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Sample records for management strategies applied

  1. Applying disease management strategies to Medicare.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, C P; Bhalotra, S; Trisolini, M; Wallack, S S; Rasgon, S; Yeoh, H

    1999-01-01

    Medicare coverage begins for many when they have already developed one or more chronic diseases, and it often pays for the latest and costliest phases. Population-based disease modeling, patient screening, and monitoring would be appropriate interventions for chronic renal disease. Patients who have not yet advanced to end-stage renal disease would benefit from management of diabetes and hypertension, avoidance of nephrotoxic substances, and better preparation for dialysis. Administrative support could take the form of clinical guidelines, physician-led multidisciplinary teams, integrated delivery systems, provider and patient education, and new information technologies. Medicare reflects the long-term public perspective, and thus should further this new direction by supporting education, reimbursing for prevention efforts and allied health services, encouraging efficiency, and monitoring cost and quality outcomes.

  2. Ecologically Significant Monitoring Strategies for Watershed Managers and Applied Ecohydrologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, B. P.; Walter, T.

    2007-12-01

    Upper Klamath Lake in Southern Oregon is home to a unique and increasingly rare strain of redband rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss newberrii). Populations connected to perennial lake systems such as the Upper Klamath have evolved adfluvial life histories and may possess unique adaptations that underscore their importance as units of conservation. Anthropogenic disturbance including stream channelization, timber harvest, livestock grazing and irrigation diversion have resulted in a 41 percent reduction in the redband's historic habitat and the disappearance of 11 redband trout populations throughout Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. In an effort to actively conserve this sensitive subspecies, a stream creation project was undertaken with the goal of increasing viable spawning and rearing habitat in Crooked Creek, a tributary to Upper Klamath Lake. A combination of analogue, empirical and analytical techniques were employed in the design of the created channel morphology (i.e. channel planform, profile, and cross-section), the sizing of bed substrate and spawning gravels and the design of in-stream habitat and scour structures. The project, completed in the fall of 1996, was qualitatively judged a success (e.g. trout were observed actively spawning and young-of-the-year were collected during unsystematic surveys). Unfortunately, as is often the case in the stream enhancement/restoration field, funding and personnel time were lacking for the implementation of a robust post-construction monitoring plan. Thus, project success was ascertained through cursory analyses and anecdotal reports. An opportunity to implement a similar stream creation project in a nearby watershed has afforded us the chance to return to the project site and conduct a more comprehensive, quantitative analysis of the project's success. A discussion of the original design methods and a review of several state of the art monitoring strategies are provided to assist watershed managers and applied

  3. Applying change management metaphors to a national e-Health strategy.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Chad; Scott, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Recent attempts at a collective understanding of how to develop an e-Health strategy have addressed the individual organisation, collection of organisations, and national levels. At the national level the World Health Organisation's National eHealth Strategy Toolkit serves as an exemplar that consolidates knowledge in this area, guides practical implementations, and identifies areas for future research. A key implication of this toolkit is the considerable number of organisational changes required to successfully apply their ideas in practice. This study looks critically at the confluence of change management and e-Health strategy using metaphors that underpin established models of change management. Several of Morgan's organisational metaphors are presented (highlighting varied beliefs and assumptions regarding how change is enacted, who is responsible for the change, and guiding principles for that change), and used to provide a framework. Attention is then directed to several prominent models of change management that exemplify one or more of these metaphors, and these theoretical insights are applied to evaluate the World Health Organisation's National eHealth Strategy Toolkit. The paper presents areas for consideration when using the WHO/ITU toolkit, and suggestions on how to improve its use in practice. The goal is to seek insight regarding the optimal sequence of steps needed to ensure successful implementation and integration of e-health into health systems using change management models. No single model, toolkit, or guideline will offer all the needed answers, but clarity around the underlying metaphors informing the change management models being used provides valuable insight so potentially challenging areas can be avoided or mitigated.

  4. Management Strategy Evaluation Applied to Coral Reef Ecosystems in Support of Ecosystem-Based Management.

    PubMed

    Weijerman, Mariska; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Brainard, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem modelling is increasingly used to explore ecosystem-level effects of changing environmental conditions and management actions. For coral reefs there has been increasing interest in recent decades in the use of ecosystem models for evaluating the effects of fishing and the efficacy of marine protected areas. However, ecosystem models that integrate physical forcings, biogeochemical and ecological dynamics, and human induced perturbations are still underdeveloped. We applied an ecosystem model (Atlantis) to the coral reef ecosystem of Guam using a suite of management scenarios prioritized in consultation with local resource managers to review the effects of each scenario on performance measures related to the ecosystem, the reef-fish fishery (e.g., fish landings) and coral habitat. Comparing tradeoffs across the selected scenarios showed that each scenario performed best for at least one of the selected performance indicators. The integrated 'full regulation' scenario outperformed other scenarios with four out of the six performance metrics at the cost of reef-fish landings. This model application quantifies the socio-ecological costs and benefits of alternative management scenarios. When the effects of climate change were taken into account, several scenarios performed equally well, but none prevented a collapse in coral biomass over the next few decades assuming a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

  5. Management Strategy Evaluation Applied to Coral Reef Ecosystems in Support of Ecosystem-Based Management

    PubMed Central

    Weijerman, Mariska; Fulton, Elizabeth A.; Brainard, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem modelling is increasingly used to explore ecosystem-level effects of changing environmental conditions and management actions. For coral reefs there has been increasing interest in recent decades in the use of ecosystem models for evaluating the effects of fishing and the efficacy of marine protected areas. However, ecosystem models that integrate physical forcings, biogeochemical and ecological dynamics, and human induced perturbations are still underdeveloped. We applied an ecosystem model (Atlantis) to the coral reef ecosystem of Guam using a suite of management scenarios prioritized in consultation with local resource managers to review the effects of each scenario on performance measures related to the ecosystem, the reef-fish fishery (e.g., fish landings) and coral habitat. Comparing tradeoffs across the selected scenarios showed that each scenario performed best for at least one of the selected performance indicators. The integrated ‘full regulation’ scenario outperformed other scenarios with four out of the six performance metrics at the cost of reef-fish landings. This model application quantifies the socio-ecological costs and benefits of alternative management scenarios. When the effects of climate change were taken into account, several scenarios performed equally well, but none prevented a collapse in coral biomass over the next few decades assuming a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions scenario. PMID:27023183

  6. Strategies to enhance chronic disease self-management: how can we apply this to stroke?

    PubMed

    Jones, Fiona

    Social Cognition Theory and the cognitive construct of self-efficacy often form the theoretical basis for many chronic disease self-management programmes. Self-efficacy can be influenced through these programmes and has been shown to be predictive of greater levels of functioning and psychological well-being. Stroke is regarded as a complex chronic disability, and individuals may share many of the same concerns as those living with other chronic diseases such as arthritis and chronic pulmonary disease. However there has been minimal reported research on the utility of self-management programmes following stroke. To comprehend the composition of chronic disease self-management programmes which could be applied to stroke, this paper examined the theoretical basis of self-management and particularly the evidence relating to interventions which have utilized self-efficacy enhancing strategies. Selected papers were retrieved from an extensive search of literature using Medline, Cinahl, PsychInfo and Web of Science databases and the Cochrane Collaboration. The search request focused on literature that specifically related to chronic disease, self-management and self-efficacy that had been published since 1995. However, seminal literature on self-efficacy produced prior to this date was also included. There is strong evidence to support the use of self-management programmes and their effect on self-efficacy and associated health outcomes. While there are differences in the nature of each chronic condition, there are similarities in the core skills required for self-management. Many effective strategies could be incorporated into current stroke rehabilitation programmes or used to develop targeted self-management interventions. Future research which informs stroke rehabilitation should utilize the evidence relating to other chronic conditions. This could be used to develop the most effective methods of equipping individuals following stroke to cope confidently with the

  7. Gating, enhanced gating, and beyond: information utilization strategies for motion management, applied to preclinical PET

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory gating and gate optimization strategies present solutions for overcoming image degradation caused by respiratory motion in PET and traditionally utilize hardware systems and/or employ complex processing algorithms. In this work, we aimed to advance recently emerging data-driven gating methods and introduce a new strategy for optimizing the four-dimensional data based on information contained in that data. These algorithms are combined to form an automated motion correction workflow. Methods Software-based gating methods were applied to a nonspecific population of 84 small-animal rat PET scans to create respiratory gated images. The gated PET images were then optimized using an algorithm we introduce as ‘gating+’ to reduce noise and optimize signal; the technique was also tested using simulations. Gating+ is based on a principle of only using gated information if and where it adds a net benefit, as evaluated in temporal frequency space. Motion-corrected images were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Of the small-animal PET scans, 71% exhibited quantifiable motion after software gating. The mean liver displacement was 3.25 mm for gated and 3.04 mm for gating+ images. The (relative) mean percent standard deviations measured in background ROIs were 1.53, 1.05, and 1.00 for the gated, gating+, and ungated values, respectively. Simulations confirmed that gating+ image voxels had a higher probability of being accurate relative to the corresponding ungated values under varying noise and motion scenarios. Additionally, we found motion mapping and phase decoupling models that readily extend from gating+ processing. Conclusions Raw PET data contain information about motion that is not currently utilized. In our work, we showed that through automated processing of standard (ungated) PET acquisitions, (motion-) information-rich images can be constructed with minimal risk of noise introduction. Such methods have the potential for

  8. Strategy for introduction of rainwater management facility considering rainfall event applied on new apartment complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Lee, D. K.; Yoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    As regional torrential rains become frequent due to climate change, urban flooding happens very often. That is why it is necessary to prepare for integrated measures against a wide range of rainfall. This study proposes introduction of effective rainwater management facilities to maximize the rainwater runoff reductions and recover natural water circulation for unpredictable extreme rainfall in apartment complex scale. The study site is new apartment complex in Hanam located in east of Seoul, Korea. It has an area of 7.28ha and is analysed using the EPA-SWMM and STORM model. First, it is analyzed that green infrastructure(GI) had efficiency of flood reduction at the various rainfall events and soil characteristics, and then the most effective value of variables are derived. In case of rainfall event, Last 10 years data of 15 minutes were used for analysis. A comparison between A(686mm rainfall during 22days) and B(661mm/4days) knew that soil infiltration of A is 17.08% and B is 5.48% of the rainfall. Reduction of runoff after introduction of the GI of A is 24.76% and B is 6.56%. These results mean that GI is effective to small rainfall intensity, and artificial rainwater retarding reservoir is needed at extreme rainfall. Second, set of target year is conducted for the recovery of hydrological cycle at the predevelopment. And an amount of infiltration, evaporation, surface runoff of the target year and now is analysed on the basis of land coverage, and an arrangement of LID facilities. Third, rainwater management scenarios are established and simulated by the SWMM-LID. Rainwater management facilities include GI(green roof, porous pavement, vegetative swale, ecological pond, and raingarden), and artificial rainwater. Design scenarios are categorized five type: 1)no GI, 2)conventional GI design(current design), 3)intensive GI design, 4)GI design+rainwater retarding reservoir 5)maximized rainwater retarding reservoir. Intensive GI design is to have attribute value to

  9. Applying appropriate risk management strategies to improve the Superfund process: Creating mutual gains for PRPs and regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, S.R.; Forney, J.; Padovani, S.; Jones, T.; Wisenbaker, B.

    1994-12-31

    A new mechanism to develop an appropriate risk management strategy is the ``Presumptive Remedy``. This allows the Superfund process to be streamlined for certain kinds of sites, e.g. municipal landfill sites. Total Quality Management concepts are also being used to improve risk management decisions and the remediation process. This presentation will describe site-specific case studies and include a panel discussion covering how incorporation of these risk management elements into selection of the site remediation strategy leads to decisions that are acceptable to all stakeholders. The presentation will discuss lessons learned from the following perspectives: Private Industry; Department of Defense (DOD); Department of Energy (DOE); (US EPA); and A-E Firms.

  10. Management strategies for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Le Marshall, Kim Francis; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2011-01-01

    What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia? There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized by widespread, chronic muscular pain and tenderness, disordered sleep, emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, and fatigue. Its prevalence is estimated to be 3%-5% in the population and higher yet in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PubMed, Cochrane Library, manual search. Key messages for patients and clinicians are: There are many effective pharmacological management strategies available for fibromyalgia.A nonpharmacological, multicomponent approach utilizing education, aerobic exercise, psychological therapy, and other strategies is also effective for fibromyalgia.Despite the significant and, at times, disabling physical and psychological symptoms, fibromyalgia can be a manageable condition with a potentially good outcome.

  11. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  12. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  13. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  14. Strategies in managing asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, A F

    1989-01-01

    The management of adult asthma involves a concerted effort to identify and remove or mollify inciting or triggering stimuli such as respiratory tract infections, gastric reflux, aspirin, beta-antagonists, and environmental agents; educate patients, using written treatment plans and pulmonary function monitoring; and properly use the antiasthmatic medications including beta-agonists, theophylline, anticholinergics, and corticosteroids, with an emphasis on aerosol delivery and the use of corticosteroids during exacerbations. This strategy is summarized with suggestions on therapy in emergency departments, during the transition from hospital to ambulatory care, before exercise, and during pregnancy. PMID:2660411

  15. Human capital strategy: talent management.

    PubMed

    Nagra, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Large organizations, including the US Army Medical Department and the Army Nurse Corps, are people-based organizations. Consequently, effective and efficient management of the human capital within these organizations is a strategic goal for the leadership. Over time, the Department of Defense has used many different systems and strategies to manage people throughout their service life-cycle. The current system in use is called Human Capital Management. In the near future, the Army's human capital will be managed based on skills, knowledge, and behaviors through various measurement tools. This article elaborates the human capital management strategy within the Army Nurse Corps, which identifies, develops, and implements key talent management strategies under the umbrella of the Corps' human capital goals. The talent management strategy solutions are aligned under the Nurse Corps business strategy captured by the 2008 Army Nurse Corps Campaign Plan, and are implemented within the context of the culture and core values of the organization.

  16. Disease management strategies: managing care giving in managed care.

    PubMed

    Nesse, R E; Hagedorn, S D; Scheitel, S M; Nyman, M A; Broers, J K

    2000-01-01

    The rapid rate of change in health care delivery systems has challenged and troubled health care providers. Some new health care delivery systems primarily emphasize the economics of medical care and leave providers with a sense that their profession has strayed from its mission. In addition, there is an increasing demand by payers and the public for public accountability for the quality and expense of clinical services. One response to these changes in health care is the use of disease management strategies. There is a growing body of knowledge regarding disease management strategies and practice guidelines in the literature. This article discusses how a provider group can implement improvement in the clinical process successfully by applying techniques of disease management.

  17. Applying a gaming approach to IP strategy.

    PubMed

    Gasnier, Arnaud; Vandamme, Luc

    2010-02-01

    Adopting an appropriate IP strategy is an important but complex area, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors, in which aspects such as regulatory submissions, high competitive activity, and public health and safety information requirements limit the amount of information that can be protected effectively through secrecy. As a result, and considering the existing time limits for patent protection, decisions on how to approach IP in these sectors must be made with knowledge of the options and consequences of IP positioning. Because of the specialized nature of IP, it is necessary to impart knowledge regarding the options and impact of IP to decision-makers, whether at the level of inventors, marketers or strategic business managers. This feature review provides some insight on IP strategy, with a focus on the use of a new 'gaming' approach for transferring the skills and understanding needed to make informed IP-related decisions; the game Patentopolis is discussed as an example of such an approach. Patentopolis involves interactive activities with IP-related business decisions, including the exploitation and enforcement of IP rights, and can be used to gain knowledge on the impact of adopting different IP strategies.

  18. Applying Management Information Systems to Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    After reviewing some concepts and principles for effective data management, the author applies the concepts to nurse staffing systems for the management of human resources. He defines a seven-step process for establishing a management information system, from defining the management objective to implementing the system. (Author/CT)

  19. Demand management and case management: a conservation strategy.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C D R Anna K

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the history and development of managed competition, and explores the possibilities of a new demand management strategy in the context of nurse case management to offer less costly, higher quality care for a greater number of patients. The article examines the history and principles of healthcare demand management, its implementation in the hospital and clinical practices of nurse case managers, and its impacts in reducing costs while maintaining care levels. The article develops and analyzes the conflicts and common ground between demand management and case management. First, demand-side strategies can be effective in reducing costs while maintaining quality of nursing care; second, nurse case managers should employ patient education, self-care, and staffing solutions to manage demand. Nurse case managers must apply demand management principles carefully. Their goal is not to restrict care, but to maintain the highest levels of care possible within the limits of their practice's resources and staffing. Two critical themes emerge: (1) demand management is a potential alternative to market-driven managed competition and (2) nursing case management can affect an effective form of demand management. However, the long-term implications of these nursing case management strategies on healthcare staffing need further exploration.

  20. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings.

  1. Knowledge management: an innovative risk management strategy.

    PubMed

    Zipperer, Lorri; Amori, Geri

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management effectively lends itself to the enterprise risk process. The authors introduce the concept of knowledge management as a strategy to drive innovation and support risk management. They align this work with organizational efforts to improve patient safety and quality through the effective sharing of experience and lessons learned. The article closes with suggestions on how to develop a knowledge management initiative at an organization, who should be on the team, and how to sustain this effort and build the culture it requires to drive success.

  2. The office of strategy management.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    There is a disconnect in most companies between strategy formulation and strategy execution. On average, 95% of a company's employees are unaware of, or do not understand, its strategy. If employees are unaware of the strategy, they surely cannot help the organization implement it effectively. It doesn't have to be like this. For the past 15 years, the authors have studied companies that achieved performance breakthroughs by adopting the Balanced Scorecard and its associated tools to help them better communicate strategy to their employees and to guide and monitor the execution of that strategy. Some companies, of course, have achieved better, longer-lasting improvements than others. The organizations that have managed to sustain their strategic focus have typically established a new corporate-level unit to oversee all activities related to strategy: an office of strategy management (OS M). The OSM, in effect, acts as the CEO's chief of staff. It coordinates an array of tasks: communicating corporate strategy; ensuring that enterprise-level plans are translated into the plans of the various units and departments; executing strategic initiatives to deliver on the grand design; aligning employees' plans for competency development with strategic objectives; and testing and adapting the strategy to stay abreast of the competition. The OSM does not do all the work, but it facilitates the processes so that strategy is executed in an integrated fashion across the enterprise. Although the companies that Kaplan and Norton studied use the Balanced Scorecard as the framework for their strategy management systems, the authors say the lessons of the OSM are applicable even to companies that do not use it.

  3. Management Strategies for Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Craig J; Carris, Nicolas W; Ruf, Kathryn M

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel is a cornerstone of dual antiplatelet therapy. Hypersensitivity reactions potentially limit the use of this treatment and present a significant clinical challenge. The authors have developed recommendations for the management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity with consideration for the etiology, pathophysiology, and critical evaluation of potential management strategies. The clopidogrel hypersensitivity reaction is complex in mechanism and presents generally around day 5 of treatment. Generalized reactions are most common, but the reaction may also be localized or systemic. Screening patients for hypersensitivity is not always possible because the type IV delayed reaction is not detected reliably by conventional skin prick, intradermal challenge, or patch testing. Proposed strategies for management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity include treatment of the reaction with corticosteroids, clopidogrel desensitization, substituting an alternative P2Y12 inhibitor, or clopidogrel avoidance. The safety, efficacy, and cost of each potential strategy must be considered when managing a patient with clopidogrel hypersensitivity.

  4. Crisis management strategies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Maria C; Politis-Norton, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the different facets of crisis as experienced within the pharmaceutical industry but which are also prevalent throughout other industries. It highlights the importance of early identification and management of crises and issues, which in return are strongly intertwined with a fundamental positive internal corporate climate. A corporate philosophy should always embrace crisis management with the attitude of 'when' and not 'if'; therefore, a company should act today and not tomorrow once a crisis is on its doorstep. Preparation is of utmost importance and there are several items that can be addressed even before a crisis has arisen. Further, this paper also provides guidance on how to deal with the media, what to do and what not to do, and how to appoint the appropriate spokesperson. In this era of fast exchange of information, crisis, which previously may have stayed behind corporate doors, may not do so any longer. Image is very important and should therefore not be risked. Crisis and issue management should therefore be integrated in every company's philosophy and standard operating procedures.

  5. Infusion of Science Software: Applying Gagne's Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaldino, Sharon; Thompson, Cathy

    1990-01-01

    Proposed are the use of implementation strategies available to teachers through the application of Robert Gagne's nine instructional events. The application of computer technology in science education is discussed. (CW)

  6. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences.

  7. Applying Learning Strategy Questionnaires: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellings, Gonny

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses measuring learning strategies by means of questionnaires. In "multi-method" research, in which think-aloud measures are compared with questionnaires, low or moderate correlations are found. A conclusion often drawn is that learners are not able to verbally report on their learning activities. Alternative explanations concern…

  8. Applying Learning Strategy Questionnaires: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellings, Gonny

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses measuring learning strategies by means of questionnaires. In "multi-method" research, in which think-aloud measures are compared with questionnaires, low or moderate correlations are found. A conclusion often drawn is that learners are not able to verbally report on their learning activities. Alternative explanations concern…

  9. Effective Studying from Text: Applying Metacognitive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tei, Ebo; Stewart, Oran

    1985-01-01

    To be effective learners, students should know about the state or level of their learning and the success of the strategies they are using, so that when they misunderstand a concept they can do additional reading or consult outside sources. Traditionally, textbook study has been taught through the use of so-called formula techniques, where the…

  10. Funding strategies for wilderness management

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Alkire

    2000-01-01

    Funding wilderness protection will continue to be a challenge for public land managers. With continuing competition for federal funds and balanced budget goals, other sources of funds may be necessary to supplement annual federal appropriations. This paper identifies and evaluates five potential funding strategies and provides examples of each that are currently in use...

  11. Applying Japanese management tips to patient accounts.

    PubMed

    Groenevelt, C J

    1990-04-01

    "Just in time," a Japanese management philosophy that has been applied successfully in manufacturing operations, also can be used to improve management of patient accounts departments. Under its principles, healthcare organizations would develop standardized procedures; involve workers in decision making; set up training and education programs aimed at creating a multi-skilled pool of workers; establish smooth production schedules; and foster cooperation and commitment to the philosophy throughout the organization.

  12. Management strategies for encouraging creativity.

    PubMed

    Preston, P

    1998-01-01

    Change, chaos, and uncertainty touch every part of every institution. The laboratory is not immune. Managers content to continue on their familiar path soon will find themselves bypassed. To meet today's challenges, directors of technical operations, laboratory directors, team leaders, and coordinators need plenty of creativity--from everyone on their staff. It is no longer just "nice" to improve group output and problem-solving skills while staying within a "shoestring" budget. It is absolutely necessary. In this article, we explore strategies laboratory managers can use to tap the creative potential and commitment of their people. These strategies work. Whether it involves using humor, creating "idea centers," or "deconstructing the bureaucracy," the goal is the same: to encourage clinical managers to think beyond their technical and managerial experience. The examples in this article may not suit the needs, situations, or tastes of all laboratory managers. They are "food for thought." The concepts and strategies these examples illustrate are every laboratory manager's keys to adapting successfully to future challenges.

  13. Applying Cost Imposition Strategies against China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    choice divided by the commensurate cost or hardship disadvantage . Contests where the competitor realizes less capability advantage or suffers more...Co mp eti tiv e Str ate gy Co st Im po sit ion Capability advantage Cost disadvantage Figure 1. Cost -based competitive spectrum Applying Cost ...possi- bility of attaining greater strategic advantage relative to US rivals. This article attempts to clarify cost -imposition methods for defense

  14. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  15. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  16. Managing human resources for successful strategy execution.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Managers face difficult challenges when they implement organizational strategies to achieve important goals. Execution of strategy has become more dependent upon the effective management of human resources. This article suggests how people can be managed more effectively to facilitate the execution of strategies and improve organizational performance.

  17. Disease management strategies for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G

    2002-04-01

    Three basic forms of management strategies exist for wildlife disease, as follows: prevention of introduction of disease, control of existing disease or eradication. Management may be directed at the disease agent, host population, habitat or be focused on human activities. Disease agents may be dealt with in the environment through disinfection or in the host through treatment. Disinfection and pesticides used to destroy agents or vectors are limited to local situations, may have serious environmental effects and may result in acquired resistance. Difficulty in delivering treatment limits chemotherapy to local situations. Host populations may be managed by immunisation, by altering their distribution or density, or by extirpation. Immunisation is best suited for microparasitic exogenous infections with a low reproductive rate and in populations which have a low turnover. Mass immunisation with oral baits has been effective, but this strategy is limited to a few serious diseases. It is difficult to move wild animals and techniques to discourage animals from entering an area become ineffective rapidly. The setting up of fences is feasible only in local situations. Selective culling is limited to situations in which affected individuals are readily identifiable. General population reduction has had little success in disease control but reducing populations surrounding a focus or creating a barrier to disease movement have been successful. Population reduction is a temporary measure. Eradication of a wildlife population has not been attempted for disease management. Habitat modification may be used to reduce exposure to disease agents, or to alter host distribution or density. Management of diseases of wild animals usually requires a change in human activities. The most important method is by restricting translocation of wild animals to prevent movement of disease.

  18. A holistic strategy for adaptive land management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adaptive management is widely applied to natural resources management. Adaptive management can be generally defined as an iterative decision-making process that incorporates formulation of management objectives, actions designed to address these objectives, monitoring of results, and repeated adapta...

  19. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  20. Population communication management training strategy.

    PubMed

    Bayan Salas, E

    1985-01-01

    The discussion presents some thoughts on a general training strategy in information/education/communication (IEC) management which might meet the needs of 3rd world countries. Management by objectives (MBO) has emerged as the central doctrine in management theory and practice since its initial formulation in 1954. Yet, little evidence exists to date of its successful application in IEC activities. Population IEC activities, being staff activities in a nonprofit, public sector program, are in the "twilight zone" of MBO where hasty efforts to comply with the form if not the substance of this management technique can lead to lower levels of performance and achievement than before the goal setting system was implemented. Yet, clearly, IEC managers need the benefits that management by objectives can bring if done properly. It is essential that IEC managers and workers stop looking at IEC materials as end products in themselves but rather as inputs to be combined with other inputs in realizing the desired output of voluntary behavioral change on a mass level. To overcome tendencies toward provincialism, all IEC managers should initially spend time working in other areas of the population program. The experience of using IEC materials and approaches in face-to-face transactions with potential acceptors is a prerequisite to the successful formulation of such materials and approaches. Training programs for IEC managers and supervisors should emphasize development of consensual decision making skills. The success or failure of the program depends on the ability of its workers to resolve potential conflicts between an individual's priorities and national priorities in a noncoercive manner. The social dynamics approach that seeks a conscious, voluntary, nonmanipulated shift of shared attitudes, opinions, feelings, and actions is the approach underlying the most successful population programs. All IEC managers and supervisors should be systematically trained in norm shifting

  1. Combination strategies for pain management.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Clark-Vetri, Rachel; Tallarida, Ronald J; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2003-10-01

    At least two factors relating to pain management using oral analgesics suggest that combination strategies merit consideration: many pains arise from more than one physiological cause and current analgesics have adverse effect profiles that might be reduced by combination with another agent in smaller doses or with less frequent dosing. In addition to increased convenience, combinations sometimes also result in the unexpected benefit of synergy. But not all pains, clinical settings or combinations merit the extra expense or other potential negative features of fixed-ratio products. This review examines the multiple basic science, clinical and pharmacoeconomic issues relating to analgesic combinations and the methodologies available for assessing these issues.

  2. Management strategies of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D

    2012-11-21

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition resulting from chronic gastro-esophageal reflux disease with a documented risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Current strategies for improved survival in patients with Barrett's adenocarcinoma focus on detection of dysplasia. This can be obtained by screening programs in high-risk cohorts of patients and/or endoscopic biopsy surveillance of patients with known Barrett's esophagus (BE). Several therapies have been developed in attempts to reverse BE and reduce cancer risk. Aggressive medical management of acid reflux, lifestyle modifications, antireflux surgery, and endoscopic treatments have been recommended for many patients with BE. Whether these interventions are cost-effective or reduce mortality from esophageal cancer remains controversial. Current treatment requires combinations of endoscopic mucosal resection techniques to eliminate visible lesions followed by ablation of residual metaplastic tissue. Esophagectomy is currently indicated in multifocal high-grade neoplasia or mucosal Barrett's carcinoma which cannot be managed by endoscopic approach.

  3. Configuration Management Process Assessment Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a strategy for assessing the development and effectiveness of configuration management systems within Programs, Projects, and Design Activities performed by technical organizations and their supporting development contractors. Scope: Various entities CM Systems will be assessed dependent on Project Scope (DDT&E), Support Services and Acquisition Agreements. Approach: Model based structured against assessing organizations CM requirements including best practices maturity criteria. The model is tailored to the entity being assessed dependent on their CM system. The assessment approach provides objective feedback to Engineering and Project Management of the observed CM system maturity state versus the ideal state of the configuration management processes and outcomes(system). center dot Identifies strengths and risks versus audit gotcha's (findings/observations). center dot Used "recursively and iteratively" throughout program lifecycle at select points of need. (Typical assessments timing is Post PDR/Post CDR) center dot Ideal state criteria and maturity targets are reviewed with the assessed entity prior to an assessment (Tailoring) and is dependent on the assessed phase of the CM system. center dot Supports exit success criteria for Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews. center dot Gives a comprehensive CM system assessment which ultimately supports configuration verification activities.*

  4. An improved AVC strategy applied in distributed wind power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. N.; Liu, Q. H.; Song, S. Y.; Mao, W.

    2016-08-01

    Traditional AVC strategy is mainly used in wind farm and only concerns about grid connection point, which is not suitable for distributed wind power system. Therefore, this paper comes up with an improved AVC strategy applied in distributed wind power system. The strategy takes all nodes of distribution network into consideration and chooses the node having the most serious voltage deviation as control point to calculate the reactive power reference. In addition, distribution principles can be divided into two conditions: when wind generators access to network on single node, the reactive power reference is distributed according to reactive power capacity; when wind generators access to network on multi-node, the reference is distributed according to sensitivity. Simulation results show the correctness and reliability of the strategy. Compared with traditional control strategy, the strategy described in this paper can make full use of generators reactive power output ability according to the distribution network voltage condition and improve the distribution network voltage level effectively.

  5. Management strategies for idiopathic urethritis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, L; Farrelly, P; Dickson, A P; Goyal, A

    2016-02-01

    Williams and Mikhael (1971) described idiopathic urethritis (IU) as a self-limiting condition that affects boys aged 5-15 years, with symptoms of urethrorrhagia, dysuria and haematuria. However, a proportion of boys will remain symptomatic for several years, and may develop urethral stricture (Poch et al., 2007; Palagiri et al., 2003). There is no universally effective treatment for IU, although various strategies have been employed. To review the presentation and long-term outcomes of boys with IU, and present the efficacy of management strategies that have been utilised. A retrospective review was performed of all boys with IU. It was based on clinical and cystoscopic findings for presentation, medical history, management and clinical progress. Fifty-four boys were included, with a median age of 11 years (range 5-15 years) at presentation. The median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 2-132 months). The median follow-up was 18.5 months (range 1-120 months). Seven (13.0%) boys had early urethral stricture at initial cystourethroscopy, and one (1.9%) developed stricture during follow-up. Thirty-six boys (66.7%) had previous circumcision and four (7.4%) had meatal stenosis. Eight (14.8%) had previous hypospadias repair. Whilst 50% of boys with IU do not require any specific treatment, those with severe/unremitting symptoms may benefit from a trial of urethral steroids or short-term urethral catheterisation. The mechanisms of benefit from these modalities are unclear and they require further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Homosexuality in Turkey: strategies for managing heterosexism.

    PubMed

    Bakacak, Ayça Gelgeç; Oktem, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the strategies used by young homosexuals to manage their sexual minority status in Turkey. In-depth interviews were conducted with 15 self-identified homosexual university students. The data on the strategies employed by homosexuals suggested a categorization of these strategies into four interrelated areas: strategies employed in the process of self-acceptance; strategies to manage sexual stigma and prejudice; strategies specific to the coming-out process; and the strategies used while openly expressing their sexual identities.

  7. Evaluating Executive Strategies (Management Strategies and Teaching-Learning Strategies) of Graduate Curriculum: Case Study in Isfahan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahmanpour, Muhammad; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Hatami, Mostafa; Mirzaee, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate executive strategies in graduate Curriculum of Isfahan University from the point of view of management and teaching-learning strategies. This study is an applied survey. The population comprised BA students and faculty members of the University of Isfahan. In order to do so, 141 professors and 278 students were…

  8. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    conducted a study to support a sand management strategy for the Galveston Park Board of Trustees of Galveston, TX. The long-term management strategy ...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 13 Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL TR-16-13 July 2016 Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

  9. Spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource and social impacts caused by recreationists and tourists have become a management concern in national parks and equivalent protected areas. The need to contain visitor impacts within acceptable limits has prompted park and protected area managers to implement a wide variety of strategies and actions, many of which are spatial in nature. This paper classifies and illustrates the basic spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in parks and protected areas. A typology of four spatial strategies was proposed based on the recreation and park management literature. Spatial segregation is a common strategy for shielding sensitive resources from visitor impacts or for separating potentially conflicting types of use. Two forms of spatial segregation are zoning and closure. A spatial containment strategy is intended to minimize the aggregate extent of visitor impacts by confining use to limited designated or established Iocations. In contrast, a spatial dispersal strategy seeks to spread visitor use, reducing the frequency of use to levels that avoid or minimize permanent resource impacts or visitor crowding and conflict. Finally, a spatial configuration strategy minimizes impacting visitor behavior though the judicious spatial arrangement of facilities. These four spatial strategics can be implemented separately or in combination at varying spatial scales within a single park. A survey of national park managers provides an empirical example of the diversity of implemented spatial strategies in managing visitor impacts. Spatial segregation is frequently applied in the form of camping restrictions or closures to protect sensitive natural or cultural resources and to separate incompatible visitor activities. Spatial containment is the most widely applied strategy for minimizing the areal extent of resource impacts. Spatial dispersal is commonly applied to reduce visitor crowding or conflicts in popular destination areas but is less frequently applied or

  10. Applying Emotional Intelligence: Exploring the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Barbara; Longbottom, Julie; Potts, Fay; Williamson, Jim

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative action research project in one primary school that arose from a mutual interest in applying the concept of "Emotional Intelligence". It involves an exploratory qualitative study of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum. This is an approach aimed at promoting emotional competence in…

  11. Applying Various Comprehension Strategies. Learning Package No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Marge; Smith, Carl, Comp.

    Originally developed for the Department of Defense Schools (DoDDS) system, this learning package on applying various comprehension strategies is designed for teachers who wish to upgrade or expand their teaching skills on their own. The package includes a comprehensive search of the ERIC database; a lecture giving an overview on the topic; the…

  12. State Strategies To Manage Budget Shortfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Conference of State Legislatures, Denver, CO.

    Some of the strategies that states have used to manage budget shortfalls are presented in this report. It provides information, evaluations, and case studies that policymakers can refer to when considering their options, and it emphasizes strategies to manage budget shortfalls, which tend to need a quick resolution. The report also examines some…

  13. Applying the ID Process to the Guided Design Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coscarelli, William C.; White, Gregory P.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the application of the instructional development process to a teaching technique called Guided Design in a Production-Operations Management course. In Guided Design, students are self-instructed in course content and use class time to apply this knowledge to self-instruction; in-class problem-solving is stressed. (JJD)

  14. Healthcare management strategies: interdisciplinary team factors.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Pamela; Marzano, David

    2012-12-01

    Interdisciplinary team factors are significant contributors to clinical performance and associated patient outcomes. Quality of care and patient safety initiatives identify human factors associated with team performance as a prime improvement area for clinical patient care. The majority of references to interdisciplinary teams in obstetrics and gynecology in the literature recommends the use of multidisciplinary approaches when managing complex medical cases. The reviewed literature suggests that interdisciplinary team development is important for achieving optimally efficient and effective performance; however, few reports provide specific recommendations for how to optimally achieve these objectives in the process of providing interdisciplinary care to patients. The absence of these recommendations presents a significant challenge for those tasked with improving team performance in the workplace. The prescribed team development programs cited in the review are principally built around communication strategies and simulation-based training mechanisms. Few reports provide descriptions of optimal team-based competencies in the various contexts of obstetric and gynecology teams. However, team-based evaluation strategies and empirical data documenting the transfer of team training to applied clinical care are increasing in number and quality. Our findings suggest that research toward determining team factors that promote optimal performance in applied clinical practice requires definition of specific competencies for the variable teams serving obstetrics and gynecology.

  15. Applying ecosystem management to urban forestry

    Treesearch

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2007-01-01

    During the 1990s, the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service shifted from commodity production management to ecosystem-based management (Overbay, 1992). Although definitions of ecosystem-based management vary by objectives, the principle had four primary elements: (1) maintaining viable populations of native species, (2) representing native ecosystems...

  16. Leadership Strategies for Managing Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormanski, Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact of conflict in small group development theory. Views conflict as a positive, normally occurring behavior and presents leadership strategies involving withdrawal, suppression, integration, compromise, and power. Examines situational contingencies and presents a rationale for strategy selection and intervention. (Author)

  17. Remote sensing applied to resource management

    Treesearch

    Henry M. Lachowski

    1998-01-01

    Effective management of forest resources requires access to current and consistent geospatial information that can be shared by resource managers and the public. Geospatial information describing our land and natural resources comes from many sources and is most effective when stored in a geospatial database and used in a geographic information system (GIS). The...

  18. Applying Critical Ethics to Educational Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Bernard T.

    1994-01-01

    Examines some problems of meanings and values that can occur regarding such widely used management terms as "power,""teamwork," and "quality" from both a "moral law" and "role-theory" viewpoint. Advocates a critical-ethical alternative to narrowly economic notions of educational management.…

  19. Disease management as a performance improvement strategy.

    PubMed

    McClatchey, S

    2001-11-01

    Disease management is a strategy of organizing care and services for a patient population across the continuum. It is characterized by a population database, interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration, and evidence-based clinical information. The effectiveness of a disease management program has been measured by a combination of clinical, financial, and quality of life outcomes. In early 1997, driven by a strategic planning process that established three Centers of Excellence (COE), we implemented disease management as the foundation for a new approach to performance improvement utilizing five key strategies. The five implementation strategies are outlined, in addition to a review of the key elements in outcome achievement.

  20. Contemporary management strategies for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Robert P

    2009-06-01

    A roundtable meeting that comprised clinical, patient advocacy, and managed care experts discussed issues regarding the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. The panel agreed that earlier diagnosis and treatment, additional education for the medical community, and appropriate management by health plans, including patient access to US Food and Drug Administration-approved fibromyalgia medications, are needed. In addition, physicians, payers, and patient advocates must work to improve clinical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes for fibromyalgia patients. Finally, treatment and diagnostic guidelines must be updated as advances in disease management are made (including approvals of 3 new pharmacologic agents), and development of a therapeutic category for "fibromyalgia" on payer formularies is needed.

  1. Time management strategies for research productivity.

    PubMed

    Chase, Jo-Ana D; Topp, Robert; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy; Zerwic, Julie J; Benefield, Lazelle E; Anderson, Cindy M; Conn, Vicki S

    2013-02-01

    Researchers function in a complex environment and carry multiple role responsibilities. This environment is prone to various distractions that can derail productivity and decrease efficiency. Effective time management allows researchers to maintain focus on their work, contributing to research productivity. Thus, improving time management skills is essential to developing and sustaining a successful program of research. This article presents time management strategies addressing behaviors surrounding time assessment, planning, and monitoring. Herein, the Western Journal of Nursing Research editorial board recommends strategies to enhance time management, including setting realistic goals, prioritizing, and optimizing planning. Involving a team, problem-solving barriers, and early management of potential distractions can facilitate maintaining focus on a research program. Continually evaluating the effectiveness of time management strategies allows researchers to identify areas of improvement and recognize progress.

  2. Gingival overgrowth: Part 2: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Chesterman, J; Beaumont, J; Kellett, M; Durey, K

    2017-02-10

    The effective and predictable management of gingival overgrowth requires correct diagnosis and consideration of aetiological factors, as discussed in Part 1 (BDJ 2017; 222: 85-91). Initial management should involve cause-related therapy, which may resolve or reduce the lesion. If functional, aesthetic and maintenance complications persist following this phase; further treatment may be required in the form of surgery. This paper discusses management strategies, including management of aetiological factors and surgical techniques.

  3. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    PubMed

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation.

  4. What's your strategy for managing knowledge?

    PubMed

    Hansen, M T; Nohria, N; Tierney, T

    1999-01-01

    The rise of the computer and the increasing importance of intellectual assets have compelled executives to examine the knowledge underlying their businesses and how it is used. Because knowledge management as a conscious practice is so young, however, executives have lacked models to use as guides. To help fill that gap, the authors recently studied knowledge management practices at management consulting firms, health care providers, and computer manufacturers. They found two very different knowledge management strategies in place. In companies that sell relatively standardized products that fill common needs, knowledge is carefully codified and stored in databases, where it can be accessed and used--over and over again--by anyone in the organization. The authors call this the codification strategy. In companies that provide highly customized solutions to unique problems, knowledge is shared mainly through person-to-person contacts; the chief purpose of computers is to help people communicate. They call this the personalization strategy. A company's choice of knowledge management strategy is not arbitrary--it must be driven by the company's competitive strategy. Emphasizing the wrong approach or trying to pursue both can quickly undermine a business. The authors warn that knowledge management should not be isolated in a functional department like HR or IT. They emphasize that the benefits are greatest--to both the company and its customers--when a CEO and other general managers actively choose one of the approaches as a primary strategy.

  5. Speed Management Strategies; A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Saadati, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically identify the various methods of speed management and their effects. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Science Direct, Ovid Medline, Scopus, PubMed and ProQuest databases from April to June 2015. Hand searching and reference of selected articles were used to improve article identification. Articles published after 1990 which had reported on efficacy/effectiveness of speed management strategies were included. Data were extracted using pre-defined extraction table. Results: Of the 803 retrieved articles, 22 articles were included in this review. Most of the included articles (63%) had before-after design and were done in European countries. Speed cameras, engineering schemes, intelligent speed adaption (ISA), speed limits and zones, vehicle activated sign and integrated strategies were the most common strategies reported in the literature. Various strategies had different effects on mean speed of the vehicles ranging from 1.6 to 10 km/h. Moreover, 8-65% and 11-71% reduction was reported in person injured accidents and fatal accidents, respectively as a result of employing various strategies. Conclusion: Literature revealed positive effects of various speed management strategies. Using various strategies was mostly dependent on road characteristics, driver’s attitude about the strategy as well as economic and technological capabilities of the country. Political support is considered as a main determinant in selecting speed management strategies. PMID:27540546

  6. Strategies for data management engagement.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Deborah H

    2013-01-01

    The research landscape is growing dramatically, and librarians are examining new roles, services, and types of collaborations to support data-intensive research. This column describes curricular enhancements at one School of Library and Information Science in the United States. Several key areas of data management in which health sciences librarians may wish to build or enhance their skills are outlined. Possible roles and opportunities for health sciences librarians to strategically engage in data management initiatives are also presented.

  7. Applying RFID technology in nuclear materials management.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y.; Norair, J. P.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.; SRL; Savi Technology; DOE

    2008-01-01

    The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Safety Management and Operations (EM-60), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for the management of nuclear materials. Argonne National Laboratory, a PCP supporting laboratory, and Savi Technology, a Lockheed Martin Company, are collaborating in the development of the RFID system, a process that involves hardware modification (form factor, seal sensor and batteries), software development and irradiation experiments. Savannah River National Laboratory and Argonne will soon field test the active RFID system on Model 9975 drums, which are used for storage and transportation of fissile and radioactive materials. Potential benefits of the RFID system are enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real time access of status and history data, and overall cost effectiveness.

  8. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  9. 15 Strategies for Managing Attention Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Glenda; Thomas, Alice; Lawson, Candy

    2005-01-01

    In this document, 15 strategies are offered for enhancing attention and managing attention problems. This listing is by no means exhaustive, but rather is meant as a place to begin. The best resources for strategies are the creative, inventive minds of enlightened assessment professionals, teachers and parents, in partnership with the students…

  10. The VERB campaign: applying a branding strategy in public health.

    PubMed

    Asbury, Lori D; Wong, Faye L; Price, Simani M; Nolin, Mary Jo

    2008-06-01

    A branding strategy was an integral component of the VERB Youth Media Campaign. Branding has a long history in commercial marketing, and recently it has also been applied to public health campaigns. This article describes the process that the CDC undertook to develop a physical activity brand that would resonate with children aged 9-13 years (tweens), to launch an unknown brand nationally, to build the brand's equity, and to protect and maintain the brand's integrity. Considerations for branding other public health campaigns are also discussed.

  11. Board and Senior Management Alignment on School Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarros, James C.; Sarros, Anne M.; Cooper, Brian K.; Santora, Joseph C.; Baker, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which senior executive members of a school's decision-making team (senior management team and board of directors) are aligned on fundamental principles of school strategy. Our study is based on a conceptual framework of strategic leadership as it applies in an Australian independent school context. We also examine…

  12. Board and Senior Management Alignment on School Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarros, James C.; Sarros, Anne M.; Cooper, Brian K.; Santora, Joseph C.; Baker, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which senior executive members of a school's decision-making team (senior management team and board of directors) are aligned on fundamental principles of school strategy. Our study is based on a conceptual framework of strategic leadership as it applies in an Australian independent school context. We also examine…

  13. Designs, Management Tactics, and Strategies in Asynchronous Learning Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Corry, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses effective designs, management tactics, and strategies to produce ideal asynchronous network discussions that allow contemplation and encourage the development of critical thinking. A model of an online collaborative learning community is applied to implement the designs. A sample of online collaborative moderation guidelines is…

  14. Winning Strategies for Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Carol

    This book offers advice on arranging classrooms, diagnosing student behavior, and responding to students' emotional needs, examining intellectual, emotional, and physical challenges students face and providing strategies which help teachers create communities of learners, design classrooms, diagnose student behavior, and respond to student needs.…

  15. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district…

  16. Applying Total Quality Management to Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel J.; Koenig, Harold F.

    1993-01-01

    Responses from 390 business school alumni (60%) show that students want educators to consider their opinions about their overall educational experience and what happens after graduation. A total quality management approach can help discover customer/student needs, establish a focus on improvement, and implement a process orientation. (SK)

  17. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district…

  18. Restructuring Schools by Applying Deming's Management Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Charles A., III

    1991-01-01

    Four school districts adopted a school restructuring project using Deming's business management method. Deming offered alternative views of organizations based on psychology, systems, perceptual framework, and causes of variance. He listed 14 points for quality improvement. Evaluation indicated that key staff members willingly engaged in…

  19. Applying Total Quality Management in Cooperative Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredendall, Lawrence D.; Lippert, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    South Carolina's Agricultural Service Laboratory received responses from 252 of 500 farmers who currently use the soil testing service; 97% were pleased with accuracy, 89% with turnaround time, 18% thought the fee too high. Nonusers (100 of 520) were mainly dissatisfied with turnaround time. Total quality management methods were used to improve…

  20. Applied climate science: the risk management route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    While several Masters programmes on climate science exist in the British Isles, until recently there has been little regard for the requirements of business, local government and the insurance market in the provision of postgraduate taught programmes. This talk will discuss the issue of climate change risk management as a way of embedding climate science into the decision-making protocols for commercial and governmental organisations. It will outline several issues for business decision-making that have implications for climate change. These include: climate sensitivity, model uncertainty and rapid climate change. The experience of developing and running the MSc in Climate Change and Risk management at Exeter University will be used to highlight these issues.

  1. Applying Content Management to Automated Provenance Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Gibson, Tara D.; Stephan, Eric G.; Chin, George

    2008-04-10

    Workflows and data pipelines are becoming increasingly valuable in both computational and experimen-tal sciences. These automated systems are capable of generating significantly more data within the same amount of time than their manual counterparts. Automatically capturing and recording data prove-nance and annotation as part of these workflows is critical for data management, verification, and dis-semination. Our goal in addressing the provenance challenge was to develop and end-to-end system that demonstrates real-time capture, persistent content management, and ad-hoc searches of both provenance and metadata using open source software and standard protocols. We describe our prototype, which extends the Kepler workflow tools for the execution environment, the Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) content management software for data services, and an existing HTTP-based query protocol. Our implementation offers several unique capabilities, and through the use of standards, is able to pro-vide access to the provenance record to a variety of commonly available client tools.

  2. Internationalisation Strategies for Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, W. Stewart; Martin, Graeme

    1998-01-01

    A literature review and case study of a British business school examined these areas: (1) competing rationales for internationalizing management education; (2) transfer of best practice from the west; and (3) problems that parent and host countries face in joint ventures. (SK)

  3. Selecting habitat management strategies on refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Richard L.; King, Wayne J.; Cornely, John E.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a joint effort of the Biological Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to provide National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) managers guidance on the selection and evaluation of habitat management strategies to meet stated objectives. The FWS recently completed a handbook on writing refuge management goals and objectives (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996a). the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires that National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) lands be managed according to approved Comprehensive Conservation Plans to guide management decisions and devise strategies for achieving refuge unit purposes and meeting the NWRS mission. It is expected that over the next several years most refuges will develop new or revised refuge goals and objectives for directing their habitat management strategies. This paper outlines the steps we recommend in selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies to meet specific refuge habitat objectives. We selected two examples to illustrate the process. Although each refuge is unique and will require specific information and solutions, these two examples can be used as guidance when selecting and evaluating habitat management strategies for other refuge resources: Example 1. Management of floodplain woods habitat for forest interior birds. The biological recourse of concern is the quality and quantity of floodplain woods habitat for eastern forest interior birds in the Cypress Creek NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996b). Example 2. Management of habitat for biodiversity: Historical landscape proportions. The biological resource of concern is the change in diversity associated with man-induced changes in the distribution and abundance of habitat types at the Minnesota Valley NWR (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1996c).

  4. Heat Management Strategy Trade Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Steve Priebe; Dirk Gombert; Ted Bauer

    2009-09-01

    This Heat Management Trade Study was performed in 2008-2009 to expand on prior studies in continued efforts to analyze and evaluate options for cost-effectively managing SNF reprocessing wastes. The primary objective was to develop a simplified cost/benefit evaluation for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing that combines the characteristics of the waste generated through reprocessing with the impacts of the waste on heating the repository. Under consideration were age of the SNF prior to reprocessing, plutonium and minor actinide (MA) separation from the spent fuel for recycle, fuel value of the recycled Pu and MA, age of the remaining spent fuel waste prior to emplacement in the repository, length of time that active ventilation is employed in the repository, and elemental concentration and heat limits for acceptable glass waste form durability. A secondary objective was to identify and qualitatively analyze remaining issues such as (a) impacts of aging SNF prior to reprocessing on the fuel value of the recovered fissile materials, and (b) impact of reprocessing on the dose risk as developed in the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Results of this study can be used to evaluate different options for managing decay heat in waste streams from spent nuclear fuel.

  5. Applying Knowledge Management to an Organization's Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Shannon; Gill, Tracy; Fritsche, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Although workers in the information age have more information at their fingertips than ever before, the ability to effectively capture and reuse actual knowledge is still a surmounting challenge for many organizations. As high tech organizations transform from providing complex products and services in an established domain to providing them in new domains, knowledge remains an increasingly valuable commodity. This paper explores the supply and demand elements of the "knowledge market" within the International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing Directorate (ISSSPD) of NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It examines how knowledge supply and knowledge demand determine the success of an organization's knowledge management (KM) activities, and how the elements of a KM infrastructure (tools, culture, and training), can be used to create and sustain knowledge supply and demand

  6. Applying the ecosystem services concept to public land management

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kline; Marisa J. Mazzota; Thomas A. Spies; Mark E. Harmon

    2013-01-01

    We examine challenges and opportunities involved in applying ecosystem services to public land management with an emphasis on national forests in the United States. We review historical forest management paradigms and related economic approaches, outline a conceptual framework defining the informational needs of forest managers, and consider the feasibility of its...

  7. Planning your UST management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.S.; Bacon, P.A. )

    1993-09-01

    For the past six years, federal regulations have required underground storage tank (UST) owners to manage their tank facilities more carefully and accountably than ever before. As mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), all 50 states have implemented programs to monitor existing USTs, regulate new tank installations and levy fines for leaking tanks. The liability stipulation may be most important. This provision makes the investment in monitoring and safety equipment worthwhile for the tank owner. Equally important, it serves as a deterrent for careless practices and provides financial recourse for the cleanup of leaks or spills. While each state has the option of expanding on the federal government's UST management guidelines, all states had to adopt at least those basics. The minimum standards require that owners protect new USTs from corrosion, leaks and overfills, install leak detection devices and acquire liability insurance. The federal regulations also exempt certain tanks from compliance. These include tanks that hold less than 1,100 gallons, flow-through or process tanks and tanks that hold heating oil used for on-premises heating. Some state, however, have set more stringent regulations disallowing some of these exemptions. Either way, gasoline dealerships are by far the largest group of UST owners affected by the regulations. The rules also affect regulated substances such as heating oil, aviation fuels, and chemical solvents.

  8. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  9. Applying a Conflict Resolution Framework to Disputes in Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom-Gottfried, Kimberly

    1998-01-01

    Describes the application of conflict-resolution strategies to managed-care disputes. The premises and processes for conflict resolution through negotiation are presented, the application of these principles to common disagreements between providers and payers is demonstrated. Strategies for overcoming difficulties resulting from differential…

  10. Nonpharmacologic strategies for managing hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randy; Aukerman, Glen

    2006-06-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends lifestyle modification for all patients with hypertension or prehypertension. Modifications include reducing dietary sodium to less than 2.4 g per day; increasing exercise to at least 30 minutes per day, four days per week; limiting alcohol consumption to two drinks or less per day for men and one drink or less per day for women; following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan (high in fruits, vegetables, potassium, calcium, and magnesium; low in fat and salt); and achieving a weight loss goal of 10 lb (4.5 kg) or more. Alternative treatments such as vitamin C, coenzyme Q10, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids have been suggested for managing hypertension, but evidence for their effectiveness is lacking.

  11. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kristen M; Ditre, Chérie M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s) for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne? Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of child-bearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral. PMID:21691566

  12. Teaching Students to Apply Strategies that Improve Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the directed reading activity (DRA) is a teaching strategy of limited use to students and discusses how teachers can transform the teaching strategy into a learning strategy. Discusses the generalization of the DRA strategy, emphasizes self-checking for learner control of strategies, and describes attributional consequences of teaching…

  13. Management strategy evaluation of pheromone-baited trapping techniques to improve management of invasive sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Heather; Jones, Michael L.; Irwin, Brian J.; Johnson, Nicholas; Wagner, Michael C.; Szymanski, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We applied a management strategy evaluation (MSE) model to examine the potential cost-effectiveness of using pheromone-baited trapping along with conventional lampricide treatment to manage invasive sea lamprey. Four pheromone-baited trapping strategies were modeled: (1) stream activation wherein pheromone was applied to existing traps to achieve 10−12 mol/L in-stream concentration, (2) stream activation plus two additional traps downstream with pheromone applied at 2.5 mg/hr (reverse-intercept approach), (3) trap activation wherein pheromone was applied at 10 mg/hr to existing traps, and (4) trap activation and reverse-intercept approach. Each new strategy was applied, with remaining funds applied to conventional lampricide control. Simulating deployment of these hybrid strategies on fourteen Lake Michigan streams resulted in increases of 17 and 11% (strategies 1 and 2) and decreases of 4 and 7% (strategies 3 and 4) of the lakewide mean abundance of adult sea lamprey relative to status quo. MSE revealed performance targets for trap efficacy to guide additional research because results indicate that combining lampricides and high efficacy trapping technologies can reduce sea lamprey abundance on average without increasing control costs.

  14. Momentum management strategy during Space Station buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Lynda; Malchow, Harvey; Hattis, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The use of momentum storage devices to control effectors for Space Station attitude control throughout the buildup sequence is discussed. Particular attention is given to the problem of providing satisfactory management of momentum storage effectors throughout buildup while experiencing variable torque loading. Continuous and discrete control strategies are compared and the effects of alternative control moment gyro strategies on peak momentum storage requirements and on commanded maneuver characteristics are described.

  15. Initial management strategies for follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Seward, Miray; Zhang, Hongzheng; Sinha, Rajni; Flowers, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular lymphoma (FL) can vary markedly in its initial presentation, and no single standard approach for its initial management has been adopted. Available options for the initial management of FL include watchful waiting, radiation, single-agent rituximab and combination of rituximab and chemotherapy with strategies segregated for patients who have low and high tumor burden disease based on established criteria. However, marked debate occurs regarding the role of watchful waiting in the modern era for low tumor burden, asymptomatic patients, the optimal timing of rituximab, the selection of chemotherapy regimen to partner with rituximab in high tumor burden patients, and strategies for the management of relapsed disease. We provide an evidence-based discussion on these and other issues regarding the management of FL, and propose a mathematical modeling approach for addressing some of these questions. PMID:23476737

  16. Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

    2008-08-01

    A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

  17. A holistic strategy for adaptive land management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.; Pyke, David A.; Bestelmeyer, Brandon T.; Wills, Skye A.; Brown, Joel R.; Karl, Jason W.; Havstad, Kris M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive management is widely applied to natural resources management (Holling 1973; Walters and Holling 1990). Adaptive management can be generally defined as an iterative decision-making process that incorporates formulation of management objectives, actions designed to address these objectives, monitoring of results, and repeated adaptation of management until desired results are achieved (Brown and MacLeod 1996; Savory and Butterfield 1999). However, adaptive management is often criticized because very few projects ever complete more than one cycle, resulting in little adaptation and little knowledge gain (Lee 1999; Walters 2007). One significant criticism is that adaptive management is often used as a justification for undertaking actions with uncertain outcomes or as a surrogate for the development of specific, measurable indicators and monitoring programs (Lee 1999; Ruhl 2007).

  18. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  19. Setting priorities for waste management strategies in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Paul H; Fellner, Johann

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the waste management systems, that are presently applied in affluent countries are appropriate solutions for waste management in less developed regions. For this purpose, three cities (Vienna, Damascus and Dhaka) which differ greatly in their gross domestic product and waste management were compared. The criteria for evaluation were economic parameters, and indicators as to whether the goals of waste management (protection of human health and the environment, the conservation of resources) were reached. Based on case studies, it was found that for regions spending 1-10 Euro capita(-1) year(-1) for waste management, the 'waste hierarchy' of prevention, recycling and disposal is not an appropriate strategy. In such regions, the improvement of disposal systems (complete collection, upgrading to sanitary landfilling) is the most cost-effective method to reach the objectives of solid waste management. Concepts that are widely applied in developed countries such as incineration and mechanical waste treatment are not suitable methods to reach waste management goals in countries where people cannot spend more than 10 Euro per person for the collection, treatment and disposal of their waste. It is recommended that each region first determines its economic capacity for waste management and then designs its waste management system according to this capacity and the goals of waste management.

  20. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Applying Deming's Fourteen Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Robert J.; Leiker, Linda

    1992-01-01

    This article presents guidelines to aid administrators of institutions of higher education in applying the 14 principles of Total Quality Management. The principles stress understanding process improvements, handling variation, fostering prediction, and using psychology to capitalize on human resources. (DB)

  1. Group-Oriented Behavior Management Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of group oriented behavior management strategies to modify classroom behavior problems is suggested. Advantages, disadvantages, and implementation guidelines for the group response cost system, the good behavior game, the group timeout ribbon, hero method, peer-mediated extinction, and peer confrontation. (DB)

  2. Management Strategies for Promoting Teacher Collective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Eric C. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to validate a theoretical model for developing teacher collective learning by using a quasi-experimental design, and explores the management strategies that would provide a school administrator practical steps to effectively promote collective learning in the school organization. Twenty aided secondary schools in Hong Kong were…

  3. Classroom Management Strategies for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Joe S.

    2007-01-01

    Classroom management strategies designed to improve problem behavior directly affect student achievement. Researchers have demonstrated positive behavior supports (PBS) can reduce problem behavior. However, researchers have also found evidence that PBS may not always be successful and further studies are needed to improve the use of PBS as a…

  4. Practical management strategies for diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, S; Bergman, J N; Au, S

    2006-09-01

    Common diaper dermatitis is an irritant contact diaper dermatitis (IDD) created by the combined influence of moisture, warmth, urine, feces, friction, and secondary infection. It is difficult to completely eradicate these predisposing factors in a diapered child. Thus, IDD presents an ongoing therapeutic challenge for parents, family physicians, pediatricians, and dermatologists. This article will focus on practical management strategies for IDD.

  5. Seeking sustainability: Israel's evolving water management strategy.

    PubMed

    Tal, Alon

    2006-08-25

    The water management policies adopted to address Israel's chronic scarcity have not been without environmental consequences. Yet, through a trial-and-error process, a combined strategy of water transport, rainwater harvesting, and wastewater reuse and desalination, along with a variety of water conservation measures, have put the country on a more sustainable path for the future.

  6. Strategies to manage antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Perfect, John R

    2011-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. From more than half a million deaths from cryptococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa to an unchanging death rate from invasive candidiasis, despite three antifungal classes of drugs, insights into better strategies to reduce therapeutic failures or resistance are needed. This review examines the issues around antifungal drug resistance from both a basic description of the failures and how they are detected to the variety of issues that need to be addressed to help prevent failures for successful management. The reader will gain an understanding of the clinical complexities in this patient population for management of invasive fungal infections. Throughout the review, principles of management are given along with some specific clinical examples to illustrate the issues and frame the knowledge base. From this discussion it is hoped that the clinician can use the insights provided to manage individual patients and find links to the evidence-based material that support its conclusions. Also, this review specifically identifies the limitations of present management and directs clinicians to gather additional information and provide even better treatment strategies. Invasive fungal infections are life-threatening complications of serious underlying diseases. Their management can be complicated by both direct and clinical drug resistance and by understanding these possibilities and correcting them; most patients can be successfully managed with present antifungal drugs if the underlying diseases can be controlled.

  7. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Managing the Chronically Overworked Team: Twenty Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Overwork, at first glance, seems like a problem that affects only the employee. But for medical practices and those who manage them, the problem is far greater than that. Chronically overworked employees may not be meeting their goals. They may be making more mistakes and letting things slip through the cracks. Ultimately, patients may have less-than-ideal experiences in a practice where the employees are stretched thin. And turnover may skyrocket in practices where employees are chronically overworked. This article offers practice managers 20 practical and affordable strategies they can use to manage a chronically overworked medical practice team. It suggests an effective technique they can use to tell their bosses that their employees are overworked. This article also suggests the costs to the practice of a chronically overworked staff, including a hidden cost many people overlook. It provides four coping strategies practice managers can teach to their overworked employees. It summarizes research exploring how overwork affects employees' sleep and eating habits, and additional research linking long hours of overwork to diminished productivity. Finally, this article provides five strategies practice managers can use to make their overworked employees feel valued.

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome: contemporary nutrition management strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Gerard E; Shepherd, Sue J; Chander Roland, Bani; Ireton-Jones, Carol; Matarese, Laura E

    2014-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex disorder whose pathophysiology involves alterations in the enteric microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune/barrier function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, neurotransmitters, stress response, psychological factors, and more. The importance of diet in the management of irritable bowel syndrome has taken center stage in recent times as the literature validates the relationship of certain foods with the provocation of symptoms. Likewise, a number of elimination dietary programs have been successful in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Knowledge of the dietary management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome will help guide nutritionists and healthcare practitioners to deliver optimal outcomes. This tutorial reviews the nutrition management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome.

  10. [Case management applied to the treatment of alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Figlie, Neliana Buzi; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2004-05-01

    This article aims is to conceptualize and describe the main steps in case management applied to the treatment of alcohol dependence. It is important to note the case manager functions, the importance of the first appointment, check the motivation to the treatment, some goals and activities suggestions for adherence reinforcement.

  11. Applying the Ecosystem Services Concept to Public Land Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine the challenges opportunities involved in applying ecosystem services to public lands management, with an emphasis on the work of the USDA Forest Service. We review the history of economics approaches to landscape management, outline a conceptual framework defining the ...

  12. Applying the Ecosystem Services Concept to Public Land Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine the challenges opportunities involved in applying ecosystem services to public lands management, with an emphasis on the work of the USDA Forest Service. We review the history of economics approaches to landscape management, outline a conceptual framework defining the ...

  13. Beyond PARR - PMEL's Integrated Data Management Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, E. F.; O'Brien, K.; Manke, A. B.; Schweitzer, R.; Smith, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) hosts a wide range of scientific projects that span a number of scientific and environmental research disciplines. Each of these 14 research projects have their own data streams that are as diverse as the research. With its requirements for public access to federally funded research results and data, the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology memo on Public Access to Research Results (PARR) changed the data management landscape for Federal agencies. In 2015, with support from the PMEL Director, Dr. Christopher Sabine, PMEL's Science Data Integration Group (SDIG) initiated a multi-year effort to formulate and implement an integrated data-management strategy for PMEL research efforts. Instead of using external requirements, such as PARR, to define our approach, we focussed on strategies to provide PMEL science projects with a unified framework for data submission, interoperable data access, data storage, and easier data archival to National Data Centers. This improves data access to PMEL scientists, their collaborators, and the public, and also provides a unified lab framework that allows our projects to meet their data management objectives, as well as those required by the PARR. We are implementing this solution in stages that allows us to test technology and architecture choices before comitting to a large scale implementation. SDIG developers have completed the first year of development where our approach is to reuse and leverage existing frameworks and standards. This presentation will describe our data management strategy, explain our phased implementation approach, the software and framework choices, and how these elements help us meet the objectives of this strategy. We will share the lessons learned in dealing with diverse and complex datasets in this first year of implementation and how these outcomes will shape our decisions for this ongoing effort. The data management capabilities now

  14. Competency-based learning applied to nursing management.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, J

    1994-07-01

    The ability to manage change has become an essential skill for all managers, particularly those employed within the Health and Social Services. It is recognized that managers may have received an introduction to management concepts and skills within their professional education but require more specific management development. The government approach to adult education with an increased emphasis on vocational training as opposed to professional education (Hyland 1991) has had an important impact upon the theory and practice of nurse management. Nurses are now required to demonstrate, not only the appropriate knowledge and theory of management, but also the competencies necessary to fulfil their role. This is becoming an important dimension of management development programmes. This paper discusses aspects of competency based learning and considers how these concepts are applied to a higher education nurse management programme on 'Managing Change'. The difficulties experienced in applying vocational standards to professional education within the culture of a higher education will be explored, difficulties identified and some alternatives offered.

  15. Environmental management strategy: four forces analysis.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  16. Environmental Management Strategy: Four Forces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Martin W.; Von Windheim, Jesko

    2015-01-01

    We develop an analytical approach for more systematically analyzing environmental management problems in order to develop strategic plans. This approach can be deployed by agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations, or other organizations and institutions tasked with improving environmental quality. The analysis relies on assessing the underlying natural processes followed by articulation of the relevant societal forces causing environmental change: (1) science and technology, (2) governance, (3) markets and the economy, and (4) public behavior. The four forces analysis is then used to strategize which types of actions might be most effective at influencing environmental quality. Such strategy has been under-used and under-valued in environmental management outside of the corporate sector, and we suggest that this four forces analysis is a useful analytic to begin developing such strategy.

  17. Heat management strategies for MSW landfills.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Nazli; Hanson, James L; Kopp, Kevin B; Yee, Emma H

    2016-10-01

    Heat is a primary byproduct of landfilling of municipal solid waste. Long-term elevated temperatures have been reported for MSW landfills under different operational conditions and climatic regions around the world. A conceptual framework is presented for management of the heat generated in MSW landfills. Three main strategies are outlined: extraction, regulation, and supplementation. Heat extraction allows for beneficial use of the excess landfill heat as an alternative energy source. Two approaches are provided for the extraction strategy: extracting all of the excess heat above baseline equilibrium conditions in a landfill and extracting only a part of the excess heat above equilibrium conditions to obtain target optimum waste temperatures for maximum gas generation. Heat regulation allows for controlling the waste temperatures to achieve uniform distribution at target levels at a landfill facility. Two approaches are provided for the regulation strategy: redistributing the excess heat across a landfill to obtain uniform target optimum waste temperatures for maximum gas generation and redistributing the excess heat across a landfill to obtain specific target temperatures. Heat supplementation allows for controlling heat generation using external thermal energy sources to achieve target waste temperatures. Two approaches are provided for the supplementation strategy: adding heat to the waste mass using an external energy source to increase waste temperatures and cooling the waste mass using an external energy source to decrease waste temperatures. For all strategies, available landfill heat energy is determined based on the difference between the waste temperatures and the target temperatures. Example analyses using data from landfill facilities with relatively low and high heat generation indicated thermal energy in the range of -48.4 to 72.4MJ/m(3) available for heat management. Further modeling and experimental analyses are needed to verify the effectiveness

  18. Management strategies for promoting successful breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bear, K; Tigges, B B

    1993-06-01

    Clinicians can promote a successful breastfeeding experience by providing support, anticipatory guidance and practical information. This article presents the components of early follow-up and guidelines for assessment. Management strategies for common problems are discussed, such as nipple soreness, cracked nipples, plugged ducts and mastitis, insufficient infant weight gain, perceived inadequacy of milk supply, breast-milk jaundice, sexual adjustment and failure at breastfeeding. Breastfeeding guidelines for employed mothers and adoptive mothers are indicated.

  19. Strategies for Management of Synchronous Colorectal Metastases.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Jason A; Merchant, Nipun B

    2014-06-01

    The management of synchronous presentation of colorectal cancer and liver metastases has long been a topic of debate and discussion for surgeons due to the unique dilemma of balancing operative timing along with treatment strategy. Operative strategies for resection include staged resection with colon first approach, "reverse" staged resection with liver metastases resected first, and one-stage, or simultaneous, resection of both the primary tumor and liver metastases approach. These operative strategies can be further augmented with perioperative chemotherapy and other novel approaches that may improve resectability and patient survival. The decision on operative timing and approach, however, remains largely dependent on the surgeon's determination of disease resectability, patient fitness, and the need for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  20. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  1. Opt-in medical management strategies.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald; Olson, Marty

    2008-02-01

    Historically, health plans and disease management companies have employed "opt-out" strategies for evaluating medical management outcomes across larger populations, targeting the entire population of eligible individuals and allowing those not interested to opt out. Recent observations that the predominant effort of these programs is on high-risk patients has lead some managers to suggest that the focus be on only those individuals with an anticipated higher effectiveness and lower cost to the payers of such services. They believe such "opt-in" models, in which only higher risk participants are targeted and enrolled, will deliver higher value. The use of common opt-in models, however, is not only methodologically unsound, but experience in the field suggests there may be less overall effect as well. Calculation methods for developing impact remain extremely sensitive to methodology

  2. Office of Management and Budget Circulars for managing grants that apply to all federal executive agencies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In addition to the provisions of authorizing legislation and implementing regulations, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issuesGovernment-wide circulars for managing grants that apply to all Federal executive agencies.

  3. Diabetes benefit management: evolving strategies for payers.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, Albert L

    2011-11-01

    Over the next quarter century, the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is expected to at least double. Currently, 1 in every 10 healthcare dollars is spent on diabetes management; by 2050, it has been projected that the annual costs of managing T2DM will rise to $336 billion. Without substantial, systemic changes, T2DM management costs will lead to a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system. However, the appropriate management of diabetes can reduce associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, adequate glycemic control can improve patient outcomes and significantly reduce diabetes-related complications. This article provides an overview of key concepts associated with a value-based insurance design (VBID) approach to T2DM coverage. By promoting the use of services or treatments that provide high benefits relative to cost, and by alternatively discouraging patients from utilizing services whose benefits do not justify their cost, VBID improves the quality of healthcare while simultaneously reining in spending. VBID initiatives tend to focus on chronic disease management and generally target prescription drug use. However, some programs have expanded their scope by incorporating services traditionally offered by wellness and disease management programs. The concept of VBID is growing, and it is increasingly being implemented by a diverse and growing number of public and private entities, including pharmacy benefit managers, health plans, and employers. This article provides key background on VBID strategies, with a focus on T2DM management. It also provides a road map for health plans seeking to implement VBID as part of their programs.

  4. Optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia: treatment and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Mohammad Hassan; Astaneh, Behrooz

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an autosomally dominant disorder caused by various mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor genes. This will lead to elevated levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which may in turn lead to premature coronary atherosclerosis and cardiac-related death. The symptoms are more severe in the homozygous type of the disease. Different options for the treatment of affected patients are now available. Diet therapy, pharmacologic therapy, lipid apheresis, and liver transplantation are among the various treatments. We clinically review the treatment and management strategies for the disease in order to shed light on the optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21191428

  5. Applying Operant Conditioning Principles to the Management of Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVries, David L.; Jablonsky, Stephen F.

    Following Walter Nord (1969), the present article contains a predictive model of individual behavior based on both operant conditioning and management literatures. The behavior of an organizational member is seen as a function of the reinforcement contingencies applied by various groups in his environment and of his cognitive assessment of such…

  6. Chance-constrained model predictive control applied to inventory management in hospitalary pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Jose Maria; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This extended abstract addresses the preliminary results of applying uncertainty handling strategies and advanced control techniques to the inventary management of hospitality pharmacy. Inventory management is one of the main tasks that a pharmacy department has to carry out in a hospital. It is a complex problem because it requires to establish a tradeoff between contradictory optimization criteria. The final goal of the proposed research is to update the inventory management system of hospitals such that it is possible to reduce the average inventory while maintaining preestablished clinical guarantees.

  7. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  8. TASKILLAN II - Pilot strategies for workload management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Leon D.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1990-01-01

    This study focused on the strategies used by pilots in managing their workload level, and their subsequent task performance. Sixteen licensed pilots flew 42 missions on a helicopter simulation, and were evaluated on their performance of the overall mission, as well as individual tasks. Pilots were divided in four groups, defined by the presence or absence of scheduling control over tasks and the availability of intelligence concerning the type and stage of difficulties imposed during the flight. Results suggest that intelligence supported strategies that yielded significant higher performance levels, while scheduling control seemed to have no impact on performance. Both difficulty type and the stage of difficulty impacted performance significantly, with strongest effects for time stresss and difficulties imposed late in the flight.

  9. Climate change adaptation strategies for resource management and conservation planning.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Joshua J

    2009-04-01

    Recent rapid changes in the Earth's climate have altered ecological systems around the globe. Global warming has been linked to changes in physiology, phenology, species distributions, interspecific interactions, and disturbance regimes. Projected future climate change will undoubtedly result in even more dramatic shifts in the states of many ecosystems. These shifts will provide one of the largest challenges to natural resource managers and conservation planners. Managing natural resources and ecosystems in the face of uncertain climate requires new approaches. Here, the many adaptation strategies that have been proposed for managing natural systems in a changing climate are reviewed. Most of the recommended approaches are general principles and many are tools that managers are already using. What is new is a turning toward a more agile management perspective. To address climate change, managers will need to act over different spatial and temporal scales. The focus of restoration will need to shift from historic species assemblages to potential future ecosystem services. Active adaptive management based on potential future climate impact scenarios will need to be a part of everyday operations. And triage will likely become a critical option. Although many concepts and tools for addressing climate change have been proposed, key pieces of information are still missing. To successfully manage for climate change, a better understanding will be needed of which species and systems will likely be most affected by climate change, how to preserve and enhance the evolutionary capacity of species, how to implement effective adaptive management in new systems, and perhaps most importantly, in which situations and systems will the general adaptation strategies that have been proposed work and how can they be effectively applied.

  10. Applying Deterrence Strategy to Agents of Asymmetrical Threats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Strategy, Disruptive Technology , Tailored Deterrence, Terrorist Psychology 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 151 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...SYSTEMS ..................................... 104 C. MODERN TERRORISM AS DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY ............ 106 D. STRATEGIZING BEYOND TECHNOLOGY ...the information might prove to be of greater use considering the consistency with the “ garbage out” portion of what makes the terrorist tick, in

  11. Integrated strategy for mutagenicity prediction applied to food contact chemicals.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Serena; Schilter, Benoît; Benfenati, Emilio; Manganaro, Alberto; Lo Piparo, Elena

    2017-09-18

    Food contamination due to unintentional leakage of chemicals from food contact materials (FCM) is a source of increasing concern. Since for many of these substances, only limited or no toxicological data are available, the development of alternative methodologies to establish rapidly and cost-efficiently level of safety concern is critical to ensure adequate consumer protection. Computational toxicology methods are considered the most promising solutions to cope with this data gap. In particular, mutagenicity assessment has a particular relevance and is a mandatory requirement for all substances released from plastic FCM, regardless how low migration and exposure are. In the present work, a strategy integrating a number of (Quantitative) Structure Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) models for Ames mutagenicity predictions is proposed. A list of chemicals representing likely migrating moieties from FCM was selected to test the value of the newly defined strategy and the possibility to combine predictions given by the different algorithms was evaluated. In particular, a scheme to integrate mutagenicity estimations into a single final assessment was developed resulting in an increased domain of applicability. In most cases, a deeper analysis of experimental data, where available, allowed fixing misclassification errors, highlighting the importance of data curation in the development, validation and application of in silico methods. The high accuracy of the strategy provided the rationales for its application for toxicologically uncharacterized chemicals. Finally, the overall strategy of integration will be automated through its implementation into a freely available software application.

  12. Vocabulary Developing Strategies Applied to Individuals with Hearing Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasu, Guzin; Girgin, Umit; Uzuner, Yildiz; Kaya, Zehranur

    2016-01-01

    The general purpose of this research was to investigate the strategies utilized for vocabulary development of ten individuals (first year college students) in Graphic Art Department, School for The Handicapped, Anadolu University with hearing impairment. The reflective and cyclical data were consisted of videotape recordings of the actual lessons,…

  13. Reading Comprehension Strategies as Applied by Iranian EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shokrpour, Nasrin; Fotovatian, Sepide

    2006-01-01

    To enhance reading comprehension, several strategies have been identified in previous research conducted (Naiman et al. 1978; O'Malley & Chamot 1990; O'Malley, Chamot, Manzanares, Russo and Kypper 1985; Politzer and McGroarty 1985; Prokop 1989; Oxford 1990; Salataci and Akyel 2002; Tercanlioglu 2004). However, using different types of Reading…

  14. Cultivating Kuumba: Applying Art Based Strategies to Any Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Auburn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    There are many contemporary issues to address in adult education. This paper explores art-based strategies and the utilization of creativity (Kuumba) to expand learning for global communities in any field of practice. Benefits of culturally grounded approaches to adult education are discussed. Images from ongoing field research can be viewed at…

  15. It's magic: a unique practice management strategy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven

    2003-11-15

    For thousands of years prior to the advent of modern dentistry, magic has been used to entertain, impress, and motivate individuals. Today's dental professionals are using the concept of The Magic of a Healthy Smile through their use of modern clinical techniques and as a means for practice marketing, patient education, and the reduction of patient stress and fear. This article describes how dentists/magicians have incorporated magic into their practices and the benefits of this useful patient management strategy. A script of the "Happy Tooth Magic Show" and resources for dentists to create their own dental magic show are provided.

  16. Novel strategies for managing pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Welley S; Smith, Jill P; Matters, Gail; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H

    2014-01-01

    With the incidence reports of pancreatic cancer increasing every year, research over the last several decades has been focused on the means to achieve early diagnosis in patients that are at a high risk of developing the malignancy. This review covers current strategies for managing pancreatic cancer and further discusses efforts in understanding the role of early onset symptoms leading to tumor progression. Recent investigations in this discussion include type 3c diabetes, selected biomarkers and pathways related to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, drug resistance, and advances in nanomedicine which may provide significant solutions for improving early detection and treatments in future medicine. PMID:25356034

  17. Strategies for pain management: a review.

    PubMed

    Sollami, Alfonso; Marino, Leonardo; Fontechiari, Simona; Fornari, Marta; Tirelli, Pierangela; Zenunaj, Elisabetta

    2015-09-09

    PROBLEM/BACKGROUND: Pain management is a major worldwide health problem. It manifests itself in a variety of forms involving in turn a multiplicity of responses and therapeutic strategies. Following from this, the training of health personnel must deal with this situation and must not only offer technical assistance, but must also deal with the psychological and social aspects of the problem. In recent years various guidelines and protocols have become popular for pain management. The aim of this paper is to present a literature review of the major international databases. Type of research: Systematic review. To identify relevant studies in the literature on pain management and identify the guidelines recognized by the scientific community. A literature search was conducted using the keywords "pain management" and "nurse" published since 2000 in English and Italian in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Med Line. Excluding items which did not meet the inclusion criteria, 49 articles were included in the review. Despite a growing availability of evidence-based guidelines, drugs for pain control and the enactment of legislation to promote the use of opioid analgesics in pain therapy, a substantial proportion of the European population continues to have pain. Estimates of the prevalence of pain symptoms in the literature show that between 40% and 63% of hospitalized patients reported pain, peaking at 82.3% in cancer patients in advanced stages of the disease or terminally ill (in hospital or at home). Several studies published in recent years have agreed on a definition of some key points in the management of pain. Studies agree that pain should be recognized as the 5th vital sign, hence the need for validated scales whether single or multi-dimensional, quantitative or qualitative. The approach to the management of pain must be multi-professional, and the use of pharmacology must be in accordance with the WHO three-step approach. Several studies have demonstrated

  18. Proposal and Evaluation of Management Method for College Mechatronics Education Applying the Project Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yoshinobu; Eguchi, Yuya; Mizukawa, Makoto

    In this research, we proposed and evaluated a management method of college mechatronics education. We applied the project management to college mechatronics education. We practiced our management method to the seminar “Microcomputer Seminar” for 3rd grade students who belong to Department of Electrical Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology. We succeeded in management of Microcomputer Seminar in 2006. We obtained the good evaluation for our management method by means of questionnaire.

  19. Invasive mycoses: strategies for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) depends on early individualized therapy that optimizes efficacy and safety. Considering the negative consequences of IFI, for some high-risk patients the potential benefits of prophylactic therapy may outweigh the risks. When using a prophylactic, empiric, or preemptive therapeutic approach, clinicians must take into account the local epidemiology, spectrum of activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, and safety profile of different antifungal agents, together with unique host-related factors that may affect antifungal efficacy or safety. Therapeutic drug monitoring is increasingly recognized as important or necessary when employing lipophilic triazoles (itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole) or flucytosine. Because early diagnostics remain limited for uncommon, yet emerging opportunistic molds (e.g., Mucorales), and treatment delay is associated with increased mortality, early effective management often depends on a high index of suspicion, taking into account predisposing factors, host cues favoring mucormycosis, and local epidemiology. Antifungal options for mucormycosis are limited, and optimal management depends on a multimodal approach that includes early diagnosis/clinical suspicion, correction of underlying predisposing factors, radical debridement of affected tissues, and extended antifungal therapy. This article discusses strategies for the effective management of invasive mycoses, with a particular focus on antifungal hepatotoxicity.

  20. Management Strategies for CLN2 Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth E; Adams, Heather R; Blohm, Martin; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica L; de Los Reyes, Emily; Denecke, Jonas; Drago, Kristen; Fairhurst, Charlie; Frazier, Margie; Guelbert, Norberto; Kiss, Szilárd; Kofler, Annamaria; Lawson, John A; Lehwald, Lenora; Leung, Mary-Anne; Mikhaylova, Svetlana; Mink, Jonathan W; Nickel, Miriam; Shediac, Renée; Sims, Katherine; Specchio, Nicola; Topcu, Meral; von Löbbecke, Ina; West, Andrea; Zernikow, Boris; Schulz, Angela

    2017-04-01

    CLN2 disease (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2) is a rare, autosomal recessive, pediatric-onset, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) enzyme deficiency, and is characterized by language delay, seizures, rapid cognitive and motor decline, blindness, and early death. No management guidelines exist and there is a paucity of published disease-specific evidence to inform clinical practice, which currently draws upon experience from the field of childhood neurodisability. Twenty-four disease experts were surveyed on CLN2 disease management and a subset met to discuss current practice. Management goals and strategies are consistent among experts globally and are guided by the principles of pediatric palliative care. Goals and interventions evolve as the disease progresses, with a shift in focus from maintenance of function early in the disease to maintenance of quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach is critical for optimal patient care. This work represents an initial step toward the development of consensus-based management guidelines for CLN2 disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  2. Interdisciplinary Instructional Reading Strategies: An Applied Application for Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polkinghorne, Frederick W.; Bland, Zinna L.

    2011-01-01

    The contemporary workforce requires technical and reading skills (Shanahan & Shanahan, 2008; The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Society of Human Resource Management, 2006). Technical skills allow workers to perform specific workforce tasks, while reading skills are generally needed by…

  3. Interdisciplinary Instructional Reading Strategies: An Applied Application for Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polkinghorne, Frederick W.; Bland, Zinna L.

    2011-01-01

    The contemporary workforce requires technical and reading skills (Shanahan & Shanahan, 2008; The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Society of Human Resource Management, 2006). Technical skills allow workers to perform specific workforce tasks, while reading skills are generally needed by…

  4. Barrett's Esophagus: Emerging Knowledge and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Stairs, Douglas B.; Mani, Haresh; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased exponentially in the last 3 decades. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of EAC. Patients with BE have a greater than 40 folds higher risk of EAC compared with the general population. Recent years have witnessed a revolution in the clinical and molecular research related to BE. However, several aspects of this condition remain controversial. Data regarding the true prevalence of BE have varied widely. Recent studies have suggested a lower incidence of EAC in nondysplastic BE (NDBE) than previously reported. There is paucity of prospective data showing a survival benefit of screening or surveillance for BE. Furthermore, the ever-increasing emphasis on healthcare cost containment has called for reexamination of the screening and surveillance strategies for BE. There is a need for identification of reliable clinical predictors or molecular biomarkers to risk-stratify patients who might benefit the most from screening or surveillance for BE. Finally, new therapies have emerged for the management of dysplastic BE. In this paper, we highlight the key areas of controversy and uncertainty surrounding BE. The paper discusses, in detail, the current literature about the molecular pathogenesis, biomarkers, histopathological diagnosis, and management strategies for BE. PMID:22701199

  5. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management. PMID:26504735

  6. Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts applied to instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    Drawing on DOE Order 5700.6C and other industry standards, this document presents several concepts and tools of Total Quality Management (TQM), a brief history of their use at EG G Rocky Flats, and how they are being applied to address processes of instruction common to TAP. Concepts presented and applied include: statistical process control (SPC), e.g. using control charts, as an evaluation methodology for learners and instructors; TQM conceptual tools, e.g. brainstorming, affinity diagrams, and interrelationship digraphs, as a methodology for planning programs of instruction such as TAP; and team activities to construct instructional process systems.

  7. Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts applied to instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    Drawing on DOE Order 5700.6C and other industry standards, this document presents several concepts and tools of Total Quality Management (TQM), a brief history of their use at EG&G Rocky Flats, and how they are being applied to address processes of instruction common to TAP. Concepts presented and applied include: statistical process control (SPC), e.g. using control charts, as an evaluation methodology for learners and instructors; TQM conceptual tools, e.g. brainstorming, affinity diagrams, and interrelationship digraphs, as a methodology for planning programs of instruction such as TAP; and team activities to construct instructional process systems.

  8. [TDAE strategy applied to drug-candidate synthesis].

    PubMed

    Terme, T; Vanelle, P

    2008-03-01

    Research, developed at the Laboratory of Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry of the School of Pharmacy, UMR-CNRS 6517, is centred on the synthesis of novel therapeutic compounds using monoelectronic transfer reactions. Tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE) is a powerful electron donor which has the specific property of activating the carbon-halogen bond leading to the formation of a stable electrophilic radical and a stable neutrophilic anion. Since 2002, our team has developed a program using monoelectronic transfer reactions initiated by TDAE of nitroaromatic, nitroheterocyclic and quinonic bioreducible alkylating agents. The goal is to synthesize new therapeutic compounds for use as anti-infectious agents, anticancer agents, and agents active on the central nervous system. In this context, we present the first pharmacochemical tools obtained with this strategy during reactions between diverse electrophilic compounds (aldehydes, ketones, alpha-keto-esters, ketomalonates, alpha-ketolactames, ...) and benzylic anions formed in situ by the action of TDAE. We illustrate the usefulness of this strategy by describing the preparation of new compounds of biological interest and the associated pharmacomodulation work.

  9. Medication management strategies used by older adults with heart failure: A systems-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Robin S; Holden, Richard J

    2017-09-01

    Older adults with heart failure use strategies to cope with the constraining barriers impeding medication management. Strategies are behavioral adaptations that allow goal achievement despite these constraining conditions. When strategies do not exist, are ineffective or maladaptive, medication performance and health outcomes are at risk. While constraints to medication adherence are described in literature, strategies used by patients to manage medications are less well-described or understood. Guided by cognitive engineering concepts, the aim of this study was to describe and analyze the strategies used by older adults with heart failure to achieve their medication management goals. This mixed methods study employed an empirical strategies analysis method to elicit medication management strategies used by older adults with heart failure. Observation and interview data collected from 61 older adults with heart failure and 31 caregivers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to derive categories, patterns and themes within and across cases. Data derived thematic sub-categories described planned and ad hoc methods of strategic adaptations. Stable strategies proactively adjusted the medication management process, environment, or the patients themselves. Patients applied situational strategies (planned or ad hoc) to irregular or unexpected situations. Medication non-adherence was a strategy employed when life goals conflicted with medication adherence. The health system was a source of constraints without providing commensurate strategies. Patients strived to control their medication system and achieve goals using adaptive strategies. Future patient self-mangement research can benefit from methods and theories used to study professional work, such as strategies analysis.

  10. Data management and processing plan, Department of Applied Geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This plan outlines Data Management and Data Processing requirements of the Department of Applied Geodesy (DAG) and presents the plan to meet these requirements (These requirements are derived from the functional needs of the Department to meet the SSCL alignment tolerances and schedules). In addition, this document presents a schedule for the implementation of this plan. This document is an integral part of the Alignment Plan of the SSCL.

  11. Applying computer simulation models as learning tools in fishery management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Computer models can be powerful tools for addressing many problems in fishery management, but uncertainty about how to apply models and how they should perform can lead to a cautious approach to modeling. Within this approach, we expect models to make quantitative predictions but only after all model inputs have been estimated from empirical data and after the model has been tested for agreement with an independent data set. I review the limitations to this approach and show how models can be more useful as tools for organizing data and concepts, learning about the system to be managed, and exploring management options. Fishery management requires deciding what actions to pursue to meet management objectives. Models do not make decisions for us but can provide valuable input to the decision-making process. When empirical data are lacking, preliminary modeling with parameters derived from other sources can help determine priorities for data collection. When evaluating models for management applications, we should attempt to define the conditions under which the model is a useful, analytical tool (its domain of applicability) and should focus on the decisions made using modeling results, rather than on quantitative model predictions. I describe an example of modeling used as a learning tool for the yellow perch Perca flavescens fishery in Green Bay, Lake Michigan.

  12. Applying the concepts of innovation strategies to plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yirong; Kotsis, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C

    2013-08-01

    Plastic surgery has a well-known history of innovative procedures and products. However, with the rise in competition, such as aesthetic procedures being performed by other medical specialties, there is a need for continued innovation in plastic surgery to create novel treatments to advance this specialty. Although many articles introduce innovative technologies and procedures, there is a paucity of publications to highlight the application of principles of innovation in plastic surgery. The authors review the literature regarding business strategies for innovation. The authors evaluate concepts of innovation, process of innovation (i.e., idea generation, idea evaluation, idea conversion, idea diffusion, and adoption), ethical issues, and application to plastic surgery. Adopting a business model of innovation is helpful for promoting a new paradigm of progress to propel plastic surgery to new avenues of creativity.

  13. Health plans' strategies for managing outpatient specialty pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C Daniel; Lavallee, Danielle Chauncey; Pradel, Françoise G; DeVries, Andrea R; Caputo, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Balancing increased spending for specialty pharmaceuticals while providing affordable and equitable coverage for consumers is a key issue for public and private payers. Health plans rely on an array of strategies, including both medical management and those used for more traditional pharmaceuticals. To explore specific management strategies for outpatient specialty pharmaceuticals, a survey was administered to thirty-eight Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, focused on identifying core strategies. Prior authorization was the most commonly used strategy, implemented by 83.3 percent of respondents. Other frequently implemented management strategies included claims review (82.8 percent), formulary management (76.7 percent), and utilization review (70 percent).

  14. An environmental analysis for comparing waste management options and strategies.

    PubMed

    Marchettini, N; Ridolfi, R; Rustici, M

    2007-01-01

    The debate on different waste management practices has become an issue of utmost importance as human activities have overloaded the assimilative capacity of the biosphere. Recent Italian law on solid waste management recommends an increase in material recycling and energy recovery, and only foresees landfill disposal for inert materials and residues from recovery and recycling. A correct waste management policy should be based on the principles of sustainable development, according to which our refuse is not simply regarded as something to eliminate but rather as a potential resource. This requires the creation of an integrated waste management plan that makes full use of all available technologies. In this context, eMergy analysis is applied to evaluate three different forms of waste treatment and construct an approach capable of assessing the whole strategy of waste management. The evaluation included how much investment is needed for each type of waste management and how much "utility" is extracted from wastes, through the use of two indicators: Environmental yield ratio (EYR) and Net eMergy. Our results show that landfill is the worst system in terms of eMergy costs and eMergy benefits. Composting is the most efficient system in recovering eMergy (highest EYR) from municipal solid waste (MSW) while incineration is capable of saving the greatest quantity of eMergy per gram of MSW (highest net eMergy). This analysis has made it possible to assess the sustainability and the efficiency of individual options but could also be used to assess a greater environmental strategy for waste management, considering a system that might include landfills, incineration, composting, etc.

  15. Apply TQM to E-Government Outsourcing Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, Jinmei

    This paper developed an approach to e-government outsourcing quality management. E-government initiatives have rapidly increased in the last decades and the success of these activities will largely depend on their operation quality. As an instrument to improve operation quality, outsourcing can be applied to e-government. This paper inspected process of e-government outsourcing and discussed how to improve the outsourcing performance through total quality management (TQM). The characteristics and special requirements of e-government outsourcing were analyzed as the basis for discussion. Then the principles and application of total quality management were interpreted. Finally the process of improving performance of e-government was analyzed in the context of outsourcing.

  16. Applying total quality management techniques to improve software development.

    PubMed

    Mezher, T; Assem Abdul Malak, M; el-Medawar, H

    1998-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a new management philosophy and a set of guiding principles that represent the basis of a continuously improving organization. This paper sheds light on the application of TQM concepts for software development. A fieldwork study was conducted on a Lebanese software development firm and its customers to determine the major problems affecting the organization's operation and to assess the level of adoption of TQM concepts. Detailed questionnaires were prepared and handed out to the firm's managers, programmers, and customers. The results of the study indicate many deficiencies in applying TQM concepts, especially in the areas of planning, defining customer requirements, teamwork, relationship with suppliers, and adopting standards and performance measures. One of the major consequences of these deficiencies is considerably increased programming errors and delays in delivery. Recommendations on achieving quality are discussed.

  17. Applying evolutionary concepts to wildlife disease ecology and management

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Eric; Garant, Dany; Calmé, Sophie; Chapman, Colin A; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Millien, Virginie; Rioux-Paquette, Sébastien; Pelletier, Fanie

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging infectious diseases are among the most pressing global threats to biodiversity, food safety and human health. The complex interplay between host, pathogen and environment creates a challenge for conserving species, communities and ecosystem functions, while mediating the many known ecological and socio-economic negative effects of disease. Despite the clear ecological and evolutionary contexts of host–pathogen dynamics, approaches to managing wildlife disease remain predominantly reactionary, focusing on surveillance and some attempts at eradication. A few exceptional studies have heeded recent calls for better integration of ecological concepts in the study and management of wildlife disease; however, evolutionary concepts remain underused. Applied evolution consists of four principles: evolutionary history, genetic and phenotypic variation, selection and eco-evolutionary dynamics. In this article, we first update a classical framework for understanding wildlife disease to integrate better these principles. Within this framework, we explore the evolutionary implications of environment–disease interactions. Subsequently, we synthesize areas where applied evolution can be employed in wildlife disease management. Finally, we discuss some future directions and challenges. Here, we underscore that despite some evolutionary principles currently playing an important role in our understanding of disease in wild animals, considerable opportunities remain for fostering the practice of evolutionarily enlightened wildlife disease management. PMID:25469163

  18. Applying evolutionary concepts to wildlife disease ecology and management.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Eric; Garant, Dany; Calmé, Sophie; Chapman, Colin A; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Millien, Virginie; Rioux-Paquette, Sébastien; Pelletier, Fanie

    2014-08-01

    Existing and emerging infectious diseases are among the most pressing global threats to biodiversity, food safety and human health. The complex interplay between host, pathogen and environment creates a challenge for conserving species, communities and ecosystem functions, while mediating the many known ecological and socio-economic negative effects of disease. Despite the clear ecological and evolutionary contexts of host-pathogen dynamics, approaches to managing wildlife disease remain predominantly reactionary, focusing on surveillance and some attempts at eradication. A few exceptional studies have heeded recent calls for better integration of ecological concepts in the study and management of wildlife disease; however, evolutionary concepts remain underused. Applied evolution consists of four principles: evolutionary history, genetic and phenotypic variation, selection and eco-evolutionary dynamics. In this article, we first update a classical framework for understanding wildlife disease to integrate better these principles. Within this framework, we explore the evolutionary implications of environment-disease interactions. Subsequently, we synthesize areas where applied evolution can be employed in wildlife disease management. Finally, we discuss some future directions and challenges. Here, we underscore that despite some evolutionary principles currently playing an important role in our understanding of disease in wild animals, considerable opportunities remain for fostering the practice of evolutionarily enlightened wildlife disease management.

  19. Risk Preferences, Probability Weighting, and Strategy Tradeoffs in Wildfire Management.

    PubMed

    Hand, Michael S; Wibbenmeyer, Matthew J; Calkin, David E; Thompson, Matthew P

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires present a complex applied risk management environment, but relatively little attention has been paid to behavioral and cognitive responses to risk among public agency wildfire managers. This study investigates responses to risk, including probability weighting and risk aversion, in a wildfire management context using a survey-based experiment administered to federal wildfire managers. Respondents were presented with a multiattribute lottery-choice experiment where each lottery is defined by three outcome attributes: expenditures for fire suppression, damage to private property, and exposure of firefighters to the risk of aviation-related fatalities. Respondents choose one of two strategies, each of which includes "good" (low cost/low damage) and "bad" (high cost/high damage) outcomes that occur with varying probabilities. The choice task also incorporates an information framing experiment to test whether information about fatality risk to firefighters alters managers' responses to risk. Results suggest that managers exhibit risk aversion and nonlinear probability weighting, which can result in choices that do not minimize expected expenditures, property damage, or firefighter exposure. Information framing tends to result in choices that reduce the risk of aviation fatalities, but exacerbates nonlinear probability weighting. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Relationship-Driven Classroom Management: Strategies That Promote Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitto, John M.

    This book combines information about resiliency, classroom management, and discipline into a user-friendly discussion suitable for all teachers. The material covers both preventive strategies and reactive strategies. The chapters of part 1, "Reinventive Strategies," are: (1) "Relationship-Driven Classroom Management and Resilience"; (2)…

  1. Relationship-Driven Classroom Management: Strategies That Promote Student Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitto, John M.

    This book combines information about resiliency, classroom management, and discipline into a user-friendly discussion suitable for all teachers. The material covers both preventive strategies and reactive strategies. The chapters of part 1, "Reinventive Strategies," are: (1) "Relationship-Driven Classroom Management and Resilience"; (2)…

  2. Effectiveness of alternative management strategies in meeting conservation objectives

    Treesearch

    Richards S. Holthausen; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2007-01-01

    This chapter evaluates how well various management strategies meet a variety of conservation objectives, summarizes their effectiveness in meeting objectives for rare or little-known (RLK) species, and proposes ways to combine strategies to meet overall conservation objectives. We address two broad categories of management strategies. Species approaches result in...

  3. The DEVELOP National Program's Strategy for Communicating Applied Science Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Crepps, G.; Favors, J.; Kelley, C.; Miller, T. N.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Rogers, L.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's DEVELOP National Program conducts rapid feasibility projects that enable the future workforce and current decision makers to collaborate and build capacity to use Earth science data to enhance environmental management and policy. The program communicates its results and applications to a broad spectrum of audiences through a variety of methods: "virtual poster sessions" that engage the general public through short project videos and interactive dialogue periods, a "Campus Ambassador Corps" that communicates about the program and its projects to academia, scientific and policy conference presentations, community engagement activities and end-of-project presentations, project "hand-offs" providing results and tools to project partners, traditional publications (both gray literature and peer-reviewed), an interactive website project gallery, targeted brochures, and through multiple social media venues and campaigns. This presentation will describe the various methods employed by DEVELOP to communicate the program's scientific outputs, target audiences, general statistics, community response and best practices.

  4. National launch strategy vehicle data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, David

    1990-01-01

    The national launch strategy vehicle data management system (NLS/VDMS) was developed as part of the 1990 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The system was developed under the guidance of the Engineering Systems Branch of the Information Systems Office, and is intended for use within the Program Development Branch PD34. The NLS/VDMS is an on-line database system that permits the tracking of various launch vehicle configurations within the program development office. The system is designed to permit the definition of new launch vehicles, as well as the ability to display and edit existing launch vehicles. Vehicles can be grouped in logical architectures within the system. Reports generated from this package include vehicle data sheets, architecture data sheets, and vehicle flight rate reports. The topics covered include: (1) system overview; (2) initial system development; (3) supercard hypermedia authoring system; (4) the ORACLE database; and (5) system evaluation.

  5. Comparing the refuge strategy for managing the evolution of insect resistance under different reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Crowder, David W; Carrière, Yves

    2009-12-07

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are used extensively worldwide to control diploid agricultural insect pests that reproduce sexually. However, future GM crops will likely soon target haplodiploid and parthenogenetic insects. As rapid pest adaptation could compromise these novel crops, strategies to manage resistance in haplodiploid and parthenogenetic pests are urgently needed. Here, we developed models to characterize factors that could delay or prevent the evolution of resistance to GM crops in diploid, haplodiploid, and parthenogenetic insect pests. The standard strategy for managing resistance in diploid pests relies on refuges of non-GM host plants and GM crops that produce high toxin concentrations. Although the tenets of the standard refuge strategy apply to all pests, this strategy does not greatly delay the evolution of resistance in haplodiploid or parthenogenetic pests. Two additional factors are needed to effectively delay or prevent the evolution of resistance in such pests, large recessive or smaller non-recessive fitness costs must reduce the fitness of resistance individuals in refuges (and ideally also on GM crops), and resistant individuals must have lower fitness on GM compared to non-GM crops (incomplete resistance). Recent research indicates that the magnitude and dominance of fitness costs could be increased by using specific host-plants, natural enemies, or pathogens. Furthermore, incomplete resistance could be enhanced by engineering desirable traits into novel GM crops. Thus, the sustainability of GM crops that target haplodiploid or parthenogenetic pests will require careful consideration of the effects of reproductive mode, fitness costs, and incomplete resistance.

  6. Preparing Future Leaders: Project Management Strategies for Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger; Gutowski, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This article makes a case for teaching project management strategies in service-learning courses. The authors describe three specific documents students can create to help them manage a service-learning project and then present strategies that can help students manage their project teams. Such skills, the authors argue, provide the tools students…

  7. Preparing Future Leaders: Project Management Strategies for Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger; Gutowski, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This article makes a case for teaching project management strategies in service-learning courses. The authors describe three specific documents students can create to help them manage a service-learning project and then present strategies that can help students manage their project teams. Such skills, the authors argue, provide the tools students…

  8. Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Effective Behavior Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nields, Allison N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student teachers' perceptions and knowledge of behavior management strategies. A questionnaire that included questions about broad behavior management techniques, behavioral learning theory, and behavior management strategies related to behavioral learning theory was given to sixty-one student teacher candidates at a large…

  9. Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Effective Behavior Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nields, Allison N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student teachers' perceptions and knowledge of behavior management strategies. A questionnaire that included questions about broad behavior management techniques, behavioral learning theory, and behavior management strategies related to behavioral learning theory was given to sixty-one student teacher candidates at a large…

  10. Applying Telecoupling Framework for Urban Water Sustainability Research and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Hyndman, D. W.; Winkler, J. A.; Viña, A.; Deines, J.; Lupi, F.; Luo, L.; Li, Y.; Basso, B.; Zheng, C.; Ma, D.; Li, S.; Liu, X.; Zheng, H.; Cao, G.; Meng, Q.; Ouyang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Urban areas, especially megacities (those with populations greater than 10 million), are hotspots of global water use and thus face intense water management challenges. Urban areas are influenced by local interactions between human and natural systems and also interact with distant systems through flows of water, food, energy, people, information, and capital. However, analyses of water sustainability and the management of water flows in urban areas are often fragmented. There is a strong need for applying integrated frameworks to systematically analyze urban water dynamics and factors influencing these dynamics. Here, we apply the framework of telecoupling (socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances) to analyze urban water issues, using Beijing as a demonstration city. Beijing exemplifies the global water sustainability challenge for urban settings. Like many other cities, Beijing has experienced drastic reductions in quantity and quality of both surface water and groundwater over the past several decades; it relies on the import of real and virtual water from sending systems to meet its demand for clean water, and releases polluted water to other systems (spillover systems). The integrated framework presented here demonstrates the importance of considering socioeconomic and environmental interactions across telecoupled human and natural systems, which include not only Beijing (the water receiving system), but also water sending systems and spillover systems. This framework helps integrate important components of local and distant human-nature interactions and incorporates a wide range of local couplings and telecouplings that affect water dynamics, which in turn generate significant socioeconomic and environmental consequences including feedback effects. The application of the framework to Beijing reveals many research gaps and management needs. This study also provides a foundation to apply the telecoupling framework to better understand and

  11. Strategies for Management of Colorectal Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Mauricio Simões; Borrelli, Giuliano Moysés; Clarizia, Roberto; Kho, Rosanne Marie; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis has clearly three distinct clinical presentations and deep endometriosis, especially compromising the rectosigmoid is probably the most concerning one for both patients and surgeons. Currently, with the available tools, it is mandatory to have a precise diagnostic of this type of disease prior to indication of treatment. Strategies to manage this form of endometriosis will take into account several involved aspects, such as age of the patient, reproductive desire or infertility, clinical symptoms, as well as the extension and localization of the disease. Treatment could vary from more conservative to more radical depending on those aspects. As we pointed out in this article, the key to manage colorectal endometriosis is to start with a good diagnosis. Knowing exactly what is the extension and localization of the disease and knowing the patient's wishes as well as the clinical complaints, surgeons are able to define the best option for each patient. Critical points should always be discussed; for example, patients chosen to have clinical treatment should be aware of important issues regarding the follow-up, while patients undergoing surgery must be advised about all surgical possibilities and related complications.

  12. Localization Strategies in WSNs as applied to Landslide Monitoring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, A.; Robol, F.; Polo, A.; Giarola, E.; Viani, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the last years, heterogeneous integrated smart systems based on wireless sensor network (WSN) technology have been developed at the ELEDIA Research Center of the University of Trento [1]. One of the key features of WSNs as applied to distributed monitoring is that, while the capabilities of each single sensor node is limited, the implementation of cooperative schemes throughout the whole network enables the solution of even complex tasks, as the landslide monitoring. The capability of localizing targets respect to the position of the sensor nodes turns out to be fundamental in those application fields where relative movements arise. The main properties like the target typology, the movement characteristics, and the required localization resolution are different changing the reference scenario. However, the common key issue is still the localization of moving targets within the area covered by the sensor network. Many experiences were preparatory for the challenging activities in the field of landslide monitoring where the basic idea is mostly that of detecting slight soil movements. Among them, some examples of WSN-based systems experimentally applied to the localization of people [2] and wildlife [3] have been proposed. More recently, the WSN backbone as well as the investigated sensing technologies have been customized for monitoring superficial movements of the soil. The relative positions of wireless sensor nodes deployed where high probability of landslide exists is carefully monitored to forecast dangerous events. Multiple sensors like ultrasound, laser, high precision GPS, for the precise measurement of relative distances between the nodes of the network and the absolute positions respect to reference targets have been integrated in a prototype system. The millimeter accuracy in the position estimation enables the detection of small soil modifications and to infer the superficial evolution profile of the landslide. This information locally acquired also

  13. The guild concept applied to management of bird populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verner, Jared

    1984-01-01

    Alternative ways to apply the guild concept to wildlife management are evaluated here. I reject the idea that indicator species can be selected for each bird guild to reduce costs of environmental assessment and monitoring. Promise is seen, however, in the option of using whole guilds to indicate the capability of habitat zones to support populations of wildlife species. It may be adequate for most management purposes to delineate guilds only for species that use an environment for breeding, because transients and winter residents probably use the same zones of the habitat in the same ways. Potential guilds are identified by cells of a two-dimensional matrix, the axes identifying primary feeding and nesting zones. Some questions may be answered with guilds as delineated by all cells in the matrix. Alternatively, larger guilds can be formed by grouping all species in each column or row of the matrix to identify, for example, all species that depend on tree canopies for foraging, or tree boles for nesting. One can also consider separately the resident breeders, migrant breeders, and winter residents to obtain insights into whether observed changes in numbers of birds in a guild are a result of conditions locally or elsewhere. I conclude that the guild concept probably has a place in wildlife management, but much testing must be done before it is widely applied.

  14. Improving Recall Using Database Management Systems: A Learning Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of microcomputer database management systems to facilitate the instructional uses of learning strategies relating to information processing skills, especially recall. Two learning strategies, cross-classification matrixing and node acquisition and integration, are highlighted. (Author/LRW)

  15. A strategy to apply quantitative epistasis analysis on developmental traits.

    PubMed

    Labocha, Marta K; Yuan, Wang; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Zhong, Weiwei

    2017-05-15

    Genetic interactions are keys to understand complex traits and evolution. Epistasis analysis is an effective method to map genetic interactions. Large-scale quantitative epistasis analysis has been well established for single cells. However, there is a substantial lack of such studies in multicellular organisms and their complex phenotypes such as development. Here we present a method to extend quantitative epistasis analysis to developmental traits. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we applied RNA interference on mutants to inactivate two genes, used an imaging system to quantitatively measure phenotypes, and developed a set of statistical methods to extract genetic interactions from phenotypic measurement. Using two different C. elegans developmental phenotypes, body length and sex ratio, as examples, we showed that this method could accommodate various metazoan phenotypes with performances comparable to those methods in single cell growth studies. Comparing with qualitative observations, this method of quantitative epistasis enabled detection of new interactions involving subtle phenotypes. For example, several sex-ratio genes were found to interact with brc-1 and brd-1, the orthologs of the human breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BARD1, respectively. We confirmed the brc-1 interactions with the following genes in DNA damage response: C34F6.1, him-3 (ortholog of HORMAD1, HORMAD2), sdc-1, and set-2 (ortholog of SETD1A, SETD1B, KMT2C, KMT2D), validating the effectiveness of our method in detecting genetic interactions. We developed a reliable, high-throughput method for quantitative epistasis analysis of developmental phenotypes.

  16. Applying total quality management to the North American construction industry

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, R.A.; Kiani, H.

    1995-03-01

    The theory of {open_quotes}if the customer is happy, your business will prosper,{close_quotes} has been around for a long time. It has been applied with a large measure of success to many diverse organizations. This theory has come to be known as total quality management (TQM) and has been credited with turning around some national economies. This may or may not be correct, but there is no doubt that TQM can be very useful when applied properly. There is a great concern among construction professional, researchers, and professional societies about the overall direction of the North American construction industry with respect to its unwillingness or inability to change. Its deficiencies range from planning and design through to project completion. The North American construction industry could be left behind in the global marketplace unless the industry as a whole changes some fundamental aspects. The following is a study of the effectiveness of some TQM principles when applied to a rough framing subcontractor from using traditional construction management principles through the implementation of certain TQM principles. This evolution of the basic methods of doing business demonstrates the effectiveness of TQM. 5 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. A comparative risk assessment framework for wildland fire management: the 2010 cohesive strategy science report

    Treesearch

    David E. Calkin; Alan A. Ager; Matthew P. Thompson; Mark A. Finney; Danny C. Lee; Thomas M. Quigley; Charles W. McHugh; Karin L. Riley; Julie M. Gilbertson-Day

    2011-01-01

    The FLAME Act of 2009 requires the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and the U.S. Department of Interior to submit to Congress a Cohesive Wildfire Management Strategy. In this report, we explore the general science available for a risk-based approach to fire and fuels management and suggest analyses that may be applied at multiple scales to inform...

  18. Best practices: applying management analysis of excellence to immunization.

    PubMed

    Wishner, Amy; Aronson, Jerold; Kohrt, Alan; Norton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The authors applied business management tools to analyze and promote excellence and to evaluate differences between average and above-average immunization peformers in private practices. The authors conducted a pilot study of 10 private practices in Pennsylvania using tools common in management to assess practices' organizational climate and managerial style. Authoritative and coaching styles of physician leaders were common to both groups. Managerial styles that emphasized higher levels of clarity and responsibility managerial styles were evident in the large practices; and rewards and flexibility styles were higher in the small above-average practices. The findings of this pilot study match results seen in high performers in other industries. It concludes that the authoritative style appears to have the most impact on performance. It has interesting implications for training/behavior change to improve immunization rates, along with traditional medical interventions.

  19. SUSTAINABLE MSW MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under increasing pressure to minimize potential environmental burdens and costs for municipal solid waste (MSW) management, state and local governments often must modify programs and adopt more efficient integrated MSW management strategies that reflect dynamic shifts in MSW mana...

  20. Essentials of Advocacy in Case Management: Part 2: Client Advocacy Model and Case Manager's Advocacy Strategies and Competencies.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein M

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a client advocacy model for use by case managers. It delineates necessary competencies for the case manager and shares important strategies for effective client advocacy. All practice settings across the continuum of health and human services and case managers of diverse professional backgrounds. Advocacy is a primary role and necessary competency of professional case managers functioning in various care settings. It is rooted in ethical theory and principles. Successful case managers apply ethical principles of advocacy at every step of the case management process and in the decisions they make. Part II of this two-part article presents a client advocacy model for case managers to apply in their practice, describes the role of advocacy in client engagement, and identifies important strategies and a set of essential competencies for effective case management advocacy. Part I already explored the ethical theories and principles of advocacy, the perception of case management-related professional organizations of advocacy, and the common types of advocacy based on scope, complexity, impact, and reach. Acquiring foundational knowledge, skills, and competencies in what advocacy is and how to effectively enact its related behaviors is essential for success of case managers and for achieving desired outcomes for both the clients and health care agencies/providers alike. Case management leaders are urged to use the knowledge shared in this article to develop advocacy training and competency management programs for their case managers.

  1. Implementing bedside handover: strategies for change management.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Anne; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne; Fetherston, Cathy

    2010-09-01

    To identify factors influencing change in two hospitals that moved from taped and verbal nursing handover to bedside handover. Bedside handover is based on patient-centred care, where patients participate in communicating relevant and timely information for care planning. Patient input reduces care fragmentation, miscommunication-related adverse events, readmissions, duplication of services and enhances satisfaction and continuity of care. Analysing change management was a component of a study aimed at developing a standard operating protocol for bedside handover communication. The research was undertaken in two regional acute care hospitals in two different states of Australia. Data collection included 532 semi-structured observations in six wards in the two hospitals and 34 in-depth interviews conducted with a purposive sample of nursing staff involved in the handovers. Observation and interview data were analysed separately then combined to generate thematic analysis of factors influencing the change process in the transition to bedside handover. Themes included embedding the change as part of the big picture, the need to link the project to standardisation initiatives, providing reassurance on safety and quality, smoothing out logistical difficulties and learning to listen. We conclude that change is more likely to be successful when it is part of a broader initiative such as a quality improvement strategy. Nurses are generally supportive of quality improvement initiatives, particularly those aimed at standardising care. For successful implementation, change managers should be mindful of clinicians' attitudes, motivation and concerns and their need for reassurance when changing their practice. This is particularly important when change is dramatic, as in moving from verbal handover, conducted in the safety of the nursing office, to bedside handover where there is greater transparency and accountability for the accuracy and appropriateness of communication

  2. Evolutionary space station fluids management strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results are summarized for an 11-month study to define fluid storage and handling strategies and requirements for various specific mission case studies and their associated design impacts on the Space Station. There are a variety of fluid users which require a variety of fluids and use rates. Also, the cryogenic propellants required for NASA's STV, Planetary, and Code Z missions are enormous. The storage methods must accommodate fluids ranging from a high pressure gas or supercritical state fluid to a sub-cooled liquid (and superfluid helium). These requirements begin in the year 1994, reach a maximum of nearly 1800 metric tons in the year 2004, and trail off to the year 2018, as currently planned. It is conceivable that the cryogenic propellant needs for the STV and/or Lunar mission models will be met by LTCSF LH2/LO2 tanksets attached to the SS truss structure. Concepts and corresponding transfer and delivery operations have been presented for STV propellant provisioning from the SS. A growth orbit maneuvering vehicle (OMV) and associated servicing capability will be required to move tanksets from delivery launch vehicles to the SS or co-orbiting platforms. Also, appropriate changes to the software used for OMV operation are necessary to allow for the combined operation of the growth OMV. To support fluid management activities at the Space Station for the experimental payloads and propellant provisioning, there must be truss structure space allocated for fluid carriers and propellant tanksets, and substantial beam strengthening may be required. The Station must have two Mobile Remote Manipulator Systems (MRMS) and the growth OMV propellant handling operations for the STV at the SS. Propellant needs for the Planetary Initiatives and Code Z mission models will most likely be provided by co-orbiting propellant platform(s). Space Station impacts for Code Z mission fluid management activities will be minimal.

  3. DETERMINANTS OF NETWORK OUTCOMES: THE IMPACT OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    YSA, TAMYKO; SIERRA, VICENTA; ESTEVE, MARC

    2014-01-01

    The literature on network management is extensive. However, it generally explores network structures, neglecting the impact of management strategies. In this article we assess the effect of management strategies on network outcomes, providing empirical evidence from 119 urban revitalization networks. We go beyond current work by testing a path model for the determinants of network outcomes and considering the interactions between the constructs: management strategies, trust, complexity, and facilitative leadership. Our results suggest that management strategies have a strong effect on network outcomes and that they enhance the level of trust. We also found that facilitative leadership has a positive impact on network management as well as on trust in the network. Our findings also show that complexity has a negative impact on trust. A key finding of our research is that managers may wield more influence on network dynamics than previously theorized. PMID:25520529

  4. Applying Lean Six Sigma to improve medication management.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Preethy; Ojha, Diptee; Fetrick, Ann; Nguyen, Anh T

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of veterans use dual care or health care services within and outside the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). In this study conducted at a VHA medical center in the USA, the authors used Lean Six Sigma principles to develop recommendations to eliminate wasteful processes and implement a more efficient and effective process to manage medications for dual care veteran patients. The purpose of this study is to: assess compliance with the VHA's dual care policy; collect data and describe the current process for co-management of dual care veterans' medications; and draft recommendations to improve the current process for dual care medications co-management. Input was obtained from the VHA patient care team members to draw a process map to describe the current process for filling a non-VHA prescription at a VHA facility. Data were collected through surveys and direct observation to measure the current process and to develop recommendations to redesign and improve the process. A key bottleneck in the process that was identified was the receipt of the non-VHA medical record which resulted in delays in filling prescriptions. The recommendations of this project focus on the four domains of: documentation of dual care; veteran education; process redesign; and outreach to community providers. This case study describes the application of Lean Six Sigma principles in one urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in the Mid-Western USA to solve a specific organizational quality problem. Therefore, the findings may not be generalizable to other organizations. The Lean Six Sigma general principles applied in this project to develop recommendations to improve medication management for dual care veterans are applicable to any process improvement or redesign project and has valuable lessons for other VAMCs seeking to improve care for their dual care veteran patients. The findings of this project will be of value to VA providers and policy makers and health

  5. Intervention strategies for the management of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1993-01-01

    This report examines the management of human error in the cockpit. The principles probably apply as well to other applications in the aviation realm (e.g. air traffic control, dispatch, weather, etc.) as well as other high-risk systems outside of aviation (e.g. shipping, high-technology medical procedures, military operations, nuclear power production). Management of human error is distinguished from error prevention. It is a more encompassing term, which includes not only the prevention of error, but also a means of disallowing an error, once made, from adversely affecting system output. Such techniques include: traditional human factors engineering, improvement of feedback and feedforward of information from system to crew, 'error-evident' displays which make erroneous input more obvious to the crew, trapping of errors within a system, goal-sharing between humans and machines (also called 'intent-driven' systems), paperwork management, and behaviorally based approaches, including procedures, standardization, checklist design, training, cockpit resource management, etc. Fifteen guidelines for the design and implementation of intervention strategies are included.

  6. Applying math onto mechanisms: mechanistic knowledge is associated with the use of formal mathematical strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Allison S; Schunn, Christian D

    2017-01-01

    It is notoriously difficult for people to adaptively apply formal mathematical strategies learned in school to real-world contexts, even when they possess the required mathematical skills. The current study explores whether a problem context's mechanism can act as an "embodied analogy" onto which abstract mathematical concepts can be applied, leading to more frequent use of formal mathematical strategies. Participants were asked to program a robot to navigate a maze and to create a navigation strategy that would work for differently sized robots. We compared the strategy complexity of participants with high levels of mechanistic knowledge about the robot against participants with low levels of mechanistic knowledge about the robot. Mechanistic knowledge was significantly associated with the frequency and complexity of the mathematical strategies used by participants, suggesting that learning to recognize a problem context's mechanism may promote independent mathematical problem solving in applied contexts.

  7. Strategies for sustainable management of renewable resources during environmental change.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Emilie; Ekeberg, Örjan; Norberg, Jon

    2017-03-15

    As a consequence of global environmental change, management strategies that can deal with unexpected change in resource dynamics are becoming increasingly important. In this paper we undertake a novel approach to studying resource growth problems using a computational form of adaptive management to find optimal strategies for prevalent natural resource management dilemmas. We scrutinize adaptive management, or learning-by-doing, to better understand how to simultaneously manage and learn about a system when its dynamics are unknown. We study important trade-offs in decision-making with respect to choosing optimal actions (harvest efforts) for sustainable management during change. This is operationalized through an artificially intelligent model where we analyze how different trends and fluctuations in growth rates of a renewable resource affect the performance of different management strategies. Our results show that the optimal strategy for managing resources with declining growth is capable of managing resources with fluctuating or increasing growth at a negligible cost, creating in a management strategy that is both efficient and robust towards future unknown changes. To obtain this strategy, adaptive management should strive for: high learning rates to new knowledge, high valuation of future outcomes and modest exploration around what is perceived as the optimal action. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Recreational user attitudes towards management strategies of Allegany State Park

    Treesearch

    Michael Nisengard; Miklos Gratzer

    1998-01-01

    This project examines attitudes towards management strategies of four Allegany State Park recreational user groups: cabin users, recreational vehicle users, tent users, and day users. It investigates recreational user group attitude differences, and attitude change over a ten year time period, in regard to the following park management strategy categories: park...

  9. Development of a Consumable Inventory Management Strategy for the Supply Management Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    efficiently balances readiness with supply chain system-wide costs. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 107 14. SUBJECT TERMS Supply Chain Management , Inventory...management strategy for the SMU by incorporating operations management, business modeling, simulation, supply chain management , and logistics...management, supply chain management , and logistics engineering concepts. Next, the project group used the information gathered from these sources to

  10. Investigation of energy management strategies for photovoltaic systems - An analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cull, R. C.; Eltimsahy, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in formulating energy management strategies for stand-alone PV systems, developing an analytical tool that can be used to investigate these strategies, applying this tool to determine the proper control algorithms and control variables (controller inputs and outputs) for a range of applications, and quantifying the relative performance and economics when compared to systems that do not apply energy management. The analysis technique developed may be broadly applied to a variety of systems to determine the most appropriate energy management strategies, control variables and algorithms. The only inputs required are statistical distributions for stochastic energy inputs and outputs of the system and the system's device characteristics (efficiency and ratings). Although the formulation was originally driven by stand-alone PV system needs, the techniques are also applicable to hybrid and grid connected systems.

  11. Investigation of energy management strategies for photovoltaic systems - An analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cull, R. C.; Eltimsahy, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in formulating energy management strategies for stand-alone PV systems, developing an analytical tool that can be used to investigate these strategies, applying this tool to determine the proper control algorithms and control variables (controller inputs and outputs) for a range of applications, and quantifying the relative performance and economics when compared to systems that do not apply energy management. The analysis technique developed may be broadly applied to a variety of systems to determine the most appropriate energy management strategies, control variables and algorithms. The only inputs required are statistical distributions for stochastic energy inputs and outputs of the system and the system's device characteristics (efficiency and ratings). Although the formulation was originally driven by stand-alone PV system needs, the techniques are also applicable to hybrid and grid connected systems.

  12. Strategy Maps in University Management: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shuangmiao; Zhong, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the conceptual use of the strategy map approach and the strategy map which it produces have been adapted from the business sector and introduced as tools for achieving more effective strategic planning and management in higher education institutions (HEIs). This study discusses the development of strategy maps as transformational…

  13. Strategy Maps in University Management: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shuangmiao; Zhong, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the conceptual use of the strategy map approach and the strategy map which it produces have been adapted from the business sector and introduced as tools for achieving more effective strategic planning and management in higher education institutions (HEIs). This study discusses the development of strategy maps as transformational…

  14. Biodiversity informatics: managing and applying primary biodiversity data.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Jorge; Peterson, A Townsend

    2004-04-29

    Recently, advances in information technology and an increased willingness to share primary biodiversity data are enabling unprecedented access to it. By combining presences of species data with electronic cartography via a number of algorithms, estimating niches of species and their areas of distribution becomes feasible at resolutions one to three orders of magnitude higher than it was possible a few years ago. Some examples of the power of that technique are presented. For the method to work, limitations such as lack of high-quality taxonomic determination, precise georeferencing of the data and availability of high-quality and updated taxonomic treatments of the groups must be overcome. These are discussed, together with comments on the potential of these biodiversity informatics techniques not only for fundamental studies but also as a way for developing countries to apply state of the art bioinformatic methods and large quantities of data, in practical ways, to tackle issues of biodiversity management.

  15. Applied engineering fundamentals: The transition from novice to engineering manager

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, M.N.; Tomchin, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of Applied Engineering Fundamentals, a course designed for newly graduated engineers and scientists serving as technical interns within the US Department of Energy (DOE). As specialists with varying undergraduate and graduate degrees, interns need further training to prepare them for the multidisciplinary environments they will encounter as they become engineering managers. This course is designed to build on individuals strengths in diverse engineering and scientific disciplines, provide instruction in less familiar disciplines, and develop skills in integrating multiple disciplines to solve real-world problems related to nuclear facilities. The course balances systems thinking with state-of-the-art approaches to curriculum development to provide training in technical content and to foster development of professional skills.

  16. Biodiversity informatics: managing and applying primary biodiversity data.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, Jorge; Peterson, A Townsend

    2004-01-01

    Recently, advances in information technology and an increased willingness to share primary biodiversity data are enabling unprecedented access to it. By combining presences of species data with electronic cartography via a number of algorithms, estimating niches of species and their areas of distribution becomes feasible at resolutions one to three orders of magnitude higher than it was possible a few years ago. Some examples of the power of that technique are presented. For the method to work, limitations such as lack of high-quality taxonomic determination, precise georeferencing of the data and availability of high-quality and updated taxonomic treatments of the groups must be overcome. These are discussed, together with comments on the potential of these biodiversity informatics techniques not only for fundamental studies but also as a way for developing countries to apply state of the art bioinformatic methods and large quantities of data, in practical ways, to tackle issues of biodiversity management. PMID:15253354

  17. A value analysis model applied to the management of amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, G R; Bane, M C; Stager, D R; Berry, P M; Wright, W W

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the value of amblyopia-related services by utilizing a health value model (HVM). Cost and quality criteria are evaluated in accordance with the interests of patients, physicians, and purchasers. METHODS: We applied an HVM to a hypothetical statistical ("median") child with amblyopia whose visual acuity is 20/80 and to a group of children with amblyopia who are managed by our practice. We applied the model to calculate the value of these services by evaluating the responses of patients and physicians and relating these responses to clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The consensus value of care for the hypothetical median child was calculated to be 0.406 (of 1.000). For those children managed in our practice, the calculated value is 0.682. Clinically, 79% achieved 20/40 or better visual acuity, and the mean final visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR (20/32). Value appraisals revealed significant concerns about the financial aspects of amblyopia-related services, particularly among physicians. Patients rated services more positively than did physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Amblyopia care is difficult, sustained, and important work that requires substantial sensitivity to and support of children and families. Compliance and early detection are essential to success. The value of amblyopia services is rated significantly higher by patients than by physicians. Relative to the measured value, amblyopia care is undercompensated. The HVM is useful to appraise clinical service delivery and its variation. The costs of failure and the benefits of success are high; high-value amblyopia care yields substantial dividends and should be commensurately compensated in the marketplace. PMID:10703133

  18. Total Quality Management Implementation Strategy: Directorate of Quality Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Directorate of Quality Assurance Total Quality Management Implementation Strategy 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8...that job. DTIC 7: t-I ECTE I SEP29 1989 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES TOM ( Total Quality Management ), Quality Assurance, Continuous Process...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 29d- 102 DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY DIRECTORATE OF QUALITY ASSURANCE 0 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY 0 89 9

  19. Applying total quality management concepts to public health organizations.

    PubMed

    Kaluzny, A D; McLaughlin, C P; Simpson, K

    1992-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a participative, systematic approach to planning and implementing a continuous organizational improvement process. Its approach is focused on satisfying customers' expectations, identifying problems, building commitment, and promoting open decision-making among workers. TQM applies analytical tools, such as flow and statistical charts and check sheets, to gather data about activities within an organization. TQM uses process techniques, such as nominal groups, brainstorming, and consensus forming to facilitate communication and decision making. TQM applications in the public sector and particularly in public health agencies have been limited. The process of integrating TQM into public health agencies complements and enhances the Model Standards Program and assessment methodologies, such as the Assessment Protocol for Excellence in Public Health (APEX-PH), which are mechanisms for establishing strategic directions for public health. The authors examine the potential for using TQM as a method to achieve and exceed standards quickly and efficiently. They discuss the relationship of performance standards and assessment methodologies with TQM and provide guidelines for achieving the full potential of TQM in public health organizations. The guidelines include redefining the role of management, defining a common corporate culture, refining the role of citizen oversight functions, and setting realistic estimates of the time needed to complete a task or project.

  20. Applying evidence-based management to anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Janet

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers how the three principles of evidence based practice (clinical expertise, scientific evidence, and patient preference) can be applied to the complexity of treatment for anorexia nervosa AN. A narrative review of the evidence of these three domains is presented. Clinical cases are used to illustrate how the formulation and management can be put into practice at different stages of illness. The management of anorexia nervosa is complex. First, individuals with the illness do not regard the manifestations of the illness as a source of concern rather they are embraced and integrated into their identity. This contrasts to the reaction of other people who are terrified by the overt signs of ill health. Thus engagement into treatment is problematic. Second, the core symptom restricted eating, produces malnutrition which impacts on brain, body, and the social network. Thus a mixture of psychological and physical problems gradually accumulates over the course of the illness. This means that the treatment targets increase over time. Thus treatment has to work with motivation and readiness to change and tackle the various domains of ill health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Applying total quality management concepts to public health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; McLaughlin, C P; Simpson, K

    1992-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a participative, systematic approach to planning and implementing a continuous organizational improvement process. Its approach is focused on satisfying customers' expectations, identifying problems, building commitment, and promoting open decision-making among workers. TQM applies analytical tools, such as flow and statistical charts and check sheets, to gather data about activities within an organization. TQM uses process techniques, such as nominal groups, brainstorming, and consensus forming to facilitate communication and decision making. TQM applications in the public sector and particularly in public health agencies have been limited. The process of integrating TQM into public health agencies complements and enhances the Model Standards Program and assessment methodologies, such as the Assessment Protocol for Excellence in Public Health (APEX-PH), which are mechanisms for establishing strategic directions for public health. The authors examine the potential for using TQM as a method to achieve and exceed standards quickly and efficiently. They discuss the relationship of performance standards and assessment methodologies with TQM and provide guidelines for achieving the full potential of TQM in public health organizations. The guidelines include redefining the role of management, defining a common corporate culture, refining the role of citizen oversight functions, and setting realistic estimates of the time needed to complete a task or project. PMID:1594734

  2. An Integrated Approach Is Needed for Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management: Insights from Ecosystem-Level Management Strategy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Anthony D. M.; Smith, David C.; Johnson, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    An ecosystem approach is widely seen as a desirable goal for fisheries management but there is little consensus on what strategies or measures are needed to achieve it. Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is a tool that has been widely used to develop and test single species fisheries management strategies and is now being extended to support ecosystem based fisheries management (EBFM). We describe the application of MSE to investigate alternative strategies for achieving EBFM goals for a complex multispecies fishery in southeastern Australia. The study was undertaken as part of a stakeholder driven process to review and improve the ecological, economic and social performance of the fishery. An integrated management strategy, involving combinations of measures including quotas, gear controls and spatial management, performed best against a wide range of objectives and this strategy was subsequently adopted in the fishery, leading to marked improvements in performance. Although particular to one fishery, the conclusion that an integrated package of measures outperforms single focus measures we argue is likely to apply widely in fisheries that aim to achieve EBFM goals. PMID:24454722

  3. An integrated approach is needed for ecosystem based fisheries management: insights from ecosystem-level management strategy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Elizabeth A; Smith, Anthony D M; Smith, David C; Johnson, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    An ecosystem approach is widely seen as a desirable goal for fisheries management but there is little consensus on what strategies or measures are needed to achieve it. Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is a tool that has been widely used to develop and test single species fisheries management strategies and is now being extended to support ecosystem based fisheries management (EBFM). We describe the application of MSE to investigate alternative strategies for achieving EBFM goals for a complex multispecies fishery in southeastern Australia. The study was undertaken as part of a stakeholder driven process to review and improve the ecological, economic and social performance of the fishery. An integrated management strategy, involving combinations of measures including quotas, gear controls and spatial management, performed best against a wide range of objectives and this strategy was subsequently adopted in the fishery, leading to marked improvements in performance. Although particular to one fishery, the conclusion that an integrated package of measures outperforms single focus measures we argue is likely to apply widely in fisheries that aim to achieve EBFM goals.

  4. Developing management strategies for riparian areas.

    Treesearch

    D.E. Hibbs; S. Chan

    2001-01-01

    This talk outlines four principles that are critical to successful management of a riparian area. First, given problems both with defining historic conditions and with returning to them, attaining management goals based on restoration of ecological processes and functions will be far more successful. Second, the management goals for any stream reach must be placed in a...

  5. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  6. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  7. A national cohesive wildland fire management strategy

    Treesearch

    Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture; Office of Wildland Fire Coordination. Department of the Interior

    2011-01-01

    Addressing wildfire is not simply a fire management, fire operations, or wildland-urban interface problem - it is a larger, more complex land management and societal issue. The vision for the next century is to: Safely and effectively extinguish fire, when needed; use fire where allowable; manage our natural resources; and as a Nation, live with wildland fire. Three...

  8. Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies beyond Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytras, Miltiadis, Ed.; Naeve, Ambjorn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, knowledge and learning management have made a significant impact on the IT research community. "Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies Beyond Tools" presents learning and knowledge management from a point of view where the basic tools and applications are provided by open source technologies.…

  9. Survival strategies in the era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, M L; Spirakes, A S

    1996-02-01

    The era of managed care has forced an unprecedented restructuring of the health care environment. As hospitals downsize in response, materiel managers should consider adopting strategies that may help ensure their survival, including innovative approaches to supply management and the development of individual responses that will best position them to succeed in this new reality.

  10. Current Models and Innovative Strategies in Management Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhong-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Current models of management education in China include national training, on-the-job technical training, and the national master's of business administration supervisory committee. Effective strategies being used include teamwork, process skills, action learning, cross-cultural management learning, and competency-based management development. (SK)

  11. Effects of new forest management strategies on squirrel populations.

    Treesearch

    Andrew B. Carey

    2000-01-01

    Two strategies for managing forests for multiple values have achieved prominence in debates in the Pacific Northwest: (1) legacy retention with passive management and long rotations, and (2) intensive management for timber with commercial thinnings and long rotations. Northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), Townsend's chipmunks (

  12. Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies beyond Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytras, Miltiadis, Ed.; Naeve, Ambjorn, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, knowledge and learning management have made a significant impact on the IT research community. "Open Source for Knowledge and Learning Management: Strategies Beyond Tools" presents learning and knowledge management from a point of view where the basic tools and applications are provided by open source technologies.…

  13. Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: Towards an integrated framework.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Please, Patricia M; Driver, Aaron B

    2015-09-15

    Invasive species wreak an estimated $1.4 trillion in damages globally, each year. To have any hope of reducing this damage, best-practice control strategies must incorporate behavior change interventions. Traditional interventions, based on the knowledge-transfer model, assume that if land managers are properly educated about risks and strategies, they will develop supportive attitudes and implement appropriate control strategies. However, the social sciences have produced a large number of behavioral models and frameworks that demonstrate that knowledge transfer, by itself, fails to change behavior. The challenge then lies in knowing which behavioral model to choose, and when, from a potentially overwhelming 'universe'. In this paper, we review nine behavior theories relevant to invasive species management. We then introduce the Behavior Change Wheel as a tool for integrating these theories into a single practical framework. This framework links drivers of and barriers to behavior change with intervention strategies and policies, in what we consider, from an applied perspective, to be an important advance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinicians' strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    PubMed

    Luff, Donna; Martin, Elliott B; Mills, Kelsey; Mazzola, Natalia M; Bell, Sigall K; Meyer, Elaine C

    2016-09-01

    To examine strategies employed by clinicians from different disciplines to manage their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. Self-report questionnaires were collected prior to simulation-based Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) workshops for professionals representing a range of experience and specialties at a tertiary pediatric hospital. In response to an open-ended prompt, clinicians qualitatively described their own strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. 126 respondents reported emotion management strategies. Respondents included physicians (42%), nurses (29%), medical interpreters (16%), psychosocial professionals (9%), and other (4%). Respondents identified 1-4 strategies. Five strategy categories were identified: Self-Care (51%), Preparatory and Relational Skills, (29%), Empathic Presence (28%), Team Approach (26%), and Professional Identity (20%). Across disciplines and experience levels, clinicians have developed strategies to manage their emotions when holding difficult healthcare conversations. These strategies support clinicians before, during and after difficult conversations. Understanding what strategies clinicians already employ to manage their emotions when holding difficult conversations has implications for educational planning and implementation. This study has potential to inform the development of education to support clinicians' awareness of their emotions and to enhance the range and effectiveness of emotion management during difficult healthcare conversations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-Based Classroom Behaviour Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsonson, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews a range of evidence-based strategies for application by teachers to reduce disruptive and challenging behaviours in their classrooms. These include a number of antecedent strategies intended to help minimise the emergence of problematic behaviours and a range of those which provide positive consequences for appropriate student…

  16. Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Shin, Dong Yeong; Ford, Eric W; Yu, Feliciano

    2011-01-01

    : Previous studies have provided theoretical and empirical evidence that environmental forces influence hospital strategy. : Rooted in resource dependence theory and the information uncertainty perspective, this study examined the relationship between environmental market characteristics and hospitals' selection of a health information technology (HIT) management strategy. : A cross-sectional design is used to analyze secondary data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database, and the Area Resource File. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses are used. : Overall, 3,221 hospitals were studied, of which 60.9% pursed a single-vendor HIT management strategy, 28.9% pursued a best-of-suite strategy, and 10.2% used a best-of-breed strategy. Multivariate analyses controlling for hospital characteristics found that measures of environmental factors representing munificence, dynamism, and/or complexity were systematically associated with various hospital HIT management strategy use. Specifically, the number of generalist physicians per capita was positively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = -5.64, p = .10). Hospitals in urban markets were more likely to pursue the best-of-suite strategy (B = 0.622, p < .001). Dynamism, measured as the number of managed care contracts for a given hospital, was negatively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = 0.004, p = .049). Lastly, complexity, measured as market competition, was positively associated with the best-of-breed strategy (B = 0.623, p = .042). : By and large, environmental factors are associated with hospital HIT management strategies in mostly theoretically supported ways. Hospital leaders and policy makers interested in influencing the adoption of hospital HIT should consider how market conditions influence HIT management decisions as part of programs to promote meaningful use.

  17. Hitch-hiking: a parallel heuristic search strategy, applied to the phylogeny problem.

    PubMed

    Charleston, M A

    2001-01-01

    The article introduces a parallel heuristic search strategy ("Hitch-hiking") which can be used in conjunction with other random-walk heuristic search strategies. It is applied to an artificial phylogeny problem, in which character sequences are evolved using pseudo-random numbers from a hypothetical ancestral sequence. The objective function to be minimized is the minimum number of character-state changes required on a binary tree that could account for the sequences observed at the tips (leaves) of the tree -- the Maximum Parsimony criterion. The Hitch-hiking strategy is shown to be useful in that it is robust and that on average the solutions found using the strategy are better than those found without. Also the strategy can dynamically provide information on the characteristics of the landscape of the problem. I argue that Hitch-hiking as a scheme for parallelization of existing heuristic search strategies is of potentially very general use, in many areas of combinatorial optimization.

  18. Applying the payoff time framework to carotid artery disease management.

    PubMed

    Yuo, Theodore H; Roberts, Mark S; Braithwaite, R Scott; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Kraemer, Kevin L

    2013-11-01

    and Asymptomatic stenosis of the carotid arteries is associated with stroke. Carotid revascularization can reduce the future risk of stroke but can also trigger an immediate stroke. The objective was to model the generic relationship between immediate risk, long-term benefit, and life expectancy for any one-time prophylactic treatment and then apply the model to the use of revascularization in the management of asymptomatic carotid disease. In the "payoff time" framework, the possibility of losing quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) because of revascularization failure is conceptualized as an "investment" that is eventually recouped over time, on average. Using this framework, we developed simple mathematical forms that define relationships between the following: perioperative probability of stroke (P); annual stroke rate without revascularization (r0); annual stroke rate after revascularization, conditional on not having suffered perioperative stroke (r1); utility levels assigned to the asymptomatic state (ua) and stroke state (us); and mortality rates (λ). In patients whose life expectancy is below a critical life expectancy (CLE = P/(1-P)r0-r1, the "investment" will never pay off, and revascularization will lead to loss of QALYs, on average. CLE is independent of utilities assigned to the health states if a rank ordering exists in which ua > us. For clinically relevant values (P = 3%, r0 = 1%, r1 = 0.5%), the CLE is approximately 6.4 years, which is longer than published guidelines regarding patient selection for revascularization. In managing asymptomatic carotid disease, the payoff time framework specifies a CLE beneath which patients, on average, will not benefit from revascularization. This formula is suitable for clinical use at the patient's bedside and can account for patient variability, the ability of clinicians who perform revascularization, and the particular revascularization technology that is chosen.

  19. Strategies to address management challenges in larger intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Matlakala, M C; Bezuidenhout, M C; Botha, A D H

    2015-10-01

    To illustrate the need for and suggest strategies that will enhance sustainable management of a large intensive care unit (ICU). The challenges faced by intensive care nursing in South Africa are well documented. However, there appear to be no strategies available to assist nurses to manage large ICUs or for ICU managers to deal with problems as they arise. Data sources to illustrate the need for strategies were challenges described by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A purposive sample of managers was included in individual interviews during compilation of evidence regarding the challenges experienced in the management of large ICUs. The challenges were presented at the Critical Care Society of Southern Africa Congress held on 28 August to 2 September 2012 in Sun City North-West province, South Africa. Five strategies are suggested for the challenges identified: divide the units into sections; develop a highly skilled and effective nursing workforce to ensure delivery of quality nursing care; create a culture to retain an effective ICU nursing team; manage assets; and determine the needs of ICU nurses. ICUs need measures to drive the desired strategies into actions to continuously improve the management of the unit. Future research should be aimed at investigating the effectiveness of the strategies identified. This research highlights issues relating to large ICUs and the strategies will assist ICU managers to deal with problems related to large unit sizes, shortage of trained ICU nurses, use of agency nurses, shortage of equipment and supplies and stressors in the ICU. The article will make a contribution to the body of nursing literature on management of ICUs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Students as Employees: Applying Performance Management Principles in the Management Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Treena L.; Parry, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    The student-as-employee metaphor emphasizes student accountability and participation in learning and provides instructors with work-oriented methods for creating a productive class environment. The authors propose that the tenets of performance management in work organizations can be applied to the classroom. In particular, they focus on three…

  1. Students as Employees: Applying Performance Management Principles in the Management Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Treena L.; Parry, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    The student-as-employee metaphor emphasizes student accountability and participation in learning and provides instructors with work-oriented methods for creating a productive class environment. The authors propose that the tenets of performance management in work organizations can be applied to the classroom. In particular, they focus on three…

  2. AN ADVANCED TOOL FOR APPLIED INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, T. Todd; Hylko, James M.; Douglas, Terence A.

    2003-02-27

    WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Department had previously assessed that a lack of consistency, poor communication and using antiquated communication tools could result in varying operating practices, as well as a failure to capture and disseminate appropriate Integrated Safety Management (ISM) information. To address these issues, the ES&H Department established an Activity Hazard Review (AHR)/Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) process for systematically identifying, assessing, and controlling hazards associated with project work activities during work planning and execution. Depending on the scope of a project, information from field walkdowns and table-top meetings are collected on an AHR form. The AHA then documents the potential failure and consequence scenarios for a particular hazard. Also, the AHA recommends whether the type of mitigation appears appropriate or whether additional controls should be implemented. Since the application is web based, the information is captured into a single system and organized according to the >200 work activities already recorded in the database. Using the streamlined AHA method improved cycle time from over four hours to an average of one hour, allowing more time to analyze unique hazards and develop appropriate controls. Also, the enhanced configuration control created a readily available AHA library to research and utilize along with standardizing hazard analysis and control selection across four separate work sites located in Kentucky and Tennessee. The AHR/AHA system provides an applied example of how the ISM concept evolved into a standardized field-deployed tool yielding considerable efficiency gains in project planning and resource utilization. Employee safety is preserved through detailed planning that now requires only a portion of the time previously necessary. The available resources can then be applied to implementing appropriate engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment

  3. Strategies used for managing symptoms by women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Kengen Traska, Theresa; Rutledge, Dana N; Mouttapa, Michele; Weiss, Jie; Aquino, Jordan

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study was to describe how persons with fibromyalgia manage their lives given the multiple symptoms they experience, in particular how they use non-pharmacologic strategies, or how they incorporate these strategies along with pharmacologic agents. Persons with fibromyalgia, a widespread chronic pain condition, often suffer from considerable fatigue, sleep disturbances and morning stiffness. Medical management does not lead to a cure, and sufferers must self-manage to maintain a good quality of life. This qualitative descriptive study used group interview methodology. Data were obtained from eight women with fibromyalgia. Women's mean age was 61 (range 54-81). Participants were invited to participate in a 90- minute group interview focused on symptom management. In the interview, open-ended questions allowed them to speak freely about managing multiple fibromyalgia symptoms. Content analysis by the first and second authors led to the identification of themes, which were validated by the co-authors who attended the interviews. Participants reported many strategies to cope with fibromyalgia symptoms and manage their lives. Main strategies included: 'pacing/planning', 'distraction techniques', 'coping with touch sensitivity', 'putting on the mask' and 'medications'. In addition, 'social support' from others with fibromyalgia and from family members was reported to be very important. Study findings demonstrate that women with fibromyalgia can develop strategies that enable them to cope with a life encumbered with chronic pain and fatigue. Moreover, this study confirmed effective fibromyalgia management strategies reported in other studies. Further research is needed on risks/benefits of these and other self-management strategies used by women with fibromyalgia. Our findings suggest that nurses should discuss the self-management strategies found with persons who have fibromyalgia in the context of individual patient experiences. © 2011 Blackwell

  4. Osteoarthritis 2: pain management and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Swift, Amelia

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful, progressive joint disorder. This article discusses pharmacological management of OA, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids, and non-pharmacological management, including weight reduction, acupuncture and joint replacement surgery. The third part, to be published online, will cover the physical, psychological and social impact of OA.

  5. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  6. Teaching Self-Management Strategies to Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, K. Richard; And Others

    This book presents a behavioral program to teach adolescents basic self-management skills; two chapters provide the theoretical basis for the program and four chapters supply sample lesson plans. The first chapter is an introduction to behavioral self-management. It proposes a behavior change model with four major components: assessment,…

  7. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  8. Applying Integrative Learning Strategies and Complexity Theory to Design Simulations for Care of Complex Patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Karen S; Riley-Doucet, Cheryl K

    Nurse educators use a variety of clinical simulation strategies to promote cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning. Statistically significant increases in self-confidence levels were found among senior-level nursing students in the assessment and management of medical and psychiatric symptoms after participating in strategically designed, complex, student-led clinical simulations. Having students role play simulation scenarios that are developed from real-life clinical experiences is a cost-effective interactive strategy that enhances their communication and technical skills.

  9. Strategies and algorithms for management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Thomas; Gerig, Hans J; Henderson, John J

    2005-12-01

    Management of the difficult airway is the most important patient safety issue in the practice of anaesthesia. Many national societies have developed algorithms and guidelines for management of the difficult airway. The key issues of this chapter are definition of terms, the advantages and disadvantages of the use of guidelines, and a comparison of different algorithms and guidelines for management of the most important clinical airway scenarios. Although there is no strong evidence of benefit for any specific strategy or algorithm for management of the difficult airway, there is strong agreement that a pre-planned strategy may lead to improved outcome.

  10. Using scenario analysis to determine managed care strategy.

    PubMed

    Krentz, S E; Gish, R S

    2000-09-01

    In today's volatile healthcare environment, traditional planning tools are inadequate to guide financial managers of provider organizations in developing managed care strategies. These tools often disregard the uncertainty surrounding market forces such as employee benefit structure, the future of Medicare managed care, and the impact of consumer behavior. Scenario analysis overcomes this limitation by acknowledging the uncertain healthcare environment and articulating a set of plausible alternative futures, thus supplying financial executives with the perspective to craft strategies that can improve the market position of their organizations. By being alert for trigger points that might signal the rise of a specific scenario, financial managers can increase their preparedness for changes in market forces.

  11. HMO strategies for managing workers' compensation claims.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, P A

    1996-03-01

    Health maintenance organizations (HMOs) have become very active in managing workers' compensation medical expense benefits. A survey of 316 HMOs shows that this activity takes the form of various network models and a range of services--such as utilization review and case management--that may not be linked to a provider network. Of the HMOs surveyed, 78 reported that, by using managed care services and provider discounts, they were able to save from 20 percent to 30 percent on occupational health claim costs.

  12. Risk preferences, probability weighting, and strategy tradeoffs in wildfire management

    Treesearch

    Michael S. Hand; Matthew J. Wibbenmeyer; Dave Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2015-01-01

    Wildfires present a complex applied risk management environment, but relatively little attention has been paid to behavioral and cognitive responses to risk among public agency wildfire managers. This study investigates responses to risk, including probability weighting and risk aversion, in a wildfire management context using a survey-based experiment administered to...

  13. Adaptive Management as an Effective Strategy: Interdisciplinary Perceptions for Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiss, Lindsay M.; Hessenauer, Jan-Michael; Nathan, Lucas R.; O'Connor, Kelly M.; Liberati, Marjorie R.; Kloster, Danielle P.; Barclay, Janet R.; Vokoun, Jason C.; Morzillo, Anita T.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive management is a well-established approach to managing natural resources, but there is little evidence demonstrating effectiveness of adaptive management over traditional management techniques. Peer-reviewed literature attempts to draw conclusions about adaptive management effectiveness using social perceptions, but those studies are largely restricted to employees of US federal organizations. To gain a more comprehensive insight into perceived adaptive management effectiveness, this study aimed to broaden the suite of disciplines, professional affiliations, and geographic backgrounds represented by both practitioners and scholars. A questionnaire contained a series of questions concerning factors that lead to or inhibit effective management, followed by another set of questions focused on adaptive management. Using a continuum representing strategies of both adaptive management and traditional management, respondents selected those strategies that they perceived as being effective. Overall, characteristics (i.e., strategies, stakeholders, and barriers) identified by respondents as contributing to effective management closely aligned with adaptive management. Responses were correlated to the type of adaptive management experience rather than an individual's discipline, occupational, or regional affiliation. In particular, perceptions of characteristics contributing to adaptive management effectiveness varied between respondents who identified as adaptive management scholars (i.e., no implementation experience) and adaptive management practitioners. Together, these results supported two concepts that make adaptive management effective: practitioners emphasized adaptive management's value as a long-term approach and scholars noted the importance of stakeholder involvement. Even so, more communication between practitioners and scholars regarding adaptive management effectiveness could promote interdisciplinary learning and problem solving for improved

  14. Adaptive Management as an Effective Strategy: Interdisciplinary Perceptions for Natural Resources Management.

    PubMed

    Dreiss, Lindsay M; Hessenauer, Jan-Michael; Nathan, Lucas R; O'Connor, Kelly M; Liberati, Marjorie R; Kloster, Danielle P; Barclay, Janet R; Vokoun, Jason C; Morzillo, Anita T

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive management is a well-established approach to managing natural resources, but there is little evidence demonstrating effectiveness of adaptive management over traditional management techniques. Peer-reviewed literature attempts to draw conclusions about adaptive management effectiveness using social perceptions, but those studies are largely restricted to employees of US federal organizations. To gain a more comprehensive insight into perceived adaptive management effectiveness, this study aimed to broaden the suite of disciplines, professional affiliations, and geographic backgrounds represented by both practitioners and scholars. A questionnaire contained a series of questions concerning factors that lead to or inhibit effective management, followed by another set of questions focused on adaptive management. Using a continuum representing strategies of both adaptive management and traditional management, respondents selected those strategies that they perceived as being effective. Overall, characteristics (i.e., strategies, stakeholders, and barriers) identified by respondents as contributing to effective management closely aligned with adaptive management. Responses were correlated to the type of adaptive management experience rather than an individual's discipline, occupational, or regional affiliation. In particular, perceptions of characteristics contributing to adaptive management effectiveness varied between respondents who identified as adaptive management scholars (i.e., no implementation experience) and adaptive management practitioners. Together, these results supported two concepts that make adaptive management effective: practitioners emphasized adaptive management's value as a long-term approach and scholars noted the importance of stakeholder involvement. Even so, more communication between practitioners and scholars regarding adaptive management effectiveness could promote interdisciplinary learning and problem solving for improved

  15. Emphysematous pyelonephritis with calculus: Management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Tanmaya; Reddy, Sreedhar; Thomas, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) with calculus is well recognized but with very few reports on its treatment. Our aim is to elucidate our experience in its successful management. Materials and Methods: Over four years, we diagnosed seven cases (eight renal units) of EPN, out of which two patients (three renal units) had EPN with urinary calculi. After the initial conservative management of EPN, the stones were tackled appropriately. Results: EPN was initially managed effectively with antibiotics and supportive care. Once the patient was stable, the stones were cleared in a step-wise fashion. The associated postoperative complications were also tackled efficiently with preservation of renal function. Conclusion: In EPN with stones, nephrectomy is not the sole option available and they can be effectively managed with open / endoscopic measures. PMID:19718324

  16. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the basis of quality, relevance to the illness and importance in illustrating current management pathways and the potential for future improvements. The implementation of a framework for chronic pain management in primary care would limit unnecessary, time-consuming, and costly tests, reduce diagnostic delay and improve patient outcomes. The patient-centred medical home (PCMH), a management framework that has been successfully implemented in other chronic diseases, might improve the care of patients with FM in primary care, by bringing together a team of professionals with a range of skills and training. Although there remain several barriers to overcome, implementation of a PCMH would allow patients with FM, like those with other chronic conditions, to be successfully managed in the primary care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. French consensus. Management of patients with hypersomnia: Which strategy?

    PubMed

    Lopez, R; Arnulf, I; Drouot, X; Lecendreux, M; Dauvilliers, Y

    Central hypersomnias principally involves type 1 narcolepsy (NT1), type 2 narcolepsy (NT2) and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH). Despite great progress made in understanding the physiopathology of NT1 with low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels, current treatment remains symptomatic. The same applies to NT2 and IH, for which the physiopathology is still largely unknown. Controlling excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and disturbed night-time sleep are key therapeutic targets in NT1. For IH and NT2, reducing EDS is the main objective. Based on European and American directives for the treatment of narcolepsy, we propose French recommendations for managing central hypersomnias as well as strategies in the case of drug-resistance. Stimulating treatments target EDS, and Modafinil is the first-line treatment. Other stimulants such as methylphenidate, pitolisant, and exceptionally dextro-amphetamine can be prescribed. Selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are effective for the management of cataplexy in NT1. Sodium oxybate is an effective treatment for several symptoms, including EDS, cataplexy and disturbed night-time sleep. Treatment of central hypersomnia must also take into consideration frequent cardiovascular, metabolic and psychiatric comorbidities, particularly in NT1. New therapies are currently under study with the development of new stimulants and anti-cataplectics. The next few years will see innovative emerging therapies, based on a physiopathological approach, aiming to restore hypocretinergic transmission or to interrupt the autoimmune processes causing the loss of hypocretin neurons.

  18. Use of single large or several small policies as strategies to manage people-park interactions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catrina A; Baird, Timothy D; Hartter, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity conservation has been criticized for undermining or ignoring social well-being. Currently efforts to mutually promote social justice, rural development, and biodiversity conservation, which have been contentious and yielded mixed results, continue to spread despite a general dearth of effective management strategies. We contend that social and economic concerns should be integral to conservation planning and propose that the scale of these phenomena is also critical. To evaluate the merit of this proposal, we adopted and expanded a conservation management strategy framework developed by Joel Heinen and examined how population density, economic disparity, and ethnic heterogeneity vary spatially surrounding 2 contrasting protected areas in East Africa: Kibale National Park in Uganda and Tarangire National Park in Tanzania. Analyses of demographic, wealth, and ethnicity data from regional censuses and household surveys conducted in 2009 and 2010 indicated that choice of scale (landscape or community) changed the management strategies recommended by the model. Therefore, "several small" people-park management strategies varying around a given protected area may be more appropriate than a "single large" people-park strategy applied across an entire protected area. Correspondingly, scale adjusted Heinen recommendations offered new strategies for effective conservation management within these human landscapes not incorporated in current in situ management plans. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Knowledge Management and the Competitive Strategy of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halawi, Leila A.; McCarthy, Richard V.; Aronson, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach: We review the existing literature on KM and strategy formulation. We utilize the resource-based view approach as a lens for…

  20. Knowledge Management and the Competitive Strategy of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halawi, Leila A.; McCarthy, Richard V.; Aronson, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge management (KM) has emerged as a strategy to improve organizational competitiveness. Our purpose is to identify the relationship between KM and the firm's competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach: We review the existing literature on KM and strategy formulation. We utilize the resource-based view approach as a lens for…

  1. Analysis of Human Resources Management Strategy in China Electronic Commerce Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fang

    The paper discussed electronic-commerce's influence on enterprise human resources management, proposed and proved the human resources management strategy which electronic commerce enterprise should adopt from recruitment strategy to training strategy, keeping talent strategy and other ways.

  2. Applying Diversity Management Concepts to Improve the Minority Educational Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntebi, Joy; Shcherbakova, Maria; Wooten, Lynn P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this conceptual article is to investigate existing diversity management paradigms and extend their implications toward the goal of increasing minority representation in management education. We suggest that the existing learning-and-effectiveness diversity management paradigm (Thomas & Ely, 1996, "Harvard Business…

  3. Applying Diversity Management Concepts to Improve the Minority Educational Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntebi, Joy; Shcherbakova, Maria; Wooten, Lynn P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this conceptual article is to investigate existing diversity management paradigms and extend their implications toward the goal of increasing minority representation in management education. We suggest that the existing learning-and-effectiveness diversity management paradigm (Thomas & Ely, 1996, "Harvard Business…

  4. Applying a Knowledge Management Taxonomy to Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thambi, Melinda; O'Toole, Paddy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the relevance of a corporate-based taxonomy of knowledge management to secondary schooling. Do the principles of knowledge management from the corporate world translate to the world of education; specifically, secondary schooling? This article examines categories of knowledge management articulated in…

  5. Applying a Knowledge Management Taxonomy to Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thambi, Melinda; O'Toole, Paddy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the relevance of a corporate-based taxonomy of knowledge management to secondary schooling. Do the principles of knowledge management from the corporate world translate to the world of education; specifically, secondary schooling? This article examines categories of knowledge management articulated in…

  6. Central States forest management guides as applied in STEMS.

    Treesearch

    Nancy R. Walters

    1988-01-01

    Describes a management prescription system for Central States cover types developed for use in the Central States Stand and Tree Evaluation and Modeling System (STEMS). It includes one management guide for each of the six major cover types in the region. Each guide consists of a decision key that prescribes management, based on stand characteristics and a set of...

  7. An optimized strategy for the management of spent steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrel, Eric; Denissen, Luc; Davain, Henri; Leveau, Jean-Phillipe; Lauwers, Johan; Gillet, Thierry

    2007-07-01

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase. The electro-mechanical dismantling is almost completed and the program related to the decontamination of the building structures has been initiated. The issue of the evacuation of the primary circuit large components, and more specifically of the Steam Generator (SG), has been dealt successfully, applying innovative technologies to lead to remarkable results in terms of waste volume minimization and occupational radiation exposure. The strategy applied for the evacuation of the BR3 SG resulted from the elaboration and comparison of the following scenarios: - Closed loop chemical decontamination prior to dismantling, cutting and unconditional release or release after melting, - Cutting of the components without decontamination and evacuation of the materials in their respective waste categories, - Cutting, decontamination of the SG secondary side and evacuation of the full SG primary side to the melting facility for recycling. While the availability of the in-house developed MEDOC{sup R} process made the clearance of the SG bundle technically feasible, nuclear safety requirements and financial aspects were also in favour of the closed loop decontamination: minimization of contamination spreading and staff exposure during all subsequent manipulations, minimization of radwaste costs. For the segmentation of this component, different techniques have been considered: An abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting tool, A prototype diamond wire developed for this application. The diamond wire allowed to cut in a single pass both the carbon steel shell and the stainless steel tube bundle. While the implementation of the diamond wire saw is rather simple, working conditions must be optimised to limit wearing of the wire and secondary waste production. Existing experience can be extrapolated to different legal frameworks in order to propose a financially and technically optimised 'all-in' strategy for the

  8. Strategies for initial management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajeev; Guptha, Soneil

    2010-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is a major public health problem in India and its prevalence is rapidly increasing among urban and rural populations. Reducing systolic and diastolic BP can decrease cardiovascular risk and this can be achieved by non-pharmacological (lifestyle measures) as well as pharmacological means. Lifestyle changes should be the initial approach to hypertension management and include dietary interventions (reducing salt, increasing potassium, alcohol avoidance, and multifactorial diet control), weight reduction, tobacco cessation, physical exercise, and stress management. A number of pharmaceutical agents, well evidenced by large randomized clinical trials, are available for initial treatment of high BP. These include older molecules such as thiazide diuretics and beta-blocking agents and newer molecules, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCB), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). In view of the recent clinical trials data, some international guidelines suggest that CCB, ACE inhibitors or ARB and not beta-blockers or diuretics should be the initial therapy in hypertension management. Comprehensive hypertension management focuses on reducing overall cardiovascular risk by lifestyle measures, BP lowering and lipid management and should be the preferred initial treatment approach. PMID:21150005

  9. Total Leaders: Applying the Best Future-Focused Change Strategies to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwahn, Charles J.; Spady, William G.

    This book focuses on education management and the change strategies needed to guide education in the upcoming years. It is intended for those who are responsible for selecting, supervising, developing, or evaluating people in leadership positions or who want to analyze their leadership performance and plan for further professional growth. The text…

  10. Development of risk-based air quality management strategies under impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Jen; Amar, Praveen; Tagaris, Efthimios; Russell, Armistead G

    2012-05-01

    climate change includes determination of air quality targets, selections of potential management options, and identification of effective air quality management strategies through decision-making models. The risk-based decision-making framework can also be applied to develop climate-responsive management strategies for the other environmental dimensions and assess costs and benefits of future environmental management policies.

  11. Meralgia paresthetica: diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Harney, Donal; Patijn, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica (MP), coined from the Greek words meros (thigh and algos), meaning pain, is a neurological disorder characterized by a localized area of paresthesia and numbness on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. The incidence of MP is more common than often reported in the literature. The etiology of MP includes mechanical factors such as obesity, pregnancy, and other conditions associated with increased intrabdominal pressure, surgery of the spine, and pelvic osteotomy. A coherent history and pertinent physical examination is essential in making the diagnosis; however, red flags such as tumor and lumbar disk herniations must be recognized and appropriately treated. While the diagnosis of MP is essentially a clinical diagnosis, sensory nerve conduction velocity studies are a useful adjunctive diagnostic tool. The management of MP includes treating the underlying cause (if any) and conservative management. Surgery should only be adopted when all nonoperative therapies have failed to manage the condition in an effective manner.

  12. Management Strategies for Mycosis Fungoides in India

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhury, Tanumay

    2017-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The approach to diagnosis and further follow-up is outlined. Evidence for interventions is based classically on a Tumor Node Metastasis Blood TNMB “stage-based” approach. The treatment options in India are limited. The options as per risk stratification and prognostic index are discussed. Early stages and low-risk patients can be managed with expectant policy or skin-directed therapies including topical steroids and phototherapy; intermediate-risk patients can be opted for interferons or retinoids or low dose methotrexate along with radiotherapy including total skin electron beam therapy while high-risk patients are managed most often with single agent or multiagent palliative chemotherapy. Patients who are intermediate- or high-risk need management by a multispecialty team at tertiary care centers. PMID:28400632

  13. Municipal solid waste management strategies in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turan, N Gamze; Coruh, Semra; Akdemir, Andaç; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2009-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental problem in Turkey, as in many developing countries. Problems associated with municipal solid waste are difficult to address, but efforts towards more efficient collection and transportation and environmentally acceptable waste disposal continue in Turkey. Although strict regulations on the management of solid waste are in place, primitive disposal methods such as open dumping and discharge into surface water have been used in various parts of Turkey. This study presents a brief history of the legislative trends in Turkey for MSW management. The study also presents the MSW responsibility and management structure together with the present situation of generation, composition, recycling, and treatment. The results show that approximately 25 million ton of MSW are generated annually in Turkey. About 77% of the population receives MSW services. In spite of efforts to change open dumping areas into sanitary landfills and to build modern recycling and composting facilities, Turkey still has over 2000 open dumps.

  14. Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical…

  15. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  16. Strategies for job creation through national forest management

    Treesearch

    Susan Charnley

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which national forest managers may contribute to community well-being by designing projects that accomplish forest management in ways that not only meet their ecological goals, but also create economic opportunities for nearby communities. The chapter summarizes a number of strategies for enhancing the economic benefits to communities...

  17. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  18. Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical…

  19. A Policy Change Strategy for Head Lice Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Kathleen; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to formulate an effective change strategy for head lice management in a group of five separate school districts within one county. Despite a desire to use evidence to support their practice, school nurses often encounter educational system barriers that prevent independent management of health conditions. The use of…

  20. Socioeconomic evaluation of broad-scale land management strategies.

    Treesearch

    Lisa K. Crone; Richard W. Haynes

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the socioeconomic effects of alternative management strategies for Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands in the interior Columbia basin. From a broad-scale perspective, there is little impact or variation between alternatives in terms of changes in total economic activity or social conditions in the region. However, adopting a finer...

  1. Delegation: Win-Win Strategies for Managing Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline

    1999-01-01

    This issue of the Australian Early Childhood Association Research in Practice Series provides staff management strategies for directors and others involved with the management of early childhood settings and suggests ways to effectively delegate authority and tasks in order to reduce administrative pressures and workload. The booklet presents…

  2. An ecosystem management strategy for Sierran mixed-conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Peter Stine; Kevin O' Hara; William Zielinski; Scott Stephens

    2009-01-01

    Current Sierra Nevada forest management is often focused on strategically reducing fuels without an explicit strategy for ecological restoration across the landscape matrix. Summarizing recent scientific literature, we suggest managers produce different stand structures and densities across the landscape using topographic variables (i.e., slope shape, aspect, and slope...

  3. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  4. A Policy Change Strategy for Head Lice Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, Kathleen; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to formulate an effective change strategy for head lice management in a group of five separate school districts within one county. Despite a desire to use evidence to support their practice, school nurses often encounter educational system barriers that prevent independent management of health conditions. The use of…

  5. Modeling the cumulative watershed effects of forest management strategies

    Treesearch

    R. R. Ziemer; J. Lewis; R. M. Rice; T. E. Lisle

    1991-01-01

    Abstract - There is increasing concern over the possibility of adverse cumulative watershed effects from intensive forest management. It is impractical to address many aspects of the problem experimentally because to do so would require studying large watersheds for 100 yr or more. One such aspect is the long-term effect of forest management strategies on erosion and...

  6. Ecological principles underpinning invasive plant management tools and strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The broad focus of ecologically-based invasive plant management is to identify and repair the ecological processes facilitating plant invasion. To be useful, however, EBIPM requires that our application of management tools and strategies be based on ecological principles that determine the rate and ...

  7. Multigeneration employees: strategies for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kupperschmidt, B R

    2000-09-01

    Today's health care workforce comprises Traditional, Baby Boomer, and Generation X employees. Effective managers must understand the times and generational characteristics of these employees and they must assure that employees understand and respect one another's differences. They must foster open discussion of how generational differences influence attitudes toward work and organizations. They must provide opportunities for multigeneration employees to contribute their best concurrent with meeting organizational goals. Employees must be offered a conditional security based upon value-added results and collaboration. Managers must use leadership practices that encourage the hearts of dispirited employees.

  8. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity.

  9. Applying Crowd Psychology to Develop Recommendations for the Management of Mass Decontamination

    PubMed Central

    Drury, John; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mass decontamination is a public health intervention employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological release. It involves a crowd of people whose interactions with each other and with the emergency responders managing the incident are likely to affect the success of the decontamination process. The way in which members of the public collectively experience decontamination is likely to affect their behavior and hence is crucial to the success of the decontamination process. Consequently, responders and the responsible authorities need to understand crowd psychology during mass emergencies and disasters. Recently, the social identity approach to crowd psychology has been applied to explain public perceptions and behavior during mass emergencies. This approach emphasizes that crowd events are characteristically intergroup encounters, in which the behavior of one group can affect the perceptions and behavior of another. We summarize the results from a program of research in which the social identity approach was applied to develop and test recommendations for the management of mass decontamination. The findings from this program of research show that (1) responders' perceptions of crowd behavior matter; (2) participants value greater communication and this affects their compliance; and (3) social identity processes explain the relationship between effective responder communication and relevant outcome variables, such as public compliance, public cooperation, and public anxiety. Based on this program of research, we recommend 4 responder management strategies that focus on increasing public compliance, increasing orderly and cooperative behavior among members of the public, reducing public anxiety, and respecting public needs for privacy. PMID:25812428

  10. Applying crowd psychology to develop recommendations for the management of mass decontamination.

    PubMed

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mass decontamination is a public health intervention employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological release. It involves a crowd of people whose interactions with each other and with the emergency responders managing the incident are likely to affect the success of the decontamination process. The way in which members of the public collectively experience decontamination is likely to affect their behavior and hence is crucial to the success of the decontamination process. Consequently, responders and the responsible authorities need to understand crowd psychology during mass emergencies and disasters. Recently, the social identity approach to crowd psychology has been applied to explain public perceptions and behavior during mass emergencies. This approach emphasizes that crowd events are characteristically intergroup encounters, in which the behavior of one group can affect the perceptions and behavior of another. We summarize the results from a program of research in which the social identity approach was applied to develop and test recommendations for the management of mass decontamination. The findings from this program of research show that (1) responders' perceptions of crowd behavior matter; (2) participants value greater communication and this affects their compliance; and (3) social identity processes explain the relationship between effective responder communication and relevant outcome variables, such as public compliance, public cooperation, and public anxiety. Based on this program of research, we recommend 4 responder management strategies that focus on increasing public compliance, increasing orderly and cooperative behavior among members of the public, reducing public anxiety, and respecting public needs for privacy.

  11. Alertness Management Strategies for Operational Contexts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    or reproductive disorders. In addition, there is evidence from some studies that night work is associated with increased accide’nts. In fact, Folkard...behaviorally based strategies for avoiding insomnia in many situations, but in some cases, hypnotic medications or so- called "sleeping pills" may be necessary...preferable to being sleep deprived. Choosing the best hypnotic for each situation requires consideration of a variety of factors. From a strictly

  12. Towards Strategic Actorhood? The Execution of Institutional Positioning Strategies at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Given the emerging interest in institutional positioning and to augment the small number of empirical studies in this field, this paper presents discussion about how Finnish universities of applied sciences implement their profiling strategies. The analysis is based on an examination of documents recently submitted by these institutions when…

  13. Metacognitive Strategies Applied during Correcting Text-Related Answers of Three Students with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuner, Yildiz

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the metacognitive strategies applied during the controlling-correcting activities of three hearing-impaired youths' written answers to text-related questions. The data have been derived from a pilot action research effort. The research journal, students' portfolios, archival information, interviews, surveys…

  14. Towards Strategic Actorhood? The Execution of Institutional Positioning Strategies at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Given the emerging interest in institutional positioning and to augment the small number of empirical studies in this field, this paper presents discussion about how Finnish universities of applied sciences implement their profiling strategies. The analysis is based on an examination of documents recently submitted by these institutions when…

  15. An Investigation of Reading Strategies Applied by American Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee-Thompson, Li-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Minimal research has been conducted in reading Chinese as a second/ foreign language (CSI/CFL). In an effort to further the understanding of the reading process, this study, utilizing think aloud and retelling procedures, focuses on the identification of strategies that American university students applied to read Chinese texts (narrative and…

  16. Assessment of Instructional and Administrative Strategies Applied by Principals to Improve Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiri, Agharuwhe A.

    2014-01-01

    The study is based on the assessment of instructional and administrative strategies applied by principals to improve academic performance of students in schools. This simply means that the individual talents of everyone in school needs to be maximized for the effective benefit of the school, students, parents, and the society at large. It is…

  17. Population health management: a "start small" strategy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kathleen D

    2013-01-01

    Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI) is piloting population health management for a test population that comprises CHI employees and their families. CHI is using a medical home model to coordinate care. The system anticipates a reduction in its employee healthcare costs of 10 to 14 percent.

  18. Financial Planning and Management--New Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The goal of the future financial manager should be to educate college personnel to the level necessary to make balanced decisions. The challenge is to maintain the current operable systems and develop new approaches to maximize scarce resources through effective communication. (RC)

  19. Radiation Proctitis: Current Strategies in Management

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nhue L.; Nagle, Deborah; Poylin, Vitaliy Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation proctitis is a known complication following radiation therapy for pelvic malignancy. The majority of cases are treated nonsurgically, and an understanding of the available modalities is crucial in the management of these patients. In this paper, we focus on the current treatments of radiation proctitis. PMID:22144997

  20. Classroom Strategies: Classroom Management Systems. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speiss, Madeleine F.; And Others

    Classroom management is defined as procedures for arranging the classroom environment so that children learn what the teacher wants to teach them in the healthiest and most effective way possible. The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory presents a discussion of these procedures as they relate to social controls and components of…

  1. Evaluation and experimentation with duck management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Johnson, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    Our knowledge of the effects of hunting regulations on duck populations has been based largely on retrospective studies of historical data. We have reached the limits of what can be learned in this way. Future knowledge gains will likely come about only through experimentation and adaptive management.

  2. Resampling versus repair in evolution strategies applied to a constrained linear problem.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Dirk V

    2013-01-01

    We study the behaviour of multi-recombination evolution strategies for the problem of maximising a linear function with a single linear constraint. Two variants of the algorithm are considered: a strategy that resamples infeasible candidate solutions and one that applies a simple repair mechanism. Integral expressions that describe the strategies' one-generation behaviour are derived and used in a simple zeroth order model for the steady state attained when operating with constant step size. Applied to the analysis of cumulative step size adaptation, the approach provides an intuitive explanation for the qualitative difference in the algorithm variants' behaviour. The findings have implications for the design of constraint handling techniques to be used in connection with cumulative step size adaptation.

  3. Change in MSW characteristics under recent management strategies in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Min; Liu, Chien-Chung; Hung, Chao-Yang; Hu, Allen; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2008-12-01

    Reduction and recycling initiatives such as producer responsibility and pay-as-you-throw are being implemented in Taiwan. This paper presents a study assessing the impact of recently implemented municipal solid waste (MSW) reduction and recycling management strategies on the characteristics of waste feedstock for incineration in Taiwan. Through the periodic sampling of two typical MSW incineration plants, proximate and ultimate analyses were conducted according to standard methods to explore the influence of MSW reduction and recycling management strategies on incineration feed waste characteristics. It was observed that the annual amount of MSW generated in 2005 decreased by about 10% compared to 2003 and that the characteristics of MSW have changed significantly due to recent management strategies. The heating value of the MSW generated in Taiwan increased yearly by about 5% after program implementation. A comparison of the monthly variations in chemical concentrations indicated that the chlorine content in MSW has changed. This change results from usage reduction of PVC plastic due to the recycling fund management (RFM) program, and the food waste as well as salt content reduction due to the total recycling for kitchen garbage program. This achievement will improve the reduction of dioxin emissions from MSW incineration. In summary, management strategies must be conducted in tandem with the global trend to achieve a zero-waste-discharge country. When implementing these strategies and planning for future MSW management systems, it is important to consider the changes that may occur in the composition and characteristics of MSW over time.

  4. What health care managers do: applying Mintzberg's structured observation method.

    PubMed

    Arman, Rebecka; Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa; Törnström, Linda

    2009-09-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first- and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first- and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective.

  5. Mistakes to avoid when planning managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Scheur, B S

    1997-06-01

    Hospital executives, steeped in hospital business traditions, sometimes fall victim to those traditions when planning their managed care strategies. They may fail to sufficiently evaluate their hospitals' market position or set appropriate priorities for their various business strategies. They may not recruit individuals with managed care expertise, develop effective marketing plans, or construct realistic physician networks. Some hospital executives may be ill-equipped to deal with cultural clashes and reluctant to share control of their managed care organizations with physicians. Or, they may not always understand the true nature of the arrangement they have entered into, the information and technology needs of the arrangement, and their own strategic advantages. Today's hospital executives must plan their managed care strategies carefully and execute them intelligently to ensure success.

  6. Epilepsy during pregnancy: focus on management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Borgelt, Laura M; Hart, Felecia M; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L

    2016-01-01

    In the US, more than one million women with epilepsy are of childbearing age and have over 20,000 babies each year. Patients with epilepsy who become pregnant are at risk of complications, including changes in seizure frequency, maternal morbidity and mortality, and congenital anomalies due to antiepileptic drug exposure. Appropriate management of epilepsy during pregnancy may involve frequent monitoring of antiepileptic drug serum concentrations, potential preconception switching of antiepileptic medications, making dose adjustments, minimizing peak drug concentration with more frequent dosing, and avoiding potentially teratogenic medications. Ideally, preconception planning will be done to minimize risks to both the mother and fetus during pregnancy. It is important to recognize benefits and risks of current and emerging therapies, especially with revised pregnancy labeling in prescription drug product information. This review will outline risks for epilepsy during pregnancy, review various recommendations from leading organizations, and provide an evidence-based approach for managing patients with epilepsy before, during, and after pregnancy. PMID:27703396

  7. Electronic mail communication--management strategies.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2003-12-01

    Electronic communication has come a long way in the past 30 years. It will no doubt continue to improve and remain the primary communication vehicle for businesses. Occupational health nurses, like other business professionals, must use email to their advantage to improve their practice. However, electronic mail communication must be managed in the same manner as records and documents produced in any form or media.

  8. Strategies used by respiratory nurses to stimulate self-management in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Remco; de Boer, Fijgje; Georges, Jean-Jacques

    2013-10-01

    To gain an insight into strategies, adopted by Dutch respiratory nurses during clinic sessions, to improve self-management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is highly prevalent and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, impacting on quality of life and healthcare expenditure. Health promotion is therefore an important consideration. By applying specific strategies, respiratory nurses can play a major role in the promotion of self-management. Research has shown that respiratory nurses, who run clinics, have insufficient knowledge of evidence-based strategies that can be adopted to promote self-management among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. It appears that respiratory nurses adopt their own strategies during clinic sessions. A qualitative research study was carried out using Grounded Theory method. Data were collected during open interviews conducted by an external researcher with a nursing background. The interviews were analysed through coding after which categories were developed. Fourteen respiratory nurses were interviewed. The results show that respiratory nurses emphasise quitting smoking during the consult. Attention is also paid to inhalation medication and techniques. Other self-management strategies that respiratory nurses use are: application of specific interviewing techniques, referring to other healthcare professionals and providing tools for coping with the illness in everyday life. The main emphasis during the clinic session is directed at quitting smoking. Other self-management strategies such as providing information regarding nutrition and exercise, instilling confidence and becoming an equal discussion partner, gain less attention. During the clinic session, respiratory nurses should also focus on these self-management strategies in addition to quitting smoking. Further research should be directed at self-management strategies used by respiratory nurses in

  9. Managing Marginal School Employees: Applying Standards-Based Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lynette; Reck, Brianne; Egley, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of case studies that provide a variety of situations in managing or working with marginal employees in a school system. Managing Marginal School Employees will serve as a primary or companion text for administrator candidates or current administrators that include dilemmas for the student to think about, discuss,…

  10. Models of Classroom Management as Applied to the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmgren, Kimber W.; Trezek, Beverly J.; Paul, Peter V.

    2005-01-01

    Difficulty managing behavior in the classroom is frequently cited as a source of frustration for teachers and a common reason why new teachers leave the profession (Ingersoll 2001, 2003). Concerted attention to issues of classroom management is important to the health of education; attention to these issues at the middle and secondary education…

  11. Managing the Manpower Aspects of Applying Micro-Electronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, P.; Routledge, C.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines major effects that the application of micro-electronics devices in products/processes and in office systems will have on future manpower and skill requirements in manufacturing organizations. Identifies the type of problems these changes will pose for manpower managers. Provides general guidelines for the successful management of these…

  12. Applying Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Construction Safety Management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Cao, Tianzhuo; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-08-11

    Construction sites are dynamic and complicated systems. The movement and interaction of people, goods and energy make construction safety management extremely difficult. Due to the ever-increasing amount of information, traditional construction safety management has operated under difficult circumstances. As an effective way to collect, identify and process information, sensor-based technology is deemed to provide new generation of methods for advancing construction safety management. It makes the real-time construction safety management with high efficiency and accuracy a reality and provides a solid foundation for facilitating its modernization, and informatization. Nowadays, various sensor-based technologies have been adopted for construction safety management, including locating sensor-based technology, vision-based sensing and wireless sensor networks. This paper provides a systematic and comprehensive review of previous studies in this field to acknowledge useful findings, identify the research gaps and point out future research directions.

  13. Applying Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Construction Safety Management

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Cao, Tianzhuo; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    Construction sites are dynamic and complicated systems. The movement and interaction of people, goods and energy make construction safety management extremely difficult. Due to the ever-increasing amount of information, traditional construction safety management has operated under difficult circumstances. As an effective way to collect, identify and process information, sensor-based technology is deemed to provide new generation of methods for advancing construction safety management. It makes the real-time construction safety management with high efficiency and accuracy a reality and provides a solid foundation for facilitating its modernization, and informatization. Nowadays, various sensor-based technologies have been adopted for construction safety management, including locating sensor-based technology, vision-based sensing and wireless sensor networks. This paper provides a systematic and comprehensive review of previous studies in this field to acknowledge useful findings, identify the research gaps and point out future research directions. PMID:28800061

  14. Risk management strategy to increase the safety of workers in the nanomaterials industry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Min-Pei; Lin, Wei-Chao; Liu, Chia-Chyuan; Huang, Yi-Shiao; Chueh, Miao-Ju; Shih, Tung-Sheng

    2012-08-30

    In recent years, many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been produced, but increasing research has revealed that these may have toxicities far greater than conventional materials and cause significant adverse health effects. At present, there is insufficient data to determine the permissible concentrations of NMs in the workplace. There is also a lack of toxicity data and environmental monitoring results relating to complete health risk assessment. In view of this, we believe that workers in the NMs industry should be provided with simple and practical risk management strategy to ensure occupational health and safety. In this study, we developed a risk management strategy based on the precautionary risk management (PRM). The risk of the engineered NMs manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on aspect identification, solubility tests, dermal absorption, and cytotoxic analyses. The risk management strategies include aspects relating to technology control, engineering control, personal protective equipment, and monitoring of the working environment for each level. Here we report the first case in which a simple and practical risk management strategy applying in specific engineered NMs manufacturing plants. We are confident that our risk management strategy can be effectively reduced engineered NM industries risks for workers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  16. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Das Krankenhausmanagement ist stets Herausforderungen ausgesetzt. Anstatt auf die Herausforderungen zu warten, sollten Ärzte und Manager im Voraus handeln, um ein optimiertes und nachhaltig wertorientiertes Gesundheitswesen zu sichern. Diese Arbeit unterstreicht die Bedeutung der Szenarienplanung in Krankenhäusern, schlägt eine ausgearbeitete Definition der Stakeholder eines Krankenhauses vor und definiert die Einflussfaktoren, denen Krankenhäuser ausgesetzt sind.Methodik: Basierend auf einer Literaturanalyse sowie auf persönlichen Interviews mit Stakeholdern eines Krankenhauses schlagen wir eine ausgearbeitete Definition von Stakeholdern vor und erarbeiteten einen Fragebogen. Dieser Fragebogen berücksichtigt folgende Einflussfaktoren, die entsprechende Auswirkungen auf das Krankenhaus-Management haben: politische/rechtliche, wirtschaftliche, soziale, technologische und Umweltkräfte.Diese Einflussfaktoren werden untersucht, um die so genannten kritischen Unsicherheiten zu entwickeln. Die gründliche Identifizierung von Unsicherheiten basierte auf „Stakeholder Feedback“.Ergebnisse: Zwei Haupt-Unsicherheiten wurden identifiziert und in dieser Studie berücksichtigt:die Entwicklung der Arbeitsbelastung für das medizinische Personaldie gewinnorientierte Leistung des medizinischen Personals.Entsprechend der entwickelten Szenarien konnten wir folgende Kernstrategie empfehlen: komplementäre Ausbildung sowohl des medizinischen Personals als auch der nicht-medizinischen Top-Führungskräfte und Manager von Krankenhäusern. Ergänzende szenariospezifische strategische Optionen sollen, falls erforderlich, in Betracht gezogen werden, um eine bestimmte zukünftige Entwicklung des medizinischen Umfeldes zu optimieren.Schlussfolgerung: Strategische Planung in Krankenhäusern ist wichtig, um nachhaltigen Erfolg zu gewährleisten. Diese Planung soll mehrere Situationen berücksichtigen und integriert interne und externe Ein- und Ausblicke. Darüber hinaus

  17. [Behavioral and cognitive strategies in stress management].

    PubMed

    Légeron, P

    1993-03-01

    Stress is a specific response of the individual to all nonspecific demands. However, this process of adaptation is very complex and varies considerably from person to person. The stress response or "stress reactivity" is triggered by various stressors, ranging from live events to daily hassles and including chronic stressors. These stressors need to be identified. The stress response is not univocal: it has physiological, cognitive and behavioral components. Most of the time, physiological, cognitive and behavioral responses are maladaptive and harmful for the individual. Stress management is directed at teaching individuals specific skills to modify parts of these responses in order to reduce stress. Relaxation therapies are the cornerstone of any stress management program. They mostly include autogenic training and progressive relaxation training, sometimes biofeedback. The relaxation response is a learned response. There are a variety of different methods of inducing this response. They share the common goal of countering the physiological aspects of the stress reaction. All the relaxation techniques involve long and exacting training. But proper training leads to a gradual reduction in time and effort required to relax. When properly pursued, these techniques produce a state of relaxation quickly and on demand. Cognitive approaches to stress management derive from the constatation that the individual's interpretation of events or situations which have been labeled stressful, the individual's anticipation of the consequences of the stressor and the individual's view of his or her ability to cope with the stressor or the stress reaction are fundamental in the stress process. There are a variety of cognitive theories and techniques, ranging from Beck's cognitive therapy to Ellis' Rational-Emotive Therapy. Initial phases of these therapies are directed at teaching the individual to recognize, record, analyse and modify maladaptive cognitions. The second phase is

  18. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  19. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders’ perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state’s management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders’ support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that

  20. Recent advances in applying decision science to managing national forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcot, Bruce G.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Runge, Michael C.; Thompson, Frank R.; McNulty, Steven; Cleaves, David; Tomosy, Monica; Fisher, Larry A.; Andrew, Bliss

    2012-01-01

    Management of federal public forests to meet sustainability goals and multiple use regulations is an immense challenge. To succeed, we suggest use of formal decision science procedures and tools in the context of structured decision making (SDM). SDM entails four stages: problem structuring (framing the problem and defining objectives and evaluation criteria), problem analysis (defining alternatives, evaluating likely consequences, identifying key uncertainties, and analyzing tradeoffs), decision point (identifying the preferred alternative), and implementation and monitoring the preferred alternative with adaptive management feedbacks. We list a wide array of models, techniques, and tools available for each stage, and provide three case studies of their selected use in National Forest land management and project plans. Successful use of SDM involves participation by decision-makers, analysts, scientists, and stakeholders. We suggest specific areas for training and instituting SDM to foster transparency, rigor, clarity, and inclusiveness in formal decision processes regarding management of national forests.

  1. Complexity Science Applications to Dynamic Trajectory Management: Research Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawhill, Bruce; Herriot, James; Holmes, Bruce J.; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The promise of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is strongly tied to the concept of trajectory-based operations in the national airspace system. Existing efforts to develop trajectory management concepts are largely focused on individual trajectories, optimized independently, then de-conflicted among each other, and individually re-optimized, as possible. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time are valuable, though perhaps could be greater through alternative strategies. The concept of agent-based trajectories offers a strategy for automation of simultaneous multiple trajectory management. The anticipated result of the strategy would be dynamic management of multiple trajectories with interacting and interdependent outcomes that satisfy multiple, conflicting constraints. These constraints would include the business case for operators, the capacity case for the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and the environmental case for noise and emissions. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time might be improved over those possible under individual trajectory management approaches. The proposed approach relies on computational agent-based modeling (ABM), combinatorial mathematics, as well as application of "traffic physics" concepts to the challenge, and modeling and simulation capabilities. The proposed strategy could support transforming air traffic control from managing individual aircraft behaviors to managing systemic behavior of air traffic in the NAS. A system built on the approach could provide the ability to know when regions of airspace approach being "full," that is, having non-viable local solution space for optimizing trajectories in advance.

  2. Management philosophies as applied to major NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.

    1974-01-01

    A definition of 'management philosophies' is discussed explaining the position of NASA in the planning and control of space programs and technology. The impact of these philosophies on the Apollo and Saturn 1 programs are described along with the need for the Saturn 5 spacecraft and launch site development. Case studies are included and describe unscheduled events where management decisions were necessary to keep programs on track.

  3. Applying CIPP Model for Learning-Object Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Erla M. Morales; Peñalvo, Francisco J. García; Martín, Carlos Muñoz; Gonzalez, Miguel Ángel Conde

    Although knowledge management process needs to receive some evaluation in order to determine their suitable functionality. There is not a clear definition about the stages where LOs need to be evaluated and the specific metrics to continuously promote their quality. This paper presents a proposal for LOs evaluation during their management for e-learning systems. To achieve this, we suggest specific steps for LOs design, implementation and evaluation into the four stages proposed by CIPP model (Context, Input, Process, Product).

  4. A sampling strategy for high-dimensional spaces applied to free-form gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubini, Mario; Coles, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    We present a novel proposal strategy for the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm designed to efficiently sample general convex polytopes in 100 or more dimensions. This improves upon previous sampling strategies used for free-form reconstruction of gravitational lenses, but is general enough to be applied to other fields. We have written a parallel implementation within the lens modelling framework GLASS. Testing shows that we are able to produce uniform uncorrelated random samples which are necessary for exploring the degeneracies inherent in lens reconstruction.

  5. Self-Management Strategies to Support Students with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is a set of procedures that students can be taught to apply to their own behaviors to change them. In self-management, students are taught to observe, assess, and modify their own behavior. These procedures include such things as self-identifying and observing a target behavior and setting a goal to change it. Self-management…

  6. Self-Management Strategies to Support Students with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is a set of procedures that students can be taught to apply to their own behaviors to change them. In self-management, students are taught to observe, assess, and modify their own behavior. These procedures include such things as self-identifying and observing a target behavior and setting a goal to change it. Self-management…

  7. Working to reduce the effects of discrimination: Identity management strategies in organizations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Margaret; Young, Maia J; Bucher, Amy

    2013-04-01

    Despite efforts to dispel discrimination, workplace discrimination still occurs. We introduce two classes of identity management strategies individuals use to mitigate the negative consequences of discrimination: identity switching (i.e., deemphasizing target identities and recategorizing to a more positively valued identity) and identity redefinition (i.e., stereotype reassociation and regeneration). Organizations adopting a color-blind approach may make it more difficult for individuals to use identity switching because the policies deemphasize differences in social identities. In contrast, organizations adopting a multicultural approach may make it more difficult for individuals to use identity redefinition. Multicultural approaches, applied superficially, may celebrate group differences that might actually reinforce culturally dominant stereotypes. We explore the likelihood that individuals will adopt each strategy given these organizational approaches to diversity. We outline steps organizations can take to reduce the need for identity management strategies and to facilitate identity management when necessary.

  8. Information Management Principles Applied to the Ballistic Missile Defense System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    if they are being applied. iv Acknowledgments I would like to thank the members who participated in the Delphi Group. Their...52 Initial Delphi Results...55 Second Round Delphi Results .............................................................................57

  9. New Management Strategies for Ectopia Lentis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Melissa A; Origlieri, Catherine A; Dinallo, Anthony M; Forbes, Brian J; Wagner, Rudolph S; Guo, Suqin

    2015-01-01

    Ectopia lentis refers to displacement of the crystalline lens in the setting of various systemic and metabolic disorders. A literature review was conducted to investigate the management of non-traumatic ectopia lentis in the pediatric population, particularly focusing on surgical intervention. Both limbal and pars plana approaches for lensectomy are well established in the literature. Surgical options for intraocular lens implantation in pediatric eyes with ectopia lentis include anterior chamber intraocular lenses and iris-fixated or scleral-fixated posterior chamber intraocular lenses. Recently, the use of capsular tension rings has also been described with promising results. Visual rehabilitation and treatment of amblyopia are essential for patients within the amblyogenic age group following surgical intervention.

  10. Blepharitis: current strategies for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Jackson, W Bruce

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this article is to present a consensus on the appropriate identification and management of patients with blepharitis based on expert clinical recommendations for 4 representative case studies and evidence from well-designed clinical trials. The case study recommendations were developed at a consensus panel meeting of Canadian ophthalmologists and a guest ophthalmologist from the U.K., with additional input from family doctors and an infectious disease/medical microbiologist, which took place in Toronto in June 2006. A MEDLINE search was also conducted of English language articles describing randomized controlled clinical trials that involved patients with blepharitis. Blepharitis involving predominantly the skin and lashes tends to be staphylococcal and (or) seborrheic in nature, whereas involvement of the meibomian glands may be either seborrheic, obstructive, or a combination (mixed). The pathophysiology of blepharitis is a complex interaction of various factors, including abnormal lid-margin secretions, microbial organisms, and abnormalities of the tear film. Blepharitis can present with a range of signs and symptoms, and is associated with various dermatological conditions, namely, seborrheic dermatitis, rosacea, and eczema. The mainstay of treatment is an eyelid hygiene regimen, which needs to be continued long term. Topical antibiotics are used to reduce the bacterial load. Topical corticosteroid preparations may be helpful in patients with marked inflammation. Blepharitis can present with a range of signs and symptoms, and its management can be complicated by a number of factors. Expert clinical recommendations and a review of the evidence on treatment supports the practice of careful lid hygiene, possibly combined with the use of topical antibiotics, with or without topical steroids. Systemic antibiotics may be appropriate in some patients.

  11. Roles of managers in academic health centers: strategies for the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2002-03-01

    This article addresses survival strategies of academic health centers (AHCs) in responding to market pressures and government reforms. Using six case studies of AHCs, the study links strategic changes in structure and management to managerial role performance. Utilizing Mintzberg's classification of work roles, the roles of liaison, monitor, entrepreneur, and resource allocator were found to be used by top-level managers as they implement strategies to enhance the viability of their AHCs. Based on these new roles, the study recommends improving management practices through education and training as well as changing organizational culture to support management decision making and foster the continued growth of managers and their AHCs.

  12. Real Time Energy Management Control Strategies for Hybrid Powertrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaher, Mohamed Hegazi Mohamed

    In order to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions of mobile vehicles, various hybrid power-train concepts have been developed over the years. This thesis focuses on embedded control of hybrid powertrain concepts for mobile vehicle applications. Optimal robust control approach is used to develop a real time energy management strategy for continuous operations. The main idea is to store the normally wasted mechanical regenerative energy in energy storage devices for later usage. The regenerative energy recovery opportunity exists in any condition where the speed of motion is in opposite direction to the applied force or torque. This is the case when the vehicle is braking, decelerating, or the motion is driven by gravitational force, or load driven. There are three main concepts for regernerative energy storing devices in hybrid vehicles: electric, hydraulic, and flywheel. The real time control challenge is to balance the system power demand from the engine and the hybrid storage device, without depleting the energy storage device or stalling the engine in any work cycle, while making optimal use of the energy saving opportunities in a given operational, often repetitive cycle. In the worst case scenario, only engine is used and hybrid system completely disabled. A rule based control is developed and tuned for different work cycles and linked to a gain scheduling algorithm. A gain scheduling algorithm identifies the cycle being performed by the machine and its position via GPS, and maps them to the gains.

  13. Clinical nutrition management position: responsibilities and skill development strategies.

    PubMed

    Witte, S S; Messersmith, A M

    1995-10-01

    To determine the duties of clinical nutrition managers, the factors associated with the performance of the duties, the job specifications for the position, and the skill development strategies used by clinical nutrition managers. Clinical nutrition managers from 700 randomly selected, acute-care hospitals in the United States (with 300 or more beds) received a survey questionnaire. Respondents were asked to indicate performance or nonperformance, perceived importance, and methods used to develop skills for 54 duties related to clinical nutrition management. We requested additional information about position requirements, position characteristics, and demographic information. An 82% response rate with 67% usable responses (n = 472) was achieved. Frequencies for performance and nonperformance, mean importance, and frequencies for methods of skill development were determined for each duty. chi 2 Analysis with P < .10 was used to determine if an association existed between performance of a duty and time allotted to the position, number of personnel supervised, and type of personnel supervised. This study validated 46 of the duties as responsibilities of practicing clinical nutrition manager. Three duties not validated were related to financial management. The duty performed least often was conducting research/investigative studies. The number and type of personnel supervised was found to influence performance of duties, but time allotted to position was not an influence. The major strategies used for skill development were continuing education, networking, work experience in clinical dietetics, work experience in management dietetics, and their present job. These results can be used by clinical nutrition managers to assess the characteristics of their current position and develop a plan for enhancing their scope of responsibility. The identification of duties actually performed by clinical nutrition managers can also be used to develop standards of practice with

  14. Careers and Management: Strategies for Women Professionals. Pre Conference Seminar (Cincinnati, Ohio, March 24-25, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccardi, Toni; And Others

    This report presents the proceedings of the pre-conference seminar, "Careers and Management: Strategies for Women Professionals," which concentrated on issues related to (1) practicing techniques and strategies which can be applied to on-the-job situations, especially as related to career advancement and (2) developing methods of overcoming…

  15. Sustainability: orthopaedic surgery wait time management strategies.

    PubMed

    Amar, Claudia; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; SanMartin, Claudia; De Coster, Carolyn; Noseworthy, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine Canadian organizational and systemic factors that made it possible to keep wait times within federally established limits for at least 18 months. The research design is a multiple cases study. The paper selected three cases: Case 1 - staff were able to maintain compliance with requirements for more than 18 months; Case 2 - staff were able to meet requirements for 18 months, but unable to sustain this level; Case 3 - staff were never able to meet the requirements. For each case the authors interviewed persons involved in the strategies and collected documents. The paper analysed systemic and organizational-level factors; including governance and leadership, culture, resources, methods and tools. Findings indicate that the hospital that was able to maintain compliance with the wait time requirements had specific characteristics: an exclusive mandate to do only hip and knee replacement surgery; motivated staff who were not distracted by other concerns; and a strong team spirit. The authors' research highlights an important gradient between three cases regarding the factors that sustain waiting times. The paper show that the hospital factory model seems attractive in a super-specialized surgery context. However, patients are selected for simple surgeries, without complications, and so this cannot be considered a unique model.

  16. Enacting the Common Script: Management Ideas at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the work of mid-level management at Finnish universities of applied sciences. Based on in-depth interviews with 15 line managers, this study investigates how the standardized management ideas of rational management and employee empowerment are used in the leadership of lecturers at these institutions. The findings indicate…

  17. 41 CFR 102-3.95 - What principles apply to the management of advisory committees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What principles apply to...-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Managed? § 102-3.95 What principles... principles to the management of their advisory committees: (a) Provide adequate support. Before...

  18. 41 CFR 102-3.95 - What principles apply to the management of advisory committees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What principles apply to...-FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT How Are Advisory Committees Managed? § 102-3.95 What principles... principles to the management of their advisory committees: (a) Provide adequate support. Before establishing...

  19. Enacting the Common Script: Management Ideas at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the work of mid-level management at Finnish universities of applied sciences. Based on in-depth interviews with 15 line managers, this study investigates how the standardized management ideas of rational management and employee empowerment are used in the leadership of lecturers at these institutions. The findings indicate…

  20. Exploring strategies used following a group-based fatigue management programme for people with multiple sclerosis (FACETS) via the Fatigue Management Strategies Questionnaire (FMSQ)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S; Kersten, P; Thomas, P W; Slingsby, V; Nock, A; Jones, R; Davies Smith, A; Galvin, K T; Baker, R; Hillier, C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore cross-sectional patterns of use of fatigue management strategies in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who had attended a group-based fatigue management programme, Fatigue: Applying Cognitive behavioural and Energy effectiveness Techniques to lifeStyle (‘FACETS’). In a multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) the FACETS programme was shown to reduce fatigue severity and improve self-efficacy and quality of life. Design A questionnaire substudy within a RCT involving the self-completed Fatigue Management Strategies Questionnaire (FMSQ). The FMSQ includes: (1) closed questions about the use and helpfulness of fatigue management strategies taught in FACETS and (2) open items about changes to lifestyle, attitudes or expectations, barriers or difficulties encountered and helpful strategies not covered in FACETS. Participants All had a clinical diagnosis of MS, significant fatigue, were ambulatory and had attended at least 4 of 6 scheduled FACETS sessions. Methods Participants (n=72) were posted the FMSQ with a prepaid return envelope 4 months after the end of the FACETS programme. Results 82% (59/72) of participants returned the FMSQ. The fatigue management strategies most frequently used since attending FACETS were prioritisation (80%), pacing (78%), saying no to others (78%), grading tasks (75%) and challenging unhelpful thoughts (71%). Adding in those participants who were already using the respective strategies prior to FACETS, the three most used strategies at 4 months were prioritisation (55/59), grading (54/59) and pacing (53/58). Free-text comments illustrated the complex interplay between attitudes/expectations, behaviours, emotions and the environment. Issues related to expectations featured strongly in participants’ comments. Expectations (from self and others) were both facilitators and barriers to effective fatigue management. Conclusions Individuals’ comments highlighted the complex, multifaceted nature of fatigue

  1. Caries Management Strategies for Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, R.M.; Innes, N.P.T.; Machiulskiene, V.; Evans, D.J.P.; Splieth, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care–based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists’ level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful

  2. Applying Graph Theory to Problems in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrahi, Amir Hossein; Goldbert, Alan; Bagasol, Leonard Neil; Jung, Jaewoo

    2017-01-01

    Graph theory is used to investigate three different problems arising in air traffic management. First, using a polynomial reduction from a graph partitioning problem, it is shown that both the airspace sectorization problem and its incremental counterpart, the sector combination problem are NP-hard, in general, under several simple workload models. Second, using a polynomial time reduction from maximum independent set in graphs, it is shown that for any fixed e, the problem of finding a solution to the minimum delay scheduling problem in traffic flow management that is guaranteed to be within n1-e of the optimal, where n is the number of aircraft in the problem instance, is NP-hard. Finally, a problem arising in precision arrival scheduling is formulated and solved using graph reachability. These results demonstrate that graph theory provides a powerful framework for modeling, reasoning about, and devising algorithmic solutions to diverse problems arising in air traffic management.

  3. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  4. [Global brain metastases management strategy: a multidisciplinary-based approach].

    PubMed

    Métellus, P; Tallet, A; Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Spano, J-P; Azria, D; Noël, G; Barlési, F; Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases management has evolved over the last fifteen years and may use varying strategies, including more or less aggressive treatments, sometimes combined, leading to an improvement in patient's survival and quality of life. The therapeutic decision is subject to a multidisciplinary analysis, taking into account established prognostic factors including patient's general condition, extracerebral disease status and clinical and radiological presentation of lesions. In this article, we propose a management strategy based on the state of current knowledge and available therapeutic resources. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Optimal management strategies for placenta accreta.

    PubMed

    Eller, A G; Porter, T F; Soisson, P; Silver, R M

    2009-04-01

    To determine which interventions for managing placenta accreta were associated with reduced maternal morbidity. Retrospective cohort study. Two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Utah. All identified cases of placenta accreta from 1996 to 2008. Cases of placenta accreta were identified using standard ICD-9 codes for placenta accreta, placenta praevia, and caesarean hysterectomy. Medical records were then abstracted for maternal medical history, hospital course, and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Maternal and neonatal complications were compared according to antenatal suspicion of accreta, indications for delivery, preoperative preparation, attempts at placental removal before hysterectomy, and hypogastric artery ligation. Early morbidity (prolonged maternal intensive care unit admission, large volume of blood transfusion, coagulopathy, ureteral injury, or early re-operation) and late morbidity (intra-abdominal infection, hospital re-admission, or need for delayed re-operation). Results Seventy-six cases of placenta accreta were identified. When accreta was suspected, scheduled caesarean hysterectomy without attempting placental removal was associated with a significantly reduced rate of early morbidity compared with cases in which placental removal was attempted (67 versus 36%, P=0.038). Women with preoperative bilateral ureteric stents had a lower incidence of early morbidity compared with women without stents (18 versus 55%, P=0.018). Hypogastric artery ligation did not reduce maternal morbidity. Scheduled caesarean hysterectomy with preoperative ureteric stent placement and avoiding attempted placental removal are associated with reduced maternal morbidity in women with suspected placenta accreta.

  6. Future strategies in the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Schwitter, Jürg

    2006-09-01

    New diagnostic techniques have now become available that will enable us to obtain information on coronary artery disease (CAD), which was not previously possible. This is urgently needed, since changes in CAD management are highly desirable considering that up to 60% of patients die due to an insufficient diagnostic strategy (reactive strategy). In this article, the pathophysiology of CAD and the evidence of current concepts on coronary atherosclerosis are critically reviewed. Consequently, a shift from a 'reactive strategy' of CAD management to an active strategy is proposed in order to detect and treat patients before acute myocardial infarcts occur. Reliability, repeatability, cost-effectiveness and comfort are important features of an optimal test for this active strategy. This perspective gives an overview of current and future tests with respect to these features. The novel tomographic techniques are particularly promising with respect to standardization and reproducibility, which will set the basis for the determination of test performance and, consequently, cost-effectiveness. Assessment of cost-effectiveness is increasingly important, since prevalence of CAD is high and will most likely increase, while resources will remain restricted in most countries. Considering these economic restrictions, this article also proposes new mathematical tools using data from prospective trials and large international registries as an objective means to select the best tests for CAD diagnosis and management, and to identify those patient subsets which benefit most from an active strategy.

  7. Reservoir management -- as conceived and applied on the Palinpinon reservoir, Phillipines

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Zosimo F.; Amistoso, Arthur E.

    1988-01-01

    The present exploitation of Palinpinon reservoir has revealed valuable information on the subsurface characteristics of the reservoir under large scale production. The initial behavior of the field has given signals that there is a need to implement appropriate strategies to optimise its capacity without jeopardizing the supply of adequate steam to the power plant. Some of the problems encountered such as reinjection returns, mineral deposition, ingress of acid fluid and other phenomena indicated the need to pursue an aggressive monitoring capability and timely appraisal of the field response to design an approach which will best suit the optimum management of the reservoir. The results of reservoir monitoring are discussed as well as the policies applied in operating the field.

  8. Impact of Conflict Management Strategies on the Generation Mechanism of Miners' Unsafe Behavior Tendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ji-Zu; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Yao-Long; Wang, Tian-Ri

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between the generation mechanism of miners' unsafe behavior tendency and conflict management strategies, including cooperative conflict management strategy, competitive conflict management strategy and avoidant conflict management strategy. Miners from 3 collieries in Shanxi province completed a…

  9. Model predictive control power management strategies for HEVs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanjun; Wang, Hong; Khajepour, Amir; He, Hongwen; Ji, Jie

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of power management strategy (PMS) utilized in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) with an emphasis on model predictive control (MPC) based strategies for the first time. Research on MPC-based power management systems for HEVs has intensified recently due to its many inherent merits. The categories of the existing PMSs are identified from the latest literature, and a brief study of each type is conducted. Then, the MPC approach is introduced and its advantages are discussed. Based on the acquisition method of driver behavior used for state prediction and the dynamic model used, the MPC is classified and elaborated. Factors that affect the performance of the MPC are put forward, including prediction accuracy, design parameters, and solvers. Finally, several important issues in the application of MPC-based power management strategies and latest developing trends are discussed. This paper not only provides a comprehensive analysis of MPC-based power management strategies for HEVs but also puts forward the future and emphasis of future study, which will promote the development of energy management controller with high performance and low cost for HEVs.

  10. Current strategies for endoscopic management of acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Tan, Damien

    2017-04-01

    At the pancreatobiliary session of Endoscopic Forum Japan (EFJ) 2016, current strategies for the endoscopic management of acute cholangitis were discussed. The topics consisted of two major parts, namely endoscopic management of acute cholangitis caused by common bile duct stones (CBDS) and biliary stent occlusion. Endoscopists from nine Japanese high-volume centers along with two overseas centers participated in the questionnaires and discussion. Strategies for management of cholangitis due to CBDS were agreed upon, and the clinical guideline of acute cholangitis (Tokyo guidelines 2013) was accepted. The best timing for drainage in Grade 2 (moderate) cholangitis urgent or early (<24 h) was inconclusive, and more data is required on this issue. Another controversy was the feasibility of one step stone extraction in the patient with cholangitis vs stone removal after the cholangitis had resolved. There were various opinions with regards to the management of acute cholangitis due to stent occlusion, and the strategies differed according to the stricture location (distal or hilar) and stent type initially placed (Covered or uncovered metal stent). Strategies for management of cholangitis caused by CBD stones are well established according to the TG13. More evidence is required before further recommendations can be made with regards to cholangitis due to stent occlusion. We aim to clarify this in the near future with questionnaires and consensus from experts. © 2017 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  12. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  13. Recent advances in applying decision science to managing national forests

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot; Matthew P. Thompson; Michael C. Runge; Frank R. Thompson; Steven McNulty; David Cleaves; Monica Tomosy; Larry A. Fisher; Andrew Bliss

    2012-01-01

    Management of federal public forests to meet sustainability goals and multiple use regulations is an immense challenge. To succeed, we suggest use of formal decision science procedures and tools in the context of structured decision making (SDM). SDM entails four stages: problem structuring (framing the problem and defining objectives and evaluation criteria), problem...

  14. Applied forest management in the Douglas-fir region.

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Briegleb

    1950-01-01

    In the past decade or two sustained yield management has been emphasized as never before in the Douglas-fir region. It would be difficult to cite all the economic and technological factors that have encouraged landowners to grow timber as a crop. But one of the most potent sources of encouragement is the fund of technical information on timber growth, silviculture, and...

  15. Management Strategies for Skull Base Inverted Papilloma.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica W; Khichi, Sunny S; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-07-01

    Inverted papilloma attached to the ventral skull base presents a surgical dilemma because surgical removal of the bony pedicle is critical to decrease risk of recurrence. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic management of skull base inverted papilloma. Case series with planned data collection. Tertiary medical center. Patients with skull base inverted papilloma. Over 7 years, 49 patients with skull base inverted papilloma were referred for surgical resection. Demographics, operative technique, pathology, complications, recurrence, and postoperative follow-up were evaluated. Average age at presentation was 57 years. Twenty-six patients (53%) had prior attempts at resection elsewhere, and 5 had squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) arising in an inverted papilloma. Six patients (12%) suffered major complications, including skull base osteomyelitis in 2 previously irradiated patients, cerebrospinal fluid leak with pneumocephalus (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), invasive fungal sinusitis (n = 1), and cerebrovascular accident (n = 1). The mean disease-free interval was 29 months (range, 10-78 months). One patient with SCCA recurred in the nasopharynx (overall 2% recurrence rate). He is disease-free 3 years following endoscopic nasopharyngectomy. Three patients with SCCA had endoscopic resection of the skull base, while 1 subject with inverted papilloma pedicled on the superior orbital roof had an osteoplastic flap in conjunction with a Draf III procedure. All others received endoscopic resection. Removal of the bony pedicle resulted in excellent local control of skull base inverted papillomas. Our experience demonstrates that disease eradication with limited morbidity is attainable with this approach. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. Strategies to improve outcomes from operative childhood management of DDH.

    PubMed

    Wedge, John H; Kelley, Simon P

    2012-07-01

    The operative management of DDH is technically challenging. To achieve excellent results, surgeons need to select the most appropriate operative treatment, minimize the risk of complications, and be aggressive in the management of serious complications, such as redislocation and AVN, when they occur. We have described specific steps and strategies to assist in each of these key steps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Applying Realtime Intelligence Acquisition Techniques To Problems In Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Jerry D.

    1989-02-01

    Most people see little similarity between a battlefield manager and a natural resource manager. However, except for the element of time, many striking similarities may be drawn. Indeed, there are more differences between the tranquil scenes of mountain scenery, forests, rivers or grasslands and bomb scarred battlefields where survival is often the prime objective. The similarities center around the basic need for information upon which good decisions may be made. Both managers of battlefields and of natural resources require accurate, timely, and continuous information about changing conditions. Based on this information, they each make decisions to conserve the materials and resources under their charge. Their common goal is to serve the needs of the people in their society. On the one hand, the goal is victory in battle to perpetuate a way of life or a political system. On the other, the goal is victory in an ongoing battle against fire, insects, disease, soil erosion, vandalism, theft, and misuse in general. Here, a desire to maintain natural resources in a productive and healthy condition prevails. The objective of the natural resource manager is to keep natural resources in such a condition that they will continue to meet the needs and wants of the people who claim them for their common good. In this paper, the different needs for information are compared and a little history of some of the quasi-military aspects of resource management is given. Needs for information are compared and current uses of data acquisition techniques are reviewed. Similarities and differences are discussed and future opportunities for cooperation in data acquisition are outlined.

  18. A Role Play for Revising Style and Applying Management Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Role-playing is a well regarded learning activity. By participating in this activity, students can apply their knowledge through their assigned roles in a realistic but risk-free situation. The role play stimulates class discussion, dramatizes rhetorical principles about purpose, shows how to adapt a text to an audience of employees in a…

  19. A Role Play for Revising Style and Applying Management Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Role-playing is a well regarded learning activity. By participating in this activity, students can apply their knowledge through their assigned roles in a realistic but risk-free situation. The role play stimulates class discussion, dramatizes rhetorical principles about purpose, shows how to adapt a text to an audience of employees in a…

  20. Natural hazard management high education: laboratory of hydrologic and hydraulic risk management and applied geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosa, L.; Margiotta, M. R.; Sdao, F.; Sole, A.; Albano, R.; Cappa, G.; Giammatteo, C.; Pagliuca, R.; Piccolo, G.; Statuto, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Environmental Engineering Faculty of University of Basilicata have higher-level course for students in the field of natural hazard. The curriculum provides expertise in the field of prediction, prevention and management of earthquake risk, hydrologic-hydraulic risk, and geomorphological risk. These skills will contribute to the training of specialists, as well as having a thorough knowledge of the genesis and the phenomenology of natural risks, know how to interpret, evaluate and monitor the dynamic of environment and of territory. In addition to basic training in the fields of mathematics and physics, the course of study provides specific lessons relating to seismic and structural dynamics of land, environmental and computational hydraulics, hydrology and applied hydrogeology. In particular in this course there are organized two connected examination arguments: Laboratory of hydrologic and hydraulic risk management and Applied geomorphology. These course foresee the development and resolution of natural hazard problems through the study of a real natural disaster. In the last year, the work project has regarded the collapse of two decantation basins of fluorspar, extracted from some mines in Stava Valley, 19 July 1985, northern Italy. During the development of the course, data and event information has been collected, a guided tour to the places of the disaster has been organized, and finally the application of mathematical models to simulate the disaster and analysis of the results has been carried out. The student work has been presented in a public workshop.

  1. Role of Emotional Intelligence in Conflict Management Strategies of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Başoğul, Ceyda; Özgür, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    This study analyzes the emotional intelligence levels and conflict management strategies of nurses and the association between them. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 277 nurses in a stratified random sample from a university hospital in Turkey. The data were collected from nurses who gave their informed consent to participate using a personal information form, the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II and Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-I). Data were assessed by descriptive statistics, t tests, and Pearson correlation analyses, using SPSS software. The levels of the nurses' strategies were as follows: avoiding (M = 2.98), dominating (M = 2.76), and obliging (M = 2.71) were medium; compromising (M = 1.99) and integration (M = 1.96) were low. The levels of the emotional intelligence of nurses (mean = 2.75) were medium on a 5-point scale. Integration (r = .168), obliging (r = .25), dominating (r = .18), and compromising (r = .33), which are conflict management strategies, were positively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence, and avoiding (r = -.25) was negatively correlated with scores of emotional intelligence (p < .05). The study determined that nurses' emotional intelligence affects conflict management strategies. To use effective strategies in conflict management, nurses must develop emotional intelligence. Training programs on conflict management and emotional intelligence are needed to improve effective conflict management in healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Major accident prevention through applying safety knowledge management approach.

    PubMed

    Kalatpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Many scattered resources of knowledge are available to use for chemical accident prevention purposes. The common approach to management process safety, including using databases and referring to the available knowledge has some drawbacks. The main goal of this article was to devise a new emerged knowledge base (KB) for the chemical accident prevention domain. The scattered sources of safety knowledge were identified and scanned. Then, the collected knowledge was formalized through a computerized program. The Protégé software was used to formalize and represent the stored safety knowledge. The domain knowledge retrieved as well as data and information. This optimized approach improved safety and health knowledge management (KM) process and resolved some typical problems in the KM process. Upgrading the traditional resources of safety databases into the KBs can improve the interaction between the users and knowledge repository.

  3. APPLIED INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USER’S MANUAL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Information Management System), an information storage and retrieval system used by the Engineering Department at SDC, is described. AIMS inputs are descriptors manually selected from the body and title of documents by a technique not requiring professional subject matter or abstracting skill. Outputs are special computer generated indexes to locate information stored. The most important is the Permuted Descriptor Index. The most common information handled by AIMS consists of SDC documents, technical articles, manuals and catalogs, correspondence, and the standard office

  4. Applying Fuzzy Data Mining to Telecom Churn Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kuo-Hsiung; Chueh, Hao-En

    Customers tend to change telecommunications service providers in pursuit of more favorable telecommunication rates. Therefore, how to avoid customer churn is an extremely critical topic for the intensely competitive telecommunications industry. To assist telecommunications service providers in effectively reducing the rate of customer churn, this study used fuzzy data mining to determine effective marketing strategies by analyzing the responses of customers to various marketing activities. These techniques can help telecommunications service providers determine the most appropriate marketing opportunities and methods for different customer groups, to reduce effectively the rate of customer turnover.

  5. A survey of managed care strategies for pregnant smokers.

    PubMed

    Barker, D C; Robinson, L A; Rosenthal, A C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the content and comprehensiveness of pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies within managed care organisations (MCOs) responding affirmatively to the national 1997-98 Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC) survey. This cross sectional follow up study consisted of a fax survey sent to medical directors and a 37 question telephone survey of program overseers about the smoking cessation strategy. 147 MCOs identifying a pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategy on the 1997-98 ATMC survey served as the initial sample; 88 MCOs of 128 eligible plans completed both components, with a response rate of 69%. Pregnancy specific smoking cessation strategies varied. 40% of respondents used the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines for clinical smoking cessation to design their strategy. Strategies included self help materials, quit classes, telephone support and brief counselling by providers, linkages to quality improvement efforts, and use of patient databases for outreach. Only 42% offered a postpartum relapse prevention element. Lack of patient interest, competing clinic priorities, and the lack of a smoker identification system were the most problematic barriers to implementing strategies, common to at least a quarter of respondents. A majority ranked best practice manuals and web site linkages as the most useful form of technical assistance, followed by peer-to-peer counselling, regional workshops, newsletters, on-site assistance, and national conferences. The survey provides the first profile of prenatal tobacco treatment strategies in managed care. While design limitations prevent generalisation of these results to all MCOs, such information can help guide technical assistance to plans interested in reducing smoking among pregnant women.

  6. Effects of Applied Land Use Strategies on Farmland Soils in the Southwestern Siberian Kulunda-Steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Lars-Christian; Illiger, Patrick; Stephan, Eckart; Frühauf, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    the understanding of the impact of agricultural land use practice on field scale, but also largely contribute to the research on sustainable land management, rural development and climate change and connect applied science with capacity building for local stakeholders.

  7. How Managers' everyday decisions create or destroy your company's strategy.

    PubMed

    Bower, Joseph L; Gilbert, Clark G

    2007-02-01

    Senior executives have long been frustrated by the disconnection between the plans and strategies they devise and the actual behavior of the managers throughout the company. This article approaches the problem from the ground up, recognizing that every time a manager allocates resources, that decision moves the company either into or out of alignment with its announced strategy. A well-known story--Intel's exit from the memory business--illustrates this point. When discussing what businesses Intel should be in, Andy Grove asked Gordon Moore what they would do if Intel were a company that they had just acquired. When Moore answered, "Get out of memory," they decided to do just that. It turned out, though, that Intel's revenues from memory were by this time only 4% of total sales. Intel's lower-level managers had already exited the business. What Intel hadn't done was to shut down the flow of research funding into memory (which was still eating up one-third of all research expenditures); nor had the company announced its exit to the outside world. Because divisional and operating managers-as well as customers and capital markets-have such a powerful impact on the realized strategy of the firm, senior management might consider focusing less on the company's formal strategy and more on the processes by which the company allocates resources. Top managers must know the track record of the people who are making resource allocation proposals; recognize the strategic issues at stake; reach down to operational managers to work across division lines; frame resource questions to reflect the corporate perspective, especially when large sums of money are involved and conditions are highly uncertain; and create a new context that allows top executives to circumvent the regular resource allocation process when necessary.

  8. Rule Driven Multi-Objective Management (RDMOM) - An Alternative Form for Describing and Developing Effective Water Resources Management Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheer, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Economics provides a model for describing human behavior applied to the management of water resources, but that model assumes, among other things, that managers have a way of directly relating immediate actions to long-term economic outcomes. This is rarely the case in water resources problems where uncertainty has significant impacts on the effectiveness of management strategies and where the management objectives are very difficult to commensurate. The difficulty in using economics is even greater in multiparty disputes, where each party has a different relative value for each of the management objectives, and many of the management objectives are shared. A three step approach to collaborative decision making can overcome these difficulties. The first step involves creating science based performance measures and evaluation tools to estimate the effect of alternative management strategies on each of the non-commensurate objectives. The second step involves developing short-term surrogate operating objectives that implicitly deal with all of the aspects of the long term uncertainty. Management that continually "optimizes" the short-term objectives subject to physical and other constraints that change through time can be characterized as Rule Driven Multi-Objective Management (RDMOM). RDMOM strategies are then tested in simulation models to provide the basis for evaluating performance measures. Participants in the collaborative process then engage in multiparty discussions that create new alternatives, and "barter" a deal. RDMOM does not assume that managers fully understand the link between current actions and long term goals. Rather, it assumes that managers operate to achieve short-term surrogate objectives which they believe will achieve an appropriate balance of both short and long-term incommensurable benefits. A reservoir rule curve is a simple, but often not particularly effective, example of the real-world implementation of RDMOM. Water managers find they

  9. The Art World's Concept of Negative Space Applied to System Safety Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Tools from several different disciplines can improve system safety management. This paper relates the Art World with our system safety world showing useful art schools of thought applied to system safety management; developing an art theory- system safety bridge. This bridge is then used to demonstrate relations with risk management, the legal system, personnel management and basic management (establishing priorities.) One goal of this presentation/paper is simply to be a fun diversion from the many technical topics presented during the conference.

  10. Management Strategies for Transition to Sustainable Agricultural Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlfeld, D.; Mulligan, K.; Brown, C. M.; Yang, Y. E.

    2011-12-01

    In many agricultural regions of the world, aquifer overdrafting for agricultural irrigation continues. Management strategies are investigated that transition from this unsustainable use of water to a future, diminished use of irrigation. Complications arising from climate change and volatile energy prices are considered. A command and control strategy is modeled using combined simulation and optimization techniques. This strategy is compared with market based mechanisms such as cap and trade and Pigouvian pricing that are modeled using agent based methods. The formulations are designed to model the effects of different management strategies including those that seek to avoid rapid changes in basin-wide water utilization (considered a surrogate for agricultural production) over this time period. Formulations also include limits on total reduction in aquifer storage and controls on streamflow in the basin. The management formulations used in this study are developed for planning horizons of 50 to 100 years and use the Republican River Basin in the High Plains Aquifer as a case study. Historical and climate-adjusted recharge patterns are considered. Spatial and temporal variation in total irrigated acreage and the aquifer storage change determined by the solutions of the management formulations are analyzed and presented.

  11. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  12. Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Human capital is one of the critical issues that impacts the Greater Philadelphia region's ability to grow and prosper. The CEO Council for Growth (CEO Council) is committed to ensuring a steady and talented supply of quality workers for this region. "Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action" provides…

  13. Evolution in clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs.

  14. Role Management Strategies of Beginning Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Pik Lin; Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2005-01-01

    Beginning teachers encounter new challenges as the role system in contemporary society has become more and more demanding. By means of the life history method, role management strategies of four Hong Kong beginning teachers employed to cope with role demands and intra-role conflicts were located in their biographical, workplace and wider…

  15. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  16. Managing Work and Family: Do Control Strategies Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versey, H. Shellae

    2015-01-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping…

  17. Sources of Faculty Stress and Strategies for Its Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Paul; Clagett, Craig

    Views on sources of stress on college faculty and strategies for its management were obtained at small-group sessions in the 1980 faculty orientation at Prince George's Community College, Maryland. Sixteen faculty groups generated 218 responses expressing sources of job stress, a complete listing of which is appended. The responses were aggregated…

  18. The creative process in biomedical visualization: strategies and management.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P A

    1990-01-01

    The phases of the creative process (identification, preparation, incubation, insight, and elaboration/verification) are related to strategies for management of biomedical illustration projects. The idea that creativity is a mystery--and is unpredictable and uncontrollable--is not accepted. This article presents a practical way to encourage creative thinking in the biomedical visualization studio.

  19. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  20. Strategic Enrollment Management: Core Strategies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontrager, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This second of a two-part series builds on the core concepts and structural considerations discussed in the first part (in the Winter 2004 issue of "College and University") to identify the core strategies and best practices that characterize successful enrollment management (SEM) organizations. Successful SEM operations place a high premium on…

  1. Managing Student Participation: Teacher Strategies in a Virtual EFL Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Airong

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to explore teacher strategies for managing student participation in a complex Multi-user Virtual Environment. Data include transcribed recordings from a task-based EFL course in Second Life. Conversational Analysis is adopted to analyze the teacher's verbal language output in the transcript, and a student questionnaire is used to…

  2. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  3. San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy for Dredging

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy (LTMS) is a cooperative effort to develop a new approach to dredging and dredged material disposal in the San Francisco Bay area. The LTMS serves as the Regional Dredging Team for the San Francisco area.

  4. Managing Work and Family: Do Control Strategies Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versey, H. Shellae

    2015-01-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping…

  5. Songbirds and humans apply different strategies in a sound sequence discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kenta; Osawa, Ayumi M; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The abilities of animals and humans to extract rules from sound sequences have previously been compared using observation of spontaneous responses and conditioning techniques. However, the results were inconsistently interpreted across studies possibly due to methodological and/or species differences. Therefore, we examined the strategies for discrimination of sound sequences in Bengalese finches and humans using the same protocol. Birds were trained on a GO/NOGO task to discriminate between two categories of sound stimulus generated based on an "AAB" or "ABB" rule. The sound elements used were taken from a variety of male (M) and female (F) calls, such that the sequences could be represented as MMF and MFF. In test sessions, FFM and FMM sequences, which were never presented in the training sessions but conformed to the rule, were presented as probe stimuli. The results suggested two discriminative strategies were being applied: (1) memorizing sound patterns of either GO or NOGO stimuli and generating the appropriate responses for only those sounds; and (2) using the repeated element as a cue. There was no evidence that the birds successfully extracted the abstract rule (i.e., AAB and ABB); MMF-GO subjects did not produce a GO response for FFM and vice versa. Next we examined whether those strategies were also applicable for human participants on the same task. The results and questionnaires revealed that participants extracted the abstract rule, and most of them employed it to discriminate the sequences. This strategy was never observed in bird subjects, although some participants used strategies similar to the birds when responding to the probe stimuli. Our results showed that the human participants applied the abstract rule in the task even without instruction but Bengalese finches did not, thereby reconfirming that humans have to extract abstract rules from sound sequences that is distinct from non-human animals.

  6. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Lavine, Laura; O’Neal, Sally; Lavine, Mark; Foss, Carrie; Walsh, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ecosystems involves understanding the status and mechanisms of insecticide resistance and reducing insecticide selection pressure by combining multiple chemical and non-chemical approaches. In this review, we will focus on the commonly used insecticides and molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance in six major urban insect pests: house fly, German cockroach, mosquitoes, red flour beetle, bed bugs and head louse. We will also discuss several strategies that may prove promising for future urban IPM programs. PMID:26751480

  7. Current Management Strategy for Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Syed, Jamil S; Javier-Desloges, Juan; Tatzel, Stephanie; Bhagat, Ansh; Nguyen, Kevin A; Hwang, Kevin; Kim, Sarah; Sprenkle, Preston C

    2017-02-01

    Active surveillance has been increasingly utilized as a strategy for the management of favorable-risk, localized prostate cancer. In this review, we describe contemporary management strategies of active surveillance, with a focus on traditional stratification schemes, new prognostic tools, and patient outcomes. Patient selection, follow-up strategy, and indication for delayed intervention for active surveillance remain centered around PSA, digital rectal exam, and biopsy findings. Novel tools which include imaging, biomarkers, and genetic assays have been investigated as potential prognostic adjuncts; however, their role in active surveillance remains institutionally dependent. Although 30-50% of patients on active surveillance ultimately undergo delayed treatment, the vast majority will remain free of metastasis with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. The optimal method for patient selection into active surveillance is unknown; however, cancer-specific mortality rates remain excellent. New prognostication tools are promising, and long-term prospective, randomized data regarding their use in active surveillance will be beneficial.

  8. Communication strategies and volunteer management for the IAU-OAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development will be developing a new communication strategy to promote its projects in a way that is relevant to stakeholders and the general public. Ideas include a magazine featuring best practices within the field of astronomy for development and setting up a workflow of communication that integrates the different outputs of the office and effectively uses the information collection tools developed by OAD team members.To accomplish these tasks the OAD will also develop a community management strategy with existing tools to effectively harness the skills of OAD volunteers for communication purposes. This talk will discuss the new communication strategy of the OAD as well the expanded community management plans.

  9. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  10. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget.

  11. Flexible augmented reality architecture applied to environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Nuno M. R.; Romao, Teresa; Santos, Carlos; Trabuco, Adelaide; Santos, Rossana; Romero, Luis; Danado, Jose; Dias, Eduardo; Camara, Antonio; Nobre, Edmundo

    2003-05-01

    Environmental management often requires in loco observation of the area under analysis. Augmented Reality (AR) technologies allow real time superimposition of synthetic objects on real images, providing augmented knowledge about the surrounding world. Users of an AR system can visualize the real surrounding world together with additional data generated in real time in a contextual way. The work reported in this paper was done in the scope of ANTS (Augmented Environments) project. ANTS is an AR project that explores the development of an augmented reality technological infrastructure for environmental management. This paper presents the architecture and the most relevant modules of ANTS. The system"s architecture follows the client-server model and is based on several independent, but functionally interdependent modules. It has a flexible design, which allows the transfer of some modules to and from the client side, according to the available processing capacities of the client device and the application"s requirements. It combines several techniques to identify the user"s position and orientation allowing the system to adapt to the particular characteristics of each environment. The determination of the data associated to a certain location involves the use of both a 3D Model of the location and the multimedia geo-referenced database.

  12. Applying ecological risk principles to watershed assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Serveiss, Victor B

    2002-02-01

    Considerable progress in addressing point source (end of pipe) pollution problems has been made, but it is now recognized that further substantial environmental improvements depend on controlling nonpoint source pollution. A watershed approach is being used more frequently to address these problems because traditional regulatory approaches do not focus on nonpoint sources. The watershed approach is organized around the guiding principles of partnerships, geographic focus, and management based on sound science and data. This helps to focus efforts on the highest priority problems within hydrologically-defined geographic areas. Ecological risk assessment is a process to collect, organize, analyze, and present scientific information to improve decision making. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored three watershed assessments and found that integrating the watershed approach with ecological risk assessment increases the use of environmental monitoring and assessment data in decision making. This paper describes the basics of the watershed approach, the ecological risk assessment process, and how these two frameworks can be integrated. The three major principles of watershed ecological risk assessment found to be most useful for increasing the use of science in decision making are (1) using assessment endpoints and conceptual models, (2) holding regular interactions between scientists and managers, and (3) developing a focus for multiple stressor analysis. Examples are provided illustrating how these principles were implemented in these assessments.

  13. Applied Space Systems Engineering. Chapter 17; Manage Technical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Effective space systems engineering (SSE) is conducted in a fully electronic manner. Competitive hardware, software, and system designs are created in a totally digital environment that enables rapid product design and manufacturing cycles, as well as a multitude of techniques such as modeling, simulation, and lean manufacturing that significantly reduce the lifecycle cost of systems. Because the SSE lifecycle depends on the digital environment, managing the enormous volumes of technical data needed to describe, build, deploy, and operate systems is a critical factor in the success of a project. This chapter presents the key aspects of Technical Data Management (TDM) within the SSE process. It is written from the perspective of the System Engineer tasked with establishing the TDM process and infrastructure for a major project. Additional perspectives are reflected from the point of view of the engineers on the project who work within the digital engineering environment established by the TDM toolset and infrastructure, and from the point of view of the contactors who interface via the TDM infrastructure. Table 17.1 lists the TDM process as it relates to SSE.

  14. Applying automated data acquisition and management technology to bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Widing, M.A.; Leser, C.

    1995-06-01

    Operating a bioremediation process requires timely and accurate analysis of physical and chemical parameters that can affect the system. At a fuel oil spill site, the operation of an in-situ bioremediation system, consisting of fluid and nutrient injection, fluid withdrawal, and aeration cycles, is monitored by means of electronic downhole sensors and on-site chemical analysis. A data acquisition and management system was designed and implemented to rapidly analyze data for operational decision malting. A hardware suite, containing an electronic monitoring system data acquisition computer, and data analysis workstation, was also developed. Through the use of both commercial software products and custom software, suites of data management and analysis tools were provided. The data acquisition suite of software tools assisted in programming dataloggers, automatically recording monitored data, and integrating these data with manually sampled chemical data. The data analysis suite of software tools assisted in downloading data to remote workstations, sampling the database for trend analysis, and automating the interface to commercial analysis packages.

  15. Management of Agricultural Weather Risks: traditional procedures and new management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgaz, F.

    2009-04-01

    Throughout history, agriculture has progressed as an outcome of farmers' efforts to design and apply adaptation strategies aiming to mitigate the impact of adverse meteorological phenomena on their farms' economy. The survival and sustainability of farmholdings, regardless of size or type of production, is directly related to their capacity to withstand the consequences of such phenomena and continue to yield a harvest year after year. While substantial differences can be identified in the intensity and frequency of the damage borne, depending on the country, region and type of production, no farm is exempt from the effects of uncontrollable risks. In this endeavour to mitigate such consequences and successfully manage natural risks, the first protective step must be taken by the farm itself, which must adopt measures that pursue more favourable crop development or a heightened ability to handle risks and their adverse effects. But when the damage inflicted is of an intensity that cannot be accommodated by the farmer, instruments must be deployed that spread or transfer risk to third parties, a process known as risk insurance. Experience shows that of the various such instruments in place, insurance constitutes the most appropriate risk management model and the one that has reached the highest levels of development and acceptance among farmers.

  16. Risk management in mental health: applying lessons from commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Simon

    2010-02-01

    Risk management in mental health focuses on risks in patients and fails to predict rare but catastrophic events such as suicide. Commercial aviation has a similar task in preventing rare but catastrophic accidents. This article describes the systems in place in commercial aviation that allows that industry to prevent disasters and contrasts this with the situation in mental health. In mental health we should learn from commercial aviation by having: national policies to promote patient safety; a national body responsible for implementing this policy which maintains a database of safety occurrences, sets targets and investigates adverse outcomes; legislation in place which encourages clinicians to report safety occurrences; and a common method and language for investigating safety occurrences.

  17. Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI): a robust strategy.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K; Raina, Neena

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy fostering holistic approach to child health and development, is built upon successful experiences gained from effective child health interventions like immunization, oral rehydration therapy, management of acute respiratory infections and improved infant feeding. The core intervention of IMCI is integrated management of the five most important causes of childhood deaths-acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, measles, malaria and malnutrition. Using a set of interventions for the integrated treatment and prevention of major childhood illnesses, the IMCI strategy aims to reduce death as well as the frequency and severity of illness and disability, thus contributing to improved growth and development. In health facilities, the IMCI strategy promotes the accurate identification of childhood illness (es) in the outpatient settings, ensures appropriate combined treatment of all major illnesses, strengthens the counselling of caretakers and the provision of preventive services, and speeds up the referral of severely ill children. The strategy also aims to improve the quality of care of sick children at the referral level. It also creates a scientifically sound link between the management guidelines at the community level and the management approach in a referral centre. The strategy also envisages actual situations when referral is not possible and offers the best possible options in such circumstances. In the home setting, it promotes appropriate early home care and care-seeking, improved nutrition and prevention, and the correct implementation of prescribed care. In addition to its focus on treatment of illness in the health facility as well as at home, it also provides an opportunity for important preventive interventions such as immunization and improved infant and child nutrition including breastfeeding. The IMCI strategy reduces wastage of resources and avoids duplication of efforts that may

  18. Experiences of Uav Surveys Applied to Environmental Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, M.; Trizzino, R.; Mazzone, F.; Scarano, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the results of some surveys carried out in an area of Apulian territory affected by serious environmental hazard are presented. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are emerging as a key engineering tool for future environmental survey tasks. UAVs are increasingly seen as an attractive low-cost alternative or supplement to aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry due to their low cost, flexibility, availability and readiness for duty. In addition, UAVs can be operated in hazardous or temporarily inaccessible locations, that makes them very suitable for the assessment and management of environmental risk conditions. In order to verify the reliability of these technologies an UAV survey and A LIDAR survey have been carried outalong about 1 km of coast in the Salento peninsula, near the towns of San Foca, Torre dellOrso and SantAndrea( Lecce, Southern Italy). This area is affected by serious environmental risks due to the presence of dangerous rocky cliffs named falesie. The UAV platform was equipped with a photogrammetric measurement system that allowed us to obtain a mobile mapping of the fractured fronts of dangerous rocky cliffs. UAV-images data have been processed using dedicated software (AgisoftPhotoscan). The point clouds obtained from both the UAV and LIDAR surveys have been processed using Cloud Compare software, with the aim of testing the UAV results with respect to the LIDAR ones. The total error obtained was of centimeter-order that is a very satisfactory result. The environmental information has been arranged in an ArcGIS platform in order to assess the risk levels. The possibility to repeat the survey at time intervals more or less close together depending on the measured levels of risk and to compare the output allows following the trend of the dangerous phenomena. In conclusion, for inaccessible locations of dangerous rocky bodies the UAV survey coupled with GIS methodology proved to be a key engineering tool for the management of environmental

  19. Managing burned landscapes: Evaluating future management strategies for resilient forests under a warming climate

    Treesearch

    K. L. Shive; P. Z. Fule; C. H. Sieg; B. A. Strom; M. E. Hunter

    2014-01-01

    Climate change effects on forested ecosystems worldwide include increases in drought-related mortality, changes to disturbance regimes and shifts in species distributions. Such climate-induced changes will alter the outcomes of current management strategies, complicating the selection of appropriate strategies to promote forest resilience. We modelled forest growth in...

  20. Evaluation of two communication strategies to improve udder health management.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; Renes, R J; Lam, T J G M

    2010-02-01

    Worldwide, programs to improve udder health are implemented using communication tools and methods that inform and persuade dairy farmers. This study evaluated 2 communication strategies used in a mastitis control program in the Netherlands. To improve farmers' udder health management, tools such as instruction cards, treatment plans, checklists and software were developed following an argument-based comprehensive "central route." These tools were used during on-farm study group meetings for farmers organized by veterinarians and also during individual veterinarian-farmer interactions. The second strategy aimed at adopting a single management practice to increase the use of milking gloves during milking. This approach followed a straightforward "peripheral" route that used implicit persuasion techniques. Results of an online survey of 374 Dutch dairy farmers showed that most farmers were able and willing to use the educational management tools to increase udder health on their farms. They evaluated the tools positively regardless of the mastitis problems on their farms. This seems to indicate that the central route of communication is most effective when farmers are motivated to work on udder health in general. Results of repeated random telephone surveys before, during, and after the campaign on the use of milking gloves showed that the use of gloves increased from 20.9 to 42.0% of the respondents. Respondents' opinions about milking gloves also changed favorably, indicating that a relatively short peripheral campaign on a single action can have a sustained effect on farmers' behavior. Both communication strategies seem to be potentially successful in disseminating knowledge to a specific target group of farmers and in changing that group's behavior. However, to reach as many farmers as possible, the strategies should be combined. When optimizing these strategies, both the farmers' motivation to work on udder health and the aim of the campaign should be considered

  1. Applying Human Capital Management to Model Manpower Readiness: A Conceptual Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    CAPITAL MANAGEMENT TO MODEL MANPOWER READINESS: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK by Pert Chin Ngin December 2005 Associate Advisors: William R...Management to Model Manpower Readiness: A Conceptual Framework 6. AUTHOR(S) Pert Chin Ngin 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...distribution is unlimited. APPLYING HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT TO MODEL MANPOWER READINESS: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Pert Chin Ngin MAJOR, Republic of

  2. Sustainable Phosphorus Management in Land Applied Reclaimed Water Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinkam, G.

    2015-12-01

    Florida leads the nation in wastewater effluent/reclaimed water use, at over 700 million gallons per day, of which 75% is land applied. While these effluent waters are treated to reduce pathogen loads, phosphorus (P) concentrations can still be substantial in long term application scenarios. Currently an estimated 1.5 million kg of P are reintroduced to the landscape yearly (at effluent = 2 mg P/L), compared to only 23,000 kg that would be applied if landscapes were irrigated with ground water (at ground water = 0.03 mg P/L). Research suggests that under long term applications of P systems can reach a state at which they are no longer able to assimilate further loading, potentially resulting in landscapes that are actively leaching and eroding P rich particulate matter to receiving hydrologic systems. This can be especially relevant in Florida given the large proportion of sandy soils that contain, relatively, low physical and chemical ion exchange capacity and high hydraulic conductivity, thus increasing the potential for water quality impairment. Due to increasingly stringent surface water P concentrations allowances, and the many uncertainties regarding the long term fate and transport of P, this research seeks to determine how different soil conditions and reclaimed water loading amounts can alter P leaching profiles in Florida. Field sampling at reclaimed water sprayfield sites are used to determine the relative change in P sequestration potential using soil-phosphorus saturation capacity (SPSC) analyses and potential leaching risk is determined by soil core experimentation. The resulting information improves fundamental understanding of soil-phosphorus transport dynamics and provides insights into alternative techniques for long term environmental sustainability of reclaimed wastewater usage.

  3. Applying the variety reduction principle to management of ancillary services.

    PubMed

    Elkhuizen, Sylvia G; van Sambeek, Jasper R C; Hans, Erwin W; Krabbendam, Koos J J; Bakker, Piet J M

    2007-01-01

    As central diagnostic facilities, computer tomography (CT) scans appear to be bottlenecks in many patient-care processes. This study describes a case study concerning redesign of a CT scan department in the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The aim was to decrease access time for the CT-scan and simultaneously increase utilization level. An important cause of relatively low-capacity utilization is variability in the time needed for the scanning process. We performed a qualitative and quantitative analysis of current processes; identified bottlenecks and selected interventions with the greatest expected reduction of variability in flow time. The most promising and most feasible opportunity appeared to be to reallocate the insertion of intravenous access lines to a preparation room. The time needed for this activity was very hard to predict and needed a lot of slack in the lead time for appointments. By removing it from the CT room, lead time could be reduced by 5 minutes. The intervention resulted in a decrease of access time from 21 days to less than 5 days, and an increase of the utilization rate from 44% to 51%. This contributed directly to patient service and indirectly to cost reduction. Our strategy is applicable in every appointment-based hospital facility with variation in the length of time of the process. It allows to simultaneously reduce costs and improve service for the patient.

  4. Management of constipation in the elderly: emerging therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2008-09-07

    A number of new, novel strategies for managing constipation in the elderly have emerged over the past few years. Prucalopride is one such new agent that is highly efficacious in managing chronic constipation. In fact, Camilleri et al in a recent study reported that the average number of bowel movements increased by at least one in nearly 47% of the patients who were administered a dose of 4 mg. Lubiprostone is another new agent recently approved by the FDA that shows efficacy in managing the symptoms of constipation. Neostigmine has also been successfully used for the management of recalcitrant constipation. Most of these studies have used subcutaneous neostigmine. Symbiotic yogurt containing components, such as Bifidobacterium and fructoligosaccharide, have also been recently shown to be highly effective in improving symptoms of constipation. Elderly patients especially those in hospices and nursing homes are often on opioids for pain management. Constipation secondary to opioid use is extremely common in nursing homes. Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone has recently been shown to be highly effective in the management of opioid-related constipation, and was recently approved by the FDA. Sacral nerve stimulation is another emerging strategy. A recent analysis by Mowatt et al supports the efficacy of this technique. Botulinum toxin is another agent that has already been successfully used for the management of chronic, refractory constipation in children and may be very effective for elderly constipation. Further larger studies are needed to confirm the findings noted in these studies. Constipation is clearly a major issue in the elderly and these new, emerging strategies will hopefully improve the quality of life and relieve the symptoms of constipation in this population.

  5. A new strategy to prevent chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced alopecia using topically applied vasoconstrictor

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.; Fahl, William E.

    2015-01-01

    In a new strategy, we sought to determine whether topically applied vasoconstrictor, with its accompanying transient skin hypoxia and exclusion of systemic drug, would prevent or suppress radiotherapy or chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Topical vasoconstrictor was applied to 1-cm2 skin patches on the backs of 10-day-old rats and minutes later they received either 7.1 gray (Gy) whole-body radiation or systemic N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) or Cytoxan. The degree of alopecia was scored 10 days later by visual assessment (% coat retention) and hair follicle histologic analysis. Topical application of epinephrine or norepinephrine in an alcohol:water delivery vehicle induced clear skin blanch, and in a dose-dependent manner, topical epinephrine or norepinephrine (20–1,000 mM) applied before 7.1 Gy irradiation conferred 95% of coat retention in the treated skin patches versus 0% coat retention in vehicle controls, or in skin outside the treated patches. By histology, small numbers of dystrophic hair follicles were observed in hairless skin versus the normal density of anagen follicles in the immediately adjacent, drug-protected skin patches at day 20; protected coats were retained into adulthood. Topical epinephrine or norepinephrine before systemic MNU (30 ug/gm body weight) conferred up to 95% of coat retention in treated skin patches versus 0% coat retention elsewhere. Epinephrine-conferred % coat retention dropped to 16% in rats that received systemic Cytoxan, a drug whose plasma half-life is at least 8- to 10-fold longer than MNU. A general strategy is discussed for the use of topical epinephrine or norepinephrine in the clinic to provide an inexpensive and convenient strategy to prevent cancer therapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24811525

  6. Public sector energy management: A strategy for catalyzing energy efficiency in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anish Kumar

    To date the public sector role in facilitating the transition to a sustainable energy future has been envisaged mainly from a regulatory perspective. In such a role, the public sector provides the push factors---enforcing regulations and providing incentives---to correct market imperfections that impede energy transitions. An alternative and complementary role of the public sector that is now gaining increasing attention is that of catalyzing energy transitions through public sector energy management initiatives. This dissertation offers a conceptual framework to rationalize such a role for the public sector by combining recent theories of sustainable energy transition and public management. In particular, the framework identifies innovative public management strategies (such as performance contracting and procurement) for effectively implementing sustainable energy projects in government facilities. The dissertation evaluates a model of sustainable public sector energy management for promoting energy efficiency in Malaysia. The public sector in Malaysia can be a major player in leading and catalyzing energy efficiency efforts as it is not only the largest and one of the most influential energy consumers, but it also plays a central role in setting national development strategy. The dissertation makes several recommendations on how a public sector energy management strategy can be implemented in Malaysia. The US Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is used as a practical model. The analysis, however, shows that in applying the FEMP model to the Malaysian context, there are a number of limitations that will have to be taken into consideration to enable a public sector energy management strategy to be effectively implemented. Overall the analysis of this dissertation contributes to a rethinking of the public sector role in sustainable energy development that can strengthen the sector's credibility both in terms of governance and institutional performance. In

  7. [Social marketing: applying commercial strategies to the prevention of nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Longtin, Yves; Alvarez-Ceyssat, Raymonde; Bonfillon, Chantal; Cavallero, Sabrina; Dayer, Pierre; Ginet, Claude; Herrault, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Although a large proportion of healthcare-associated infections are avoidable, healthcare workers do not always practice evidence-based preventive strategies. Marketing technologies might help to improve patient safety. This article presents the basic principles of marketing and its potential use to promote good infection control practices. The marketing mix (Product, Price, Place, and Promotion) should be taken into account to induce behaviour change. By placing the emphasis on the perceived "profits" for healthcare workers the approach might lose its moral aspect and gain in effectiveness. VigiGerme, a non-commercial registered trademark, applies social marketing techniques to infection control and prevention.

  8. Leadership Strategies of Performance Measures Impacts in Public Sector Management: A National Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubala, James Joseph

    A quantitative and qualitative study examined three leadership strategies found in performance-based management (human resource, scientific management and political strategies used in public sector management); a framework by which performance measurement (PM) supports leadership strategies; and how the strategies impact PM. It examined leadership…

  9. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  10. The Effectiveness of Time Management Strategies Instruction on Students' Academic Time Management and Academic Self Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Fathi Abdul Hamid Abdul; Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using time management strategies instruction on improving first year learning disabled students' academic time management and academic self efficacy. A total of 60 students identified with LD participated. The sample was divided into two groups; experimental (n = 30 boys) and control (n = 30 boys). ANCOVA and…

  11. Perceived barriers and effective strategies to diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerk, Jean; Reick, Kay; Meengs, Leona

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports the perceived barriers to and effective strategies for self-management of adults with type 2 diabetes in a rural setting. Worldwide, diabetes is a major public health concern and financial burden. Research shows that, for people with diabetes, adhering to programs of self-care is often problematic. Despite the potential for improved metabolic control and quality of life, little is published on the barriers and effective strategies that people with diabetes successfully use to incorporate plans of care into their lifestyles. Twenty-four adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a rural primary care practice to participate in one of three audiotaped focus groups. Content analysis was conducted on the focus group transcripts and validity was strengthened through independent rankings of barriers and strategies by an expert panel and by the nurse researchers. The data were collected 2002. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of knowledge of a specific diet plan, lack of understanding of the plan of care and helplessness and frustration from lack of glycaemic control and continued disease progression despite adherence. Effective strategies identified were developing a collaborative relationship with a provider, maintaining a positive attitude that prompts proactive learning and having a support person who provides encouragement and promotes accountability. These data highlight the importance of barrier and strategy identification in developing and implementing realistic self-management plans and the significance of collaborative alliances between patients and practitioners. Awareness of barriers, identification of strategies to overcome obstacles and the opportunity to problem solve with practitioners assists patients in managing a chronic illness that requires numerous daily decisions.

  12. Applying Evidence-Based Medicine Principles to Hip Fracture Management

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph; Morshed, Saam; Helfet, David L.; Bhandari, Mohit; Ahn, Jaimo

    2014-01-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate and not scar after injury – sometimes leaving behind no evidence at all of a prior fracture. As surgeons capable of facilitating such healing, it becomes our responsibility to help choose a treatment that minimizes functional deficits and residual symptoms. And in the case of the geriatric hip fracture, we have seen the accumulation of a vast amount of evidence to help guide us. The best method we currently have for selecting treatment plans is by the practice of evidence-based medicine. According to the now accepted hierarchy, the best is called Level I evidence (e.g., well performed randomized controlled trials) – but this evidence is best only if it is available and appropriate. Lower forms of accepted evidence include cohort studies, case control studies, case series, and case reports, and last, expert opinion – all of which can be potentially instructive. The hallmark of evidence-based treatment is not so much the reliance on evidence in general, but to use the best available evidence relative to the particular patient, the clinical setting and surgeon experience. Correctly applied, varying forms of evidence each have a role in aiding surgeons offer appropriate care for their patients – to help them best fix the fracture. PMID:25593964

  13. Interactive effects of environmental change and management strategies on regional forest carbon emissions.

    PubMed

    Hudiburg, Tara W; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Thornton, Peter E; Law, Beverly E

    2013-11-19

    Climate mitigation activities in forests need to be quantified in terms of the long-term effects on forest carbon stocks, accumulation, and emissions. The impacts of future environmental change and bioenergy harvests on regional forest carbon storage have not been quantified. We conducted a comprehensive modeling study and life-cycle assessment of the impacts of projected changes in climate, CO2 concentration, and N deposition, and region-wide forest management policies on regional forest carbon fluxes. By 2100, if current management strategies continue, then the warming and CO2 fertilization effect in the given projections result in a 32-68% increase in net carbon uptake, overshadowing increased carbon emissions from projected increases in fire activity and other forest disturbance factors. To test the response to new harvesting strategies, repeated thinnings were applied in areas susceptible to fire to reduce mortality, and two clear-cut rotations were applied in productive forests to provide biomass for wood products and bioenergy. The management strategies examined here lead to long-term increased carbon emissions over current harvesting practices, although semiarid regions contribute little to the increase. The harvest rates were unsustainable. This comprehensive approach could serve as a foundation for regional place-based assessments of management effects on future carbon sequestration by forests in other locations.

  14. Shikimic Acid Production in Escherichia coli: From Classical Metabolic Engineering Strategies to Omics Applied to Improve Its Production.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Juan Andrés; Bolívar, Francisco; Escalante, Adelfo

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) is an intermediate of the SA pathway that is present in bacteria and plants. SA has gained great interest because it is a precursor in the synthesis of the drug oseltamivir phosphate (OSF), an efficient inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of diverse seasonal influenza viruses, the avian influenza virus H5N1, and the human influenza virus H1N1. For the purposes of OSF production, SA is extracted from the pods of Chinese star anise plants (Illicium spp.), yielding up to 17% of SA (dry basis content). The high demand for OSF necessary to manage a major influenza outbreak is not adequately met by industrial production using SA from plants sources. As the SA pathway is present in the model bacteria Escherichia coli, several "intuitive" metabolically engineered strains have been applied for its successful overproduction by biotechnological processes, resulting in strains producing up to 71 g/L of SA, with high conversion yields of up to 0.42 (mol SA/mol Glc), in both batch and fed-batch cultures using complex fermentation broths, including glucose as a carbon source and yeast extract. Global transcriptomic analyses have been performed in SA-producing strains, resulting in the identification of possible key target genes for the design of a rational strain improvement strategy. Because possible target genes are involved in the transport, catabolism, and interconversion of different carbon sources and metabolic intermediates outside the central carbon metabolism and SA pathways, as genes involved in diverse cellular stress responses, the development of rational cellular strain improvement strategies based on omics data constitutes a challenging task to improve SA production in currently overproducing engineered strains. In this review, we discuss the main metabolic engineering strategies that have been applied for the development of efficient SA-producing strains, as the perspective of omics analysis has focused on further strain improvement for the

  15. Shikimic Acid Production in Escherichia coli: From Classical Metabolic Engineering Strategies to Omics Applied to Improve Its Production

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Juan Andrés; Bolívar, Francisco; Escalante, Adelfo

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) is an intermediate of the SA pathway that is present in bacteria and plants. SA has gained great interest because it is a precursor in the synthesis of the drug oseltamivir phosphate (OSF), an efficient inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of diverse seasonal influenza viruses, the avian influenza virus H5N1, and the human influenza virus H1N1. For the purposes of OSF production, SA is extracted from the pods of Chinese star anise plants (Illicium spp.), yielding up to 17% of SA (dry basis content). The high demand for OSF necessary to manage a major influenza outbreak is not adequately met by industrial production using SA from plants sources. As the SA pathway is present in the model bacteria Escherichia coli, several “intuitive” metabolically engineered strains have been applied for its successful overproduction by biotechnological processes, resulting in strains producing up to 71 g/L of SA, with high conversion yields of up to 0.42 (mol SA/mol Glc), in both batch and fed-batch cultures using complex fermentation broths, including glucose as a carbon source and yeast extract. Global transcriptomic analyses have been performed in SA-producing strains, resulting in the identification of possible key target genes for the design of a rational strain improvement strategy. Because possible target genes are involved in the transport, catabolism, and interconversion of different carbon sources and metabolic intermediates outside the central carbon metabolism and SA pathways, as genes involved in diverse cellular stress responses, the development of rational cellular strain improvement strategies based on omics data constitutes a challenging task to improve SA production in currently overproducing engineered strains. In this review, we discuss the main metabolic engineering strategies that have been applied for the development of efficient SA-producing strains, as the perspective of omics analysis has focused on further strain improvement for

  16. Strategies for healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management.

    PubMed

    Lee, James G

    2012-05-01

    Adventist HealthCare offers the following lessons learned in improving the value of healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management: Use an integrated approach. Ensure that the objectives of the approach align the hospital or health system's mission and values. Embrace innovation. Develop a plan that applies to the whole organization, rather than specific business units. Ensure commitment of senior leaders.

  17. A Critique of Externally Oriented Behavior Management Approaches as Applied to Exceptional Black Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, James M.

    The paper looks at philosophical, heuristic, and practical reasons why behavior management approaches have failed to positively impact on the lives of exceptional Black children. Critiqued are behavior modification techniques, contingency management strategies, suspensions, expulsions, and positive and negative reinforcement. Noted among the…

  18. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, Caroline E; Van Buren, Harry J

    2016-05-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood.

  19. Specialty pharmacy cost management strategies of private health care payers.

    PubMed

    Stern, Debbie; Reissman, Debi

    2006-01-01

    The rate of increase in spending on specialty pharmaceuticals is outpacing by far the rate of increase in spending for other drugs. To explore the strategies payers are using in response to challenges related to coverage, cost, clinical management, and access of specialty pharmaceuticals and to describe the potential implications for key stakeholders, including patients, physicians, and health care purchasers. Sources of information were identified in the course of providing consulting services in the subject area of specialty pharmaceuticals to health plans, pharmacy benefit managers, employers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Specialty pharmaceuticals represent the fastest growing segment of drug spending due to new product approvals, high unit costs, and increasing use. Health care payers are faced with significant challenges related to coverage, cost, clinical management, and access. A variety of short- and long-term strategies have been employed to address these challenges. Current management techniques for specialty pharmaceuticals often represent a stop-gap approach for controlling rising drug costs. Optimum cost and care management methods will evolve as further research identifies the true clinical and economic value of various specialty pharmaceuticals.

  20. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Caroline E.; Van Buren, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood. PMID:27471326

  1. Forest management strategies for reducing carbon emissions, the French case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Bellassen, Valentin; Vallet, Patrick; Martin, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    International agreements now recognize the role of forest in the mitigation of climate change through the levers of in-situ sequestration, storage in products and energy and product substitution. These three strategies of carbon management are often antagonistic and it is still not clear which strategy would have the most significant impact on atmospheric carbon concentrations. With a focus on France, this study compares several scenarios of forest management in terms of their effect on the overall carbon budget from trees to wood-products. We elaborated four scenarios of forest management that target different wood production objectives. One scenario is 'Business as usual' and reproduces the current forest management and wood production levels. Two scenarios target an increase in bioenergy wood production, with either long-term or short-term goals. One scenario aims at increasing the production of timber for construction. For this, an empirical regression model was developed building on the rich French inventory database. The model can project the current forest resource at a time horizon of 20 years for characteristic variables diameter, standing volume, above-ground biomass, stand age. A simplified life-cycle analysis provides a full carbon budget for each scenario from forest management to wood use and allows the identification of the scenario that most reduces carbon emissions.

  2. Management strategies and financial performance in rural and urban hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wang, B B; Wan, T T; Falk, J A; Goodwin, D

    2001-08-01

    This study identifies the difference in financial performance between rural and urban hospitals and examines whether or not that difference may be attributed to the emphasis of revenue enhancement over cost management strategies. Hospitals in Virginia were included in this study except for the two state university medical centers. Rural and urban hospitals were compared on 10 performance indicators grouped into four categories: revenues, costs, profits, and productivity. The results suggest that rural hospital profitability is dependent on cost management. Since rural hospitals achieved lower cost, better efficiency and productivity level than urban hospitals in Virginia, they demonstrate a significant higher level of profit.

  3. Financial coping strategies of mental health consumers: managing social benefits.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Mary Ager

    2014-05-01

    Mental health consumers depend on social benefits in the forms of supplemental security income and social security disability insurance for their livelihood. Although these programs pay meager benefits, little research has been undertaken into how this population makes ends meet. Using a qualitative approach, this study asks what are the financial coping strategies of mental health consumers? Seven approaches were identified: subsidies, cost-effective shopping, budgeting, prioritizing, technology, debt management, and saving money. Results illustrate the resourcefulness of mental health consumers in managing meager social benefits and highlight the need to strengthen community mental health efforts with financial capabilities education.

  4. Development of Strategies for Sustainable Irrigation Water Management in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    During 1960 - 1990 years irrigated areas in Russia have increased rapidly, helping to boost agricultural output. Although the impressive achievements of irrigation in this period its large experience indicates problems and failures of irrigation water management. In addition to large water use and low irrigation water efficiency, environmental concerns (excessive water depletion, water quality reduction, water logging, soil degradation) are usually considered like the most significant problem of the irrigation sector. Despite of considerable shrinking of irrigated areas in Russia and decreasing of water withdrawal for irrigation purposes during two last decades a degradation of environment as well as degradation of soil and water resources in irrigated areas was prolonged and will probably continue if current irrigation practices are maintained. Nowadays, in different regions of Russia there are societal demand to restore agricultural irrigation in Russia as answer to challenges from climate pattern changes and degradation of land & water resources. In the respect of these demands there is a need to develop strategies for sustainability of agricultural irrigation in Russia that should be based on three main societal objectives: costeffective use of water in irrigated agriculture at farm level, and satisfactory preserving the natural environment. Therefore sustainable irrigation water management is not only an objective at farm level but also an overall goal at the local and regional as well. A way to achieve sustainability in irrigation water management is to solve the local conflicts arising from the interactions between water use at irrigation areas and surrounding environment. Thus should be based on the development of irrigation framework program including on the irrigation water management issues, policies & decisions making at federal and regional levels should be based on the indicators of environment & irrigation water efficiency monitoring promoting the

  5. Resources Management Strategy For Mud Crabs (Scylla spp.) In Pemalang Regency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnama Fitri, Aristi Dian; Boesono, Herry; Sabdono, Agus; Adlina, Nadia

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop resources management strategies of mud crab (Scylla spp.) in Pemalang Regency. The method used is descriptive survey in a case study. This research used primary data and secondary data. Primary data were collected through field observations and in-depth interviews with key stakeholders. Secondary data were collected from related publications and documents issued by the competent institutions. SWOT Analysis was used to inventory the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. TOWS matrix was used to develop an alternative of resources management strategies. SWOT analysis was obtained by 6 alternative strategies that can be applied for optimization of fisheries development in Pemalang Regency. The strategies is the control of mud crab fishing gear, restricted size allowable in mud crab, control of mud crab fishing season, catch monitoring of mud crab, needs a management institutions which ensure the implementation of the regulation, and implementation for mud crab aquaculture. Each alternative strategy can be synergized to optimize the resources development in Pemalang Regency.

  6. A review of climate-change adaptation strategies for wildlife management and biodiversity conservation.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, Jonathan R; O'Malley, Robin; Ojima, Dennis S

    2009-10-01

    The scientific literature contains numerous descriptions of observed and potential effects of global climate change on species and ecosystems. In response to anticipated effects of climate change, conservation organizations and government agencies are developing "adaptation strategies" to facilitate the adjustment of human society and ecological systems to altered climate regimes. We reviewed the literature and climate-change adaptation plans that have been developed in United States, Canada, England, México, and South Africa and found 16 general adaptation strategies that relate directly to the conservation of biological diversity. These strategies can be grouped into four broad categories: land and water protection and management; direct species management; monitoring and planning; and law and policy. Tools for implementing these strategies are similar or identical to those already in use by conservationists worldwide (land and water conservation, ecological restoration, agrienvironment schemes, species translocation, captive propagation, monitoring, natural resource planning, and legislation/regulation). Although our review indicates natural resource managers already have many tools that can be used to address climate-change effects, managers will likely need to apply these tools in novel and innovative ways to meet the unprecedented challenges posed by climate change.

  7. Clinicians in management: a qualitative study of managers' use of influence strategies in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2014-06-13

    Combining a professional and managerial role can be challenging for doctors and nurses. We aimed to explore influence strategies used by doctors and nurses who are managers in hospitals with a model of unitary and profession neutral management at all levels. We did a study based on data from interviews and observations of 30 managers with a clinical background in Norwegian hospitals. Managers with a nursing background argued that medical doctors could more easily gain support for their views. Nurses reported deliberately not disclosing their professional background, and could use a doctor as their agent to achieve a strategic advantage. Doctors believed that they had to use their power as experts to influence peers. Doctors attempted to be medical role models, while nurses spoke of being a role model in more general terms. Managers who were not able to influence the system directly found informal workarounds. We did not identify horizontal strategies in the observations and accounts given by the managers in our study. Managers' professional background may be both a resource and constraint, and also determine the influence strategies they use. Professional roles and influence strategies should be a theme in leadership development programs for health professionals.

  8. What Strategies Do the Nurses Apply to Cope With Job Stress?: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Eslami Akbar, Rasool; Elahi, Nasrin; Mohammadi, Eesa; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud

    2015-09-28

    Nursing staff encounter a lot of physical, psychological and social stressors at work. Because the adverse effects of job stress on the health of this group of staff and subsequently on the quality of care services provided by nurses; study and identify how nurses cope with the job stress is very important and can help prevent the occurrence of unfavorable outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses to identify the strategies they used to cope with the job stress. In this qualitative study content analysis approach was used. Purposive sampling approach was applied. The sample population included 18 nurses working in three hospitals. Data collection was conducted through face to face unstructured interview and was analyzed using conventional content analysis approach. The analysis of the data emerged six main themes about the strategies used by nurses to cope with job stress, which, include: situational control of conditions, seeking help, preventive monitoring of situation, self-controlling, avoidance and escape and spiritual coping. Exploring experiences of nurses on how to cope with job stress emerged context-dependent and original strategies and this knowledge can pave the ground for nurses to increase self-awareness of how to cope with job stress. And could also be the basis for planning and the adoption of necessary measures by the authorities to adapt nurses with their profession better and improves their health which are essential elements to fulfill high-quality nursing care.

  9. What Strategies Do the Nurses Apply to Cope With Job Stress?: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Rasool Eslami; Elahi, Nasrin; Mohammadi, Eesa; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nursing staff encounter a lot of physical, psychological and social stressors at work. Because the adverse effects of job stress on the health of this group of staff and subsequently on the quality of care services provided by nurses; study and identify how nurses cope with the job stress is very important and can help prevent the occurrence of unfavorable outcomes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses to identify the strategies they used to cope with the job stress. Methods: In this qualitative study content analysis approach was used. Purposive sampling approach was applied. The sample population included 18 nurses working in three hospitals. Data collection was conducted through face to face unstructured interview and was analyzed using conventional content analysis approach. Findings: The analysis of the data emerged six main themes about the strategies used by nurses to cope with job stress, which, include: situational control of conditions, seeking help, preventive monitoring of situation, self-controlling, avoidance and escape and spiritual coping. Conclusions: Exploring experiences of nurses on how to cope with job stress emerged context-dependent and original strategies and this knowledge can pave the ground for nurses to increase self-awareness of how to cope with job stress. And could also be the basis for planning and the adoption of necessary measures by the authorities to adapt nurses with their profession better and improves their health which are essential elements to fulfill high-quality nursing care. PMID:26755462

  10. Aircrew Discourse: Exploring Strategies of Information and Action Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Cheryl M.; Veinott, Elizabeth S.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores methodology issues encountered in the analysis of flightcrew communications in aviation simulation research. Examples are provided by two recent studies which are compared on three issues: level of analysis, data definition, and interpretation of the results. The data discussed were collected in a study comparing two levels of aircraft automation. The first example is an investigation of how pilots' information transfer strategies differed as a function of automation during low and high-workload flight phases. The second study focuses on how crews managed actions in the two aircraft during a ten minute, high-workload flight segment. Results indicated that crews in the two aircraft differed in their strategies of information and action management. The differences are discussed in terms of their operational and research significance.

  11. Aircrew Discourse: Exploring Strategies of Information and Action Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Cheryl M.; Veinott, Elizabeth S.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores methodology issues encountered in the analysis of flightcrew communications in aviation simulation research. Examples are provided by two recent studies which are compared on three issues: level of analysis, data definition, and interpretation of the results. The data discussed were collected in a study comparing two levels of aircraft automation. The first example is an investigation of how pilots' information transfer strategies differed as a function of automation during low and high-workload flight phases. The second study focuses on how crews managed actions in the two aircraft during a ten minute, high-workload flight segment. Results indicated that crews in the two aircraft differed in their strategies of information and action management. The differences are discussed in terms of their operational and research significance.

  12. Applying Science: Opportunities to Inform Disease Management Policy with Cooperative Research within a One Health Framework.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Kracalik, Ian T; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola) or (possible) environmental exposure (saiga), diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatiotemporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts, and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is negotiated and

  13. Applying Science: Opportunities to Inform Disease Management Policy with Cooperative Research within a One Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jason K.; Kracalik, Ian T.; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola) or (possible) environmental exposure (saiga), diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock–human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatiotemporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts, and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is negotiated

  14. International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program : visions and strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Michael; Mohagheghi, Amir Hossein

    2011-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program is working to establish a long-term border security strategy with United States Central Command (CENTCOM). Efforts are being made to synthesize border security capabilities and technologies maintained at the Laboratories, and coordinate with subject matter expertise from both the New Mexico and California offices. The vision for SNL is to provide science and technology support for international projects and engagements on border security.

  15. Evolution in Clinical Knowledge Management Strategy at Intermountain Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Nathan C.; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs. PMID:23304309

  16. Run-to-Run Control Strategy for Diabetes Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    quite serious ( diabetic coma), and the long- term implications of varying glucose levels ( nephropathy , retinopathy, and other tissue damage ) have...Trial Re- search Group, \\The e ect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long{term complications in insulin{dependent...1 RUN-TO-RUN CONTROL STRATEGY FOR DIABETES MANAGEMENT F.J. Doyle III1, B. Srinivasan2, and D. Bonvin2 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  17. Perioperative pain management strategies among women having reproductive surgeries.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Malavika; Bortoletto, Pietro; Bateman, Brian T

    2017-08-01

    This review presents opioid-sparing strategies for perioperative pain management among women undergoing reproductive surgeries and procedures. Recommendations are provided regarding the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, other adjunctive medications, and regional anesthetic blocks. Additional considerations for chronic opioid users or patients using opioid replacement or antagonist therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Applying lean management principles to the creation of a postpartum hemorrhage care bundle.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Beth

    2013-10-01

    A lean management process is a set of interventions, each of which creates value for the customer. Lean management is not a new concept, but is relatively new to health care. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the most common cause of maternal death worldwide in both developing and developed countries. We applied lean management principles as an innovative approach to improving outcomes in patients with PPH. Initial results using principles of lean management indicated significant improvements in response time and family-centered care. When applied rigorously and throughout the organization, lean principles can have a dramatic effect on productivity, cost and quality. © 2013 AWHONN.

  19. Identification and assessment of containment and release management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, J.R.; Lin, C.C.; Neogy, P.

    1990-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating accident management strategies which could help preserve containment integrity or minimize releases during a severe accident. The objective is to make use of existing plant systems and equipment in innovative ways to reduce the likelihood of containment failure or to mitigate the release of fission products to the environment if failure cannot be prevented. Many of the strategies would be implemented during the later stages of a severe accident. The identification and assessment process for containment and release strategies is described, and some insights derived from its application to a BWR Mark 1 plant are presented here. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Managing work and family: Do control strategies help?

    PubMed

    Versey, H Shellae

    2015-11-01

    How can we effectively manage competing obligations from work and family without becoming overwhelmed? This question inspires the current study by examining control strategies that may facilitate better work-life balance, with a specific focus on the role of lowered aspirations and positive reappraisals, attitudes that underlie adaptive coping behaviors. Data from the Midlife in the United States Survey (MIDUS II) were used to explore the relationship between negative spillover, control strategies, and well-being among full-time working men and women (N = 2,091). In this nationally representative sample, findings indicate that while positive reappraisals function as a protective buffer, lowering aspirations exacerbate the relationship between work-family spillover and well-being, with moderating effects stronger among women. This study extends prior research tying work-life conflict to health and mental health, and suggests further investigation is needed to consider types of resources that may be effective coping strategies in balancing work and family.

  1. Chronic pain management strategies used by low income overweight Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Dana N; Cantero, Patricia J; Ruiz, Jeanette E

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In group interviews, we examined strategies used to manage chronic pain from the perspective of the individual. Methods Sixteen low income overweight Latino adults participated in two group interviews facilitated by a trained moderator who inquired about the type of chronic pain suffered by participants, followed by more specific questions about pain management. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim (Spanish), back-translated into English, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Participants’ pain varied in type, location, and intensity. Participants discussed pain-related changes in activities and social life, and difficulties with health care providers, and as a result, we discovered five major themes: Pain-related Life Alterations, Enduring the Pain, Trying Different Strategies, Emotional Suffering, and Encounters with Health Care System/Providers. Discussion Findings indicated that there are opportunities for providers to improve care for low income overweight Latinos with chronic pain by listening respectfully to how pain alters their daily lives and assisting them in feasible self management strategies. PMID:23129787

  2. What are Robust Strategies to Manage Coastal Flooding Risks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, T. E.; Keller, K.

    2016-12-01

    As the climate changes and sea levels rise, the frontiers of environmental science, economics and public policy rely on effectively synthesizing climate data and projections from coupled physical-economic models. Approaches to design coastal flood-risk management strategies are often made under deep uncertainties surrounding the model structure, parameter values, and management objectives. A strategy which is optimal for a specific choice of objectives and model structure may perform quite poorly if this choices turns out to be wrong. A robust decision-making framework can help address this issue by mapping the deeply uncertain trade-offs between objectives. This map can then be used to identify strategies that perform well across a broad range of possible futures and relevant objectives. Here, we use a simple decision-analytical model of coastal flood-risk management to (1) examine the sensitivity of decisions to deeply uncertain projections of sea-levels and storm surges, (2) compare robust and optimal decision-making frameworks and (3) quantify the economic value of sea-level and storm surge information when facing these deep uncertainties.

  3. Delusional infestations: case series, differential diagnoses, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H; Nesbitt, Lee T

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are not infrequently consulted by distraught patients with delusions of infestation who believe that they are infested with external or internal parasites and describe a crawling sensation of bugs or worms on or under their skin. Internet search engines were queried with the keywords as search terms to examine the latest articles on delusional infestations in order to describe presenting manifestations, differential diagnoses, and effective management strategies. The demographic and behavioral features of delusional infestations have remained constant and include: (1) onset in well-educated, middle-aged adults who are pet owners; (2) production of purported specimens of causative parasites; (3) pesticide overtreatment of themselves, their households, and pets; (4) excessive cleaning or vacuuming of households; (5) intense anger and resentment directed at physicians failing to confirm their self-diagnoses; and (6) sharing delusional symptoms with spouses or relatives. Although some reports have suggested that cases of delusional infestation are increasing today in the tropics, most studies have confirmed a stable incidence over time and similar disorder demographics worldwide. However, management strategies for delusional infestations have changed significantly over time with second generation, atypical antipsychotics offering safer adverse effect profiles and better prognoses than earlier therapies with first generation, typical antipsychotics. The most effective management strategies for delusional infestations include empathetic history-taking and active listening to the patient, careful exclusion of true parasitoses, and a therapeutic regimen that includes a second generation neuroleptic agent.

  4. The future of nematology: integration of new and improved management strategies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, P A

    1993-09-01

    The potential for managing plant-parasitic nenlatodes by combining two or more control strategies in an integrated program is examined. Advantages of this approach include the use of partially effective strategies and protection of highly effective ones vulnerable from nematode adaptation or environmental risk. Strategies can be combined sequentially from season to season or applied simultaneously. Programs that have several strategies available but that are limited in the true integration of control components are used as examples of current management procedures and the potential for their improvement. These include potato cyst nematodes in northern Europe, soybean cyst nematode in North Carolina, and root-knot nematodes on vegetable and field crops in California. A simplified model of the impact of component strategies on the nematode damage function indicates the potential for combining control measures with different efficacies to give acceptable nematode population reduction and crop protection. The likelihood for additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects from combining strategies is considered with respect to the biological target and component compatibility.

  5. Evaluation of toluene LIF thermometry detection strategies applied in an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Brian; Baum, Elias; Böhm, Benjamin; Sick, Volker; Dreizler, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    In the context of toluene laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry, the two common LIF detection strategies, namely one-color and two-color detection, have been simultaneously applied to compare each strategy's ability to accurately resolve thermal gradients during an engine cycle within an optically accessible internal combustion (IC) engine. Temperature images are obtained from high-speed toluene LIF measurements and are combined with high-speed particle image velocimetry. The combination with flow data and Mie scattering images facilitates the interpretation of differences between the toluene LIF detection strategies. Two-color temperature images are limited in their ability to detect thermal gradients near the end of compression due to larger precision uncertainties. Local regions of cold gases in the two-color images are better identified with the guidance of the one-color images when homogeneous toluene mixtures preside. During expansion, large differences exist between one- and two-color temperature images and likely caused by local mixture fraction heterogeneities that bias the one-color detection strategy. Toluene condensation occurs during the expansion and exhaust stroke and causes local mixture fraction heterogeneities in the combustion chamber. Liquid toluene is in contact with solid surfaces and crevices of the combustion chamber and can evaporate during compression or expansion causing both local temperature and mixture stratification. This work demonstrates the advantage of high-speed imaging and use of multiple image diagnostics to reveal the development of natural temperature and mixture stratification in a motored IC engine. This work also suggests that natural temperature stratification typically regarded from gas-wall heat transfer may also be caused by liquid droplet evaporation on solid surfaces. Such phenomenon, however, is expected to be pertinent for all modern-day engine operating systems.

  6. Wildlife reservoirs for bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in Canada: strategies for management and research.

    PubMed

    Nishi, John S; Shury, Todd; Elkin, Brett T

    2006-02-25

    In Canada, there are two known regional foci where wildlife populations are infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and considered to be disease reservoirs. Free-ranging populations of wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) in and around Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP) and wapiti (Cervus elaphus manitobensis) in and around Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP) are infected with bovine tuberculosis. In this paper, we provide an overview of these diseased wild ungulate populations and the complexities of attempting to manage issues relating to bovine tuberculosis in and around protected areas. We do not describe the quantitative science and epidemiological data in detail from these case histories, but instead compare and contrast these two cases from a broader perspective. This is achieved by reviewing the context and process by which a diverse group of stakeholders engage and develop strategies to address the controversial problems that diseased wildlife populations often present. We suggest that understanding the factors that drive the strategic-level management processes is equally important for addressing a wildlife disease problem as the tactical-level issues, such as design and implementation of technically sound field research and management programs. Understanding the experiences within the WBNP and RMNP areas, particularly the strategies that have failed or succeeded, may prove useful to understanding and improving management approaches when wildlife are infected with M. bovis. Applying this understanding is consistent with the principles of adaptive management in which we learn from previous experiences to develop better strategies for the future.

  7. A framework for evaluation of flood management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hansson, K; Danielson, M; Ekenberg, L

    2008-02-01

    The resulting impact of disasters on society depends on the affected country's economic strength prior to the disaster. The larger the disaster and the smaller the economy, the more significant is the impact. This is clearest seen in developing countries, where weak economies become even weaker afterwards. Deliberate strategies for the sharing of losses from hazardous events may aid a country or a community in efficiently using scarce prevention and mitigation resources, thus being better prepared for the effects of a disaster. Nevertheless, many governments lack an adequate institutional system for applying cost effective and reliable technologies for disaster prevention, early warnings, and mitigation. Modelling by event analyses and strategy models is one way of planning ahead, but these models have so far not been linked together. An approach to this problem was taken during a large study in Hungary, the Tisza case study, where a number of policy strategies for spreading of flood loss were formulated. In these strategies, a set of parameters of particular interest were extracted from interviews with stakeholders in the region. However, the study was focused on emerging economies, and, in particular, on insurance strategies. The scope is now extended to become a functional framework also for developing countries. In general, they have a higher degree of vulnerability. The paper takes northern Vietnam as an example of a developing region. We identify important parameters and discuss their importance for flood strategy formulations. Based on the policy strategies in the Tisza case, we extract data from the strategies and propose a framework for loss spread in developing and emerging economies. The parameter set can straightforwardly be included in a simulation and decision model for policy formulation and evaluation, taking multiple stakeholders into account.

  8. DSC: software tool for simulation-based design of control strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computer tool called DSC (Simulation based Controllers Design) that enables an easy design of control systems and strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants. Although the control systems are developed and evaluated by simulation, this tool aims to facilitate the direct implementation of the designed control system to the PC of the full-scale WWTP (wastewater treatment plants). The designed control system can be programmed in a dedicated control application and can be connected to either the simulation software or the SCADA of the plant. To this end, the developed DSC incorporates an OPC server (OLE for process control) which facilitates an open-standard communication protocol for different industrial process applications. The potential capabilities of the DSC tool are illustrated through the example of a full-scale application. An aeration control system applied to a nutrient removing WWTP was designed, tuned and evaluated with the DSC tool before its implementation in the full scale plant. The control parameters obtained by simulation were suitable for the full scale plant with only few modifications to improve the control performance. With the DSC tool, the control systems performance can be easily evaluated by simulation. Once developed and tuned by simulation, the control systems can be directly applied to the full-scale WWTP.

  9. Savannah River Site Mixed Waste Management Facility Southwest Plume Tritium Phytoremediation Evaluating Irrigation Management Strategies Over 25 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Riah, Susan; Rebel, Karin

    2004-02-27

    To minimize movement of tritium into surface waters at the Mixed Waste Management Facility at the Savannah River Site, tritium contaminated seepage water is being retained in a constructed pond and used to irrigate forest acreage that lies above the pond and over the contaminated groundwater. Twenty five-year potential evapotranspiration and average precipitation are 1443 mm/year and 1127 mm/year, respectively, for the region in which the site is located. Management of the application of tritium contaminated irrigation water needs to be evaluated in the context of the large amount of rainfall relative to evapotranspiration, the strong seasonality in evapotranspiration, and intraannual and inter-annual variability in precipitation. A dynamic simulation model of water and tritium fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum was developed to assess the efficiency (tritium transpired/tritium applied) of several irrigation management strategies.

  10. Improving the integration of recreation management with management of other natural resources by applying concepts of scale from ecology

    Treesearch

    Wayde c. Morse; Troy E. Hall; Linda E. Kruger

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we examine how issues of scale affect the integration of recreation management with the management of other natural resources on public lands. We present two theories used to address scale issues in ecology and explore how they can improve the two most widely applied recreation-planning frameworks. The theory of patch dynamics and hierarchy theory are...

  11. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Contemporary Strategies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Shirin Elizabeth; Heaton, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on a background of chronic liver disease. Liver resection or locoregional ablative therapies may be indicated for patients with preserved synthetic function without significant portal hypertension. Milan criteria were introduced to select suitable patients for liver transplant with low risk of tumor recurrence and 5-year survival in excess of 70%. Currently the incidence of HCC is climbing rapidly and in a current climate of organ shortage has led to the re-evaluation of locoregional therapies and resectional surgery to manage the case load. The introduction of biological therapies has had a new dimension to care, adding to the complexities of multidisciplinary team working in the management of HCC. The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of present day management strategies and decision making. PMID:23197879

  13. Marketing strategies in a competitive managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Cascardo-Weissman, D C

    1999-01-01

    In the new health care marketplace dominated by managed care, patients expect more from their physicians and other providers. Because cost is not an issue for the managed care patient, physicians must find a way to distinguish their practices from others in the managed care plan directory. This article provides low-cost strategies that physicians may use to do so. These include: focusing on the customer; ensuring friendly, attentive, and trained staff using patient-friendly office policies; making the patient priority number one; listening to and communicating with patients; being a patient advocate; giving patients choices to increase their control over their care; respecting the time demands on the patient and his or her family, and others.

  14. A strategy for monitoring and managing declines in an amphibian community.

    PubMed

    Grant, Evan H Campbell; Zipkin, Elise F; Nichols, James D; Campbell, J Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Although many taxa have declined globally, conservation actions are inherently local. Ecosystems degrade even in protected areas, and maintaining natural systems in a desired condition may require active management. Implementing management decisions under uncertainty requires a logical and transparent process to identify objectives, develop management actions, formulate system models to link actions with objectives, monitor to reduce uncertainty and identify system state (i.e., resource condition), and determine an optimal management strategy. We applied one such structured decision-making approach that incorporates these critical elements to inform management of amphibian populations in a protected area managed by the U.S. National Park Service. Climate change is expected to affect amphibian occupancy of wetlands and to increase uncertainty in management decision making. We used the tools of structured decision making to identify short-term management solutions that incorporate our current understanding of the effect of climate change on amphibians, emphasizing how management can be undertaken even with incomplete information. Estrategia para Monitorear y Manejar Disminuciones en una Comunidad de Anfibios. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. Present and New Treatment Strategies in the Management of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kolko, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and axonal loss. It remains a major cause of blindness worldwide. All current modalities of treatment are focused on lowering intraocular pressure (IOP), and it is evident that increased IOP is an important risk factor for progression of the disease. However, it is clear that a significant number of glaucoma patients show disease progression despite of pressure lowering treatments. Much attention has been given to the development of neuroprotective treatment strategies, but the identification of such has been hampered by lack of understanding of the etiology of glaucoma. Hence, in spite of many attempts no neuroprotective drug has yet been clinically approved. Even though neuroprotection is without doubt an important treatment strategy, many glaucoma subjects are diagnosed after substantial loss of RGCs. In this matter, recent approaches aim to rescue RGCs and regenerate axons in order to restore visual function in glaucoma. The present review seeks to provide an overview of the present and new treatment strategies in the management of glaucoma. The treatment strategies are divided into current available glaucoma medications, new pressure lowering targets, prospective neuroprotective interventions, and finally possible neuroregenrative strategies. PMID:26069521

  16. Clinical multi-omics strategies for the effective cancer management.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Woo, Sang Myung; Myung, Jae Kyung

    2017-08-15

    Cancer is a global health issue as a multi-factorial complex disease, and early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are required for more effective cancer management. With the development of systemic analytical -omics strategies, the therapeutic approach and study of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression have moved from hypothesis-driven targeted investigations to data-driven untargeted investigations focusing on the integrated diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer in individual patients. Predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) is a promising new approach to reduce the burden of cancer and facilitate more accurate prognosis, diagnosis, as well as effective treatment. Here we review the fundamentals of, and new developments in, -omics technologies, together with the key role of a variety of practical -omics strategies in PPPM for cancer treatment and diagnosis. In this review, a comprehensive and critical overview of the systematic strategy for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) for cancer disease was described in a view of cancer prognostic prediction, diagnostics, and prevention as well as cancer therapy and drug responses. We have discussed multi-dimensional data obtained from various resources and integration of multisciplinary -omics strategies with computational method which could contribute the more effective PPPM for cancer. This review has provided the novel insights of the current applications of each and combined -omics technologies, which showed their powerful potential for the establishment of PPPM for cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Art World's Concept of Negative Space Applied to System Safety Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Tools from several different disciplines can improve system safety management. This paper relates the Art World with our system safety world, showing useful art schools of thought applied to system safety management, developing an art theory-system safety bridge. This bridge is then used to demonstrate relations with risk management, the legal system, personnel management and basic management (establishing priorities). One goal of this presentation/paper is simply to be a fun diversion from the many technical topics presented during the conference.

  18. Assessment of soil sealing management responses, strategies, and targets toward ecologically sustainable urban land use management.

    PubMed

    Artmann, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Soil sealing has negative impacts on ecosystem services since urban green and soil get lost. Although there is political commitment to stop further sealing, no reversal of this trend can be observed in Europe. This paper raises the questions (1) which strategies can be regarded as being efficient toward ecologically sustainable management of urban soil sealing and (2) who has competences and should take responsibility to steer soil sealing? The analyses are conducted in Germany. The assessment of strategies is carried out using indicators as part of a content analysis. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative, and informational strategies are analyzed. Results show that there is a sufficient basis of strategies to secure urban ecosystem services by protecting urban green and reducing urban gray where microclimate regulation is a main target. However, soil sealing management lacks a spatial strategically overview as well as the consideration of services provided by fertile soils.

  19. Characteristics of couples applying for bibliotherapy via different recruitment strategies: a multivariate comparison.

    PubMed

    van Lankveld, J J; Grotjohann, Y; van Lokven, B M; Everaerd, W

    1999-01-01

    This study compared characteristics of couples with different sexual dysfunctions who were recruited for participation in a bibliotherapy program via two routes: in response to media advertisements and through their presence on a waiting list for therapist-administered treatment in an outpatient sexology clinic. Data were collected from 492 subjects (246 couples). Male sexology patients were younger than media-recruited males. However, type of sexual dysfunction accounted for a substantially larger proportion of variance in the demographic and psychometric data. An interaction effect of recruitment strategy and sexual dysfunction type was found with respect to female anorgasmia. We conclude from the absence of differences between the two study groups that the Wills and DePaulo (1991) model of help-seeking behavior for mental problems does not apply to couples with sexual dysfunctions joining a bibliotherapy program who either primarily requested professional treatment or who responded to media advertising.

  20. A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    This book applies the latest in brain research and learning theory to classroom management. The concepts of psychoneurophysiology are made readily accessible. The book offers creative data gathering activities to help students manage their own behavior and to help teachers learn how their own behavior impacts the classroom environment. The seven…

  1. A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    This book applies the latest in brain research and learning theory to classroom management. The concepts of psychoneurophysiology are made readily accessible. The book offers creative data gathering activities to help students manage their own behavior and to help teachers learn how their own behavior impacts the classroom environment. The seven…

  2. Planning-Programming-Budgeting Concepts Applied to Public School District Financial Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordon, Leland G.; Weaver, James L.

    The rising cost of public education and the resulting pressures for higher local property tax rates have caused the financial management of public schools to come under increased scrutiny. This study applies planning programing budgeting systems (PPBS) to school district financial management. A program structure is described that relates all…

  3. A review of fault tolerant control strategies applied to proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijoux, Etienne; Steiner, Nadia Yousfi; Benne, Michel; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Pérez, Brigitte Grondin

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cells are powerful systems for power generation. They have a good efficiency and do not generate greenhouse gases. This technology involves a lot of scientific fields, which leads to the appearance of strongly inter-dependent parameters. This makes the system particularly hard to control and increases fault's occurrence frequency. These two issues call for the necessity to maintain the system performance at the expected level, even in faulty operating conditions. It is called ;fault tolerant control; (FTC). The present paper aims to give the state of the art of FTC applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The FTC approach is composed of two parts. First, a diagnosis part allows the identification and the isolation of a fault; it requires a good a priori knowledge of all the possible faults. Then, a control part allows an optimal control strategy to find the best operating point to recover/mitigate the fault; it requires the knowledge of the degradation phenomena and their mitigation strategies.

  4. Management Methods Applied to Lunch Program. What Food Management Companies Can Do for You - 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kenneth R.

    1974-01-01

    In Joliet, Illinois, a food management system based on increased student participation in the school lunch program, was so successful that the controls developed to manage it were adopted as standard operating procedure in overall school system management. (Author/MLF)

  5. Assertive Classroom Management Strategies and Students' Performance: The Case of EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Bozorgmanesh, Bafrin

    2015-01-01

    Ample research findings support the effective role that classroom management strategies play in enhancing students' learning. Drawing upon Iranian high school teachers' classroom management strategies, this article is intended to examine the extent to which these teachers follow assertive classroom management strategies and if these strategies…

  6. Assertive Classroom Management Strategies and Students' Performance: The Case of EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Bozorgmanesh, Bafrin

    2015-01-01

    Ample research findings support the effective role that classroom management strategies play in enhancing students' learning. Drawing upon Iranian high school teachers' classroom management strategies, this article is intended to examine the extent to which these teachers follow assertive classroom management strategies and if these strategies…

  7. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  8. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-12-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep "learning curve" associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real- time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  9. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  10. Do continence management strategies reduce falls? a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Frances A; Dow, Briony; Low, May-Ann

    2013-12-01

    Urinary incontinence is associated with increased fall risk, and fall prevention programs include recommendations to manage continence as one component of fall reduction. However, the evidence to support this recommendation is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify continence management interventions that are effective in decreasing falls. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Studies were included if they evaluated the effect of any type of continence management strategy on falls in older adults. The included studies were assessed for quality, and data relating to participants, interventions and outcomes were extracted by two independent reviewers. Four articles met the inclusion criteria. Two studies were randomised controlled trials, one a retrospective cohort study and one an uncontrolled intervention study. Interventions included pharmacological agents, a toileting regime combined with physical activity and an individualised continence program. Only the study evaluating the combination of physical activity and prompted voiding found an effect on falls. It is surprising that there has been so little research into continence management interventions that include fall outcomes. A toileting regime combined with physical activity may reduce falls in residential care. There is a need for further studies investigating the impact of continence management on falls.

  11. Building Research Relationships With Managed Care Organizations: Issues and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    LEIN, CATHERINE; COLLINS, CLARE; LYLES, JUDITH S.; HILLMAN, DONALD; SMITH, ROBERT C.

    2006-01-01

    Managed care is now the dominant form of healthcare in the United States. The need for clinical research about the organization, delivery, and outcomes of primary care services in managed care models is high, yet access to managed care organizations as sites for clinical research may be problematic. The purpose of this article is to describe issues involved in obtaining access to managed care settings for clinical research and practical strategies for successful collaboration using literature review and case description. Three steps for developing collaborative relationships with managed care organizations (MCOs) are presented: 1) assessment of organizational structure, history, and culture; 2) finding common ground; and 3) project implementation. These steps are discussed within the context of MCO systems issues and a relationship-centered approach to communication between researchers and individuals from the MCO. Successful relationships with MCOs for clinical research are possible when careful attention is paid to inclusion of MCOs as collaborators in the development of the research questions and design, and as partners in the research implementation process. PMID:17203136

  12. A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Management of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sea level rise is causing shoreline erosion, increased coastal flooding, and marsh vulnerability to the impact of storms. Coastal marshes provide flood abatement, carbon and nutrient sequestration, water quality maintenance, and habitat for fish, shellfish, and wildlife, including species of concern, such as the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus). We present a climate change adaptation strategy (CCAS) adopted by scientific, management, and policy stakeholders for managing coastal marshes and enhancing system resiliency. A common adaptive management approach previously used for restoration projects was modified to identify climate-related vulnerabilities and plan climate change adaptive actions. As an example of implementation of the CCAS, we describe the stakeholder plans and management actions the US Fish and Wildlife Service and partners developed to build coastal resiliency in the Narrow River Estuary, RI, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. When possible, an experimental BACI (before-after, control-impact) design, described as pre- and post-sampling at the impact site and one or more control sites, was incorporated into the climate change adaptation and implementation plans. Specific climate change adaptive actions and monitoring plans are described and include shoreline stabilization, restoring marsh drainage, increasing marsh elevation, and enabling upland marsh migration. The CCAS provides a framework and methodology for successfully managing coa

  13. A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Management of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sea level rise is causing shoreline erosion, increased coastal flooding, and marsh vulnerability to the impact of storms. Coastal marshes provide flood abatement, carbon and nutrient sequestration, water quality maintenance, and habitat for fish, shellfish, and wildlife, including species of concern, such as the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus). We present a climate change adaptation strategy (CCAS) adopted by scientific, management, and policy stakeholders for managing coastal marshes and enhancing system resiliency. A common adaptive management approach previously used for restoration projects was modified to identify climate-related vulnerabilities and plan climate change adaptive actions. As an example of implementation of the CCAS, we describe the stakeholder plans and management actions the US Fish and Wildlife Service and partners developed to build coastal resiliency in the Narrow River Estuary, RI, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. When possible, an experimental BACI (before-after, control-impact) design, described as pre- and post-sampling at the impact site and one or more control sites, was incorporated into the climate change adaptation and implementation plans. Specific climate change adaptive actions and monitoring plans are described and include shoreline stabilization, restoring marsh drainage, increasing marsh elevation, and enabling upland marsh migration. The CCAS provides a framework and methodology for successfully managing coa

  14. The Impact of Employing Brainstorming Strategy on Improving Writing Performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoush, Kholoud Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying the impact of employing brainstorming strategy on improving writing performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan. The sample of the study which consisted of 80 male and female university students was distributed into two groups; experimental (taught by brainstorming strategy) and…

  15. A Qualitative Study of Vocabulary Learning Strategies Applied by Iranian Undergraduate EFL Learners in Real Learning Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazdi, Mahdi; Kafipour, Reza

    2014-01-01

    This study tries to investigate real use of vocabulary learning strategies by Iranian EFL learners. To achieve this goal, the researcher applied a pure qualitative research method in which frequency of all strategies counted and then classified. To select participants for the current study, the researcher used cluster sampling and fish ball…

  16. Risk evaluation mitigation strategies: the evolution of risk management policy.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Kristen; Toscani, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the primary regulatory responsibility to ensure that medications are safe and effective both prior to drug approval and while the medication is being actively marketed by manufacturers. The responsibility for safe medications prior to marketing was signed into law in 1938 under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; however, a significant risk management evolution has taken place since 1938. Additional federal rules, entitled the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act, were established in 2007 and extended the government's oversight through the addition of a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) for certain drugs. REMS is a mandated strategy to manage a known or potentially serious risk associated with a medication or biological product. Reasons for this extension of oversight were driven primarily by the FDA's movement to ensure that patients and providers are better informed of drug therapies and their specific benefits and risks prior to initiation. This article provides an historical perspective of the evolution of medication risk management policy and includes a review of REMS programs, an assessment of the positive and negative aspects of REMS, and provides suggestions for planning and measuring outcomes. In particular, this publication presents an overview of the evolution of the REMS program and its implications.

  17. Office-based strategies for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Goutham

    2010-06-15

    Roughly two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or obese. Obesity increases the risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, pulmonary disease, hepatobiliary disease, cancer, and a number of psychosocial complications. Physicians often feel unprepared to handle this important problem. Practical office-based strategies include: (1) making recommendations for assisted self-management, including guidance on popular diets, (2) advising patients about commercial weight-loss programs, (3) advising patients about and prescribing medications, (4) recommending bariatric surgery, and (5) supplementing these strategies with counseling about lifestyle changes using a systematic approach. Family physicians should provide basic information about the effectiveness and safety of popular diets and commercial weight-loss programs, and refer patients to appropriate information sources. Sibutramine and orlistat, the only medications currently approved for the long-term treatment of obesity, should only be prescribed in combination with lifestyle changes. Bariatric surgery is an option for adults with a body mass index of 40 kg per m2 or higher, or for those with a body mass index of 35 kg per m2 or higher who have obesity-related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. The five A's behavioral counseling paradigm (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) can be used as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to the management of obesity that incorporates evidence for managing common obesity-related behaviors.

  18. Optimal management strategies in variable environments: Stochastic optimal control methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic optimization was used to investigate the optimal defoliation of salt desert shrubs in north-western Utah. Management was formulated in the context of optimal stochastic control theory, with objective functions composed of discounted or time-averaged biomass yields. Climatic variability and community patterns of salt desert shrublands make the application of stochastic optimal control both feasible and necessary. A primary production model was used to simulate shrub responses and harvest yields under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The simulation results then were used in an optimization model to determine optimal defoliation strategies. The latter model encodes an algorithm for finite state, finite action, infinite discrete time horizon Markov decision processes. Three questions were addressed: (i) What effect do changes in weather patterns have on optimal management strategies? (ii) What effect does the discounting of future returns have? (iii) How do the optimal strategies perform relative to certain fixed defoliation strategies? An analysis was performed for the three shrub species, winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). In general, the results indicate substantial differences among species in optimal control strategies, which are associated with differences in physiological and morphological characteristics. Optimal policies for big sagebrush varied less with variation in climate, reserve levels and discount rates than did either shadscale or winterfat. This was attributed primarily to the overwintering of photosynthetically active tissue and to metabolic activity early in the growing season. Optimal defoliation of shadscale and winterfat generally was more responsive to differences in plant vigor and climate, reflecting the sensitivity of these species to utilization and replenishment of carbohydrate reserves. Similarities could be seen in the influence of both

  19. Paradigm Shift in the Management Strategy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; McAlpine, Jessica N; Lheureux, Stephanie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Oza, Amit M

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer continues to evolve. Although epithelial ovarian cancer had been assumed to arise from the coelomic epithelium of the ovarian surface, it is now becoming clearer that the majority of serous carcinomas arise from epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, whereas clear cell and endometrioid cancers arise from endometriosis. Molecular and genomic characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer have been extensively investigated. Our understanding of pathogenesis of the various histologic types of ovarian cancer have begun to inform changes to the strategies for management of epithelial ovarian cancer, which represent a paradigm shift not only for treatment but also for prevention, which previously had not been considered achievable. In this article, we will discuss novel attempts at the prevention of high-grade serous ovarian cancer and treatment strategies for two distinct entities in epithelial ovarian cancer: low-grade serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas, which are relatively rare and resistant to conventional chemotherapy.

  20. Agroecological strategies for arthropod pest management in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Felipe; Sarmento, Renato A; Teodoro, Adenir V; dos Santos, Gil R; do Nascimento, Ildon R

    2011-05-01

    There is a need to implement a new approach to pest control in which agroecological strategies are developed and adapted in a site-specific way to highly variable and diverse farm conditions typical of farms in tropical regions such as Brazil. It has become evident that the conventional agriculture based on high use of external inputs and oriented to maximize profits, has often been detrimental and unviable when considered from social and ecological perspectives. Pest problems, for example, are generally related to high input, single-crop agroecosystems. We discuss here agroecological strategies such as conservation biological control, use of natural pesticides and selectivity of synthetic and natural pesticides as a way to conserve and increase natural enemies' efficiency in Brazilian agroecosystems. In addition, we discuss some patents related to agroecological pest management.

  1. Financial management and dental school strength, Part I: Strategy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W; Bergstrom, Roy

    2004-04-01

    The ultimate goal of financial management in a dental school is to accumulate assets that are available for strategic growth, which is a parallel objective to the profit motive in business. Budget development is often grounded in an income statement framework where the goal is to match revenues and expenses. Only when a balance sheet perspective (assets = liabilities + equity) is adopted can strategic growth be fully addressed. Four views of budgeting are presented in this article: 1) covering expenses, 2) shopping, 3) strategic support, and 4) budgeting as strategy. These perceptions of the budgeting process form a continuum, moving from a weak strategic position (covering expenses) to a strong one (budgeting as strategy) that encourages the accumulation of assets that build equity in the organization.

  2. Determining management strategies for the Sarikum Nature Protection Area.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Sevgi

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, many environmental problems have become important factors in promoting the economic need to develop tourist activity: climate change such as energy wars, increasing hunger and aridity, population increases in urban areas, excessive and unthinking use of natural resources, difficult international relations, economic competition, and increasing environmental stress. Trends in global tourism have changed with changes in culture and our attitude to nature. Changes in both the profile and consumption patterns of tourists have called for the need to balance the use of natural and cultural assets with the need to adequately protect them. In this study, the Sarikum Nature Protection Area (SNPA) was selected as a case study because of its significance as a Turkish wetland area and the variety of different ecosystems coexisting within it. The study focussed on management strategies, but also provides a broader strategy for an area that currently has no management plan. Strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analyses of the area were gathered and analyzed using R'WOT analysis (ranking + SWOT), a multi-criteria assessment method, in order to determine strategies, obtain the participation of interest groups, and assess their opinions and attitudes. The analysis showed the following: the rich biological diversity and the existence of endemic species were the reserve's most significant strength; the presence of natural areas in surrounding regions was the most significant opportunity; the shortage of infrastructure and lack of legal regulation of ecotourism was the most significant weakness; and the lack of a management plan was the most immediate threat.

  3. Advanced blood management strategies for elective joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Layton, Jodi L; Rubin, Lee E; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2013-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of anemia detected in the preoperative work-up of elective surgical patients preparing for total joint replacement. The impact of anemia in this population has significant implications due to elevations in postoperative morbidity and mortality. By using current clinical guidelines and medical evidence, clinicians can improve outcomes for these patients by employing a three-phase approach, focused on preoperative assessment, intraoperative hemostasis, and postoperative blood product management. Strategies to optimize preoperative hemoglobin levels, reduce intraoperative blood losses, and decrease postoperative transfusion rates can independently and collectively improve overall patient care and surgical outcomes following lower extremity total joint arthroplasty.

  4. Advanced airway management strategies for severe OSAS and craniofacial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Anil

    Pediatric OSAS and craniofacial malformations present challenges that require innovative approaches and comprehensive treatment strategies. Synchronous airway lesions, craniofacial malformations, obstructive anomalies of the tongue base, nasal vault and choanae are commonly addressed by subspecialists from various clinical and surgical academic traditions who practice variable levels of required communication. This is not a mere social requirement but an important requisite for intelligent and effective airway management. Membership of dedicated airway, aero digestive or craniofacial teams are desirable but not required. I expect this clinical brief to help many brilliant clinicians in their pursuit of perfection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  6. Management strategies for problem behaviors in the patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, F W; Ravindran, V L; Stewart, J T

    1998-04-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral problems are present in most patients with dementia and are usually the clinician's main focus of management. Differential diagnosis of these problems can be challenging, but the effort is essential for planning appropriate therapy. Pharmacologic interventions are available for treatment of depression, agitation, aggression, psychotic symptoms, wandering, and sleep disorders. Given the less than favorable risk-benefit ratio of most psychotropic drugs in the population of older patients with dementia, the importance of nonpharmacologic strategies and limiting treatment goals should not be overlooked.

  7. Strategies for Managing Mobile Devices for Use by Hospitalized Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Stade, Diana; Dalal, Anuj; Clements, Marsha; Collins, Sarah; Chang, Frank; Fladger, Anne; Getty, George; Hanna, John; Kandala, Ravali; Lehmann, Lisa S; Leone, Kathleen; Massaro, Anthony F; Mlaver, Eli; McNally, Kelly; Ravindran, Sucheta; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential advantages, implementation of mobile devices and ongoing management pose challenges in the hospital environment. Our team implemented the PROSPECT (Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety through Patient-centeredness, Engagement, Communication and Technology) project at Brigham and Women's Hospital. The goal of PROSPECT is to transform the hospital environment by providing a suite of e-tools to facilitate teamwork among nurses, physicians, patients and to engage patients and care partners in their plan of care. In this paper, we describe the device-related decisions and challenges faced including device and accessory selection, integration, information and device security, infection control, user access, and ongoing operation and maintenance. We relate the strategies that we used for managing mobile devices and lessons learned based on our experiences.

  8. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital.

  9. Weight management and weight loss strategies of professional jockeys.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jan M; Timperio, Anna F; Crawford, David A; Burns, Cate M; Cameron-Smith, David

    2002-03-01

    Jockeys are required to maintain very low body weight and precise weight control during competition. This study examined the weight loss and weight management strategies of professional horseracing jockeys in the state of Victoria, Australia. An anonymous, self-completed questionnaire was administered (55% response rate, n = 116). Almost half (43%) reported that maintaining riding weight was difficult or very difficult, with 75% routinely skipping meals. In preparation for racing, 60% reported that they typically required additional weight loss, with 81% restricting food intake in the 24 hours prior to racing. Additionally, sauna-induced sweating (29%) and diuretics (22%) were frequently employed to further aid in weight loss prior to racing. These rapid weight loss methods did not differ between the 51% of jockeys who followed a weight management plan compared to those who did not. The impact of these extreme weight loss practices on riding performance and health remains unknown.

  10. Strategies for Managing Mobile Devices for Use by Hospitalized Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Stade, Diana; Dalal, Anuj; Clements, Marsha; Collins, Sarah; Chang, Frank; Fladger, Anne; Getty, George; Hanna, John; Kandala, Ravali; Lehmann, Lisa S.; Leone, Kathleen; Massaro, Anthony F.; Mlaver, Eli; McNally, Kelly; Ravindran, Sucheta; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential advantages, implementation of mobile devices and ongoing management pose challenges in the hospital environment. Our team implemented the PROSPECT (Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety through Patient-centeredness, Engagement, Communication and Technology) project at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The goal of PROSPECT is to transform the hospital environment by providing a suite of e-tools to facilitate teamwork among nurses, physicians, patients and to engage patients and care partners in their plan of care. In this paper, we describe the device-related decisions and challenges faced including device and accessory selection, integration, information and device security, infection control, user access, and ongoing operation and maintenance. We relate the strategies that we used for managing mobile devices and lessons learned based on our experiences. PMID:26958185

  11. An initial evaluation of potential options for managing riparian reserves of the Aquatic Conservation Strategy of the Northwest Forest Plan

    Treesearch

    Gordon H. Reeves; Brian R. Pickard; K. Norman. Johnson

    2016-01-01

    The Aquatic Conservation Strategy (ACS) of the Northwest Forest Plan guides management of riparian and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands in western Oregon, western Washington, and northern California. We applied new scientific findings and tools to evaluate two potential options, A and B, for refining interim riparian reserves to meet ACS goals and likely challenges...

  12. Advanced Behavioral Applications in Schools: A Review of R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies: An Applied Behavior Analysis Systems Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies" is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS[R]) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include…

  13. Advanced Behavioral Applications in Schools: A Review of R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies: An Applied Behavior Analysis Systems Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies" is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS[R]) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include…

  14. Lessons Learnt from Applying Action Research to Support Strategy Formation Processes in Long-Term Care Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has failed to explain how to apply AR and action learning…

  15. Lessons Learnt from Applying Action Research to Support Strategy Formation Processes in Long-Term Care Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has failed to explain how to apply AR and action learning…

  16. Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

  17. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriano Maia; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and

  18. Water Management Strategies against Water Shortage in the Alps (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, C.

    2009-12-01

    In the European Alps water has been perceived as ubiquitous and not the subject of management. Climate change and anthropogenic pressures have changed demand and supply relations rapidly and over the last 10 years, water problems have increasingly become apparent over temporal and spatial hotspots. Stakeholders in the Alpine Space have been confronted with water management problems in agriculture, tourism and hydropower to such an extent that they approached scientists to create solution strategies based on adaptation and mitigation. In this context, Alp-Water-Scarce, a European project on Water Management Strategies against Water Scarcity in the Alps was funded by the Alpine Space programme as part of the "European Territorial Cooperation" scheme. It has 17 project partners from Austria Switzerland, France, Italy and Slovenia from local governments, provinces, federal institutes and offices, universities, regional agencies, alpine societies, geological surveys, and chambers of agriculture and forestry. The Lead Partner is the Mountain Institute in Savoy, Rhone-Alpes, France. The main challenges of this project are to create local Early Warning Systems against Water Scarcity in the Alps. This system is based on strengthening existing long-term monitoring and modeling and creating new measuring networks in those countries where they do not yet exist. It is anchored strongly and actively within a Stakeholder Interaction Forum linked across comparative and contrasting regions across the Alps. The Early Warning System is based on the linkage and improvement of field monitoring and assemblage of qualitative and quantitative data derived both from natural water reservoirs as well as from anthropogenic water use in 28 selected pilot regions selected in France, Italy, Austria, Slovenia and Switzerland. The objectives are to improve water management at the short term (annual scale) and long term (using future scenarios) based on modelling and application of climate change

  19. Watershed management strategies to prevent and control cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Piehler, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    The tenets of watershed management--a focus on the land area linked to the water body, the incorporation of sound scientific information into the decision-making process and stakeholder involvement throughout the process--are well-suited for the management of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (C-HABs). The management of C-HABs can be viewed as having two main areas of focus. First, there is mitigation--control and/or removal of the bloom. This type of crisis response is an important component to managing active C-HABs and there are several techniques that have been successfully utilized, including the application of algicides, physical removal of surface scums and the mechanical mixing of the water column. While these methods are valuable because they address the immediate problem, they do not address the conditions that exist in the system that promote and maintain C-HABs. Thus, the second component of a successful C-HAB management strategy would include a focus on prevention. C-HABs require nutrients to fuel their growth and are often favored in longer-residence time systems with vertical stratification of the water column. Consequently, nutrients and hydrology are the two factors most commonly identified as the targets for prevention of C-HABs. Management strategies to control the sources, transformation and delivery of the primary growth-limiting nutrients have been applied with success in many areas. The most effective of these include controlling land use, maintaining the integrity of the landscape and applying best management practices. In the past, notable successes in managing C-HABs have relied on the reduction of nutrients from point-sources. Because many point sources are now well-managed, current efforts are focused on non-point source nutrient reduction, such as runoff from agricultural and urban areas. Non-point sources present significant challenges due to their diffuse nature. Regardless of which techniques are utilized, effective watershed

  20. A Review of Enrollment Management: Issues and Strategies. Management/Marketing Special Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ed; And Others

    This report presents findings and recommendations from a project undertaken by the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) to determine reasons for a decline in business course enrollments and develop strategies to increase enrollments in management and marketing programs throughout the district. Following background information on the…

  1. Strategies to improve self-management in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Toback, Mehnosh; Clark, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of hospitalization, hospital readmission and death. Patients with heart failure have many complications, with multiple co-existing diagnoses which result in polypharmacy. Following instructions provided by many physicians, medication adjustments based on changes in their symptoms are required. Behavioral adjustments concerning diet and exercise regime are recommended. Therefore, the patient plays a crucial role in the management of heart failure. To review the available studies on heart failure self-management, and investigate educational, behavioral and psychosocial strategies that plays an important role to improve patient self-management. A literature review was conducted based upon the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. The articles identified through an extensive search using PubMed and UpToDate from 1999 to 2016. Improved self-management will increase compliance, promote patient quality-of-life, advance clinical outcomes, reduce hospital re-admission and will decrease hospitalization costs.

  2. Rheumatic diseases and sexuality: Disease impact and self-management strategies.

    PubMed

    Helland, Ylva; Kjeken, Ingvild; Steen, Eldri; Kvien, Tore K; Hauge, Mona-Iren; Dagfinrud, Hanne

    2011-05-01

    To explore how intimate relationships and sexuality are influenced by rheumatic diseases and to describe self-management strategies used to manage disease consequences. To ensure that data were grounded in patients' language and experiences, individual and focus group interviews were conducted. Purposeful sampling was used to ensure variation in age, sex, disease duration, diagnosis, and marital status among the informants. Participants were men and women ages 18 years or older, were diagnosed with inflammatory rheumatic disease by a rheumatologist, and had a disease duration of ≥2 years. The mean age of the 23 participants was 44 years, the mean disease duration was 13.6 years, and the mean ± SD modified Health Assessment Questionnaire score was 1.58 ± 0.46. Four key themes summarized the main issues described by the informants: between disease and normality, relational aspects, disease-related sexual challenges, and self-management strategies. The results reveal that the disease constituted a disruption in life, requiring a new orientation of sexual identity and relationship. Participants' experiences of sexuality went beyond specific sexual activity, including aspects such as body image and relational issues, illustrating a multidimensional perception of sexuality. A large inter- and intrapersonal variety of impact and a wide range of management strategies were reported. This study shows that sexuality is a vital area of life for people living with arthritis. It is a source of physical pleasure and intimacy with their partner, but may cause anxiety and distress when affected by rheumatic disease. However, various self-management strategies are applied to enhance intimate relationships and sexual activity. Knowledge and openness concerning sexual issues need to be emphasized as part of the competence of health professionals and researchers. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. How drug life-cycle management patent strategies may impact formulary management.

    PubMed

    Berger, Jan; Dunn, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Margaret M; Karst, Kurt R; Shear, W Chad

    2016-10-01

    Drug manufacturers may employ various life-cycle management patent strategies, which may impact managed care decision making regarding formulary planning and management strategies when single-source, branded oral pharmaceutical products move to generic status. Passage of the Hatch-Waxman Act enabled more rapid access to generic medications through the abbreviated new drug application process. Patent expirations of small-molecule medications and approvals of generic versions have led to substantial cost savings for health plans, government programs, insurers, pharmacy benefits managers, and their customers. However, considering that the cost of developing a single medication is estimated at $2.6 billion (2013 dollars), pharmaceutical patent protection enables companies to recoup investments, creating an incentive for innovation. Under current law, patent protection holds for 20 years from time of patent filing, although much of this time is spent in product development and regulatory review, leaving an effective remaining patent life of 7 to 10 years at the time of approval. To extend the product life cycle, drug manufacturers may develop variations of originator products and file for patents on isomers, metabolites, prodrugs, new drug formulations (eg, extended-release versions), and fixed-dose combinations. These additional patents and the complexities surrounding the timing of generic availability create challenges for managed care stakeholders attempting to gauge when generics may enter the market. An understanding of pharmaceutical patents and how intellectual property protection may be extended would benefit managed care stakeholders and help inform decisions regarding benefit management.

  4. Managing differences: the central challenge of global strategy.

    PubMed

    Ghemawat, Pankaj

    2007-03-01

    The main goal of any international strategy should be to manage the large differences that arise at the borders of markets. Yet executives often fail to exploit market and production discrepancies, focusing instead on the tensions between standardization and localization. In this article, Pankaj Ghemawat presents a new framework that encompasses all three effective responses to the challenges of globalization. He calls it the AAA Triangle. The A's stand for the three distinct types of international strategy. Through adaptation, companies seek to boost revenues and market share by maximizing their local relevance. Through aggregation, they attempt to deliver economies of scale by creating regional, or sometimes global, operations. And through arbitrage, they exploit disparities between national or regional markets, often by locating different parts of the supply chain in different places--for instance, call centers in India, factories in China, and retail shops in Western Europe. Ghemawat draws on several examples that illustrate how organizations use and balance these strategies and describes the trade-offs they make as they do so. Because most enterprises should draw from all three A's to some extent, the framework can be used to develop a summary scorecard indicating how well the company is globalizing. However, given the tensions among the strategies, it's not enough simply to tick off the corresponding boxes. Strategic choice requires some degree of prioritization--and the framework can help with that as well. While it is possible to make progress on all three strategies, companies usually must focus on one or two when trying to build competitive advantage.

  5. A novel electronic assessment strategy to support applied Drosophila genetics training in university courses.

    PubMed

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-02-25

    The advent of "omic" technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353-358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Fostier et al.

  6. A Novel Electronic Assessment Strategy to Support Applied Drosophila Genetics Training in University Courses

    PubMed Central

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The advent of “omic” technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353−358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation. PMID:25717150

  7. HPV-Based Screening, Triage, Treatment, and Followup Strategies in the Management of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; García-Suastegui, Wendy Argelia; Fierros-Zárate, Geny del Socorro; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia Judith

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop immunotherapy and gene therapy strategies to treat cervical cancer. HPV genotyping has potentially valuable applications in triage of low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, assessment of prognosis and followup of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and in treatment strategies for invasive cervical cancer. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, the identification and subsequent functional evaluation of host proteins associated with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins may provide useful information in understanding cervical carcinogenesis, identifying cervical cancer molecular markers, and developing specific targeting strategies against tumor cells. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the main diagnostic methods, management strategies, and followup of HPV-associated cervical lesions and review clinical trials applying gene therapy strategies against the development of cervical cancer. PMID:23690785

  8. Aortic Dissection in Pregnancy: Management Strategy and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Ming; Ma, Wei-Guo; Peterss, Sven; Wang, Long-Fei; Qiao, Zhi-Yu; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Elefteriades, John A; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Aortic dissection in pregnancy is a rare but lethal catastrophe. Clinical experiences are limited. We report our experience in 25 patients focusing on etiology, management strategies, and outcomes. Between June 1998 and February 2015, we treated 25 pregnant women (mean age, 31.6 ± 4.7 years) in whom aortic dissection developed at a mean of 28 ± 10 gestational weeks (GWs). Type A aortic dissection (TAAD) was present in 20 (80%) and type B (TBAD) in 5 (20%). Marfan syndrome was seen in 17 (68%). Management strategy was based on dissection type and GWs. TAADs were managed surgically in 19 (95.0%) and medically in 1 (5.0%). Maternal and fetal mortalities were, respectively, 14.3% (1 of 7) and 0 (0 of 7) in the "delivery first" group (7 of 20), 16.7% (1 of 6) and 33.3% (2 of 6) in "single-stage delivery and aortic repair" group (6 of 20), 16.7% (1 of 6) and 66.7% (4 of 6) in "aortic repair first" group (6 of 20), and 100% (1 of 1) and 100% (1 of 1) in the "medical management" group (1 of 20). TBADs were managed surgically in 60% (3 of 5) and endovascularly and medically in 20% each (1 of 5). No maternal deaths occurred. Fetal mortality was 100% in the surgical group and 0% in the other groups. During late follow-up, which was complete in 95.2% (20 of 21), 3 maternal and 2 fetal deaths occurred in the TAAD group. Overall maternal survival was 68.6% at 5 years. Marfan syndrome predominates among women with aortic dissection in pregnancy. For TAADs, after 28 GWs, delivery followed by surgical repair can achieve maternal and fetal survival adequately; before 28 GWs, maternal survival should be prioritized given the high risk of fetal death. For TBADs in pregnancy, nonsurgical management is preferred. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulations, Policies and Strategies for LLRW Management in Bangladesh - 12368

    SciTech Connect

    Mollah, A.S.

    2012-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste (LLW) is generated from various nuclear applications in Bangladesh. The major sources of radioactive waste in the country are at present: (a) the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor; (b) the radioisotope production facility; (c) the medical, industrial and research facilities that use radionuclides; and (d) the industrial facility for processing monazite sands. Radioactive waste needs to be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. According to Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Act-93, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the governmental body responsible for the receipt and final disposal of radioactive wastes in the whole country. Waste management policy has become an important environmental, social, and economical issue for LLW in Bangladesh. Policy and strategies will serve as a basic guide for radioactive waste management in Bangladesh. The waste generator is responsible for on-site collection, conditioning and temporary storage of the waste arising from his practice. The Central Waste Processing and Storage Unit (CWPSU) of BAEC is the designated national facility with the requisite facility for the treatment, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste until a final disposal facility is established and becomes operational. The Regulatory Authority is responsible for the enforcement of compliance with provisions of the waste management regulation and other relevant requirements by the waste generator and the CWPSU. The objective of this paper is to present, in a concise form, basic information about the radioactive waste management infrastructure, regulations, policies and strategies including the total inventory of low level radioactive waste in the country. For improvement and strengthening in terms of operational capability, safety and security of RW including spent radioactive sources and overall security of the facility (CWPSF), the facility is expected to serve

  10. The Caries Management System: an evidence-based preventive strategy for dental practitioners. Application for adults.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W; Pakdaman, A; Dennison, P J; Howe, E L C

    2008-03-01

    In the absence of effective caries preventive methods, operative care became established as the means for caries control in general practice. Water fluoridation resulted in a declining caries incidence which decreased further following the advent of fluoridated toothpaste. The challenge today is to develop a non-invasive model of practice that will sustain a low level of primary caries experience in the younger generation and reduce risk of caries experience in the older generations. The Caries Management System is a ten step non-invasive strategy to arrest and remineralize early lesions. The governing principle of this system is that caries management must include consideration of the patient at risk, the status of each lesion, patient management, clinical management and monitoring. Both dental caries risk and treatment are managed according to a set of protocols that are applied at various steps throughout patient consultation and treatment. The anticipated outcome of implementing the Caries Management System in general dental practice is reduction in caries incidence and increased patient satisfaction. Since the attainment and maintenance of oral health is determined mainly by controlling both caries and periodontal disease, the implementation of the Caries Management System in general practice will promote both outcomes.

  11. Development of in situ product removal strategies in biocatalysis applying scaled-down unit operations.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Søren; Börner, Tim; Ringborg, Rolf H; Rehn, Gustav; Grey, Carl; Nordblad, Mathias; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Woodley, John M

    2017-03-01

    An experimental platform based on scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner enables easy and highly flexible testing of advanced biocatalytic process options such as in situ product removal (ISPR) process strategies. In such a platform, it is possible to compartmentalize different process steps while operating it as a combined system, giving the possibility to test and characterize the performance of novel process concepts and biocatalysts with minimal influence of inhibitory products. Here the capabilities of performing process development by applying scaled-down unit operations are highlighted through a case study investigating the asymmetric synthesis of 1-methyl-3-phenylpropylamine (MPPA) using ω-transaminase, an enzyme in the sub-family of amino transferases (ATAs). An on-line HPLC system was applied to avoid manual sample handling and to semi-automatically characterize ω-transaminases in a scaled-down packed-bed reactor (PBR) module, showing MPPA as a strong inhibitor. To overcome the inhibition, a two-step liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) ISPR concept was tested using scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner. Through the tested ISPR concept, it was possible to continuously feed the main substrate benzylacetone (BA) and extract the main product MPPA throughout the reaction, thereby overcoming the challenges of low substrate solubility and product inhibition. The tested ISPR concept achieved a product concentration of 26.5 gMPPA  · L(-1) , a purity up to 70% gMPPA  · gtot(-1) and a recovery in the range of 80% mol · mol(-1) of MPPA in 20 h, with the possibility to increase the concentration, purity, and recovery further. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 600-609. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Applying Grounded Theory to Weight Management among Women: Making a Commitment to Healthy Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunker, Christie; Ivankova, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    In this study we developed a theory grounded in data from women who continued healthy eating behaviors after a weight management program. Participant recruitment was guided by theoretical sampling strategies for focus groups and individual interviews. Inclusion criteria were: African American or Caucasian women aged 30+ who lost [greater than or…

  13. Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Goeran Bjoerklund, Anna; Reich, Marcus Carlsson; Eriksson, Ola; Soerbom, Adrienne

    2007-07-01

    Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different policy instruments. Emphasis is on environmental aspects, but social and economic aspects are also considered. The results show that most waste treatment methods have a role to play in a robust and flexible integrated waste management system, and that the waste hierarchy is valid as a rule of thumb from an environmental perspective. A review of social aspects shows that there is a general willingness among people to source separate wastes. A package of policy instruments can include landfill tax, an incineration tax which is differentiated with respect to the content of fossil fuels and a weight based incineration tax, as well as support to the use of biogas and recycled materials.

  14. Strategies for dosing and switching antipsychotics for optimal clinical management.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Peter F; Correll, Christoph U

    2008-01-01

    Optimal clinical management of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder can be achieved through careful antipsychotic dosing and, if necessary, switching to another well-chosen antipsychotic using suitable switching strategies. For severely ill patients treated in clinical practice, adequate dosing may not result from following the relatively low dosing levels and abrupt titration schedules typically used in clinical registration trials. Data from recent effectiveness trials, naturalistic studies, and the Roadmap Expert Consensus Survey provide evidence of specific dose levels and titration schedules for antipsychotic agents that may be appropriate in clinical practice. Discontinuation and frequent switching of medication are common among patients treated with antipsychotics, but data suggest that an adequate trial of the first antipsychotic medication should be undertaken before switching to another antipsychotic medication. Making a decision to switch from a typical to an atypical antipsychotic or between atypical antipsychotics should involve consideration of variables relating to the patient, illness, medication, and the patient's environment. Switching can improve efficacy and tolerability but may also result in predictable side effects or withdrawal symptoms, including weight gain and metabolic effects as well as effects associated with prolactin changes. Many side effects that occur during switching are attributable to receptor profiles and antimuscarinic or antihistaminic blockade. Individualized switching strategies that include careful choice of medication, dose, and titration and tapering schedules; management of symptoms; and patient psychoeducation can reduce or treat side effects, increasing the likelihood of a successful switch and greater adherence and efficacy.

  15. Recent Advances in Nanosystems and Strategies for Managing Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Rudra; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K; Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Bhosale, Rohit R; Naga Sravan Kumar Varma, V

    2016-04-01

    Parasitic infection such as Leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease, presents a significant global burden which is responsible for high mortality rate especially in less developed countries. Its intracellular nature and disseminated locations of parasite, limited number of chemotherapeutic agents, increasing incidences of resistance to first line drugs and toxicities, poses a great challenge to formulation scientists that have necessitated effective management of leishmanial infection by modulating the delivery of existing drugs. Over the past decade, research on development of alternative treatments such as nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes etc.), use of natural products as well as development of antileishmanial vaccine have been extensively investigated. The present review focuses on different facets of therapeutic strategies, existing miscellaneous drug delivery systems and approaches intended for management, as well as treatment of the infection, with an aim to summarize the current trends and strategies adopted for antileishmanial therapy in a systematic manner. Moreover, the article encloses an eclectic collection of patents allied to new-fangled chemotherapeutics for antileishmanial therapy.

  16. A mathematically guided strategy for risk assessment and management.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, James Arlin

    2005-03-01

    Strategies for risk assessment and management of high consequence operations are often based on factors such as physical analysis, analysis of software and other logical processing, and analysis of statistically determined human actions. Conventional analysis methods work well for processing objective information. However, in practical situations, much or most of the data available are subjective. Also, there are potential resultant pitfalls where conventional analysis might be unrealistic, such as improperly using event tree and fault tree failure descriptions where failures or events are soft (partial) rather than crisp (binary), neglecting or misinterpreting dependence (positive, negative, correlation), and aggregating nonlinear contributions linearly. There are also personnel issues that transcend basic human factors statistics. For example, sustained productivity and safety in critical operations can depend on the morale of involved personnel. In addition, motivation is significantly influenced by 'latent effects', which are pre-occurring influences. This paper addresses these challenges and proposes techniques for subjective risk analysis, latent effects risk analysis and a hybrid analysis that also includes objective risk analysis. The goal is an improved strategy for risk management.

  17. Management Development Programs: The Effects of Management Level and Corporate Strategy. [and] Invited Reaction: Level and Strategy Should and Do Make a Difference!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakely, Gerald L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Consensus of survey responses from 155 of 600 human resource managers was as follows: management development programs emphasized technical skills at lower levels, entrepreneurial skills at senior levels; organizations with corporate growth strategies focused on more areas than those with stability or retrenchment strategies. (Muschewske's reaction…

  18. Habitat Demonstration Unit Project Leadership and Management Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) led multi-center Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project leadership and management strategies. The HDU project team constructed and tested an analog prototype lunar surface habitat/laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) during 2010. The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a tiger team approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies and innovations from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the leadership and management strategies as well as lessons learned pertaining to leading and managing a multi-center diverse team in a rapid prototype environment. The PEM configuration went from a paper design to an operational surface habitat demonstration unit in less than 12 months. The HDU project is part of the strategic plan from the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Directorate Integration Office (DIO) and the Exploration Mission Systems Office (EMSO) to test destination elements in analog environments. The 2011 HDU-Deep Space Habitat (DSH) configuration will build upon the PEM work, and emphasize validity of crew operations (remote working and living), EVA operations, mission operations, logistics operations, and science operations that might be required in a deep space context for Near Earth Object (NEO) exploration mission architectures. The 2011 HDU-DSH will be field-tested during the 2011 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (DRaTS) field tests. The HDU project is a "technology-pull" project that integrates technologies and innovations from multiple NASA centers. This project will repurpose the HDU 2010 demo unit that was field tested in the 2010 DRaTS, adding habitation functionality to the prototype unit. This paper will describe the strategy of establishing a multi-center project management team that put in place the key multi-center leadership skills and

  19. TRALI risk reduction: donor and component management strategies.

    PubMed

    Eder, Anne F; Benjamin, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 transfusions and may cause considerably more morbidity and mortality that is not recognized in clinical practice. Based on the current understanding of the etiology of TRALI, blood centers have implemented or are evaluating various donor and component management strategies in an effort to mitigate the risk of TRALI. Many cases of TRALI are likely caused by antibodies to leukocyte antigens (HLA or HNA) in blood components. Approximately 10 to 20% of female blood donors with a history of pregnancy and 1 to 5% of male blood donors harbor these antibodies. Alternatively, TRALI may be mediated by other bioactive lipids or substances that accumulate during storage and cause a reaction when transfused to susceptible patients. The complex interplay among various donor-, component-, and patient-related factors underlying TRALI guarantees that effective prevention will not be a single or simple intervention but rather will require a multifaceted approach. Perhaps, the most important risk reduction strategy is the effort to ensure appropriate use of blood products and eliminate unnecessary transfusions. Blood collection agencies, however, have more proximate control over donor selection and component management than transfusion practice. AABB has provided some guidance on deferring donors implicated in TRALI and minimizing the preparation of high plasma volume components from donors who have anti-leukocyte antibodies or are at increased risk of leukocyte alloimmunization. Blood centers have taken various approaches to mitigate the risk of TRALI, and the possible benefit and the inherent limitations of the current strategies will be reviewed.

  20. Improving VBAC rates: the combined impact of two management strategies.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kate; Henry, Amanda; Thou, Steven; Davis, Greg; Miller, Trent

    2014-08-01

    Caesarean section rates in Australia have risen to >30%, with repeat caesarean delivery the most common indication. One method of reducing caesarean delivery rates is to increase rates of vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC). To determine the combined effect of two management strategies on the rates of successful VBAC in women experiencing their first pregnancy following primary caesarean section. Prospective cohort study from May 2009 to October 2010 at a metropolitan Australian teaching hospital. The strategies studied were (i) allocating responsibility for VBAC candidates attempting labour to the hospital's three high-risk obstetric consultants and (ii) implementing a next birth after caesarean (NBAC) antenatal clinic designed to counsel and support women deciding on mode of birth for their next pregnancy after a primary caesarean section. Data were collected from Obstetrix, a NBAC logbook and medical records of 396 eligible women who gave birth during the study period. Overall VBAC rates improved from 17.2% in 2006 prior to implementation of the combined strategies, to 27.0% over the studied period (P < 0.001). Of those women who desired and attempted a VBAC, the success rate was 64.4%. Regression analysis identified an increased likelihood of attempted vaginal birth where malpresentation was the indication for previous caesarean, while Eastern Asian ethnicity was associated with increased likelihood of choosing repeat caesarean. A dedicated NBAC clinic and more consistent approach to labour management can help improve VBAC rates. Further targeted counselling towards women with previous malpresentation and/or East Asian descent may further improve VBAC attempt rates. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.