is often ignored in fish management and conservation programs (McPhail and Paragamian 2000; Stapanian et al. 2008, 2010). Even basic information on Burbot ecology, particularly its early life history and spawning habitats and sites, is lacking. This lack of information is particularly troubling because Burbot are an indicator of the health of coldwater systems (Stapanian et al. 2010). Efforts to rehabilitate or restore imperiled populations include culturing early life stages. Burbot larvae are difficult to culture for a variety of reasons, including their delicate body structure, small size at hatch, and live-feed requirement for at least 5 weeks following alimentary tract development.

  16. Dimethyl fumarate in the management of multiple sclerosis: appropriate patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Pontecorvo, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF), also known as gastroresistant DMF, is the most recently approved oral disease-modifying treatment (DMT) for relapsing multiple sclerosis. Two randomized clinical trials (Determination of the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Fumarate in Relapsing–Remitting MS [DEFINE] and Comparator and an Oral Fumarate in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis [CONFIRM]) demonstrated significant efficacy in reducing relapse rate and radiological signs of disease activity, as seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The DEFINE study also indicated a significant effect of DMF on disability worsening, while the low incidence of confirmed disability worsening in the CONFIRM trial rendered an insignificant reduction among the DMF-treated groups when compared to placebo. DMF also demonstrated a good safety profile and acceptable tolerability, since the most common side effects (gastrointestinal events and flushing reactions) are usually transient and mild to moderate in severity. Here, we discuss the place in therapy of DMF for individuals with relapsing multiple sclerosis, providing a tentative therapeutic algorithm to manage newly diagnosed patients and those who do not adequately respond to self-injectable DMTs. Literature data supporting the potential role of DMF as a first-line therapy are presented. The possibility of using DMF as switching treatment or even as an add-on strategy in patients with breakthrough disease despite self-injectable DMTs will also be discussed. Lastly, we argue about the role of DMF as an exit strategy from natalizumab-treated patients who are considered at risk for developing multifocal progressive leukoencephalopathy. PMID:27042079

  17. Dimethyl fumarate in the management of multiple sclerosis: appropriate patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Prosperini, Luca; Pontecorvo, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF), also known as gastroresistant DMF, is the most recently approved oral disease-modifying treatment (DMT) for relapsing multiple sclerosis. Two randomized clinical trials (Determination of the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Fumarate in Relapsing-Remitting MS [DEFINE] and Comparator and an Oral Fumarate in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis [CONFIRM]) demonstrated significant efficacy in reducing relapse rate and radiological signs of disease activity, as seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The DEFINE study also indicated a significant effect of DMF on disability worsening, while the low incidence of confirmed disability worsening in the CONFIRM trial rendered an insignificant reduction among the DMF-treated groups when compared to placebo. DMF also demonstrated a good safety profile and acceptable tolerability, since the most common side effects (gastrointestinal events and flushing reactions) are usually transient and mild to moderate in severity. Here, we discuss the place in therapy of DMF for individuals with relapsing multiple sclerosis, providing a tentative therapeutic algorithm to manage newly diagnosed patients and those who do not adequately respond to self-injectable DMTs. Literature data supporting the potential role of DMF as a first-line therapy are presented. The possibility of using DMF as switching treatment or even as an add-on strategy in patients with breakthrough disease despite self-injectable DMTs will also be discussed. Lastly, we argue about the role of DMF as an exit strategy from natalizumab-treated patients who are considered at risk for developing multifocal progressive leukoencephalopathy. PMID:27042079

  18. Priapism: evolution of management in 48 patients in a 22-year series.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J H; Winter, C C

    1977-04-01

    The choice of an effective method to treat priapism is challenging because precise causes in the majority of patients have not been well defined. A review of 48 patients treated during a 22-year period shows evolution of a regimen of management that has yielded a high percentage of success. Idiopathic priapism and sickle cell disease accounted for 81 per cent of the subjects. An evaluation should include a medication history, a search for specific diseases, as well as a thorough physical examination to detect possible etiologic factors. The explanation for the frequent association of fever deserves further investigation. Initial therapy consisting of aspiration and irrigation, and intermittent pneumatic cuff compression should be undertaken for a trial period of 12 to 36 hours, repeating the aspiration 2 or 3 times if necessary. The failure of priapism to resolve after such treatment is an indication for a shunt operation. Patients with known etiology should be treated specifically for the primary disease and usually more conservatively for priapism. Resolution occurred in all patients and approximately 50 per cent regained sexual potency.

  19. Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. Special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F.

    2012-07-01

    This Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) has been jointly coordinated by Working Groups I (WGI) and II (WGII) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report focuses on the relationship between climate change and extreme weather and climate events, the impacts of such events, and the strategies to manage the associated risks. This Special Report, in particular, contributes to frame the challenge of dealing with extreme weather and climate events as an issue in decision making under uncertainty, analyzing response in the context of risk management. The report consists of nine chapters, covering risk management; observed and projected changes in extreme weather and climate events; exposure and vulnerability to as well as losses resulting from such events; adaptation options from the local to the international scale; the role of sustainable development in modulating risks; and insights from specific case studies. (LN)

  20. Process-induced damage evolution and management in resin transfer molding of composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yean-Der

    2000-10-01

    Woven fiber composites made by resin transfer molding process are currently used as the primary and secondary load bearing structures in automotive and aircraft industries. A variety of defects could be evolved during the injection stage and the curing stage of the process. Improper injection conditions or unsound tool design would result in process induced damage in the form of dry spots, incomplete filling, or displacement of the fiber. In the curing stage, the process parameters of heating and cooling rates, and the temperature level at each element of the curing cycle have direct effects on the development of internal residual stresses, and shape distortion due to warpage. The work in this dissertation aims at developing numerical models to predict, characterize, and minimize process-induced damage during both the injection stage and curing stage in RTM process for woven-fiber composites. A control volume technique based on the finite difference method is used to characterize the flow behavior in resin transfer molding (RTM) of composite structures. Resin flow through fiber mats is modeled as a two-phase flow through porous media. Experimental results on flow behavior of EPON 826 epoxy resin into irregular mold cavity with fiberglass mats agree well with the present numerical simulation. Parametric analysis of several case studies using developed model illustrates the effectiveness of the flow model in investigating the flow pattern, mold filling time, dry spots formulation, and pressure distribution inside the mold. A numerical model describing the evolution of process-induced damage during curing in molded composite panels was developed. The effects of thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical responses of the material on the evolution of damage during resin transfer molding of the panels are quantified. The developed numerical model in conjunction with an optimization module based on Simulated Annealing (SA) scheme form a useful tool for conducting a parametric

  1. Nutrition Management of School Age Children with Special Needs: A Resource Manual for School Personnel, Families, and Health Professionals. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, Janet W.; Allen, Elizabeth R.; Daniel, Patricia White

    This guide is intended to help school personnel facilitate the management of special diets and nutrition education in the school curriculum in accordance with requirements of the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. After the introduction,…

  2. Trophic state evolution in a subtropical reservoir over 34 years in response to different management procedures.

    PubMed

    Cunha, D G F; Grull, D; Damato, M; Blum, J R C; Lutti, J E I; Eiger, S; Mancuso, P C S

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance for water management, long-term studies on trophic state are relatively scarce in subtropical reservoirs. We analyzed total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in the Billings Reservoir (Brazil) over time: Phase 1 (1977-1992, Tietê River water was pumped to Billings to increase energy generation, 100 m(3) s(-1)); Phase 2 (1992-2007, Tietê water was conveyed to Billings only in special cases for flood avoidance, 8 m(3) s(-1)); and Phase 3 (2007-2010, besides flood control, Billings received Tietê water treated by an in situ flotation system, 13 m(3) s(-1)). We compared our results with data from 12 reservoirs to evaluate current (2005-2009) enrichment conditions. Phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations decreased (p < 0.05, MANOVA) from Phase 1 to 2 and were stable thereafter. TN/TP ratios increment (1977-2010) indicated shift from N- to P-limitation in the reservoir, affecting the phytoplankton. Nutrient levels in Billings are currently between the expected concentrations in mesotrophic and eutrophic reservoirs (0.03 mg L(-1) < TP < 0.42 mg L(-1), 0.8 mg L(-1) < TN < 7.6 mg L(-1)) and Chl a concentrations exceeded 34 μg L(-1), median for the eutrophic waterbodies from the dataset. Although water quality in Billings has improved, nutrient inputs from Tietê River pumping episodes, diffuse and internal sources are still favoring biomass accrual and compromising water uses.

  3. Avoidance of fisheries-induced evolution: management implications for catch selectivity and limit reference points.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    I examined how the fitness (r) associated with early- and late-maturing genotypes varies with fishing mortality (F) and age-/size-specific probability of capture. Life-history data on Newfoundland's northern Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) allowed for the estimation of r for individuals maturing at 4 and 7 year in the absence of fishing. Catch selectivity data associated with four types of fishing gear (trap, gillnet, handline, otter trawl) were then incorporated to examine how r varied with gear type and with F. The resulting fitness functions were then used to estimate the F above which selection would favour early (4 year) rather than delayed (7 year) maturity. This evolutionarily-sensitive threshold, F evol, identifies a limit reference point somewhat similar to those used to define overfishing (e.g., F msy, F 0.1). Over-exploitation of northern cod resulted in fishing mortalities considerably greater than those required to effect evolutionary change. Selection for early maturity is reduced by the dome-shaped selectivities characteristic of fixed gears such as handlines (the greater the leptokurtosis, the lower the probability of a selection response) and enhanced by the knife-edged selectivities of bottom trawls. Strategies to minimize genetic change are consistent with traditional management objectives (e.g., yield maximization, population increase). Compliance with harvest control rules guided by evolutionarily-sensitive limit reference points, which may be achieved by adherence to traditional reference points such as F msy and F 0.1, should be sufficient to minimize the probability of fisheries-induced evolution for commercially exploited species.

  4. Analysis of the therapeutic evolution in the management of airway infantile hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Vivas-Colmenares, Grecia V; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Fernandez-Hurtado, Miguel Angel; Garcia-Casillas, Maria Antonia; Matute de Cardenas, Jose Antonio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the evolution in the management of airway infantile hemangioma (AIH) and to report the results from 3 pediatric tertiary care institutions. METHODS: A retrospective study of patients with diagnosis of AIH and treated in 3 pediatric tertiary care institutions from 1996 to 2014 was performed. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with diagnosis of AIH were identified. Mean age at diagnosis was 6 mo (range, 1-27). Single therapy was indicated in 16 patients and 7 patients received combined therapy. Two therapeutic groups were identified: Group A included 14 patients who were treated with steroids, interferon, laser therapy and/or surgery; group B included 9 patients treated with oral propranolol. In group A, oral corticosteroids were used in 9 patients with a good response in 3 cases (no requiring other therapeutic option), the other patients required additional treatment options. Cushing syndrome was observed in 3 patients. One patient died of a fulminant sepsis. Open surgical excision and endoscopic therapy were performed in 11 patients (in 5 of them as a single treatment) with a response rate of 54.5%. Stridor persisted in 2 cases, and one patient died during the clinical course of bronchial aspiration. In group B, oral propranolol was used in 9 patients (in 8 of them as a single treatment) with a response rate of 100%, with an mean treatment duration of 7 mo (range, 5-10); complications were not observed. CONCLUSION: Our experience and the medical literature support the use of propranolol as a first line of treatment in AIH. PMID:26862508

  5. Simulating mesoscale coastal evolution for decadal coastal management: A new framework integrating multiple, complementary modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Maanen, Barend; Nicholls, Robert J.; French, Jon R.; Barkwith, Andrew; Bonaldo, Davide; Burningham, Helene; Brad Murray, A.; Payo, Andres; Sutherland, James; Thornhill, Gillian; Townend, Ian H.; van der Wegen, Mick; Walkden, Mike J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Coastal and shoreline management increasingly needs to consider morphological change occurring at decadal to centennial timescales, especially that related to climate change and sea-level rise. This requires the development of morphological models operating at a mesoscale, defined by time and length scales of the order 101 to 102 years and 101 to 102 km. So-called 'reduced complexity' models that represent critical processes at scales not much smaller than the primary scale of interest, and are regulated by capturing the critical feedbacks that govern landform behaviour, are proving effective as a means of exploring emergent coastal behaviour at a landscape scale. Such models tend to be computationally efficient and are thus easily applied within a probabilistic framework. At the same time, reductionist models, built upon a more detailed description of hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes, are capable of application at increasingly broad spatial and temporal scales. More qualitative modelling approaches are also emerging that can guide the development and deployment of quantitative models, and these can be supplemented by varied data-driven modelling approaches that can achieve new explanatory insights from observational datasets. Such disparate approaches have hitherto been pursued largely in isolation by mutually exclusive modelling communities. Brought together, they have the potential to facilitate a step change in our ability to simulate the evolution of coastal morphology at scales that are most relevant to managing erosion and flood risk. Here, we advocate and outline a new integrated modelling framework that deploys coupled mesoscale reduced complexity models, reductionist coastal area models, data-driven approaches, and qualitative conceptual models. Integration of these heterogeneous approaches gives rise to model compositions that can potentially resolve decadal- to centennial-scale behaviour of diverse coupled open coast, estuary and inner

  6. Evolution from safety management system (SMS) to HSE MS: Incorporating health aspects into the HSE management system

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, G. de

    1996-12-31

    There is increasing recognition within the E&P industry that protection and promotion of the health of people at work is more than taking care of individual health. It is an organizational issue which can be managed using the same principles as for safety and environment. The synergy`s with safety and environmental management provide the link with the management system. However line managers need to under the critical Health issues: what are they are they relevant? How do we manage them? what are the standards? What are the management tools to be used? How do we monitor performance? What is the role of the line? What is the role of the health advisers? What training and competencies are needed for health management? What are the benefits? These questions have to be clarified before acceptance can be achieved for full integration of Health aspects into the HSE Management System. Health Risk Assessment was developed as a tool for systematic identification and assessment of health hazards and risks. It specifies the need for and type of controls and recovery measures, which can subsequently be incorporated in HSE Management System and HSE Cases. Our experience to date indicates that Health can successfully be integrated in HSE Management Systems and HSE Cases by using the same principles as developed for Safety Management Systems and Safety Cases. There are still many problems which need to be addressed but the methodology used appears to be sound and will eventually enhance line management understanding of the health management aspects relevant to the E&P Industry.

  7. Co-operation processes in dynamic environment management: evolution through training experienced pilots in flying a highly automated aircraft.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, J

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic environment management (process control, aircraft piloting, etc.) increasingly implies collective work components. Pragmatic purposes as well as epistemological interests raise important questions on collective activities at work. In particular, linked to the technological evolution in flight management, the role of the 'collective fact' appears as a key point in reliability. Beyond the development of individual competencies, the quality of the 'distributed' crew activity has to be questioned. This paper presents an empirical study about how experienced pilots co-ordinate their information and actions during the last period of training on a highly automated cockpit. A task of disturbance management (engine fire during takeoff) is chosen as amplifying cognitive requirements. Analysis focuses on the transitions between the main task and the incident to be managed. Crew performance and co-operation between two pilots are compared in three occurrences of the same task: the results are coherent with the hypothesis of a parallel evolution of the crew performance and its internal co-operation, and show that prescribed explicit co-operation is more present on action than on information about the 'state of the world'. Methodological issues are discussed about the possible effects of the specific situation of training, and about the psychological meaning of the results. PMID:11540153

  8. 44 CFR 60.12 - Flood plain management criteria for State-owned properties in special hazard areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flood plain management... MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Requirements for State Flood Plain Management Regulations § 60.12 Flood plain management criteria for State-owned properties...

  9. Evaluation of Impaired Driving Assessments and Special Management Reviews in Reducing Impaired Driving Fatal Crashes in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fell, James; Auld-Owens, Amy; Snowden, Cecelia

    2013-01-01

    Since 1991, State Impaired-Driving Assessments (IDAs) and Special Management Reviews (SMRs) have been conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to serve as a mechanism to assess the impaired-driving problem in the State, document the existing system, recommend improvements, and garner both political and public support to fund and implement improvements. Did these assessments and reviews serve the States as intended and provide a catalyst to reduce impaired driving? Almost half of the priority recommendations from IDAs in seven States and 60% of the priority recommendations in SMR States were implemented. Barriers to the implementation of some recommendations are discussed. IDAs and SMRs implemented at varying times were examined using logistic regression analyses of the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) for the years 1990 to 2008 to determine the effect they may have triggered on impaired driving rates in fatal crashes. States receiving IDAs and SMRs were compared to similar States not receiving them. Paired comparisons of similar States (e.g. IDA-State vs. non-IDA State) did not reveal any significant differences in impaired driving rates, but IDA and SMR States as a group showed significantly greater impaired driving declines in fatal crashes compared to non-IDA and non-SMR States as a group. IDAs and SMRs appear to provide a mechanism to examine the State’s impaired-driving program by an external team of experts and reveal areas where improvement is needed and confirm strategies that appear to be effective. PMID:24406944

  10. Canadian paediatricians’ approaches to managing patients with adverse events following immunization: The role of the Special Immunization Clinic network

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A; Zafack, Joseline; De Serres, Gaston; Halperin, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When moderate or severe adverse events occur after vaccination, physicians and patients may have concerns about future immunizations. Similar concerns arise in patients with underlying conditions whose risk for adverse events may differ from the general population. The Special Immunization Clinic (SIC) network was established in 2013 at 13 sites in Canada to provide expertise in the clinical evaluation and vaccination of these patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess referral patterns for patients with vaccine adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications among paediatricians and to assess the anticipated utilization of an SIC. METHODS: A 12-item questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians and subspecialists participating in the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program through monthly e-mail and mail contacts. RESULTS: The response rate was 24% (586 of 2490). Fifty-three percent of respondents practiced general paediatrics exclusively and 52% reported that they administer vaccines. In the previous 12 months, 26% of respondents had encountered children with challenging adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications in their practice and 29% had received referrals for such patients, including 27% of subspecialists. Overall, 69% of respondents indicated that they would be likely or very likely to refer patients to an SIC, and 34% indicated that they would have referred at least one patient to an SIC in the previous 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who experience challenging adverse events following immunization or potential vaccine contraindications are encountered by paediatricians and subspecialists in all practice settings. The SIC network will be able to respond to a clinical need and support paediatricians in managing these patients. PMID:25332661

  11. Psychosocial factors associated with poor diabetes self-care management in a specialized center in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Israel; Lozano, Liliana; Villa, Antonio R; Hernández-Jiménez, Sergio; Weinger, Katie; Caballero, A Enrique; Salinas, Carlos Aguilar; Velasco, Maria Luisa; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco Javier; Rull, Juan A

    2004-12-01

    To examine the relationship between demographic, clinical and psychosocial variables and diabetes self-care management in Mexican type 2 diabetic patients. Cross-sectional study of 176 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes aged 30-75 years, attending a tertiary health-care center in Mexico City. A brief medical history and previously validated questionnaires were completed. The study group consisted of 64 males/112 females, aged 55 +/- 11 years, mean diabetes duration of 12 +/- 8 years and HbA1c of 9.0 +/- 2.0%, 78.4% reported following the correct dose of diabetes pills or insulin, 58% ate the recommended food portions, and 44.3% did exercise three or more times per week. A good adherence to these three recommendations was observed in only 26.1% of the patients. These patients considered as a group were characterized by a greater knowledge about the disease (P < 0.00001), regular home blood glucose monitoring (P < 0.01), an inner perception of better diabetes control (P = 0.007), good health (P = 0.004) and better communication with their physician (P < 0.02). A poor adherence to two or the three main diabetes care recommendations was associated with a depressive state (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.1-4.9, P < 0.01) and a history of excessive alcohol intake (OR 4.03, 95% CI 1.1-21.0, P = 0.03). Poor adherence to standard diabetes care recommendations is frequently observed in patients with type 2 diabetes attending a specialized health care center in Mexico City. Depression must be identified and treated effectively. PMID:15589064

  12. Exploiting CMS data popularity to model the evolution of data management for Run-2 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacorsi, D.; Boccali, T.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Neri, M.; Magini, N.; Kuznetsov, V.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-01

    During the LHC Run-1 data taking, all experiments collected large data volumes from proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. The collisions data, together with massive volumes of simulated data, were replicated in multiple copies, transferred among various Tier levels, transformed/slimmed in format/content. These data were then accessed (both locally and remotely) by large groups of distributed analysis communities exploiting the WorldWide LHC Computing Grid infrastructure and services. While efficient data placement strategies - together with optimal data redistribution and deletions on demand - have become the core of static versus dynamic data management projects, little effort has so far been invested in understanding the detailed data-access patterns which surfaced in Run-1. These patterns, if understood, can be used as input to simulation of computing models at the LHC, to optimise existing systems by tuning their behaviour, and to explore next-generation CPU/storage/network co-scheduling solutions. This is of great importance, given that the scale of the computing problem will increase far faster than the resources available to the experiments, for Run-2 and beyond. Studying data-access patterns involves the validation of the quality of the monitoring data collected on the “popularity of each dataset, the analysis of the frequency and pattern of accesses to different datasets by analysis end-users, the exploration of different views of the popularity data (by physics activity, by region, by data type), the study of the evolution of Run-1 data exploitation over time, the evaluation of the impact of different data placement and distribution choices on the available network and storage resources and their impact on the computing operations. This work presents some insights from studies on the popularity data from the CMS experiment. We present the properties of a range of physics analysis activities as seen by the data popularity, and make recommendations for

  13. Variability in evolution and course of gunshot injuries to the neck and impact on management. A case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen R; Metwalli, Zeyad A; Yevich, Steven M; Whigham, Cliff J; Benndorf, Goetz

    2013-12-01

    This study reports the differences in evolution and course of multiple pseudoaneurysms (PAs) and an axillary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) after penetrating vascular trauma due to shotgun injury to the head and neck. We describe the unusual case of a young man who, following penetrating shotgun injuries to the head and neck, developed multiple PAs of the common carotid, vertebral and superficial temporal arteries as well as an axillary AVF. Serial angiographic follow-up studies documented differences in time of occurrence, evolution and course of these lesions. This allowed for tailored management using endovascular (AVF, superficial temporal artery PAs) and conservative (carotid and vertebral PAs) treatment. No complication occurred and complete cure of all lesions was achieved and documented after seven months. Time of occurrence, evolution and regression of penetrating vascular injuries can differ significantly even in the same patient. Close angiographic follow-up helps not only detect a lesion with delayed occurrence, but also provides a practical basis for decision-making for optimal therapeutic management.

  14. 44 CFR 60.12 - Flood plain management criteria for State-owned properties in special hazard areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program CRITERIA FOR LAND MANAGEMENT AND USE Requirements for State Flood Plain Management Regulations § 60.12 Flood plain management criteria for State-owned properties in... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood plain...

  15. Special Days, Special Ways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    Presents unique ways to create special rituals that recognize individual students' achievements and milestones. Ideas include throwing a send-off party for a student who is moving; holding monthly birthday luncheons; choosing an ambassador to accompany new students around school; and making a lost tooth container that students can use to safely…

  16. Managing Evolution and Change in Web-Based Teaching and Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Claus

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the design and maintenance of computer-based teaching and learning environments and illustrates consequences of evolution and change in Web-based courses. Focuses on changes in content; format of the course; infrastructure, including hardware, systems, and software; and pedagogy, or instructional design, including knowledge modeling,…

  17. Evolution Under Attack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, David; Newell, Norman D.

    1974-01-01

    The article points out the growing attempts by creationists to have special creation presented with evolution in any educational discussion of the origin of life. The evolution theory is shown to be consistent with known scientific facts while the theory of special creation does not adequately account for these facts. (LS)

  18. Environmental influences on mosquito foraging and integrated vector management can delay the evolution of behavioral resistance.

    PubMed

    Stone, Chris; Chitnis, Nakul; Gross, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Along with the scaled-up distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets for malaria control has become concern about insecticide resistance. A related concern regards the evolution of host-seeking periodicity from the nocturnal to the crepuscular periods of the day. Why we observe such shifts in some areas but not others and which methods could prove useful in managing such behavioral resistance remain open questions. We developed a foraging model to explore whether environmental conditions affect the evolution of behavioral resistance. We looked at the role of the abundance of blood hosts and nectar sources and investigated the potential of attractive toxic sugar baits for integrated control. Higher encounter rates with hosts and nectar sources allowed behaviorally resistant populations to persist at higher levels of bed net coverage. Whereas higher encounter rates with nectar increased the threshold where resistance emerged, higher encounter rates of hosts lowered this threshold. Adding sugar baits lowered the coverage level of bed nets required to eliminate the vector population. In certain environments, using lower bed net coverage levels together with toxic sugar baits may delay or prevent the evolution of behavioral resistance. Designing sustainable control strategies will depend on an understanding of vector behavior expressed in local environmental conditions. PMID:26989441

  19. Relationships between specialized cells, capillaries and intermediary cytofibrillary elements. Xth Note. Biological evolution of the emonctory subsystem and stereotype in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mârza, V D

    1978-01-01

    The paper points out the importance of homeostasis as the most general system of the organism (Ist order system) and the 2nd order subsystem which composes it, discussing the relations between them and the biological evolution of the emonctory subsystem in protists and invertebrates. The emonctory structures, functions and stereotype and their component parts are studied in protists, spongia, coelenterata and coelomata: lower worms, annelids, their hyponeurian descendents (arthropods, molluses) and epineurian descedents echinoderms and protochordates (Stomochordata, Tunicata, Cephalochordata). The structure, functions and stereotypes of protonephridia and metanephridia and of substitutive (vicarious) emonctory organs (nephrocytes and peritoneal cells) are studied in coelomatic invertebrates. Their evolution appears to be directioned to localize within the limits of the emonctory subsystem. During their evolution, some nephridial functions are performed by the vicarious emonctory organs. The evolution of the subsystem in invertebrates appears to be based on stable characters and their relationships with variable features.

  20. Next Waves in the Evolution of Management Education: Non-Traded Enterprises and Spatial Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    The last generation in management education identified and addressed two perceived gaps in standard degree curricula: global business and corporate ethics. The Association for Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has been instrumental in assuring these topics receive due attention. Given the current state of management education…

  1. From Civil Protection Plan to Disaster Management. PETer evolution from GIS tool to multi-area Emergency Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigerio, Simone; Sterlacchini, Simone; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Glade, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    PETer (Protection and Emergency of the Territory) has been developed since 2006 as a tool to manage all the information available to perform a wide range of Civil Protection activities. Based on MapObjects spatial support, it was relied on capacity to manage data from different sources and at different scale, offering practical GIS-tools for a technical and practical use during crisis state. At the first stages of the development, after different assessment, critical on-field analysis and a direct proof on test area, the approach came into sight like a valid database management for the entire dataset, but quite static, not full-blown for every emergency necessity, too complicate and not enough user-friendly, considering people in charge during emergency management, the quick change of state with many parameters involved and also uncertainty, hesitation, confusion or general panic among decision makers. As a second step of research, a more down-to-earth methodology targeted to cope with the aftermath of critical events is presented here. It takes advantage of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Decision Support Systems (DSS), and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to prepare, apply and coordinate Civil Protection plans. The main aim was to set up and manage contingency plans in advance; that is, to identify and prepare people in charge to take action to define the activities to be performed, to be aware of available resources and to optimize the communication system among the people involved, in order to efficiently face a prospective crisis phase. A disaster preparedness plan should anticipate the demands for a disaster relief operation and indicate the most effective way of joining those requirements. Through scientific and technical co-operation between public and private research groups, a new platform was planned and set up, in order to test the aims of the project. The application was based on a cooperative organizational structure by which

  2. A legal and ecological perspective of 'site integrity' to inform policy development and management of Special Areas of Conservation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rees, Siân E; Sheehan, Emma V; Jackson, Emma L; Gall, Sarah C; Cousens, Sophie L; Solandt, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Matthew; Attrill, Martin J

    2013-07-15

    The European Union Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) provides for the designation and management of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and requires that impacting activities are subject to 'an appropriate assessment' of their implications for the 'integrity' of the site. We define the term 'site integrity' from a legal and an ecological perspective. We demonstrate that 'site integrity' is the maintenance of ecological processes and functions that support the wider delivery of ecosystem services. 'Site integrity' can be influenced by SAC management. Management that seeks to support 'site integrity' may include the use of buffer zones or connecting areas that extend beyond the SAC site's designated features. We conclude that 'site integrity' and 'favourable conservation status' are powerful legal terms that if fully transposed into the law and policy of Member States can enable the achievement of broader European and International goals for marine conservation.

  3. Pilot study investigating the utility of a specialized online symptom management program for individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome as compared to an online meditation program

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Megan A; Attree, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Clare L; Dancey, Christine P

    2014-01-01

    Background Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a long-term, debilitating condition that impacts numerous areas of individuals’ lives. The two predominant treatment options for ME/CFS are cognitive behavioral therapy and graded exercise therapy; however, many people have found these techniques unacceptable or even damaging. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the utility of a specialized online symptom management program for ME/CFS in comparison to an online meditation program in an effort to ascertain whether this tool could be a further option for those with ME/CFS. Methods This experimental design consisted of two interventions: a specialized online symptoms management program (N=19) and a control intervention based on an online meditation website (N=9). A battery of questionnaires, including measures of multidimensional fatigue, illness-specific symptoms, perceived control, and mindful awareness, were completed before the participants commenced use of the programs and following 8 weeks’ use. Results Significant differences were found in the areas of chance and powerful others’ locus of control, and sleeping difficulties, but not in ME/CFS symptomatology overall. Conclusion The specialized online program described in this study warrants further investigation, as it appears to influence perceived control and key ME/CFS symptoms over time. PMID:25214803

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Barrett's Esophagus: A Retrospective Study Comparing the Endoscopic Assessment of Early Esophageal Lesions in the Community versus a Specialized Center

    PubMed Central

    Rayner-Hartley, Erin; Takach, Oliver; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Specialized endoscopic evaluation for patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) is well supported; however, no studies have shown that centers with expertise provide better quality care for BE with high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma. In this study, the investigators aimed to evaluate the management and clinical course for patients treated in a community practice versus a specialized BE center. Methods. A retrospective analysis of referrals from the community to our specialized center for evaluation of BE at St Paul's Hospital Division of Gastroenterology between January 2007 and February 2014 was performed. Subjects were patients who were referred for BE and dysplasia and subsequently reevaluated by endoscopy. The pathology and endoscopy reports from the community and our center were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: being ≥ 19 years old and pathologic diagnosis of BE or dysplasia in the community. Exclusion criteria were as follows: incomplete pathology data or incomplete endoscopy reports from the community physicians. Results. A total of 77 patients were reviewed. The staging of 28.9% of patients referred from the community was changed from the initial pathological diagnosis. 18.4% of these patients were upstaged. Using Fischer's exact test, we showed that, in our specialized center, endoscopic impressions correlated significantly with pathology results (p < 0.0001). PMID:27446850

  5. Handbook of Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M., Ed.; Hallahan, Daniel P., Ed.

    Intended to serve as a basic reference work for students and professionals in special education, the book contains 34 author contributed chapters concerned with the conceptual foundations of special education, service delivery systems, curriculum and methods, and child and child/environmental management. Chapters have the following titles and…

  6. Online Learning: Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This special section includes "The View from the Middle" (Dick Schaaf); "Crossing the Channel" (Dawn Garrett); and "Bandwidth Basics" (Dick Schaaf). Sidebars look at bandwidth and management issues as well as courseware development. (JOW)

  7. Management of patient education in US hospitals: evolution of a concept.

    PubMed

    Giloth, B E

    1990-04-01

    While patient education has been an integral part of health care for centuries, the management of this process is a relatively new concept for US hospitals. Beginning in the late 1960s, documentation of patient education coordinator positions, policies, committee mandates, and other management structures began to appear. National surveys and projects documented the growth of these structures and provided some evidence that their existence positively impacted the number of programs and their effectiveness. Financial pressures on hospitals including the advent of the prospective pricing system, other actions by government and business to control health care costs, and changes in technology have resulted in budget cuts, staff reductions, and reorganizations that have posed new challenges for the development of patient education management. This paper discusses these developments and their impact on management of patient education programs in hospitals.

  8. Telementoring for airway management between a far forward special operations location to a major medical center using inexpensive telemedicine solutions.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Daniel; Boedeker, Ben H; Bernhagen, Mary; Miljkovic, Nikola; Nicholas Iv, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients in remote settings have limited access to specialized care. Telemedicine/telementoring can improve access to quality care, although VTC equipment is costly. This study showed that an inexpensive internet telecom software program can be effectively employed in the intubation training of a remote trainee. PMID:22356988

  9. Special Deveice as Aids in the Management of Child Self-Mutilation in the Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letts, R. M.; Hobson, Douglas A.

    1975-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team at a hospital special devices clinic designed multiple use wheelchair and car seats with unique tabletop or arm enclosures for two educable mentally retarded brothers (11 and 14-years-old) afflicted with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, a purine metabolic disorder characterized by an insatiable urge for self-mutilation. (LH)

  10. Rational Design of Antibiotic Treatment Plans: A Treatment Strategy for Managing Evolution and Reversing Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Portia M.; Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Meza, Juan C.; Sturmfels, Bernd; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The development of reliable methods for restoring susceptibility after antibiotic resistance arises has proven elusive. A greater understanding of the relationship between antibiotic administration and the evolution of resistance is key to overcoming this challenge. Here we present a data-driven mathematical approach for developing antibiotic treatment plans that can reverse the evolution of antibiotic resistance determinants. We have generated adaptive landscapes for 16 genotypes of the TEM β-lactamase that vary from the wild type genotype “TEM-1” through all combinations of four amino acid substitutions. We determined the growth rate of each genotype when treated with each of 15 β-lactam antibiotics. By using growth rates as a measure of fitness, we computed the probability of each amino acid substitution in each β-lactam treatment using two different models named the Correlated Probability Model (CPM) and the Equal Probability Model (EPM). We then performed an exhaustive search through the 15 treatments for substitution paths leading from each of the 16 genotypes back to the wild type TEM-1. We identified optimized treatment paths that returned the highest probabilities of selecting for reversions of amino acid substitutions and returning TEM to the wild type state. For the CPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.6 and 1.0. For the EPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.38 and 1.0. For cyclical CPM treatment plans in which the starting and ending genotype was the wild type, the probabilities were between 0.62 and 0.7. Overall this study shows that there is promise for reversing the evolution of resistance through antibiotic treatment plans. PMID:25946134

  11. Rational design of antibiotic treatment plans: a treatment strategy for managing evolution and reversing resistance.

    PubMed

    Mira, Portia M; Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Meza, Juan C; Sturmfels, Bernd; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The development of reliable methods for restoring susceptibility after antibiotic resistance arises has proven elusive. A greater understanding of the relationship between antibiotic administration and the evolution of resistance is key to overcoming this challenge. Here we present a data-driven mathematical approach for developing antibiotic treatment plans that can reverse the evolution of antibiotic resistance determinants. We have generated adaptive landscapes for 16 genotypes of the TEM β-lactamase that vary from the wild type genotype "TEM-1" through all combinations of four amino acid substitutions. We determined the growth rate of each genotype when treated with each of 15 β-lactam antibiotics. By using growth rates as a measure of fitness, we computed the probability of each amino acid substitution in each β-lactam treatment using two different models named the Correlated Probability Model (CPM) and the Equal Probability Model (EPM). We then performed an exhaustive search through the 15 treatments for substitution paths leading from each of the 16 genotypes back to the wild type TEM-1. We identified optimized treatment paths that returned the highest probabilities of selecting for reversions of amino acid substitutions and returning TEM to the wild type state. For the CPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.6 and 1.0. For the EPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.38 and 1.0. For cyclical CPM treatment plans in which the starting and ending genotype was the wild type, the probabilities were between 0.62 and 0.7. Overall this study shows that there is promise for reversing the evolution of resistance through antibiotic treatment plans.

  12. Evolution of co-management: role of knowledge generation, bridging organizations and social learning.

    PubMed

    Berkes, Fikret

    2009-04-01

    Over a period of some 20 years, different aspects of co-management (the sharing of power and responsibility between the government and local resource users) have come to the forefront. The paper focuses on a selection of these: knowledge generation, bridging organizations, social learning, and the emergence of adaptive co-management. Co-management can be considered a knowledge partnership. Different levels of organization, from local to international, have comparative advantages in the generation and mobilization of knowledge acquired at different scales. Bridging organizations provide a forum for the interaction of these different kinds of knowledge, and the coordination of other tasks that enable co-operation: accessing resources, bringing together different actors, building trust, resolving conflict, and networking. Social learning is one of these tasks, essential both for the co-operation of partners and an outcome of the co-operation of partners. It occurs most efficiently through joint problem solving and reflection within learning networks. Through successive rounds of learning and problem solving, learning networks can incorporate new knowledge to deal with problems at increasingly larger scales, with the result that maturing co-management arrangements become adaptive co-management in time.

  13. Evolution of co-management: role of knowledge generation, bridging organizations and social learning.

    PubMed

    Berkes, Fikret

    2009-04-01

    Over a period of some 20 years, different aspects of co-management (the sharing of power and responsibility between the government and local resource users) have come to the forefront. The paper focuses on a selection of these: knowledge generation, bridging organizations, social learning, and the emergence of adaptive co-management. Co-management can be considered a knowledge partnership. Different levels of organization, from local to international, have comparative advantages in the generation and mobilization of knowledge acquired at different scales. Bridging organizations provide a forum for the interaction of these different kinds of knowledge, and the coordination of other tasks that enable co-operation: accessing resources, bringing together different actors, building trust, resolving conflict, and networking. Social learning is one of these tasks, essential both for the co-operation of partners and an outcome of the co-operation of partners. It occurs most efficiently through joint problem solving and reflection within learning networks. Through successive rounds of learning and problem solving, learning networks can incorporate new knowledge to deal with problems at increasingly larger scales, with the result that maturing co-management arrangements become adaptive co-management in time. PMID:19110363

  14. Performance Management--Motivating and Developing Good Teachers? The Experiences of Teachers in a Small Special School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isherwood, Mary; Johnson, Heather; Brundrett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In 1998, when "Teachers--meeting the challenge of change" was published by the English Department for Education and Skills (DfES), one of the most fundamental reforms of the teaching profession was initiated--performance management. In 2005, all schools became subject to "Light Touch Validation" of their performance management policy and…

  15. 17 CFR 210.3-18 - Special provisions as to registered management investment companies and companies required to be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940, AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 General Instructions As to... registered management investment companies and companies required to be registered as management...

  16. Evolution of diabetes management in the 21st century: the contribution of quality of life measurement in Asians.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shereen Giap Kah; Rusli, Bin Nordin; Khalid, Bin Abdul Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex and chronic disease with multiple complications leading to increased mortality and poor quality of life. Current studies have shown that lowering glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) confers protection against microvascular complications. However, with more intensive glucose control to achieve HbA1c of less than 6.5%, there seems to be a significant increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular events. The current recommendation worldwide is for "tailoring" of DM management to risk and also quality of Life (QOL) which is a crucial component in determining the success or failure of DM management. In Asia, DM has become a health crisis but there is a lack of QOL assessment tool that is specific for Asians with wide spectrum of ethnicity, languages, religions and socio-economic differences. In this review, we discuss the evolution of DM management over the decade and the issues pertaining to QOL among people living with diabetes in Asia. PMID:26078234

  17. Evolution of Information Management at the GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC): 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Alcott, Gary; Berrick, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth science missions have driven their associated data and data management systems from providing simple point-to-point archiving and retrieval to performing user-responsive distributed multisensor information extraction. To fully maximize the use of remote-sensor-generated Earth science data, NASA recognized the need for data systems that provide data access and manipulation capabilities responsive to research brought forth by advancing scientific analysis and the need to maximize the use and usability of the data. The decision by NASA to purposely evolve the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) and other information management facilities was timely and appropriate. The GES DISC evolution was focused on replacing the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) by reusing the In-house developed disk-based Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Product Archive (S4PA) data management system and migrating data to the disk archives. Transition was completed in December 2007

  18. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; De Simone, Belinda; Sartelli, Massimo; Van Goor, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast follow-through and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients. PMID:27022449

  19. Convergence and dissonance: evolution in private-sector approaches to disease management and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Mays, Glen P; Au, Melanie; Claxton, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Disease management (DM) approaches survived the 1990s backlash against managed care because of their potential for consumer-friendly cost containment, but purchasers have been cautious about investing heavily in them because of uncertainty about return on investment. This study examines how private-sector approaches to DM have evolved over the past two years in the midst of the movement toward consumer-driven health care. Findings indicate that these programs have become standard features of health plan design, despite a thin evidence base concerning their effectiveness. Uncertainties remain regarding how well these programs will function within benefit designs that require higher consumer cost sharing.

  20. [Evolution of mechanisms of Ca(2+)-signaling. Role of Ca2+ in regulation of specialized functions of cardiomyocytes in chronic heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Shemarova, I V; Nesterov, V P

    2014-01-01

    The review considers role of Ca2+ ions in regulation of specialized functions of cardiomyocytes (CM) in disturbances of heart activity. Problems of Ca(2+)-dependent signaling mechanisms leading to pathological hypertrophy, arrythmogenesis, and heart failure are elucidated. A particular attention is paid to analysis of Ca(2+)-dependent molecular mechanisms leading to remodeling of contractile proteins, apoptosis, or pathological growth of CM.

  1. Federal Funding for Students with Disabilities: The Evolution of Federal Special Education Finance in the United States. New America Education Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 6.5 million students in the United States ages 3 through 21 are currently classified as requiring special education. Those students have physical, developmental, and emotional disabilities that make educational endeavors more challenging for teachers, administrators, and the students themselves. Yet historically, the needs of special…

  2. Specializing architectures for the type 2 diabetes mellitus care use cases with a focus on process management.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Gustavo A; Blobel, Bernd; López, Diego M; Ruiz, Alonso A

    2015-01-01

    The development of software supporting inter-disciplinary systems like the type 2 diabetes mellitus care requires the deployment of methodologies designed for this type of interoperability. The GCM framework allows the architectural description of such systems and the development of software solutions based on it. A first step of the GCM methodology is the definition of a generic architecture, followed by its specialization for specific use cases. This paper describes the specialization of the generic architecture of a system, supporting Type 2 diabetes mellitus glycemic control, for a pharmacotherapy use case. It focuses on the behavioral aspect of the system, i.e. the policy domain and the definition of the rules governing the system. The design of this architecture reflects the inter-disciplinary feature of the methodology. Finally, the resulting architecture allows building adaptive, intelligent and complete systems. PMID:25980859

  3. Evaluation in the Private Sector: Evolution and Professionalization of Quality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfroij, Arnold J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews approaches to quality management in the private sector from an evolutionary perspective. Focuses on two critical dimensions: product versus system, and objective versus intersubjective orientation. Experiences within the private sector can be relevant for the public sector, and the complexity of evaluation has implications for the…

  4. The Evolution of the School Library Collection: Implications for Effective Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debowski, Shelda

    1999-01-01

    Explores some of the collection and service-related issues which should be considered by those developing an electronic collection in a school library. Highlights include principles of electronic collection management; selection of electronic resources; technological infrastructure; user training; online subscriptions; marketing; and technical…

  5. Organizational Learning, Change Process, and Evolution of Management Systems: Empirical Evidence from the Basque Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aramburu, Nekane; Saenz, Josune; Rivera, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their management systems. Design/methodology/approach: To this end, an ad hoc questionnaire was devised and addressed to the Chief Executive Officers of a representative…

  6. Evolution of quantitative methods for the study and management of avian populations: on the importance of individual contributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Evolution of quantitative methods for the study and management of avian populations: on the importance of individual contributions.-The EURING meetings and the scientists who have attended them have contributed substantially to the growth of knowledge in the field of estimating parameters of animal populations. The contributions of David R. Anderson to process modeling, parameter estimation and decision analysis are briefly reviewed. Metrics are considered for assessing individual contributions to a field of inquiry, and it is concluded that Anderson's contributions have been substantial. Important characteristics of Anderson and his career are the ability to identify and focus on important topics, the premium placed on dissemination of new methods to prospective users, the ability to assemble teams of complementary researchers, and the innovation and vision that characterized so much of his work. The paper concludes with a list of interesting current research topics for consideration by EURING participants.

  7. The evolution of diabetic ketoacidosis: An update of its etiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Kitabchi, Abbas E

    2016-04-01

    The prognosis of diabetic ketoacidosis has undergone incredibly remarkable evolution since the discovery of insulin nearly a century ago. The incidence and economic burden of diabetic ketoacidosis have continued to rise but its mortality has decreased to less than 1% in good centers. Improved outcome is attributable to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and widespread application of treatment guidelines. In this review, we present the changes that have occurred over the years, highlighting the evidence behind the recommendations that have improved outcome. We begin with a discussion of the precipitants and pathogenesis of DKA as a prelude to understanding the rationale for the recommendations. A brief review of ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes, an update relating to the diagnosis of DKA and a future perspective are also provided. PMID:26975543

  8. The evolution of diabetic ketoacidosis: An update of its etiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Kitabchi, Abbas E

    2016-04-01

    The prognosis of diabetic ketoacidosis has undergone incredibly remarkable evolution since the discovery of insulin nearly a century ago. The incidence and economic burden of diabetic ketoacidosis have continued to rise but its mortality has decreased to less than 1% in good centers. Improved outcome is attributable to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and widespread application of treatment guidelines. In this review, we present the changes that have occurred over the years, highlighting the evidence behind the recommendations that have improved outcome. We begin with a discussion of the precipitants and pathogenesis of DKA as a prelude to understanding the rationale for the recommendations. A brief review of ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes, an update relating to the diagnosis of DKA and a future perspective are also provided.

  9. Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

    2012-09-30

    This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA

  10. Advancing knowledge for proactive drought planning and enhancing adaptive management for drought on rangelands: Introduction to a special issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall that adversely affects vegetation growth and negatively impacts land managers, ranching enterprises, and pastoral systems. As an ecological driver, drought historically shaped vegetation composition, structure, diversity, and productivity of r...

  11. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes before and after bariatric surgery: evolution and microvascular complications.

    PubMed

    Chuah, L L; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly seen as a treatment option for patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe complex obesity (SCO). There is however no consensus on how to manage this cohort preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients with T2DM having cardiac surgery benefit from glycaemic optimisation prior to surgery. National Health Service Diabetes in the United Kingdom recommends that glucose is optimised prior to all elective surgery. However, bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass (RYGB) is distinct from general surgery. Glycaemic control improves immediately after RYGB and thus all T2DM patients need a review of their glucose lowering medications postoperatively. Preoperatively most bariatric centres use a low calorie diet (LCD) which improved glycaemic control and may predisposed patients using insulin or sulphonylureas to risks of hypoglycaemia. There are no protocols and consensus among bariatric centres on how best to manage patients with T2DM preoperatively and postoperatively. Moreover patients with difficult to control T2DM are at risk of microvascular complications of diabetes. So far, there is little evidence on the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetes nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy. In conclusion, bariatric surgery improves glycaemic control; however, there are limited studies, and no guidelines on how to manage patients with T2DM pre and postoperatively. Given the increasing proportion of T2DM patients referred for bariatric surgery, there is a need to review current practice on how to manage these patients in the short term and long term with a specific focus on improving end organ damage such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy.

  12. Environmental Resource Management in Borderlands: Evolution from Competing Interests to Common Aversions

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Patrick Henry; Belec, John; Levy, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Great enthusiasm is attached to the emergence of cross-border regions (CBRs) as a new institutional arrangement for dealing with local cross-border environmental resource management and other issues that remain too distant from national capitals and/or too expensive to be addressed in the traditional topocratic manner requiring instead local adhocratic methods. This study briefly discusses the perceived value of CBRs and necessary and sufficient conditions for the successful and sustainable development of such places. Then, assuming that necessary conditions can be met, the study investigates an intriguing hypothesis concerning the catalyzing of sustainable consensus for cross-border resource management based on a game theoretical approach that employs the use of dilemma of common aversion rather than the more traditional dilemma of competing common interests. Using this lens to investigate a series of events on the Pacific northwestern Canadian-American border in a part of the Fraser Lowland, we look for evidence of the emergence of an active and sustainable CBR to address local trans-border resource management issues. Although our micro-level scale fails to conclusively demonstrate such evidence, it does demonstrate the value of using this approach and suggests a number of avenues for further research. PMID:26154660

  13. Forest Management and the Evolution of Project Design in Dynamic Wildland Urban Interface Fire Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Truckee Ranger District on the Tahoe National Forest, in the heart of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, has a rich history of human activities. Native American influences, comstock-era logging, fire suppression, development, and recreation have all shaped the natural environment into what it is today. Like much of our national forests in California, forest conditions that have developed are generally much more homogenous and less resistant to disturbance from fire, insect, and disease than they might have been without the myriad of human influences. However, in order to improve the resiliency of our forests to stand replacing disturbances like high severity fire, while managing for integrated anthropomorphic values, it is imperative that management evolve to meet those dynamic needs. Recent advances in remote sensing and GIS allow land managers more access to forest information and can inform site specific prescriptions to change site specific undesirable conditions. It is ecologically and politically complex, yet our forests deserve that microscope. This particular presentation will focus on how the Truckee Ranger District began this process of incorporating several values, generated from stakeholder collaboration, into one project's goals and how those lessons learned informed their most recent project.

  14. Environmental Resource Management in Borderlands: Evolution from Competing Interests to Common Aversions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick Henry; Belec, John; Levy, Jason

    2015-07-01

    Great enthusiasm is attached to the emergence of cross-border regions (CBRs) as a new institutional arrangement for dealing with local cross-border environmental resource management and other issues that remain too distant from national capitals and/or too expensive to be addressed in the traditional topocratic manner requiring instead local adhocratic methods. This study briefly discusses the perceived value of CBRs and necessary and sufficient conditions for the successful and sustainable development of such places. Then, assuming that necessary conditions can be met, the study investigates an intriguing hypothesis concerning the catalyzing of sustainable consensus for cross-border resource management based on a game theoretical approach that employs the use of dilemma of common aversion rather than the more traditional dilemma of competing common interests. Using this lens to investigate a series of events on the Pacific northwestern Canadian-American border in a part of the Fraser Lowland, we look for evidence of the emergence of an active and sustainable CBR to address local trans-border resource management issues. Although our micro-level scale fails to conclusively demonstrate such evidence, it does demonstrate the value of using this approach and suggests a number of avenues for further research.

  15. Environmental Resource Management in Borderlands: Evolution from Competing Interests to Common Aversions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick Henry; Belec, John; Levy, Jason

    2015-07-01

    Great enthusiasm is attached to the emergence of cross-border regions (CBRs) as a new institutional arrangement for dealing with local cross-border environmental resource management and other issues that remain too distant from national capitals and/or too expensive to be addressed in the traditional topocratic manner requiring instead local adhocratic methods. This study briefly discusses the perceived value of CBRs and necessary and sufficient conditions for the successful and sustainable development of such places. Then, assuming that necessary conditions can be met, the study investigates an intriguing hypothesis concerning the catalyzing of sustainable consensus for cross-border resource management based on a game theoretical approach that employs the use of dilemma of common aversion rather than the more traditional dilemma of competing common interests. Using this lens to investigate a series of events on the Pacific northwestern Canadian-American border in a part of the Fraser Lowland, we look for evidence of the emergence of an active and sustainable CBR to address local trans-border resource management issues. Although our micro-level scale fails to conclusively demonstrate such evidence, it does demonstrate the value of using this approach and suggests a number of avenues for further research. PMID:26154660

  16. Evolution of a web-based, prototype Personal Health Application for diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Stephanie J; Kedziora, Richard J; Vigersky, Robert A; Bursell, Sven-Erik

    2010-10-01

    Behaviors carried out by the person with diabetes (e.g., healthy eating, physical activity, judicious use of medication, glucose monitoring, coping and problem-solving, regular clinic visits, etc.) are of central importance in diabetes management. To assist with these behaviors, we developed a prototype PHA for diabetes self-management that was based on User-Centered Design principles and congruent with the anticipatory vision of Project Health Design (PHD). This article presents aspects of the prototype PHA's functionality as conceived under PHD and describes modifications to the PHA now being undertaken under new sponsorship, in response to user feedback and timing tests we have performed. In brief, the prototype Personal Health Application (PHA) receives data on the major diabetes management domains from a Personal Health Record (PHR) and analyzes and provides feedback based on clinically vetted educational content. The information is presented within "gadgets" within a portal-based website. The PHR used for the first implementation was the Common Platform developed by PHD. Key changes include a re-conceptualization of the gadgets by topic areas originally defined by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, a refocusing on low-cost approaches to diabetes monitoring and data entry, and synchronization with a new PHR, Microsoft® HealthVault™.

  17. Evidence of a specialized feeding niche in a Late Triassic ray-finned fish: evolution of multidenticulate teeth and benthic scraping in † Hemicalypterus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah Z.

    2015-04-01

    Fishes have evolved to exploit multiple ecological niches. Extant fishes in both marine (e.g., rabbitfishes, surgeonfishes) and freshwater systems (e.g., haplochromine cichlids, characiforms) have evolved specialized, scoop-like, multidenticulate teeth for benthic scraping, feeding primarily on algae. Here, I report evidence of the oldest example of specialized multidenticulate dentition in a ray-finned fish, † Hemicalypterus weiri, from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of southeastern Utah (˜210-205 Ma), USA. † H. weiri is a lower actinopterygian species that is phylogenetically remote from modern fishes, and has evolved specialized teeth that converge with those of several living teleost fishes (e.g., characiforms, cichlids, acanthurids, siganids), with a likely function of these teeth being to scrape algae off a rock substrate. This finding contradicts previously held notions that fishes with multicuspid, scoop-like dentition were restricted to teleosts, and indicates that ray-finned fishes were diversifying into different trophic niches and exploring different modes of feeding earlier in their history than previously thought, fundamentally altering our perceptions of the ecological roles of fishes during the Mesozoic.

  18. Evidence of a specialized feeding niche in a Late Triassic ray-finned fish: evolution of multidenticulate teeth and benthic scraping in †Hemicalypterus.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sarah Z

    2015-04-01

    Fishes have evolved to exploit multiple ecological niches. Extant fishes in both marine (e.g., rabbitfishes, surgeonfishes) and freshwater systems (e.g., haplochromine cichlids, characiforms) have evolved specialized, scoop-like, multidenticulate teeth for benthic scraping, feeding primarily on algae. Here, I report evidence of the oldest example of specialized multidenticulate dentition in a ray-finned fish, †Hemicalypterus weiri, from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of southeastern Utah (∼210-205 Ma), USA. †H. weiri is a lower actinopterygian species that is phylogenetically remote from modern fishes, and has evolved specialized teeth that converge with those of several living teleost fishes (e.g., characiforms, cichlids, acanthurids, siganids), with a likely function of these teeth being to scrape algae off a rock substrate. This finding contradicts previously held notions that fishes with multicuspid, scoop-like dentition were restricted to teleosts, and indicates that ray-finned fishes were diversifying into different trophic niches and exploring different modes of feeding earlier in their history than previously thought, fundamentally altering our perceptions of the ecological roles of fishes during the Mesozoic.

  19. The Evolution of Wildland Fire Management Policy in the USA: Successes and Failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Caban, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires have been suppressed over the last 100 years in forest and brush landscapes. For the last three decades, fires occurrence and severity have significantly increased when compared to historical levels causing economic damage and suppression costs never experienced before in the US or globally. As the wildland fire problem evolved so did the public response through a wildland fire management policy guided by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management understanding of the problem. Globally it is estimated that more 350 million hectares of wildland burn annually. They oxidize approximately 3-8% of the total terrestrial net primary productivity. The economic and physical relevance of wildland fire management and protection programs is ever growing, particularly considering mounting wildfire costs and losses globally. In the US alone, from 2000 to 2013 more than 37 million hectares of wildland has been affected at a cost of over $21 billion. The increase in siege-like fires can be explained in part by increasing population, particularly in the wildland-urban interface and the accumulation of biomass fuel due to over a century of fire exclusion. Recent developments demonstrate a strong relationship between fire and weather and climate variations. How the wildland fire management policy has evolved through time? The development can be divided in three stages: the formative years between 1905 and 1911; the consolidation years from 1911 through 1968; and the modern era from 1995 to present. Each stage is characterized by a series of significant events that caused changes on how the problem was approached. For example, the establishment of the Forest Service in 1905 and the rash of large wildfires in the western USA set the base for the wildfire suppression of all wildfires in 1911. During the second stage we see the 1935 policy of suppressing all wildfires by 10-am next-day. By 1968 the policy has evolved to include the use of prescribed burning and the

  20. Corneal foreign body management at a role 1 flight line aid station: risks, benefits, and implications for Special Operations medicine.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Christopher J; Enzenauer, Robert W; Wenkel, Jack W; Henke, Jessica L; Rohrbough, Christiana K; Miller, Stephanie L; Howerton, Paul H; Schreffler, James P

    2014-01-01

    Eye injuries are common in forward areas of operations. Definitive diagnosis and care may be limited not by provider skill but rather by available equipment. The ability to treat simple trauma such as corneal foreign bodies at the Role 1 level has advantages including rapid return to duty, decreased cost of treatment, and, most important, decreased risk of delayed care. We propose the device such as a hand-held portable slit lamp should be made available for appropriate Special Operations Medical Forces (SOFMED) or aviation providers.

  1. Gynecomastia Management: An Evolution and Refinement in Technique at UT Southwestern Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Steven H.; Guenther, Dax; Constantine, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Gynecomastia is a benign proliferation of male breast glandular tissue. Gynecomastia can affect men at any stage of life. Traditional treatment options involved excisional surgeries with periareolar or T-shaped scars, which can leave more visible scars on the chest. The technique presented represents a technique used by the senior author, which relies on ultrasonic liposuction and pull-through technique to remove breast tissue. A retrospective chart review was performed, including all patients who were treated, from 2000 to 2013 by the senior author, for gynecomastia. A deidentified database was created to record patient characteristics, including age, height, weight, ptosis, stage of gynecomastia, and gynecomastia classification. Surgical approaches, complications, and revisions were also recorded. Our experience includes 75 patients with all grades of gynecomastia from 2000 to 2013. These cases span the evolution of our technique to include direct pull-through excision with ultrasound-assisted liposuction. The distribution of the grades I, II, III, and IV ptosis was 30.6%, 36 %, 22.6%, and 10.6% respectively. There were no complications in this series. Only one patient with grade III ptosis required revision surgery. This technique provides a safe and aesthetically pleasing way to treat gynecomastia with a low need for revision. PMID:27482482

  2. Advances in plant virus evolution: translating evolutionary insights into better disease management.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Leal, R; Duffy, S; Xiong, Z; Hammond, R W; Elena, S F

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies in plant virus evolution are revealing that genetic structure and behavior of virus and viroid populations can explain important pathogenic properties of these agents, such as host resistance breakdown, disease severity, and host shifting, among others. Genetic variation is essential for the survival of organisms. The exploration of how these subcellular parasites generate and maintain a certain frequency of mutations at the intra- and inter-host levels is revealing novel molecular virus-plant interactions. They emphasize the role of host environment in the dynamic genetic composition of virus populations. Functional genomics has identified host factors that are transcriptionally altered after virus infections. The analyses of these data by means of systems biology approaches are uncovering critical plant genes specifically targeted by viruses during host adaptation. Also, a next-generation resequencing approach of a whole virus genome is opening new avenues to study virus recombination and the relationships between intra-host virus composition and pathogenesis. Altogether, the analyzed data indicate that systematic disruption of some specific parameters of evolving virus populations could lead to more efficient ways of disease prevention, eradication, or tolerable virus-plant coexistence.

  3. From Revolution to Evolution: 21 Years of the IRIS Data Management Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. B.; Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C. M.; Casey, R.

    2009-12-01

    A revolution is defined as a "drastic and far-reaching change in the way of thinking and behaving", and this describes the effect that the IRIS Data Management System (DMS) has had in the framework of seismological research. The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) prototype began operation at theUniversity of Texas at Austin in 1988 and has evolved to to a fully functioning facility at the University of Washington in Seattle. The focus of this submission is to share an historical timeline of events related to the DMC, a bit of scrap-booking perhaps, centered around the business of waveform data management conducted by IRIS and it's partners. We hope to illustrate how the successful philosophy of sharing unrestricted data, openly collaborating with a global network of networks, and partnering with computer and software industry vendors that have supported our community's academic research, has enabled generations of seismologists to both curate and continually "mine" the ever-growing 45 years of digital data currently stored in the perpetual archive located in Seattle, WA. At the time that the Loma Prieta Earthquake shook and burned San Francisco on October 17, 1989, there were only 3 stations which had dial-up modems enabling what then was considered "fast access" to waveform data delivery from them back to the DMC. This was considered the first test of the DMC, since waveform data were collected and distributed within days of this event. But this was only a foretelling of things to come, since the rates of archiving and distribution have continually grown to a current 1900+ stations and a 17,000+ channel count of real-time data streaming in and out of the DMC daily, totaling 50 Terabytes of data shipped in 2009 alone. We will attempt to summarize the important technological challenges, solutions, and growth of the DMC with the goal of illustrating that "if you build it, they will come", and how this could be useful to other organizations.

  4. The History and Evolution of the Trauma Program Manager/Coordinator.

    PubMed

    Koestner, Amy; Walters, Madonna; DeBoer, Mican

    2016-01-01

    The role of the trauma program manager (TPM) has evolved since the early 1980s. Duties of TPM historically included broad responsibilities such as education, data collection, system, EMS, clinical activities, research, and quality assurance. The purpose of this study was to use survey sampling to evaluate self-perceived functions and scope of work of TPMs in the United States. Results show that TPMs from higher volume centers spend more time on program administration duties whereas TPMs from lower volume centers focus more on registry and clinical duties. Across time, the role has been expanded, refined, and customized, but much role variability remains. PMID:26953538

  5. The Evolution of NSF Arctic Data Management: Challenges and Lessons Learned after Two Decades of Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. A.; Serreze, M. C.; Williams, S.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Middleton, D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation has been providing data management support to the Arctic research community through the UCAR/NCAR since late 1995. Support began during the early planning phase of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) Project and continues today with a major collaboration involving the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL), the NCAR Computational Information Systems Laboratory (CISL), the UCAR Unidata Program, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), in the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information System (ACADIS). These groups have managed thousands of datasets for hundreds of Principal Investigators. The datasets, including the metadata and documentation held in the archives vary in size from less than 30 kilobytes to tens of gigabytes and represent dozens of research disciplines. The ACADIS holdings alone include more than 50 scientific disciplines as defined by the NASA/GCMD keywords. The data formats vary from simple ASCII text to proprietary complex binary and imagery. A lot has changed in the way data are collected due to improved data collection technologies, real time processing and wide bandwidth communications. There have been some changes to data management best practices especially related to metadata, flexible formatting, DOIs, and interoperability with other archives to take advantage of new technologies, software and related support capabilities. ACADIS has spent more than 7 years working these issues and implementing an agile service approach. There are some very interesting challenges that we have been confronted with and overcome during the past 20 years. However, with all those improvements there are guiding principles for the data managers that are robust and remain important even after 20 years of experience. These include the provision of evolving standards and complete metadata records to describe each dataset, International data exchange and easy access to the archived data, and the inclusion of

  6. Trends in Special Library Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elaine; Cohen, Aaron

    1987-01-01

    Examines special library facilities, noting impact of organizational structure, and discusses the concept of information resources management in this context. Development of online and telecommunications systems, corporate and government campuses, and special library systems are identified as reasons for growth of special libraries. Furniture and…

  7. The evolution of surgical procedures in the management of duodenal and gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ajao, O G; Ugwu, B T

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the surgical management of duodenal ulcer had evolved through many stages, over the years. It started with gastroenterostomy alone, then followed by subtotal gastrectomy, vagotomy alone, vagotomy and gastro-jejunostomy, vagotomy and pyloroplasty, and highly selective vagotomy - all which started as open surgical procedures. Now unless there are complications the treatment is essentially medical following the work of Marshall and Warren. Currently, even when surgery is indicated, minimal invasive procedures are preferred. Four main types of pyloroplasties are well known. They are Weinberg, Heinecke-Mikulicz, Finney and Jaboulay. Vagotomy can be truncal, selective, and highly selective. Accepted surgical treatment for gastric ulcer is the distal gastric resection to include the ulcerated area, but not resecting more than 50-60% of the stomach. In the uncommon cases of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, aggressive gastric surgery, the use of drugs, and the resection of the tumour have all been recommended in appropriate cases. With the discovery of Helicobacter pylori and its effective medical treatment, surgery has little role in the initial management of peptic ulcer disease. The place of the history of the surgical procedures employed earlier in the treatment of this disease would remain relevant.

  8. Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA workload management system for exascale computational science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, T.; De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.; Yu, D.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    An important foundation underlying the impressive success of data processing and analysis in the ATLAS experiment [1] at the LHC [2] is the Production and Distributed Analysis (PanDA) workload management system [3]. PanDA was designed specifically for ATLAS and proved to be highly successful in meeting all the distributed computing needs of the experiment. However, the core design of PanDA is not experiment specific. The PanDA workload management system is capable of meeting the needs of other data intensive scientific applications. Alpha-Magnetic Spectrometer [4], an astro-particle experiment on the International Space Station, and the Compact Muon Solenoid [5], an LHC experiment, have successfully evaluated PanDA and are pursuing its adoption. In this paper, a description of the new program of work to develop a generic version of PanDA will be given, as well as the progress in extending PanDA's capabilities to support supercomputers and clouds and to leverage intelligent networking. PanDA has demonstrated at a very large scale the value of automated dynamic brokering of diverse workloads across distributed computing resources. The next generation of PanDA will allow other data-intensive sciences and a wider exascale community employing a variety of computing platforms to benefit from ATLAS' experience and proven tools.

  9. The origin and evolution of safe-yield policies in the Kansas groundwater management districts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.

    2000-01-01

    The management of groundwater resources in Kansas continues to evolve. Declines in the High Plains aquifer led to the establishment of groundwater management districts in the mid-1970s and reduced streamflows prompted the enactment of minimum desirable streamflow standards in the mid-1980s. Nonetheless, groundwater levels and streamflows continued to decline, although at reduced rates compared to premid-1980s rates. As a result, "safe-yield" policies were revised to take into account natural groundwater discharge in the form of stream baseflow. These policies, although a step in the right direction, are deficient in several ways. In addition to the need for more accurate recharge data, pumping-induced streamflow depletion, natural stream losses, and groundwater evapotranspiration need to be accounted for in the revised safe-yield policies. Furthermore, the choice of the 90% flow-duration statistic as a measure of baseflow needs to be reevaluated, as it significantly underestimates mean baseflow estimated from baseflow separation computer programs; moreover, baseflow estimation needs to be refined and validated. ?? 2000 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  10. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput. PMID:26520383

  11. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput.

  12. SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF THE AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION ON THE PARTICULATE MATTER SUPERSITES PROGRAM AND RELATED STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article is the preface or editors note to the dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association for a selection of scientific papers from the specialty conference entitled, "Particulate Matter Supersites Program and Related Studies," that was...

  13. The ecology, evolution, impacts and management of host-parasite interactions of marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Coen, Loren D; Bishop, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    Molluscs are economically and ecologically important components of aquatic ecosystems. In addition to supporting valuable aquaculture and wild-harvest industries, their populations determine the structure of benthic communities, cycling of nutrients, serve as prey resources for higher trophic levels and, in some instances, stabilize shorelines and maintain water quality. This paper reviews existing knowledge of the ecology of host-parasite interactions involving marine molluscs, with a focus on gastropods and bivalves. It considers the ecological and evolutionary impacts of molluscan parasites on their hosts and vice versa, and on the communities and ecosystems in which they are a part, as well as disease management and its ecological impacts. An increasing number of case studies show that disease can have important effects on marine molluscs, their ecological interactions and ecosystem services, at spatial scales from centimeters to thousands of kilometers and timescales ranging from hours to years. In some instances the cascading indirect effects arising from parasitic infection of molluscs extend well beyond the temporal and spatial scales at which molluscs are affected by disease. In addition to the direct effects of molluscan disease, there can be large indirect impacts on marine environments resulting from strategies, such as introduction of non-native species and selective breeding for disease resistance, put in place to manage disease. Much of our understanding of impacts of molluscan diseases on the marine environment has been derived from just a handful of intensively studied marine parasite-host systems, namely gastropod-trematode, cockle-trematode, and oyster-protistan interactions. Understanding molluscan host-parasite dynamics is of growing importance because: (1) expanding aquaculture; (2) current and future climate change; (3) movement of non-native species; and (4) coastal development are modifying molluscan disease dynamics, ultimately leading to

  14. The ecology, evolution, impacts and management of host-parasite interactions of marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Coen, Loren D; Bishop, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    Molluscs are economically and ecologically important components of aquatic ecosystems. In addition to supporting valuable aquaculture and wild-harvest industries, their populations determine the structure of benthic communities, cycling of nutrients, serve as prey resources for higher trophic levels and, in some instances, stabilize shorelines and maintain water quality. This paper reviews existing knowledge of the ecology of host-parasite interactions involving marine molluscs, with a focus on gastropods and bivalves. It considers the ecological and evolutionary impacts of molluscan parasites on their hosts and vice versa, and on the communities and ecosystems in which they are a part, as well as disease management and its ecological impacts. An increasing number of case studies show that disease can have important effects on marine molluscs, their ecological interactions and ecosystem services, at spatial scales from centimeters to thousands of kilometers and timescales ranging from hours to years. In some instances the cascading indirect effects arising from parasitic infection of molluscs extend well beyond the temporal and spatial scales at which molluscs are affected by disease. In addition to the direct effects of molluscan disease, there can be large indirect impacts on marine environments resulting from strategies, such as introduction of non-native species and selective breeding for disease resistance, put in place to manage disease. Much of our understanding of impacts of molluscan diseases on the marine environment has been derived from just a handful of intensively studied marine parasite-host systems, namely gastropod-trematode, cockle-trematode, and oyster-protistan interactions. Understanding molluscan host-parasite dynamics is of growing importance because: (1) expanding aquaculture; (2) current and future climate change; (3) movement of non-native species; and (4) coastal development are modifying molluscan disease dynamics, ultimately leading to

  15. Ecology, evolution, and management strategies of northern pike populations in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per; Tibblin, Petter; Koch-Schmidt, Per; Engstedt, Olof; Nilsson, Jonas; Nordahl, Oscar; Forsman, Anders

    2015-06-01

    Baltic Sea populations of the northern pike (Esox lucius) have declined since the 1990s, and they face additional challenges due to ongoing climate change. Pike in the Baltic Sea spawn either in coastal bays or in freshwater streams and wetlands. Pike recruited in freshwater have been found to make up about 50 % of coastal pike stocks and to show natal homing, thus limiting gene flow among closely located spawning sites. Due to natal homing, sub-populations appear to be locally adapted to their freshwater recruitment environments. Management actions should therefore not involve mixing of individuals originating from different sub-populations. We offer two suggestions complying with this advice: (i) productivity of extant freshwater spawning populations can be boosted by modifying wetlands such that they promote spawning and recruitment; and (ii) new sub-populations that spawn in brackish water can potentially be created by transferring fry and imprinting them on seemingly suitable spawning environments. PMID:26022327

  16. Ecology, evolution, and management strategies of northern pike populations in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per; Tibblin, Petter; Koch-Schmidt, Per; Engstedt, Olof; Nilsson, Jonas; Nordahl, Oscar; Forsman, Anders

    2015-06-01

    Baltic Sea populations of the northern pike (Esox lucius) have declined since the 1990s, and they face additional challenges due to ongoing climate change. Pike in the Baltic Sea spawn either in coastal bays or in freshwater streams and wetlands. Pike recruited in freshwater have been found to make up about 50 % of coastal pike stocks and to show natal homing, thus limiting gene flow among closely located spawning sites. Due to natal homing, sub-populations appear to be locally adapted to their freshwater recruitment environments. Management actions should therefore not involve mixing of individuals originating from different sub-populations. We offer two suggestions complying with this advice: (i) productivity of extant freshwater spawning populations can be boosted by modifying wetlands such that they promote spawning and recruitment; and (ii) new sub-populations that spawn in brackish water can potentially be created by transferring fry and imprinting them on seemingly suitable spawning environments.

  17. Emergency Neurologic Life Support (ENLS): Evolution of Management in the First Hour of a Neurological Emergency.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad M; Pineda, Jose; Corry, Megan; Brophy, Gretchen; Smith, Wade S

    2015-12-01

    Emergency neurological life support (ENLS) is an educational program designed to provide users advisory instruction regarding management for the first few hours of a neurological emergency. The content of the course is divided into 14 modules, each addressing a distinct category of neurological injury. The course is appropriate for practitioners and providers from various backgrounds who work in environments of variable medical complexity. The focus of ENLS is centered on a standardized treatment algorithm, checklists to guide early patient care, and a structured format for communication of findings and concerns to other healthcare professionals. Certification and training in ENLS is hosted by the Neurocritical Care Society. This document introduces the concept of ENLS and describes the revisions that constitute this second version. PMID:26438452

  18. The Evolution of Cooperation in Managed Groundwater Systems: An Agent-Based Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla Rho, J. C.; Mariethoz, G.; Rojas, R. F.; Andersen, M. S.; Kelly, B. F.; Holley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Human interactions with groundwater systems often exhibit complex features that hinder the sustainable management of the resource. This leads to costly and persistent conflicts over groundwater at the catchment scale. One possible way to address these conflicts is by gaining a better understanding of how social and groundwater dynamics coevolve using agent-based models (ABM). Such models allow exploring 'bottom-up' solutions (i.e., self-organised governance systems), where the behaviour of individual agents (e.g., farmers) results in the emergence of mutual cooperation among groundwater users. There is significant empirical evidence indicating that this kind of 'bottom-up' approach may lead to more enduring and sustainable outcomes, compared to conventional 'top-down' strategies such as centralized control and water right schemes (Ostrom 1990). New modelling tools are needed to study these concepts systematically and efficiently. Our model uses a conceptual framework to study cooperation and the emergence of social norms as initially proposed by Axelrod (1986), which we adapted to groundwater management. We developed an ABM that integrates social mechanisms and the physics of subsurface flow. The model explicitly represents feedback between groundwater conditions and social dynamics, capturing the spatial structure of these interactions and the potential effects on cooperation levels in an agricultural setting. Using this model, we investigate a series of mechanisms that may trigger norms supporting cooperative strategies, which can be sustained and become stable over time. For example, farmers in a self-monitoring community can be more efficient at achieving the objective of sustainable groundwater use than government-imposed regulation. Our coupled model thus offers a platform for testing new schemes promoting cooperation and improved resource use, which can be used as a basis for policy design. Importantly, we hope to raise awareness of agent-based modelling as

  19. Case Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk in American Indians and Alaska Natives With Diabetes: Results From the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Manson, Spero M.; Beals, Janette; Henderson, William; Pratte, Katherine; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes in the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart (SDPI-HH) Demonstration Project. Methods. Multidisciplinary teams implemented an intensive case management intervention among 30 health care programs serving 138 tribes. The project recruited 3373 participants, with and without current CVD, between 2006 and 2009. We examined data collected at baseline and 1 year later to determine whether improvements occurred in CVD risk factors and in Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores, aspirin use, and smoking status. Results. A1c levels decreased an average of 0.2% (P < .001). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels decreased, with the largest significant reduction in LDL cholesterol (∆ = −5.29 mg/dL; P < .001). Average Framingham CHD risk scores also decreased significantly. Aspirin therapy increased significantly, and smoking decreased. Participants with more case management visits had significantly greater reductions in LDL cholesterol and A1c values. Conclusions. SDPI-HH successfully translated an intensive case management intervention. Creative retention strategies and an improved understanding of organizational challenges are needed for future Indian health translational efforts. PMID:25211728

  20. Reduced biological control and enhanced chemical pest management in the evolution of fungus farming in ants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Zimmerman, Jess K; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Wcislo, William T

    2009-06-22

    To combat disease, most fungus-growing ants (Attini) use antibiotics from mutualistic bacteria (Pseudonocardia) that are cultured on the ants' exoskeletons and chemical cocktails from exocrine glands, especially the metapleural glands (MG). Previous work has hypothesized that (i) Pseudonocardia antibiotics are narrow-spectrum and control a fungus (Escovopsis) that parasitizes the ants' fungal symbiont, and (ii) MG secretions have broad-spectrum activity and protect ants and brood. We assessed the relative importance of these lines of defence, and their activity spectra, by scoring abundance of visible Pseudonocardia for nine species from five genera and measuring rates of MG grooming after challenging ants with disease agents of differing virulence. Atta and Sericomyrmex have lost or greatly reduced the abundance of visible bacteria. When challenged with diverse disease agents, including Escovopsis, they significantly increased MG grooming rates and expanded the range of targets. By contrast, species of Acromyrmex and Trachymyrmex maintain abundant Pseudonocardia. When challenged, these species had lower MG grooming rates, targeted primarily to brood. More elaborate MG defences and reduced reliance on mutualistic Pseudonocardia are correlated with larger colony size among attine genera, raising questions about the efficacy of managing disease in large societies with chemical cocktails versus bacterial antimicrobial metabolites.

  1. Recent Evolution of Climate Change Paradigms and Practice in Southwest US Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, H. C.; Udall, B.

    2011-12-01

    The water resources community has traditionally conducted their planning and management under a paradigm of stationarity. Since Milly et al. (2008) declared that "stationarity is dead", attitudes and action within the water resources community have evolved rapidly, albeit not uniformly. This presentation reviews the changes occurring within the states of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado, and highlights specific examples involving utilities, agencies, organizations, consultants, and communities. Activities are occurring due to mandates and self-directed initiative, with networks fostering shared learning, common messaging, and policy impact. Planning activities include assessing vulnerabilities and concerns, constraining and characterizing uncertainty, embracing irreducible uncertainties through scenario planning, and exploring options that range from short-term, no regrets strategies to "thinking the unthinkable". Innovation and experimentation are expanding the suite of adaptation options as well. Adaptation activities being implemented include novel approaches for diversifying water supply portfolios, reducing demand, and increasing, time shifting or location shifting water supplies; innovative finance programs are important elements of some activities. Varying in location, scale, impact, and other characteristics, these activities provide test cases for evaluation of effectiveness and assessment of the potential impact and requirements associated with region-wide implementation.

  2. The evolution of groundwater rights and groundwater management in New Mexico and the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuMars, Charles T.; Minier, Jeffrie D.

    Historically, rights in water originated as public property and only later became individualized rights to utilize the public resource, in a manner consistent with the public welfare needs of society, but protected by principles of property law. Five basic regulatory systems for rights in groundwater in the United States have evolved to date. The problems raised by the hydrologic differences between groundwater hydraulically connected to stream systems and groundwater in non-replenished aquifers have been resolved to some extent by a couple of leading court cases. Numerical modeling and other technical methodologies have also evolved to evaluate the scientific issues raised by the different hydrologic conditions, but these are not immune from criticism. The current role of aquifers is evolving into that of storage facilities for recycled water, and their utilization in this manner may be expanded even further in the future. The policy implications of the choices relating to joint management of ground and surface water cannot be overstated. As this paper demonstrates, proactive administration of future groundwater depletions that affect stream systems is essential to the ultimate ability to plan for exploitation, management and utilization of water resources in a rational way that coordinates present and future demand with the reality of scarcity of supply. The examples utilized in this paper demonstrate the need for capacity building, not just to develop good measurement techniques, or to train talented lawyers and judges to write good laws, but also for practical professional water managers to keep the process on a rational course, avoiding limitless exploitation of the resource as well as conservative protectionism that forever precludes its use. Historiquement, les droits d'eau étaient à l'origine un bien public; ils sont devenus plus tard des droits individualisés pour utiliser la ressource publique conformément aux besoins de salut public de la soci

  3. Evolution of farm and manure management and their influence on ammonia emissions from agriculture in Switzerland between 1990 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupper, Thomas; Bonjour, Cyrill; Menzi, Harald

    2015-02-01

    The evolution of farm and manure management and their influence on ammonia (NH3) emissions from agriculture in Switzerland between 1990 and 2010 was modeled. In 2010, total agricultural NH3 emissions were 48,290 t N. Livestock contributed 90% (43,480 t N), with the remaining 10% (4760 t N) coming from arable and fodder crops. The emission stages of grazing, housing/exercise yard, manure storage and application produced 3%, 34%, 17% and 46%, respectively, of livestock emissions. Cattle, pigs, poultry, small ruminants, horses and other equids accounted for 78%, 15%, 3%, 2% and 2%, respectively, of the emissions from livestock and manure management. Compared to 1990, total NH3 emissions from agriculture and from livestock decreased by 16% and 14%, respectively. This was mainly due to declining livestock numbers, since the emissions per animal became bigger for most livestock categories between 1990 and 2010. The production volume for milk and meat remained constant or increased slightly. Other factors contributing to the emission mitigation were increased grazing for cattle, the growing importance of low-emission slurry application techniques and a significant reduction in the use of mineral fertilizer. However, production parameters enhancing emissions such as animal-friendly housing systems providing more surface area per animal and total volume of slurry stores increased during this time period. That such developments may counteract emission mitigation illustrates the challenge for regulators to balance the various aims in the striving toward sustainable livestock production. A sensitivity analysis identified parameters related to the excretion of total ammoniacal nitrogen from dairy cows and slurry application as being the most sensitive technical parameters influencing emissions. Further improvements to emission models should therefore focus on these parameters.

  4. The evolution of groundwater rights and groundwater management in New Mexico and the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuMars, Charles T.; Minier, Jeffrie D.

    Historically, rights in water originated as public property and only later became individualized rights to utilize the public resource, in a manner consistent with the public welfare needs of society, but protected by principles of property law. Five basic regulatory systems for rights in groundwater in the United States have evolved to date. The problems raised by the hydrologic differences between groundwater hydraulically connected to stream systems and groundwater in non-replenished aquifers have been resolved to some extent by a couple of leading court cases. Numerical modeling and other technical methodologies have also evolved to evaluate the scientific issues raised by the different hydrologic conditions, but these are not immune from criticism. The current role of aquifers is evolving into that of storage facilities for recycled water, and their utilization in this manner may be expanded even further in the future. The policy implications of the choices relating to joint management of ground and surface water cannot be overstated. As this paper demonstrates, proactive administration of future groundwater depletions that affect stream systems is essential to the ultimate ability to plan for exploitation, management and utilization of water resources in a rational way that coordinates present and future demand with the reality of scarcity of supply. The examples utilized in this paper demonstrate the need for capacity building, not just to develop good measurement techniques, or to train talented lawyers and judges to write good laws, but also for practical professional water managers to keep the process on a rational course, avoiding limitless exploitation of the resource as well as conservative protectionism that forever precludes its use. Historiquement, les droits d'eau étaient à l'origine un bien public; ils sont devenus plus tard des droits individualisés pour utiliser la ressource publique conformément aux besoins de salut public de la soci

  5. Evolution of product lifespan and implications for environmental assessment and management: a case study of personal computers in higher education.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Callie W; Kahhat, Ramzy; Williams, Eric; Babbitt, Gregory A

    2009-07-01

    Product lifespan is a fundamental variable in understanding the environmental impacts associated with the life cycle of products. Existing life cycle and materials flow studies of products, almost without exception, consider lifespan to be constant over time. To determine the validity of this assumption, this study provides an empirical documentation of the long-term evolution of personal computer lifespan, using a major U.S. university as a case study. Results indicate that over the period 1985-2000, computer lifespan (purchase to "disposal") decreased steadily from a mean of 10.7 years in 1985 to 5.5 years in 2000. The distribution of lifespan also evolved, becoming narrower over time. Overall, however, lifespan distribution was broader than normally considered in life cycle assessments or materials flow forecasts of electronic waste management for policy. We argue that these results suggest that at least for computers, the assumption of constant lifespan is problematic and that it is important to work toward understanding the dynamics of use patterns. We modify an age-structured model of population dynamics from biology as a modeling approach to describe product life cycles. Lastly, the purchase share and generation of obsolete computers from the higher education sector is estimated using different scenarios for the dynamics of product lifespan.

  6. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  7. Resistance evolution to the first generation of genetically modified Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events by western corn rootworm: management and monitoring considerations.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Meihls, Lisa N; Kiss, József; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) is a major coleopteran maize pest in North America and the EU, and has traditionally been managed through crop rotation and broad-spectrum soil insecticides. Genetically modified Bt-maize offers an additional management tool for WCR and has been valuable in reducing insecticide use and increasing farm income. A concern is that the widespread, repeated, and exclusive deployment of the same Bt-maize transformation event will result in the rapid evolution of resistance in WCR. This publication explores the potential of WCR to evolve resistance to plant-produced Bt-toxins from the first generation of Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events (MON 863 and MON 88017, DAS-59122-7 and MIR604), and whether currently implemented risk management strategies to delay and monitor resistance evolution are appropriate. In twelve of the twelve artificial selection experiments reported, resistant WCR populations were yielded rapidly. Field-selected resistance of WCR to Cry3Bb1 is documented in some US maize growing areas, where an increasing number of cases of unexpected damage of WCR larvae to Bt-maize MON 88017 has been reported. Currently implemented insect resistance management measures for Bt-crops usually rely on the high dose/refuge (HDR) strategy. Evidence (including laboratory, greenhouse and field data) indicates that several conditions contributing to the success of the HDR strategy may not be met for the first generation of Bt-maize events and WCR: (1) the Bt-toxins are expressed heterogeneously at a low-to-moderate dose in roots; (2) resistance alleles may be present at a higher frequency than initially assumed; (3) WCR may mate in a non-random manner; (4) resistance traits could have non-recessive inheritance; and (5) fitness costs may not necessarily be associated with resistance evolution. However, caution must be exercised when extrapolating laboratory and greenhouse results to field conditions. Model predictions

  8. Resistance evolution to the first generation of genetically modified Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events by western corn rootworm: management and monitoring considerations.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Meihls, Lisa N; Kiss, József; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) is a major coleopteran maize pest in North America and the EU, and has traditionally been managed through crop rotation and broad-spectrum soil insecticides. Genetically modified Bt-maize offers an additional management tool for WCR and has been valuable in reducing insecticide use and increasing farm income. A concern is that the widespread, repeated, and exclusive deployment of the same Bt-maize transformation event will result in the rapid evolution of resistance in WCR. This publication explores the potential of WCR to evolve resistance to plant-produced Bt-toxins from the first generation of Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events (MON 863 and MON 88017, DAS-59122-7 and MIR604), and whether currently implemented risk management strategies to delay and monitor resistance evolution are appropriate. In twelve of the twelve artificial selection experiments reported, resistant WCR populations were yielded rapidly. Field-selected resistance of WCR to Cry3Bb1 is documented in some US maize growing areas, where an increasing number of cases of unexpected damage of WCR larvae to Bt-maize MON 88017 has been reported. Currently implemented insect resistance management measures for Bt-crops usually rely on the high dose/refuge (HDR) strategy. Evidence (including laboratory, greenhouse and field data) indicates that several conditions contributing to the success of the HDR strategy may not be met for the first generation of Bt-maize events and WCR: (1) the Bt-toxins are expressed heterogeneously at a low-to-moderate dose in roots; (2) resistance alleles may be present at a higher frequency than initially assumed; (3) WCR may mate in a non-random manner; (4) resistance traits could have non-recessive inheritance; and (5) fitness costs may not necessarily be associated with resistance evolution. However, caution must be exercised when extrapolating laboratory and greenhouse results to field conditions. Model predictions

  9. Comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral and forelimb musculature of tetrapods with special attention to extant limbed amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Virginia; Diogo, Rui

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of the present work is to synthesize the information obtained from our dissections of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of representative members of the major extant taxa of limbed amphibians and reptiles and from our review of the literature, in order to provide an account of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of these muscles in the Tetrapoda. The pectoral and forelimb musculature of all these major taxa conform to a general pattern that seems to have been acquired very early in the evolutionary history of tetrapods. Although some muscles are missing in certain taxa, and a clear departure from this general pattern is obviously present in derived groups such as birds, the same overall configuration is easily distinguishable in these taxa. Among the most notable anatomical differences between the groups, one that seems to have relevant evolutionary and functional implications, concerns the distal insertion points of the forearm musculature. In tetrapods, the muscles of the radial and ulnar complexes of the forearm are pleisomorphically mainly inserted onto the radius/ulna or onto the more proximal carpal bones, but in mammals some of these muscles insert more distally onto bones such as the metacarpals. Interestingly, a similar trend towards a more distal insertion of these muscles is also found in some non-mammalian tetrapod taxa, such as some anurans (e.g. Phyllomedusa). This may be correlated with the acquisition of more subtle digital movement abilities in these latter taxa.

  10. Comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral and forelimb musculature of tetrapods with special attention to extant limbed amphibians and reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Virginia; Diogo, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the present work is to synthesize the information obtained from our dissections of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of representative members of the major extant taxa of limbed amphibians and reptiles and from our review of the literature, in order to provide an account of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of these muscles in the Tetrapoda. The pectoral and forelimb musculature of all these major taxa conform to a general pattern that seems to have been acquired very early in the evolutionary history of tetrapods. Although some muscles are missing in certain taxa, and a clear departure from this general pattern is obviously present in derived groups such as birds, the same overall configuration is easily distinguishable in these taxa. Among the most notable anatomical differences between the groups, one that seems to have relevant evolutionary and functional implications, concerns the distal insertion points of the forearm musculature. In tetrapods, the muscles of the radial and ulnar complexes of the forearm are pleisomorphically mainly inserted onto the radius/ulna or onto the more proximal carpal bones, but in mammals some of these muscles insert more distally onto bones such as the metacarpals. Interestingly, a similar trend towards a more distal insertion of these muscles is also found in some non-mammalian tetrapod taxa, such as some anurans (e.g. Phyllomedusa). This may be correlated with the acquisition of more subtle digital movement abilities in these latter taxa. PMID:20807270

  11. Rethinking Special Education for a New Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr., Ed.; Rotherham, Andrew J., Ed.; Hokanson, Charles R., Jr., Ed.

    This book scrutinizes the education now being received by 6 million U.S. children with disabilities. It identifies the problems that currently beset special education, analyzes their causes, and suggests solutions. Chapters include: (1) "The Evolution of the Federal Role" (Tyce Palmaffy); (2) "Time To Make Special Education 'Special' Again" (Wade…

  12. Specialized Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  13. Specialized science.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2014-04-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  14. Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Ray, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on special needs instruction and technology: (1) "Hawaii Special Education Teacher Induction" (Kalena Oliva and Quinn Avery); (2) "The Impact of Group v Individual Use of Hypermedia-Based Instruction" (Lewis R. Johnson, Louis P. Semrau, and Gail E. Fitzgerald); (3) "Assistive Technology Meets…

  15. A clinical study of Nirgundi Ghana Vati and Matra Basti in the management of Gridhrasi with special reference to sciatica.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mumtaz; Shukla, V D; Dave, A R; Bhatt, N N

    2010-10-01

    Gridhrasi can be equated with sciatica, where pain, weakness, numbness, and other discomforts along the path of the sciatic nerve often accompanies low back pain. It is a common affliction of adults, costing billions of dollars in healthcare and resulting in more lost days of work than any other illness but the common cold. A herniated disc, spinal stenosis, piriformis syndrome, etc., can all cause sciatica. The treatment available for sciatica in modern medicine is not very satisfactory.The role of research in Ayurveda is to elucidate the underlying principles and to explain them in modern parameters. The present study was aimed at establishing clinically the effect of Nirgundi (Vitex negundo) Ghan Vati (dried water extract) alone as well as in combination with Matra Basti in the management of Gridhrasi. A total of 119 patients were registered for the study, out of which 102 patients completed the treatment: 52 patients in group A (Nirgundi Ghan Vati) and 50 in group B (Nirgundi Ghan Vati + Matra Basti). The results show that both treatments had an effect on Gridhrasi, but there was better relief of the signs and symptoms in group B. Matra Basti and Nirgundi Ghan Vati might both contribute to different extents in the recovery of the patient. PMID:22048539

  16. Computer-Based Information Management System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume IV. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the fourth of four project objectives, the development and preliminary evaluation of a computer-based…

  17. Effect of practice management softwares among physicians of developing countries with special reference to Indian scenario by Mixed Method Technique

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Sanjeev; Davey, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, many cheaper “practice management software” (PMS) are available in developing countries including India; despite their availability and benefits, its penetration and usage vary from low to moderate level, justifying the importance of this study area. Materials and Methods: First preferred reporting items for systematic-review and meta-analysis (2009) guidelines were considered; followed by an extensive systematic-review of available studies in literature related to developing countries, on key search term from main abstracting databases: PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, BIO-MED Central, Cochrane Library, world CAT-library till 15 June 2014; where any kind of article whether published or unpublished, in any sort or form or any language indicating the software usage were included. Thereafter, meta-analysis on Indian studies revealing the magnitude of usage in Indian scenario by Open Meta-(analyst) software using binary random effects (REs) model was done. Studies from developed countries were excluded in our study. Results: Of 57 studies included in a systematic review from developing countries, only 4 Indian studies were found eligible for meta-analysis. RE model revealed although not-significant results (total participants = 243,526; range: 100–226,228, overall odds ratio = 2.85, 95% confidence interval = P < 0.05 and tests for heterogeneity: Q [df = 3] = 0.8 Het. P = 0.85). The overall magnitude of usage of PMS on Indian physicians practice was however found between 10% and 45%. Conclusion: Although variable and nonsignificant effect of usage of PM software on practice of physicians in developing countries like India was found; there is a need to recognize the hidden potential of this system. Hence, more in-depth research in future needs to be done, in order to find a real impact of this system. PMID:25949969

  18. 36 CFR 219.27 - Special designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning Special Considerations § 219.27 Special... areas within the National Forest System that are identified for their unique or special characteristics... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special designations....

  19. Special Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Phil

    1986-01-01

    Specialized publications such as "Opera News,""Gourmet," and "Forbes" can bring an institution's story to targeted audiences. The experiences of Chautauqua Institution are described. Some of the benefits of marketing articles to these publications are discussed. (MLW)

  20. Evolution of Brain and Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenemann, P. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of language and the evolution of the brain are tightly interlinked. Language evolution represents a special kind of adaptation, in part because language is a complex behavior (as opposed to a physical feature) but also because changes are adaptive only to the extent that they increase either one's understanding of others, or one's…

  1. Career Exploration through Specialization with Concentrations in Business Plus Focus on Knowledge Management (KM) and Implications for Education: Secondary-Postsecondary Levels, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Warren H.

    Career development services from exploration to specialization in a school-based context can be enhanced greatly through a partial or intensive technological delivery system. Specialization contains both awareness and exploration, as well as concentration within it. Awareness and exploration for specialization with concentration refines career…

  2. 78 FR 5184 - Special Emphasis Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Special Emphasis Panel Meeting AGENCY: Agency... Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Special Emphasis Panel (SEP) meeting on ``Patient Centered Outcomes... contact: Mrs. Bonnie Campbell, Committee Management Officer, Office of Extramural Research, Education...

  3. Special Reports; Homeland Security and Information Management; The Development of Electronic Government in the United States: The Federal Policy Experience; Digital Rights Management: Why Libraries Should Be Major Players; The Current State and Future Promise of Portal Applications; Recruitment and Retention: A Professional Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relyea, Harold C.; Halchin, L. Elaine; Hogue, Henry B.; Agnew, Grace; Martin, Mairead; Schottlaender, Brian E. C.; Jackson, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Theses five reports address five special issues: the effects of the September 11 attacks on information management, including homeland security, Web site information removal, scientific and technical information, and privacy concerns; federal policy for electronic government information; digital rights management and libraries; library Web portal…

  4. Stress: The Special Educator's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raschke, Donna; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The article describes approaches special education teachers can take to reduce stress including diet and exercise, relaxation techniques, use of social support systems, goal setting, time management, and networking. A survey of special education teachers found the use of humor the most common strategy for coping with stress. (DB)

  5. Special Education Administration Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watherman, Richard F.; Hollingsworth, Sue Ann

    Presented are course materials from a competency based education program in special education administration. It is explained that the Special Education Administration Training Program (SEATP) is designed for continuing education of administrators. Materials are divided into three self contained curriculum areas: fiscal management, personnel…

  6. Microbial community evolution during simulated managed aquifer recharge in response to different biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Alidina, Mazahirali; Ouf, Mohamed; Sharp, Jonathan O; Saikaly, Pascal; Drewes, Jörg E

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the evolution of the microbial community in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating the infiltration zone of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems. Parallel systems were supplemented with either moderate (1.1 mg/L) or low (0.5 mg/L) biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) for a period of six months during which time, spatial (1 cm, 30 cm, 60 cm, 90 cm, and 120 cm) and temporal (monthly) analyses of sediment-associated microbial community structure were analyzed. Total microbial biomass associated with sediments was positively correlated with BDOC concentration where a significant decline in BDOC was observed along the column length. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated dominance by Bacteria with Archaea comprising less than 1 percent of the total community. Proteobacteria was found to be the major phylum in samples from all column depths with contributions from Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Microbial community structure at all the phylum, class and genus levels differed significantly at 1 cm between columns receiving moderate and low BDOC concentrations; in contrast strong similarities were observed both between parallel column systems and across samples from 30 to 120 cm depths. Samples from 1 cm depth of the low BDOC columns exhibited higher microbial diversity (expressed as Shannon Index) than those at 1 cm of moderate BDOC columns, and both increased from 5.4 to 5.9 at 1 cm depth to 6.7-8.3 at 30-120 cm depths. The microbial community structure reached steady state after 3-4 months since the initiation of the experiment, which also resulted in an improved DOC removal during the same time period. This study suggested that BDOC could significantly influence microbial community structure regarding both composition and diversity of artificial MAR systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems.

  7. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  8. Special Advocate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Weele, Maribeth

    1992-01-01

    Thomas Hehir, special education chief of Chicago Public Schools, is evangelist of integrating children with disabilities into regular classrooms. By completely reorganizing department viewed as political patronage dumping ground, Hehir has made remarkable progress in handling large number of children awaiting evaluation and placement in special…

  9. Institutional evolution of a community-based programme for malaria control through larval source management in Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-based service delivery is vital to the effectiveness, affordability and sustainability of vector control generally, and to labour-intensive larval source management (LSM) programmes in particular. Case description The institutional evolution of a city-level, community-based LSM programme over 14 years in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, illustrates how operational research projects can contribute to public health governance and to the establishment of sustainable service delivery programmes. Implementation, management and governance of this LSM programme is framed within a nested set of spatially-defined relationships between mosquitoes, residents, government and research institutions that build upward from neighbourhood to city and national scales. Discussion and evaluation The clear hierarchical structure associated with vertical, centralized management of decentralized, community-based service delivery, as well as increasingly clear differentiation of partner roles and responsibilities across several spatial scales, contributed to the evolution and subsequent growth of the programme. Conclusions The UMCP was based on the principle of an integrated operational research project that evolved over time as the City Council gradually took more responsibility for management. The central role of Dar es Salaam’s City Council in coordinating LSM implementation enabled that flexibility; the institutionalization of management and planning in local administrative structures enhanced community-mobilization and funding possibilities at national and international levels. Ultimately, the high degree of program ownership by the City Council and three municipalities, coupled with catalytic donor funding and technical support from expert overseas partners have enabled establishment of a sustainable, internally-funded programme implemented by the National Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and supported by national research and training institutes. PMID

  10. Evolution under domestication: ongoing artificial selection and divergence of wild and managed Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) populations in the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Fabiola; Casas, Alejandro; Peñaloza-Ramírez, Juan Manuel; Cortés-Palomec, Aurea C.; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; González-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The Tehuacán Valley in Mexico is a principal area of plant domestication in Mesoamerica. There, artificial selection is currently practised on nearly 120 native plant species with coexisting wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations, providing an excellent setting for studying ongoing mechanisms of evolution under domestication. One of these species is the columnar cactus Stenocereus pruinosus, in which we studied how artificial selection is operating through traditional management and whether it has determined morphological and genetic divergence between wild and managed populations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 83 households of three villages to investigate motives and mechanisms of artificial selection. Management effects were studied by comparing variation patterns of 14 morphological characters and population genetics (four microsatellite loci) of 264 plants from nine wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations. Key Results Variation in fruit characters was recognized by most people, and was the principal target of artificial selection directed to favour larger and sweeter fruits with thinner or thicker peel, fewer spines and pulp colours others than red. Artificial selection operates in agroforestry systems favouring abundance (through not felling plants and planting branches) of the preferred phenotypes, and acts more intensely in household gardens. Significant morphological divergence between wild and managed populations was observed in fruit characters and plant vigour. On average, genetic diversity in silvicultural populations (HE = 0·743) was higher than in wild (HE = 0·726) and cultivated (HE = 0·700) populations. Most of the genetic variation (90·58 %) occurred within populations. High gene flow (NmFST > 2) was identified among almost all populations studied, but was slightly limited by mountains among wild populations, and by artificial selection among wild and managed populations. Conclusions

  11. The role of databases in areawide pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A database is a comprehensive collection of related data organized for convenient access, generally in a computer. The evolution of computer software and the need to distinguish the specialized computer systems for storing and manipulating data, stimulated development of database management systems...

  12. Origin of the Species: An Epistemological Tale of Classroom Management Theory and the Evolution of a Teacher Preparation Course Syllabus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertel, Nichole L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation dually explores the topics of classroom management theory as it occurs in teacher preparation programs in American colleges of education and of curriculum syllabus design of undergraduate education classes teaching such. It begins with the classroom management and teaching pedagogical knowledges gained through my experience as a…

  13. Genetic structure of coexisting wild and managed agave populations: implications for the evolution of plants under domestication

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, Carmen Julia; Casas, Alejandro; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Nassar, Jafet M.; Colunga-GarcíaMarín, Patricia; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Domestication is a continuous evolutionary process guided by humans. This process leads to divergence in characteristics such as behaviour, morphology or genetics, between wild and managed populations. Agaves have been important resources for Mesoamerican peoples since prehistory. Some species are domesticated and others vary in degree of domestication. Agave inaequidens Koch is used in central Mexico to produce mescal, and a management gradient from gathered wild and silvicultural populations, as well as cultivated plantations, has been documented. Significant morphological differences were reported among wild and managed populations, and a high phenotypic variation in cultivated populations composed of plants from different populations. We evaluated levels of genetic diversity and structure associated with management, hypothesizing that high morphological variation would be accompanied by high genetic diversity in populations with high gene flow and low genetic structure among managed and unmanaged populations. Wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations were studied, collecting tissue of 19–30 plants per population. Through 10 nuclear microsatellite loci, we compared population genetic parameters. We analysed partition of variation associated with management categories to estimate gene flow among populations. Agave inaequidens exhibits high levels of genetic diversity (He = 0.707) and moderate genetic structure (FST = 0.112). No differences were found in levels of genetic diversity among wild (He = 0.704), silviculturally managed (He = 0.733) and cultivated (He = 0.698) populations. Bayesian analysis indicated that five genetic clusters best fit the data, with genetic groups corresponding to habitats where populations grow rather than to management. Migration rates ranged from zero between two populations to markedly high among others (M = 0.73–35.25). Natural mechanisms of gene flow and the dynamic management of agave propagules among populations favour

  14. Genetic structure of coexisting wild and managed agave populations: implications for the evolution of plants under domestication.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Carmen Julia; Casas, Alejandro; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Nassar, Jafet M; Colunga-GarcíaMarín, Patricia; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor

    2015-10-03

    Domestication is a continuous evolutionary process guided by humans. This process leads to divergence in characteristics such as behaviour, morphology or genetics, between wild and managed populations. Agaves have been important resources for Mesoamerican peoples since prehistory. Some species are domesticated and others vary in degree of domestication. Agave inaequidens Koch is used in central Mexico to produce mescal, and a management gradient from gathered wild and silvicultural populations, as well as cultivated plantations, has been documented. Significant morphological differences were reported among wild and managed populations, and a high phenotypic variation in cultivated populations composed of plants from different populations. We evaluated levels of genetic diversity and structure associated with management, hypothesizing that high morphological variation would be accompanied by high genetic diversity in populations with high gene flow and low genetic structure among managed and unmanaged populations. Wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations were studied, collecting tissue of 19-30 plants per population. Through 10 nuclear microsatellite loci, we compared population genetic parameters. We analysed partition of variation associated with management categories to estimate gene flow among populations. Agave inaequidens exhibits high levels of genetic diversity (He = 0.707) and moderate genetic structure (FST = 0.112). No differences were found in levels of genetic diversity among wild (He = 0.704), silviculturally managed (He = 0.733) and cultivated (He = 0.698) populations. Bayesian analysis indicated that five genetic clusters best fit the data, with genetic groups corresponding to habitats where populations grow rather than to management. Migration rates ranged from zero between two populations to markedly high among others (M = 0.73-35.25). Natural mechanisms of gene flow and the dynamic management of agave propagules among populations favour gene

  15. Genetic structure of coexisting wild and managed agave populations: implications for the evolution of plants under domestication.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Carmen Julia; Casas, Alejandro; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Nassar, Jafet M; Colunga-GarcíaMarín, Patricia; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Domestication is a continuous evolutionary process guided by humans. This process leads to divergence in characteristics such as behaviour, morphology or genetics, between wild and managed populations. Agaves have been important resources for Mesoamerican peoples since prehistory. Some species are domesticated and others vary in degree of domestication. Agave inaequidens Koch is used in central Mexico to produce mescal, and a management gradient from gathered wild and silvicultural populations, as well as cultivated plantations, has been documented. Significant morphological differences were reported among wild and managed populations, and a high phenotypic variation in cultivated populations composed of plants from different populations. We evaluated levels of genetic diversity and structure associated with management, hypothesizing that high morphological variation would be accompanied by high genetic diversity in populations with high gene flow and low genetic structure among managed and unmanaged populations. Wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations were studied, collecting tissue of 19-30 plants per population. Through 10 nuclear microsatellite loci, we compared population genetic parameters. We analysed partition of variation associated with management categories to estimate gene flow among populations. Agave inaequidens exhibits high levels of genetic diversity (He = 0.707) and moderate genetic structure (FST = 0.112). No differences were found in levels of genetic diversity among wild (He = 0.704), silviculturally managed (He = 0.733) and cultivated (He = 0.698) populations. Bayesian analysis indicated that five genetic clusters best fit the data, with genetic groups corresponding to habitats where populations grow rather than to management. Migration rates ranged from zero between two populations to markedly high among others (M = 0.73-35.25). Natural mechanisms of gene flow and the dynamic management of agave propagules among populations favour gene

  16. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a

  17. Evolution of Data Management Tools for Managing Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Results: A Survey of iPhone Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anoop; Hou, Philip; Golnik, Timothy; Flaherty, Joseph; Vu, Sonny

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have indicated that sharing of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) data and subsequent feedback from the health care provider (HCP) can help achieve glycemic goals such as a reduction in glycated hemoglobin. Electronic SMBG data management and sharing tools for the PC and smartphones may help in reducing the effort to manage SMBG data. Methods We reviewed software and top-ranking applications (Apps) for the iPhone platform to document the variety of useful features. Additionally, in an attempt to assess metrics such as task analysis and user friendliness of diabetes Apps, we observed and surveyed patients with diabetes as they recorded and relayed sample SMBG results to their hypothetical HCP using three Apps. Results Observation and survey demonstrated that the WaveSense Diabetes Manager allowed the participants to complete preselected SMBG data entry and relay tasks faster than other Apps. The survey revealed patient behavior patterns that would be useful in future App development. Conclusion Being able to record, analyze, seamlessly share, and obtain feedback on the SMBG data using an iPhone/iTouch App might potentially benefit patients. Trends in SMBG data management and the possibility of having interoperability of blood glucose monitors and smartphones may open up new avenues of diabetes management for the technologically savvy patient. PMID:20663461

  18. Effects of soil tillage and management of crop residues on soil properties: abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms, soil structure and nutrient evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lemtiri, Aboulkacem

    2013-04-01

    The living soil is represented by soil biota that interacts with aboveground biota and with the abiotic environment, soil structure, soil reaction, organic matter, nutrient contents, aso. Maintenance of soil organic matter through integrated soil fertility management is an important issue to conciliate soil quality and agricultural productivity. Earthworms are key actors in soil structure formation through the production of casts and the incorporation of soil organic matter in the soil. Research is still needed about the interactive effects of various tillage and crop residue management practices on earthworm populations and physical and chemical properties of soil. To investigate the impacts of two tillage management systems and two cropping systems on earthworm populations, soil structure evolution and nutrient dynamics, we carried out a three years study in an experimental field. The aims of this experimentation, were to assess the effects of the tillage systems (ploughing versus reduced tillage) and the availability of crop residues (export versus no export) on (i) the abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms, on the soil structure and on the temporal variation of water extractable nutrients and organic carbon. The first results show that tillage management did significantly affect earthworm abundance and biomass. However, crop residue management did not affect abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms. Regarding soil physical properties, the tillage affected the compaction profiles within the top 30cm. The analysis of nutrient and organic carbon dynamics show divergent trends (decrease of calcium and magnesium, increase of hot water extractable carbon and phosphorus…) but no clear effect of the studied factors could be identified. The question of the initial soil variability raised as a crucial point in the discussion.

  19. The evolution of international policies and mechanisms to advance sustainable forest management and mitigate global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Bologna, J.; Lyke, J.; Theophile, K.

    1995-06-01

    Scientific findings regarding global climate change and deforestation led industrialized nations to bring both issues to the forefront of an international dialogue on the environment. International institutional attention to deforestation began in 1985 with the Tropical Forestry Action Program which helped countries develop plans for sustainable forest management. A few years later, the International Tropical Timber Organization, though designed to facilitate tropical timber trade, adopted guidelines for sustainable management of tropical production forests. Next, the activities before and after UNCED established a general set of forest principles and regional efforts to define sustainable forest management. The World Bank has also sought to reduce past lending failures that led to deforestation and other environmental degradation, through programmatic redirections and macro-economic policy reforms. Finally, through innovative financial incentives, industrialized and developing countries are identifying opportunities to offset debts and increase economic development without depleting forest resources. Collectively, these efforts have let to some trends that support sustainable forest management and mitigate climate change. The upcoming years will see a proactive set of multilateral programs to address deforestation, an increasing link between trade and the environment, and more uses of financial incentives to encourage sustainable forest management.

  20. From SARS to 2009 H1N1 influenza: the evolution of a public health incident management system at CDC.

    PubMed

    Papagiotas, Stephen S; Frank, Mark; Bruce, Sherrie; Posid, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the response to infectious disease outbreaks by public health agencies at the federal, state, and local levels has historically been based on traditional public health functions (e.g., epidemiology, surveillance, laboratory, infection control, and health communications). Federal guidance has established a framework for the management of domestic incidents, including public health emergencies. Therefore, public health agencies have had to find a way to incorporate traditional public health functions into the common response framework of the National Incident Management System. One solution is the development of a Science Section, containing public health functions, that is equivalent to the traditional incident command system sections. Public health agencies experiencing difficulties in developing incident management systems should consider the feasibility and suitability of creating a Science Section to allow a more seamless and effective coordination of a public health response, while remaining consistent with current federal guidance.

  1. Subduction & orogeny: Introduction to the special volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Bosch, D.; Guillot, S.; de Sigoyer, J.; Martinod, J.; Agard, P.; Yamato, P.

    2016-05-01

    Subduction processes play a major role in plate tectonics and the subsequent geological evolution of Earth. This special issue focuses on ongoing research in subduction dynamics to a large extent (oceanic subduction, continental subduction, obduction…) for both past and active subduction zones and into mountain building processes and the early evolution of orogens. It puts together various approaches combining geophysics (imaging of subduction zones), petrology/geochemistry (metamorphic analysis of HP-UHP rocks, fluid geochemistry and magmatic signal, geochronology), seismology and geodesy (present-day evolution of subduction zones, active tectonics), structural geology (structure and evolution of mountain belts), and numerical modelling to provide a full spectrum of tools that can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of subduction processes and orogeny. Studies presented in this special issue range from the long-term (orogenic cycle) to short-term (seismic cycle).

  2. Validation of a short-term shoreline evolution model and coastal risk management implications. The case of the NW Portuguese coast (Ovar-Marinha Grande)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenci, Luca; Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Disperati, Leonardo; Oliveira, Eduardo R.; de Fátima Lopes Alves, Maria; Boni, Giorgio; Pulvirenti, Luca; Phillips, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Coastal zones are fragile and dynamic environments where environmental, economic and social aspects are interconnected. While these areas are often highly urbanised, they are especially vulnerable to natural hazards (e.g. storms, floods, erosion, storm surges). Hence, high risk affects people and goods in several coastal zones throughout the world. The recent storms that hit the European coasts (Hercules, Christian and Stephanie, among others) showed the high vulnerability of these territories. Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) deals with the sustainable development of coastal zones by taking into account the different aspects that affect them, including risks adaptation and mitigation. Accurate mapping of shoreline position through time and models to predict shoreline evolution play a fundamental role for coastal zone risk management. In this context, spaceborne remote sensing is fundamental because it provides synoptic and multitemporal information that allow the extraction of shorelines' proxies. These are stable coastal features (e.g. the vegetation lines, the foredune toe, etc.) that can be mapped instead of the proper shoreline, which is an extremely dynamic boundary. The use of different proxies may provide different evolutionary patterns for the same study area; therefore it is important to assess which is the most suitable, given the environmental characteristics of a specific area. In Portugal, the coastal stretch between Ovar and Marinha Grande is one of the greatest national challenges in terms of integrated management of resources and risks. This area is characterised by intense erosive processes that largely exceed the shoreline's retreat predictions made in the first Coastal Zone Management Plan, developed in 2000. The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of a new model of shoreline evolution implemented in 2013 in order to check its robustness for short-term predictions. The method exploited the potentialities of the Landsat archive

  3. Air quality management: evolution of policy and practice in the UK as exemplified by the experience of English local government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, C. I.; Longhurst, J. W. S.; Woodfield, N. K.

    The air quality management (AQM) framework in the UK is designed to be an effects-based solution to air pollutants currently affecting human health. The AQM process has been legislated through The Environment Act 1995, which required the National Air Quality Strategy (NAQS) to be published. AQM practice and capability within local authorities has flourished since the publication of the NAQS in March 1997. This paper outlines the policy framework within which the UK operates, both at a domestic and European level, and reviews the air quality management process relating to current UK policy and EU policy. Data from questionnaire surveys are used to indicate the involvement of various sectors of local government in the air quality management process. These data indicate an increasing use of monitoring, and use of air dispersion modelling by English local authorities. Data relating to the management of air quality, for example, the existence and work of air quality groups, dissemination of information to the public and policy measures in place on a local scale to improve air quality, have also been reported. The UK NAQS has been reviewed in 1999 to reflect developments in European legislation, technological and scientific advances, improved air pollution modelling techniques and an increasingly better understanding of the socio-economic issues involved. The AQM process, as implemented by UK local authorities, provides an effective model for other European member states with regards to the implementation of the Air Quality Framework Directive. The future direction of air quality policy in the UK is also discussed.

  4. Emergence and evolution of social self-management of Parkinson’s disease: study protocol for a 3-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease affects facial, vocal and trunk muscles. As symptoms progress, facial expression becomes masked, limiting the person’s ability to communicate emotions and intentions to others. As people with the disease live and reside in their homes longer, the burden of caregiving is unmitigated by social and emotional rewards provided by an expressive individual. Little is known about how adults living with Parkinson’s disease manage their social lives and how an inability to be emotionally expressive can affect social connections and health. Because social networks have been shown to be crucial to the overall well-being of people living with chronic diseases, research is needed on how expressive capacity affects life trajectories and health. Methods/Design The overall objective is to understand the emergence and evolution of the trajectories of the self-management of the social lives of people living with Parkinson’s disease. The central hypothesis is that expressive capacity predicts systematic change in the pattern of social self-management and quality of life outcomes. The specific aims of this 3-year longitudinal study of 120 people with the disease and a maximum of 120 care partners are: 1) characterize social self-management trajectories over a 3-year period; 2) estimate the degree to which expressive nonverbal capacity predicts the trajectory; and 3) determine the moderating effect of gender on the association between expressive capacity and change in social self-management. Each participant will be assessed 14 times to detect rapid and non-linear changes in social participation and management of social activities; social network; and social comfort, general health and well-being. Discussion This project will provide evidence to guide the development of interventions for supporting social integration of those living with Parkinson’s disease, thus leading to improved overall health. It focuses on the novel construct of social self-management

  5. Management Information Reporting 2000-01 Data Analysis for Special Education, English as a Second Language (ESL), Early Literacy Initiative (ELI), and Technology Integration Funding (TIF).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    This report is intended to stimulate inquiry into the achievement of special groups of students in Alberta schools and model reporting to the public on these students, a traditionally weak area of school board Annual Education Results reports. The data in the report provide provincial level comparisons to data that may be compiled by school…

  6. A Guide for the Management of Special Education Programs. 2.0 Education and Counseling. Newday Operations Guide for Drug Dependent Minor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the second component, Education and Counseling, of a special day class educational program for drug dependent minors. A major goal of the program is given to be the provision of successful academic experiences, positive rewards for desired behavior, and individual and family counseling. The behavior modification program is described,…

  7. Assistance for Special Educators, Law Enforcement, and Child Protective Services in Recognizing and Managing Abuse and Neglect of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Linda M.

    This booklet is designed to help Virginia special educators, law enforcement, and child protective service professionals recognize and understand abuse and neglect of children with disabilities; improve the reporting accuracy when there is suspicion of child abuse/neglect; and provide strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration that will…

  8. A Guide for the Management of Special Education Programs. 3.0 Educational Simulations. Newday Operations Guide for Drug Dependent Minor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented is the third component, Educational Simulations, of a special day class educational program for drug dependent minors. One objective of the project is said to have been the identification of instructional methods and materials suited to drug dependent minors. Educational games and simulations designed to provide practice in reading and…

  9. Technologies for ECLSS Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamant, Bryce L.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on technologies for Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) evolution are presented. Topics covered include: atmosphere revitalization including CO2 removal, CO2 reduction, O2 generation, and trace contaminant control; water recovery and management including urine processing, hygiene water processing, and potable water processing; and waste management. ECLSS technology schematics, process diagrams, and fluid interfaces are included.

  10. "H. Sapiens" as Ecologically Special: What Does Language Contribute?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Don

    2007-01-01

    This paper inquires into the extent to which humans are specially constituted relative to other animals by their language. First a principled concept of evolutionary specialness is operationalized. Then it is agreed that humans satisfy the criteria for this sort of specialness in consequence of the kind of cultural evolution in which they have…

  11. Evolution in agriculture: the application of evolutionary approaches to the management of biotic interactions in agro-ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Thrall, Peter H; Oakeshott, John G; Fitt, Gary; Southerton, Simon; Burdon, Jeremy J; Sheppard, Andy; Russell, Robyn J; Zalucki, Myron; Heino, Mikko; Ford Denison, R

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts increasingly drive ecological and evolutionary processes at many spatio-temporal scales, demanding greater capacity to predict and manage their consequences. This is particularly true for agro-ecosystems, which not only comprise a significant proportion of land use, but which also involve conflicting imperatives to expand or intensify production while simultaneously reducing environmental impacts. These imperatives reinforce the likelihood of further major changes in agriculture over the next 30–40 years. Key transformations include genetic technologies as well as changes in land use. The use of evolutionary principles is not new in agriculture (e.g. crop breeding, domestication of animals, management of selection for pest resistance), but given land-use trends and other transformative processes in production landscapes, ecological and evolutionary research in agro-ecosystems must consider such issues in a broader systems context. Here, we focus on biotic interactions involving pests and pathogens as exemplars of situations where integration of agronomic, ecological and evolutionary perspectives has practical value. Although their presence in agro-ecosystems may be new, many traits involved in these associations evolved in natural settings. We advocate the use of predictive frameworks based on evolutionary models as pre-emptive management tools and identify some specific research opportunities to facilitate this. We conclude with a brief discussion of multidisciplinary approaches in applied evolutionary problems. PMID:25567968

  12. Evolution and management of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome through adolescence and into adulthood: are seizures always the primary issue?

    PubMed

    Kerr, Michael; Kluger, Gerhard; Philip, Sunny

    2011-05-01

    Although Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) typically begins during childhood, it frequently persists through adolescence and on into adulthood. It may also, rarely, have late onset during adolescence or adulthood. Longitudinal studies have highlighted that the "typical" features of LGS observed during childhood evolve and change over time, so that by adulthood it might be difficult to recognise LGS in previously undiagnosed patients. Approaches to treatment must therefore adapt to the changes in a patient's condition as they progress through life. Effective management of LGS requires a global approach to care that not only encompasses seizure control, but also the management of co-morbidities associated with the condition, such as cognitive and behavioural problems, sleep disturbances and physical disability, together with the specific educational and psychosocial needs of the individual. This is particularly relevant during adolescence, when patients have to cope with a host of additional issues alongside those relating to their epilepsy. During all stages of life, management of LGS must carefully balance the need for treatment against its side effects, with the patient's overall quality of life always being the primary focus. The transition of care from paediatric to adult services presents important challenges for patients, their families and healthcare providers, and requires particular consideration to ensure that it is as smooth as possible. It also presents an important opportunity to review and reappraise a patient's condition, treatment and other longer-term needs as they journey into adulthood. PMID:21669559

  13. Evolution of opioid risk management and review of the classwide REMS for extended-release/long-acting opioids.

    PubMed

    Stanos, Steven

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) afforded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the ability to enforce postmarketing risk management strategies for prescription medicines. Under this policy, certain medications with known or potential risks could be required to have a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS), a risk management program designed to ensure that a product's therapeutic benefit outweighs its risks. Prescription opioid analgesics, particularly extended-release (ER)/long-acting (LA) formulations, have undergone scrutiny in recent years due to the serious risks associated with their use, especially when they are prescribed improperly, misused, or abused. In July 2012, the FDA approved a classwide REMS for ER and LA opioids. This ER/LA opioid REMS program is designed to improve prescriber education and patient awareness about safe opioid use to minimize the risks of addiction, unintentional overdose, and death. Because clinicians often encounter patients with moderate-to-severe chronic, noncancer pain who are in need of around-the-clock opioid analgesia, knowledge of the conditions of this classwide REMS may become essential to continue prescribing ER/LA opioids. This article briefly describes the changes in US risk management policies that have shaped today's regulatory environment and provides an overview of the requirements for the classwide ER/LA opioid REMS.

  14. Sustainable Resource Development in the Third World. Selected Papers from an International Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 1985). Westview Special Studies in Natural Resources and Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southgate, Douglas D., Ed.; Disinger, John F., Ed.

    Over time, scientists, technologists, and resource managers in affluent countries have devised and institutionalized methodologies for exploiting and managing natural resources in their own environments with considerable success. In doing so, they have provided models, at least of development and affluence, that the less developed countries seek…

  15. Something Special

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    There is plenty of interest and excitement in APPL's (Academy of Program and Project Leadership) KS (Knowledge Sharing) effort. We have received numerous requests for members of the KS Team to give presentations about what we're doing. A recent Knowledge Management Roundtable at NASA Headquarters drew record-setting attendance for the event. A few weeks later, I was invited to give a presentation for the Census Bureau. Ron Taylor, a senior leader of the organization, had requested the presentation. I was looking forward to a group of about 20 people or so. As it turned out, the auditorium was packed. Nearly 300 people were in attendance. They were excited about what we're doing and wanted to pick my brain as to how they could establish something like our KS effort in their organization.

  16. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans.

  17. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management. Special Edition: A Collection of Papers on NASA Procedures and Guidance 7120.5A. Volume 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    A key aspect of NASA's new Strategic Management System is improving the way we plan, approve, execute and evaluate our programs and projects. To this end, NASA has developed the NASA Program and Project Management processes and Requirements-NASA Procedures and Guidelines (NPG) 7120.5A, which formally documents the "Provide Aerospace Products and Capabilities" crosscutting process, and defines the processes and requirements that are responsive to the Program/Project Management-NPD 7120.4A. The Program/Project Management-NPD 7120.4A, issued November 14, 1996, provides the policy for managing programs and projects in a new way that is aligned with the new NASA environment. An Agencywide team has spent thousands of hours developing the NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements-NPG 7120.5A. We have created significant flexibility, authority and discretion for the program and project managers to exercise and carry out their duties, and have delegated the responsibility and the accountability for their programs and projects.

  18. A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Information Related to the Biology and Management of Species of Special Concern at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Jonathan B.; Erwin, R. Michael; French, John B.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Meyers, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) conducted a study for the National Park Service (NPS) Southeast Region, Atlanta, GA, and Cape Hatteras National Seashore (CAHA) in North Carolina to review, evaluate, and summarize the available scientific information for selected species of concern at CAHA (piping plovers, sea turtles, seabeach amaranth, American oystercatchers, and colonial waterbirds). This work consisted of reviewing the scientific literature and evaluating the results of studies that examined critical life history stages of each species, and focused on the scientific findings reported that are relevant to the management of these species and their habitats at CAHA. The chapters that follow provide the results of that review separately for each species and present scientifically based options for resource management at CAHA. Although no new original research or experimental work was conducted, this synthesis of the existing information was peer reviewed by over 15 experts with familiarity with these species. This report does not establish NPS management protocols but does highlight scientific information on the biology of these species to be considered by NPS managers who make resource management decisions at CAHA. To ensure that the best available information is considered when assessing each species of interest at CAHA, this review included published research as well as practical experience of scientists and wildlife managers who were consulted in 2005. PWRC scientists evaluated the literature, consulted wildlife managers, and produced an initial draft that was sent to experts for scientific review. Revisions based on those comments were incorporated into the document. The final draft of the document was reviewed by NPS personnel to ensure that the description of the recent status and management of these species at CAHA was accurately represented and that the report was consistent with our work agreement. The following

  19. Evolution of a Patient Information Management System in a Local Area Network Environment at Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ronald N; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J; Tamirisa, Balaji

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC) of Chicago has implemented a local area network (LAN) based Patient Information Management System (PIMS) as part of its integrated departmental database management system. PIMS consists of related database applications encompassing demographic information, current medications, problem lists, clinical data, prior events, and on-line procedure results. Integration into the existing departmental database system permits PIMS to capture and manipulate data in other departmental applications. Standardization of clinical data is accomplished through three data tables that verify diagnosis codes, procedures codes and a standardized set of clinical data elements. The modularity of the system, coupled with standardized data formats, allowed the development of a Patient Information Protocol System (PIPS). PIPS, a userdefinable protocol processor, provides physicians with individualized data entry or review screens customized for their specific research protocols or practice habits. Physician feedback indicates that the PIMS/PIPS combination enhances their ability to collect and review specific patient information by filtering large amount of clinical data.

  20. Convergent evolution of health information management and health informatics: a perspective on the future of information professionals in health care.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Dixon, B E; Abrams, K

    2015-01-01

    Clearly defined boundaries are disappearing among the activities, sources, and uses of health care data and information managed by health information management (HIM) and health informatics (HI) professionals. Definitions of the professional domains and scopes of practice for HIM and HI are converging with the proliferation of information and communication technologies in health care settings. Convergence is changing both the roles that HIM and HI professionals serve in their organizations as well as the competencies necessary for training future professionals. Many of these changes suggest a blurring of roles and responsibilities with increasingly overlapping curricula, job descriptions, and research agendas. Blurred lines in a highly competitive market create confusion for students and employers. In this essay, we provide some perspective on the changing landscape and suggest a course for the future. First we review the evolving definitions of HIM and HI. We next compare the current domains and competencies, review the characteristics as well as the education and credentialing of both disciplines, and examine areas of convergence. Given the current state, we suggest a path forward to strengthen the contributions HIM and HI professionals and educators make to the evolving health care environment. PMID:25848421

  1. A Constrained Differential Evolution Algorithm for Reservoir Management: Optimal Placement and Control of Wells for Geological Carbon Storage with Uncertainty in Reservoir Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Bianchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of large volume of CO2 into deep geological reservoirs for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is expected to cause significant pressure perturbations in subsurface. Large-scale pressure increases in injection reservoirs during GCS operations, if not controlled properly, may limit dynamic storage capacity and increase risk of environmental impacts. The high pressure may impact caprock integrity, induce fault slippage, and cause leakage of brine and/or CO2 into shallow fresh groundwater resources. Thus, monitoring and controlling pressure buildup are critically important for environmentally safe implementation of GCS projects. Extraction of native brine during GCS operations is a pressure management approach to reduce significant pressure buildup. Extracted brine can be transferred to the surface for utilization or re-injected into overlying/underlying saline aquifers. However, pumping, transportation, treatment and disposal of extracted brine can be challenging and costly. Therefore, minimizing volume of extracted brine, while maximizing CO2 storage, is an essential objective of the pressure management with brine extraction schemes. Selection of optimal well locations and extraction rates are critical for maximizing storage and minimizing brine extraction during GCS. However, placing of injection and extraction wells is not intuitive because of heterogeneity in reservoir properties and complex reservoir geometry. Efficient computerized algorithms combining reservoir models and optimization methods are needed to make proper decisions on well locations and control parameters. This study presents a global optimization methodology for pressure management during geologic CO2 sequestration. A constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm is introduced for solving optimization problems involving well placement and injection/extraction control. The CDE methodology is tested and applied for realistic CO2 storage scenarios with the presence of uncertainty in

  2. Evolution of Public Participation in the Assessment and Management of Environmental Health Risks: A Brief History of Developments in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Significance for public health Risk-based decision making is a core feature of government actions aimed at protecting public health from the adverse effects of environmental hazards. In the past, it has often been an expert-driven, mostly obscure process used by federal agencies to justify and defend regulatory decisions made outside the public arena. But the nature of decision making has changed as it has become apparent that environmental health problems are more complicated, controversial, and costly to solve than originally thought. Meaningful public engagement is now an inherent component of all phases of the risk assessment – risk management paradigm because it promotes stakeholder buy in, taps into unique stakeholder knowledge, and promotes the concept of environmental democracy. In the United States, the risk assessment – risk management paradigm that underpins federal decisions about environmental health risks was first established in 1983. In the beginning, the importance of public participation was not explicitly recognized within the paradigm. Over time, however, it has become evident that not only must risk-based decisions be founded on the best available scientific knowledge and understanding, but also that they must take account of the knowledge, values, and preferences of interested and affected parties, including community members, business people, and environmental advocates. This article examines the gradually expanding role of public participation in risk-based decision making in the United States, and traces its evolution from a peripheral issue labeled as an external pressure to an integral element of the 21st century risk assessment – risk management paradigm. Today, and into the foreseeable future, public participation and stakeholder involvement are intrinsic features of the emerging American regulatory landscape, which emphasizes collaborative approaches for achieving cooperative and cost-effective solutions to complicated and often

  3. 14 CFR 91.1075 - Training program: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Operations Program Management § 91.1075 Training program: Special rules. Other than the program manager, only... program manager operating under this subpart: (b) A training center certificated under part 142 of...

  4. Addressing the Special Education Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amprey, Walter G.

    2005-01-01

    In the author's past work as a superintendent, and in his current capacity as an educational consultant, he has seen hundreds of dollars (per special education student) wasted in unnecessary costs and lost funding opportunities resulting from out-of-date, ineffective management systems. In addition to the fiscal implications, this imposes…

  5. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes.

  6. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes. PMID:26764228

  7. 28 CFR 541.21 - Special Housing Units (SHUs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special Housing Units (SHUs). 541.21 Section 541.21 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Special Housing Units § 541.21 Special Housing Units...

  8. 28 CFR 541.21 - Special Housing Units (SHUs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special Housing Units (SHUs). 541.21 Section 541.21 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Special Housing Units § 541.21 Special Housing Units...

  9. 28 CFR 541.21 - Special Housing Units (SHUs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special Housing Units (SHUs). 541.21 Section 541.21 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Special Housing Units § 541.21 Special Housing Units...

  10. 28 CFR 541.21 - Special Housing Units (SHUs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special Housing Units (SHUs). 541.21 Section 541.21 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Special Housing Units § 541.21 Special Housing Units...

  11. Playing a 3-Stringed Violin: Innovation via the Joint Evolution of People, Process, and Knowledge Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2010-01-01

    Users continuously evaluate the value and performance of their Knowledge Management Systems (KMS). As suggested by a punctuated socio-technical system process model, today's success can quickly become tomorrow's failure should the KMS fail to meet evolving needs and expectations. The more deeply a tool is embedded in the actual work process, the more vulnerable it is to emergent changes and perturbations. This paper uses the metaphor of a "3-stringed violin" to explore how differing levels of user knowledge about tools and processes can lead to system perturbations and how the active involvement of other actors can dampen the impact of perturbations, i.e., help the system survive the operational equivalent of a broken string. Recommendations suggest ways to increase system resiliency and contribute to incremental innovation.

  12. Evolution and summary results of the Stanford randomized clinical trials of the management of Hodgkin's disease: 1962-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    This is a summary report of the Stanford randomized clinical trials of the management of Hodgkin's disease, initiated in 1962. There have been four major changes in the treatment protocols during this 22 year period. Between 1962-67, 132 patients with CS I, II and III disease were enrolled on various radiation trials. Between 1968-74, 367 patients were enrolled on studies primarily evaluating the role of adjuvant MOPP chemotherapy. Between 1974-80, variations in the chemotherapy regimen and the sequences of the combined modality programs were studied. The current studies, initiated in 1980, have enrolled 102 patients, and test a new mild adjuvant chemotherapy, VBM, (vinblastine, bleomycin and methotrexate) and utilizes ABVD in combined modality and alternating regimens. During the two decades of these studies, involving more than 800 patients, the initial remission rate and duration and the survival of all patients treated have progressively improved.

  13. Quantum decoherence modulated by special relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jianming; Zhou Zhengwei; Guo Guangcan; Yuan Yefei

    2007-10-15

    By investigating the evolution of a moving spin-(1/2) Dirac electron coupled with a background magnetic noise, we demonstrate that the effects of special relativity will significantly modify the decoherence properties of the spin state. The dephasing could be much suppressed, and for a sufficiently long time the decoherence even seems to halt. This interesting phenomenon stems from the dressed environment induced by special relativity.

  14. Building and Managing Electronic Resources in Digital Era in India with Special Reference to IUCAA and NIV, Pune: A Comparative Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, H. K.; Singh, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses and presents a comparative case study of two libraries in Pune, India, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Information Centre and Library of National Institute of Virology (Indian Council of Medical Research). It compares how both libraries have managed their e-resource collections, including acquisitions, subscriptions, and consortia arrangements, while also developing a collection of their own resources, including pre-prints and publications, video lectures, and other materials in an institutional repository. This study illustrates how difficult it is to manage electronic resources in a developing country like India, even though electronic resources are used more than print resources. Electronic resource management can be daunting, but with a systematic approach, various problems can be solved, and use of the materials will be enhanced.

  15. Special forest products: An east-side perspective. Interior Columbia Basin ecosystem management project: Scientific assessment. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, W.E.; Blatner, K.

    1997-02-01

    The special forest products industry has gained increasing attention, as timber harvest levels in the Pacific Northwest have declined, and has been heralded, at least by some, as a partial solution to the employment problems common throughout the rural areas of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. To date, relatively little work has been published on those portions of the industry located east of the Cascade Range. Yet the east side produced about 48 percent of the total wild edible mushroom harvest (about 1.9 million pounds worth $11.8 million) during 1992. The region also accounts for all of the baby`s breath harvested in the Pacific Northwest and has the potential to produce large quantities of other foral products. It also seems to have the potential to become an important producer of other edibles and medicinal products; however, relatively little is known about this segment of the industry. The following report provides overview of the special forest products industry east of the Cascade Range and evaluates its potential for expansion.

  16. Solving problems resulting from solutions: evolution of a dual nutrient management strategy for the eutrophying Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Joyner, Alan R; Piehler, Michael F; Lebo, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    In estuaries, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) inputs generally control freshwater and saltwater primary production, respectively. Improved wastewater P removal and a P-detergent ban in the late 1980s decreased P loading to the nutrient over-enriched Neuse River Estuary, NC, without a contemporaneous reduction in N loading. This led to a decrease in upstream freshwater phytoplankton production and a reduction in nuisance algal blooms. While this nutrient management approach appeared to be effective in reducing the symptoms of freshwater eutrophication, it may have also diminished the upstream algal N filter, promoting N enrichment, relative to P enrichment, and eutrophication of the more saline downstream N-limited waters. Recent N controls implemented by the State of North Carolina should help address the problem. These findings underscore the need for watershed- and basin-scale, dual nutrient (N and P) reduction strategies that consider the entire freshwater--marine continuum as well as hydrologic variability (e.g., hurricanes, floods, droughts) when formulating long-term controls of estuarine eutrophication.

  17. Recent evolution of natural hazard management policy in France, the example of Serre-Chevalier (French Alps).

    PubMed

    Flez, Christophe; Lahousse, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Since the 1960s, the development of the Serre-Chevalier winter and summer resort has led to a rapid extension of the urban fabric on the territory of the village of St-Chaffrey. On July 9, 1981, the new neighborhoods built on the alluvial fan of the Verdarel torrent were partly devastated by a channeled debris flow. This disaster prompted the civil authorities to set up an extensive fluvial regulation system, which rapidly contributed to recreating a climate of confidence and security favorable to continuing urban expansion. The combination of catastrophic floods in July 1995, and a new security-oriented national policy on natural hazards, nevertheless led to a return to precautionary measures. The St-Chaffrey town council has therefore been forced by the State to accept a building-free zone on the land-use plan. This measure is perceived as a real denial of the local efficacy of the flood and landslide risk management policy as carried out by the council of St-Chaffrey during the previous 20 years. PMID:15520892

  18. Evolution of the role of army transfusion services in the management of trauma patients and battle casualties with massive hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R S; Philip, J; Kumar, S; Yadav, Pramod

    2012-10-01

    Providing blood at the times of national emergencies and war-like scenarios is a challenge to the blood transfusion services. The dictum should be adequate bleeding, minimum storage time, quick transportation and maximum utilization of blood as soon as possible. For the successful implementation of its role, forward transfusion services should be fully mobile with integral transportation and communication systems. Supplementation of blood supplies has to be prompt, & for this adequate air transport facilities will have to be established. A rational approach to using blood products in patients with bleeding, requires an understanding of the principles of managing hemorrhagic shock. The main priorities are controlling hemorrhage and restoring adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues. Surgical control and treatment of coagulopathy are required to stop hemorrhage in these patients. Resuscitation with fluids and red cells are necessary to improve perfusion and oxygen delivery to tissues. Once patients are resuscitated and further bleeding is stopped, use of conservative transfusion triggers is recommended to avoid excessive transfusion and adverse outcomes. A host of new technologies are being developed that have the potential of reducing blood loss. These will help in reducing the transfusion requirements in trauma patients with massive hemorrhage.

  19. Management of full-thickness duodenal laceration in the damage control era: evolution to primary repair without diversion or decompression.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, John; Fabricant, Loic; Anton, Amy; Ham, Bruce; Schreiber, Martin; Mullins, Richard

    2011-06-01

    The management of duodenal laceration (DL) is controversial. We sought to determine the influence of damage control (DC) on the use of decompression/diversion/exclusion (DDE) techniques and the risk of duodenal-related complications (DRC). We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with full-thickness DL surviving more than 72 hours in the years 1989 to 2009. Forty-one patients with a median duodenal organ injury scale of 3 and a mean abdominal trauma index (ATI) of 45 ± 24 underwent laparotomy. Twenty-five patients (61%) were treated with DC and 16 (39%) with fascial closure (FC). Although the ATI of the patients treated with DC was greater than the ATI of the patients treated with FC (56 ± 23 vs 28 ± 17, P < 0.001), DRCs were equivalent (two vs three, nonsignificant). Twenty-one patients were treated in the first decade and 20 in the second decade. Between the first and second decades, there were trends toward an increased use of DC (52 to 70%, nonsignificant) and a decreased use of DDE (52 to 35%, nonsignificant) with a significant reduction in DRC (5 vs 0, P = 0.04). Among the 18 patients (44%) who underwent DDE procedures there were 2 DRCs (11%) related to DDE. Among the 23 patients who did not have DDE, there were three DRCs (13%), including two obstructions, one partial and one complete. When DC is used after DL, DDE may be unnecessary. Diversion is recommended, however, when the duodenum is at risk for obstruction after primary repair.

  20. PREFACE: SPECIAL SECTION OF THE JOURNAL OF AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, EXPOSURE AND THE FOURTH COLLOQUIUM ON PM AND HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This dedicated issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association contains 17 peer-reviewed scientific papers that were presented at the specialty conference, “Particulate Matter: Atmospheric Sciences, Exposure and the Fourth Colloquium on PM and Human Health,” that w...

  1. Same Planet, Different Worlds: Why Projects Continue to Fail. A Generalist Review of Project Management with Special Reference to Electronic Research Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Implementation of IT "solutions" in the context of changes to business processes and efficiency is a common trigger for using formalised project management techniques. The trigger may include topical activities such as job evaluation schemes or quality assurance accreditation. This has led to a blurring of the boundary between projects and…

  2. Guidelines for the use of mathematics in operational area-wide integrated pest management programs using the sterile insect technique with a special focus on Tephritid Fruit Flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest control managers can benefit from using mathematical approaches, particularly models, when implementing area-wide pest control programs that include sterile insect technique (SIT), especially when these are used to calculate required rates of sterile releases to result in suppression or eradica...

  3. Risk Communication in Rural Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Kay Sather; Kimball, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    Risk communication is a methodology recommended for rural special education professionals who communicate with parents and teachers. Using rural special education examples, the steps of risk-based decision making are described: hazard identification, hazard assessment, risk assessment, risk management, risk analysis, and risk communication.…

  4. 28 CFR 540.18 - Special mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH... the Regional Counsel, documents in writing that the special mail either has posed a threat or may pose a threat of physical harm to the recipient (e.g., the inmate has previously used special mail...

  5. 5 CFR 179.210 - Special review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special review. 179.210 Section 179.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Salary Offset § 179.210 Special review. (a) An OPM employee subject to salary offset or a...

  6. Leadership in Early Childhood Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Samita Berry

    2013-01-01

    With the demands of high quality early childhood special education programs within public school settings, there is a need to place emphasis on research and training regarding early childhood leaders and managers in this complex and diverse field. The focus of this research is to examine what early childhood special education (ECSE) leadership…

  7. Project Development Specification for Special Protective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-09-28

    Establishes the performance, design development, and test requirements for the Special Protective Coating. The system engineering approach was used to develop this document in accordance with the guidelines laid out in the Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314.

  8. Eukaryogenesis, how special really?

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Austin; Doolittle, W. Ford

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryogenesis is widely viewed as an improbable evolutionary transition uniquely affecting the evolution of life on this planet. However, scientific and popular rhetoric extolling this event as a singularity lacks rigorous evidential and statistical support. Here, we question several of the usual claims about the specialness of eukaryogenesis, focusing on both eukaryogenesis as a process and its outcome, the eukaryotic cell. We argue in favor of four ideas. First, the criteria by which we judge eukaryogenesis to have required a genuinely unlikely series of events 2 billion years in the making are being eroded by discoveries that fill in the gaps of the prokaryote:eukaryote “discontinuity.” Second, eukaryogenesis confronts evolutionary theory in ways not different from other evolutionary transitions in individuality; parallel systems can be found at several hierarchical levels. Third, identifying which of several complex cellular features confer on eukaryotes a putative richer evolutionary potential remains an area of speculation: various keys to success have been proposed and rejected over the five-decade history of research in this area. Fourth, and perhaps most importantly, it is difficult and may be impossible to eliminate eukaryocentric bias from the measures by which eukaryotes as a whole are judged to have achieved greater success than prokaryotes as a whole. Overall, we question whether premises of existing theories about the uniqueness of eukaryogenesis and the greater evolutionary potential of eukaryotes have been objectively formulated and whether, despite widespread acceptance that eukaryogenesis was “special,” any such notion has more than rhetorical value. PMID:25883267

  9. Building the future of healthcare. Part III: managing the build. Hospital leaders are moving forward using specialized IT tools to help them manage today's complex new-construction projects.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Daphne

    2010-05-01

    Hospital leaders are increasing making use of project management information systems (PMIS), which are built around documentation and communication of project-specific information. PMIS solutions are being applied to the daunting challenge of managing the large volumes of information involved in new construction projects. Project management tools usually utilize a portal. These tools can interface with administrative systems for best effect. CIOs and other senior executives emphasize that good leadership and execution are fundamental to success, and that automated project management tools are supports, not substitutes for good strategic planning and execution.

  10. General very special relativity in Finsler cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kouretsis, A. P.; Stathakopoulos, M.; Stavrinos, P. C.

    2009-05-15

    General very special relativity (GVSR) is the curved space-time of very special relativity (VSR) proposed by Cohen and Glashow. The geometry of general very special relativity possesses a line element of Finsler geometry introduced by Bogoslovsky. We calculate the Einstein field equations and derive a modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology for an osculating Riemannian space. The Friedmann equation of motion leads to an explanation of the cosmological acceleration in terms of an alternative non-Lorentz invariant theory. A first order approach for a primordial-spurionic vector field introduced into the metric gives back an estimation of the energy evolution and inflation.

  11. 5 CFR 9701.361 - Special skills payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9701.361 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Special Payments § 9701.361 Special skills...

  12. 41 CFR 101-26.102 - Special buying services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Special buying services. 101-26.102 Section 101-26.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... PROGRAM 26.1-General § 101-26.102 Special buying services....

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.102 - Special buying services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special buying services. 101-26.102 Section 101-26.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... PROGRAM 26.1-General § 101-26.102 Special buying services....

  14. 41 CFR 101-26.102 - Special buying services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Special buying services. 101-26.102 Section 101-26.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... PROGRAM 26.1-General § 101-26.102 Special buying services....

  15. 41 CFR 101-26.102 - Special buying services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Special buying services. 101-26.102 Section 101-26.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... PROGRAM 26.1-General § 101-26.102 Special buying services....

  16. 41 CFR 101-26.102 - Special buying services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Special buying services. 101-26.102 Section 101-26.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... PROGRAM 26.1-General § 101-26.102 Special buying services....

  17. 5 CFR 9701.361 - Special skills payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9701.361 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Special Payments § 9701.361 Special skills...

  18. The 5S rDNA gene family in mollusks: characterization of transcriptional regulatory regions, prediction of secondary structures, and long-term evolution, with special attention to Mytilidae mussels.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Vierna, Joaquín; González-Tizón, Ana M; Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Several reports on the characterization of 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) in various animal groups have been published to date, but there is a lack of studies analyzing this gene family in a much broader context. Here, we have studied 5S rDNA variation in several molluskan species, including bivalves, gastropods, and cephalopods. The degree of conservation of transcriptional regulatory regions was analyzed in these lineages, revealing a conserved TATA-like box in the upstream region. The evolution of the 120 bp coding region (5S) was also studied, suggesting the occurrence of paralogue groups in razor clams, clams, and cockles. In addition, 5S rDNA sequences from 11 species and 7 genus of Mytilidae Rafinesque, 1815 mussels were sampled and studied in detail. Four different 5S rDNA types, based on the nontranscribed spacer region were identified. The phylogenetic analyses performed within each type showed a between-species gene clustering pattern, suggesting ancestral polymorphism. Moreover, some putative pseudogenized 5S copies were also identified. Our report, together with previous studies that found high degree of intragenomic divergence in bivalve species, suggests that birth-and-death evolution may be the main force driving the evolution of 5S rDNA in these animals, even at the genus level.

  19. Special Education in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Byung Ha, Ed.; Yeo, Kwang Eung

    The text on special education in Korea is divided into four major sections--a brief history of special education in Korea, the present status of special education in Korea, the special education plan of the Young Kwang Educational Foundation, and directory of schools and classes for the exceptional in Korea. Topics covered include the following:…

  20. Special topics--Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: II. A review of manure management mitigation options.

    PubMed

    Montes, F; Meinen, R; Dell, C; Rotz, A; Hristov, A N; Oh, J; Waghorn, G; Gerber, P J; Henderson, B; Makkar, H P S; Dijkstra, J

    2013-11-01

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. Reducing excreted nitrogen (N) and degradable organic carbon (C) by diet manipulation to improve the balance of nutrient inputs with production is an effective practice to reduce CH4 and N2O emissions. Most CH4 is produced during manure storage; therefore, reducing storage time, lowering manure temperature by storing it outside during colder seasons, and capturing and combusting the CH4 produced during storage are effective practices to reduce CH4 emission. Anaerobic digestion with combustion of the gas produced is effective in reducing CH4 emission and organic C content of manure; this increases readily available C and N for microbial processes creating little CH4 and increased N2O emissions following land application. Nitrous oxide emission occurs following land application as a byproduct of nitrification and dentrification processes in the soil, but these processes may also occur in compost, biofilter materials, and permeable storage covers. These microbial processes depend on temperature, moisture content, availability of easily degradable organic C, and oxidation status of the environment, which make N2O emissions and mitigation results highly variable. Managing the fate of ammoniacal N is essential to the success of N2O and CH4 mitigation because ammonia is an important component in the cycling of N through manure, soil, crops, and animal feeds. Manure application techniques such as subsurface injection reduce ammonia and CH4 emissions but can result in increased N2O emissions. Injection works well when combined with anaerobic digestion and solids separation by improving infiltration. Additives such as urease and nitrification inhibitors that inhibit microbial processes have mixed results but are generally effective in controlling N2O emission from intensive grazing systems. Matching plant nutrient

  1. Geostatistical approach for management of soil nutrients with special emphasis on different forms of potassium considering their spatial variation in intensive cropping system of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sourov; Santra, Priyabrata; Majumdar, Kaushik; Ghosh, Debjani; Das, Indranil; Sanyal, S K

    2015-04-01

    A large part of precision agriculture research in the developing countries is devoted towards precision nutrient management aspects. This has led to better economics and efficiency of nutrient use with off-farm advantages of environmental security. The keystone of precision nutrient management is analysis and interpretation of spatial variability of soils by establishing management zones. In this study, spatial variability of major soil nutrient contents was evaluated in the Ghoragacha village of North 24 Parganas district of West Bengal, India. Surface soil samples from 100 locations, covering different cropping systems of the village, was collected from 0 to 15 cm depth using 100×100 m grid system and analyzed in the laboratory to determine organic carbon (OC), available nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) contents of the soil as well as its water-soluble K (KWS), exchangeable K (KEX), and non-exchangeable forms of K (KNEX). Geostatistical analyses were performed to determine the spatial variation structure of each nutrient content within the village, followed by the generation of surface maps through kriging. Four commonly used semivariogram models, i.e., spherical, exponential, Gaussian, and linear models were fitted to each soil property, and the best one was used to prepare surface maps through krigging. Spherical model was found the best for available N and P contents, while linear and exponential model was the best for OC and available K, and for KWS and KNEK, Gausian model was the best. Surface maps of nutrient contents showed that N content (129-195 kg ha(-1)) was the most limiting factor throughout the village, while P status was generally very high ( 10-678 kg ha(-1)) in the soils of the present village. Among the different soil K fractions, KWS registered the maximum variability (CV 75%), while the remaining soil K fractions showed moderate to high variation. Interestingly, KNEX content also showed high variability, which essentially

  2. Trade study for water and waste management concepts. Task 7: Support special analysis. [cost analysis of life support systems for waste utilization during space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost analyses and tradeoff studies are given for waste management in the Space Station, Lunar Surface Bases, and interplanetary space missions. Crew drinking water requirements are discussed and various systems to recycle water are examined. The systems were evaluated for efficiency and weight savings. The systems considered effective for urine water recovery were vapor compression, flash evaporation, and air evaporation with electrolytic pretreatment. For wash water recovery, the system of multifiltration was selected. A wet oxidation system, which can process many kinds of wastes, is also considered.

  3. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory EnergyX Macroencapsulated Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory J.

    2015-06-01

    This special analysis (SA) evaluates whether the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) EnergyX Macroencapsulated waste stream (B LAMACRONCAP, Revision 1) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The LLNL EnergyX Macroencapsulated waste stream is macroencapsulated mixed waste generated during research laboratory operations and maintenance (LLNL 2015). The LLNL EnergyX Macroencapsulated waste stream required a special analysis due to tritium (3H), cobalt-60 (60Co), cesium-137 (137Cs), and radium-226 (226Ra) exceeding the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office [NNSA/NFO] 2015).The results indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the waste stream in a SLB trench. Addition of the LLNL EnergyX Macroencapsulated inventory slightly increases multiple performance assessment results, with the largest relative increase occurring for the all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED). The maximum mean and 95th percentile 222Rn flux density remain less than the performance objective throughout the compliance period. The LLNL EnergyX Macroencapsulated waste stream is suitable for disposal by SLB at the Area 5 RWMS. The waste stream is recommended for approval without conditions.

  4. SCAI expert consensus statement: Evaluation, management, and special considerations of cardio-oncology patients in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Endorsed by the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologıa Intervencionista).

    PubMed

    Iliescu, Cezar; Grines, Cindy L; Herrmann, Joerg; Yang, Eric H; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Hakeem, Abdul; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Leesar, Massoud A; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    In the United States alone, there are currently approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors, and this number is expected to increase to 20 million by 2020. Cancer therapies can cause significant injury to the vasculature, resulting in angina, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stroke, critical limb ischemia, arrhythmias, and heart failure, independently from the direct myocardial or pericardial damage from the malignancy itself. Consequently, the need for invasive evaluation and management in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) for such patients has been increasing. In recognition of the need for a document on special considerations for cancer patients in the CCL, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) commissioned a consensus group to provide recommendations based on the published medical literature and on the expertise of operators with accumulated experience in the cardiac catheterization of cancer patients.

  5. SCAI Expert consensus statement: Evaluation, management, and special considerations of cardio-oncology patients in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologıa intervencionista).

    PubMed

    Iliescu, Cezar A; Grines, Cindy L; Herrmann, Joerg; Yang, Eric H; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Hakeem, Abdul; Toutouzas, Konstantinos P; Leesar, Massoud A; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    In the United States alone, there are currently approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors, and this number is expected to increase to 20 million by 2020. Cancer therapies can cause significant injury to the vasculature, resulting in angina, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stroke, critical limb ischemia, arrhythmias, and heart failure, independently from the direct myocardial or pericardial damage from the malignancy itself. Consequently, the need for invasive evaluation and management in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) for such patients has been increasing. In recognition of the need for a document on special considerations for cancer patients in the CCL, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) commissioned a consensus group to provide recommendations based on the published medical literature and on the expertise of operators with accumulated experience in the cardiac catheterization of cancer patients.

  6. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  7. Management of drug-drug interactions: considerations for special populations--focus on opioid use in the elderly and long term care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Elderly patients and residents in long term care facilities requiring pain medication often have multiple pharmacologic and physiologic factors that can impact the choice of analgesic. One particular problem with prescribing opioids to the elderly and long term care residents is that opioid safety and efficacy have not been well studied in these populations, and it may be difficult to predict how these patients will respond to opioid treatment. As people age, numerous physiological changes occur, which may affect opioid pharmacokinetics and the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Long term care residents include the elderly but also include many younger patients who require assistance for a variety of reasons, such as physical or mental disability. Many elderly and long term care patients have cognitive deficits that impede communication about their pain, thus making detection of opioid DDIs more difficult. Knowledge of the patient's medical history and current prescriptions can help guide the pain management team in the selection of treatment, help minimize the risk of DDIs, and provide these patients with the pain relief they require. There are several practice management recommendations for opioid therapy in the elderly and long term care residents, with the goal of optimizing analgesia while avoiding adverse events and drug interactions.

  8. An Overview of Prognosis Health Management Research at GRC for Gas Turbine Engine Structures With Special Emphasis on Deformation and Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.

    2009-01-01

    Herein a general, multimechanism, physics-based viscoelastoplastic model is presented in the context of an integrated diagnosis and prognosis methodology which is proposed for structural health monitoring, with particular applicability to gas turbine engine structures. In this methodology, diagnostics and prognostics will be linked through state awareness variable(s). Key technologies which comprise the proposed integrated approach include 1) diagnostic/detection methodology, 2) prognosis/lifing methodology, 3) diagnostic/prognosis linkage, 4) experimental validation and 5) material data information management system. A specific prognosis lifing methodology, experimental characterization and validation and data information management are the focal point of current activities being pursued within this integrated approach. The prognostic lifing methodology is based on an advanced multi-mechanism viscoelastoplastic model which accounts for both stiffness and/or strength reduction damage variables. Methods to characterize both the reversible and irreversible portions of the model are discussed. Once the multiscale model is validated the intent is to link it to appropriate diagnostic methods to provide a full-featured structural health monitoring system.

  9. An Overview of Prognosis Health Management Research at Glenn Research Center for Gas Turbine Engine Structures With Special Emphasis on Deformation and Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.

    2009-01-01

    Herein a general, multimechanism, physics-based viscoelastoplastic model is presented in the context of an integrated diagnosis and prognosis methodology which is proposed for structural health monitoring, with particular applicability to gas turbine engine structures. In this methodology, diagnostics and prognostics will be linked through state awareness variable(s). Key technologies which comprise the proposed integrated approach include (1) diagnostic/detection methodology, (2) prognosis/lifing methodology, (3) diagnostic/prognosis linkage, (4) experimental validation, and (5) material data information management system. A specific prognosis lifing methodology, experimental characterization and validation and data information management are the focal point of current activities being pursued within this integrated approach. The prognostic lifing methodology is based on an advanced multimechanism viscoelastoplastic model which accounts for both stiffness and/or strength reduction damage variables. Methods to characterize both the reversible and irreversible portions of the model are discussed. Once the multiscale model is validated the intent is to link it to appropriate diagnostic methods to provide a full-featured structural health monitoring system.

  10. The evolution of lasers in urology

    PubMed Central

    Zarrabi, Amir; Gross, Andreas J.

    2011-01-01

    The world’s first laser was developed by Theodore Maiman in 1960. Over the course of the past five decades, this technology has evolved into a highly specialized entity, also finding a niche market in the field of urology. Lasers obtained from various lasing mediums producing amplified light of different wavelengths have been tested for urological applications. Today, these lasers are most commonly used in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and as intracorporeal lithotripters. Other uses include ablation of various urologic tumors and incising strictures of the upper- and lower urinary tract. A continuous process of evolution of this technology is taking place, resulting in surgical lasers becoming ever safer, more effective, and more affordable. PMID:21869908

  11. The evolution and refinements of varicocele surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marmar, Joel L

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles had been recognized in clinical practice for over a century. Originally, these procedures were utilized for the management of pain but, since 1952, the repairs had been mostly for the treatment of male infertility. However, the diagnosis and treatment of varicoceles were controversial, because the pathophysiology was not clear, the entry criteria of the studies varied among centers, and there were few randomized clinical trials. Nevertheless, clinicians continued developing techniques for the correction of varicoceles, basic scientists continued investigations on the pathophysiology of varicoceles, and new outcome data from prospective randomized trials have appeared in the world's literature. Therefore, this special edition of the Asian Journal of Andrology was proposed to report much of the new information related to varicoceles and, as a specific part of this project, the present article was developed as a comprehensive review of the evolution and refinements of the corrective procedures. PMID:26732111

  12. The evolution of the Italian EPR system for the management of household Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). Technical and economic performance in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Favot, Marinella; Veit, Raphael; Massarutto, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the Italian collective system for the management of household Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), and its evolution over time, following the European Directives on WEEE, which include the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR). The analysis focuses on the technical and economic performance of WEEE compliance organisations (consortia), as they are the key players in the Italian EPR regime. Economic results have not usually been provided in previous studies, due to the lack of available data. This study overcomes this problem by accessing the financial statements for the years 2009-2014 of all consortia. The main conclusions of the study are: The Italian EPR system barely exceeded the technical target of the first WEEE Directive (4kg per capita). Improvements are necessary to achieve the target set for 2019 by the Recast Directive. The economic performance of the Italian EPR regime improved significantly over time. The fees charged per tonne of WEEE collected decreased by almost 43% from 652 Euro per tonne in 2009 to 374 Euro per tonne in 2014, while the fees per tonne put on the market (POM) were 134 Euro in 2009 and 104 Euro in 2014. The results prove the theory which states that, competing consortia use the learning effects to reduce the contribution fees for producers rather than to increase the quantity collected. Municipalities remain the most important actor in WEEE collection operations. Consortia compensate municipalities with a reimbursement that ranges between 28 and 38 Euros per tonne collected. These repayments cover only partially their costs. Additional studies should investigate their role.

  13. The evolution of the Italian EPR system for the management of household Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). Technical and economic performance in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Favot, Marinella; Veit, Raphael; Massarutto, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the Italian collective system for the management of household Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), and its evolution over time, following the European Directives on WEEE, which include the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR). The analysis focuses on the technical and economic performance of WEEE compliance organisations (consortia), as they are the key players in the Italian EPR regime. Economic results have not usually been provided in previous studies, due to the lack of available data. This study overcomes this problem by accessing the financial statements for the years 2009-2014 of all consortia. The main conclusions of the study are: The Italian EPR system barely exceeded the technical target of the first WEEE Directive (4kg per capita). Improvements are necessary to achieve the target set for 2019 by the Recast Directive. The economic performance of the Italian EPR regime improved significantly over time. The fees charged per tonne of WEEE collected decreased by almost 43% from 652 Euro per tonne in 2009 to 374 Euro per tonne in 2014, while the fees per tonne put on the market (POM) were 134 Euro in 2009 and 104 Euro in 2014. The results prove the theory which states that, competing consortia use the learning effects to reduce the contribution fees for producers rather than to increase the quantity collected. Municipalities remain the most important actor in WEEE collection operations. Consortia compensate municipalities with a reimbursement that ranges between 28 and 38 Euros per tonne collected. These repayments cover only partially their costs. Additional studies should investigate their role. PMID:27329553

  14. Mississippi Special Olympics: Special Events Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Toni; Cooper, Walter E.

    Provided in the manual are organizational guidelines and suggested activities for a Special Evants segment of the Mississippi Special Olympics Program to encourage participation by low motor functioning, multihandicapped, mentally retarded persons. Information is provided concerning objectives, organizational set-up, guidelines, communication…

  15. SPECIAL CLASSES FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOWELL, G.L.

    A SPECIAL 3-YEAR TRAINING PROGRAM IN FARM POWER AND MACHINERY WAS DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE FOR DIFFERENT LEVELS OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND TO HELP MEET THE NEED FOR SKILLED WORKERS IN THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA AREA. CHANGES IN THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF STUDENTS TRANSFERRED FROM REGULAR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE CLASSES TO THE SPECIAL CLASSES PROVIDE A MORE…

  16. Special Issue: Book Reviews 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Barbara Ellman, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This special issue reviews 71 books on the following topics: career management; career opportunities for people with disabilities; federal government career information; college career development/counseling; job search strategies, tools, methods; coaching; retirement issues; strategies for managers; women and careers; general career books; and…

  17. Special Issue: Competencies from the Individual's Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Ten articles in this special issue deal with competencies and how their use is revolutionizing human resource management and the work of career practitioners. Topics include competency technology, models, and mapping; behavioral interviewing; talent management; emotional intelligence; succession planning; and lifelong learning. (JOW)

  18. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  19. Critical incident stress management (CISM) in support of special agents and other first responders responding to the Fort Hood shooting: summary and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Strand, Russell; Felices, Karina; Williams, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    On November 5, 2009, an individual entered the Fort Hood Soldier Readiness Processing (SRP) site and opened fire with a handgun. The result of the shooting was a total of 13 people killed and 31 wounded. A two-person critical incident peer support (CIPS) team from the United States Army Military Police School (USAMPS) provided critical incident stress management (CISM) in the forms of critical incident stress debriefings (CISD) and one-on-one crisis intervention for investigators and their spouses. This article provides a summary and discussion of the results of the interventions that were conducted. Key results for successful CISM were accessibility of CIPS team, the credibility of trained peers and the development of supportive relationships, the reduction of stigma by requiring attendance at interventions, and the commitment of the CIPS team to the principles of CISM (e.g., homogenous groups, utilizing a multicomponent approach, and facilitating the normalization of emotional reactions to the crisis). Recommendations include mandating critical incident peer support cells for Criminal Investigation Division (CID) units, Director of Emergency Services (DES) on military installations, and Military Police units; providing a pool of trained peers in the above-mentioned organizations; providing permanent funding for USAMPS' CIPS Course; and recognition of CIPS/CISMas an essential element of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness and Army Human Capital in promoting Soldier Family, and Civilian well-being and resiliency. This article would benefit leaders, chaplains, mental health professionals, and emergency services personnel in investigative, operational, and U.S. Army Garrison units.

  20. Manuscript evolution.

    PubMed

    Howe, C J; Barbrook, A C; Spencer, M; Robinson, P; Bordalejo, B; Mooney, L R

    2001-03-01

    Frequently, letters, words and sentences are used in undergraduate textbooks and the popular press as an analogy for the coding, transfer and corruption of information in DNA. We discuss here how the converse can be exploited, by using programs designed for biological analysis of sequence evolution to uncover the relationships between different manuscript versions of a text. We point out similarities between the evolution of DNA and the evolution of texts.

  1. Manuscript evolution.

    PubMed

    Howe, C J; Barbrook, A C; Spencer, M; Robinson, P; Bordalejo, B; Mooney, L R

    2001-09-01

    Frequently, letters, words and sentences are used in undergraduate textbooks and the popular press as an analogy for the coding, transfer and corruption of information in DNA. We discuss here how the converse can be exploited, by using programs designed for biological analysis of sequence evolution to uncover the relationships between different manuscript versions of a text. We point out similarities between the evolution of DNA and the evolution of texts.

  2. Critical incident stress management (CISM) in support of special agents and other first responders responding to the Fort Hood shooting: summary and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Strand, Russell; Felices, Karina; Williams, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    On November 5, 2009, an individual entered the Fort Hood Soldier Readiness Processing (SRP) site and opened fire with a handgun. The result of the shooting was a total of 13 people killed and 31 wounded. A two-person critical incident peer support (CIPS) team from the United States Army Military Police School (USAMPS) provided critical incident stress management (CISM) in the forms of critical incident stress debriefings (CISD) and one-on-one crisis intervention for investigators and their spouses. This article provides a summary and discussion of the results of the interventions that were conducted. Key results for successful CISM were accessibility of CIPS team, the credibility of trained peers and the development of supportive relationships, the reduction of stigma by requiring attendance at interventions, and the commitment of the CIPS team to the principles of CISM (e.g., homogenous groups, utilizing a multicomponent approach, and facilitating the normalization of emotional reactions to the crisis). Recommendations include mandating critical incident peer support cells for Criminal Investigation Division (CID) units, Director of Emergency Services (DES) on military installations, and Military Police units; providing a pool of trained peers in the above-mentioned organizations; providing permanent funding for USAMPS' CIPS Course; and recognition of CIPS/CISMas an essential element of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness and Army Human Capital in promoting Soldier Family, and Civilian well-being and resiliency. This article would benefit leaders, chaplains, mental health professionals, and emergency services personnel in investigative, operational, and U.S. Army Garrison units. PMID:21473365

  3. Stress and Burnout: A Primer for Special Education and Special Services Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stan F.; And Others

    The primer is designed to help promote mental, physical, and emotional health in school personnel and to prevent job burnout, with primary focus on interventions that special education and special services personnel, administrators, and teacher trainers can implement to manage stress and prevent burnout. Nine chapters address the following topics:…

  4. Evolution, Emotions, and Emotional Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesse, Randolph M.; Ellsworth, Phoebe C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotions research is now routinely grounded in evolution, but explicit evolutionary analyses of emotions remain rare. This article considers the implications of natural selection for several classic questions about emotions and emotional disorders. Emotions are special modes of operation shaped by natural selection. They adjust multiple response…

  5. Specialized face learning is associated with individual recognition in paper wasps.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Michael J; Tibbetts, Elizabeth A

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that the evolution of facial recognition in wasps is associated with specialized face-learning abilities. Polistes fuscatus can differentiate among normal wasp face images more rapidly and accurately than nonface images or manipulated faces. A close relative lacking facial recognition, Polistes metricus, however, lacks specialized face learning. Similar specializations for face learning are found in primates and other mammals, although P. fuscatus represents an independent evolution of specialization. Convergence toward face specialization in distant taxa as well as divergence among closely related taxa with different recognition behavior suggests that specialized cognition is surprisingly labile and may be adaptively shaped by species-specific selective pressures such as face recognition.

  6. 5 CFR 9701.363 - Special staffing payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Special Payments § 9701.363 Special... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special staffing payments. 9701.363 Section 9701.363 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.362 - Special assignment payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Special Payments § 9701.362 Special... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special assignment payments. 9701.362 Section 9701.362 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  8. Rural Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helge, Doris, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Exceptional Children has the theme "Rural Special Education." Nine articles deal with this theme as follows: (1) "The State of the Art of Rural Special Education" (by D. Helge), looks at recent improvements, remaining challenges, and current functioning; policy recommendations are offered for national and state…

  9. Mentorship of Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer Booker; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2012-01-01

    The national shortage and exceptionally high attrition rate of special education teachers are impediments to serving students with special needs. Given that only 64 percent of special education teachers have access to a mentor compared with 86 percent of general education teachers, this book meets an essential need for attracting, retaining, and…

  10. In vitro evolution of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The author reviews recent published reports of in vitro selection and evolution of nucleic acids. These nucleic acids will bind to a target ligand or catalyze a specific chemical reaction. The terms aptamers and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) are explained. The review focuses on protein binders, small molecule binders, and ribozymes obtained by directed evolution. The reference list identifies articles of special or outstanding interest.

  11. [Tendency of specialization in medicine].

    PubMed

    Pereira, J C

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of medicine from an applied science to the extension of specialized medical care delivery, has had a bearing on the student's early decision, influenced by a specialist teacher, to chose specialization in a given field. The author gives current explanations of the specialization process in order to conclude that, in Brazil, one of its leading determinants is a policy of the social welfare system that favors the specialist. Other factors cited are the (not always justified) preference of patients--at least of those who can afford it--for physicians who work with sophisticated equipment, the vested interests of the industry that produces or owns that equipment, and the desire of the young physician to escape the stiff competition he would encounter in general practice, while at the same time separating himself from the somewhat negative image of the general clinician who does not keep abreast of developments in medicine. The author examines the question in light of sociological theories of social and technical division of labor, and asserts that the process has led to the atomization of responsibilities among physicians who have become incapable, because of overspecialization, of viewing the patient as a biological, psychological, social and cultural whole.

  12. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory J.

    2015-06-01

    This special analysis (SA) evaluates whether the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources waste stream (BCLALADOEOSRP, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The LLNL Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources waste stream consists of sealed sources that are no longer needed. The LLNL Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources waste stream required a special analysis because cobalt-60 (60Co), strontium-90 (90Sr), cesium-137 (137Cs), and radium-226 (226Ra) exceeded the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office [NNSA/NFO] 2015). The results indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the LLNL Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources in a SLB trench. The LLNL Low Activity Beta/Gamma Sources waste stream is suitable for disposal by SLB at the Area 5 RWMS. However, the activity concentration of 226Ra listed on the waste profile sheet significantly exceeds the action level. Approval of the waste profile sheet could potentially allow the disposal of high activity 226Ra sources. To ensure that the generator does not include large 226Ra sources in this waste stream without additional evaluation, a control is need on the maximum 226Ra inventory. A limit based on the generator’s estimate of the total 226Ra inventory is recommended. The waste stream is recommended for approval with the control that the total 226Ra inventory disposed shall not exceed 5.5E10 Bq (1.5 Ci).

  13. Teaching Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryner, Jeanna

    2005-01-01

    Eighty years after the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," which tested a teacher's right to discuss the theory of evolution in the classroom, evolution--and its most recent counterview, called "intelligent design"--are in the headlines again, and just about everyone seems to have an opinion. This past July, President Bush weighed in, telling…

  14. FTS evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provost, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on flight telerobotic servicer evolution are presented. Topics covered include: paths for FTS evolution; frequently performed actions; primary task states; EPS radiator panel installation; generic task definitions; path planning; non-contact alignment; contact planning and control; and human operator interface.

  15. 43 CFR 3483.6 - Special logical mining unit rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special logical mining unit rules. 3483.6... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES Diligence Requirements § 3483.6 Special logical mining unit rules. (a) Production anywhere...

  16. 43 CFR 3483.6 - Special logical mining unit rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special logical mining unit rules. 3483.6... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES Diligence Requirements § 3483.6 Special logical mining unit rules. (a) Production anywhere...

  17. 43 CFR 3483.6 - Special logical mining unit rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special logical mining unit rules. 3483.6... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES Diligence Requirements § 3483.6 Special logical mining unit rules. (a) Production anywhere...

  18. 43 CFR 3483.6 - Special logical mining unit rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special logical mining unit rules. 3483.6... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COAL EXPLORATION AND MINING OPERATIONS RULES Diligence Requirements § 3483.6 Special logical mining unit rules. (a) Production anywhere...

  19. 5 CFR 9701.363 - Special staffing payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special staffing payments. 9701.363 Section 9701.363 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Special Payments § 9701.363...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.333 - Special rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rate supplements. 9701.333 Section 9701.333 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Locality and Special Rate...