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Sample records for management society american

  1. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Award Recipients Strong Evidence Still Lacking on Medical Marijuana for Pain Fibromyalgia Has Central Nervous System Origins ... Mayday Fund American Pain Society Offers Guidance on Medical Marijuana for Pain Study Shows Pain Often Improves in ...

  2. An official American Thoracic Society Policy statement: managing conflict of interest in professional societies.

    PubMed

    Schünemann, Holger J; Osborne, Molly; Moss, Joel; Manthous, Constantine; Wagner, Gregory; Sicilian, Leonard; Ohar, Jill; McDermott, Shane; Lucas, Lance; Jaeschke, Roman

    2009-09-15

    Competing interests occur frequently in health care. This results in the potential for conflict of interest (COI). COI can lead to biased generation or assessment of evidence and misinform healthcare decision makers. Declaration of COI is insufficient to neutralize potentially harmful effects. Medical professional societies are obliged to develop robust mechanisms to "manage" COI, particularly in the development of official guidance documents that affect health care. This document describes the background, methods, and content of the new "American Thoracic Society (ATS) Policy on Management of COI in Official ATS Documents, Projects, and Conferences." We used existing reviews on COI policies that were prepared for the World Health Organization and for an ATS guideline methodology workshop as the evidence base for this work. We reviewed existing policies of selected organizations and other relevant literature. Members of the ATS Documents Development and Implementation Committee and the ATS Ethics and COI Committee collaborated to draft a COI policy. We used face-to-face meetings, electronic correspondence, and teleconferences to finalize the draft. The policy then underwent review and ultimate approval by the ATS Board of Directors. The ATS developed a new policy and procedures for declaration and management of COI. These procedures include: (1) self declaration of COI, (2) review of potential participants' COI, (3) disclosure of COI to project participants, (4) refusal or excusal from certain decisions or recommendations when appropriate, (5) disclosure of COI to users of documents or attendees of conferences, (6) handling disputes in COI resolution. This policy includes a tool that may be useful for supporting decision makers in management of COIs as they assess the value and relevance of conflicts. The ATS Policy on Management of COI in Official ATS Documents, Projects, and Conferences, in effect since March 2008, promises greater organizational transparency

  3. American Society for Pain Management nursing position statement: pain management in patients with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N

    2012-09-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high-quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. Copyright © 2012 International Nursing Society on Addiction (IntNSA) and the American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

    2013-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:22929604

  5. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:24335741

  6. American Society for Pain Management nursing position statement: pain management in patients with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N

    2012-10-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high-quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations.

  7. American Urogynecologic Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2017 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  8. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... your friends, your family, and the American Cancer Society help you take a step closer toward a ... DNA Offers Lung Cancer Clues An American Cancer Society grantee discovers a non-coding gene that may ...

  9. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  10. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEWS VIEW ALL NEWS FIRST ANNUAL “MIGRAINE MOMENT” FILM CONTEST WINNERS The American Headache Society and American ... RT @mrobbinsmd : A7 See the recent @amfmigraine #MigraineMoment film competition & stories like @brainstorm83 to understand the gravity & ...

  11. American Society of Hematology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  12. Management of Postoperative Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American Pain Society, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Committee on Regional Anesthesia, Executive Committee, and Administrative Council.

    PubMed

    Chou, Roger; Gordon, Debra B; de Leon-Casasola, Oscar A; Rosenberg, Jack M; Bickler, Stephen; Brennan, Tim; Carter, Todd; Cassidy, Carla L; Chittenden, Eva Hall; Degenhardt, Ernest; Griffith, Scott; Manworren, Renee; McCarberg, Bill; Montgomery, Robert; Murphy, Jamie; Perkal, Melissa F; Suresh, Santhanam; Sluka, Kathleen; Strassels, Scott; Thirlby, Richard; Viscusi, Eugene; Walco, Gary A; Warner, Lisa; Weisman, Steven J; Wu, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Most patients who undergo surgical procedures experience acute postoperative pain, but evidence suggests that less than half report adequate postoperative pain relief. Many preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative interventions and management strategies are available for reducing and managing postoperative pain. The American Pain Society, with input from the American Society of Anesthesiologists, commissioned an interdisciplinary expert panel to develop a clinical practice guideline to promote evidence-based, effective, and safer postoperative pain management in children and adults. The guideline was subsequently approved by the American Society for Regional Anesthesia. As part of the guideline development process, a systematic review was commissioned on various aspects related to various interventions and management strategies for postoperative pain. After a review of the evidence, the expert panel formulated recommendations that addressed various aspects of postoperative pain management, including preoperative education, perioperative pain management planning, use of different pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities, organizational policies, and transition to outpatient care. The recommendations are based on the underlying premise that optimal management begins in the preoperative period with an assessment of the patient and development of a plan of care tailored to the individual and the surgical procedure involved. The panel found that evidence supports the use of multimodal regimens in many situations, although the exact components of effective multimodal care will vary depending on the patient, setting, and surgical procedure. Although these guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence on management of postoperative pain, the panel identified numerous research gaps. Of 32 recommendations, 4 were assessed as being supported by high-quality evidence, and 11 (in the areas of patient education and perioperative planning, patient

  13. Management of COPD exacerbations: a European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society guideline.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Miravitlles, Marc; Hurst, John R; Calverley, Peter M A; Albert, Richard K; Anzueto, Antonio; Criner, Gerard J; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Rigau, David; Sliwinski, Pawel; Tonia, Thomy; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wilson, Kevin C; Krishnan, Jerry A

    2017-03-01

    This document provides clinical recommendations for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations.Comprehensive evidence syntheses, including meta-analyses, were performed to summarise all available evidence relevant to the Task Force's questions. The evidence was appraised using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach and the results were summarised in evidence profiles. The evidence syntheses were discussed and recommendations formulated by a multidisciplinary Task Force of COPD experts.After considering the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences, quality of evidence, feasibility, and acceptability of various interventions, the Task Force made: 1) a strong recommendation for noninvasive mechanical ventilation of patients with acute or acute-on-chronic respiratory failure; 2) conditional recommendations for oral corticosteroids in outpatients, oral rather than intravenous corticosteroids in hospitalised patients, antibiotic therapy, home-based management, and the initiation of pulmonary rehabilitation within 3 weeks after hospital discharge; and 3) a conditional recommendation against the initiation of pulmonary rehabilitation during hospitalisation.The Task Force provided recommendations related to corticosteroid therapy, antibiotic therapy, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, home-based management, and early pulmonary rehabilitation in patients having a COPD exacerbation. These recommendations should be reconsidered as new evidence becomes available.

  14. Surgical Management of Stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society Guideline, PART II.

    PubMed

    Assimos, Dean; Krambeck, Amy; Miller, Nicole L; Monga, Manoj; Murad, M Hassan; Nelson, Caleb P; Pace, Kenneth T; Pais, Vernon M; Pearle, Margaret S; Preminger, Glenn M; Razvi, Hassan; Shah, Ojas; Matlaga, Brian R

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is intended to provide a clinical framework for the surgical management of patients with kidney and/or ureteral stones. The summary presented herein represents Part II of the two-part series dedicated to Surgical Management of Stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society Guideline. Please refer to Part I for introductory information and a discussion of pre-operative imaging and special cases. A systematic review of the literature (search dates 1/1/1985 to 5/31/2015) was conducted to identify peer-reviewed studies relevant to the surgical management of stones. The review yielded an evidence base of 1,911 articles after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. These publications were used to create the Guideline statements. Evidence-based statements of Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendation were developed based on benefits and risks/burdens to patients. Additional directives are provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions when insufficient evidence existed. The Panel identified 12 adult Index Patients to represent the most common cases seen in clinical practice. Three additional Index Patients were also created to describe the more commonly encountered special cases, including pediatric and pregnant patients. With these patients in mind, Guideline statements were developed to aid the clinician in identifying optimal management. Proper treatment selection, which is directed by patient- and stone-specific factors, remains the greatest predictor of successful treatment outcomes. This Guideline is intended for use in conjunction with the individual patient's treatment goals. In all cases, patient preferences and personal goals should be considered when choosing a management strategy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical Management of Stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society Guideline, PART I.

    PubMed

    Assimos, Dean; Krambeck, Amy; Miller, Nicole L; Monga, Manoj; Murad, M Hassan; Nelson, Caleb P; Pace, Kenneth T; Pais, Vernon M; Pearle, Margaret S; Preminger, Glenn M; Razvi, Hassan; Shah, Ojas; Matlaga, Brian R

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is intended to provide a clinical framework for the surgical management of patients with kidney and/or ureteral stones. The summary presented herein represents Part I of the two-part series dedicated to Surgical Management of Stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society Guideline. Please refer to Part II for an in-depth discussion of patients presenting with ureteral or renal stones. A systematic review of the literature (search dates 1/1/1985 to 5/31/2015) was conducted to identify peer-reviewed studies relevant to the surgical management of stones. The review yielded an evidence base of 1,911 articles after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. These publications were used to create the Guideline statements. Evidence-based statements of Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendation were developed based on benefits and risks/burdens to patients. Additional directives are provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions when insufficient evidence existed. The Panel identified 12 adult Index Patients to represent the most common cases seen in clinical practice. Three additional Index Patients were also created to describe pediatric and pregnant patients with such stones. With these patients in mind, Guideline statements were developed to aid the clinician in identifying optimal management. Proper treatment selection, which is directed by patient- and stone-specific factors, remains the greatest predictor of successful treatment outcomes. This Guideline is intended for use in conjunction with the individual patient's treatment goals. In all cases, patient preferences and personal goals should be considered when choosing a management strategy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. American pain society recommendations for improving the quality of acute and cancer pain management: American Pain Society Quality of Care Task Force.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Debra B; Dahl, June L; Miaskowski, Christine; McCarberg, Bill; Todd, Knox H; Paice, Judith A; Lipman, Arthur G; Bookbinder, Marilyn; Sanders, Steve H; Turk, Dennis C; Carr, Daniel B

    2005-07-25

    The American Pain Society (APS) set out to revise and expand its 1995 Quality Improvement Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain and Cancer Pain and to facilitate improvements in the quality of pain management in all care settings. Eleven multidisciplinary members of the APS with expertise in quality improvement or measurement participated in the update. Five experts from organizations that focus on health care quality reviewed the final recommendations. MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched (1994-2004) to identify articles on pain quality measurement and quality improvement published after the development of the 1995 guidelines. The APS task force revised and expanded recommendations on the basis of the systematic review of published studies. The more than 3000 members of the APS were invited to provide input, and the 5 experts provided additional comments. The task force synthesized reviewers' comments into the final set of recommendations. The recommendations specify that all care settings formulate structured, multilevel systems approaches (sensitive to the type of pain, population served, and setting of care) that ensure prompt recognition and treatment of pain, involvement of patients and families in the pain management plan, improved treatment patterns, regular reassessment and adjustment of the pain management plan as needed, and measurement of processes and outcomes of pain management. Efforts to improve the quality of pain management must move beyond assessment and communication of pain to implementation and evaluation of improvements in pain treatment that are timely, safe, evidence based, and multimodal.

  17. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    PubMed

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society policy statement: managing conscientious objections in intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Wicclair, Mark; Pope, Thaddeus; Rushton, Cynda; Curlin, Farr; Diekema, Douglas; Durrer, Debbie; Ehlenbach, William; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Glavan, Bradford; Langer, Rabbi Levi; Manthous, Constantine; Rose, Cecile; Scardella, Anthony; Shanawani, Hasan; Siegel, Mark D; Halpern, Scott D; Truog, Robert D; White, Douglas B

    2015-01-15

    Intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians sometimes have a conscientious objection (CO) to providing or disclosing information about a legal, professionally accepted, and otherwise available medical service. There is little guidance about how to manage COs in ICUs. To provide clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers with recommendations for managing COs in the critical care setting. This policy statement was developed by a multidisciplinary expert committee using an iterative process with a diverse working group representing adult medicine, pediatrics, nursing, patient advocacy, bioethics, philosophy, and law. The policy recommendations are based on the dual goals of protecting patients' access to medical services and protecting the moral integrity of clinicians. Conceptually, accommodating COs should be considered a "shield" to protect individual clinicians' moral integrity rather than as a "sword" to impose clinicians' judgments on patients. The committee recommends that: (1) COs in ICUs be managed through institutional mechanisms, (2) institutions accommodate COs, provided doing so will not impede a patient's or surrogate's timely access to medical services or information or create excessive hardships for other clinicians or the institution, (3) a clinician's CO to providing potentially inappropriate or futile medical services should not be considered sufficient justification to forgo the treatment against the objections of the patient or surrogate, and (4) institutions promote open moral dialogue and foster a culture that respects diverse values in the critical care setting. This American Thoracic Society statement provides guidance for clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers to address clinicians' COs in the critical care setting.

  19. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  20. Integrating forest management for wildlife and fish: 1987 Society of American Foresters national convention; 1987 October 18-21; Minneapolis, MN.

    Treesearch

    USDA FS

    1988-01-01

    Papers from a technical session working group of the 1987 Society of American Foresters national convention. Topics include ecological and economic considerations of integrated forest resource management.

  1. Shunt-dependent hydrocephalus: management style among members of the American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Mark R; Sandoval-Garcia, Carolina; Bragg, Taryn; Iskandar, Bermans J

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors conducted a survey to evaluate differences in the understanding and management of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus among members of the American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgeons (ASPN). METHODS Surveys were sent to all 204 active ASPN members in September 2014. One hundred thirty responses were received, representing a 64% response rate. Respondents were asked 13 multiple-choice and free-response questions regarding 4 fundamental problems encountered in shunted-hydrocephalus management: shunt malfunction, chronic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overdrainage, chronic headaches, and slit ventricle syndrome (SVS). RESULTS Respondents agreed that shunt malfunction occurs most often as the result of ventricular catheter obstruction. Despite contrary evidence in the literature, most respondents (66%) also believed that choroid plexus is the tissue most often found in obstructed proximal catheters. However, free-text responses revealed that the respondents' understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of shunt obstruction was highly variable and included growth, migration, or adherence of choroid plexus, CSF debris, catheter position, inflammatory processes, and CSF overdrainage. Most respondents considered chronic CSF overdrainage to be a rare complication of shunting in their practice and reported wide variation in treatment protocols. Moreover, despite a lack of evidence in the literature, most respondents attributed chronic headaches in shunt patients to medical reasons (for example, migraines, tension). Accordingly, most respondents managed headaches with reassurance and/or referral to pain clinics. Lastly, there were variable opinions on the etiology of slit ventricle syndrome (SVS), which included early shunting, chronic overdrainage, and/or loss of brain compliance. Beyond shunt revision, respondents reported divergent SVS treatment preferences. CONCLUSIONS The survey shows that there is wide variability in the understanding and management of

  2. American Contact Dermatitis Society Contact Allergy Management Program: An Epidemiologic Tool to Quantify Ingredient Usage.

    PubMed

    Scheman, Andrew; Severson, David

    2016-01-01

    The usage prevalence of ingredients in topical products is important to dermatologists and industry. To determine the prevalence of methylisothiazolinone (MI) in various types of consumer products The Contact Allergy Management Program (CAMP) database was mapped and sorted in spreadsheet format to determine the prevalence of MI in various types of consumer products. Methylisothiazolinone was found in 13.2% of 4660 total products in CAMP. High usage of MI was seen in dishwashing products (64%), shampoos (53%), bathroom/kitchen/all-purpose cleaners (47%), hair conditioners (45%), hair dyes (43%), laundry additives/fresheners/softeners (30%), soaps/cleansers (29%), and surface cleaners/disinfectants (27%). Of the products containing MI, MI alone (without methylchloroisothiazolinone) was most common in makeup products (100%), cleaning/dish/laundry products (>99%), moisturizers (82%), shaving products (78%), sunscreens (71%), and antiaging products (67%). The American Contact Dermatitis Society's CAMP is a valuable tool to collect epidemiologic data on the incidence of specific ingredient usage in various types of topical products.

  3. [Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology: hemodynamic management of newborns].

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G; Fariña, Diana; Sola, Augusto; Baquero, Hernando; Cabañas, Fernando; Dominguez, Fernando; Fajardo, Carlos; Goldsmit, Gustavo S; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Lee, Mario; Varela, Lourdes Lemus; Mariani, Gonzalo; Miura, Ernani; Pérez, Jose Maria; Zambosco, Guillermo; Pellicer, Adelina; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2011-04-01

    This study reports on the process and results of the Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology. Eighty neonatologists from 23 countries were invited to collaborate and participate in the event. Several questions of clinical-physiological importance in the hemodynamic management of newborns were addressed. Participants were divided into groups to facilitate interaction and teamwork, with instructions to respond to three to five questions by analyzing the literature and local factors. Meeting in Mar del Plata, Argentina, the Consensus Group served as a form for various presentations and discussions. In all, 54 neonatologists from 21 countries attended, with the objective of reaching a consensus on such matters as concepts and definitions of hemodynamic instability, the physiopathology of hemodynamic compromise, recommended therapy strategies, and hemodynamic monitoring. It is hoped that this international experience will serve as a useful initiative for future consensus building and reduction of the existing disparities among the countries of the Region in terms of treatment and outcomes.

  4. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Prescribing and Administering Opioid Doses Based Solely on Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    Pasero, Chris; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Rae, Diana; Broglio, Kathleen; Drew, Debra

    2016-06-01

    The foundation of safe and effective pain management is an individualized, comprehensive pain assessment, which includes, but is not limited to, determining the intensity of pain if the patient is able to report it. An unforeseen consequence of the widespread use of pain intensity rating scales is the practice of prescribing specific doses of opioid analgesics based solely on specific pain intensity. Many factors in addition to pain intensity influence opioid requirements, and there is no research showing that a specific opioid dose will relieve pain of a specific intensity in all patients. The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) holds the position that the practice of prescribing doses of opioid analgesics based solely on a patient's pain intensity should be prohibited because it disregards the relevance of other essential elements of assessment and may contribute to untoward patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  6. Report by a special panel of the American Nuclear Society: Protection and management of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Bengelsdorf, H.

    1996-07-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established an independent and prestigious panel several months ago to take the matter up where the US National Academy of Science (NAS) left off. The challenge was to look at the broader issue of what to do with civil plutonium, as well as excess weapons material. In terms of approach, the report focused on several short- and long-term issues. The short-term focus was on the disposition of excess weapons plutonium, while the longer-range issue concerned the disposition of the plutonium being produced in the civil nuclear fuel cycle. For the short term, the ANS panel strongly endorsed the concept that all plutonium scheduled for release from the US and Russian weapons stocks should be converted to a form that is intensively radioactive in order to protect the plutonium from theft of seizure (the spent fuel standard). However, since the conversion will at best take several years to complete, the panel has concluded that immediate emphasis should be placed on the assurance that all unconverted materials are protected as securely as when they were part of the active weapon stockpiles. More importantly, the panel also recommended prompt implementation of the so-called reactor option for disposing of surplus US and Russian weapons plutonium. The longer-term issues covered by the panel were those posed by the growing stocks of both separated plutonium and spent fuel generated in the world`s civil nuclear power programs. These issues included what fuel cycle policies should be prudently pursued in light of proliferation risks and likely future energy needs, what steps should be taken in regard to the increase in the demand for nuclear power in the future, and how civil plutonium in its various forms should be protected and managed to minimize proliferation. Overall, the panel concluded that plutonium is an energy resource that should be used and not a waste material to be disposed of.

  7. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ... RESOURCES Navigation CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ...

  8. ISS Update: American Physical Society

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Becky Thompson, head of Public Outreach for the American Physical Society, a professional organization for physicists whose web site hosts astronaut ...

  9. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... ASCP Selects ArborMetrix to Drive Patient-Centric National Pathology Quality Registry ePolicy News August 2017 July 2017 ... Measure Copyright © 2017 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  10. American Society of Human Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deficiency October 20, 2016 Parents of Children with Cancer Value Sequencing Results, Even if Non-actionable October 20, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, Maryland 20814 society@ashg.org • 1-866-HUM-GENE • (301) 634-7300 Privacy Policy

  11. The American Montessori Society, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Gilbert E.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a brief history of the establishment of the American Montessori Society (AMS) and takes a closer look at its structure. The history of AMS has essentially been a search for standards and a search for community in its efforts to further the welfare of children in America. It has been an indigenous effort by American parents, and…

  12. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: The Role of the Pulmonologist in the Diagnosis and Management of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S.; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. Purpose: This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. Methods: A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Results: Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Conclusions: Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care. PMID:23947517

  13. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: the role of the pulmonologist in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaga, Mina; Powell, Charles A; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Rabe, Klaus; Hill, Nicholas S; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-15

    Lung cancer is a common problem seen by pulmonologists. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) are professional organizations whose memberships are composed of large numbers of pulmonologists. This document describes the key role of pulmonologists in the prevention, early diagnosis, and management of lung cancer. A committee of ATS and ERS leaders and their oncology groups discussed the activities of pulmonologists in relation to lung cancer in various settings and reviewed available literature on the topic. The content of this statement was approved by the board of directors of both the ATS and ERS. Optimal lung cancer care requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists who care for a significant number of patients on a regular basis. Pulmonologists are responsible for and involved with patients from their initial diagnosis and staging through treatment and restaging. They are often involved with complications, palliative care, and end-of-life care, and thus have an important role in team leadership. Lung cancer is a disease with high mortality, profound effects on the quality of the lives of patients and their families, and an enormous cost and impact on society. To treat lung cancer optimally, care must be prompt, multidisciplinary, and patient-centered. In the entire process, pulmonologists have a key role. Pulmonologists and their professional societies should also enhance lung cancer research and education to provide better treatment options and patient care.

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: A Research Framework for Pulmonary Nodule Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R; Midthun, David E; Powell, Charles A; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Gould, Michael K

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge and strategies to address them. We did not use formal mechanisms to prioritize one research area over another or to achieve consensus. There was widespread agreement that novel tests (including novel imaging tests and biopsy techniques, biomarkers, and prognostic models) may improve diagnostic accuracy for identifying cancerous nodules. Before they are used in clinical practice, however, better evidence is needed to show that they improve more distal outcomes of importance to patients. In addition, the pace of research and the quality of clinical care would be improved by the development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope that it will accelerate the pace and increase the efficiency of discovery to improve the quality of care for patients with pulmonary nodules.

  15. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: A Research Framework for Pulmonary Nodule Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R.; Midthun, David E.; Powell, Charles A.; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Gould, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. Methods: In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge and strategies to address them. We did not use formal mechanisms to prioritize one research area over another or to achieve consensus. Results: There was widespread agreement that novel tests (including novel imaging tests and biopsy techniques, biomarkers, and prognostic models) may improve diagnostic accuracy for identifying cancerous nodules. Before they are used in clinical practice, however, better evidence is needed to show that they improve more distal outcomes of importance to patients. In addition, the pace of research and the quality of clinical care would be improved by the development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. Conclusions: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope that it will accelerate the pace and increase the efficiency of discovery to improve the quality of care for patients with pulmonary nodules. PMID:26278796

  16. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  17. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  18. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  19. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 5: a guide on the management of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The last article in this 5-part series provides a final overview of consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. Optimal management of rosacea requires careful assessment of the patient's clinical features with integration of therapies that adequately treat the presenting signs and symptoms. The treatment consensus recommendations from the AARS are based on 2 major common clinical presentations of rosacea: (1) centrofacial erythema with papulopustular lesions, and (2) centrofacial erythema without papulopustular lesions. The recommendations provided here serve to guide clinicians in their clinical practice.

  20. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) <60% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend treatment with inhaled bronchodilators (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 4: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians prescribe monotherapy using either long-acting inhaled

  1. Clinical Equipoise and Shared Decision-making in Pulmonary Nodule Management. A Survey of American Thoracic Society Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Iaccarino, Jonathan M; Simmons, James; Gould, Michael K; Slatore, Christopher G; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2017-06-01

    Guidelines for pulmonary nodule evaluation suggest a variety of strategies, reflecting the lack of high-quality evidence demonstrating the superiority of any one approach. It is unclear whether clinicians agree that multiple management options are appropriate at different levels of risk and whether this impacts their decision-making approaches with patients. To assess clinicians' perceptions of the appropriateness of various diagnostic strategies, approach to decision-making, and perceived clinical equipoise in pulmonary nodule evaluation. We developed and administered a web-based survey in March and April, 2014 to clinician members of the American Thoracic Society. The primary outcome was perceived appropriateness of pulmonary nodule evaluation strategies in three clinical vignettes with different malignancy risk. We compared responses to guideline recommendations and analyzed clinician characteristics associated with a reported shared decision-making approach. We also assessed clinicians' likelihood to enroll patients in hypothetical randomized trials comparing nodule evaluation strategies. Of 5,872 American Thoracic Society members e-mailed, 1,444 opened the e-mail and 428 eligible clinicians participated in the survey (response rate, 30.0% among those who opened the invitation; 7% overall). The mean number of options considered appropriate increased with pretest probability of cancer, ranging from 1.8 (SD, 1.2) for the low-risk case to 3.5 (1.1) for the high-risk case (P < 0.0001). As recommended by guidelines, the proportion that deemed surgical resection as an appropriate option also increased with cancer risk (P < 0.0001). One-half of clinicians (50.4%) reported engaging in shared decision-making with patients for pulmonary nodule management; this was more commonly reported by clinicians with more years of experience (P = 0.01) and those who reported greater comfort in managing pulmonary nodules (P = 0.005). Although one-half (49.9%) deemed

  2. American Society for Pain Management Nursing guidelines on monitoring for opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression.

    PubMed

    Jarzyna, Donna; Jungquist, Carla R; Pasero, Chris; Willens, Joyce S; Nisbet, Allison; Oakes, Linda; Dempsey, Susan J; Santangelo, Diane; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2011-09-01

    result, there are considerable variations in screening for risk and monitoring practices. All of these factors prompted the American Society for Pain Management Nursing to approve the formation of an expert consensus panel to examine the scientific basis and state of practice for assessment and monitoring practices for adult hospitalized patients receiving opioid analgesics for pain control and to propose recommendations for patient care, education, and systems-level changes that promote quality care and patient safety. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of the American Society of Hematology guidelines on the management of newly diagnosed childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Corinna L; Mitra, Nandita; Schapira, Marilyn M; Lambert, Michele P

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) published updated guidelines for the management of childhood immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) recommending management with observation alone when there are mild or no bleeding symptoms, regardless of platelet count. Little is known about practice patterns of newly diagnosed ITP in the United States. To understand the impact of management recommendations on practice patterns. Retrospective medical record review in the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a large, urban, pediatric tertiary care hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The study involved 311 pediatric patients with newly diagnosed ITP managed between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2012. Management type (observation alone vs pharmacotherapy) was determined via medical record review and electronic pharmacy data at diagnosis and within 6 months after diagnosis. Overall, 44.7% of patients were managed with observation alone at diagnosis, with a significant increase from 34.9% in 2007-2010 to 49.2% in 2011 (P < .02) and 71.1% in 2012 (P < .001). Of those treated, 99% were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. In multivariable logistic regression, younger age (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87-0.99), lower platelet count (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.83-0.89), and earlier period (2007-2010) of diagnosis (odds ratio, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.09-0.34) were significantly associated with increased odds of pharmacologic management. During 2010-2012, 20.8% of patients were also treated within 6 months after diagnosis. There was no significant difference by year or initial management type in those who received this later pharmacotherapy. Additionally, 19.6% of patients had documented bleeding symptoms beyond cutaneous bruising or petechiae at diagnosis. Intracranial hemorrhage at diagnosis was rare (0.6%). We demonstrated a significant practice change in the management of newly diagnosed ITP at a pediatric care tertiary care hospital in the United States surrounding

  4. Topical, geospatial, and temporal diffusion of the 2015 North American Menopause Society position statement on nonhormonal management of vasomotor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Janet S; Laine, Tei; Harrison, Blake; LePage, Meghan; Pierce, Taran; Hoteling, Nathan; Börner, Katy

    2017-10-01

    We sought to depict the topical, geospatial, and temporal diffusion of the 2015 North American Menopause Society position statement on the nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms released on September 21, 2015, and its associated press release from September 23, 2015. Three data sources were used: online news articles, National Public Radio, and Twitter. For topical diffusion, we compared keywords and their frequencies among the position statement, press release, and online news articles. We also created a network figure depicting relationships across key content categories or nodes. For geospatial diffusion within the United States, we compared locations of the 109 National Public Radio (NPR) stations covering the statement to 775 NPR stations not covering the statement. For temporal diffusion, we normalized and segmented Twitter data into periods before and after the press release (September 12, 2015 to September 22, 2015 vs September 23, 2015 to October 3, 2015) and conducted a burst analysis to identify changes in tweets from before to after. Topical information diffused across sources was similar with the exception of the more scientific terms "vasomotor symptoms" or "vms" versus the more colloquial term "hot flashes." Online news articles indicated media coverage of the statement was mainly concentrated in the United States. NPR station data showed similar proportions of stations airing the story across the four census regions (Northeast, Midwest, south, west; P = 0.649). Release of the statement coincided with bursts in the menopause conversation on Twitter. The findings of this study may be useful for directing the development and dissemination of future North American Menopause Society position statements and/or press releases.

  5. Role delineation study for the American Society for Pain Management Nursing.

    PubMed

    Willens, Joyce S; DePascale, Christine; Penny, James

    2010-06-01

    A role delineation study, or job analysis, is a necessary step in the development of a quality credentialing program. The process requires a logical approach and systematic methods to have an examination that is legally defensible. There are three main phases: initial development and evaluation, validation study, and development of test specifications. In the first phase, the content expert panel discussed performance domains that exist in pain management nursing. The six domains developed were: 1) assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of pain; 2) pharmacologic pain management; 3) nonpharmacologic pain management; 4) therapeutic communication and counseling; 5) patient and family teaching; and 6) collaborative and organizational activities. The panel then produced a list of 70 task statements to develop an online survey which was sent to independent reviewers with expertise in pain management nursing. After the panel reviewed the results of the pilot test, it was decided to clarify a few items that did not perform as expected. After the questionnaire was finalized it was distributed to 1,500 pain management nurses. The final yield was 585 usable returns, for a response rate of 39%. Thirty-three percent of the respondents reported a bachelor's degree in nursing as the highest degree awarded. Over 80% indicated that they were certified in pain management. Over 35% reported working in a staff position, 14% as a nurse practitioner, and 13% as a clinical nurse specialist. Part of the questionnaire asked the participants to rate performance expectation, consequence or the likelihood that the newly certified pain management nurse could cause harm, and the frequency of how often that nurse performs in each of the performance domains. The performance expectation was rated from 0 (the newly certified pain management nurse was not at all expected to perform the domain task) to 2 (after 6 months the newly certified pain management nurse would be expected to perform the domain

  6. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  7. Management of Small Renal Masses: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Antonio; Ismaila, Nofisat; Bro, Bill; Durack, Jeremy; Eggener, Scott; Evans, Andrew; Gill, Inderbir; Graham, David; Huang, William; Jewett, Michael A S; Latcha, Sheron; Lowrance, William; Rosner, Mitchell; Shayegan, Bobby; Thompson, R Houston; Uzzo, Robert; Russo, Paul

    2017-02-20

    Purpose To provide recommendations for the management options for patients with small renal masses (SRMs). Methods By using a literature search and prospectively defined study selection, we sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, prospective comparative observational studies, and retrospective studies published from 2000 through 2015. Outcomes included recurrence-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Results Eighty-three studies, including 20 systematic reviews and 63 primary studies, met the eligibility criteria and form the evidentiary basis for the guideline recommendations. Recommendations On the basis of tumor-specific findings and competing risks of mortality, all patients with an SRM should be considered for a biopsy when the results may alter management. Active surveillance should be an initial management option for patients who have significant comorbidities and limited life expectancy. Partial nephrectomy (PN) for SRMs is the standard treatment that should be offered to all patients for whom an intervention is indicated and who possess a tumor that is amenable to this approach. Percutaneous thermal ablation should be considered an option if complete ablation can reliably be achieved. Radical nephrectomy for SRMs should only be reserved for patients who possess a tumor of significant complexity that is not amenable to PN or for whom PN may result in unacceptable morbidity even when performed at centers with expertise. Referral to a nephrologist should be considered if chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) or progressive chronic kidney disease occurs after treatment, especially if associated with proteinuria.

  8. Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees. Nonhormonal management of VMS is an important consideration when hormone therapy is not an option, either because of medical contraindications or a woman's personal choice. Nonhormonal therapies include lifestyle changes, mind-body techniques, dietary management and supplements, prescription therapies, and others. The costs, time, and effort involved as well as adverse effects, lack of long-term studies, and potential interactions with medications all need to be carefully weighed against potential effectiveness during decision making. Clinicians need to be well informed about the level of evidence available for the wide array of nonhormonal management options currently available to midlife women to help prevent underuse of effective therapies or use of inappropriate or ineffective therapies. Recommended: Cognitive-behavioral therapy and, to a lesser extent, clinical hypnosis have been shown to be effective in reducing VMS. Paroxetine salt is the only nonhormonal medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of VMS, although other selective serotonin reuptake/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentinoids, and clonidine show evidence of efficacy. Recommend with caution: Some therapies that may be beneficial for alleviating VMS are weight loss, mindfulness-based stress reduction, the S-equol derivatives of soy isoflavones, and stellate ganglion block, but additional studies of these therapies are

  9. An official American Thoracic Society statement: diagnosis and management of beryllium sensitivity and chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R; Abraham, Jerrold L; Dweik, Raed A; Fireman, Elizabeth; Fontenot, Andrew P; Maier, Lisa A; Muller-Quernheim, Joachim; Ostiguy, Gaston; Pepper, Lewis D; Saltini, Cesare; Schuler, Christine R; Takaro, Tim K; Wambach, Paul F

    2014-11-15

    Beryllium continues to have a wide range of industrial applications. Exposure to beryllium can lead to sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The purpose of this statement is to increase awareness and knowledge about beryllium exposure, BeS, and CBD. Evidence was identified by a search of MEDLINE. The committee then summarized the evidence, drew conclusions, and described their approach to diagnosis and management. The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test is the cornerstone of both medical surveillance and the diagnosis of BeS and CBD. A confirmed abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test without evidence of lung disease is diagnostic of BeS. BeS with evidence of a granulomatous inflammatory response in the lung is diagnostic of CBD. The determinants of progression from BeS to CBD are uncertain, but higher exposures and the presence of a genetic variant in the HLA-DP β chain appear to increase the risk. Periodic evaluation of affected individuals can detect disease progression (from BeS to CBD, or from mild CBD to more severe CBD). Corticosteroid therapy is typically administered when a patient with CBD exhibits evidence of significant lung function abnormality or decline. Medical surveillance in workplaces that use beryllium-containing materials can identify individuals with BeS and at-risk groups of workers, which can help prioritize efforts to reduce inhalational and dermal exposures.

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Evaluation and Management of Asthma in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Skloot, Gwen S; Busse, Paula J; Braman, Sidney S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Dixon, Anne E; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Scichilone, Nicola; Prakash, Y S; Pabelick, Christina M; Mathur, Sameer K; Hanania, Nicola A; Moore, Wendy C; Gibson, Peter G; Zieman, Susan; Ragless, Betina B

    2016-11-01

    Asthma in the elderly (>65 yr old) is common and associated with higher morbidity and mortality than asthma in younger patients. The poor outcomes in this group are due, in part, to underdiagnosis and undertreatment. There are a variety of factors related to aging itself that affect the presentation of asthma in the elderly and influence diagnosis and management. Structural changes in the aging lung superimposed on structural changes due to asthma itself can worsen the disease and physiologic function. Changes in the aging immune system influence the cellular composition and function in asthmatic airways. These processes and differences from younger individuals with asthma are not well understood. Phenotypes of asthma in the elderly have not been clearly delineated, but it is likely that age of onset and overlap with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impact disease characteristics. Physiologic tests and biomarkers used to diagnose and follow asthma in the elderly are generally similar to testing in younger individuals; however, whether they should be modified in aging has not been established. Confounding influences, such as comorbidities (increasing the risk of polypharmacy), impaired cognition and motor skills, psychosocial effects of aging, and age-related adverse effects of medications, impact both diagnosis and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Future efforts to understand asthma in the elderly must include geriatric-specific methodology to diagnose, characterize, monitor, and treat their disease.

  11. Red blood cell exchange: 2015 American Society for Apheresis consensus conference on the management of patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ravi; Ballas, Samir K; Garcia, Alicia; Kim, Haewon C; King, Karen; Sachais, Bruce; Williams, Lance A

    2016-10-09

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) conducted a one-day consensus conference on red blood cell exchange (RBCx) in sickle cell disease (SCD) during its annual meeting in San Antonio, TX, on May 5, 2015. The authors of this article, a subcommittee of ASFA's Clinical Applications Committee, developed several questions with regard to pathophysiology of SCD and use of RBCx in the management of various complications. These questions were provided to the seven invited speakers who are the experts in the field of SCD. Two experts in the field moderated the proceedings of the conference, which was attended by more than 150 participants. After each presentation, there was a summary of the main points by the moderators and an open discussion with questions from the audience. A video recording of the proceedings, as well as each presentation, was made available to the authors. Each author's summary was reviewed and approved by the respective speaker before submission of this manuscript. The subcommittee also developed several key questions to generate a consensus amongst the speakers on key issues for using RBCx for patients with SCD.

  12. Identification and management of mental health issues by dermatologic surgeons: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Sobanko, Joseph F; Beer, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologists have long been interested in mental health issues of their patients. Some psychosocial distress likely motivates the pursuit of cosmetic dermatologic treatments. However, a percentage of patients seeking treatment suffer from significant psychopathology, such as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which may contraindicate treatment. To assess dermatologic surgeons' strategies for identification and management of mental health issues among patients seeking cosmetic procedures. A survey was sent to 2,855 practicing members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery by e-mail. Two hundred sixty members completed the survey (9.1%). Approximately, 60% of respondents indicated that they ask new patients about psychiatric treatment history, and 92% reported that they have declined to provide a cosmetic treatment because of concerns about mental health status. Most (94%) indicated that they were aware of BDD, and 62% indicated that they refused to treat a patient believed to have BDD. Respondents estimated that 13% of new patients had BDD and 63% considered BDD to be a contraindication to treatment. Approximately 60% of dermatologic surgeons inquire about the mental health issues of their cosmetic patients. Most are aware of BDD, but less than two-thirds consider it a contraindication to treatment.

  13. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGCT! Job Bank Donate Media The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members are scientists, physicians, patient advocates, and other ...

  14. The Black Man in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Framingham Public Schools, MA.

    GRADE OR AGES: Junior high school. SUBJECT MATTER: The black man in American society. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four major parts each with an overview. The four parts concern a) the African heritage of the black man, b) the American exploitation of the black man, c) the black man's contribution to American society, d) the…

  15. Breast cancer follow-up and management after primary treatment: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James L; Hurley, Patricia; Bantug, Elissa; Esserman, Laura J; Grunfeld, Eva; Halberg, Francine; Hantel, Alexander; Henry, N Lynn; Muss, Hyman B; Smith, Thomas J; Vogel, Victor G; Wolff, Antonio C; Somerfield, Mark R; Davidson, Nancy E

    2013-03-01

    To provide recommendations on the follow-up and management of patients with breast cancer who have completed primary therapy with curative intent. To update the 2006 guideline of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), a systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through March 2012 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Committee reviewed the evidence to determine whether the recommendations were in need of updating. There were 14 new publications that met inclusion criteria: nine systematic reviews (three included meta-analyses) and five randomized controlled trials. After its review and analysis of the evidence, the Update Committee concluded that no revisions to the existing ASCO recommendations were warranted. Regular history, physical examination, and mammography are recommended for breast cancer follow-up. Physical examinations should be performed every 3 to 6 months for the first 3 years, every 6 to 12 months for years 4 and 5, and annually thereafter. For women who have undergone breast-conserving surgery, a post-treatment mammogram should be obtained 1 year after the initial mammogram and at least 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. Thereafter, unless otherwise indicated, a yearly mammographic evaluation should be performed. The use of complete blood counts, chemistry panels, bone scans, chest radiographs, liver ultrasounds, pelvic ultrasounds, computed tomography scans, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 15-3, and CA 27.29) is not recommended for routine follow-up in an otherwise asymptomatic patient with no specific findings on clinical examination.

  16. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass--Temperature Management During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Likosky, Donald S; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including: 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendations: CLASS I RECOMMENDATIONS: a)The oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is recommended to be utilized as a surrogate for cerebral temperature measurement during CPB. (Class I, Level C) b)To monitor cerebral perfusate temperature during warming, it should be assumed that the oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature under-estimates cerebral perfusate temperature. (Class I, Level C) c)Surgical teams should limit arterial outlet blood temperature to<37°C to avoid cerebral hyperthermia. (Class 1, Level C) d)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB cooling should not exceed 10°C to avoid generation of gaseous emboli. (Class 1, Level C) e)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB rewarming should not exceed 10°C to avoid out-gassing when blood is returned to the patient. (Class 1, Level C) CLASS IIa a)Pulmonary artery or nasopharyngeal temperature recording is reasonable for weaning and immediate post-bypass temperature measurement. (Class IIa, Level C)b)Rewarming when arterial blood outlet temperature ≥30° C: i.To achieve the desired temperature for separation from bypass, it is reasonable to maintain a temperature gradient between

  17. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Member Resources Careers About History Bylaws Society Leadership Awards CME Mission and Goals Annual Report ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  18. Joseph Henry and the American Philosophical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Walter E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the extent to which Henry was affiliated with the Society and its influence on his work including his evolving relationship with the Society in the scope of the changing nature of American scientific institutions. (DF)

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. Management of Adults With Acute Migraine in the Emergency Department: The American Headache Society Evidence Assessment of Parenteral Pharmacotherapies.

    PubMed

    Orr, Serena L; Friedman, Benjamin W; Christie, Suzanne; Minen, Mia T; Bamford, Cynthia; Kelley, Nancy E; Tepper, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    To provide evidence-based treatment recommendations for adults with acute migraine who require treatment with injectable medication in an emergency department (ED). We addressed two clinically relevant questions: (1) Which injectable medications should be considered first-line treatment for adults who present to an ED with acute migraine? (2) Do parenteral corticosteroids prevent recurrence of migraine in adults discharged from an ED? The American Headache Society convened an expert panel of authors who defined a search strategy and then performed a search of Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database and clinical trial registries from inception through 2015. Identified articles were rated using the American Academy of Neurology's risk of bias tool. For each medication, the expert panel determined likelihood of efficacy. Recommendations were created accounting for efficacy, adverse events, availability of alternate therapies, and principles of medication action. The search identified 68 unique randomized controlled trials utilizing 28 injectable medications. Of these, 19 were rated class 1 (low risk of bias), 21 were rated class 2 (higher risk of bias), and 28 were rated class 3 (highest risk of bias). Metoclopramide, prochlorperazine, and sumatriptan each had multiple class 1 studies supporting acute efficacy, as did dexamethasone for prevention of headache recurrence. All other medications had lower levels of evidence. Intravenous metoclopramide and prochlorperazine, and subcutaneous sumatriptan should be offered to eligible adults who present to an ED with acute migraine (Should offer-Level B). Dexamethasone should be offered to these patients to prevent recurrence of headache (Should offer-Level B). Because of lack of evidence demonstrating efficacy and concern about sub-acute or long-term sequelae, injectable morphine and hydromorphone are best avoided as first-line therapy (May avoid-Level C). © 2016 American Headache Society.

  1. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    taTME Study Info Foundation SAGES.TV MyCME Educational Activities SAGES Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons Advanced Search Home SAGES Home SAGES Foundation About Donate to ...

  2. American Society of Radiologic Technologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Details To Our Members Affected by the Hurricanes More Info Educators Students Volunteers Affiliates Managers News ASRT Donates $10,000 in Support of Hurricane Maria Relief Efforts Sep 29, 2017 Abstracts Accepted ...

  3. Management of the Potential Organ Donor in the ICU: Society of Critical Care Medicine/American College of Chest Physicians/Association of Organ Procurement Organizations Consensus Statement.

    PubMed

    Kotloff, Robert M; Blosser, Sandralee; Fulda, Gerard J; Malinoski, Darren; Ahya, Vivek N; Angel, Luis; Byrnes, Matthew C; DeVita, Michael A; Grissom, Thomas E; Halpern, Scott D; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Stock, Peter G; Sudan, Debra L; Wood, Kenneth E; Anillo, Sergio J; Bleck, Thomas P; Eidbo, Elling E; Fowler, Richard A; Glazier, Alexandra K; Gries, Cynthia; Hasz, Richard; Herr, Dan; Khan, Akhtar; Landsberg, David; Lebovitz, Daniel J; Levine, Deborah Jo; Mathur, Mudit; Naik, Priyumvada; Niemann, Claus U; Nunley, David R; O'Connor, Kevin J; Pelletier, Shawn J; Rahman, Omar; Ranjan, Dinesh; Salim, Ali; Sawyer, Robert G; Shafer, Teresa; Sonneti, David; Spiro, Peter; Valapour, Maryam; Vikraman-Sushama, Deepak; Whelan, Timothy P M

    2015-06-01

    This document was developed through the collaborative efforts of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations. Under the auspices of these societies, a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional task force was convened, incorporating expertise in critical care medicine, organ donor management, and transplantation. Members of the task force were divided into 13 subcommittees, each focused on one of the following general or organ-specific areas: death determination using neurologic criteria, donation after circulatory death determination, authorization process, general contraindications to donation, hemodynamic management, endocrine dysfunction and hormone replacement therapy, pediatric donor management, cardiac donation, lung donation, liver donation, kidney donation, small bowel donation, and pancreas donation. Subcommittees were charged with generating a series of management-related questions related to their topic. For each question, subcommittees provided a summary of relevant literature and specific recommendations. The specific recommendations were approved by all members of the task force and then assembled into a complete document. Because the available literature was overwhelmingly comprised of observational studies and case series, representing low-quality evidence, a decision was made that the document would assume the form of a consensus statement rather than a formally graded guideline. The goal of this document is to provide critical care practitioners with essential information and practical recommendations related to management of the potential organ donor, based on the available literature and expert consensus.

  4. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ronald C; Rumble, R Bryan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Ehdaie, Behfar; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Morgan, Scott C; Tyldesley, Scott; Haluschak, John J; Tan, Winston; Justman, Stewart; Jain, Suneil

    2016-06-20

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline, published in May 2015, are clear, thorough, and based upon the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline with added qualifying statements. The Cancer Care Ontario recommendation regarding 5-alpha reductase inhibitors was not endorsed by the ASCO panel. For most patients with low-risk (Gleason score ≤ 6) localized prostate cancer, active surveillance is the recommended disease management strategy. Factors including younger age, prostate cancer volume, patient preference, and ethnicity should be taken into account when making management decisions. Select patients with low-volume, intermediate-risk (Gleason 3 + 4 = 7) prostate cancer may be offered active surveillance. Active surveillance protocols should include prostate-specific antigen testing, digital rectal examinations, and serial prostate biopsies. Ancillary radiologic and genomic tests are investigational but may have a role in patients with discordant clinical and/or pathologic findings. Patients who are reclassified to a higher-risk category (Gleason score ≥ 7) or who have significant increases in tumor volume on subsequent biopsies should be offered active therapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  6. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  7. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna M; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R; Chelmow, David; Herzig, Abbe; Kim, Jane J; Kinney, Walter; Herschel, W Lawson; Waldman, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16/18 infections.

  8. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  9. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-04-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  10. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

  11. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

  12. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management. Differences Between the European and American Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Recommendations on disease management for patients with advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Naren; Temin, Sarah; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Crews, Jennie R; Davidson, Nancy E; Esteva, Francisco J; Giordano, Sharon H; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Krop, Ian; Levinson, Jennifer; Modi, Shanu; Patt, Debra A; Perez, Edith A; Perlmutter, Jane; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2014-07-01

    To provide formal expert consensus-based recommendations to practicing oncologists and others on the management of brain metastases for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive advanced breast cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy experts and conducted a systematic review of the literature. When that failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence, the Expert Panel undertook a formal expert consensus-based process to produce these recommendations. ASCO used a modified Delphi process. The panel members drafted recommendations, and a group of other experts joined them for two rounds of formal ratings of the recommendations. No studies or existing guidelines met the systematic review criteria; therefore, ASCO conducted a formal expert consensus-based process. Patients with brain metastases should receive appropriate local therapy and systemic therapy, if indicated. Local therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. Treatments depend on factors such as patient prognosis, presence of symptoms, resectability, number and size of metastases, prior therapy, and whether metastases are diffuse. Other options include systemic therapy, best supportive care, enrollment onto a clinical trial, and/or palliative care. Clinicians should not perform routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for brain metastases, but rather should have a low threshold for MRI of the brain because of the high incidence of brain metastases among patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Higher Education in American Society. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 16 essays explore the effects and implications of the changing relationship between external societal influences and academic institutions in the United States. A foreword by Clark Kerr is entitled, "American Society Turns More Assertive: A New Century Approaches for Higher Education in the United States." The essays…

  15. The Academic System in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touraine, Alain

    Although the American system of higher education has been concerned with developing its own unity as a social institution, this book demonstrates that the system has always remained sensitive to three societal factors. There are the changing needs of society; the struggles for control over the sources of culture, knowledge and power within…

  16. Recollections and Reflections: The American Montessori Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravel, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some of his recollections around the birth of the American Montessori Society (AMS), beginning in the 1950s. He explains the way AMS evolved in its earliest days which reveals something of who its members are now and how they have been part of the 50-year journey. He adds that by recounting the past, members of…

  17. 2013 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards Including Standards for the Safe Administration and Management of Oral Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neuss, Michael N.; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R.; LeFebvre, Kristine B.; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards. PMID:23914148

  18. Consensus recommendations from the American acne & rosacea society on the management of rosacea, part 4: a status report on physical modalities and devices.

    PubMed

    Tanghetti, Emil; Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The fourth article in this 5-part series reviews physical modalities and devices used to treat cutaneous rosacea based on consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. The major therapeutic uses of physical modalities and devices, especially laser and light-based systems, are for treatment of telangiectases and persistent facial erythema (background erythema). Phymas, especially rhinophyma, also are treated with physical modalities such as ablative lasers or surgical devices (eg, electrosurgical loop). Appropriately selected and properly used lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) devices can successfully address specific clinical manifestations of rosacea that exhibit limited or no response to available medical therapies, such as telangiectases and background centrofacial erythema. Rosacea-associated symptoms also may improve. In most cases, treatment will need to be repeated intermittently to sustain improvement.

  19. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 3: a status report on systemic therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The third article in this 5-part series reviews systemic therapies used to treat cutaneous rosacea based on consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. The consensus recommendations are based on current understanding of research that describes pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to be operative in rosacea, correlation of these underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms with specific clinical manifestations of rosacea, and outcomes from clinical trials that evaluate therapies for rosacea both as monotherapy and in combination with other agents. Systemic agents used for treatment of rosacea have been administered as oral formulations (ie, tablets, capsules). The only oral agent for rosacea approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a modified-release doxycycline 40-mg capsule. Other non-FDA-approved oral agents also are discussed including other tetracyclines, macrolides, metronidazole, and isotretinoin.

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Multidisciplinary Cancer Management Course: Connecting Lives, Cancer Care, Education, and Compassion in Zimbabwe-A Pilot for Efforts of Sustainable Benefit?

    PubMed

    Ndarukwa, Sandra; Nyakabau, Anna Mary; Chagpar, Anees B; Raben, David; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Kadzatsa, Webster; Eaton, Vanessa J; Mafunda, Paida; Razis, Evangelia

    2017-08-01

    The burden of cancer in low- to middle-income countries is growing and is expected to rise dramatically while resources to manage this disease remain inadequate. All authorities for the management of cancer recommend multidisciplinary care. Educational efforts by international organizations to assist local professionals in caring for their patients tend to have a lasting impact because they empower local professionals and enhance their skills. A multidisciplinary cancer management course was designed by American Society of Clinical Oncology staff and local experts to provide a roadmap for cross-specialty interaction and coordination of care in Zimbabwe. The outcome of the course was measured through feedback obtained from participants and impact on local workforce. The cancer management course was relevant to daily practice and fostered long-lasting partnerships and collaborations. Furthermore, it resulted in a more motivated local workforce and strengthened existing multidisciplinary practices. Cancer care is in a critical state in low- to middle-income countries. Educational efforts and collaborative partnerships may provide a cost-effective strategy with sustainable benefits. A multidisciplinary approach to optimize therapy is desirable. Evaluation of the course impact after a period of 6 months to 1 year is needed to determine the sustainability and impact of such efforts.

  1. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [Spanish interdisciplinary committee for cardiovascular disease prevention and the spanish society of cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and american guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-04-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier España.

  4. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: tobacco control initiatives within the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Bailey, William C; Carlsen, Kai-Häkon; Eisner, Mark D; Folan, Patricia; Heath, Janie; Klinnert, Mary D; Kovesi, Tom; Pien, Grace W; Reichart, Virginia C; Talwar, Arunabh; Thompson, Katherine

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoking represents the single most preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States and the burden of tobacco use is apparent world-wide. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death in the United States in 2004. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and its members have contributed significantly to an understanding of the biological and pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the development and management of tobacco-attributable disease and disability. The society's active involvement in tobacco control advocacy and policy-related initiatives are central to its mission. Within the ATS, there is also increased interest in accelerating the society's efforts to understand the mechanisms responsible for the uptake, persistence, and cessation of tobacco use. Scientific, clinical, and educational activities that include an examination of these underlying mechanisms are warranted. This paper describes findings from an ATS initiative that developed a preliminary strategy for enhancing scientific, clinical, educational, and policy-related tobacco control efforts that are consistent with the vision of the ATS. The specific aims of this project included the identification of existing mechanisms, as well as the current governance in place within the ATS infrastructure, to address tobacco control issues related to scientific inquiry, policy initiatives, and advocacy for tobacco control. This assessment generated recommendations to inform the ATS leadership with regard to the future development of relevant tobacco control initiatives.

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, 1971 Courtesy, National Geographic Society LIBRARY, 1971 - Townsend House, 2121 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Occurrence of adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast material and management of patients at increased risk: a survey of the American Society of Neuroradiology Fellowship Directors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K P; Szopinski, K T; Cohan, R H; Mermillod, B; Ellis, J H

    1999-11-01

    The authors attempted to determine the frequency and severity of adverse reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents and to identify strategies for management of patients at increased risk. American Society of Neuroradiology program directors were surveyed about adverse reactions at their institutions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, the contrast agents responsible, and the management of patients with allergy-like reactions to iodinated or gadolinium-based agents who required MR contrast agent administration. Fifty-three (50.5%) surveys were received from 105 centers. Of 687,255 gadopentetate dimeglumine injections, 314 (0.046%) nonallergic reactions and 107 (0.016%) mild, 28 (0.004%) moderate, and five (0.001%) severe allergy-like reactions occurred. Of 74,275 gadodiamide injections, 11 (0.015%) nonallergic and 12 (0.016%) mild allergy-like reactions occurred. Of 64,005 gadoteridol administrations, 171 (0.267%) nonallergic reactions and 49 (0.077%) mild, 29 (0.047%) moderate, and 11 (0.017%) severe allergy-like reactions occurred. Twenty-six departments took no precautions for patients with previous allergy-like reactions to iodinated contrast material. Nineteen did not premedicate patients who previously had reactions to gadolinium-based agents before repeat administration of MR contrast agents. Although MR contrast agents are safe, adverse reactions occur. Many centers have not adopted policies for the OFF

  7. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women.

  8. Screening, assessment, and management of fatigue in adult survivors of cancer: an American Society of Clinical oncology clinical practice guideline adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bower, Julienne E; Bak, Kate; Berger, Ann; Breitbart, William; Escalante, Carmelita P; Ganz, Patricia A; Schnipper, Hester Hill; Lacchetti, Christina; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Lyman, Gary H; Ogaily, Mohammed S; Pirl, William F; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2014-06-10

    This guideline presents screening, assessment, and treatment approaches for the management of adult cancer survivors who are experiencing symptoms of fatigue after completion of primary treatment. A systematic search of clinical practice guideline databases, guideline developer Web sites, and published health literature identified the pan-Canadian guideline on screening, assessment, and care of cancer-related fatigue in adults with cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Cancer-Related Fatigue and the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship. These three guidelines were appraised and selected for adaptation. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for the presence of fatigue after completion of primary treatment and be offered specific information and strategies for fatigue management. For those who report moderate to severe fatigue, comprehensive assessment should be conducted, and medical and treatable contributing factors should be addressed. In terms of treatment strategies, evidence indicates that physical activity interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing this distressing symptom. Given the multiple factors contributing to post-treatment fatigue, interventions should be tailored to each patient's specific needs. In particular, a number of nonpharmacologic treatment approaches have demonstrated efficacy in cancer survivors. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 2: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-11-01

    In part 1 of this 3-part series, an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women was provided. Proper selection and integration of skin care products is important in the management of AV in this patient population. Part 2 of this series includes a discussion of over-the-counter and prescription topical therapies for adult women with AV. A summary of key randomized controlled trials also is provided. Further well-designed studies are needed, as data on the use of topical agents in this subpopulation are limited.

  10. American neurophysiology and two nineteenth-century American Physiological Societies.

    PubMed

    Lazar, J Wayne

    2017-01-01

    This article contrasts two American Physiological Societies, one founded near the beginning of the nineteenth century in 1837 and the other founded near its end in 1887. The contrast allows a perspective on how much budding neuroscience had developed during the nineteenth century in America. The contrast also emphasizes the complicated structure needed in both medicine and physiology to allow neurophysiology to flourish. The objectives of the American Physiological Society of 1887 were (and are) to promote physiological research and to codify physiology as a discipline. These would be accomplished by making physiology much more inclusive than traditionally accepted by raising research standards, by giving prestige to its members, by providing members a source of professional interchange, by protecting its members from antivivisectionists, and by promoting physiology as fundamental to medicine. The quantity of neuroscientific experiments by its members was striking. The main organizers of the society were Silas Weir Mitchell, John Call Dalton, Henry Pickering Bowditch, and Henry Newell Martin. The objective of the American Physiological Society of 1837 was to disperse knowledge of the "laws of life" and to promote human health and longevity. The primary organizers were William Andrus Alcott and Sylvester Graham with the encouragement of John Benson. Its technique was to use physiological information, not create it as was the case in 1887. Its object was to disseminate the word that healthy eating will improve the quality of life.

  11. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  12. North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology

    MedlinePlus

    ... removeClass('notactive'); autoPlay();}); }); About NASPAG The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG), founded in ... Bayer/NASPAG Young Investigator Grant The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG) has partnered ...

  13. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of pulmonary hypertension of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Machado, Roberto F; Barst, Robyn J; Morris, Claudia R; Mubarak, Kamal K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kato, Gregory J; Ataga, Kenneth I; Gibbs, J Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C; Telen, Marilyn J; Decastro, Laura M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H; Badesch, David B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2014-03-15

    In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating.

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Diagnosis, Risk Stratification, and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Machado, Roberto F.; Barst, Robyn J.; Morris, Claudia R.; Mubarak, Kamal K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Kato, Gregory J.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Gibbs, J. Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C.; Telen, Marilyn J.; DeCastro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H.; Badesch, David B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. Methods: A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Results: Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Conclusions: Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating. PMID:24628312

  15. Database Management: Building, Changing and Using Databases. Collected Papers and Abstracts of the Mid-Year Meeting of the American Society for Information Science (15th, Portland, Oregon, May 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Information Science, Washington, DC.

    This document contains abstracts of papers on database design and management which were presented at the 1986 mid-year meeting of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS). Topics considered include: knowledge representation in a bilingual art history database; proprietary database design; relational database design; in-house databases;…

  16. Database Management: Building, Changing and Using Databases. Collected Papers and Abstracts of the Mid-Year Meeting of the American Society for Information Science (15th, Portland, Oregon, May 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Information Science, Washington, DC.

    This document contains abstracts of papers on database design and management which were presented at the 1986 mid-year meeting of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS). Topics considered include: knowledge representation in a bilingual art history database; proprietary database design; relational database design; in-house databases;…

  17. An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: classification, evaluation, and management of childhood interstitial lung disease in infancy.

    PubMed

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R; Hagood, James S; Young, Lisa R; Brody, Alan S; Castile, Robert G; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M; Redding, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient's or family's quality of life, and death. No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having "childhood ILD syndrome"; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential.

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

  19. American Radium Society 92nd Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Jani, Ashesh B; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff J; Sawaya, Raymond; Wilson, Lynn D

    2010-08-01

    We provide a summary of the 92nd Annual Meeting of the American Radium Society (ARS), the oldest organization devoted to the study of cancer. This May 2010 meeting included a postgraduate course/contouring laboratory, seven scientific sessions, two keynote lectures, one Janeway lecture, four Panel presentations, one debate, one satellite symposium and 107 poster presentations--details of each of these activities are provided. All of these academic activities revolved around the major meeting theme of 'Improved Outcomes Through Judicious Applications of Advanced Technology'.

  20. Management and Care of Women With Invasive Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Linus T.; Temin, Sarah; Camacho, Rolando; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Feldman, Sarah; Gultekin, Murat; Gupta, Vandana; Horton, Susan; Jacob, Graciela; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Lishimpi, Kennedy; Nakisige, Carolyn; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Small, William; Thomas, Gillian; Berek, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based, resource-stratified global recommendations to clinicians and policymakers on the management and palliative care of women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer. Methods ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of cancer control, medical and radiation oncology, health economic, obstetric and gynecologic, and palliative care experts to produce recommendations reflecting resource-tiered settings. A systematic review of literature from 1966 to 2015 failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence to support basic- and limited-resource setting recommendations; a formal consensus-based process was used to develop recommendations. A modified ADAPTE process was also used to adapt recommendations from existing guidelines. Results Five existing sets of guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Eight systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided indirect evidence to inform the consensus process, which resulted in agreement of 75% or greater. Recommendations Clinicians and planners should strive to provide access to the most effective evidence-based antitumor and palliative care interventions. If a woman cannot access these within her own or neighboring country or region, she may need to be treated with lower-tier modalities, depending on capacity and resources for surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and supportive and palliative care. For women with early-stage cervical cancer in basic settings, cone biopsy or extrafascial hysterectomy may be performed. Fertility-sparing procedures or modified radical or radical hysterectomy may be additional options in nonbasic settings. Combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (including brachytherapy) should be used for women with stage IB to IVA disease, depending on available resources. Pain control is a vital component of palliative care. Additional information is available at www

  1. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care.

  2. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care. PMID:21804069

  3. American Nuclear Society exchanges of information

    SciTech Connect

    Du Temple, O.J.

    2000-07-01

    Many are familiar with the technical journals and other publications that American Nuclear Society (ANS) members receive. However, there is a whole series of documents that is helpful to any nuclear society group for a modest fee or no fee. The author is referring to documents such as the ANS Bylaws and Rules, which have been made available to almost every existing nuclear society in the world. He remembers working with groups from Russia, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, France, Germany, and others when they sought the experience of ANS in establishing a society. Financial planning guides are available for meetings, international conferences, technical expositions, and teacher workshops. Periodically, the ANS publishes position papers on the uses and handling of fuel materials and other publications helpful to public relations and teacher training courses. A few have had distributions in the hundreds of thousands, and one went as high as 750,000. Some of these have been translated in part into Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japanese. Nuclear Standards are developed by a series of ANS committees consisting of about 1000 experts--the largest technical operation of ANS. Buyers guides and directories are very helpful in promoting the commerce in the nuclear industry. The Utility Directory covers utilities all over the globe. Radwaste Solutions, the new name for the former Radwaste Magazine, covers the efforts made by all sectors--private, government, and utility--to deal with radioactive waste. In the author's opinion, the one area in which all societies are weak is in interfacing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since his retirement 9 yr ago, he has become much more aware of the IAEA as a news and technical information source. The ANS is trying to be more aware of what the IAEA is doing for everyone.

  4. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  5. Opioids in the management of chronic non-cancer pain: an update of American Society of the Interventional Pain Physicians' (ASIPP) Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Trescot, Andrea M; Helm, Standiford; Hansen, Hans; Benyamin, Ramsin; Glaser, Scott E; Adlaka, Rajive; Patel, Samir; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2008-03-01

    Opioid abuse has continued to increase at an alarming rate since our last opioid guidelines were published in 2005. Available evidence suggests a continued wide variance in the use of opioids, as documented by different medical specialties, medical boards, advocacy groups, and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The objectives of opioid guidelines by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) are to provide guidance for the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain, to bring consistency in opioid philosophy among the many diverse groups involved, to improve the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain, and to reduce the incidence of abuse and drug diversion. A broadly based policy committee of recognized experts in the field evaluated the available literature regarding opioid use in managing chronic non-cancer pain. This resulted in the formulation of the review and update of the guidelines published in 2006, a series of potential evidence linkages representing conclusions, followed by statements regarding the relationships between clinical interventions and outcomes. The elements of the guideline preparation process included literature searches, literature synthesis, consensus evaluation, open forum presentations, formal endorsement by the Board of Directors of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, and peer review. Based on the criteria of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the quality of evidence was designated as Level I, II, and III, with 3 subcategories in Level II, with Level I described as strong and Level III as indeterminate. The recommendations were provided from 1A to 2C, varying from strong recommendation with high quality evidence to weak recommendation with low-quality or very low-quality evidence. After an extensive review and analysis of the literature, which included systematic reviews and all of the available literature, the evidence for the effectiveness of long-term opioids in reducing

  6. American contact dermatitis society core allergen series.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Dunnick, Cory A; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce; Warshaw, Erin; Mowad, Christen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of patch testing and the need for an expanded series that provides experience and evidence-based suggestions for an extended patch testing series are examined in this review. Many of those testing with shorter allergen series are interested in expanding the spectrum of patch testing. The American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) Core Allergen Series Group has arranged a group of suggested allergen groups that can be logically scaled up or down depending on the needs of the patch tester and the community being tested. This is not an "ACDS 80 Standard." We suggest a core group of allergens similar to the TRUE Test (SmartPractice, Phoenix, Ariz) with subsequent trays providing a greater breadth of coverage in a logical fashion, with more likely allergens being higher in the tray. For more extensive testing, specialty trays (ie, cosmetics, metals, plant, etc) are recommended.

  7. 73rd American Welding Society annual meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The volume includes the abstracts of papers presented at the 73rd American Welding Society Annual Meeting. Detailed summaries are given for 118 technical sessions papers discussing computer and control applications in welding, stainless steel, nickel and nickel alloys, weld metal microstructure, shipbuilding, consumables, structural welding, investigations in arc welding and cutting, arc welding processes, weldability testing, piping and tubing, high energy beam welding processes, welding metallurgy of structural steels, new applications, weld metal behavior, NDT certification, aluminum welding, submerged arc welding, modeling studies, resistance welding, friction welding, and safety and health. The 23rd International AWS Brazing and Soldering Conference was also held during this meeting. The topics presented in 24 papers included recent developments in soldering technology, brazing of stainless steel, brazing of ceramics and nickel material, filler metal developments for torch brazing, and developments in diffusion and induction brazing.

  8. American Meteorological Society Embraces Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert; Fisher, Genene

    2011-02-01

    Eight years ago, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) tentatively reached out to the space weather community by scheduling a day-and-a-half Space Weather Symposium (SWS) at its Annual Meeting. That symposium included briefings from operational and research agencies involved with space weather as well as a variety of talks targeting areas of interest common to meteorology and space weather. Topics included data assimilation, connections between the lower and upper atmosphere, new space weather sensors and models, and the economic and social impacts of space weather. That highly successful symposium led to a follow-on SWS every year at the AMS Annual Meeting. These meetings, combined with the release of an AMS policy statement on space weather (see http://www.ametsoc.org/policy/2008spaceweather_amsstatement.html and Fisher [2008]) and related studies in the AMS Policy Program, led the AMS Council to vote on making the space weather discipline a regular part of the society by creating a new Space Weather Committee for the Scientific and Technological Activities Commission (STAC) (http://www.ametsoc.org/stacpges/CommitteeDisplay/CommitteeDisplay.aspx?CC=SW). This is AMS's first new STAC committee in 20 years.

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2006 update of the breast cancer follow-up and management guidelines in the adjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James L; Wolff, Antonio C; Smith, Thomas J; Grunfeld, Eva; Muss, Hyman B; Vogel, Victor G; Halberg, Francine; Somerfield, Mark R; Davidson, Nancy E

    2006-11-01

    To update the 1999 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline on breast cancer follow-up and management in the adjuvant setting. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed pertinent information from the literature through March 2006. More weight was given to studies that tested a hypothesis directly relating testing to one of the primary outcomes in a randomized design. The evidence supports regular history, physical examination, and mammography as the cornerstone of appropriate breast cancer follow-up. All patients should have a careful history and physical examination performed by a physician experienced in the surveillance of cancer patients and in breast examination. Examinations should be performed every 3 to 6 months for the first 3 years, every 6 to 12 months for years 4 and 5, and annually thereafter. For those who have undergone breast-conserving surgery, a post-treatment mammogram should be obtained 1 year after the initial mammogram and at least 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. Thereafter, unless otherwise indicated, a yearly mammographic evaluation should be performed. Patients at high risk for familial breast cancer syndromes should be referred for genetic counseling. The use of CBCs, chemistry panels, bone scans, chest radiographs, liver ultrasounds, computed tomography scans, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, or tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 15-3, and CA 27.29) is not recommended for routine breast cancer follow-up in an otherwise asymptomatic patient with no specific findings on clinical examination. Careful history taking, physical examination, and regular mammography are recommended for appropriate detection of breast cancer recurrence.

  10. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1875 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  11. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1885 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  12. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy: Credit: Nevada Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy: Credit: Nevada Historical Society FORMER COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE, JUNE 13, 1900 - Nevada State Capitol, Plaza at Carson Street, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  13. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  14. Cigarette smoking and health. American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    1996-02-01

    Cigarette smoking remains the primary cause of preventable death and morbidity in the United States. Smoking causes lung cancer, COPD, and CHD and contributes significantly to mortality from other conditions such as stroke. Maternal smoking during pregnancy causes low birthweight and perinatal mortality, and it may have lasting impact on the child's physical and cognitive growth. Passive exposure to ETS causes lung cancer and poses particular danger to the respiratory health of young children. Smoking cessation strategies are important, but the should be supplemented by community and policy-level interventions. Workplace or community smoking bans, statewide taxes on tobacco, and antismoking media campaigns may be effective adjuncts to individual cessation strategies. These strategies may be an even more important disincentive to smoking initiation. The expanding horizon of health consequences of smoking and its costs to American society should again challenge public health agencies to develop and implement effective strategies to prevent smoking acquisition by young people. These health effects should also motivate health professionals in other countries where smoking prevalence is increasing, rather than decreasing, to initiate more effective efforts to reverse this trend and minimize the excess morbidity and death that accompany this dangerous habit.

  15. The role of interdisciplinary team approach in the management of the diabetic foot: a joint statement from the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Podiatric Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Sumpio, Bauer E; Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A; Andros, George

    2010-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) recognize the beneficial impact of a multidisciplinary team approach on the care of patients with critical limb ischemia, especially in the diabetic population. As a first step in identifying clinical issues and questions important to both memberships, and to work together to find solutions that will benefit the shared patient, the two organizations appointed a representative group to write a joint statement on the importance of multidisciplinary team approach to the care of the diabetic foot.

  16. The role of interdisciplinary team approach in the management of the diabetic foot: a joint statement from the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Podiatric Medical Association.

    PubMed

    Sumpio, Bauer E; Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A; Andros, George

    2010-01-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) recognize the beneficial impact of a multidisciplinary team approach on the care of patients with critical limb ischemia, especially in the diabetic population. As a first step in identifying clinical issues and questions important to both memberships, and to work together to find solutions that will benefit the shared patient, the two organizations appointed a representative group to write a joint statement on the importance of multidisciplinary team approach to the care of the diabetic foot.

  17. NRAO Astronomer Honored by American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), received the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) Helen B. Warner Prize on January 11, at the society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. The prize is awarded annually for "a significant contribution to observational or theoretical astronomy during the five years preceding the award." Presented by AAS President Debra Elmegreen, the prize recognized Ransom "for his astrophysical insight and innovative technical leadership enabling the discovery of exotic, millisecond and young pulsars and their application for tests of fundamental physics." "Scott has made landmark contributions to our understanding of pulsars and to using them as elegant tools for investigating important areas of fundamental physics. We are very proud that his scientific colleagues have recognized his efforts with this prize," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. A staff astronomer at the NRAO since 2004, Ransom has led efforts using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope and other facilities to study pulsars and use them to make advances in areas of frontier astrophysics such as gravitational waves and particle physics. In 2010, he was on a team that discovered the most massive pulsar yet known, a finding that had implications for the composition of pulsars and details of nuclear physics, gravitational waves, and gamma-ray bursts. Ransom also is a leader in efforts to find and analyze rapidly-rotating millisecond pulsars to make the first direct detection of the gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein. In other work, he has advanced observational capabilities for finding millisecond pulsars in globular clusters of stars and investigated how millisecond pulsars are formed. A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, Ransom served as an artillery officer in the U.S. Army. After leaving the Army, he earned a Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2001, and was a postdoctoral fellow

  18. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal. A meta-analysis and evidence-based practice guideline. American Society of Addiction Medicine Working Group on Pharmacological Management of Alcohol Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Smith, M F

    1997-07-09

    To provide an evidence-based practice guideline on the pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal. English-language articles published before July 1, 1995, identified through MEDLINE search on "substance withdrawal--ethyl alcohol" and review of references from identified articles. Articles with original data on human subjects. Structured review to determine study design, sample size, interventions used, and outcomes of withdrawal severity, delirium, seizures, completion of withdrawal, entry into rehabilitation, adverse effects, and costs. Data from prospective controlled trials with methodologically sound end points corresponding to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, were abstracted by 2 independent reviewers and underwent meta-analysis. Benzodiazepines reduce withdrawal severity, reduce incidence of delirium (-4.9 cases per 100 patients; 95% confidence interval, -9.0 to -0.7; P=.04), and reduce seizures (-7.7 seizures per 100 patients; 95% confidence interval, -12.0 to -3.5; P=.003). Individualizing therapy with withdrawal scales results in administration of significantly less medication and shorter treatment (P<.001). beta-Blockers, clonidine, and carbamazepine ameliorate withdrawal severity, but evidence is inadequate to determine their effect on delirium and seizures. Phenothiazines ameliorate withdrawal but are less effective than benzodiazepines in reducing delirium (P=.002) or seizures (P<.001). Benzodiazepines are suitable agents for alcohol withdrawal, with choice among different agents guided by duration of action, rapidity of onset, and cost. Dosage should be individualized, based on withdrawal severity measured by withdrawal scales, comorbid illness, and history of withdrawal seizures. beta-Blockers, clonidine, carbamazepine, and neuroleptics may be used as adjunctive therapy but are not recommended as monotherapy.

  20. American Physiological Society Statements on Animal Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Contains three policy statements involving the use of animals for proper teaching of students, research, and the utilization of pound animals. Discusses the benefits to society of using animals in the biomedical sciences. (CW)

  1. Origins of the American Astronomical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendzen, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Analyzes the historical context that led to the founding of the society. Relates the ideas and reactions of key figures of the time such as James Lick, George Hale, E.C. Pickering, and S. Newcomb. (GS)

  2. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources ASCRS Textbook, 3rd Edition CARSEP® CREST® Case Study Listserv International Colon and Rectal Societies and Organizations ... Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery CARSEP® Members Case Study Listserv CREST® Young Surgeons Listserv Quality Assessment and ...

  3. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upcoming Meetings Online Education Archived Meetings Faculty Resources Sports Medicine Fellowships Traveling Fellowship Submit an Abstract Submit ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal ...

  4. American Astronomical Society Honors NRAO Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has awarded its prestigious George Van Biesbroeck Prize to Dr. Eric Greisen of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The society cited Greisen's quarter-century as "principal architect and tireless custodian" of the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS), a massive software package used by astronomers around the world, as "an invaluable service to astronomy." Dr. Eric Greisen Dr. Eric Greisen CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The Van Biesbroeck Prize "honors a living individual for long-term extraordinary or unselfish service to astronomy, often beyond the requirements of his or her paid position." The AAS, with about 7,000 members, is the major organization of professional astronomers in North America. " The Very Large Array (VLA) is the most productive ground-based telescope in the history of astronomy, and most of the more than 10,000 observing projects on the VLA have depended upon the AIPS software to produce their scientific results," said Dr. James Ulvestad, NRAO's Director of New Mexico Operations. "This same software package also has been the principal tool for scientists using the Very Long Baseline Array and numerous other radio telescopes around the world," Ulvestad added. Greisen, who received a Ph.D in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology, joined the NRAO in 1972. He moved from the observatory's headquarters in Charlottesville, Virginia, to its Array Operations Center in Socorro in 2000. Greisen, who learned of the award in a telephone call from the AAS President, Dr. Robert Kirschner of Harvard University, said, "I'm pleased for the recognition of AIPS and also for the recognition of the contributions of radio astronomy to astronomy as a whole." He added that "it wasn't just me who did AIPS. There were many others." The AIPS software package grew out of the need for an efficient tool for producing images with the VLA, which was being

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  6. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar A; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  7. The child with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: is pharmacotherapy or watchful waiting the best initial management? A panel discussion from the 2002 meeting of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula; Tarantino, Michael D; Buchanan, George R; Bussel, James B; George, James N

    2004-02-01

    The initial management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a topic of debate among pediatric hematologists. The decision whether to start a patient on pharmacotherapy or to employ an approach of watchful waiting and patient education is problematic for this group of physicians. A wide variety of research studies and review articles have been published on either side of this debate. Here, the proceedings from a panel discussion, held at the 2002 American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology meeting, are presented. The panel, composed of experts on both sides of the debate, presented the rationale, benefits, and risks of both pharmacotherapy and the watchful waiting strategy.

  8. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  9. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers From Vischer Drawing REAR VIEW OF MISSION About 1870 - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers MISSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers MISSION (1883) FROM DRAWING BY FORD - Mission San Francisco de Asis, Mission & Sixteenth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: 1860's Re-photo: January 1940 MISSION BUILDING OPPOSITE MISSION (NOW DESTROYED) - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  12. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: 1850's Re-photo: January 1940 MISSION BUILDINGS NORTH OF CHURCH; VIEW FROM WEST - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  13. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers DRAWING OF MISSION ABOUT 1860's BY VISCHER SHOWING MISSION BEFORE 1835 - Mission San Francisco de Asis, Mission & Sixteenth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: About ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: About 1870 Re-photo: January 1940 CONVENTO AND ADDITIONS (VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST) - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  15. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: 1860's Re-photo: January 1940 CONVENTO - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  16. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: 1850's Re-photo: January 1940 CONVENTO (VIEW FROM SOUTH) - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  17. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Drawing Society of California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Drawing - Society of California Pioneers Original: August 1881 (Ford drawing) Re-photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM NORTHWEST (BEFORE 1835) - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  18. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: Early 1860'2 Re-photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  19. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: About ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: About 1860's Re-photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM NORTHWEST 1797 - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  20. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: After ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey California Historical Society Original: After 1868 Re-photo: January 1940 CEMETERY AND FRAME CHURCH (VIEW FROM NORTHWEST) - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Society California Pioneers FROM DRAWING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Society California Pioneers FROM DRAWING, PURPORTEDLY ABOUT 1816 - 'VOYAGE AUTERE DU MONTE' By CHORIS - Mission San Francisco de Asis, Mission & Sixteenth Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Courtesy of Oregon Historical Society, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Courtesy of Oregon Historical Society, Photo from 'West Shore' VILLIARD HALL, 1886, DEADY HALL, 1876. - University of Oregon, Deady Hall, University of Oregon Campus, Eugene, Lane County, OR

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Original in Indiana Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Original in Indiana Historical Society Library 'BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMISSION BUILDING JANUARY, 1917 AT TECH. GROUNDS' - U. S. Arsenal, Arsenal Building, 1500 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  4. North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Skip to Navigation NASPGHAN Annual Meeting and Postgraduate ... transition well. Moreover, Doc4me provides information about medications, nutrition and living with IBD. Please help us promote ...

  5. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Original: About 1870's Re- photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Mission San Antonio de Padua, Hunter Liggett Military Reservation, Jolon, Monterey County, CA

  6. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey From California Historical Society Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey From California Historical Society Original: 1888 Re-photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTH (front) - Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, Soledad, Monterey County, CA

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Vischer drawing, from Society of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Vischer drawing, from Society of California Pioneers Original: Early 1870's Re-photo: January 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, Soledad, Monterey County, CA

  8. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey From California Historical Society Original: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey From California Historical Society Original: 1881 Re-photo: January 1940 SECOND CHURCH AND CONVENTO (view from south) - Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, Soledad, Monterey County, CA

  9. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  10. Aging and Work in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowsesian, Richard

    On the premise that researchers, practitioners, and policy makers lack an extensive and systematic examination of the concerns of the aging, this monograph examines American social issues as a context for a functional definition of aging and a taxonomy for use in conducting research. Issues are examined with regard to aging and work in four areas…

  11. Youth Violence Syndrome (YVS) and American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This paper names and describes a common, growing, and dangerous psychological syndrome: Youth Violence Syndrome (YVS). YVS is characterized by at least nine behaviors: (1) hopelessness; (2) a complete or great disregard for the laws followed by most Americans; (3) a short temper combined with a lack of empathy; (4) a desire for respect from others…

  12. Theory Z and American Education in an Advanced Industrial Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappert, Gary

    Suggesting that a major socioeconomic transformation is underway in American society, this paper discusses seven elements of an emergent post-affluent society: (1) the demographic effects of the "baby boom" generation; (2) the emergence and recognition of a post-affluent consciousness; (3) the recognition of the transcendental nature of…

  13. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy from The Society of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy from The Society of Cincinnati Guidebook, 1938 'The Larz Anderson House in Washington,' Courtesy of The Society of the Cincinnati, 1972 FLOOR PLANS - Larz Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy from The Society of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy from The Society of Cincinnati Guidebook, 1938 'The Larz Anderson House in Washington' Sourtesy of The Society of the Cincinnati, 1972 SITE OR PLOT PLAN - Larz Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Centennial Calendar- 100 Years of the American Phytopathological Society

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    I edited a 40-page publication (calendar) that covered 18 chapters written by members of our society. This covered pioneering researchers, departments, and epidemics of the last 100 years of plant pathology in the U. S. This was given to all members of the American Phytopathological Society who att...

  16. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society LOBBY LOOKING TOWARD BALCONY Permission to reproduce is given providing the following appears on the same page with the reproduction: Courtesy Chicago Historical Society - Rookery Building, 209 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  17. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society The 'Rookery' Lobby, copyright by S. L. Stein Publishing Co., c. 1893. Permission to reproduce is given providing the following appears on the same page with the reproduction: Courtesy Chicago Historical Society - Rookery Building, 209 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society EXTERIOR FROM NORTHEAST IN THE LATE 1880's Permission to reproduce is given providing the following appears on the same page with the reproduction: Courtesy Chicago Historical Society - Rookery Building, 209 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy Courtesy Chicago Historical Society 'Office Building, Being Erected by the Central Safety Deposit Company,' Published in The Inland Architect and Builder, Vol. VII No. 9 Permission to reproduce is given providing the following appears on the same page with the reproduction: Courtesy Chicago Historical Society - Rookery Building, 209 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  20. Creation of the American Board of Ophthalmology: The Role of the American Ophthalmological Society.

    PubMed

    Liesegang, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    The American Ophthalmological Society (AOS) is 1 of the 3 founding organizations of the American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO), in addition to the Section on Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. The early history of the AOS and its role in the founding of the ABO are addressed in this article. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Knowledge to Manage the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minati, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to make evident the inadequateness of concepts and language based on industrial knowledge still used in current practices by managers to cope with problems of the post-industrial societies characterised by non-linear process of emergence and acquisition of properties. The purpose is to allow management to…

  2. Knowledge to Manage the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minati, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to make evident the inadequateness of concepts and language based on industrial knowledge still used in current practices by managers to cope with problems of the post-industrial societies characterised by non-linear process of emergence and acquisition of properties. The purpose is to allow management to…

  3. American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Ted A; Wolf, Andrew M D; Erb, Nicole L; Brooks, Durado D; Rivers, Brian M; Underwood, Willie; Salner, Andrew L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Slovin, Susan F; Wittmann, Daniela A; Hoyt, Michael A; Sinibaldi, Victoria J; Chodak, Gerald; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

  4. How the American Society for Virology was founded.

    PubMed

    Joklik, Wolfang K; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2006-01-05

    The American Society for Virology, the very first such Society to be formed anywhere, was founded at a meeting of some 40 virologists at Chicago O'Hare International airport on June 9, 1981. They met after a decade and a half of intense discussion that originated at the 9th International Congress of Microbiology in Moscow in 1966 when a small group of virologists requested the International Association of Microbiological Societies to form a Virology Section within IAMS, and this request was rejected. Virologists therefore held their own First International Congress of Virology in Helsinki in 1968 which was very successful and generated intense informal discussion among leading virologists in this country as to the desirability of founding an American society for virologists. Proposals were circulated and discussed which resulted in the informal Chicago meeting that created the mechanism for founding the ASV and organizing its 1st Annual Meeting at Cornell in Ithaca in August 1982.

  5. Diversity in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Leadership.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Paloma; Duce, Lorent; Adams, Jerome; Ross, Vernon H; Thompson, Kelli M; Wong, Cynthia A

    2017-05-01

    Women and minorities are underrepresented in US academic medicine. The Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce emphasized the importance of diverse leadership for reducing health care disparities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the demographics of the American Society of Anesthesiologists leadership. We hypothesized that the percentage of women and underrepresented minorities is less than that of their respective proportions in the general physician workforce. An electronic survey was developed by the authors and mailed to 595 members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists leadership who had valid email addresses, including the members of the 2014 House of Delegates and state society leaders who were not the members of the House of Delegates. Univariate statistics were used to characterize survey responses and the probability distributions were estimated using the binomial distribution. A one-sample t test was used to compare the percentage of women and minorities in the survey pool to that of the corresponding percentages in the general physician workforce (38.0% women and 8.9% minorities), and the US population (51.0% women and 32.0% minorities). The survey response rate was 54%. A total of 21.1% (95% confidence interval: 16.4%-25.7%) of respondents were women and 6.0% (95% confidence interval: 3.3%-8.7%) were minorities. The proportion of women in the American Society of Anesthesiologist leadership was lower than the general medical workforce and the US population (P < .001 for both); the proportion of underrepresented minorities was lower than the US population (P < .001). Women and minorities are underrepresented in the leadership of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. Efforts should be made to increase the diversity of the American Society of Anesthesiologists leadership with the goal of reducing overall anesthesia workforce disparities.

  6. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  7. An Official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Policy Statement

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Daniel R.; Diamond, Edward; Fan, Vincent S.; Maurer, Janet R.; Mularski, Richard A.; Peters, Jay I.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation’s Choosing Wisely campaign aims to curb health-care costs and improve patient care by soliciting lists from medical societies of the top five tests or treatments in their specialty that are used too frequently and inappropriately. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians created a joint task force, which produced a top five list for adult pulmonary medicine. Our top five recommendations, which were approved by the executive committees of the ATS and American College of Chest Physicians and published by Choosing Wisely in October 2013, are as follows: (1) Do not perform CT scan surveillance for evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules at more frequent intervals or for a longer period of time than recommended by established guidelines; (2) do not routinely offer pharmacologic treatment with advanced vasoactive agents approved only for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension to patients with pulmonary hypertension resulting from left heart disease or hypoxemic lung diseases (groups II or III pulmonary hypertension); (3) for patients recently discharged on supplemental home oxygen following hospitalization for an acute illness, do not renew the prescription without assessing the patient for ongoing hypoxemia; (4) do not perform chest CT angiography to evaluate for possible pulmonary embolism in patients with a low clinical probability and negative results of a highly sensitive D-dimer assay; (5) do not perform CT scan screening for lung cancer among patients at low risk for lung cancer. We hope pulmonologists will use these recommendations to stimulate frank discussions with patients about when these tests and treatments are indicated—and when they are not. PMID:24889436

  8. American Geriatrics Society care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults position statement: American Geriatrics Society Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    There is ample evidence that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face discrimination in the healthcare setting. Providing high-quality health care for older LGBT adults will require active steps by organizations, institutions, advocacy groups, and health professionals that create an environment that is free from discrimination. This position statement that the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Ethics Committee developed addresses the vision of the AGS for the care of LGBT older adults and specific steps that can be taken to ensure that they receive the care that they need. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Japanese Management: An American Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehder, Robert R.

    1979-01-01

    In contrast to the American system of management, Japanese management motivates its employees by challenging them with high goals and by providing inhouse training and development opportunities to meet their self-fulfillment needs. (Author/LD)

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey From Society of California Pioneers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey From Society of California Pioneers Original: About 1790 Re- photo: January 1940 (From old drawing by Sukes, showing first church at left, second church being built near center - about 1790) - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  11. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast cancer screening: update 2003.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Saslow, Debbie; Sawyer, Kimberly Andrews; Burke, Wylie; Costanza, Mary E; Evans, W Phil; Foster, Roger S; Hendrick, Edward; Eyre, Harmon J; Sener, Steven

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the American Cancer Society updated its guidelines for early detection of breast cancer based on recommendations from a formal review of evidence and a recent workshop. The new screening recommendations address screening mammography, physical examination, screening older women and women with comorbid conditions, screening women at high risk, and new screening technologies.

  12. American Society of Indexers: History, Activities and Relationship to ASIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the American Society of Indexers (ASI) and assesses its position among other organizations, such as ASIS, involved with the organization of information. Topics discussed include the annual award for best monograph index; the ASI newsletter; and publicity to convey the importance of quality indexing. (LRW)

  13. American Council of Learned Societies Annual Report, 2008-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) provides the humanities and related social sciences with leadership, opportunities for innovation, and national and international representation. ACLS was founded in 1919 to represent the United States in the Union Academique Internationale. Its mission is "the advancement of humanistic studies in…

  14. American Council of Learned Societies Annual Report, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) provides the humanities and related social sciences with leadership, opportunities for innovation, and national and international representation. ACLS was founded in 1919 to represent the United States in the Union Academique Internationale. Its mission is "the advancement of humanistic studies…

  15. Analysis of the American Cancer Society's Generation Fit Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael; Goodwin, Steve; Ellenberg, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the American Cancer Society's (ACS's) media based peer education program, Message Magic: Selling Healthy Eating and Physical Activity, on participant self-reported dietary and physical activity behaviors and advocacy skill development. High school students participating in the program were required to work as a…

  16. Crime and Violence in American Society: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Edith Elisabeth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Six articles focus on various aspects on violence in American society. Titles are "Evolving a Science of Violence,""Violence by Youth; Violence Against Youth,""Victims and Aggressors in Marital Violence,""Television Violence, Victimization, and Power," and "Violence in Business Settings." (DB)

  17. Chemical Society Reinstates Iranian Chemists; Iranian-American Scholar Arrested

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    The frosty relationship between the United States and Iran has created a chill in many areas of scholarly endeavor. One resulting battle, over whether Iranian scholars can belong to the American Chemical Society, has been largely resolved. But a new imbroglio looms with the arrest of a prominent U.S.-Iranian scholar who was visiting Tehran. The…

  18. Crime and Violence in American Society: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Edith Elisabeth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Six articles focus on various aspects on violence in American society. Titles are "Evolving a Science of Violence,""Violence by Youth; Violence Against Youth,""Victims and Aggressors in Marital Violence,""Television Violence, Victimization, and Power," and "Violence in Business Settings." (DB)

  19. Society of American Foresters - an advocacy for forest inventory

    Treesearch

    John W., Jr. Moser

    2007-01-01

    The Society of American Foresters (SAF) represents all segments of the forestry profession in the United States, including public and private practitioners, researchers, administrators, educators, and students. Its mission is to advance the science, education, technology, and practice of forestry. SAF's science and education program and its policy program have...

  20. 75th Diamond anniversary American Welding Society annual meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Detailed summaries are given for 85 technical sessions papers, 16 brazing and soldering conference papers, 11 education program papers, 15 thermal spray symposium papres, 9 industrial technology sessions papers 2, invited lectures, and 8 posters presented at the 75th annual convention of the American Welding Society. Also included are the names and addresses of all authors, speakers, and presiding officers.

  1. The Church-Related College in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Charles S.

    Many problems plague denominational colleges. This paper explores the question: "what will be lost to American society and the churches if church-related colleges sever their denominational ties?" Church-related colleges find themselves caught between the remnants of their secular past and the demands of their public present. This has lead to a…

  2. The Media Environment: Mass Communications in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Robert H.; Steinberg, Charles S.

    The purpose of this book is to provide the reader with an informational frame of reference that will permit the formation of critical judgments concerning America's mass media institutions. The book covers the broad spectrum of the communications media in terms of their impact on American society. Such topics are discussed as social aspects of…

  3. Programs organized by the American Nuclear Society`s Public Information Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, L.; Price, J.; Kerrick, S.

    1994-12-31

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has consistently placed significant emphasis on the public communications role of the society. This has been translated into a significant effort in terms of providing teacher training and outreach. The importance of this effort is reflected in the formation of the Public Education Program, which has been chartered to raise funds from members and corporate sources to augment the society`s funding of the public communications program, especially as related to the educational outreach program. The ANS has a lengthy history of teacher training activities. In about 1975 it was realized that public education needed to become a significant focus of the society. This was further refined in 1980 to focus on teacher training, based on requests for assistance that were received at ANS headquarters. The teacher training program has consequently evolved as the top priority of the public communications activities.

  4. Promoting Ocean Literacy through American Meteorological Society Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, Michael; Abshire, Wendy; Weinbeck, Robert; Geer, Ira; Mills, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    American Meteorological Society Education Programs provide course materials, online and physical resources, educator instruction, and specialized training in ocean, weather, and climate sciences (https://www.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/education-careers/education-program/k-12-teachers/). Ocean Science literacy efforts are supported through the Maury Project, DataStreme Ocean, and AMS Ocean Studies. The Maury Project is a summer professional development program held at the US Naval Academy designed to enhance effective teaching of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics of oceanography. DataStreme Ocean is a semester-long course offered twice a year to participants nationwide. Created and sustained with major support from NOAA, DS Ocean explores key concepts in marine geology, physical and chemical oceanography, marine biology, and climate change. It utilizes electronically-transmitted text readings, investigations and current environmental data. AMS Ocean Studies provides complete packages for undergraduate courses. These include online textbooks, investigations manuals, RealTime Ocean Portal (course website), and course management system-compatible files. It can be offered in traditional lecture/laboratory, completely online, and hybrid learning environments. Assistance from AMS staff and other course users is available.

  5. Self-Management in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinical Report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Greenley, Rachel N.; Maddux, Michele Herzer; Gray, Wendy N.; Mackner, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report aims to review key self-management and adherence issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to provide recommendations for health care providers regarding evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to promote optimal self-management. Self-management difficulties in the form of nonadherence to treatment regimens are common in pediatric IBD and are influenced by various disease-related, individual, family, and health-professional relationship factors. To promote adaptive self-management, health care providers are encouraged to adopt a long-term preventive orientation which includes routine screening of barriers to self-management and nonadherence in the context of routine clinic appointments. The use of a multimethod approach to assessment which incorporates objective measures (e.g., pill counts or bioassays) may be particularly advantageous. Individualized treatment approaches that incorporate evidence-based practices, such as providing written treatment plans and offering opportunities to practice and receive feedback on skills may help to ameliorate minor self-management concerns; however, more severe or chronic self-management problems may require a referral for behavioral health intervention. Additional research to broaden our understanding of self-management in domains beyond medication adherence and to evaluate the impact of clinic-based interventions is imperative. PMID:23648790

  6. Self-management in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: A clinical report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Kevin A; Greenley, Rachel N; Maddux, Michele Herzer; Gray, Wendy N; Mackner, Laura M

    2013-08-01

    This clinical report aims to review key self-management and adherence issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to provide recommendations for health care providers regarding evidence-based assessment and treatment approaches to promote optimal self-management. Self-management difficulties in the form of nonadherence to treatment regimens are common in pediatric IBD and are influenced by various disease-related, individual, family, and health professional relationship factors. To promote adaptive self-management, health care providers are encouraged to adopt a long-term preventive orientation, which includes routine screening of barriers to self-management and nonadherence in the context of routine clinic appointments. The use of a multimethod approach to assessment that incorporates objective measures (eg, pill counts or bioassays) may be particularly advantageous. Individualized treatment approaches that incorporate evidence-based practices, such as providing written treatment plans and offering opportunities to practice and receive feedback on skills, may help to ameliorate minor self-management concerns; however, more severe or chronic self-management problems may require a referral for behavioral health intervention. Additional research to broaden our understanding of self-management in domains beyond medication adherence and to evaluate the effect of clinic-based interventions is imperative.

  7. Education and Public Outreach at the American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, R. T.

    2011-09-01

    Recently the Council of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) adopted its first-ever mission-and-vision statement. Independently, the Astronomy Education Board (AEB), which has oversight of the Society's educational activities, adopted new goals for the AAS education program. Much of the responsibility for aligning the AAS mission-and-vision statement and AEB goals and implementing them is vested in a new position: AAS Press Officer and Education and Outreach Coordinator. Here I describe the AAS's priorities for education and public outreach and explain how they are being, or will be, achieved.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  9. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  10. Electronic Publishing and the Journals of the American Chemical Society

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Jeffrey D.; Garson, Lorrin R.

    1996-01-01

    The American Chemical Society is developing a number of initiatives that implement emerging electronic technologies in order to provide a broad range of products and services to members and subscribers. Examples of products currently available, or under development, for access via the World Wide Web include supporting information for journals, electronic ads, color graphics and entire journals. Other activities employ e-mail, CD-ROMs, and softcopy text. PMID:27805172

  11. The American Meteor Society's filter bank spectroscopy project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) has sponsored the development of an alternative method of meteor spectroscopy that relies on a set of eight very narrow band wavelength filters. The interference filters used are tuned to the dominant meteoric emission lines of Ca+, two Fe line regions, Mg, Na, Si+, the forbidden O line, and atmospheric O777. Discussion will include the design trade-offs, construction of the instrument, first light testing, and initial results.

  12. Antimicrobial prophylaxis and outpatient management of fever and neutropenia in adults treated for malignancy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Christopher R; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Bow, Eric J; Karten, Clare; Gleason, Charise; Hawley, Douglas K; Kuderer, Nicole M; Langston, Amelia A; Marr, Kieren A; Rolston, Kenneth V I; Ramsey, Scott D

    2013-02-20

    To provide guidelines on antimicrobial prophylaxis for adult neutropenic oncology outpatients and on selection and treatment as outpatients of those with fever and neutropenia. A literature search identified relevant studies published in English. Primary outcomes included: development of fever and/or infections in afebrile neutropenic outpatients and recovery without complications and overall mortality in febrile neutropenic outpatients. Secondary outcomes included: in afebrile neutropenic outpatients, infection-related mortality; in outpatients with fever and neutropenia, defervescence without regimen change, time to defervescence, infectious complications, and recurrent fever; and in both groups, hospital admissions, duration, and adverse effects of antimicrobials. An Expert Panel developed guidelines based on extracted data and informal consensus. Forty-seven articles from 43 studies met selection criteria. Antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis are only recommended for patients expected to have < 100 neutrophils/μL for > 7 days, unless other factors increase risks for complications or mortality to similar levels. Inpatient treatment is standard to manage febrile neutropenic episodes, although carefully selected patients may be managed as outpatients after systematic assessment beginning with a validated risk index (eg, Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer [MASCC] score or Talcott's rules). Patients with MASCC scores ≥ 21 or in Talcott group 4, and without other risk factors, can be managed safely as outpatients. Febrile neutropenic patients should receive initial doses of empirical antibacterial therapy within an hour of triage and should either be monitored for at least 4 hours to determine suitability for outpatient management or be admitted to the hospital. An oral fluoroquinolone plus amoxicillin/clavulanate (or plus clindamycin if penicillin allergic) is recommended as empiric therapy, unless fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was used

  13. Screening, Assessment, and Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Bak, Kate; Berger, Ann; Breitbart, William; Escalante, Carmelita P.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Schnipper, Hester Hill; Lacchetti, Christina; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Lyman, Gary H.; Ogaily, Mohammed S.; Pirl, William F.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This guideline presents screening, assessment, and treatment approaches for the management of adult cancer survivors who are experiencing symptoms of fatigue after completion of primary treatment. Methods A systematic search of clinical practice guideline databases, guideline developer Web sites, and published health literature identified the pan-Canadian guideline on screening, assessment, and care of cancer-related fatigue in adults with cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Cancer-Related Fatigue and the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship. These three guidelines were appraised and selected for adaptation. Results It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for the presence of fatigue after completion of primary treatment and be offered specific information and strategies for fatigue management. For those who report moderate to severe fatigue, comprehensive assessment should be conducted, and medical and treatable contributing factors should be addressed. In terms of treatment strategies, evidence indicates that physical activity interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Conclusion Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing this distressing symptom. Given the multiple factors contributing to post-treatment fatigue, interventions should be tailored to each patient's specific needs. In particular, a number of nonpharmacologic treatment approaches have demonstrated efficacy in cancer survivors. PMID:24733803

  14. North American Fuzzy Logic Processing Society (NAFIPS 1992), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the NAFIPS '92 North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society Conference. More than 75 papers were presented at this Conference, which was sponsored by NAFIPS in cooperation with NASA, the Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, the Indian Society for Fuzzy Mathematics and Information Processing (ISFUMIP), the Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), the International Fuzzy Systems Association (IFSA), the Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory and Systems, and the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). The fuzzy set theory has led to a large number of diverse applications. Recently, interesting applications have been developed which involve the integration of fuzzy systems with adaptive processes such as neural networks and genetic algorithms. NAFIPS '92 was directed toward the advancement, commercialization, and engineering development of these technologies.

  15. North American Fuzzy Logic Processing Society (NAFIPS 1992), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the NAFIPS '92 North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society Conference. More than 75 papers were presented at this Conference, which was sponsored by NAFIPS in cooperation with NASA, the Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, the Indian Society for Fuzzy Mathematics and Information Processing (ISFUMIP), the Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), the International Fuzzy Systems Association (IFSA), the Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory and Systems, and the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). The fuzzy set theory has led to a large number of diverse applications. Recently, interesting applications have been developed which involve the integration of fuzzy systems with adaptive processes such a neural networks and genetic algorithms. NAFIPS '92 was directed toward the advancement, commercialization, and engineering development of these technologies.

  16. Charting the Future of Cancer Health Disparities Research: A Position Statement from the American Association of Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the National Cancer Institute

    Cancer.gov

    The American Association for Cancer Research, American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and NCI present a unified strategy to promote cooperation in all areas of the cancer health disparities research community.

  17. The founding of the American Epilepsy Society: 1936-1971.

    PubMed

    Goodkin, Howard P

    2007-01-01

    In December 1946, a joint meeting devoted to epilepsy research and care was held by the Association for the Research in Nervous and Mental Disease and the American Chapter of the International League Against Epilepsy. The American Epilepsy Society (AES) has chosen this date and this meeting to mark its founding and recognizes Dr. Charles D. Aring as the organization's first president. However, the founding process of the AES actually began a decade earlier with a dinner meeting held during the American Medical Association's annual meeting. Based on this historical review, it is recommended that the AES recognize 1936 as the year of its founding and Dr. William G. Lennox as its founder and first president.

  18. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 1: a status report on the disease state, general measures, and adjunctive skin care.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Larry; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Rosacea is a common clinical diagnosis that encompasses a variety of presentations, predominantly involving the centrofacial skin. Reported to present most commonly in adults of Northern European heritage with fair skin, rosacea can affect males and females of all ethnicities and skin types. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to correlate with the manifestation of rosacea have been the focus of multiple research studies, with outcomes providing a better understanding of why some individuals are affected and how their visible signs and symptoms develop. A better appreciation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways of rosacea has allowed therapeutic strategies to be optimally incorporated. Part 1 of this 5-part series discusses the rosacea disease state with an emphasis on clinical correlation, reviews adjunctive skin care for cutaneous rosacea, and provides management caveats.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERROR MANAGEMENT ON THE NATURAL HISTORY AND TREATMENT OUTCOME OF ACCOMMODATIVE ESOTROPIA (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Black, Bradley Charles

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of refractive error management on resolution of accommodative esotropia, deterioration of accommodative esotropia, and the natural history of hypermetropia in accommodative esotropia. Methods Retrospective cohort study and nested case-control study of patients with accommodative esotropia untreated prior to diagnosis by the author. Eligibility criteria included esodeviation of ≥10 prism diopters (PD) on distance and near fixation on initial examination, hypermetropia, distance esodeviation <10 PD with full cycloplegic refraction correction on first follow-up examination, and at least 2 years of follow-up. Results The study included 285 patients with mean follow-up of 102 months. After age 7 years, mean annual decrease in hypermetropia was .24 D for patients wearing full cycloplegic refraction and for patients in whom hypermetropia was undercorrected by 1.00 D or more. Age at diagnosis (P < .0001), oblique muscle dysfunction (P < .0001), and abnormal distance-near relationship (P = .007) were associated with deterioration of accommodative esotropia. Of 51 patients with an intermittent abnormal distance-near relationship, 19 (37%) had increased hypermetropia on cycloplegic refraction, and prescription of the increased correction normalized the distance-near relationship. Conclusions The possibility that undercorrecting hypermetropia speeds its resolution is not supported by this study. Accommodative esotropia is usually stable, but younger age at diagnosis, oblique muscle dysfunction, and abnormal distance-near relationship are associated with deterioration. Undercorrection of hypermetropia can cause an abnormal distance-near relationship, which in turn can cause deterioration of accommodative esotropia. Aggressive undercorrection of hypermetropia should be pursued carefully, because the risk may outweigh the potential advantages. PMID:17471349

  20. Position of the American Dietetic Association, American Society for Nutrition, and Society for Nutrition Education: food and nutrition programs for community-residing older adults.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Barbara J; Wellman, Nancy S; Russell, Carlene

    2010-01-01

    Given the federal cost-containment policy to rebalance long-term care away from nursing homes to home- and community-based services, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Society for Nutrition Education that all older adults should have access to food and nutrition programs that ensure the availability of safe, adequate food to promote optimal nutritional status. Appropriate food and nutrition programs include adequately funded food assistance and meal programs, nutrition education, screening, assessment, counseling, therapy, monitoring, evaluation, and outcomes documentation to ensure more healthful aging. The growing number of older adults, the health care focus on prevention, and the global economic situation accentuate the fundamental need for these programs. Yet far too often food and nutrition programs are disregarded or taken for granted. Growing older generally increases nutritional risk. Illnesses and chronic diseases; physical, cognitive, and social challenges; racial, ethnic, and linguistic differences; and low socioeconomic status can further complicate a situation. The beneficial effects of nutrition for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management need emphasis. Although many older adults are enjoying longer and more healthful lives in their own homes, others, especially those with health disparities and poor nutritional status, would benefit from greater access to food and nutrition programs and services. Food and nutrition practitioners can play a major role in promoting universal access and integrating food and nutrition programs and nutrition services into home- and community-based services. Copyright 2010 The American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investment analysts and the American Society of Hematology.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2008-07-01

    Investment analysts are a growing presence at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), and financial professionals frequently contact ASH members for information and perspective on drugs, devices, and scientific developments. Recent incidents have raised concerns about consulting relationships between physicians and the investment industry; the appropriate role of medical societies in influencing these relationships is unclear. In this essay, I summarize the current situation, discuss potential risks and benefits from interactions between physicians and investment analysts, and outline issues that all individuals involved in investment industry consulting should consider. I also propose changes in ASH policy that may help safeguard public trust as well as preserve the access of clinicians and scientists to clinically relevant data presented at the Annual Meeting.

  2. The professional education program of the American Cancer Society.

    PubMed

    Fink, D J; Bertram, D A

    1986-01-01

    The American Cancer Society is the major organization that provides cancer education to health professionals in the United States. This is implemented not only by the National Office but through 58 Divisions and over 3000 local Units. Objectives for professional education emphasize informing physicians and the multiple disciplines of health professionals engaged in primary care about cancer detection and prevention, particularly for breast, lung, colon, rectal, and cervical cancers. A plan is now being developed for a professional education program to the year 2000. Cancer control programs sponsored or planned by the Society include the Colorectal Health CHECK program, Smoke Free Young America, Breast Cancer Detection Awareness, and Cancer Risk Reduction. These programs demonstrate an effective partnership between professionals and lay volunteers. The Society also offers Clinical Fellowships, Medical and Nursing Professorships, and Nursing Scholarships to further professional education. National conferences are sponsored by the Society, as are special graduate courses for physicians from foreign countries. In addition, numerous publications and audiovisuals are available through Units to supplement professional, as well as lay, education.

  3. An evaluation of the American Cancer Society research scholar program.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Alyce L; Vogler, William R; Kepner, James L

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) allocated competitive funding for Research Project Grants (RPG) to investigators and health care professionals early in their careers. This study explored the process of applying for an ACS grant and determined the differences, if any, in applicants that were funded and applicants that were not funded. Applicants applying for RPG funding in the spring of 1996 were sent a questionnaire. Most variables between funded and unfunded applicants did not show significant differences. The perception of the application process varied significantly between groups. The application process of RPG was highly valued among funded applicants.

  4. Proceedings of the American Society for Composites: Ninth technical conference

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Ninth Annual Technical Conference of the American Society for Composites was held on September 20--22, 1994, at the University of Delaware, John M. Clayton Conference Center, Newark, Delaware. Technical papers were presented on a broad range of topics that range across the entire scope of interest of polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites. Topics included biomedical and intelligent composites, mechanical behavior, textile structural composites, joining, interfaces, design, plates and shells, environmental effects and processing. One hundred and forty one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. American Glaucoma Society position statement: glaucoma surgery by surgeons.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Cynthia; Tsai, James C

    2013-08-01

    The American Glaucoma Society seeks to ensure the highest quality care for patients with glaucoma. The surgical care of the glaucoma patient requires the skills and judgment of physicians who have graduated from the rigorous training and hands-on experience provided by a complete curriculum in allopathic or osteopathic medicine with subsequent subspecialty training in Ophthalmology. Surgery for glaucoma includes the use of laser, incisional surgery with and without devices, injections into or around the eye, and should be performed only by physicians who have been licensed and credentialed in allopathic (MD) or osteopathic (DO) medicine.

  6. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  7. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Glomerular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-05-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of United States nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special app with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  8. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-06-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of US nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special application with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  9. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: RRT.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-06-05

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of U.S. nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors (TPDs). The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  10. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2012: glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Glassock, Richard J; Bleyer, Anthony J

    2013-08-01

    Presentation of the Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQQ) has become an annual tradition at the meetings of the American Society of Nephrology. It is a very popular session, judged by consistently large attendance. Members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They can also compare their answers in real time, using audience response devices, to those of program directors of nephrology training programs in the United States, acquired through an Internet-based questionnaire. The topic presented here is GN. Cases representing this category, along with single best answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts (Drs. Fervenza, Glassock, and Bleyer). The correct and incorrect answers were then briefly discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for a larger audience--that of the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Have fun.

  12. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2012: Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Daniel C; Glassock, Richard J; Bleyer, Anthony J

    2013-07-01

    Presentation of the Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire has become an annual tradition at the meetings of the American Society of Nephrology. It is a very popular session, as judged by consistently large attendance. Members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They can also compare their answers in real time, using audience response devices, to those of program directors of nephrology training programs in the United States, acquired through an Internet-based questionnaire. Topics presented here include fluid and electrolyte disorders, transplantation, and ESRD and dialysis. Cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts (Drs. Palmer, Fervenza, Brennan, and Mehrotra, respectively). The correct and incorrect answers were briefly discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for a larger audience--that of the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Have fun.

  13. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: RRT

    PubMed Central

    Perazella, Mark A.; Choi, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of U.S. nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors (TPDs). The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:25897000

  14. The clinician's view: role of human papillomavirus testing in the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology Guidelines for the management of abnormal cervical cytology and cervical cancer precursors.

    PubMed

    Cox, J Thomas

    2003-08-01

    The American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) National Consensus Conference for the Management of Women With Cervical Cytological Abnormalities and Cervical Cancer Precursors was held on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Md, September 6-8, 2001. The conference was attended by 121 representatives from 29 national organizations interested in cervical cancer screening issues. For the first time, guidelines for the management of women with abnormal cervical cytology, developed from evidence-based literature, were presented to delegates from the majority of organizations with interest in cervical cancer screening, voted on, and revised when necessary to achieve a majority two-thirds approval. This development of consensus-approved guidelines is likely to be considered one of the most important milestones to date in the management of women with abnormal cervical cytology. The timing of this Consensus Conference resulted from the convergence of many different factors, including new cytologic terminology developed at the Bethesda 2001 workshop and publication of the enrollment data from the National Cancer Institute's Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASC-US)/Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (LSIL) Triage Study, otherwise known as ALTS. Additionally, new preliminary longitudinal ALTS data provided much of the information on the natural history of abnormal Papanicolaou tests and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), as well as data on the performance of both new liquid-based cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing in the management of women following colposcopy. The result was a large database of new information that provided the foundation for the ASCCP Consensus Conference. This article covers only the recommendations of the ASCCP Guidelines that were based in large part on the results of the ALTS trial. Therefore, the focus is on the management of women with equivocal (ASC-US) and low

  15. The American Society of Hematology: a success at age 50.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Ernst R; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The American Society of Hematology (ASH) turns 50 years old in 2008, and we have much to celebrate. Over those years the Society established its principles: to promote both the art and science of hematology and to hold a high-quality Educational Meeting. ASH membership has grown from a few hundred curious attendees at a planning meeting in 1957 to more than 15,000 members today, and the annual meeting has grown from a scientific session of 5 papers at the planning meeting to more than 500 oral presentations and nearly 2,500 poster presentations at the 2007 meeting. The modern ASH promotes cutting-edge science, sponsors research by scholars from all over the globe, helps train the next generation of clinician-scientists, lobbies Congress and several other governmental agencies on behalf of its clinician and scientist members, and publishes the foremost scholarly journal in the field of hematology, Blood, designed to provide its readership with timely reviews, expert opinion on clinical hematology, practice-changing clinical trials, and insightful basic science. The next 50 years of ASH are likely to see many profound changes, but one thing is almost certain-our dedication to fostering clinical and scientific excellence in hematology will continue as the Society's raison d'etre.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Research questions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarized, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of COPD as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS Research Statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centered outcomes.

  17. Transitions of Care Consensus Policy Statement American College of Physicians-Society of General Internal Medicine-Society of Hospital Medicine-American Geriatrics Society-American College of Emergency Physicians-Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Snow, Vincenza; Beck, Dennis; Budnitz, Tina; Miller, Doriane C; Potter, Jane; Wears, Robert L; Weiss, Kevin B; Williams, Mark V

    2009-08-01

    The American College of Physicians (ACP), Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM), Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM), American Geriatric Society (AGS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) developed consensus standards to address the quality gaps in the transitions between inpatient and outpatient settings. The following summarized principles were established: 1.) Accountability; 2) Communication; 3.) Timely interchange of information; 4.) Involvement of the patient and family member; 5.) Respect the hub of coordination of care; 6.) All patients and their family/caregivers should have a medical home or coordinating clinician; 7.) At every point of transitions the patient and/or their family/caregivers need to know who is responsible for their care at that point; 9.) National standards; and 10.) Standardized metrics related to these standards in order to lead to quality improvement and accountability. Based on these principles, standards describing necessary components for implementation were developed: coordinating clinicians, care plans/transition record, communication infrastructure, standard communication formats, transition responsibility, timeliness, community standards, and measurement.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia W; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs, and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality health care contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by the full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. ERS and ATS have strong international commitments, and work with leaders from governments, academia, and organizations to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of health care systems and health equality. Both the ATS and ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organizations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members and other societies to

  19. An official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality healthcare contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by their full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. The ERS and the ATS have strong international commitments and work with leaders from governments, academia, and other organisational bodies to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of healthcare systems and health equality. Both the ATS and the ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organisations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members

  20. Overview of space nuclear technologies and the American Nuclear Society

    SciTech Connect

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    2000-07-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has seen an aspect of the universe where nuclear technology is the best energy source available for power, transportation, etc. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been exploiting this aspect of the universe by sending machines and humans into it and exploring, colonizing, industrializing, developing, inhabiting, etc. Space is the final frontier, and nuclear technology is the best suited for today's or the next century's space exploration and development. Many aspects of nuclear technology and its uses in space will be needed. ANS encompasses these and many more aspects of nuclear technology, and all have some role to play in the exploration and development of space. It should be ANS's intent to be an advisory body to NASA on the nuclear aspects of space exploration.

  1. The strategic plan of the American Fisheries Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.; Irwin, E.R.; Landolt, M.L.; Loefflad, M.; Marsh, J.; Marshall, T.R.; Olmsted, L.L.; Pajak, P.; Peterson, S.; Webster, J.

    1994-01-01

    In August 1994, at its annual meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the Executive Committee of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) approved a new Strategic Plan. The plan sets out eight goals that define a vision of AFS in the year 2001, and provides strategies to achieve each goal. Accomplishing the plan should position AFS to be more responsive to member needs and more effective at meeting the challenges facing the resource and profession under future expected conditions. The plan provides opportunities for every member to help shape AFS for the 21st century. In this paper, we describe the process of strategic planning, the goals and strategies of the AFS Strategic Plan, and how the plan is implemented through AFS annual work plans.

  2. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S.; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E.; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.

    2017-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. PMID:27434803

  3. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    2016-12-20

    Purpose A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. Recommendations The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

  4. First inter-American conference on society, violence, and health.

    PubMed

    1994-12-01

    As a part of the strategy to promote the Regional Plan of Action on Violence and Health, the First Conference on Society, Violence, and Health was held at the headquarters of the Pan American Health Organization in Washington 16-17 November 1994. The objectives of the Conference were to: 1) Draft a declaration calling upon the heads of state of the American States to mobilize resources in order to prevent violence: 2) Create a consensus among the national and international cooperation organizations on methods and procedures to achieve effective support for democratic values and the respect of the human rights in societies living in peaceful coexistence: 3) Promote a regional movement of nongovernmental and other organizations in order to create nonviolent communities; 4) Urge the governments of the Hemisphere to commit themselves individually and through international organizations to allocate financial resources capable of reversing the trend toward violence. The Conference had five panels: 1) Violence as a Public Health Issue; 2) Towards a Democracy without Violence; 3) The Political Economy of Non-Violence; 4) a Culture of Peace for the XXI Century; and 5) Building Non-Violent Social Relations. Distinguished speakers representing various institutions related to the subject area participated in each. As part of the objectives, the participants approved a Declaration that considered the nature of violence, examined its multiple causes and different expressions, and specified the structures of the most vulnerable social groups. Explicit reference was made to the need for carrying out efforts in order to strengthen democracy, seek healthier forms of life, and strive for a culture of peace and coexistence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. HER2 Testing and Clinical Decision Making in Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Angela N; Washington, Mary Kay; Ventura, Christina B; Ismaila, Nofisat; Colasacco, Carol; Benson, Al B; Carrato, Alfredo; Gulley, Margaret L; Jain, Dhanpat; Kakar, Sanjay; Mackay, Helen J; Streutker, Catherine; Tang, Laura; Troxell, Megan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-12-01

    ERBB2 (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 or HER2) is currently the only biomarker established for selection of a specific therapy for patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA). However, there are no comprehensive guidelines for the assessment of HER2 in patients with GEA. To establish an evidence-based guideline for HER2 testing in patients with GEA, to formalize the algorithms for methods to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing while addressing which patients and tumor specimens are appropriate, and to provide guidance on clinical decision making. The College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to conduct a systematic review of the literature to develop an evidence-based guideline with recommendations for optimal HER2 testing in patients with GEA. The panel is proposing 11 recommendations with strong agreement from the open-comment participants. The panel recommends that tumor specimen(s) from all patients with advanced GEA, who are candidates for HER2-targeted therapy, should be assessed for HER2 status before the initiation of HER2-targeted therapy. Clinicians should offer combination chemotherapy and a HER2-targeted agent as initial therapy for all patients with HER2-positive advanced GEA. For pathologists, guidance is provided for morphologic selection of neoplastic tissue, testing algorithms, scoring methods, interpretation and reporting of results, and laboratory quality assurance. This guideline provides specific recommendations for assessment of HER2 in patients with advanced GEA while addressing pertinent technical issues and clinical implications of the results. © 2016 College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. American Society of Gene Therapy - Third Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, E M

    2000-09-01

    The field of gene therapy, delivering genes to directly treat diseases, has had a remarkable year. This is no more evident than in the scope of the third annual meeting of the American Society of Gene Therapy (ASGT). Clear progress has been made in both ex vivo clinical protocols and in vivo administration. The meeting covered every major method of gene delivery, from injection of naked DNA to advanced synthetic gene delivery systems, as well as the major viral-based vectors. The optimism of the society was tempered, however, by the much-publicized death of a patient in a clinical trial at the University of Pennsylvania last year. There was a correspondingly high regulatory presence at the meeting, with several presentations by representatives of the US FDA and National Institutes of Health (NIH). Major clinical advances in gene therapy have been in genetic diseases, including hemophilia, severe combined immunodeficiency, and cystic fibrosis. Therapies are in later-stage clinical trials, and evidence of efficacy has been demonstrated, most notably by the apparent cure of SCID-affected children in Paris by ex vivo gene therapy with cytokine receptor subunit genes. Cancer gene therapy is also making significant headway, with many products entering phase II and III trials. Basic technology development is proceeding in vector targeting, enhancement of gene transfer efficiency, and regulating expression of therapeutic genes. In addition, basic research demonstrates the promise of new combined modes for treating diseases such as muscular dystrophy, lysosomal storage diseases and cardiovascular disease.

  7. Patch testing practices of American Contact Dermatitis Society members.

    PubMed

    Schleichert, Rachel A; Hostetler, Sarah G; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2010-01-01

    Patch testing is an important part of diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis although there is much variability in methodology among practitioners. We surveyed members of the American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) to quantify time spent with patients with contact dermatitis; to characterize patch testing practices, including the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous (T.R.U.E.) Test; and to assess utilization of the Contact Allergen Replacement Database (CARD). An electronic survey was sent to all members of the ACDS. Our survey was sent to the 600 members of the ACDS; 100 members participated (a response rate of 16.6%). Respondents used patch testing trays that contained an average of 62 allergens; 68% of respondents used the North American Contact Dermatitis Group series, and only 9% used the T.R.U.E. Test. Respondents' biggest criticism of the T.R.U.E. Test was its low number of allergens, and 94% of respondents used CARD regularly. ACDS members used patch testing trays with many allergens. Despite the T.R.U.E. Test's popularity among general dermatologists and allergists, few ACDS members used it. Routine CARD usage should be encouraged.

  8. Readability of American Cancer Society patient education literature.

    PubMed

    Meade, C D; Diekmann, J; Thornhill, D G

    1992-01-01

    American Cancer Society (ACS) literature commonly used to inform patients about cancer-detection methods, life-style risks, and treatment modalities was examined for readability. Fifty-one booklets obtained from a regional ACS office were evaluated. According to the SMOG formula, the reading level estimates of the booklets ranged from grade 5.8-15.6 (SD = 2.2), with a mean reading level of grade 11.9. The sampled cancer materials may be too difficult for many Americans to read and understand since most of the booklets (55%) were written for individuals with grade 12 or higher reading skills. Only one booklet was written at less than a grade six reading level. Booklets produced since 1985 were written at significantly lower reading levels (p less than 0.05) than those published in earlier years. The nurse's role in cancer education encompasses awareness of patients' diverse reading skills and formulation of a systematic method to develop materials that meet the needs of low-literacy groups.

  9. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Singh, Sally J; Garvey, Chris; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda; Rochester, Carolyn; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Man, William D-C; Pitta, Fabio; Sewell, Louise; Raskin, Jonathan; Bourbeau, Jean; Crouch, Rebecca; Franssen, Frits M E; Casaburi, Richard; Vercoulen, Jan H; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Gosselink, Rik; Clini, Enrico M; Effing, Tanja W; Maltais, François; van der Palen, Job; Troosters, Thierry; Janssen, Daisy J A; Collins, Eileen; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Brooks, Dina; Fahy, Bonnie F; Puhan, Milo A; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Garrod, Rachel; Schols, Annemie M W J; Carlin, Brian; Benzo, Roberto; Meek, Paula; Morgan, Mike; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry; Goldstein, Roger S; Dowson, Claire A; Brozek, Jan L; Donner, Claudio F; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our knowledge of its efficacy and scope. The purpose of this Statement is to update the 2006 document, including a new definition of pulmonary rehabilitation and highlighting key concepts and major advances in the field. A multidisciplinary committee of experts representing the ATS Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the ERS Scientific Group 01.02, "Rehabilitation and Chronic Care," determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant clinical and scientific expertise. The final content of this Statement was agreed on by all members. An updated definition of pulmonary rehabilitation is proposed. New data are presented on the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation, including its effectiveness in acutely ill individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and in individuals with other chronic respiratory diseases. The important role of pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic disease management is highlighted. In addition, the role of health behavior change in optimizing and maintaining benefits is discussed. The considerable growth in the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation since 2006 adds further support for its efficacy in a wide range of individuals with chronic respiratory disease.

  10. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  11. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment--a position paper of the The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  12. Position of the American Dietetic Association and American Society for Nutrition: obesity, reproduction, and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; King, Janet C

    2009-05-01

    Given the detrimental influence of maternal overweight and obesity on reproductive and pregnancy outcomes for the mother and child, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition that all overweight and obese women of reproductive age should receive counseling on the roles of diet and physical activity in reproductive health prior to pregnancy,during pregnancy, and in the inter conceptional period, in order to ameliorate these adverse outcomes. The effect of maternal nutritional status prior to pregnancy on reproduction and pregnancy outcomes is of great public health importance. Obesity in the United States and worldwide has grown to epidemic proportions, with an estimated 33% of US women classified as obese. This position paper has two objectives: (a) to help nutrition professionals become aware of the risks and possible complications of overweight and obesity for fertility,the course of pregnancy, birth outcomes, and short- and long-term maternal and child health outcomes;and (b) related to the commitment to research by the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition, to identify the gaps in research to improve our knowledge of the risks and complications associated with being overweight and obese before and during pregnancy.Only with an increased knowledge of these risks and complications can health care professionals develop effective strategies that can be implemented before and during pregnancy as well as during the inter conceptional period to ameliorate adverse outcomes.

  13. Position of the American Dietetic Association, American Society for Nutrition, and Society for Nutrition Education: Food and nutrition programs for community-residing older adults.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Barbara J; Wellman, Nancy S; Russell, Carlene

    2010-03-01

    Given the federal cost-containment policy to rebalance long-term care away from nursing homes to home- and community-based services, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Society for Nutrition Education that all older adults should have access to food and nutrition programs that ensure the availability of safe, adequate food to promote optimal nutritional status. Appropriate food and nutrition programs include adequately funded food assistance and meal programs, nutrition education, screening, assessment, counseling, therapy, monitoring, evaluation, and outcomes documentation to ensure more healthful aging. The growing number of older adults, the health care focus on prevention, and the global economic situation accentuate the fundamental need for these programs. Yet far too often food and nutrition programs are disregarded or taken for granted. Growing older generally increases nutritional risk. Illnesses and chronic diseases; physical, cognitive, and social challenges; racial, ethnic, and linguistic differences; and low socioeconomic status can further complicate a situation. The beneficial effects of nutrition for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management need emphasis. Although many older adults are enjoying longer and more healthful lives in their own homes, others, especially those with health disparities and poor nutritional status, would benefit from greater access to food and nutrition programs and services. Food and nutrition practitioners can play a major role in promoting universal access and integrating food and nutrition programs and nutrition services into home- and community-based services.

  14. American Geriatrics Society Policy Priorities for New Administration and 115th Congress.

    PubMed

    Lundebjerg, Nancy E; Hollmann, Peter; Malone, Michael L

    2017-03-01

    This paper is a statement of the American Geriatrics Society's (AGS) core policy priorities and the Society's positions on federal programs and policies that support older Americans as articulated to the new administration. Among the AGS priorities discussed in this paper are health reform, Medicare, and Medicaid. The AGS is committed to leveraging its expertise to inform regulatory and legislative policy proposals. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. The North American Menopause Society: from abstract to publication.

    PubMed

    Schnatz, Peter F; Romegialli, Alison; Abrantes, Jessica; Marakovits, Kimberly; Cunningham, David; O'Sullivan, David M

    2008-01-01

    The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) provides a forum through which researchers can present scientific abstracts. After presenting an abstract, the goal is to publish the research as a full-length article. The objective for this study was to determine the publication rate of abstracts presented at NAMS meetings. The PubMed database was searched for full-length, peer-reviewed publications, corresponding to the abstracts presented at the 1999 to 2003 NAMS meetings. When a full-length article was found, the title, authors, date of publication, and the journal were collected. Of the 661 abstracts presented at the five consecutive annual meetings, 253 (38.3%) have been published in peer-reviewed journals. The average time to publication was 2.0 +/- 1.5 years. The average time to publication for oral presentations was 1.7 +/- 1.3 years, and that for poster presentations was 2.0 +/- 1.5 years (P = 0.241). The publication rate of oral presentations was significantly greater than that of poster presentations (57.7% vs 36.5%; P < 0.003). Manuscripts were published in a total of 97 journals, with four (Menopause, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Climacteric, and Maturitas) accounting for 38.3% of the publications. The percentage of abstracts published by NAMS is within the range and within a similar time frame compared with other scientific meetings. Oral presentations are more likely to be rapidly published and may therefore be of higher interest and clinical relevance along with sound methodology and results. Menopause contained the most manuscripts, demonstrating a possible preference of submission to the Society's journal.

  16. Readability assessment of the American Rhinologic Society patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Kasabwala, Khushabu; Misra, Poonam; Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-04-01

    The extensive amount of medical literature available on the Internet is frequently accessed by patients. To effectively contribute to healthcare decision-making, these online resources should be worded at a level that is readable by any patient seeking information. The American Medical Association and National Institutes of Health recommend the readability of patient information material should be between a 4th to 6th grade level. In this study, we evaluate the readability of online patient education information available from the American Rhinologic Society (ARS) website using 9 different assessment tools that analyze the materials for reading ease and grade level of the target audience. Online patient education material from the ARS was downloaded in February 2012 and assessed for level of readability using the Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) Grading, Coleman-Liau Index, Gunning-Fog Index, FORCAST formula, Raygor Readability Estimate, the Fry Graph, and the New Dale-Chall Readability Formula. Each article was pasted as plain text into a Microsoft® Word® document and each subsection was analyzed using the software package Readability Studio Professional Edition Version 2012.1. All healthcare education materials assessed were written between a 9th grade and graduate reading level and were considered "difficult" to read by the assessment scales. Online patient education materials on the ARS website are written above the recommended 6th grade level and may require revision to make them easily understood by a broader audience. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  17. Risk stratification algorithm for management of patients with dual modular taper total hip arthroplasty: consensus statement of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Hip Society.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Min; Fehring, Thomas K; Lombardi, Adolph V; Barnes, C Lowry; Cabanela, Miguel E; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2014-11-01

    Although 'dual taper' modular stems with interchangeable modular necks have the potential to optimize hip biomechanical parameters, there is increasing concern regarding the occurrence of adverse local tissue reactions from mechanically assisted crevice corrosion at the neck-stem taper junction. A systematic treatment approach (risk stratification algorithm) based on the currently available data is recommended to optimize patient management. While specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and MARS MRI are useful modalities in evaluating for adverse tissue reactions, over-reliance on any single investigative tool in the clinical decision-making process should be avoided. There should be a low threshold to perform a systematic evaluation of patients with dual taper stem total hip arthroplasty as early recognition and diagnosis will facilitate the initiation of appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. American society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-05-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  19. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2013: transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The nephrology quiz and questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the nephrology quiz and questionnaire was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responds, and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  20. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2014: glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-04-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions that were prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  1. Reliability of the "American Knee Society Score" (AKSS)

    PubMed Central

    Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Calabrese, Fernanda Rizzo; Iha, Luiz Alberto Nakao; Petrilli, Marcelo; Lira Neto, Ozório; Carneiro Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the reproducibility of the "American Knee Society Score" (AKSS) scale, and determine its measurement, in order to make it useful for the evaluation of patients with osteoarthritis or who have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Methods In the first interview, the AKSS was applied along with the SF-36 and WOMAC (examiner 1). After thirty minutes the same patients answered only the AKSS. After a two week break, a third additional interview with AKSS was applied (examiner 2). Results We selected 58 patients with a mean age of 67.4 years. In the analysis of reproducibility, by ICC, there was strong inter-examiner and intra-examiner correlation for two AKSS components. In the individual items analysis there was good correlation for "Pain", "Range of Motion", "Flexion contracture" and all items of the AKSS Function component. Validation through the Pearson coefficient showed good correlation between AKSS "Pain," WOMAC "pain" and SF-36 "Pain domain", and good correlation between the AKSS and SF-36 "Functional Capacity domain". Conclusion The AKSS adapted to Brazilian culture is useful and reliable for the evaluation of individuals with osteoarthritis or those who have undergone TKA. PMID:24453578

  2. Radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the American Cancer Society cohort.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Yue; Pope, C Arden; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    Radon is a known cause of human lung cancer. Previously, the authors observed a significant positive association between mean county-level residential radon concentrations and lung cancer mortality in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II), a large prospective study of nearly 1.2 million participants recruited in 1982 by the American Cancer Society. There was also a significant positive association with mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because it is unclear whether radon is associated with mortality from other malignant or nonmalignant disease, the authors examined the association between radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the CPS-II. Mean county-level residential radon concentrations (mean = 53.5 (standard deviation: 38.0) Bq/m(3)) were linked to participants by their zip code at enrollment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for all-cause (excluding lung cancer and respiratory mortality) and cause-specific mortality associated with radon concentrations. A total of 811,961 participants in 2,754 counties were analyzed, including 265,477 deaths through 2006. There were no clear associations between radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the CPS-II. These findings suggest that residential radon is not associated with any other mortality beyond lung cancer or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. American Cancer Society perspectives on environmental factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Thun, Michael J; Ward, Elizabeth; Portier, Kenneth M; Balch, Alan J; Delancey, John Oliver L; Samet, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    Cancer prevention is central to the mission of the American Cancer Society (ACS). The ACS's prevention activities take many forms, but are primarily focused on modifiable risk factors that have been demonstrated to have the largest impact on cancer risk in the general population (with particular emphasis on tobacco use because of its large impact on cancer), and well-proven policy and program interventions. The ACS addresses nutrition, physical inactivity and obesity, alcohol consumption, excessive sun exposure, prevention of certain chronic infections, and selected other environmental factors through a variety of venues, including consensus guidelines (eg, nutrition and physical activity, human papillomavirus vaccination) and developing educational materials for health care providers and the general public. In contrast to the broad definition of environmental factors used by the ACS and most other public health agencies, some members of the general public associate the term "environmental" only with toxic air and water pollutants and other, predominantly manmade, hazards that people encounter, often involuntarily, in their daily life. This article will provide an overview of the ACS's approach to the prevention of cancer associated with such toxic pollutants in the context of its mission and priorities with respect to cancer prevention.

  4. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: summary of American Brachytherapy Society recommendations.

    PubMed

    Nag, S

    2000-05-01

    This article summarizes recent American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The ABS recommends treating patients with high probability of organ-confined disease with brachytherapy alone. Brachytherapy candidates with a significant risk of extraprostatic extension should be treated with supplemental external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The recommended prescription doses for monotherapy are 145 Gy for (125)I and 125 Gy for (103)Pd. The corresponding boost doses (after 40 to 50 Gy EBRT) are 110 Gy and 100 Gy, respectively. The ABS recommends that post-implant dosimetry should be performed on all patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy for optimal patient care. A dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the prostate should be performed and the D(90) (dose to 90% of the prostate gland) reported by all centers. Additionally, the D(80) D(100), the fractional V(80), V(90), V(100), V(150), V(200) (ie, the percentage of prostate volume receiving 80%, 90%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose, respectively), the rectal and urethral doses should be reported and ultimately correlated with clinical outcome in the research environment. On-line, real-time dosimetry, the effects of dose heterogeneity, and the effects of tissue heterogeneity need further investigation.

  5. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2013: glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall of the 2013 meeting was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single best answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the NQ&Q was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for CJASN readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  6. American Geriatrics Society feeding tubes in advanced dementia position statement.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    When eating difficulties arise, feeding tubes are not recommended for older adults with advanced dementia. Careful hand feeding should be offered because hand feeding has been shown to be as good as tube feeding for the outcomes of death, aspiration pneumonia, functional status, and comfort. Moreover, tube feeding is associated with agitation, greater use of physical and chemical restraints, healthcare use due to tube-related complications, and development of new pressure ulcers. Efforts to enhance oral feeding by altering the environment and creating patient-centered approaches to feeding should be part of usual care for older adults with advanced dementia. Tube feeding is a medical therapy that an individual's surrogate decision-maker can decline or accept in accordance with advance directives, previously stated wishes, or what it is thought the individual would want. It is the responsibility of all members of the healthcare team caring for residents in long-term care settings to understand any previously expressed wishes of the individuals (through review of advance directives and with surrogate caregivers) regarding tube feeding and to incorporate these wishes into the care plan. Institutions such as hospitals, nursing homes, and other care settings should promote choice, endorse shared and informed decision-making, and honor preferences regarding tube feeding. They should not impose obligations or exert pressure on individuals or providers to institute tube feeding. © 2014, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Perazella, Mark A.; Choi, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:25862775

  8. American Physiological Society Fall Meeting, August 15-20, 1976, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Abstracts of Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented are abstracts of papers arranged in alphabetical order by first-named author. The proceedings of the American Physiological Society were held jointly with the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ) and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). (EB)

  9. American Physiological Society Fall Meeting, August 15-20, 1976, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Abstracts of Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented are abstracts of papers arranged in alphabetical order by first-named author. The proceedings of the American Physiological Society were held jointly with the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ) and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). (EB)

  10. Obesity in older adults: technical review and position statement of the American Society for Nutrition and NAASO, The Obesity Society.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Dennis T; Apovian, Caroline M; Kushner, Robert F; Klein, Samuel

    2005-11-01

    Obesity causes serious medical complications and impairs quality of life. Moreover, in older persons, obesity can exacerbate the age-related decline in physical function and lead to frailty. However, appropriate treatment for obesity in older persons is controversial because of the reduction in relative health risks associated with increasing body mass index and the concern that weight loss could have potential harmful effects in the older population. This joint position statement from the American Society for Nutrition and NAASO, The Obesity Society reviews the clinical issues related to obesity in older persons and provides health professionals with appropriate weight-management guidelines for obese older patients. The current data show that weight-loss therapy improves physical function, quality of life, and the medical complications associated with obesity in older persons. Therefore, weight-loss therapy that minimizes muscle and bone losses is recommended for older persons who are obese and who have functional impairments or medical complications that can benefit from weight loss.

  11. Obesity in older adults: technical review and position statement of the American Society for Nutrition and NAASO, The Obesity Society.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Dennis T; Apovian, Caroline M; Kushner, Robert F; Klein, Samuel

    2005-11-01

    Obesity causes serious medical complications and impairs quality of life. Moreover, in older persons, obesity can exacerbate the age-related decline in physical function and lead to frailty. However, appropriate treatment for obesity in older persons is controversial because of the reduction in relative health risks associated with increasing body mass index and the concern that weight loss could have potential harmful effects in the older population. This joint position statement from the American Society for Nutrition and the NAASO, The Obesity Society reviews the clinical issues related to obesity in older persons and provides health professionals with appropriate weight-management guidelines for obese older patients. The current data show that weight-loss therapy improves physical function, quality of life, and the medical complications associated with obesity in older persons. Therefore, weight-loss therapy that minimizes muscle and bone losses is recommended for older persons who are obese and who have functional impairments or medical complications that can benefit from weight loss.

  12. The state of American management.

    PubMed

    Wriston, W B

    1990-01-01

    Every year, the president of the United States offers his State of the Union address. Here, from one of the most respected managers in America, is a report on the State of American Management. The state of management, says Walter B. Wriston, is good. Despite the predictions of America's decline, our economy continues to prosper. That is because of this fundamental truth: the United States is the only country in the world that renews itself daily. This is the Age of Pluralism, and U.S. business is based on pluralism. The spirit of the entrepreneur has entered the mainstream of U.S. management, transforming bureaucracy and emphasizing leadership. Today's top executives need to be more like politicians than the number-crunchers of yesterday. At the same time, information is flowing more freely, so corporations are eliminating layers of managers who were really just transmission lines. And top managers are learning to listen to the people who are closest to the work. Everyone today is a knowledge worker. The accelerating pace of knowledge has put a greater premium than ever on talent. Globalization is a big part of this new world. From the manager's viewpoint, globalization means that "you're in a marketplace where you're suddenly waking up with a guy...from a country you're not too sure where it is, who's eating your lunch in your hometown." To understand global competition, managers in large and small companies need broad vision. Finally, to deal with change, U.S. managers must confront some issues at home. For instance, our accounting systems are obsolete, both in companies and in our national accounts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Management of Death in the Middle Class American Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Vidal S.

    Starting with the observation that attitudes towards death cannot be divorced from attitudes towards life, the author proceeds with a critical and reflective look at American society's poor management of death, both in terms of the dying person and the bereaved. Denial is the mechanism used to protect ourselves from facing the fact of death, and…

  14. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment: a position paper of The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  16. American Thoracic Society Member Survey on Climate Change and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bloodhart, Brittany; Ewart, Gary; Thurston, George D.; Balmes, John R.; Guidotti, Tee L.; Maibach, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed a random sample of ATS members to assess their perceptions of, clinical experiences with, and preferred policy responses to climate change. An e-mail containing an invitation from the ATS President and a link to an online survey was sent to 5,500 randomly selected U.S. members; up to four reminder e-mails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from members in 49 states and the District of Columbia (n = 915); the response rate was 17%. Geographic distribution of respondents mirrored that of the sample. Survey estimates’ confidence intervals were ±3.5% or smaller. Results indicate that a large majority of ATS members have concluded that climate change is happening (89%), that it is driven by human activity (68%), and that it is relevant to patient care (“a great deal”/“a moderate amount”) (65%). A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%). A larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next 2 decades. Respondents indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. Overall, ATS members are observing that human health is already adversely affected by climate change and support responses to address this situation. PMID:25535822

  17. American Thoracic Society member survey on climate change and health.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Bloodhart, Brittany; Ewart, Gary; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Guidotti, Tee L; Maibach, Edward W

    2015-02-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed a random sample of ATS members to assess their perceptions of, clinical experiences with, and preferred policy responses to climate change. An e-mail containing an invitation from the ATS President and a link to an online survey was sent to 5,500 randomly selected U.S. members; up to four reminder e-mails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from members in 49 states and the District of Columbia (n = 915); the response rate was 17%. Geographic distribution of respondents mirrored that of the sample. Survey estimates' confidence intervals were ±3.5% or smaller. Results indicate that a large majority of ATS members have concluded that climate change is happening (89%), that it is driven by human activity (68%), and that it is relevant to patient care ("a great deal"/"a moderate amount") (65%). A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%). A larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next 2 decades. Respondents indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. Overall, ATS members are observing that human health is already adversely affected by climate change and support responses to address this situation.

  18. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Hesketh, Paul J; Kris, Mark G; Feyer, Petra C; Somerfield, Mark R; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Flaherty, Anne Marie; Freundlich, Barbara; Morrow, Gary; Rao, Kamakshi V; Schwartz, Rowena N; Lyman, Gary H

    2011-11-01

    To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for antiemetics in oncology. A systematic review of the medical literature was completed to inform this update. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and meeting materials from ASCO and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer were all searched. Primary outcomes of interest were complete response and rates of any vomiting or nausea. Thirty-seven trials met prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review. Two systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration were identified; one surveyed the pediatric literature. The other compared the relative efficacy of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonists. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens were reclassified as highly emetic. Patients who receive this combination or any highly emetic agents should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 (NK(1)) receptor antagonist. A large trial validated the equivalency of fosaprepitant, a single-day intravenous formulation, with aprepitant; either therapy is appropriate. Preferential use of palonosetron is recommended for moderate emetic risk regimens, combined with dexamethasone. For low-risk agents, patients can be offered dexamethasone before the first dose of chemotherapy. Patients undergoing high emetic risk radiation therapy should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist before each fraction and for 24 hours after treatment and may receive a 5-day course of dexamethasone during fractions 1 to 5. The Update Committee noted the importance of continued symptom monitoring throughout therapy. Clinicians underestimate the incidence of nausea, which is not as well controlled as emesis.

  19. "Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS)": Past, Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    1999-01-01

    Explores how the "Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS)" has developed and what it might become. Topics covered include JASIS versus other American Society for Information Science publications; types of papers in JASIS; authors; competing journals; content scope; electronic enhancements; and how information…

  20. 78 FR 37885 - Approval of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Code Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... June 24, 2013 Part II Nuclear Regulatory Commission 10 CFR Part 50 Approval of American Society of..., 2013 / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 RIN 3150-AI72 Approval of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Code Cases AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission....

  1. Lumbar disc nomenclature: version 2.0: recommendations of the combined task forces of the North American Spine Society, the American Society of Spine Radiology, and the American Society of Neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Fardon, David F; Williams, Alan L; Dohring, Edward J; Murtagh, F Reed; Gabriel Rothman, Stephen L; Sze, Gordon K

    2014-11-15

    This article comprises a review of the literature pertaining to the normal and pathological lumbar disc and the compilation of a standardized nomenclature. To provide a resource that promotes a clear understanding of lumbar disc terminology among clinicians, radiologists, and researchers. The article "Nomenclature and Classification of Lumbar Disc Pathology. Recommendations of the Combined Task Forces of the North American Spine Society, American Society of Spine Radiology and American Society of Neuroradiology" was published in 2001 in Spine © Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins and formally endorsed by the 3 boards. Its purpose, which it served for well over a decade, was to promote greater clarity and consistency of usage of spine terminology. Since 2001, there has been sufficient evolution in our understanding of the lumbar disc to suggest the need for revision and updating. The document represents the consensus recommendations of the current combined task forces and reflects changes consistent with current concepts in radiological and clinical care. A PubMed search was performed for literature pertaining to the lumbar disc. The task force members individually and collectively reviewed the literature and revised the 2001 document. It was then reviewed by the governing boards of the American Society of Spine Radiology, the American Society of Neuroradiology, and the North American Spine Society. After further revision based on their feedback, the paper was approved for publication. The article provides a discussion of the recommended diagnostic categories and a glossary of terms pertaining to the lumbar disc, a detailed discussion of the terms and their recommended usage, as well as updated illustrations and literature references. We have revised and updated a document that, since 2001, has provided a widely accepted nomenclature that helps maintain consistency and accuracy in the description of the properties of the normal and abnormal lumbar discs and that

  2. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes.

  3. 75 FR 23245 - American Lobster Fishery Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-AT31 American Lobster Fishery Management AGENCY... impact statement (DEIS) that identifies several proposed management actions and alternatives for the American lobster fishery in Federal waters. The management actions are based on recommendations to NMFS by...

  4. American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update on the use of epoetin and darbepoetin in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Brouwers, Melissa; Hurley, Patricia; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Arcasoy, Murat O; Spivak, Jerry L; Bennett, Charles L; Bohlius, Julia; Evanchuk, Darren; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Regan, David H; Somerfield, Mark R

    2010-11-18

    To update American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with cancer. An Update Committee reviewed data published between January 2007 and January 2010. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched. The literature search yielded one new individual patient data analysis and four literature-based meta-analyses, two systematic reviews, and 13 publications reporting new results from randomized controlled trials not included in prior or new reviews. For patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy who have a hemoglobin (Hb) level less than 10 g/dL, the Update Committee recommends that clinicians discuss potential harms (eg, thromboembolism, shorter survival) and benefits (eg, decreased transfusions) of ESAs and compare these with potential harms (eg, serious infections, immune-mediated adverse reactions) and benefits (eg, rapid Hb improvement) of RBC transfusions. Individual preferences for assumed risk should contribute to shared decisions on managing chemotherapy-induced anemia. The Committee cautions against ESA use under other circumstances. If used, ESAs should be administered at the lowest dose possible and should increase Hb to the lowest concentration possible to avoid transfusions. Available evidence does not identify Hb levels ≥ 10 g/dL either as thresholds for initiating treatment or as targets for ESA therapy. Starting doses and dose modifications after response or nonresponse should follow US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling. ESAs should be discontinued after 6 to 8 weeks in nonresponders. ESAs should be avoided in patients with cancer not receiving concurrent chemotherapy, except for those with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Caution should be exercised when using ESAs with chemotherapeutic agents in diseases associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Table 1 lists detailed recommendations.

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology clinical practice guideline update on the use of epoetin and darbepoetin in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Brouwers, Melissa; Hurley, Patricia; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Arcasoy, Murat O; Spivak, Jerry L; Bennett, Charles L; Bohlius, Julia; Evanchuk, Darren; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Regan, David H; Somerfield, Mark R

    2010-11-20

    To update American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology recommendations for use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with cancer. An Update Committee reviewed data published between January 2007 and January 2010. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched. The literature search yielded one new individual patient data analysis and four literature-based meta-analyses, two systematic reviews, and 13 publications reporting new results from randomized controlled trials not included in prior or new reviews. For patients undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy who have a hemoglobin (Hb) level less than 10 g/dL, the Update Committee recommends that clinicians discuss potential harms (eg, thromboembolism, shorter survival) and benefits (eg, decreased transfusions) of ESAs and compare these with potential harms (eg, serious infections, immune-mediated adverse reactions) and benefits (eg, rapid Hb improvement) of RBC transfusions. Individual preferences for assumed risk should contribute to shared decisions on managing chemotherapy-induced anemia. The Committee cautions against ESA use under other circumstances. If used, ESAs should be administered at the lowest dose possible and should increase Hb to the lowest concentration possible to avoid transfusions. Available evidence does not identify Hb levels ≥ 10 g/dL either as thresholds for initiating treatment or as targets for ESA therapy. Starting doses and dose modifications after response or nonresponse should follow US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling. ESAs should be discontinued after 6 to 8 weeks in nonresponders. ESAs should be avoided in patients with cancer not receiving concurrent chemotherapy, except for those with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Caution should be exercised when using ESAs with chemotherapeutic agents in diseases associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Table 1 lists detailed recommendations.

  6. American Meteor Society Fireball reporting system and mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankey, M.

    2014-07-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) founded in 1911 pioneered the visual study of meteors and has collected data relating to meteor observations and bright fireballs for over 100 years. In December 2010, the online fireball reporting system was upgraded to an interactive application that utilizes Google Maps and other programmatic methods to pinpoint the observer's location, azimuth and elevation values with a high degree of precision. The AMS has collected 10s of 1000s of witness reports relating to 100s of events each year since the new application was released. Three dimensional triangulation methods that average the data collected from witnesses have been developed that can determine the start and end points of the meteor with an accuracy of <50 km (when compared to published solutions provided by operators of all sky cameras). RA and DEC radiant estimates can also be computed for all significant events reported to the AMS. With the release of the mobile application, the AMS is able to collect more precise elevation angles than through the web application. Users can file a new report directly on the phone or update the values submitted through a web report. After web users complete their fireball report online, they are prompted to download the app and update their observation with the more precise data provided by the sensors in the mobile device. The mobile app also provides an accurate means for the witness to report the elapsed time of the fireball. To log this value, the user drags the device across the sky where they saw the fireball. This process is designed to require no button click or user interaction to start and stop the time recording. A count down initiates the process and once the user's phone crosses the plane of azimuth for the end point of the fireball the velocity timer automatically stops. Users are asked to log the recording three times in an effort to minimize error. The three values are then averaged into a final score. Once enough

  7. The Asian-American and Pacific Islander population and the American Cancer Society initiative.

    PubMed

    Vance, Ralph

    2005-12-15

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) Nationwide Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) Initiative is a continuing collaboration between the ACS and other organizations and community groups. With a view to incorporating access to quality treatment as an over-arching principal, the objectives of the AAPI Initiative are to provide strategic oversight to the ACS for outreach to AAPI populations and to develop a nationwide plan for the purpose of making ACS programs and services available to these populations. After a series of meetings in 2002, including a joint meeting between the Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (AANCART) and the ACS, the first ACS Nationwide AAPI Council meeting was held in early 2003. The goals and objectives of this initiative are 1) to develop a plan for delivery of ACS programs and services to the AAPI population, 2) to develop a program for collaboration with organizations that can help the ACS reach its objectives, 3) to develop an advocacy program that enables the ACS to reach its objectives, and 4) to develop an income-development program to both reach and maintain these objectives. The ACS-AANCART collaboration is a great example of the type of collaboration that will make not only the ACS but also the cancer community as a whole successful in eradicating cancer as a major public health problem.

  8. American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for reporting morbidity after prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subir; Ellis, Rodney J; Merrick, Gregory S; Bahnson, Robert; Wallner, Kent; Stock, Richard

    2002-10-01

    To standardize the reporting of brachytherapy-related prostate morbidity to guide ongoing clinical practice and future investigations. Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate brachytherapy performed a literature review and, guided by their clinical experience, formulated specific recommendations for reporting on morbidity related to prostate brachytherapy. The ABS recommends using validated, patient-administered health-related quality-of-life instruments for the determination of baseline and follow-up data regarding bowel, urinary, and sexual function. Both actuarial and crude incidences should be reported, along with the temporal resolution of specific complications, and correlated with the doses to the normal tissues. The International Prostate Symptom Score is recommended to assess urinary morbidity, and any dysuria, gross hematuria, urinary retention, incontinence, or medication use should be quantified. Likewise, the "Sexual Health Inventory for Men," which includes the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function, is the preferred instrument for reporting sexual function, and the loss of sexual desire, incidence of hematospermia, painful orgasm (orgasmalgia), altered orgasm intensity, decreased ejaculatory volume, use of erectile aids, and use of hormones for androgen deprivation should be quantified. The ABS recommends adoption of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer acute and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme for reporting rectal morbidity and noting the incidence of rectal steroid, laser, or antidiarrheal use. It is important to focus on health-related quality-of-life issues in the treatment of prostate cancer, because the control rates are very similar between appropriate treatment modalities. The ABS recommends using the International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of Erectile Function, and Radiation Therapy

  9. Selection of ecologic covariates in the American Cancer Society study.

    PubMed

    Willis, Alette; Krewski, Daniel; Jerrett, Michael; Goldberg, Mark S; Burnett, Richard T

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) Study of the effects of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution on mortality used metropolitan areas to assign exposures to individual cohort members (Pope et al., 1995); these authors did not, however, control for any other place-specific variables in their analysis. Consequently, the study has been criticized on the basis that the association observed between air pollution and mortality may be confounded by other unmeasured ecologic covariates. To address this criticism, the reanalysis team selected a set of place-specific variables that measured determinants of health ranging from the biophysical environment to the social environment and the healthcare system. This article outlines the process by which place-specific ecologic covariates were selected; data measuring these variables were obtained and geographic boundaries for places were delineated. Issues involved in obtaining and using geographically based ecological data are examined within the context of the reanalysis of the ACS study. Both the ecological fallacy and the atomistic fallacy are addressed and an argument is made for the importance of studying the effects of place-specific variables that are integral or contextual in nature. Issues relating to the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) are explored with reference to using ZIP codes and data from a variety of sources. It is argued that differences in the geographical scale of variability for various pollutants may prove to be the key to distinguishing between their relative impacts on health and that multilevel analyses are essential for understanding the impact of social and environmental determinants of health. A number of determinants of health are then briefly examined in terms of their association with mortality, the appropriateness of their being measured at the metropolitan scale, and the availability of data for the 1980s from U.S. sources. Finally, the article presents the database of place

  10. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for brachytherapy of uveal melanomas.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subir; Quivey, Jeanne M; Earle, John D; Followill, David; Fontanesi, James; Finger, Paul T

    2003-06-01

    This article presents the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines for the use of brachytherapy for patients with choroidal melanomas. Members of the ABS with expertise in choroidal melanoma formulated brachytherapy guidelines based upon their clinical experience and a review of the literature. The Board of Directors of the ABS approved the final report. Episcleral plaque brachytherapy is a complex procedure and should only be undertaken in specialized medical centers with expertise in this sophisticated treatment program. Recommendations were made for patient selection, techniques, dose rates, and dosages. Most patients with very small uveal melanomas (<2.5 mm height and <10 mm in largest basal dimension) should be observed for tumor growth before treatment. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of medium-sized choroidal melanoma (between 2.5 and 10 mm in height and <16 mm basal diameter) are candidates for episcleral plaques if the patient is otherwise healthy and without metastatic disease. A histopathologic verification is not required. Small melanomas may be candidates if there is documented growth; some patients with large melanomas (>10 mm height or >16 mm basal diameter) may also be candidates. Patients with large tumors or with tumors at peripapillary and macular locations have a poorer visual outcome and lower local control that must be taken into account in the patient decision-making process. Patients with gross extrascleral extension, ring melanoma, and tumor involvement of more than half of the ciliary body are not suitable for plaque therapy. For plaque fabrication, the ophthalmologist must provide the tumor size (including basal diameters and tumor height) and a detailed fundus diagram. The ABS recommends a minimum tumor (125)I dose of 85 Gy at a dose rate of 0.60-1.05 Gy/h using AAPM TG-43 formalism for the calculation of dose. NRC or state licensing guidelines regarding procedures for handling of radioisotopes must be followed. Brachytherapy

  11. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  12. Respiratory Health Equality in the United States. The American Thoracic Society Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jesse; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Thomas, Alvin; Samet, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Because the frequency of major risk factors for respiratory diseases (e.g., tobacco use) differs across demographic groups (defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health care access, occupation, or other characteristics), health disparities are commonly encountered in pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. As part of its policy on respiratory health disparities, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Executive Committee created a Health Equality Subcommittee of the Health Policy Committee, with an initial mandate of defining respiratory health equality and, as a subsequent task, providing recommendations to the ATS leadership as to how our society may help attain such equality in the United States. After receiving input from the ATS assemblies and committees, the subcommittee developed this document on respiratory health equality. This document defines respiratory health disparities and respiratory health equality, and expands on a recent ATS and European Respiratory Society policy statement on disparities in respiratory health. Attainment of respiratory health equality requires the ending of respiratory health disparities, which can be achieved only through multidisciplinary efforts to eliminate detrimental environmental exposures while promoting a healthy lifestyle, implementing all components of high-quality health care (prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment), and conducting research that will lead to better prevention and management of respiratory diseases for everyone. The ATS recognizes that such efforts must include all stakeholders: members of society at large, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and other professional societies. The ATS urges all of its members and those of sister societies to work to achieve this laudable goal. PMID:24625275

  13. Respiratory health equality in the United States. The American thoracic society perspective.

    PubMed

    Celedón, Juan C; Roman, Jesse; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Thomas, Alvin; Samet, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Because the frequency of major risk factors for respiratory diseases (e.g., tobacco use) differs across demographic groups (defined by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health care access, occupation, or other characteristics), health disparities are commonly encountered in pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. As part of its policy on respiratory health disparities, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Executive Committee created a Health Equality Subcommittee of the Health Policy Committee, with an initial mandate of defining respiratory health equality and, as a subsequent task, providing recommendations to the ATS leadership as to how our society may help attain such equality in the United States. After receiving input from the ATS assemblies and committees, the subcommittee developed this document on respiratory health equality. This document defines respiratory health disparities and respiratory health equality, and expands on a recent ATS and European Respiratory Society policy statement on disparities in respiratory health. Attainment of respiratory health equality requires the ending of respiratory health disparities, which can be achieved only through multidisciplinary efforts to eliminate detrimental environmental exposures while promoting a healthy lifestyle, implementing all components of high-quality health care (prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment), and conducting research that will lead to better prevention and management of respiratory diseases for everyone. The ATS recognizes that such efforts must include all stakeholders: members of society at large, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and other professional societies. The ATS urges all of its members and those of sister societies to work to achieve this laudable goal.

  14. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  15. Interdependence in American Society and Commitment to the Common Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Starting with a discussion of the religious dimension of national purpose in America, this article examines the concept of American civil religion and the emergence of individualism as a fundamental aspect of American identity. It then examines recent history, looking at two social revolutions that America has gone through in recent…

  16. Interdependence in American Society and Commitment to the Common Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Starting with a discussion of the religious dimension of national purpose in America, this article examines the concept of American civil religion and the emergence of individualism as a fundamental aspect of American identity. It then examines recent history, looking at two social revolutions that America has gone through in recent…

  17. The Enemy at Home: Images of Addiction in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statman, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that much of American public, political leadership, and service providers share marked denial of antecedents, dynamics, and consequences of dysfunctional drug use. Examines dynamics of this denial, describes popular images of drug use and drug users in American culture, and considers roots of these images in the underlying value systems of…

  18. HER2 Testing and Clinical Decision Making in Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Angela N; Washington, Mary Kay; Ventura, Christina B; Ismaila, Nofisat; Colasacco, Carol; Benson, Al B; Carrato, Alfredo; Gulley, Margaret L; Jain, Dhanpat; Kakar, Sanjay; Mackay, Helen J; Streutker, Catherine; Tang, Laura; Troxell, Megan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-12-01

    - ERBB2 (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 or HER2) is currently the only biomarker established for selection of a specific therapy for patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GEA). However, there are no comprehensive guidelines for the assessment of HER2 in patients with GEA. - To establish an evidence-based guideline for HER2 testing in patients with GEA, to formalize the algorithms for methods to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing while addressing which patients and tumor specimens are appropriate, and to provide guidance on clinical decision making. - The College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to conduct a systematic review of the literature to develop an evidence-based guideline with recommendations for optimal HER2 testing in patients with GEA. - The panel is proposing 11 recommendations with strong agreement from the open-comment participants. - The panel recommends that tumor specimen(s) from all patients with advanced GEA, who are candidates for HER2-targeted therapy, should be assessed for HER2 status before the initiation of HER2-targeted therapy. Clinicians should offer combination chemotherapy and a HER2-targeted agent as initial therapy for all patients with HER2-positive advanced GEA. For pathologists, guidance is provided for morphologic selection of neoplastic tissue, testing algorithms, scoring methods, interpretation and reporting of results, and laboratory quality assurance. - This guideline provides specific recommendations for assessment of HER2 in patients with advanced GEA while addressing pertinent technical issues and clinical implications of the results.

  19. Lumbar disc nomenclature: version 2.0: Recommendations of the combined task forces of the North American Spine Society, the American Society of Spine Radiology and the American Society of Neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Fardon, David F; Williams, Alan L; Dohring, Edward J; Murtagh, F Reed; Gabriel Rothman, Stephen L; Sze, Gordon K

    2014-11-01

    The paper ''Nomenclature and classification of lumbar disc pathology, recommendations of the combined task forces of the North American Spine Society, the American Society of Spine Radiology and the American Society of Neuroradiology,'' was published in 2001 in Spine (© Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins). It was authored by David Fardon, MD, and Pierre Milette, MD, and formally endorsed by the American Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR), American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR), and North American Spine Society (NASS). Its purpose was to promote greater clarity and consistency of usage of spinal terminology, and it has served this purpose well for over a decade. Since 2001, there has been sufficient evolution in our understanding of the lumbar disc to suggest the need for revision and updating of the original document. The revised document is presented here, and it represents the consensus recommendations of contemporary combined task forces of the ASSR, ASNR, and NASS. This article reflects changes consistent with current concepts in radiologic and clinical care. To provide a resource that promotes a clear understanding of lumbar disc terminology amongst clinicians, radiologists, and researchers. All the concerned need standard terms for the normal and pathologic conditions of lumbar discs that can be used accurately and consistently and thus best serve patients with disc disorders. This article comprises a review of the literature. A PubMed search was performed for literature pertaining to the lumbar disc. The task force members individually and collectively reviewed the literature and revised the 2001 document. The revised document was then submitted for review to the governing boards of the ASSR, ASNR, and NASS. After further revision based on the feedback from the governing boards, the article was approved for publication by the governing boards of the three societies, as representative of the consensus recommendations of the societies. The article provides a

  20. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  1. 77 FR 31041 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Research and Production Act of 1993--American Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that... of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  2. 76 FR 80406 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--American Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby... Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), American Society of Mechanical...

  3. The Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies (PAFNS): A New Regional Organization.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marco T; Román, Gustavo C

    2016-07-15

    The Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies (PAFNS) was created on 15 November 2011 during the 20th World Congress of Neurology in Marrakech by virtue of the "Declaration of Morocco" signed by the WFN Latin American delegates and ratified on 5 March 2012 by delegates attending the 13th Pan-American Congress of Neurology in La Paz, Bolivia. On 20 March 2013 delegates attending the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in San Diego, California, USA, gave formal approval to the PAFNS Constitution. The neurological societies from the following countries have approved and signed the constitution as founding members and active ordinary members: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The Ibero-American Stroke Society (SIECV), the Commission on Latin American Affairs of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the World Sleep Society have requested the status of Associate Members. The WFN and the American Academy of Neurology provided seed grants for the creation of the Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies. PAFNS represents a major step for the improvement of regional neurological care, education and research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biopesticides: State of the Art and Future Opportunities by the American Chemical Society

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter from an American Chemical Society symposium reviews areas including how EPA views the benefits of biopesticides, related laws and legal requirements, biopesticide registration, and biopesticide data requirements.

  5. Forestry Across Borders: Proceedings of the New England Society of American Foresters 84th Winter Meeting

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey S. Ward; Mark J., eds. Twery

    2004-01-01

    Contains 19 short papers and abstracts presented at the 84th annual winter meeting of the New England Society of American Foresters, Forestry Across Borders, in Quebec City, Canada, March 23-26, 2004.

  6. Why kidneys fail: report from an American Society of Nephrology Advances in Research Conference.

    PubMed

    Schnaper, H William; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2006-07-01

    A recent American Society of Nephrology Conference, entitled "Why Kidneys Fail: Translating Basic Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis into Novel Therapies," explored basic mechanisms and their potential translational implications. In this article, the conference organizers summarize the conference presentations.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  8. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  9. Final Report on Kokes Awards for the 20th North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Michael S

    2008-12-31

    This Final Report describes how the Kokes Awards program was carried out for the 2007 meeting with regard to selection of students and disbursement of funds received from DOE and other sources. The objective of the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program of the American Catalysis Society is to encourage graduate students to attend and participate meaningfully in the biennial North American Catalysis Society Meeting.

  10. American Chemical Society division of fuel chemistry Henry H. Storch award.

    SciTech Connect

    Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry Henry H. Storch Award ... The purpose of the Henry H. Storch Award is to recognize distinguished contributions worldwide to fundamental or engineering research on the chemistry and utilization of all hydrocarbon fuels, with the exception of petroleum. ... The award was established in 1964 by the American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry and administered by the Division until 1985.

  11. Environmentalism, Feminism, and the Future of American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marietta, Don E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two important current movements are environmentalism, respect for the natural environment and the effort to preserve it, and feminism, concern for the rights of women and the worth of values traditionally associated with the female. These two movements are closely related, both philosophically and in their concrete goals for society. (RM)

  12. Environmentalism, Feminism, and the Future of American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marietta, Don E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two important current movements are environmentalism, respect for the natural environment and the effort to preserve it, and feminism, concern for the rights of women and the worth of values traditionally associated with the female. These two movements are closely related, both philosophically and in their concrete goals for society. (RM)

  13. Adaptation of Adolescent Mexican Americans to United States Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derbyshire, Robert L.

    1969-01-01

    In a paper prepared for the conference on "Migration and Behavioral Deviance, November 4-8, 1968, Dorado Beach, Puerto Rico, the author compares "the attitudes of Mexican American adolescents who were born and reared or whose parents were born and reared in the United States with those adolescents who migrated or whose parents migrated…

  14. Adaptation of Adolescent Mexican Americans to United States Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derbyshire, Robert L.

    1969-01-01

    In a paper prepared for the conference on "Migration and Behavioral Deviance, November 4-8, 1968, Dorado Beach, Puerto Rico, the author compares "the attitudes of Mexican American adolescents who were born and reared or whose parents were born and reared in the United States with those adolescents who migrated or whose parents migrated…

  15. Native American Youth: Meeting Their Needs in a Multicultural Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Stephen P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Although Native Americans are among the fastest growing ethnic groups, educators and counselors frequently understand little about their cultural heritage and customs. This overview of factors such as cooperation/competitiveness, communication, and learning styles should help educators and counselors to promote multicultural awareness and to…

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy for relationships with companies: background and rationale.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) new conflict of interest policy reflects a commitment to transparency and independence in the development and presentation of scientific and educational content. ASCO supports thorough and accessible disclosure of financial relationships with companies at institutional and individual levels and calls for rigorous evaluation of content in light of the information disclosed. For abstracts and articles presenting original research, ASCO holds first, last, and corresponding authors to a clear standard of independence. In imposing restrictions, the new policy focuses on the role of these authors rather than of the principal investigator(s) as in the previous policy. ASCO remains actively engaged with the broader scientific community in seeking and implementing efficient, effective approaches to conflict of interest management.

  17. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: flexible airway endoscopy in children.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Wood, Robert E; Schechter, Michael S; Leong, Albin B; Wittkugel, Eric; Abode, Kathy; Chmiel, James F; Daines, Cori; Davis, Stephanie; Eber, Ernst; Huddleston, Charles; Kilbaugh, Todd; Kurland, Geoffrey; Midulla, Fabio; Molter, David; Montgomery, Gregory S; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rutter, Michael J; Visner, Gary; Walczak, Stephen A; Ferkol, Thomas W; Michelson, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    Flexible airway endoscopy (FAE) is an accepted and frequently performed procedure in the evaluation of children with known or suspected airway and lung parenchymal disorders. However, published technical standards on how to perform FAE in children are lacking. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) approved the formation of a multidisciplinary committee to delineate technical standards for performing FAE in children. The committee completed a pragmatic synthesis of the evidence and used the evidence synthesis to answer clinically relevant questions. There is a paucity of randomized controlled trials in pediatric FAE. The committee developed recommendations based predominantly on the collective clinical experience of our committee members highlighting the importance of FAE-specific airway management techniques and anesthesia, establishing suggested competencies for the bronchoscopist in training, and defining areas deserving further investigation. These ATS-sponsored technical standards describe the equipment, personnel, competencies, and special procedures associated with FAE in children.

  18. Atopic dermatitis guideline. Position paper from the Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías, A; Olmos, C; de Falco, A

    2014-01-01

    As in other regions, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America has been increasing in recent years. Although there are several clinical guidelines, many of their recommendations cannot be universal since they depend on the characteristics of each region. Thus, we decided to create a consensus guideline on atopic dermatitis applicable in Latin America and other tropical regions, taking into account socio-economic, geographical, cultural and health care system characteristics. The Latin American Society of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (SLAAI) conducted a systematic search for articles related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of dermatitis using various electronic resources such as Google, Pubmed, EMBASE (Ovid) and Cochrane data base. We have also looked for all published articles in Latin America on the subject using LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) database. Each section was reviewed by at least two members of the committee, and the final version was subsequently approved by all of them, using the Delphi methodology for consensus building. Afterward, the final document was shared for external evaluation with physicians, specialists (allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians), patients and academic institutions such as universities and scientific societies related to the topic. All recommendations made by these groups were taken into account for the final drafting of the document. There are few original studies conducted in Latin America about dermatitis; however, we were able to create a practical guideline for Latin America taking into account the particularities of the region. Moreover, the integral management was highlighted including many of the recommendations from different participants in the health care of this disease (patients, families, primary care physicians and specialists). This practical guide presents a concise approach to the diagnosis and management of atopic dermatitis that can be

  19. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs.

  20. Nine proposed action areas to enhance diversity and inclusion in the American Fisheries Society

    Treesearch

    Brooke E. Penaluna; Ivan Arismendi; Christine M. Moffitt; Zachary L. Penney

    2017-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the fisheries profession, including diversity of members of the American Fisheries Society (AFS), is vital to ensuring the future relevance of fish and their habitats, fisheries, and fisheries professionals in the broader context of society. Any well-informed natural resource professional understands the value of a diverse ecosystem, and savvy...

  1. The American Psychosomatic Society - integrating mind, brain, body and social context in medicine since 1942.

    PubMed

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The American Psychosomatic Society is one of the oldest and probably the most influential scientific society in psychosomatic/biopsychosocial research worldwide. The current article delineates the historical development and current strategic orientation of the society. Review of published literature, archived materials and current documents of the society. The American Psychosomatic Society (APS) was founded in 1942, originally named the "American Society for Research in Psychosomatic Problems ". It originated from the editorial board of the Journal Psychosomatic Medicine, which had already been founded in 1939 and has become one of the major journals in the field. As an organization, APS has developed into a premier international scientific society, providing an interdisciplinary home for researchers from medicine, psychology and related areas, gathering under the mission "to advance and integrate the scientific study of biological, psychological, behavioral and social factors in health and disease" and dedicated to the goals of Scientific Excellence, Clinical Relevance, and Vibrant and Diverse Membership. Besides editing Psychosomatic Medicine, the APS organizes Annual Meetings and specialized events, issues several scientific awards and scholarships and is engaged in collaborative efforts to improve the research and funding landscape for biobehavioral research in the US and translate psychosomatic research findings into medical education and clinical practice. In its 75(th) anniversary year, the American Psychosomatic Society has developed into the scientific landscape of the 21(st) century, and its current updated strategy addresses contemporary demands in advancing science and improving holistic patient care.

  2. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: the Integrated Care of The COPD Patient.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The optimal care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires an individualized, patient-centered approach that recognizes and treats all aspects of the disease, addresses the systemic effects and comorbidities, and integrates medical care among healthcare professionals and across healthcare sectors. In many ways the integration of medical care for COPD is still in its infancy, and its implementation will undoubtedly represent a paradigm shift in our thinking. This article summarizes the proceedings of a workshop, The Integrated Care of the COPD Patient, which was funded by the American Thoracic Society. This workshop included participants who were chosen because of their expertise in the area as well as their firsthand experience with disease management models. Our summary describes the concepts of integrated care and chronic disease management, details specific components of disease management as they may apply to the patient with COPD, and provides several innovative examples of COPD disease management programs originating from different healthcare systems. It became clear from the discussions and review of the literature that more high-quality research in this area is vital. It is our hope that the information presented here provides a "call to arms" in this regard.

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Pediatric Chronic Home Invasive Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sterni, Laura M; Collaco, Joseph M; Baker, Christopher D; Carroll, John L; Sharma, Girish D; Brozek, Jan L; Finder, Jonathan D; Ackerman, Veda L; Arens, Raanan; Boroughs, Deborah S; Carter, Jodi; Daigle, Karen L; Dougherty, Joan; Gozal, David; Kevill, Katharine; Kravitz, Richard M; Kriseman, Tony; MacLusky, Ian; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine; Tori, Alvaro J; Ferkol, Thomas; Halbower, Ann C

    2016-04-15

    Children with chronic invasive ventilator dependence living at home are a diverse group of children with special health care needs. Medical oversight, equipment management, and community resources vary widely. There are no clinical practice guidelines available to health care professionals for the safe hospital discharge and home management of these complex children. To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the hospital discharge and home/community management of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The Pediatric Assembly of the American Thoracic Society assembled an interdisciplinary workgroup with expertise in the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The experts developed four questions of clinical importance and used an evidence-based strategy to identify relevant medical evidence. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to formulate and grade recommendations. Clinical practice recommendations for the management of children with chronic ventilator dependence at home are provided, and the evidence supporting each recommendation is discussed. Collaborative generalist and subspecialist comanagement is the Medical Home model most likely to be successful for the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Standardized hospital discharge criteria are suggested. An awake, trained caregiver should be present at all times, and at least two family caregivers should be trained specifically for the child's care. Standardized equipment for monitoring, emergency preparedness, and airway clearance are outlined. The recommendations presented are based on the current evidence and expert opinion and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies become available.

  4. Beyond Training: A Field Test of the American Society for Training & Development's Workplace Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foucar-Szocki, Diane L.

    In 1991, a project studied implementation of the American Society for Training and Development's Workplace Basics model. Field testing was conducted in two Virginia industries: Corning Incorporated in Waynesboro and American Safety Razor (ASR) in Verona. Corning had fewer than 100 employees and an 85 percent female work force; it had shifted from…

  5. American Society for Reproductive Medicine: defining embryo donation.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    Building families through adoption of children has been supported by human society throughout history. Building families through reproductive donation of surplus embryos, in contrast, has become an option only since the dawn of assisted reproductive technologies. The ethical appropriateness of patients donating embryos to other patients for family building, or for research, including stem cell research, is well established and has been affirmed by this body and many others.

  6. Private Militias: The Cancer of the American Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    government. A few years after Shay’s rebellion , in 1794 , whiskey producers in Pennsylvania organized and armed themselves to protest against the excise...the Whiskey Rebellion . Militias, no matter what the year, their affiliation, or personal beliefs, base their views and patriotism on the image and...tax placed on whiskey . The mass of armed citizens believed that the tax was an attack on their freedom as Americans and on their economic well-being

  7. Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Boodhwani, Munir; Andelfinger, Gregor; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lindsay, Thomas; McMurtry, M Sean; Therrien, Judith; Siu, Samuel C

    2014-06-01

    This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement aims to provide succinct perspectives on key issues in the management of thoracic aortic disease (TAD). This document is not a comprehensive overview of TAD and important elements of the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of acute aortic syndromes are deliberately not discussed; readers are referred to the 2010 guidelines published by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, and other stakeholders. Rather, this document is a practical guide for clinicians managing adult patients with TAD. Topics covered include size thresholds for surgical intervention, emerging therapies, imaging modalities, medical and lifestyle management, and genetics of TAD. The primary panel consisted of experts from a variety of disciplines that are essential for comprehensive management of TAD patients. The methodology involved a focused literature review with an emphasis on updates since 2010 and the use of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to arrive at specific recommendations. The final document then underwent review by a secondary panel. This document aims to provide recommendations for most patients and situations. However, the ultimate judgement regarding the management of any individual patients should be made by their health care team. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  9. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  10. Ethical management of conflict of interest: proposed standards for academic surgical societies.

    PubMed

    Minter, Rebecca M; Angelos, Peter; Coimbra, Raul; Dale, Paul; de Vera, Michael E; Hardacre, Jeff; Hawkins, William; Kirkwood, Kimberly; Matthews, Jeffrey B; McLoughlin, James; Peralta, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Max; Zhou, Wei; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2011-11-01

    A significant increase in industry support of professional medical associations coupled with data suggesting that gifts from industry have significant clinical influence have prompted calls from the Institute of Medicine and physician leaders to identify and manage conflicts of interest that stem from financial support of professional medical associations by industry. A joint task force of members appointed by the Association for Academic Surgery and the Society of University Surgeons was convened in July 2009. Recommendations were developed regarding management of all potential conflicts of interest that can arise within the context of an academic surgical society, with specific focus on relationships with industry. Task force members reached consensus around each recommendation and the guidelines were subsequently adopted by the Executive Councils of both societies. The committee identified 4 primary areas of need for transparent and definitive management of conflict of interest: 1) individual society activities, including general budget support, society endorsements, and journal affiliation; 2) individual personnel conflicts such as society leadership and standards for disclosure of conflict; 3) meeting activities including budgetary support, program committee associations, and abstract review process; and 4) foundation support and research and travel awards. The resulting guidelines aim to protect the societies and their membership from undue bias that may undermine the credibility and mission of these associations. Policy guidelines to mitigate conflict of interest are necessary to protect the integrity of the work of academic surgical societies and their fiduciary duty to members and patients. Guidelines created and adopted by the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons form an effective model for academic surgical societies and their members. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  11. Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Management of Avalanche and Nonavalanche Snow Burial Accidents.

    PubMed

    Van Tilburg, Christopher; Grissom, Colin K; Zafren, Ken; McIntosh, Scott; Radwin, Martin I; Paal, Peter; Haegeli, Pascal; Smith, William Will R; Wheeler, Albert R; Weber, David; Tremper, Bruce; Brugger, Hermann

    2017-03-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians and avalanche professionals about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, rescue, and medical management of avalanche and nonavalanche snow burial victims. Recommendations are graded on the basis of quality of supporting evidence according to the classification scheme of the American College of Chest Physicians. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. How members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility and Society of Reproductive Surgeons evaluate, define, and manage hydrosalpinges

    PubMed Central

    Omurtag, Kenan; Grindler, Natalia M.; Roehl, Kimberly A.; Bates, Gordon Wright; Beltsos, Angeline N.; Odem, Randall R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the management of hydrosalpinges among Society for Reproduction Endocrinology and Infertility (SREI)/Society of Reproductive Surgeons (SRS) members. Design Cross-sectional survey of SREI/SRS members. Setting Academic and private practice–based reproductive medicine physicians. Participant(s) A total of 442 SREI and/or SRS members. Intervention(s) Internet-based survey. Main Outcome Measure(s) To understand how respondents evaluate, define, and manage hydrosalpinges. Result(s) Of 1,070 SREI and SRS members surveyed, 442 responded to all items, for a 41% response rate. Respondents represented both academic and private practice settings, and differences existed in the evaluation and management of hydrosalpinges. More than one-half (57%) perform their own hysterosalpingograms (HSGs), and 54.5% involve radiologists in their interpretation of tubal disease. Most respondents thought that a clinically significant hydrosalpinx on HSG is one that is distally occluded (80.4%) or visible on ultrasound (60%). Approximately one in four respondents remove a unilateral hydrosalpinx before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH)/intrauterine insemination (IUI) and clomiphene citrate (CC)/IUI (29.3% and 22.8%, respectively), and physicians in private practice were more likely to intervene (COH: risk ratio [RR] 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.51; CC: RR 1.98, 95% CI 1.33–2.95). Although laparoscopic salpingectomy was the preferred method of surgical management, nearly one-half responded that hysteroscopic tubal occlusion should have a role as a primary method of intervention. Conclusion(s) SREI/SRS members define a “clinically significant hydrosalpinx” consistently, and actual practice among members reflects American Society for Reproductive Medicine/SRS recommendations, with variation attributed to individual patient needs. Additionally, one in four members intervene before other infertility treatments when there is a unilateral

  13. The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    PubMed

    2017-06-22

    The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees.Hormone therapy (HT) remains the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and has been shown to prevent bone loss and fracture. The risks of HT differ depending on type, dose, duration of use, route of administration, timing of initiation, and whether a progestogen is used. Treatment should be individualized to identify the most appropriate HT type, dose, formulation, route of administration, and duration of use, using the best available evidence to maximize benefits and minimize risks, with periodic reevaluation of the benefits and risks of continuing or discontinuing HT.For women aged younger than 60 years or who are within 10 years of menopause onset and have no contraindications, the benefit-risk ratio is most favorable for treatment of bothersome VMS and for those at elevated risk for bone loss or fracture. For women who initiate HT more than 10 or 20 years from menopause onset or are aged 60 years or older, the benefit-risk ratio appears less favorable because of the greater absolute risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and dementia. Longer durations of therapy should be for documented indications such as persistent VMS or bone loss, with shared decision making and periodic reevaluation. For bothersome GSM symptoms not

  14. The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    PubMed

    2017-07-01

    The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees.Hormone therapy (HT) remains the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and has been shown to prevent bone loss and fracture. The risks of HT differ depending on type, dose, duration of use, route of administration, timing of initiation, and whether a progestogen is used. Treatment should be individualized to identify the most appropriate HT type, dose, formulation, route of administration, and duration of use, using the best available evidence to maximize benefits and minimize risks, with periodic reevaluation of the benefits and risks of continuing or discontinuing HT.For women aged younger than 60 years or who are within 10 years of menopause onset and have no contraindications, the benefit-risk ratio is most favorable for treatment of bothersome VMS and for those at elevated risk for bone loss or fracture. For women who initiate HT more than 10 or 20 years from menopause onset or are aged 60 years or older, the benefit-risk ratio appears less favorable because of the greater absolute risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and dementia. Longer durations of therapy should be for documented indications such as persistent VMS or bone loss, with shared decision making and periodic reevaluation. For bothersome GSM symptoms not

  15. The American Society of Hematology 2011 evidence-based practice guideline for immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Neunert, Cindy; Lim, Wendy; Crowther, Mark; Cohen, Alan; Solberg, Lawrence; Crowther, Mark A

    2011-04-21

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is commonly encountered in clinical practice. In 1996 the American Society of Hematology published a landmark guidance paper designed to assist clinicians in the management of this disorder. Since 1996 there have been numerous advances in the management of both adult and pediatric ITP. These changes mandated an update in the guidelines. This guideline uses a rigorous, evidence-based approach to the location, interpretation, and presentation of the available evidence. We have endeavored to identify, abstract, and present all available methodologically rigorous data informing the treatment of ITP. We provide evidence-based treatment recommendations using the GRADE system in those areas in which such evidence exists. We do not provide evidence in those areas in which evidence is lacking, or is of lower quality--interested readers are referred to a number of recent, consensus-based recommendations for expert opinion in these clinical areas. Our review identified the need for additional studies in many key areas of the therapy of ITP such as comparative studies of "front-line" therapy for ITP, the management of serious bleeding in patients with ITP, and studies that will provide guidance about which therapy should be used as salvage therapy for patients after failure of a first-line intervention.

  16. American Health Information Management Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Directors House Of Delegates Affiliates Component State Associations Volunteer Advocacy & Public Policy Advocacy Agenda Current Efforts ... Workshop AHIMA is collaborating with the American Medical Association (AMA) to offer an interactive, one-day outpatient ...

  17. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  18. Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. [1999 Winter Meeting.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoelin, C.A.

    1999-11-14

    Topics covered include: biology and medicine; decommissioning, decontamination, and reutilization; education and training; environmental sciences; fuel cycle and waste management; human factors; isotopes and radiation; materials science and technology; mathematics and computation; nuclear criticality safety; nuclear installations safety; operations and power; radiation protection and shielding; reactor physics; robotics and remote systems; thermal hydraulics; and electric power deregulation.

  19. The American Society of Transplantation Consensus Conference on the Use of Hepatitis C Viremic Donors in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, J; Formica, R N; Bloom, R D; Charlton, M; Curry, M; Friedewald, J; Friedman, J; Goldberg, D; Hall, S; Ison, M; Kaiser, T; Klassen, D; Klintmalm, G; Kobashigawa, J; Liapakis, A; O'Conner, K; Reese, P; Stewart, D; Terrault, N; Theodoropoulos, N; Trotter, J; Verna, E; Volk, M

    2017-05-29

    The availability of direct-acting antiviral agents for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has resulted in a profound shift in the approach to the management of this infection. These changes have affected the practice of solid organ transplantation by altering the framework by which patients with end-stage organ disease are managed and receive organ transplants. The high level of safety and efficacy of these medications in patients with chronic HCV infection provides the opportunity to explore their use in the setting of transplanting organs from HCV-viremic patients into non-HCV-viremic recipients. Because these organs are frequently discarded and typically come from younger donors, this approach has the potential to save lives on the solid organ transplant waitlist. Therefore, an urgent need exists for prospective research protocols that study the risk versus benefit of using organs for hepatitis C-infected donors. In response to this rapidly changing practice and the need for scientific study and consensus, the American Society of Transplantation convened a meeting of experts to review current data and develop the framework for the study of using HCV viremic organs in solid organ transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Summary of the Updated American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society clinical practice guideline for prevention of falls in older persons.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The following article is a summary of the American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Prevention of Falls in Older Persons (2010). This article provides additional discussion of the guideline process and the differences between the current guideline and the 2001 version and includes the guidelines' recommendations, algorithm, and acknowledgments. The complete guideline is published on the American Geriatrics Society's Web site (http://www.americangeriatrics.org/health_care_professionals/clinical_practice/clinical_guidelines_recommendations/2010/). © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Endoscopic skull base surgery practice patterns: survey of the North American Skull Base Society.

    PubMed

    Batra, Pete S; Lee, Jivianne; Barnett, Samuel L; Senior, Brent A; Setzen, Michael; Kraus, Dennis H

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of advanced endoscopic techniques on the current practice patterns in skull base surgery. A 20-item written survey approved by the American Rhinologic Society (ARS) and North American Skull Base Society (NASBS) was conducted at the 22nd Annual NASBS meeting in Las Vegas, NV, from February 17 to 19, 2012. The target group included 212 practicing skull base surgeons. Seventy-nine physicians (37.3%) completed the survey. The subspecialty composition was 42 (53%) otolaryngologists and 35 (44%) neurosurgeons. The respondents represented all regions of the country, with most common being the North Central (24%) and Mid-Atlantic (23%) states. Open and endoscopic skull base techniques were used by 91% and 80%, respectively. During a typical year, the number of endoscopic skull base cases ranged between 20 and 50 in 32%, 50 to 100 in 13%, and >100 in 8%. Endoscopic pituitary surgery was performed by 95%, while transcribriform, transplanum, and transclival approaches were performed by 70.5%, 66%, and 66%, respectively. Wide variation in coding philosophy was noted, including use of unlisted neurosurgical (28%), open skull base (28%), unlisted endoscopic (24%), and sinus surgery (20%) codes. Only 30% of physicians reported adequate reimbursement in ≥50% of the performed cases. Overall, 87% were supportive of the creation of dedicated endoscopic skull base codes. The present survey attests to the widespread adaptation of endoscopic techniques in the management schema of skull base surgery. The wide variation in coding techniques and inadequate reimbursement suggests that future dialogue should also focus on developing consensus with respect to the coding and billing process. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology position statement on obesity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Courneya, Kerry S; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Fabian, Carol J; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L; Hudson, Melissa M; Jones, Lee W; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2014-11-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team--the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis--is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Pilot analysis of presentations at meetings of the American Contact Dermatitis Society and the European Society of Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel J; Miller, Lee; Neal, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The largest meetings on contact dermatitis are those of the American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) and the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD). To document the topics presented at these meetings and their presenters' countries of origin. Review of abstracts from the 2006 ESCD meeting and the 2005 and 2006 ACDS meetings. Twenty percent of ACDS presentations were on patch testing, versus 5% at the ESCD meeting (p < .001); 15% of ACDS presentations were on local reactions, versus 5% at the ESCD meeting (p < .01); 10% of ESCD presentations were on cosmetics/fragrance, versus 1% at the ACDS meetings (p = .014); and 31% of ESCD presentations were on metals and occupational topics, versus 18% at the ACDS meetings (p < .05). At the ACDS meetings, 55% of presenters were American, versus 2% at the ESCD meeting. Higher percentages of ESCD presenters were from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland (p < .001), the United Kingdom (p < .01), France and Belgium (p < .05), Italy (p < .05), and Scandinavia (p < .001). More papers from Canada (p < .001) and the rest of the world were presented at the ACDS meetings (p < .001). Significant differences exist between these meetings. There may be the potential for increased joint meetings of these societies.

  4. American Chemical Society: Twentieth northeast regional meeting. Program and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain papers on the following topics: preparation, characterization, and applications of fine particles; multinuclear NMR spectroscopy; chemical aspects of wine making; organic electrochemistry; chemical education; laboratory information management systems; laser-based processing and diagnostics of materials; modern liquid chromatography; high-temperature superconductivity; organic chemistry; chemometrics; colloid and surface science; biological chemistry; environmental sciences; drug analysis; and organometallic chemistry. Papers within the scope of the Energy Data Base have been processed separately.

  5. Radon and COPD mortality in the American Cancer Society Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Yue; Pope, C. Arden; Gapstur, Susan M.; Thun, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Although radon gas is a known cause of lung cancer, the association between residential radon and mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease has not been well characterised. The Cancer Prevention Study-II is a large prospective cohort study of nearly 1.2 million Americans recruited in 1982. Mean county-level residential radon concentrations were linked to study participants' residential address based on their ZIP code at enrolment (mean±sd 53.5±38.0 Bq·m−3). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for non-malignant respiratory disease mortality associated with radon concentrations. After necessary exclusions, a total of 811,961 participants in 2,754 counties were included in the analysis. Throughout 2006, there were a total of 28,300 non-malignant respiratory disease deaths. Radon was significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality (HR per 100 Bq·m−3 1.13, 95% CI 1.05–1.21). There was a significant positive linear trend in COPD mortality with increasing categories of radon concentrations (p<0.05). Findings suggest residential radon may increase COPD mortality. Further research is needed to confirm this finding and to better understand possible complex inter-relationships between radon, COPD and lung cancer. PMID:22005921

  6. Radon and COPD mortality in the American Cancer Society Cohort.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Yue; Pope, C Arden; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Although radon gas is a known cause of lung cancer, the association between residential radon and mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease has not been well characterised. The Cancer Prevention Study-II is a large prospective cohort study of nearly 1.2 million Americans recruited in 1982. Mean county-level residential radon concentrations were linked to study participants' residential address based on their ZIP code at enrolment (mean ± SD 53.5 ± 38.0 Bq · m(-3)). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for non-malignant respiratory disease mortality associated with radon concentrations. After necessary exclusions, a total of 811,961 participants in 2,754 counties were included in the analysis. Throughout 2006, there were a total of 28,300 non-malignant respiratory disease deaths. Radon was significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality (HR per 100 Bq · m(-3) 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21). There was a significant positive linear trend in COPD mortality with increasing categories of radon concentrations (p<0.05). Findings suggest residential radon may increase COPD mortality. Further research is needed to confirm this finding and to better understand possible complex inter-relationships between radon, COPD and lung cancer.

  7. Demonstrating the Experimenting Society Model with Classwide Behavior Management Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Taya C.; Stoner, Gary; Green, Susan K.

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates the experimenting society model using data-based decision making and collaborative consultation to evaluate behavior-management intervention strategies in 25 seventh graders. Each intervention results in improved behavior, but active teaching of classroom rules was determined to be most effective. (Author/JDM)

  8. Information Society Needs of Managers in a Large Governmental Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broos, Elizabeth; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2009-01-01

    Dealing effectively with information and communication technology in the information society is a complex task and the human dimension is often under-estimated. This paper tries to give a voice to some managers about their experiences with information, communication and technology in their working environment, which involves participating in a…

  9. Information Society Needs of Managers in a Large Governmental Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broos, Elizabeth; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2009-01-01

    Dealing effectively with information and communication technology in the information society is a complex task and the human dimension is often under-estimated. This paper tries to give a voice to some managers about their experiences with information, communication and technology in their working environment, which involves participating in a…

  10. An official american thoracic society statement: work-exacerbated asthma.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Paul K; Redlich, Carrie A; Callahan, David B; Harber, Philip; Lemière, Catherine; Martin, James; Tarlo, Susan M; Vandenplas, Olivier; Torén, Kjell

    2011-08-01

    Occupational exposures can contribute to the exacerbation as well as the onset of asthma. However, work-exacerbated asthma (WEA) has received less attention than occupational asthma (OA) that is caused by work. The purpose of this Statement is to summarize current knowledge about the descriptive epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management and treatment of WEA; propose a case definition for WEA; and discuss needs for prevention and research. Information about WEA was identified primarily by systematic searches of the medical literature. Statements about prevention and research needs were reached by consensus. WEA is defined as the worsening of asthma due to conditions at work. WEA is common, with a median prevalence of 21.5% among adults with asthma. Different types of agents or conditions at work may exacerbate asthma. WEA cases with persistent work-related symptoms can have clinical characteristics (level of severity, medication needs) and adverse socioeconomic outcomes (unemployment, reduction in income) similar to those of OA cases. Compared with adults with asthma unrelated to work, WEA cases report more days with symptoms, seek more medical care, and have a lower quality of life. WEA should be considered in any patient with asthma that is getting worse or who has work-related symptoms. Management of WEA should focus on reducing work exposures and optimizing standard medical management, with a change in jobs only if these measures are not successful. WEA is a common and underrecognized adverse outcome resulting from conditions at work. Additional research is needed to improve the understanding of the risk factors for, and mechanisms and outcomes of, WEA, and to inform and evaluate preventive interventions.

  11. The American Physical Society: A survey of its first 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Melba

    1990-03-01

    As the distinct scientific professions arose in the 19th century, the need for professional societies was felt. Spurred by the momentous discoveries of its last decade (x rays, radioactivity, the electron), the American Physical Society was organized in 1899. The initiative was taken by Arthur Gordon Webster; Rowland and Michelson, the most prestigious physicists in the country, accepted positions as president and vice president. The chief and almost exclusive concern of APS was the encouragement of research in pure physics. This single-minded behavior resulted in the formation of other societies of physicists: the Optical Society of America in 1916, the Acoustical Society of America and the Society of Rheologists in 1929, and the American Association of Physics Teachers in 1930, with talk of associations for applied physics and mathematical physics. That fragmentation coupled with the financial difficulties of the APS led to the formation of the American Institute of Physics in 1931. AIP played a more active role during the war years than did APS, but after the war the Physical Society grew rapidly. Its 50th anniversary celebration, held at Harvard, was characterized by optimism despite the existence of many new problems.

  12. Molecular Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer: Guideline From the American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Antonia R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Allegra, Carmen J; Grody, Wayne; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M; Funkhouser, William K; Kopetz, Scott E; Lieu, Christopher; Lindor, Noralane M; Minsky, Bruce D; Monzon, Federico A; Sargent, Daniel J; Singh, Veena M; Willis, Joseph; Clark, Jennifer; Colasacco, Carol; Rumble, R Bryan; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn; Ventura, Christina B; Nowak, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    To develop evidence-based guideline recommendations through a systematic review of the literature to establish standard molecular biomarker testing of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues to guide epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies and conventional chemotherapy regimens. The American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to establish standard molecular biomarker testing and guide therapies for patients with CRC. A comprehensive literature search that included more than 4,000 articles was conducted. Twenty-one guideline statements were established. Evidence supports mutational testing for EGFR signaling pathway genes, since they provide clinically actionable information as negative predictors of benefit to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapies for targeted therapy of CRC. Mutations in several of the biomarkers have clear prognostic value. Laboratory approaches to operationalize CRC molecular testing are presented. Key Words: Molecular diagnostics; Gastrointestinal; Histology; Genetics; Oncology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, American Society for Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  14. School Management Options for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streiff, Paul R.

    In response to the Presidential/Secretarial Educational Objective of 1975 which called for a statement from American Indian communities relative to their educational management preferences, the Office of Indian Education Programs (OIEP) established a program for gathering and disseminating educational management options to Indian people. A seven…

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  16. Synopsis of history of American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1958-2008.

    PubMed

    Montana, Gustavo S

    2008-10-01

    To provide a synopsis of the history of the association of radiation oncologists in the United States, currently known as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), with the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the organization. The history of ASTRO, from its beginning as the American Club of Therapeutic Radiologists, is the subject of a book that is to be released with the occasion of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society in 2008. This book was prepared by members of ASTRO's History Committee and History Working Subcommittee. The source material for the book was the archives of the Society and recorded interviews, conducted by members of the subcommittee, of members of the Society and of the past and present Society staff. The book was also based on previously published material. This article used the source material used for the Society anniversary book. This synopsis of the history of the Society will provide a source of reference for anyone interested in the history of the Society from its foundation in 1958 to the present, 2008.

  17. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  18. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Erb, Nicole L.; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L.; Cannady, Rachel; Wong, Sandra L.; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April; Stein, Kevin; Sharpe, Katherine; Brooks, Durado D.; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant disease in the United States (U.S.). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years following diagnosis. The prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the U.S. population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns following treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The following guidelines are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  19. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Pediatric Chronic Home Invasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, Joseph M.; Baker, Christopher D.; Carroll, John L.; Sharma, Girish D.; Brozek, Jan L.; Finder, Jonathan D.; Ackerman, Veda L.; Arens, Raanan; Boroughs, Deborah S.; Carter, Jodi; Daigle, Karen L.; Dougherty, Joan; Gozal, David; Kevill, Katharine; Kravitz, Richard M.; Kriseman, Tony; MacLusky, Ian; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine; Tori, Alvaro J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Halbower, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with chronic invasive ventilator dependence living at home are a diverse group of children with special health care needs. Medical oversight, equipment management, and community resources vary widely. There are no clinical practice guidelines available to health care professionals for the safe hospital discharge and home management of these complex children. Purpose: To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the hospital discharge and home/community management of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Methods: The Pediatric Assembly of the American Thoracic Society assembled an interdisciplinary workgroup with expertise in the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. The experts developed four questions of clinical importance and used an evidence-based strategy to identify relevant medical evidence. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to formulate and grade recommendations. Results: Clinical practice recommendations for the management of children with chronic ventilator dependence at home are provided, and the evidence supporting each recommendation is discussed. Conclusions: Collaborative generalist and subspecialist comanagement is the Medical Home model most likely to be successful for the care of children requiring chronic invasive ventilation. Standardized hospital discharge criteria are suggested. An awake, trained caregiver should be present at all times, and at least two family caregivers should be trained specifically for the child’s care. Standardized equipment for monitoring, emergency preparedness, and airway clearance are outlined. The recommendations presented are based on the current evidence and expert opinion and will require an update as new evidence and/or technologies become available. PMID:27082538

  20. Management of patients with refractory angina: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pain Society joint guidelines.

    PubMed

    McGillion, Michael; Arthur, Heather M; Cook, Allison; Carroll, Sandra L; Victor, J Charles; L'allier, Philippe L; Jolicoeur, E Marc; Svorkdal, Nelson; Niznick, Joel; Teoh, Kevin; Cosman, Tammy; Sessle, Barry; Watt-Watson, Judy; Clark, Alexander; Taenzer, Paul; Coyte, Peter; Malysh, Louise; Galte, Carol; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    Refractory angina (RFA) is a debilitating disease characterized by cardiac pain resistant to conventional treatments for coronary artery disease including nitrates, calcium-channel and β-adrenoceptor blockade, vasculoprotective agents, percutaneous coronary interventions, and coronary artery bypass grafting. The mortality rate of patients living with RFA is not known but is thought to be in the range of approximately 3%. These individuals suffer severely impaired health-related quality of life with recurrent and sustained pain, poor general health status, psychological distress, impaired role functioning, and activity restriction. Effective care for RFA sufferers in Canada is critically underdeveloped. These guidelines are predicated upon a 2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Position Statement which identified that underlying the problem of RFA management is the lack of a formalized, coordinated, interprofessional strategy between the cardiovascular and pain science/clinical communities. The guidelines are therefore a joint initiative of the CCS and the Canadian Pain Society (CPS) and make practice recommendations about treatment options for RFA that are based on the best available evidence. Concluding summary recommendations are also made, giving direction to future clinical practice and research on RFA management in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons 2006 to 2016: Another Decade of Excellence in Education and Research.

    PubMed

    Doumit, Gaby; Totonchi, Ali; Wexler, Andy; Gosain, Arun K

    2017-09-01

    Over the past 10 years, the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (ASMS) has continued to advance to meet its mission of being the premier organization to represent maxillofacial and pediatric plastic surgery in the United States. These advances are focused on education of its members, to include the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons basic course, the preconference symposium, the annual meeting, two basic maxillofacial courses per year, advanced maxillofacial courses, a boot camp for craniofacial fellows, a cleft course, quarterly webinars, sponsored fellowships, a visiting professorship, and the ASMS journal. In addition, the ASMS has continued to advance as the premier national organization representing maxillofacial and pediatric plastic surgery in the United States, thereby positioning the organization as a primary advocate for these surgical specialties. Outreach of the ASMS has grown over the past decade and now includes representatives to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons/Plastic Surgery Foundation, the American Board of Plastic Surgeons, the American Medical Association, and most recently a seat as a governor with the American College of Surgeons. The ASMS has also initiated an annual Summer Leadership Seminar to explore topics of relevance in a changing health care environment. The present report outlines the major initiatives of the ASMS over the past 10 years.

  2. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology’s standards

    PubMed Central

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Methods: In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Results: Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Conclusion: Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities’ attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand. PMID:27489600

  3. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Seung, Steven K; Larson, David A; Galvin, James M; Mehta, Minesh P; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J; Yajnik, Santosh V; Hartford, Alan C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2013-06-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program.

  4. ACCF/ASE/ACEP/AHA/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR 2008 appropriateness criteria for stress echocardiography: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, American Society of Echocardiography, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Khandheria, Bijoy; Stainback, Raymond F; Weissman, Neil J; Peterson, Eric D; Hendel, Robert C; Stainback, Raymond F; Blaivas, Michael; Des Prez, Roger D; Gillam, Linda D; Golash, Terry; Hiratzka, Loren F; Kussmaul, William G; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Masoudi, Frederick A; Mayo, Paul H; Porembka, David; Spertus, John A; Wann, L Samuel; Wiegers, Susan E; Brindis, Ralph G; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Patel, Manesh R; Peterson, Eric D; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2008-03-18

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) together with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review for stress echocardiography. The review assessed the risks and benefits of stress echocardiography for several indications or clinical scenarios and scored them on a scale of 1 to 9 (based upon methodology developed by the ACCF to assess imaging appropriateness). The upper range (7 to 9) implies that the test is generally acceptable and is a reasonable approach, and the lower range (1 to 3) implies that the test is generally not acceptable and is not a reasonable approach. The midrange (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the indication for a stress echocardiogram is uncertain. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Use of stress echocardiography for risk assessment in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, while routine repeat testing and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. It is anticipated that these results will have a significant impact on physician decision making and performance, reimbursement policy, and will help guide future research.

  5. The last twenty-five years of the American Epidemiological Society: 1972-1996.

    PubMed

    Paul, O

    1998-07-01

    The American Epidemiological Society (AES) was founded in 1927. A history of the first 45 years of the Society was written in the early 1970s by Dr. John Rodman Paul (Yale J Biol Med 1973;46:1-84). The past 25 years have seen the AES continue as a small, relatively elite organization characterized by a membership of senior leaders in the field of epidemiology. The Society has continued to hold an annual meeting at which free, informed, and uninhibited discussion is encouraged. In this paper, the author presents an account of the affairs of the AES during the past quarter century.

  6. American Issues Forum, Volume I: American Society in the Molding. A Courses by Newspaper Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Daniel, Ed.; And Others

    This reader is designed to be used in a one-semester curriculum program which is linked to topics outlined in the American Issues Forum calendar. It is intended for use at the local level. Some of the principal conditions affecting the development of American ideas and institutions are examined. Focus is on the settlement of the North American…

  7. American Identity: Impact of Youths' Differential Experiences in Society on Their Attachment to American Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Margaret Beale

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the problem of national and civic detachment among American youth. Using a developmental theoretical framework that integrates the ecological aspects of development with the phenomenological experiences of the developing individual, I argue that young Americans have difficulty developing an attachment to their identity as…

  8. 76 FR 52014 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on July 25, 2011, pursuant to section 6(a) of...''), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with...

  9. 76 FR 27351 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on April 12, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with...

  10. 78 FR 58558 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on August 20, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications...

  11. 76 FR 6497 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on January 10, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with...

  12. 75 FR 14191 - Notice Pursuant to The National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on February 25, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications...

  13. 75 FR 45156 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on June 28, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a) of...''), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications...

  14. 77 FR 58412 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on August 27, 2012, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications...

  15. 75 FR 70031 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on October 14, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (``ASME'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with...

  16. Treatment of severe thyroid eye disease: a survey of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS).

    PubMed

    Perumal, Balaji; Meyer, Dale R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the current practice patterns for the treatment of severe thyroid eye disease (TED) in the United States by conducting a survey of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. This is a questionnaire study. The survey encompassed the use of different modalities, including intravenous steroids, oral steroids, orbital decompression, orbital radiation, intraorbital steroid injections, and steroid-sparing biologic agents, in the treatment of severe TED. Specifics on the dosing regimens of steroids and types of decompression used were queried. With regard to treatments used "at all" in the management of severe TED, 87% use oral steroids and 74% use intravenous steroids. Eighty-three percent use orbital decompression, 70% use radiation, 33% use biologic agents, and 28% use intraorbital steroid injections. Oral steroids were slightly preferred to intravenous steroids at 43% versus 40% for first-line treatment. Most responders (61%) chose 2-wall decompression as their preferred technique. Severe TED can be a devastating disease leading to diplopia and vision loss. Treatment recommendations have varied and continue to evolve. The survey reported herein found that oral steroids were slightly preferred over intravenous steroids by the members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, most of who practice in the United States. This is in contrast to survey results from European and Latin American physicians, which more strongly favored intravenous steroids. In addition, orbital decompression and orbital radiation still play significant roles in the management of severe TED.

  17. Towards integrative risk management and more resilient societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khudhairy, D.; Axhausen, K.; Bishop, S.; Herrmann, H.; Hu, B.; Kröger, W.; Lewis, T.; MacIntosh, J.; Nowak, A.; Pickl, S.; Stauffacher, D.; Tan, E.

    2012-11-01

    Society depends decisively on the availability of infrastructure systems such as energy, telecommunication, transportation, banking and finance, health care and governmental and public administration. Even selective damages of one of these infrastructures may result in disruptions of governmental, industrial or public functions. Vulnerability of infrastructures therefore provides spectacular leverage for natural disasters as well as criminal and terrorist actions. Threats and risks are part of the technological, economical, and societal development. This article focuses on the development and characterization of an integrative risk-management which, from the perspective of "resilient systems", can be seen as an innovative and pro-active crisis management approach dealing with the increasing amount of complexity in societies in a comprehensive, agile and adaptive way.

  18. The Life of Learning. The Charles Homer Haskins Lectures of the American Council of Learned Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Douglas, Ed.; Katz, Stanley N., Ed.

    Lectures from the Charles Homer Haskins Lecture Series of the American Council of Learned Societies are gathered here. They include the untitled lectures of: Maynard Mack (1983) of Yale University; Lawrence Stone (1985) of Princeton University; Milton V. Anastos (1986) of the University of California at Los Angeles; Carl E. Schorske (1987) of…

  19. Presidential Plenary Sessions: Report on Three American Chemical Society Presidential Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    2000-06-01

    A marathon of plenary sessions was held at the 219th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society on Sunday March 26, 2000. The first session began at 1:20 p.m. and the third ended at 9:00 p.m., with 30-minute breaks between each session.

  20. Political advocacy by the American Society for Cell Biology and its partners

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    I trace how the American Society for Cell Biology became a strong political advocate for the scientific community. I celebrate how good leadership and an effective staff enabled its energetic volunteer organization to have an impact, but I also ask how the effort can be made more successful. PMID:23112231

  1. Ongoing Capacity Building in the American Cancer Society (ACS) 1995-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Donald W.; Glover-Kudon, Rebecca; Smith, Iris E.; Avery, Mary Eden

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the first evaluation practitioner for the American Cancer Society (ACS) came to do evaluation capacity building (ECB) because of the need for evaluation following changes in the organizational structure. Provides a brief history of these changes as a background for understanding the seven principles of ECB at the ACS. (Author/SLD)

  2. "Holding High the Standard": The Influence of the American Education Society in Ante-Bellum Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Natalie A.

    1984-01-01

    The primary concerns of the American Education Society (AES), formed in Boston in 1815 as part of a Protestant crusade to save the nation, were the education of ministers and the revitalization of religion. The educational influence of the AES in antebellum higher education is discussed. (RM)

  3. American Society for Microbiology. Microbes display their versatility at ASM meeting.

    PubMed

    Strauss, E

    2000-06-16

    About 12,000 scientists gathered here from 21 to 25 May for the 100th annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. This year's lineup boasted presentations on a wide array of topics--everything from the body's defenses against microbial pathogens to bacterial involvement in geological processes.

  4. The Life of Learning. The Charles Homer Haskins Lectures of the American Council of Learned Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Douglas, Ed.; Katz, Stanley N., Ed.

    Lectures from the Charles Homer Haskins Lecture Series of the American Council of Learned Societies are gathered here. They include the untitled lectures of: Maynard Mack (1983) of Yale University; Lawrence Stone (1985) of Princeton University; Milton V. Anastos (1986) of the University of California at Los Angeles; Carl E. Schorske (1987) of…

  5. Political advocacy by the American Society for Cell Biology and its partners.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Thomas D

    2012-11-01

    I trace how the American Society for Cell Biology became a strong political advocate for the scientific community. I celebrate how good leadership and an effective staff enabled its energetic volunteer organization to have an impact, but I also ask how the effort can be made more successful.

  6. Dialog and the American Chemical Society Play a High Stakes Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1991-01-01

    Discusses Dialog Information Service's lawsuit against the American Chemical Society (ACS) over online searching capabilities. Antitrust law is discussed, fair competition issues are raised, the user's point of view is considered, possible outcome scenarios are suggested, and a sidebar summarizes claims and counterclaims by Dialog, ACS, and…

  7. The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists advancing sugarbeet research for 75 years

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists (ASSBT) was created 75 years ago when a group of researchers that had been meeting informally as the Sugarbeet Roundtable adopted the constitution and by-laws that provided the basis for an organization that continues to foster the exchange of ideas a...

  8. A Tribute to Cleo Monson: First National Director of the American Montessori Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Cathleen

    2010-01-01

    The early 1960s was a critical, albeit chaotic, period for the revival of the Montessori movement, which had been recently rekindled in the United States. The success or failure of the movement can arguably be said to have rested squarely upon the backs of those founding members and early supporters of the fledgling American Montessori Society,…

  9. Dialog and the American Chemical Society Play a High Stakes Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1991-01-01

    Discusses Dialog Information Service's lawsuit against the American Chemical Society (ACS) over online searching capabilities. Antitrust law is discussed, fair competition issues are raised, the user's point of view is considered, possible outcome scenarios are suggested, and a sidebar summarizes claims and counterclaims by Dialog, ACS, and…

  10. [Government management and society: information, technology and scientific output].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Patrícia; Sophia, Daniela Carvalho; Grigório, Deise de Araújo

    2007-01-01

    The complexity of government tasks today suggests that virtual interaction processes that could streamline flows and exchanges of information between governments and society in public policymaking may contribute to more effective intervention that is more closely attuned to the heterogeneity and diversity of social problems. Innovative participatory government administration initiatives have proliferated, together with the extension of public control over government actions, handled through by information technologies. Exploring this field, this paper identifies some key issues for better demarcation and qualification of such initiatives in public sector management, based on the authors' own experience in leading an institutional project designed to empower the political, technical, and communicative participation of society in discussions of the implementation of the Unified National Health System in Brazil. Based on a review of the literature analyzing the links among information, technology, development, and democracy, and particularly with regard to social management, this paper systematizes aspects for consideration drawn from in experiences of interactions between government and society, mediated by scientific knowledge, fostering greater transparency and plurality of views in government management.

  11. Treatment of Cluster Headache: The American Headache Society Evidence-Based Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Starling, Amaal J; Pringsheim, Tamara M; Becker, Werner J; Schwedt, Todd J

    2016-07-01

    Cluster headache (CH), the most common trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, is an extremely debilitating primary headache disorder that is often not optimally treated. New evidence-based treatment guidelines for CH will assist clinicians with identifying and choosing among current treatment options. In this systematic review we appraise the available evidence for the acute and prophylactic treatment of CH, and provide an update of the 2010 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) endorsed systematic review. Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched for double-blind, randomized controlled trials that investigated treatments of CH in adults. Exclusion and inclusion criteria were identical to those utilized in the 2010 AAN systematic review. For acute treatment, sumatriptan subcutaneous, zolmitriptan nasal spray, and high flow oxygen remain the treatments with a Level A recommendation. Since the 2010 review, a study of sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation was added to the current guideline and has been administered a Level B recommendation for acute treatment. For prophylactic therapy, previously there were no treatments that were administered a Level A recommendation. For the current guidelines, suboccipital steroid injections have emerged as the only treatment to receive a Level A recommendation with the addition of a second Class I study. Other newly evaluated treatments since the 2010 guidelines have been given a Level B recommendation (negative study: deep brain stimulation), a Level C recommendation (positive study: warfarin; negative studies: cimetidine/chlorpheniramine, candesartan), or a Level U recommendation (frovatriptan). This AHS guideline can be utilized for understanding which therapies have superiority to placebo or sham treatment in the management of CH. In clinical practice, these recommendations should be considered in concert with other variables including safety, side effects, patient preferences, clinician experience, cost, and the invasiveness

  12. The American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery Preceptorship Program: A Product of the 2013 American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery Executive Board Strategy Session and Survey.

    PubMed

    Papay, Francis; Taub, Peter J; Doumit, Gaby; Flores, Roberto L; Kuang, Anna A; Mlynek, Karolina; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri

    2015-06-01

    One of the main goals of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery (ASMS) is to develop educational programs that increase expertise in maxillofacial surgery. We describe the outline of the new ASMS Preceptorship Program, a collective effort by ASMS members to increase access to all areas of maxillofacial surgery. Furthermore, we discuss the original survey pertinent to the development of this program, the results of the survey, and specifics regarding the structure of the program. We hope for the preceptorship program to be an excellent resource for members to mentor one another, develop intellectual and academic curiosity, provide avenues for collaboration, and further the ASMS's role in shaping maxillofacial surgery into the future.

  13. American Geriatrics Society identifies another five things that healthcare providers and patients should question.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Since 2012, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has also been collaborating with the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation, joining its "Choosing Wisely" campaign on two separate lists of Five Things Healthcare Providers and Patients Should Question. The campaign is designed to engage healthcare organizations and professionals, individuals, and family caregivers in discussions about the safety and appropriateness of medical tests, medications, and procedures. Participating healthcare providers are asked to identify five things-tests, medications, or procedures-that appear to harm rather than help. Providers then share this information in a published article about these things on the ABIM campaign's website (www.choosingwisely.org). The first AGS list was published in February 2013. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. [American participation in the creation of a nurse model in Brazilian society in the 1920's].

    PubMed

    Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Barreira, Ieda de Alencar; da Fonte, Aline Silva; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this historical-social study are: to describe the circumstances that determined the participation of North American nurses in the formation of the Brazilian nurse; and analyse the process of implementing institutional rituals as a strategy of symbolic fight, to confer visibility to the nurse profession and discuss the symbolic effects of institutional rituals for the consecration of a nurse model for Brazilian society at the time. The primary sources are constituted of pertaining written and photographic documents relative to the studied theme. By reading the documentary corpus an analysis was made of the symbols that had distinguished and established the hierarchies of the actions, as well as the strategies undertaken for the North American nurses, towards implementing a new model of nurses in Brazilian society, coherent with the model of the North American schools of nursing. Institutional rituals, conducted or testified by prestigious figures of the history of Brazil and nursing, were fundamental for the construction of professional identity.

  15. Aspects of dosimetry and clinical practice of skin brachytherapy: The American Brachytherapy Society working group report.

    PubMed

    Ouhib, Zoubir; Kasper, Michael; Perez Calatayud, Jose; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Pai, Sujatha; Strasswimmer, John

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common type of human malignancy. Although surgical techniques are the standard treatment, radiation therapy using photons, electrons, and brachytherapy (BT) (radionuclide-based and electronic) has been an important mode of treatment in specific clinical situations. The purpose of this work is to provide a clinical and dosimetric summary of the use of BT for the treatment of NMSC and to describe the different BT approaches used in treating cutaneous malignancies. A group of experts from the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, and dermatology, who specialize in managing cutaneous malignancies reviewed the literature and compiled their clinical experience regarding the clinical and dosimetric aspects of skin BT. A dosimetric and clinical review of both high dose rate ((192)Ir) and electronic BT treatment including surface, interstitial, and custom mold applicators is given. Patient evaluation tools such as staging, imaging, and patient selection criteria are discussed. Guidelines for clinical and dosimetric planning, appropriate margin delineation, and applicator selection are suggested. Dose prescription and dose fractionation schedules, as well as prescription depth are discussed. Commissioning and quality assurance requirements are also outlined. Given the limited published data for skin BT, this article is a summary of the limited literature and best practices currently in use for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Medical risk assessment in dentistry: use of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification.

    PubMed

    Clough, S; Shehabi, Z; Morgan, C

    2016-02-12

    Medical risk assessment is essential to safe patient management and the delivery of appropriate dental care. The American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA PS) Classification is widely used within medicine and dentistry, but has received significant criticism. This is the first UK survey to assess the consistency of medical risk assessment in dentistry. (i) To determine the use and consistency of the ASA PS among dentists and anaesthetists. (ii) To consider the appropriateness of the ASA PS in relation to dental treatment planning and delivery of care. A cross-sectional online questionnaire was distributed to anaesthetists and dental practitioners in general practice, community and hospital dental services. Questions focused on professional backgrounds, use of the ASA PS, alternative approaches to risk assessment in everyday practice and scoring of eight hypothetical patients using ASA PS. There were 101 responses, 82 were complete. Anaesthetists recorded ASA PS score more frequently than dental practitioners and found it more useful. Inconsistencies were evident in the assignment of ASA PS scores both between and within professional groups. Many dental practitioners did not use or find ASA PS helpful, with significant inconsistencies in its use. An awareness of alternative assessment scales may be useful across settings. Accepting its limitations, it would be helpful for all dentists to be educated in ASA PS and its use in medical risk assessment, particularly in relation to conscious sedation.

  17. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Bruce G.; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Chambers, David A.; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Riekert, Kristin A.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S.; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K.; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H.; Okelo, Sande O.; Mularski, Richard A.; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Patel, Minal R.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Weiss, Curtis H.; Wilson, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients’ access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators’ experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings. PMID:26653201

  18. Multiple Myeloma: Clinical Updates From the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting 2016.

    PubMed

    Terpos, Evangelos

    2017-06-01

    The novel clinical data for plasma cell neoplasms (smoldering myeloma, multiple myeloma (MM) and AL-amyloidosis) that were presented in the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology are summarized here. Data from large phase 3 studies for newly diagnosed MM patients who are eligible for autologous transplantation (EMN02, MRC XI and StaMINA trials) are described along with the results of phase 2 studies using novel anti-myeloma drug combinations for induction, consolidation and maintenance as first line therapy. Recent updates of previous important studies in the field of both newly diagnosed (FIRST) and relapsed/refractory MM (POLLUX, CASTOR) are also reported. Moreover, the results of clinical studies with the use of anti-myeloma drugs with new mechanisms of action, including pembrolizumab, selinexor, venetoclax and monoclonal antibodies, are discussed. All these data provide the basis for possible changes in the way we manage myeloma in the near future trying to "cure" the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. American Thoracic Society and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Implementation Research Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Chambers, David A; Cloutier, Michelle M; Riekert, Kristin A; Rand, Cynthia S; Schatz, Michael; Thomson, Carey C; Wilson, Sandra R; Apter, Andrea; Carson, Shannon S; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn; Goss, Christopher H; Okelo, Sande O; Mularski, Richard A; Nguyen, Huong Q; Patel, Minal R; Szefler, Stanley J; Weiss, Curtis H; Wilson, Kevin C; Freemer, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    To advance implementation research (IR) in respiratory, sleep, and critical care medicine, the American Thoracic Society and the Division of Lung Diseases from the NHLBI cosponsored an Implementation Research Workshop on May 17, 2014. The goals of IR are to understand the barriers and facilitators of integrating new evidence into healthcare practices and to develop and test strategies that systematically target these factors to accelerate the adoption of evidence-based care. Throughout the workshop, presenters provided examples of IR that focused on the rate of adoption of evidence-based practices, the feasibility and acceptability of interventions to patients and other stakeholders who make healthcare decisions, the fidelity with which practitioners use specific interventions, the effects of specific barriers on the sustainability of an intervention, and the implications of their research to inform policies to improve patients' access to high-quality care. During the discussions that ensued, investigators' experience led to recommendations underscoring the importance of identifying and involving key stakeholders throughout the research process, ensuring that those who serve as reviewers understand the tenets of IR, managing staff motivation and turnover, and tackling the challenges of scaling up interventions across multiple settings.

  20. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  1. Comparison of American Society of Testing Materials and Soil Science Society of America Hydrometer Methods for Particle-Size Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jason M.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2006-05-31

    Particle-size analysis (PSA) is widely used in both soil science and geo-engineering. Soil classification schemes are built on PSA values while recent developments in pedotransfer functions rely on PSA to estimate soil hydraulic properties. Because PSA is method dependent, the standardization of experimental procedures is important for the comparison of reported results. A study was conducted to compare the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) hydrometer method (D422) for particle-size analysis with the hydrometer method published by the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA). Tests on soils ranging in texture from sand to a sandy clay loam were conducted at temperatures ranging from 20 C to 30 C. The main difference between methods is the temperature correction, with the ASTM method relying on an empirical correction and the SSSA method using a blank hydrometer reading. Identical texture estimates for all but one sample was observed between methods. Percent fines, silt, and clay demonstrated relatively consistent values between methods. D50 and D30 showed reasonable agreement between methods, with differences of less than 4 percent and 8 percent. For D10 values, the agreement was less satisfactory, with uncertainties of as much as 10 percent. The results suggest that ASTM and SSSA methods can be used interchangeably for textural analysis.

  2. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    PubMed

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  3. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Beth A.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hayes, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Morris, David E.; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  4. Conflict of interest and professional medical associations: the North American Spine Society experience.

    PubMed

    Schofferman, Jerome A; Eskay-Auerbach, Marjorie L; Sawyer, Laura S; Herring, Stanley A; Arnold, Paul M; Muehlbauer, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    Recently the financial relationships between industry and professional medical associations have come under increased scrutiny because of the concern that industry ties may create real or perceived conflicts of interest. Professional medical associations pursue public advocacy as well as promote medical education, develop clinical practice guidelines, fund research, and regulate professional conduct. Therefore, the conflicts of interest of a professional medical association and its leadership can have more far-reaching effects on patient care than those of an individual physician. Few if any professional medical associations have reported their experience with implementing strict divestment and disclosure policies, and among the policies that have been issued, there is little uniformity. We describe the experience of the North American Spine Society (NASS) in implementing comprehensive conflicts of interest policies. A special feature article. We discuss financial conflicts of interest as they apply to professional medical associations rather than to individual physicians. We describe the current policies of disclosure and divestment adopted by the NASS and how these policies have evolved, been refined, and have had no detrimental impact on membership, attendance at annual meetings, finances, or leadership recruitment. No funding was received for this work. The authors report no potential conflict-of-interest-associated biases in the text. The NASS has shown that a professional medical association can manage its financial relationships with industry in a manner that minimizes influence and bias. The NASS experience can provide a template for other professional medical associations to help manage their own possible conflicts of interest issues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Policy Statement: Enhancing Implementation, Use, and Delivery of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Puhan, Milo A; Spruit, Martijn A; Masefield, Sarah; Casaburi, Richard; Clini, Enrico M; Crouch, Rebecca; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Garvey, Chris; Goldstein, Roger S; Hill, Kylie; Morgan, Michael; Nici, Linda; Pitta, Fabio; Ries, Andrew L; Singh, Sally J; Troosters, Thierry; Wijkstra, Peter J; Yawn, Barbara P; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has demonstrated physiological, symptom-reducing, psychosocial, and health economic benefits for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, yet it is underutilized worldwide. Insufficient funding, resources, and reimbursement; lack of healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge; and additional patient-related barriers all contribute to the gap between the knowledge of the science and benefits of PR and the actual delivery of PR services to suitable patients. The objectives of this document are to enhance implementation, use, and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation to suitable individuals worldwide. Members of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Rehabilitation and Chronic Care Group established a Task Force and writing committee to develop a policy statement on PR. The document was modified based on feedback from expert peer reviewers. After cycles of review and revisions, the statement was reviewed and formally approved by the Board of Directors of the ATS and the Science Council and Executive Committee of the ERS. This document articulates policy recommendations for advancing healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge of PR, increasing patient access to PR, and ensuring quality of PR programs. It also recommends areas of future research to establish evidence to support the development of an updated funding and reimbursement policy regarding PR. The ATS and ERS commit to undertake actions that will improve access to and delivery of PR services for suitable patients. They call on their members and other health professional societies, payers, patients, and patient advocacy groups to join in this commitment.

  6. American Council of Learned Societies Annual Report for the Years 2006-2007 and 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) provides the humanities and related social sciences with leadership, opportunities for innovation, and national and international representation. The American Council of Learned Societies was created in 1919 to represent the United States in the Union Academique Internationale. Its mission is…

  7. Test Methods for Vertebrate Pest Control and Management Materials. A Symposium Sponsored by ASTM Committee E-35 on Pesticides, American Society for Testing and Materials, Monterey, California, March 8, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, W. B., Ed.; Marsh, R. E., Ed.

    The first symposium on "Test Methods for Vertebrate Pest Management" was held in March, 1976. Much of the thrust was toward explaining and defining the "state of the art." Concerns included rodents and rabbits, predators, scavengers, and large game animals, and a variety of bird species. Environments were as restricted as a…

  8. Test Methods for Vertebrate Pest Control and Management Materials. A Symposium Sponsored by ASTM Committee E-35 on Pesticides, American Society for Testing and Materials, Monterey, California, March 8, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, W. B., Ed.; Marsh, R. E., Ed.

    The first symposium on "Test Methods for Vertebrate Pest Management" was held in March, 1976. Much of the thrust was toward explaining and defining the "state of the art." Concerns included rodents and rabbits, predators, scavengers, and large game animals, and a variety of bird species. Environments were as restricted as a…

  9. Evolution and revolution: the formation of Today's American Thoracic Society, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Philip C; Du Melle, Fran; Murray, John F

    2012-12-01

    The major event in the recent history of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) is its separation from the American Lung Association (ALA), resulting in the Society's independence. The seeds of the separation were sown over the course of many years. The fundamental reason driving the separation was the organizational structure of the ALA, with the ATS being a division within the larger organization and having neither the standing to make independent decisions nor the ability to respond effectively to the expectations of a growing and diverse membership. Additional important factors included continual organizational conflicts; ongoing struggles over finances; reluctance by the ALA to provide what the ATS considered to be appropriate support for research; divergence of areas of interest as the Society became more broad based to include critical care and sleep medicine, as well as concerns with medical practice issues; and internationalization of the Society, with an increasing proportion of members residing outside the United States. Once it was decided that the ATS could only exist as an independent organization, the separation agreement was negotiated in less than 3 years. Although there were substantial unknowns immediately after the separation, a unified leadership, a strongly supportive membership, and a skilled and dedicated staff guided the organization through this difficult period, from which the Society emerged as a strong independent professional organization that remains true to the public-minded spirit that guided its formation 107 years ago.

  10. Kokes Award for the 24th North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, Robert M.

    2016-05-02

    The objective of the Richard. J. Kokes Travel Award program is to encourage the participation of students in the biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings. The Kokes Award covers a significant portion of the transportation, lodging, and conference registration costs. Eligible students must be enrolled at a North American university and need to present a paper at the meeting. The Kokes awardee will be required to contribute some time to the organizing committee to assist in meeting operations and to be present at the meeting during the entire time. Similar to the 23rd Kokes Award program, undergraduate students are also eligible for the 24th Kokes Award program.

  11. The management of hypertension in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Armani, Annemarie M

    2007-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in blacks in the United States is among the highest in the world. Compared with whites, blacks develop hypertension at an earlier age, their average blood pressures are much higher and they experience worse disease severity. Consequently, blacks have a 1.3 times greater rate of nonfatal stroke, 1.8 times greater rate of fatal stroke, 1.5 times greater rate of heart disease death, 4.2 times greater rate of end-stage kidney disease, and a 50% higher frequency of heart failure; overall, mortality due to hypertension and its consequences is 4 to 5 times more likely in African Americans than in whites. The increased prevalence of hypertension and excessive target organ damage is due to a combination of genetic and, most likely, environmental factors. There are no clinical trial data at present to suggest that lower-than-usual BP targets should be set for high-risk demographic groups such as African Americans. The primary means of prevention and early treatment of hypertension in African Americans will be the appropriate use of lifestyle modification. The International Society of Hypertension in Blacks guidelines realize that most patients will require combination therapy, many of them first-line, to reach appropriate BP goals. Although certain classes and combinations of antihypertensive agents have been well-established to be effective, the choice of drugs for combination therapy in African American patients may be different. Within the African American group, the responsiveness to monotherapy with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta blockers may be less than the responsiveness to diuretics and calcium channel blockers, but these differences are corrected when diuretics are added to the neurohormonal antagonists. Of note, African American patients with systolic BP >15 mm Hg or a diastolic BP >10 mm Hg above goal should be treated with first-line combination therapy.

  12. American Issues Forum, Volume I: American Society in the Making. Courses by Newspaper: Community Leader's Guide, Newspaper Articles, [And] Examination Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Diego. Univ. Extension.

    These materials are designed to be used in a one-semester curriculum program which is linked to topics outlined in the American Issues Forum calendar. It is intended for use at the local level. Volume I, American Society in the Making, examines some of the principal conditions affecting the development of American ideas and institutions. It…

  13. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  14. How Linus Pauling Finally Got the Priestley Medal of the American Chemical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Derek A.

    1998-10-01

    Late in 1981 I started firming up plans for a symposium marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Joseph Priestley in 1733. The symposium was scheduled for the 1983 Fall Meeting of the American Chemical Society to be held in Washington D. C. Because of Priestley's wide-ranging interests and activities, the speakers were to include not only chemists and historians but also a political scientist, a grammarian, and a Unitarian minister. The closing session was to open with Melvin Calvin speaking on "Artificial Photosynthesis"-a phenomenon Priestley was the first to observe, albeit somewhat confusedly. Next came Fred Basolo, then president of the American Chemical Society, on "Synthetic Oxygen Carriers of Biological Interest"-Priestley had abeen among the first to remark on the role of dephlogisticated air (oxygen) in the interconversion of venous and arterial blood.

  15. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  16. Challenges for Chemistry in the 21st Century: Report on the American Chemical Society Presidential Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    1998-06-01

    On Sunday morning, March 29, 1998, during the 215th American Chemical Society National Meeting in Dallas, TX, a special Presidential Event, "Challenges for Chemistry in the 21st Century", was held. It was sponsored by the American Chemical Society Committee on Science and Chemical and Engineering News as part of its 75th Anniversary. Six outstanding scientists spoke on the future of their chosen fields of study to a standing-room-only audience. The intensity and enthusiasm of these men and women were inspiring. Several common themes emerged. According to these experts, the next century will require greater education in science and technology for the public and greater emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to science by scientists. The completion of the human genome project and technological advances, including the development of nanotechnology, will be the driving forces of research in chemistry.

  17. Turkish Thoracic Society asthma management and prevention guideline: key points.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Füsun; Oğuzülgen, I Kıvılcım; Dursun, Berna; Mungan, Dilşad; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Yorgancıoğlu, Arzu

    2011-01-01

    Asthma still has high morbidity and cost despite all advances in pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. Although asthma can be controlled with proper diagnosis and treatment, the low rates of control in our country and in the world can not be attributed to the variable course of the disease and patients' psycho-social behaviours for chronic disease. In this context, Turkish Thoracic Society (TTS) has decided to update Asthma Diagnosis and Management Guide latest published in 2000. National data were collected, compiled and prepared by authors, and final form given by the TTS Asthma and Allergy Study Group, after presenting to consultant individuals and institutions. In June 2009, the National Asthma Management and Prevention Guideline were published in Turkish. In this paper, we aimed to present the national guide in English with its basics and individual differences.

  18. Evolution and revolution: the formation of today's American Thoracic Society, part 1.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Du Melle, Fran; Hopewell, Philip C

    2012-11-15

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), the preeminent professional organization in the field of respiratory, critical care, and sleep medicine, is now 107 years old. For the most part, the Society's administrative and medical-scientific interests evolved in an orderly fashion, but two "revolutions" took place that should be remembered. What ultimately metamorphosed into the ATS in 1960 began in 1905 as the 34-member American Sanatorium Association, which in 1915 became the medical section of the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis (NASPT). In 1918, the NASPT became the National Tuberculosis Association and in 1939, the ASA became the American Trudeau Society, cosmetic revisions having no effect on either the medical section-parent relationship or the one-disease orientation of both organizations. After World War II, the narrow focus of the ATS on tuberculosis was progressively enlarged through coalescence of several factors that transformed the practice of pulmonary medicine: the growth of intensive care units and pulmonary function laboratories and the advent of fiberoptic bronchoscopy; the rise of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer coincident with the withering of tuberculosis; and the arrival of pulmonary physician-scientists who sought enrichment through a professional society. The newcomers found a home in the ATS, but it was slow to fulfill their needs for scientific communication and administrative responsibility. The first revolution, the formation of Scientific Assemblies, got the job done quickly and well, as described in Part 1 of this perspective. The second revolution, separation from the American Lung Association, is described in Part 2.

  19. American Society of Anesthesiologists Classification Versus ARISCAT Risk Index: Predicting Pulmonary Complications Following Renal Transplant.

    PubMed

    Kupeli, Elif; Er Dedekarginoglu, Balam; Ulubay, Gaye; Oner Eyuboglu, Fusun; Haberal, Mehmet

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are prone to pulmonary complications. Renal transplant recipients should undergo complete preoperative evaluation to determine risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. The American Society of Anesthesiologists classification and the Assess Respiratory Risk in Surgical Patients in Catalonia risk index correlate well with incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Here, we compared their accuracy in predicting pulmonary complications following renal transplant. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of renal transplant recipients between years 2004 and 2015. We collected patient data on Assess Respiratory Risk in Surgical Patients in Catalonia risk index, including demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, preoperative pulmonary risk score, laboratory results, surgery information, history of lower respiratory tract infection 1 month pretransplant, urgency of surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, and pulmonary complications within 1 month posttransplant. Of 172 patients (123 males; mean age 38.82 y), 22 (12.8%) developed pulmonary complication during the first month posttransplant, including effusion (9 patients), pneumonia (10 patients), respiratory inefficiency (2 patients), and pulmonary embolism (1 patient). Atelectasis was observed in 95.4% of patients with complications. A positive correlation was observed between age and development of complications (r = 0.171; P = .025). Regarding risk score, 75% of patients at high risk and 19.5% at intermediate risk developed pulmonary complications. Patients with low-risk scores had significantly lower complications than intermediate- and high-risk groups (P < .001). A positive correlation was observed between preoperative risk score and complications (r = 0.34; P < .001). There was no association between the American Society of Anesthesiologists scores and postoperative complications (P = .7). The American Society of Anesthesiologists

  20. Survey of Anesthetic Choice among Fellows of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Morton

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty Fellows of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology were surveyed concerning their personal preference of anesthetic technique, regional versus general anesthesia, through the use of two scenarios. Those surveyed preferred regional anesthesia as opposed to general anesthesia in both emergency and elective scenarios. These results are consistent with similar studies of anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists, although these groups demonstrated an even greater bias toward regional anesthetic techniques. PMID:3250280

  1. Cytopathology laboratory accreditation, with special reference to the American Society of Cytology programs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Erozan, Y S

    1989-01-01

    The features of the Laboratory Accreditation Program of the American Society of Cytology that pertain to quality assurance in cytopathology are reviewed. The areas considered include: (1) specimen procurement and cytopreparation, (2) the role of the cytotechnologist in cytoscreening, evaluation and reporting, (3) the role of the cytopathologist and (4) quality control measures. Attention to the issues raised in these areas is essential to achieving the best possible cytopathology practice in the most efficient and economical manner.

  2. The First International Residency Program Accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Alissa, Dema A.; Al-Jedai, Ahmed; Ajlan, Aziza; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S.

    2012-01-01

    The processes by which the pharmacy residency program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia became the first American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited program outside the United States is described. This article provides key points for a successful program for other pharmacy residency programs around the world. Additionally, it points out the need for establishing international standards for pharmacy residency programs. PMID:23275655

  3. The Diagnosis and Management of Lipodystrophy Syndromes: A Multi-Society Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Vilar, David; Cheung, Pik To; Dunger, David; Garg, Abhimanyu; Jack, Michelle; Mungai, Lucy; Oral, Elif A.; Patni, Nivedita; Rother, Kristina I.; von Schnurbein, Julia; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Stanley, Takara; Vigouroux, Corinne; Wabitsch, Martin; Williams, Rachel; Yorifuji, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Lipodystrophy syndromes are extremely rare disorders of deficient body fat associated with potentially serious metabolic complications, including diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, and steatohepatitis. Due to their rarity, most clinicians are not familiar with their diagnosis and management. This practice guideline summarizes the diagnosis and management of lipodystrophy syndromes not associated with HIV or injectable drugs. Participants: Seventeen participants were nominated by worldwide endocrine societies or selected by the committee as content experts. Funding was via an unrestricted educational grant from Astra Zeneca to the Pediatric Endocrine Society. Meetings were not open to the general public. Evidence: A literature review was conducted by the committee. Recommendations of the committee were graded using the system of the American Heart Association. Expert opinion was used when published data were unavailable or scarce. Consensus Process: The guideline was drafted by committee members and reviewed, revised, and approved by the entire committee during group meetings. Contributing societies reviewed the document and provided approval. Conclusions: Lipodystrophy syndromes are heterogeneous and are diagnosed by clinical phenotype, supplemented by genetic testing in certain forms. Patients with most lipodystrophy syndromes should be screened for diabetes, dyslipidemia, and liver, kidney, and heart disease annually. Diet is essential for the management of metabolic complications of lipodystrophy. Metreleptin therapy is effective for metabolic complications in hypoleptinemic patients with generalized lipodystrophy and selected patients with partial lipodystrophy. Other treatments not specific for lipodystrophy may be helpful as well (eg, metformin for diabetes, and statins or fibrates for hyperlipidemia). Oral estrogens are contraindicated. PMID:27710244

  4. The Diagnosis and Management of Lipodystrophy Syndromes: A Multi-Society Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Araujo-Vilar, David; Cheung, Pik To; Dunger, David; Garg, Abhimanyu; Jack, Michelle; Mungai, Lucy; Oral, Elif A; Patni, Nivedita; Rother, Kristina I; von Schnurbein, Julia; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Stanley, Takara; Vigouroux, Corinne; Wabitsch, Martin; Williams, Rachel; Yorifuji, Tohru

    2016-12-01

    Lipodystrophy syndromes are extremely rare disorders of deficient body fat associated with potentially serious metabolic complications, including diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, and steatohepatitis. Due to their rarity, most clinicians are not familiar with their diagnosis and management. This practice guideline summarizes the diagnosis and management of lipodystrophy syndromes not associated with HIV or injectable drugs. Seventeen participants were nominated by worldwide endocrine societies or selected by the committee as content experts. Funding was via an unrestricted educational grant from Astra Zeneca to the Pediatric Endocrine Society. Meetings were not open to the general public. A literature review was conducted by the committee. Recommendations of the committee were graded using the system of the American Heart Association. Expert opinion was used when published data were unavailable or scarce. The guideline was drafted by committee members and reviewed, revised, and approved by the entire committee during group meetings. Contributing societies reviewed the document and provided approval. Lipodystrophy syndromes are heterogeneous and are diagnosed by clinical phenotype, supplemented by genetic testing in certain forms. Patients with most lipodystrophy syndromes should be screened for diabetes, dyslipidemia, and liver, kidney, and heart disease annually. Diet is essential for the management of metabolic complications of lipodystrophy. Metreleptin therapy is effective for metabolic complications in hypoleptinemic patients with generalized lipodystrophy and selected patients with partial lipodystrophy. Other treatments not specific for lipodystrophy may be helpful as well (eg, metformin for diabetes, and statins or fibrates for hyperlipidemia). Oral estrogens are contraindicated.

  5. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Gary

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  6. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  7. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N A; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M W J; Spruit, Martijn A; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem. Strategies for early detection and specific treatments for

  8. Embryo transfer techniques: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine survey of current Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology practices.

    PubMed

    Toth, Thomas L; Lee, Malinda S; Bendikson, Kristin A; Reindollar, Richard H

    2017-04-01

    To better understand practice patterns and opportunities for standardization of ET. Cross-sectional survey. Not applicable. Not applicable. An anonymous 82-question survey was emailed to the medical directors of 286 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member IVF practices. A follow-up survey composed of three questions specific to ET technique was emailed to the same medical directors. Descriptive statistics of the results were compiled. The survey assessed policies, protocols, restrictions, and specifics pertinent to the technique of ET. There were 117 (41%) responses; 32% practice in academic settings and 68% in private practice. Responders were experienced clinicians, half of whom had performed <10 procedures during training. Ninety-eight percent of practices allowed all practitioners to perform ET; half did not follow a standardized ET technique. Multiple steps in the ET process were identified as "highly conserved;" others demonstrated discordance. ET technique is divided among [1] trial transfer followed immediately with ET (40%); [2] afterload transfer (30%); and [3] direct transfer without prior trial or afterload (27%). Embryos are discharged in the upper (66%) and middle thirds (29%) of the endometrial cavity and not closer than 1-1.5 cm from fundus (87%). Details of each step were reported and allowed the development of a "common" practice ET procedure. ET training and practices vary widely. Improved training and standardization based on outcomes data and best practices are warranted. A common practice procedure is suggested for validation by a systematic literature review. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy: An American Brachytherapy Society consensus report.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S; Alektiar, K M; Nag, S; Huang, Y J; Deufel, C L; Mourtada, F; Gaffney, D K

    This report presents recommendations from the American Brachytherapy Society for the use of intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy. Members of the American Brachytherapy Society with expertise in IOHDR formulated this document based on their clinical experience and a review of the literature. This report covers the use of IOHDR in colorectal cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancers, and pediatric cancers. This report does not cover intraoperative brachytherapy for breast cancer. Details about treatment planning and delivery are emphasized so this document can serve as a guide to practices implementing this technique. IOHDR brachytherapy is generally most beneficial for patients with either close or positive margins and/or recurrent disease in a previous resection bed or previously irradiated area. IOHDR brachytherapy requires a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. IOHDR brachytherapy is recommended in the treatment of both recurrent and primary locally advanced disease for colorectal and gynecologic malignancies, soft tissue sarcoma, and selected head and neck and pediatric malignancies. Other techniques such as perioperative fractionated brachytherapy are also acceptable in many cases with some advantages and disadvantages compared to IOHDR. IOHDR brachytherapy is a specialized technique in radiation therapy with unique properties and advantages in cancer control. Special considerations for treatment planning and delivery are outlined herein. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. American Geriatrics Society identifies five things that healthcare providers and patients should question.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Given the American Geriatrics Society's (AGS) commitment to improving health care for older adults by, among other means, educating older people and their caregivers about their health and healthcare choices, the AGS was delighted when, in late 2011, the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation invited the Society to join its "Choosing Wisely(®) " campaign. Choosing Wisely is designed to engage patients, healthcare professionals, and family caregivers in discussions about the safety and appropriateness of medical tests, medications, and procedures. Ideally, these discussions should examine whether the tests and procedures are evidence-based, whether any risks they pose might overshadow their potential benefits, whether they are redundant, and whether they are truly necessary. In addition to improving the quality of care, the initiative aims to rein in unneeded healthcare spending. According to a 2008 Congressional Budget Office report, as much as 30% of healthcare spending in the United States may be unnecessary. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Fabian, Carol J.; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Jones, Lee W.; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K.; Merrill, Janette K.; Wollins, Dana S.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team—the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis—is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. PMID:25273035

  12. Celebrating the First One Hundred Years of The American Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzbacher, Eugen

    1998-11-01

    In the past few years physicists have had the occasion to observe a number of centennials: the one hundredth anniversaries of the discoveries of x rays, the electron, and radioactivity, and other milestones. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was given to Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen in 1901. The first meeting of The American Physical Society was held on 20 May 1899 at 10:30 a.m. The centenary of the Society will be celebrated at an extraordinary meeting on 20-26 March, 1999, in Atlanta. All units of the APS - Divisions, Topical Groups, Forums, as well as Sections - will contribute special symposia and exhibits, highlighting the achievements of physicists and the role played by the Society in this century. The Centennial Meeting and the concurrent Festival of Physics in the City of Atlanta are intended to appeal to the entire physics community and to the students, who will carry the torch of science into the next century.

  13. Prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Criner, Gerard J; Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L; Ouellette, Daniel R; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G; Celli, Bartolome R; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T; Fiel, Stanley B; Foreman, Marilyn G; Hanania, Nicola A; Ireland, Belinda K; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Mularski, Richard A; Ornelas, Joseph; Road, Jeremy D; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in the field of COPD would lead to

  14. Patch Testing for Evaluation of Hypersensitivity to Implanted Metal Devices: A Perspective From the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Crawford, Glen; Nedorost, Susan; Scheinman, Pamela L; Atwater, Amber Reck; Mowad, Christen; Brod, Bruce; Ehrlich, Alison; Watsky, Kalman L; Sasseville, Denis; Silvestri, Dianne; Worobec, Sophie M; Elliott, John F; Honari, Golara; Powell, Douglas L; Taylor, James; DeKoven, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society recognizes the interest in the evaluation and management of metal hypersensitivity reactions. Given the paucity of robust evidence with which to guide our practices, we provide reasonable evidence and expert opinion-based guidelines for clinicians with regard to metal hypersensitivity reaction testing and patient management. Routine preoperative evaluation in individuals with no history of adverse cutaneous reactions to metals or history of previous implant-related adverse events is not necessary. Patients with a clear self-reported history of metal reactions should be evaluated by patch testing before device implant. Patch testing is only 1 element in the assessment of causation in those with postimplantation morbidity. Metal exposure from the implanted device can cause sensitization, but a positive metal test does not prove symptom causality. The decision to replace an implanted device must include an assessment of all clinical factors and a thorough risk-benefit analysis by the treating physician(s) and patient.

  15. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  16. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  17. Confessions of a Wannabe (American Folklore Society Presidential Invited Plenary Address, October 2009).

    PubMed

    Welsch, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a written rendering of a plenary address delivered at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society. Drawing on materials from his forthcoming book Confessions of a Wannabe, the author provides a personal account of the deeply emotional sense of responsibility, obligation, and reciprocity involved in long-term ethnographic research among Native American communities, particularly the Omaha and Pawnee tribes of Nebraska. The author details the ways in which personal relations with the people and communities he has observed have shaped his personal and professional life, and he calls into question the ideal of purportedly neutral or distanced ethnography. Details are provided of the author's experiences in converting his farm into an appropriate reburial site for repatriated Pawnee remains recovered under the aegis of the Native American Graves Repatriation and Protection Act (NAGPRA).

  18. Shared Decision Making in ICUs: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A; Davidson, Judy E; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision making is endorsed by critical care organizations; however, there remains confusion about what shared decision making is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define shared decision making, recommend when shared decision making should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. The American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society were included in the statement. Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) DEFINITION: Shared decision making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make healthcare decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient's values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a shared decision making process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their "default" approach a shared decision making process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable, including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision

  19. An official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians policy statement: the Choosing Wisely top five list in adult pulmonary medicine.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Ouellette, Daniel R; Diamond, Edward; Fan, Vincent S; Maurer, Janet R; Mularski, Richard A; Peters, Jay I; Halpern, Scott D

    2014-06-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation's Choosing Wisely campaign aims to curb health-care costs and improve patient care by soliciting lists from medical societies of the top five tests or treatments in their specialty that are used too frequently and inappropriately. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians created a joint task force, which produced a top five list for adult pulmonary medicine. Our top five recommendations, which were approved by the executive committees of the ATS and American College of Chest Physicians and published by Choosing Wisely in October 2013, are as follows: (1) Do not perform CT scan surveillance for evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules at more frequent intervals or for a longer period of time than recommended by established guidelines; (2) do not routinely offer pharmacologic treatment with advanced vasoactive agents approved only for the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension to patients with pulmonary hypertension resulting from left heart disease or hypoxemic lung diseases (groups II or III pulmonary hypertension); (3) for patients recently discharged on supplemental home oxygen following hospitalization for an acute illness, do not renew the prescription without assessing the patient for ongoing hypoxemia; (4) do not perform chest CT angiography to evaluate for possible pulmonary embolism in patients with a low clinical probability and negative results of a highly sensitive D-dimer assay; (5) do not perform CT scan screening for lung cancer among patients at low risk for lung cancer. We hope pulmonologists will use these recommendations to stimulate frank discussions with patients about when these tests and treatments are indicated--and when they are not.

  20. Conservation and management of the American crocodile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushlan, James A.

    1988-11-01

    The American crocodile is a rare and endangered species, the range of which has contracted to disjunct locations such as Hispaniola, Jamaica, Cuba, Panama, and southern Florida. In an attempt to determine what factors might be limiting population growth, an extensive collaborative research program was conducted in 1978 82 in southern Florida. Limiting factors explicitly studied included climate, hurricanes, population dispersion, nesting habitat, fertility, predation, nest chamber environment, juvenile survivorship, artificial mortality, disturbance, and environmental contamination. No single natural factor limits the population, although in concert various factors result in low adult recruitment rates. Such natural limitations explain the natural rarity of this tropical species at the temperate limits of its range. Two artificial sources of mortality are death of adults on roads and the flooding of nests by high groundwater tables. These sources of mortality are potentially controllable by the appropriate management agencies. Active management, by such means as protection of individuals, habitat preservation and enhancement, nest site protection, and captive breeding, is also appropriate for assuring the survival of a rare species. The American crocodile has survived in southern Florida in face of extensive human occupancy of parts of its former nesting habitat, demonstrating the resilience of a threatened species. This case history illustrates the efficacy of conducting research aimed at testing specific management hypotheses, the importance of considering biographical constraints limiting population status in peripheral populations, the need for active management of rare species, and the role of multiple reserves in a conservation and management strategy.

  1. Cross-cultural examination of the structure of the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ-R).

    PubMed

    Botti, Mari; Khaw, Damien; Jørgensen, Emmy Brandt; Rasmussen, Bodil; Hunter, Susan; Redley, Bernice

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the cross-cultural factor stability and internal consistency of the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ-R), a measure of the quality of postoperative pain management used internationally. We conducted exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of APS-POQ-R data from 2 point prevalence studies comprising 268 and 311 surveys of Danish and Australian medical-surgical patients, respectively. Parallel analysis indicated 4- and 3-factor solutions for Danish and Australian patients, respectively, which accounted for 58.1% and 52.9% of variance. Internal consistency was unsatisfactory among both Danish (Cronbach α = .54) and Australian (Cronbach α = .63) cohorts. There was a high degree of between-group similarity in item-factor loadings of variables coded as "pain experience," but not "pain management." This finding reflected cross-cultural differences in ratings of treatment satisfaction. For Danish patients, satisfaction was associated with the degree of pain severity and activity interference, whereas for Australian patients, satisfaction was associated with their perceived ability to participate in treatment. To facilitate further cross-cultural comparison, we compared our findings with past research conducted in the United States and Iceland. EFA supported the construct validity of the APS-POQ-R as a measure of "pain experience" but indicated that items measuring "pain management" may vary cross-culturally. Findings highlighted the need for further validation of the APS-POQ-R internationally. This study revealed the APS-POQ-R as a valid measure of postoperative pain experience for Danish and Australian patients. Measures of patients' perception of pain management were not robust to group differences in treatment expectations and demonstrated cross-cultural instability. Results highlighted the difficulties in establishing stable cross-cultural, cross-population subscales for the APS-POQ-R. Copyright © 2015

  2. The Norwegian version of the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire: reliability and validity of three subscales.

    PubMed

    Dihle, Alfhild; Helseth, Sølvi; Christophersen, Knut-Andreas

    2008-08-01

    To examine some psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the American Pain Society's Patient Outcome Questionnaire(APS-POQ-N). This study is part of an investigation of Norwegian orthopaedic surgical patients, where the overall aim is to evaluate the quality of postoperative pain management. Therefore, an adequate questionnaire on the quality of postoperative pain management was needed. The sample included 114 orthopaedic postoperative patients. The instrument consists of three main subscales, namely the modified Brief Pain Inventory(modified BPI subscale), the subscale on satisfaction with pain management(Satisfaction subscale) and the subscale on beliefs about pain management (Beliefs subscale), together with six single items about pain management. The reliability of these three main subscales was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficients and the construct validity was evaluated using principal-axis factor analysis with oblimin rotation. Face and content validity of the APS-POQ-N were satisfactory, while the modified BPI and the Beliefs subscales showed acceptable internal consistency but the Satisfaction subscale did not. Factor analyses yielded a three-factor solution for the modified BPI, a one-factor solution for the Satisfaction subscale and a two-factor solution for the Beliefs subscale. The APS-POQ-N appears, in general, to be an acceptable method of evaluating postoperative pain management in orthopaedic postoperative patients.However, the alpha value of the Satisfaction subscale was low, and thus the subscale is not recommended for this purpose.

  3. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Finelli, Antonio; Chen, Ronald C; Slovin, Susan; Stein, Mark N; Mendelson, David S; Wackett, Colin; Sandler, Howard M

    2014-12-01

    To endorse the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The panel determined that the guideline recommendations on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, published in August 2013, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, adding one qualifying statement that not all candidates for adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy have the same risk of recurrence or disease progression, and thus, risk-benefit ratios are not the same for all men. Those at the highest risk for recurrence after radical prostatectomy include men with seminal vesicle invasion, Gleason score 8 to 10, extensive positive margins, and detectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Physicians should discuss adjuvant radiotherapy with patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiotherapy with patients with PSA or local recurrence after prostatectomy. The discussion of radiotherapy should include possible short- and long-term adverse effects and potential benefits. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and multidisciplinary treatment team, keeping in mind that not all men are at equal risk of recurrence or clinically meaningful disease progression. Thus, the risk-benefit ratio will differ for each patient. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical

  4. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part I.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-11-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. This report highlights biology, epidemiology, prognosis and treatment sequelae of brain metastases.

  5. Advances in brain metastases presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy F; Patel, Jyoti D; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-12-01

    American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, USA, 3-7 June 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting took place in Chicago, IL, USA, from 3 to 7 June 2016. Over 30,000 oncologists, researchers, related professionals and advocates participated in the conference, which covered all aspects of oncology. An overview of the key studies in brain metastases presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is highlighted here. Key data presented on radiotherapy, and systemic therapy for brain metastases are reviewed.

  6. Maintaining the competitiveness of the American fisheries society journals: an assessment based on influence and cost-effectiveness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, David A.; Link, Jason S.; Steinich, Dave R.; Wahl, David H.; Mather, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent changes in the landscape of scientific publishing prompted the Publications Overview Committee of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) to review the Society's portfolio of scientific journals. We evaluated journals based on metrics in two categories: (1) citation-based measures of the influence of a journal on the scientific literature, and (2) measures of the cost-effectiveness of a journal (citation rate adjusted for subscription cost). Over the long-term, we found that ecology journals had far stronger citation-based influence than fisheries and aquatic sciences journals, and that journals publishing primarily basic research had stronger influence than journals publishing applied research (including four AFS journals and Fisheries magazine). In evaluating the current status of fisheries and aquatic sciences journals, we found that metrics of influence and cost-effectiveness provided considerably different portrayals of journals relative to their peers. In terms of citation-based influence, we found that the AFS journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society (TAFS) and Fisheries magazine were competitive with highly regarded peer fisheries journals, but that North American Journal of Aquaculture (NAJA) and Journal of Aquatic Animal Health (JAAH) were less influential than their peers. The citation-based influence of North American Journal of Fisheries Management (NAJFM) was intermediate between TAFS/Fisheries and NAJA/JAAH. For journals like NAJFM and NAJA, we expect that much of the scientific influence on policy and management is not captured by citations in the primary literature, and alternative methods of evaluation may be needed. All of the AFS journals ranked highly with regard to cost-effectiveness because their subscription costs are low, and these rankings are in accordance with membership needs and the strategic mission of AFS to provide broad and timely dissemination of scientific information. We conclude by suggesting

  7. The First Year Out: Understanding American Teens after High School. Morality and Society Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clydesdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Wild parties, late nights, and lots of sex, drugs, and alcohol. Many assume these are the things that define an American teenager's first year after high school. But the reality is really quite different. As Tim Clydesdale reports in "The First Year Out", teenagers generally manage the increased responsibilities of everyday life immediately after…

  8. The First Year Out: Understanding American Teens after High School. Morality and Society Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clydesdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Wild parties, late nights, and lots of sex, drugs, and alcohol. Many assume these are the things that define an American teenager's first year after high school. But the reality is really quite different. As Tim Clydesdale reports in "The First Year Out", teenagers generally manage the increased responsibilities of everyday life immediately after…

  9. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  10. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  11. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography. A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  12. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  13. European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Goeminne, Pieter C; McDonnell, Melissa J; Aliberti, Stefano; Marshall, Sara E; Loebinger, Michael R; Murris, Marlene; Cantón, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Dimakou, Katerina; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T; Haworth, Charles S; Vendrell, Montserrat; Ringshausen, Felix C; Subotic, Dragan; Wilson, Robert; Vilaró, Jordi; Stallberg, Bjorn; Welte, Tobias; Rohde, Gernot; Blasi, Francesco; Elborn, Stuart; Almagro, Marta; Timothy, Alan; Ruddy, Thomas; Tonia, Thomy; Rigau, David; Chalmers, James D

    2017-09-01

    Bronchiectasis in adults is a chronic disorder associated with poor quality of life and frequent exacerbations in many patients. There have been no previous international guidelines.The European Respiratory Society guidelines for the management of adult bronchiectasis describe the appropriate investigation and treatment strategies determined by a systematic review of the literature.A multidisciplinary group representing respiratory medicine, microbiology, physiotherapy, thoracic surgery, primary care, methodology and patients considered the most relevant clinical questions (for both clinicians and patients) related to management of bronchiectasis. Nine key clinical questions were generated and a systematic review was conducted to identify published systematic reviews, randomised clinical trials and observational studies that answered these questions. We used the GRADE approach to define the quality of the evidence and the level of recommendations. The resulting guideline addresses the investigation of underlying causes of bronchiectasis, treatment of exacerbations, pathogen eradication, long term antibiotic treatment, anti-inflammatories, mucoactive drugs, bronchodilators, surgical treatment and respiratory physiotherapy.These recommendations can be used to benchmark quality of care for people with bronchiectasis across Europe and to improve outcomes. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. MEDIA ADVISORY: EPA Administrator to Visit Fresno, Phoenix for high-speed rail groundbreaking, American Meteorological Society annual meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On Wednesday, Administrator McCarthy will travel to Phoenix, Ariz. for a Presidential Town Hall at the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) 95 th annual meeting. The growing body of science on climate change and extreme weather underpins Presi

  15. The American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study 3 (CPS-3): Recruitment, study design, and baseline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpa V; Jacobs, Eric J; Dudas, Daniela M; Briggs, Peter J; Lichtman, Cari J; Bain, Elizabeth B; Stevens, Victoria L; McCullough, Marjorie L; Teras, Lauren R; Campbell, Peter T; Gaudet, Mia M; Kirkland, Elizabeth G; Rittase, Melissa H; Joiner, Nance; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Yaw, Nancy C; Gapstur, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    Prospective cohort studies contribute importantly to understanding the role of lifestyle, genetic, and other factors in chronic disease etiology. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recruited a new prospective cohort study, Cancer Prevention Study 3 (CPS-3), between 2006 and 2013 from 35 states and Puerto Rico. Enrollment took place primarily at ACS community events and at community enrollment "drives." At enrollment sites, participants completed a brief survey that included an informed consent, identifying information necessary for follow-up, and key exposure information. They also provided a waist measure and a nonfasting blood sample. Most participants also completed a more comprehensive baseline survey at home that included extensive medical, lifestyle, and other information. Participants will be followed for incident cancers through linkage with state cancer registries and for cause-specific mortality through linkage with the National Death Index. In total, 303,682 participants were enrolled. Of these, 254,650 completed the baseline survey and are considered "fully" enrolled; they will be sent repeat surveys periodically for at least the next 20 years to update exposure information. The remaining participants (n = 49,032) will not be asked to update exposure information but will be followed for outcomes. Twenty-three percent of participants were men, 17.3% reported a race or ethnicity other than "white," and the median age at enrollment was 47 years. CPS-3 will be a valuable resource for studies of cancer and other outcomes because of its size; its diversity with respect to age, ethnicity, and geography; and the availability of blood samples and detailed questionnaire information collected over time. Cancer 2017;123:2014-2024. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Are plastic surgery advertisements conforming to the ethical codes of the american society of plastic surgeons?

    PubMed

    Spilson, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Walters, Madonna

    2002-03-01

    Cosmetic surgeons have increasingly come under fire for using advertisements that may be deceptive or intended for the solicitation of vulnerable consumers. However, aesthetic surgery is a growing business that relies heavily on advertising to survive. To prevent the use of deceptive advertisements, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons has developed a code of ethics for its physician members. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of cosmetic surgery advertisements considered objectionable by the lay public. These advertisements were published in the Yellow Pages of the 10 largest U.S. cities. Because all of the advertisements in this study contained the American Society of Plastic Surgeons logo, we also determined whether its members are upholding the ethical code of advertising. We asked a convenience sample of 50 participants to rate 104 advertisements using four yes/no questions derived from the code of ethics and one overall yes/no question regarding whether the advertisement was objectionable. We obtained the mean percentage of "yes" responses for each advertisement, from the total sample, for each question. We found that the study participants felt that 25 percent of the advertisements used images of persons or facsimiles that falsely and deceptively created unjustified expectations of favorable results. The participants responded that 22 percent of the advertisements appealed primarily to the layperson's fears, anxieties, or emotional vulnerabilities. In addition, 18 percent of the advertisements were considered to be objectionable. Discretion is currently left up to physicians as to the ethical nature of their advertisements. Although the majority of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members uphold the ethical code of advertising, there are still a substantial number of published advertisements that the average consumer considers to be in violation of this code.

  17. [The treasure of the American Society of Anesthesiologists: Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shigemasa

    2014-09-01

    The origin of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Wood Library of Museum (WLM) can be traced back to the early 1930s when Dr. Paul Meyer Wood donated his collection of books and medical devices to the New York Society of Anesthetists. The WLM's current activities go beyond collection and preservation of the historical materials and publication and sale of history-related books. The WLM publishes and sells history-related books, and provides anesthesia related materials and information to the society members, as well as the public in general. The on-going programs initiated by the WLM encourage one to study history (WLM Fellowship in Anesthesiology) and honor the established anesthesia historians (WLM Laureate of History of Anesthesia). At the annual ASA meeting, the WLM has also its own lectures and symposium sessions, such as 'Patrick Sim Forum on the History of Anesthesiology' 'Lewis H. Wright Memorial Lecture' and 'History Panel'. These activities are partly supported by a group of anesthesiologist-historians (Friends of WLM). The Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists' Museum was founded in 2011 and it is still in its infancy. In order for the museum to be fully functional, Japanese anesthesiologists will be able to learn from the well-established anesthesiology museum/libraries, such as the WLM.

  18. The College of American Pathologists and National Society for Histotechnology workload study.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Shane K; Lewis, Sue E; Tunnicliffe, Janet; Lott, Robert L; Spencer, Lena T; Carson, Freida L; Souers, Rhona J; Knapp, Robert H; Movahedi-Lankarani, Saeid; Haas, Thomas S; Brown, Richard W

    2011-06-01

    Limited data exist in regard to productivity and staffing in the anatomic pathology laboratory. In 2004, the National Society for Histotechnology (NSH) conducted a pilot study to examine productivity and staffing in the histology laboratory. After review of the data, The College of American Pathologists (CAP)/NSH Histotechnology Committee concluded that a larger survey was required to further address and expand on the pilot study findings. In 2007, a total of 2674 surveys were sent out to North American laboratories. From the responses, comparisons of laboratory demographics and productivity were examined by institution type and workload volume. Productivity was measured as the number of paraffin-embedded tissue blocks processed per full-time equivalent per year. This manuscript presents and discusses the data collected from the CAP/NSH Workload Study.

  19. Listening to Neglected Voices - American Indian Perspectives on Natural Resource Management

    Treesearch

    David N. Bengston

    2004-01-01

    Forestry agencies must ensure that the views of all citizens in our increasingly diverse society are included in decisionmaking. But gaining clear insights into the perspectives of ethnic and minority communities is often difficult. This article summarizes an analysis of news articles about resource management issues written by American Indians and published in Indian...

  20. The 1993 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  1. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  2. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spent 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objects were the following: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  3. American Society of Hypertension position paper: central blood pressure waveforms in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Rosendorff, Clive; Nichols, Wilmer W; Edwards, David G; Chirinos, Julio A; Fernhall, Bo; Cushman, William C

    2016-01-01

    A number of devices are available which noninvasively estimate central aortic blood pressure using a variety of approaches such as tonometry or oscillometry. In this position paper, we discuss how the central pressure waveform is generated and measured, how central pressure waveforms appear in health and disease, the predictive value of central blood pressure measurements, the effects of interventions on waveforms, and areas of future need in this field of clinical and research endeavor. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How we developed and use the American Society for Apheresis guidelines for therapeutic apheresis procedures.

    PubMed

    Shaz, Beth H; Schwartz, Joseph; Winters, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The decision to treat a patient with therapeutic apheresis depends on multiple factors, such as what does the patient most likely have, is the diagnosis amenable to apheresis treatment, what is the harm-versus-benefit ratio of apheresis treatment in this patient, and what are the internal and external issues associated with receiving apheresis treatment? The "Guidelines on the Use of Therapeutic Apheresis in Clinical Practice-Evidence-based Approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis" addresses these issues and helps aid in clinical decision making. The development and application of these Guidelines as well as potential new applications will be discussed in this article. © 2013 AABB.

  5. An analysis of the American Cancer Society Clinical Research Training program.

    PubMed

    Vogler, William R

    2004-01-01

    In 1996 the American Cancer Society initiated a Clinical Research Training Grant for junior investigators. This was a 3-year mentored grant for preclinical and clinical research training. Two hundred four individuals applied from 103 institutions, and 25% were funded. This report is an initial assessment of the impact of the program on future career development. Both the funded and unfunded groups were queried regarding prior research experience, publications, and academic status. Although small differences were seen between the funded and unfunded groups, the major finding was that those applicants with prior research and publication experience were more likely to get funded, but both groups were highly motivated to seek an academic career.

  6. Achieving Speaker Gender Equity at the American Society for Microbiology General Meeting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2015, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) General Meeting essentially achieved gender equity, with 48.5% of the oral presentations being given by women. The mechanisms associated with increased female participation were (i) making the Program Committee aware of gender statistics, (ii) increasing female representation among session convener teams, and (iii) direct instruction to try to avoid all-male sessions. The experience with the ASM General Meeting shows that it is possible to increase the participation of female speakers in a relatively short time and suggests concrete steps that may be taken to achieve this at other meetings. PMID:26242628

  7. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, S.N.

    1991-09-01

    In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spent 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objects were the following: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  8. The primary care sports medicine fellowship: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine proposed standards of excellence.

    PubMed

    Asif, Irfan M; Stovak, Mark; Ray, Tracy; Weiss-Kelly, Amanda

    2017-09-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recognises a need to provide direction and continually enhance the quality of sports medicine fellowship training programmes. This document was developed to be an educational resource for sports medicine physicians who teach in a 1-year primary care sports medicine fellowship training programme. It is meant to provide high standards and targets for fellowship training programmes that choose to re-assess their curriculum and seek to make improvements. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  10. The American Cancer Society's Approach to Addressing the Cancer Burden in the LGBT Community.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Sharpe, Katherine B; Westmaas, J Lee; Patel, Alpa V

    2015-11-05

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has embraced the achievement of equity in cancer-related health outcomes as a foundational principle. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals experience health disparities related to certain risk factors for cancer and in certain cancer outcomes. Accordingly, the ACS is defining a new program of work in partnership with the LGBT community to help understand and reduce disparities in cancer risk factors and outcomes. This article describes the cancer control program of the ACS including specific public health and research programs targeted at reducing cancer related health disparities for the LGBT population.

  11. Pain: metaphor, body, and culture in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between metaphorical languages, body, and culture, and suggests that such an analysis can reveal a great deal about the meaning and experience of pain in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. It uses concepts within embodied cognition to speculate on how historians can write a history of sensation. Bodies are actively engaged in the linguistic processes and social interactions that constitute painful sensations. Language is engaged in a dialogue with physiological bodies and social environments. And culture collaborates in the creation of physiological bodies and metaphorical systems. PMID:28331427

  12. American brachytherapy society recommendations for clinical implementation of NIST-1999 standards for (103)palladium brachytherapy. The clinical research committee of the American Brachytherapy Society.

    PubMed

    Beyer, D; Nath, R; Butler, W; Merrick, G; Blasko, J; Nag, S; Orton, C

    2000-05-01

    Recent important developments in palladium-103 ((103)Pd) dosimetry mandate a reevaluation of (103)Pd brachytherapy prescribing practices. The clinical research committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) convened a consensus session of brachytherapists and physicists to develop recommendations regarding future dose prescribing guidelines for National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST-1999) calibrated (103)Pd sources. The ABS recommends that clinicians attempt to reproduce the implant doses delivered and reported in the literature through the past decade. The following should be immediately implemented for (103)Pd dosimetry: 1) All practicing physicians, physicists, dosimetrists, and suppliers implement NIST-1999 air-kerma strength standard for (103)Pd brachytherapy. 2) All treatment planning systems and dose calculation algorithms must be updated to reflect new dose rate constants. The AAPM-recommended validated value for Theraseed model 200 is 0.665 cGy h(-1) U(-1). The dose rate constant for the Mentor MED3633 seed is currently reported as 0.68 cGy h(-1) U(-1). This latter value and the values for seeds from other manufacturers are awaiting independent confirmation. 3) Physicians who previously prescribed 115 Gy for (103)Pd monotherapy prostate implants should now prescribe 125 Gy. When using (103)Pd as a boost following 45 Gy of external beam irradiation, 100 Gy should be prescribed instead of the previous 90 Gy. It is critical that all three changes be implemented concurrently, because they are interdependent.

  13. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G.; Powell, Charles A.; Riely, Gregory J.; Van Schil, Paul E.; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H. M.; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M.; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Methods An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection

  14. International association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society international multidisciplinary classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim R; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G; Powell, Charles A; Riely, Gregory J; Van Schil, Paul E; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H M; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W; Hirsch, Fred R; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2011-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤ 5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection, will have 100% or near 100

  15. A Comparison of North American and Latin American Societies and Their Social-Political Pressures: A Preliminary Statement for Instructional Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Ronald H.

    In this paper, a comparison of the Latin American and the North American society is presented as a preliminary to future refinement of the concepts into instructional devices for secondary students. Following discussion of the distinctions between the two general societal types (Latin America as organic-centripetal and North America as…

  16. Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear War. Papers Based on a Symposium of the Forum on Physics and Society of the American Physical Society, (Washington, D.C., April 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Philip; And Others

    Three papers on nuclear weapons and nuclear war, based on talks given by distinguished physicists during an American Physical Society-sponsored symposium, are provided in this booklet. They include "Caught Between Asymptotes" (Philip Morrison), "We are not Inferior to the Soviets" (Hans A. Bethe), and "MAD vs. NUTS"…

  17. North American migratory bird management issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.H.; Ryan, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    As human population and industry have grown in North America, land-use practices have greatly altered the landscape. As a result of this changed landscape, several migratory bird populations have declined in recent years. For waterbirds, there have been several milestones: the 1986 North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) and the 1989 North American Wetlands Conservation Act. As a result, the United States and Canada have established 12 habitat and 2 species joint ventures. The primary emphasis of waterfowl management in Canada-U.S. has been land purchase and lease, wetland restoration, and coordination of harvest rates. Because of its different biological and cultural context, Mexico has established other conservation priorities. Mexico has had a long-standing concern to conserve its biodiversity and, in addition, conservation of Mexican resources goes hand in hand with human community development. Unlike Canada-U.S., wetland conservation projects in'Mexico include information gathering, environmental education, and management planning for its 32 priority wetlands. For migratory landbirds' scientists attribute declines in several migrant populations to forest fragmentation on the breeding grounds, deforestation on the wintering grounds, pesticide poisoning, or the cumulative effects of habitat changes. In 1990, the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Program, commonly known as Partners in Flight-Aves de las Americas-was initiated. The next step that is being proposed is the formation of a habitat conservation plan for landbirds modeled after the NAWMP. Management of migratory birds requires a strong international approach in order to coordinate actions for the benefit of migratory birds, their habitats, and the uses they provide.

  18. Attitudes Regarding Labial Hypertrophy and Labiaplasty: A Survey of Members of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons and the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Lauren B; Oakley, Susan H; Mazloomdoost, Donna; Crisp, Catrina C; Kleeman, Steven D; Benbouajili, Janine M; Pauls, Rachel N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe gynecologists' attitudes toward labial hypertrophy and explore possible differences among providers for pediatric/adolescent patients. This was an institutional review board-approved, cross-sectional survey of physician attendees at 2 national meetings in 2014: the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons (SGS) and the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG). The survey was designed to query demographics and impressions regarding labial hypertrophy and labiaplasty. Three hundred sixty-five surveys were completed (response rate, 50%); 268 were analyzed: 55% from SGS and 45% from NASPAG. Most were older than 41 years; 170 (63%) were women, and 93 (35%) were men. More men than women attended SGS (60%); however, women were the majority at NASPAG (94%).Most respondents believed labial hypertrophy to be infrequently reported and "a condition that impacts body image." Common symptoms were "discomfort with exercise" and "dissatisfaction with appearance naked." The majority felt this to impact sexual function "in some cases," citing "self-esteem" and "comfort" most often.Concerning therapies for provided labial hypertrophy, 83% of practitioners provide reassurance, whereas 77% would offer labiaplasty. Expertise with labiaplasty varied; 28% felt "very comfortable," and 11% felt "very uncomfortable."Provider preference for treatment differed based on meeting attendance. After logistic regression controlling for sex and age, attendance at SGS remained associated with offering labiaplasty (P = 0.001; odds ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-9.3), whereas NASPAG attendance was associated with providing reassurance (P = 0.008; odds ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.70). Although the majority surveyed view labial hypertrophy to be bothersome, gynecologists caring for our youngest patients are more likely to provide reassurance. Consensus guidelines are needed to aid practitioners in appropriate management

  19. Recognition of American Physiological Society Members Whose Research Publications Had a Significant Impact on the Discipline of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Society members whose research publication during the past 125 yr had an important impact on the discipline of physiology were featured at the American Physiological Society (APS)'s 125th Anniversary symposium. The daunting and challenging task of identifying and selecting significant publications was assumed by the Steering Committee of the…

  20. Growing the science of agronomy by growing the profession: a Message from the President of the American Society of Agronomy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We often refer to the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) as being both a scientific and professional society. Membership within the organization includes a wide range of people from diverse regions and cultures of the world working with complex and diverse cropping systems. Yet members are unified...

  1. Recognition of American Physiological Society Members Whose Research Publications Had a Significant Impact on the Discipline of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Society members whose research publication during the past 125 yr had an important impact on the discipline of physiology were featured at the American Physiological Society (APS)'s 125th Anniversary symposium. The daunting and challenging task of identifying and selecting significant publications was assumed by the Steering Committee of the…

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement: Implementation Science in Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Curtis H; Krishnan, Jerry A; Au, David H; Bender, Bruce G; Carson, Shannon S; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Cloutier, Michelle M; Cooke, Colin R; Erickson, Karen; George, Maureen; Gerald, Joe K; Gerald, Lynn B; Goss, Christopher H; Gould, Michael K; Hyzy, Robert; Kahn, Jeremy M; Mittman, Brian S; Mosesón, Erika M; Mularski, Richard A; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Patel, Sanjay R; Rand, Cynthia S; Redeker, Nancy S; Reiss, Theodore F; Riekert, Kristin A; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Tate, Judith A; Wilson, Kevin C; Thomson, Carey C

    2016-10-15

    Many advances in health care fail to reach patients. Implementation science is the study of novel approaches to mitigate this evidence-to-practice gap. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) created a multidisciplinary ad hoc committee to develop a research statement on implementation science in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. The committee used an iterative consensus process to define implementation science and review the use of conceptual frameworks to guide implementation science for the pulmonary, critical care, and sleep community and to explore how professional medical societies such as the ATS can promote implementation science. The committee defined implementation science as the study of the mechanisms by which effective health care interventions are either adopted or not adopted in clinical and community settings. The committee also distinguished implementation science from the act of implementation. Ideally, implementation science should include early and continuous stakeholder involvement and the use of conceptual frameworks (i.e., models to systematize the conduct of studies and standardize the communication of findings). Multiple conceptual frameworks are available, and we suggest the selection of one or more frameworks on the basis of the specific research question and setting. Professional medical societies such as the ATS can have an important role in promoting implementation science. Recommendations for professional societies to consider include: unifying implementation science activities through a single organizational structure, linking front-line clinicians with implementation scientists, seeking collaborations to prioritize and conduct implementation science studies, supporting implementation science projects through funding opportunities, working with research funding bodies to set the research agenda in the field, collaborating with external bodies responsible for health care delivery, disseminating results of implementation

  3. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-04-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cell-phone app containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for theClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrologyreaders. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  4. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2014: acid-base and electrolyte disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-03-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, in 2014 the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases from each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions using an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the acid-base and electrolyte disorders portion of the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  5. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: ESRD/RRT.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-07-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting, the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cellphone application containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then, the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  6. The American Society for Clinical Pathology's 2014 vacancy survey of medical laboratories in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edna; Ali, Asma M; Soles, Ryan M; Lewis, D Grace

    2015-09-01

    To determine the extent and distribution of workforce shortages within the nation's medical laboratories. Historically, the results of this biennial survey have served as a basis for additional research on laboratory recruitment, retention, education, marketing, certification, and advocacy. The 2014 Vacancy Survey was conducted through collaboration between American Society for Clinical Pathology's Institute of Science, Technology, and Policy in Washington, DC, and the Evaluation, Measurement, and Assessment Department and Board of Certification in Chicago, Illinois. Data were collected via an Internet survey that was distributed to individuals who were able to report on staffing and certifications for their laboratories. Data reveal increased overall vacancy rates since 2012 for all departments surveyed except cytology and cytogenetics. Also, results show higher anticipated retirement rates for both staff and supervisors. Overall certification rates are highest among laboratory personnel in cytogenetics, hematology/coagulation, and flow cytometry departments and lowest among phlebotomy, specimen processing, and anatomic pathology. Factors such as retirement and the improving economy are driving the need for more laboratory professionals. Recruitment of qualified laboratory professionals in the workforce and students in laboratory programs will be the key in fulfilling the higher vacancies revealed from the survey results in 2014. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  7. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  8. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, in 2014 the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases from each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions using an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the acid-base and electrolyte disorders portion of the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:25617429

  9. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee Report on Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C.; Yom, Sue S.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A.; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A.; Wallner, Paul E.

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  11. American Fisheries Society 136th Annual Meeting Lake Placid, NY 10-14 September, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einhouse, D.; Walsh, M.G.; Keeler, S.; Long, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The New York Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation invite you to experience the beauty of New York's famous Adirondack Park as the American Fisheries Society (AFS) convenes its 136th Annual Meeting in the legendary Olympic Village of Lake Placid, NY, 10-14 September 2006. Our meeting theme "Fish in the Balance" will explore the interrelation between fish, aquatic habitats, and man, highlighting the challenges facing aquatic resource professionals and the methods that have been employed to resolve conflicts between those that use or have an interest in our aquatic resources. As fragile as it is beautiful, the Adirondack Region is the perfect location to explore this theme. Bordered by Mirror Lake and its namesake, Lake Placid, the Village of Lake Placid has small town charm, but all of the conveniences that a big city would provide. Whether its reliving the magic of the 1980 hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Olympic Center, getting a panoramic view of the Adirondack high peaks from the top of the 90 meter ski jumps, fishing or kayaking in adjacent Mirror Lake, hiking a mountain trail, or enjoying a quiet dinner or shopping excursion in the various shops and restaurants that line Main Street, Lake Placid has something for everyone.

  12. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Thompson, Ian; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Wolf, J. Stuart; Sartor, Oliver; Klein, Eric; Hahn, Carol; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Faraday, Martha M.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  13. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Bernstein, Karen De Amorim; Chetty, Indrin J; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R

    2011-11-15

    In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Ying; De Amorim Bernstein, Karen; Chetty, Indrin J.; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E.; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  15. Applying total quality management to the North American construction industry

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, R.A.; Kiani, H.

    1995-03-01

    The theory of {open_quotes}if the customer is happy, your business will prosper,{close_quotes} has been around for a long time. It has been applied with a large measure of success to many diverse organizations. This theory has come to be known as total quality management (TQM) and has been credited with turning around some national economies. This may or may not be correct, but there is no doubt that TQM can be very useful when applied properly. There is a great concern among construction professional, researchers, and professional societies about the overall direction of the North American construction industry with respect to its unwillingness or inability to change. Its deficiencies range from planning and design through to project completion. The North American construction industry could be left behind in the global marketplace unless the industry as a whole changes some fundamental aspects. The following is a study of the effectiveness of some TQM principles when applied to a rough framing subcontractor from using traditional construction management principles through the implementation of certain TQM principles. This evolution of the basic methods of doing business demonstrates the effectiveness of TQM. 5 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. 76 FR 53149 - North American Waterfowl Management Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service North American Waterfowl Management Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the draft North American Waterfowl Management Plan Revision... Plan Revision, which was developed in close consultation with the waterfowl management community...

  17. Modeling the Interactions between Hydrological Extremes, Water Management and Society.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Fabian; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Kalantari, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, several studies have focused on exploring human impacts on the hydrological regime. Even though the dominant hydrological processes are mostly well understood, there are still several challenges related to modeling the coevolution of human impacts on (and responses to) hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts. Some initial modeling attempts have proved to capture the essential dynamics emerging from two-way feedbacks between hydrological and social processes. However, they have predominantly focused on flooding. This research aims to develop a new conceptual model unraveling the interplay between hydrological extremes (floods and droughts) and human societies in a changing climate. In particular, this socio-hydrological model aims at understanding, and predicting the dynamics of coupled human-water systems to explain and capture how the occurrence of hydrological extremes changes water management approach, and how such a change (in turn) mitigates the impacts of hydrological extremes. The conceptual model is then applied to a case study to test its ability in simulating the dynamics emerging from the interplay between hydrological and social processes.

  18. Current state and future perspectives of the Latin American Society for Immunodeficiencies (LASID).

    PubMed

    Condino-Neto, A; Sorensen, R U; Gómez Raccio, A C; King, A; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Franco, J L

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are genetic diseases that affect the immune system and for the last 20 years, the Latin American Society for Immunodeficiencies (LASID) has been promoting initiatives in awareness, research, diagnosis, and treatment for the affected patients in Latin America. These initiatives have resulted in the development of programmes such as the LASID Registry (with 4900 patients registered as of January 2014), fellowships in basic and clinical research, PID summer schools, biannual meetings, and scientific reports, amongst others. These achievements highlight the critical role that LASID plays as a scientific organisation in promoting science, research and education in this field in Latin America. However, challenges remain in some of these areas and the Society must envision additional strategies to tackle them for the benefit of the patients. In June 2013, a group of experts in the field met to discuss the contributions of LASID to the initiatives of PID in Latin America, and this article summarises the current state and future perspectives of this society and its role in the advance of PIDs in Latin America. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The following sports ultrasound (SPORTS US) curriculum is a revision of the curriculum developed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) in 2010. Several changes have been made to the curriculum with the primary aim of providing a pathway by which a sports medicine fellow can obtain sufficient SPORTS US training to become proficient in the core competencies of SPORTS US. The core competencies of SPORTS US are outlined in the learning objectives section of this document. The term "SPORTS US" was purposefully chosen rather than "musculoskeletal ultrasound" (MSK US) because it was recognized by the panel that the evolving field of SPORTS US encompasses non-MSK applications of ultrasound such as the FAST examination (focused assessment with sonography for trauma). Although the SPORTS US core competencies in this curriculum are all MSK in nature, they represent the minimum SPORTS US knowledge a sports medicine fellow should acquire during fellowship. However, additional training in more advanced MSK and non-MSK applications of ultrasound can be provided at the fellowship director's discretion. Completion of this SPORTS US curriculum fulfills the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's (AIUM) requirements to perform an MSK US examination and the prerequisites for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography's (ARDMS) MSK sonography certification examination.

  20. The critical role of the pathologist in determining eligibility for active surveillance as a management option in patients with prostate cancer: consensus statement with recommendations supported by the College of American Pathologists, International Society of Urological Pathology, Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology, the New Zealand Society of Pathologists, and the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mahul B; Lin, Daniel W; Gore, John L; Srigley, John R; Samaratunga, Hema; Egevad, Lars; Rubin, Mark; Nacey, John; Carter, H Ballentine; Klotz, Laurence; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony L; Holden, Stuart; Montironi, Rodolfo; Humphrey, Peter A; Evans, Andrew J; Epstein, Jonathan I; Delahunt, Brett; McKenney, Jesse K; Berney, Dan; Wheeler, Thomas M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; True, Lawrence; Knudsen, Beatrice; Hammond, M Elizabeth H

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer remains a significant public health problem. Recent publications of randomized trials and the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations have drawn attention to overtreatment of localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Active surveillance, in which patients undergo regular visits with serum prostate-specific antigen tests and repeat prostate biopsies, rather than aggressive treatment with curative intent, may address overtreatment of low-risk prostate cancer. It is apparent that a greater awareness of the critical role of pathologists in determining eligibility for active surveillance is needed. To review the state of current knowledge about the role of active surveillance in the management of prostate cancer and to provide a multidisciplinary report focusing on pathologic parameters important to the successful identification of patients likely to succeed with active surveillance, to determine the role of molecular tests in increasing the safety of active surveillance, and to provide future directions. Systematic review of literature on active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer, pathologic parameters important for appropriate stratification, and issues regarding interobserver reproducibility. Expert panels were created to delineate the fundamental questions confronting the clinical and pathologic aspects of management of men on active surveillance. Expert panelists identified pathologic parameters important for management and the related diagnostic and reporting issues. Consensus recommendations were generated where appropriate. Active surveillance is an important management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer. Vital to this process is the critical role pathologic parameters have in identifying appropriate candidates for active surveillance. These findings need to be reproducible and consistently reported by surgical pathologists with accurate pathology reporting.

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L.; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H.; McEvoy, Cindy T.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice. PMID:26848609

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C; Cheifetz, Ira M; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H; McEvoy, Cindy T; Newth, Christopher J L; Pillow, J Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-02-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice.

  3. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Small, William; Eifel, Patricia J

    Brachytherapy is the use of radionuclides to treat malignancies or benign conditions by means of a radiation source placed close to or into the tumor or treatment site. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclide brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has traditionally been used for treating prostate, head and neck, breast, cervical, and endometrial cancers as well as obstructive bile duct, esophageal, or bronchial lesions. It has been practiced for over a century with a variety of sources including radium-226, cesium-137, and, more recently, iridium- 192, iodine-125, and palladium-103. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy can be given as interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and/or plesiotherapy to a wide variety of treatment sites. This practice parameter addresses sealed sources as they are used for LDR brachytherapy. It is recognized that unsealed sources (e.g., yttrium-90) are also a form of LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  5. The acute treatment of migraine in adults: the american headache society evidence assessment of migraine pharmacotherapies.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Silberstein, Stephen D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to provide an updated assessment of the evidence for individual pharmacological therapies for acute migraine treatment. Pharmacological therapy is frequently required for acutely treating migraine attacks. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines published in 2000 summarized the available evidence relating to the efficacy of acute migraine medications. This review, conducted by the members of the Guidelines Section of the American Headache Society, is an updated assessment of evidence for the migraine acute medications. A standardized literature search was performed to identify articles related to acute migraine treatment that were published between 1998 and 2013. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines Development procedures were followed. Two authors reviewed each abstract resulting from the search and determined whether the full manuscript qualified for review. Two reviewers studied each qualifying full manuscript for its level of evidence. Level A evidence requires at least 2 Class I studies, and Level B evidence requires 1 Class I or 2 Class II studies. The specific medications - triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan [oral, nasal spray, injectable, transcutaneous patch], zolmitriptan [oral and nasal spray]) and dihydroergotamine (nasal spray, inhaler) are effective (Level A). Ergotamine and other forms of dihydroergotamine are probably effective (Level B). Effective nonspecific medications include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen), opioids (butorphanol nasal spray), sumatriptan/naproxen, and the combination of acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeine (Level A). Ketoprofen, intravenous and intramuscular ketorolac, flurbiprofen, intravenous magnesium (in migraine with aura), and the combination of isometheptene compounds, codeine/acetaminophen and tramadol/acetaminophen are probably effective (Level B). The antiemetics prochlorperazine

  6. Does the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Short Curriculum Increase Resident Knowledge in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology?

    PubMed

    Huguelet, P S; Browner-Elhanan, K J; Fleming, N; Karjane, N W; Loveless, M; Sheeder, J; Talib, H J; Wheeler, C; Kaul, P

    2016-12-01

    To determine if the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG) Short Curriculum improves self-reported knowledge in pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) among obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residents, at programs without PAG-trained faculty. Prospective, cross-sectional exposure to the NASPAG short curriculum with a follow-up questionnaire. Ob/Gyn residency training programs without PAG faculty. Ob/Gyn residents in training from February 2015 to June 2015. Exposure to the NASPAG Short Curriculum. Improvement in self-perceived knowledge after completion of curriculum. Two hundred twenty-seven residents met inclusion criteria; 34 completed the study (15% response). Less than 50% of residents reported adequate knowledge in the areas of prepubertal vaginal bleeding, vulvovaginitis, precocious and delayed puberty, Home environment, Education and Employment, Eating, peer-related Activities, Drugs, Sexuality, Suicide/depression, Safety from injury and violence (HEEADSSS) interview, pelvic pain, and bleeding management in teens with developmental delay. After completion of the curriculum, self-reported knowledge improved in 8 of 10 learning objectives, with no significant improvement in bleeding disorders or Müllerian anomalies. There was no association between pretest knowledge and level of residency training, type of residency program, previous exposure to PAG lectures, and previous exposure to patients with PAG complaints. Significant deficiencies exist regarding self-reported knowledge of core PAG topics among Ob/Gyn residents at programs without PAG-trained faculty. Use of the NASPAG Short Curriculum by residents without access to PAG-trained faculty resulted in improved self-reported knowledge in PAG. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shared Decision Making in Intensive Care Units: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Alexander A.; Davidson, Judy E.; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Shared decision-making (SDM) is endorsed by critical care organizations, however there remains confusion about what SDM is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define SDM, recommend when SDM should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. Methods The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and American Thoracic Society (ATS) Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of ACCM and ATS were included in the statement. Main Results Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) Definition: Shared decision-making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a SDM process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their “default” approach a SDM process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision-making strategies. Conclusions Patient and surrogate preferences for decision-making roles regarding value

  8. 2016 Guidelines of the Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Liu, Yen-Bin; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lin, Li-Jen; Lin, Lian-Yu; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Mien-Cheng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Yeh, San-Jou; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Both the incidence and prevalence of AF are increasing, and the burden of AF is becoming huge. Many innovative advances have emerged in the past decade for the diagnosis and management of AF, including a new scoring system for the prediction of stroke and bleeding events, the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and their special benefits in Asians, new rhythm- and rate-control concepts, optimal endpoints of rate control, upstream therapy, life-style modification to prevent AF recurrence, and new ablation techniques. The Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology aimed to update the information and have appointed a jointed writing committee for new AF guidelines. The writing committee members comprehensively reviewed and summarized the literature, and completed the 2016 Guidelines of the Taiwan Heart Rhythm Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. This guideline presents the details of the updated recommendations, along with their background and rationale, focusing on data unique for Asians. The guidelines are not mandatory, and members of the writing committee fully realize that treatment of AF should be individualized. The physician's decision remains most important in AF management. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  10. An examination of gender differences in the American Fisheries Society peer-review process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Grace; Frantz, Cynthia M; Kocovsky, Patrick; DeVries, Dennis R.; Cooke, Steven J.; Claussen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of gender differences in outcomes throughout the peer review process of American Fisheries Society (AFS) journals. For each manuscript submitted to four AFS journals between January 2003 and December 2010, we collated information regarding the gender and nationality of authors, gender of associate editor, gender of reviewers, reviewer recommendations, associate editor's decision, and publication status of the manuscript. We used hierarchical linear modeling to test for differences in manuscript decision outcomes associated with author, reviewer, and associate editor gender. Gender differences were present at some but not every stage of the review process and were not equal among the four journals. Although there was a small gender difference in decision outcomes, we found no evidence of bias in editors’ and reviewers’ recommendations. Our results support the conclusion that the current single-blind review system does not result in bias against female authors within AFS journals.

  11. American Chemical Society Student Affiliates Chapters: More Than Just Chemistry Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Ingrid; Collazo, Carmen

    2003-10-01

    Chemistry educators often examine and implement various instructional techniques, such as mentoring programs, to advance learning objectives and to equip students with analytical and technical skills, as well as the skills required of chemical science professionals. Student organizations, such as an American Chemical Society Student Affiliates (SA) chapter, can create a learning environment for undergraduates by engaging them in activities that develop communication, teamwork and inquiry, analysis, and problem-solving skills within a real-world setting. The environment is student-based, has personal meaning for the learner, emphasizes a process-and-product orientation, and emphasizes evaluation. Participation in SAs enhance the traditional chemistry curriculum, complementing the learning goals and meeting learning objectives that might not otherwise be addressed in the curriculum. In this article we discuss how SA chapters enhance the educational experience of undergraduate chemical science students, help develop new chemistry professionals, and shape enthusiastic and committed future chemical science leaders.

  12. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) developed a musculoskeletal ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships in 2010. As the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound in sports medicine has evolved, it became clear that the curriculum needed to be updated. Furthermore, the name 'musculoskeletal ultrasound' was changed to 'sports ultrasound' (SPORTS US) to reflect the broad range of diagnostic and interventional applications of ultrasound in sports medicine. This document was created to outline the core competencies of SPORTS US and to provide sports medicine fellowship directors and others interested in SPORTS US education with a guide to create a SPORTS US curriculum. By completing this SPORTS US curriculum, sports medicine fellows and physicians can attain proficiency in the core competencies of SPORTS US required for the practice of sports medicine.

  13. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.H.; Young, D.B.

    1994-12-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants` institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  14. The American Society for Clinical Pathology's 2015 Wage Survey of Medical Laboratories in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edna; Fisher, Patrick B

    2017-04-01

    To inform the pathology and laboratory field of the most recent national wage data from the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Historically, the results of this biennial survey have served as a basis for additional research on laboratory recruitment, retention, education, marketing, certification, and advocacy. The 2015 wage survey was conducted through collaboration between the ASCP's Institute of Science, Technology, & Policy in Washington, DC, and the ASCP Board of Certification in Chicago, Illinois. Electronic survey invitations were sent to individuals who are currently practicing in the field. Data reveal increased salaries since 2013 for all staff-level laboratory professionals surveyed except phlebotomists and pathologists' assistants. Laboratory assistants and phlebotomists, regardless of level, continue to have lower salaries while pathologists' assistants and administration personnel have higher salaries than the rest of the laboratory professions surveyed. Survey results put emphasis on strategic recruitment and retention by laboratory training programs and institutions that hire laboratory professionals.

  15. The American Society for Clinical Pathology's 2015 Wage Survey of Medical Laboratories in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edna; Fisher, Patrick B

    2017-05-01

    To inform the pathology and laboratory field of the most recent national wage data from the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Historically, the results of this biennial survey have served as a basis for additional research on laboratory recruitment, retention, education, marketing, certification, and advocacy. The 2015 wage survey was conducted through collaboration between the ASCP's Institute of Science, Technology, and Policy in Washington, DC, and the ASCP Board of Certification in Chicago, Illinois. Electronic survey invitations were sent to individuals who are currently practicing in the field. Data reveal increased salaries since 2013 for all staff-level laboratory professionals surveyed except phlebotomists and pathologists' assistants. Laboratory assistants and phlebotomists, regardless of level, continue to have lower salaries while pathologists' assistants and administration personnel have higher salaries than the rest of the laboratory professions surveyed. Survey results put emphasis on strategic recruitment and retention by laboratory training programs and institutions that hire laboratory professionals.

  16. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Boetes, Carla; Burke, Wylie; Harms, Steven; Leach, Martin O; Lehman, Constance D; Morris, Elizabeth; Pisano, Etta; Schnall, Mitchell; Sener, Stephen; Smith, Robert A; Warner, Ellen; Yaffe, Martin; Andrews, Kimberly S; Russell, Christy A

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at different defined levels of risk. Screening MRI is recommended for women with an approximately 20-25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer, including women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer and women who were treated for Hodgkin disease. There are several risk subgroups for which the available data are insufficient to recommend for or against screening, including women with a personal history of breast cancer, carcinoma in situ, atypical hyperplasia, and extremely dense breasts on mammography. Diagnostic uses of MRI were not considered to be within the scope of this review.

  17. Collaboration, collegiality, and cooperation: consumer health library services and the American Cancer Society navigator role.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Carol Ann; Wellik, Kay E

    2012-10-01

    Patients and family members are overwhelmed by the diagnosis of cancer and often do not know where to look for answers, information on the treatment options, or community resources for support during the cancer journey. A unique relationship was forged with a patient and health education librarian at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an American Cancer Society navigator, which encouraged collaboration to better meet the informational and supportive healthcare needs of patients. This article addresses the background of the project, the steps taken to establish the relationship, space allocation, and need for confidentiality. The innovations produced by this partnership also are discussed, including development of cancer pathfinders and cancer communication blogs for patients, as well as comarketing of services.

  18. Achieving Speaker Gender Equity at the American Society for Microbiology General Meeting.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-08-04

    In 2015, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) General Meeting essentially achieved gender equity, with 48.5% of the oral presentations being given by women. The mechanisms associated with increased female participation were (i) making the Program Committee aware of gender statistics, (ii) increasing female representation among session convener teams, and (iii) direct instruction to try to avoid all-male sessions. The experience with the ASM General Meeting shows that it is possible to increase the participation of female speakers in a relatively short time and suggests concrete steps that may be taken to achieve this at other meetings. Public speaking is very important for academic advancement in science. Historically women have been underrepresented as speakers in many scientific meetings. This article describes concrete steps that were associated with achieving gender equity at a major meeting. Copyright © 2015 Casadevall.

  19. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) position statement: interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Hall, Mederic M; Adams, Erik; Berkoff, David; Concoff, Andrew L; Dexter, William; Smith, Jay

    2015-02-01

    The use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound has significantly increased over the past decade. A majority of the increased utilization is by nonradiologists. In sports medicine, ultrasound is often used to guide interventions such as aspirations, diagnostic or therapeutic injections, tenotomies, releases, and hydrodissections. This American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) position statement critically reviews the literature and evaluates the accuracy, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections in major, intermediate, and small joints, and soft tissues, all of which are commonly performed in sports medicine. New ultrasound-guided procedures and future trends are also briefly discussed. Based upon the evidence, the official AMSSM position relevant to each subject is made.

  20. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. H.

    1992-09-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Topics covered in this work included materials damage due to radiation effects, materials properties, damage detection, and shielding calculations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.