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Sample records for managing emerging infectious

  1. Emergent Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Moncef; Jelliti, Bechir; Jenzeri, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management. PMID:20404989

  2. Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this: Main Content Area Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases NIAID conducts and supports basic research to better ... diagnose, treat, and prevent a wide range of infectious diseases, whether those diseases emerge naturally or are deliberately ...

  3. Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Emerging Infectious Diseases/Pathogens Research Introduction and Goals Despite remarkable advances ... medical research and treatments during the 20th century, infectious diseases remain among the leading causes of death worldwide. ...

  4. Conflict and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Dominique; Formenty, Pierre; Connolly, Maire A.

    2007-01-01

    Detection and control of emerging infectious diseases in conflict situations are major challenges due to multiple risk factors known to enhance emergence and transmission of infectious diseases. These include inadequate surveillance and response systems, destroyed infrastructure, collapsed health systems and disruption of disease control programs, and infection control practices even more inadequate than those in resource-poor settings, as well as ongoing insecurity and poor coordination among humanitarian agencies. This article outlines factors that potentiate emergence and transmission of infectious diseases in conflict situations and highlights several priority actions for their containment and control. PMID:18217543

  5. Effective Coordination and Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases in Wildlife Populations.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Alex; Aguirre, A Alonso; Jeggo, Martyn; Woods, Rupert

    2015-09-01

    A transdisciplinary, One Health approach is proposed for the coordination of wildlife health diagnostics, research, and policy development. In some countries, considerable effort has been made to establish specific activities including surveillance and integration of wildlife health within diagnostic and research laboratories. We suggest that some of these activities can be improved and many countries still require national structures to deal with wildlife disease investigation and management. We also suggest that scientists in this field should actively engage with national and international organizations and conferences to influence the development of policy, diagnostics, research, and management of emerging wildlife diseases.

  6. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  7. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting. PMID:26963227

  8. Managing an Infectious Disease Outbreak in a School. Lessons Learned from School Crises and Emergencies. Volume 2, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on an infectious disease incident, which resulted in the death of a student, closure of area schools and the operation of an on-site school vaccine clinic. The report highlights the critical need…

  9. Towards effective emerging infectious disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ear, Sophal

    2014-01-01

    In this plenary talk given at the annual meeting of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences at Texas Tech University last October, Professor Sophal Ear, then of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, discussed his research on the political economy of emerging infectious disease (EID) surveillance programs. His talk reviews lessons learned for U.S. military medical research laboratories collaborating with developing countries and is comprised of three case studies: Cambodia (U.S. Naval Area Medical Research Unit 2 or NAMRU-2), Indonesia (also NAMRU-2 in the context of H5N1 or Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza), (1) and Mexico (that country's handling of A/H1N1 or Swine Flu in 2009). (2) Professor Ear's research provides policymakers with tools for improving the effectiveness of new or existing EID surveillance programs. His work also offers host countries the opportunity to incorporate ideas, provide opinions, and debate the management of political and economic constraints facing their programs. In this analysis, constraints are found for each case study and general recommendations are given for improving global emerging infectious disease surveillance across political, economic, and cultural dimensions. PMID:25514524

  10. Towards effective emerging infectious disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ear, Sophal

    2014-01-01

    In this plenary talk given at the annual meeting of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences at Texas Tech University last October, Professor Sophal Ear, then of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, discussed his research on the political economy of emerging infectious disease (EID) surveillance programs. His talk reviews lessons learned for U.S. military medical research laboratories collaborating with developing countries and is comprised of three case studies: Cambodia (U.S. Naval Area Medical Research Unit 2 or NAMRU-2), Indonesia (also NAMRU-2 in the context of H5N1 or Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza), (1) and Mexico (that country's handling of A/H1N1 or Swine Flu in 2009). (2) Professor Ear's research provides policymakers with tools for improving the effectiveness of new or existing EID surveillance programs. His work also offers host countries the opportunity to incorporate ideas, provide opinions, and debate the management of political and economic constraints facing their programs. In this analysis, constraints are found for each case study and general recommendations are given for improving global emerging infectious disease surveillance across political, economic, and cultural dimensions.

  11. Emerging infectious diseases and amphibian population declines.

    PubMed Central

    Daszak, P.; Berger, L.; Cunningham, A. A.; Hyatt, A. D.; Green, D. E.; Speare, R.

    1999-01-01

    We review recent research on the pathology, ecology, and biogeography of two emerging infectious wildlife diseases, chytridiomycosis and ranaviral disease, in the context of host-parasite population biology. We examine the role of these diseases in the global decline of amphibian populations and propose hypotheses for the origins and impact of these panzootics. Finally, we discuss emerging infectious diseases as a global threat to wildlife populations. PMID:10603206

  12. Moving beyond too little, too late: managing emerging infectious diseases in wild populations requires international policy and partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voyles, Jamie; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Collins, James P.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Frick, Winifred F.; McCallum, Hamish I.; Willis, Craig K.R.; Blehert, David S.; Murray, Kris A.; Puschendorf, Robert; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Cheng, Tina L.; Langwig, Kate E.; Linder, Daniel L.; Toothman, Mary; Wilber, Mark Q.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are on the rise due to multiple factors, including human facilitated movement of pathogens, broad-scale landscape changes, and perturbations to ecological systems (Jones et al. 2008; Fisher et al. 2012). Epidemics in wildlife are problematic because they can lead to pathogen spillover to new host organisms, erode biodiversity and threaten ecosystems that sustain human societies (Fisher et al. 2012; Kilpatrick 2011). There have been recent calls for large-scale research approaches to combat threats EIDs pose to wildlife (Sleeman 2013). While it is true that developing new analytical models, diagnostic assays and molecular tools will significantly avance outr abilities to respond to disease threats, we also propose that addressing difficult problems in EIDs will require considerable shofts in international health policy and infrastructure. While there are currently international organizations responsbile for rapidly initiating and coordinating preventative measures to control infectious diseases in human, livestock, and arable systems, there are few comparable instiutions that have the authority to implement transnational responses to EIDs in wildlife. This absence of well-developed infastructure hampers the rapid responses necessary to mitigate international spread of EIDs.

  13. Selected emerging infectious diseases of ornamental fish.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Colin; Palmeiro, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Several emerging infectious diseases have serious implications for the trade and husbandry of ornamental fish. Although many of these diseases have been well studied and described in certain species, there are still many diseases that are not well understood. The following discussion focuses on select important emerging infectious diseases that affect ornamental fish in the aquarium and aquaculture industries: goldfish herpesvirus, koi herpesvirus, Ranavirus, Megalocytivirus, Betanodavirus, Francisella, Cryptobia iubilans, and Exophiala. When possible, the known species affected, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, disinfection, and prevention modalities for each disease are discussed.

  14. Self-disseminating vaccines for emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Aisling A; Redwood, Alec J; Jarvis, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Modern human activity fueled by economic development is profoundly altering our relationship with microorganisms. This altered interaction with microbes is believed to be the major driving force behind the increased rate of emerging infectious diseases from animals. The spate of recent infectious disease outbreaks, including Ebola virus disease and Middle East respiratory syndrome, emphasize the need for development of new innovative tools to manage these emerging diseases. Disseminating vaccines are one such novel approach to potentially interrupt animal to human (zoonotic) transmission of these pathogens.

  15. Self-disseminating vaccines for emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Aisling A.; Redwood, Alec J.; Jarvis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Modern human activity fueled by economic development is profoundly altering our relationship with microorganisms. This altered interaction with microbes is believed to be the major driving force behind the increased rate of emerging infectious diseases from animals. The spate of recent infectious disease outbreaks, including Ebola virus disease and Middle East respiratory syndrome, emphasize the need for development of new innovative tools to manage these emerging diseases. Disseminating vaccines are one such novel approach to potentially interrupt animal to human (zoonotic) transmission of these pathogens. PMID:26524478

  16. Global climate change and emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Patz, J A; Epstein, P R; Burke, T A; Balbus, J M

    1996-01-17

    Climatic factors influence the emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases, in addition to multiple human, biological, and ecological determinants. Climatologists have identified upward trends in global temperatures and now estimate an unprecedented rise of 2.0 degrees C by the year 2100. Of major concern is that these changes can affect the introduction and dissemination of many serious infectious diseases. The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue, and viral encephalitides, are among those diseases most sensitive to climate. Climate change would directly affect disease transmission by shifting the vector's geographic range and increasing reproductive and biting rates and by shortening the pathogen incubation period. Climate-related increases in sea surface temperature and sea level can lead to higher incidence of water-borne infectious and toxin-related illnesses, such as cholera and shellfish poisoning. Human migration and damage to health infrastructures from the projected increase in climate variability could indirectly contribute to disease transmission. Human susceptibility to infections might be further compounded by malnutrition due to climate stress on agriculture and potential alterations in the human immune system caused by increased flux of ultraviolet radiation. Analyzing the role of climate in the emergence of human infectious diseases will require interdisciplinary cooperation among physicians, climatologists, biologists, and social scientists. Increased disease surveillance, integrated modeling, and use of geographically based data systems will afford more anticipatory measures by the medical community. Understanding the linkages between climatological and ecological change as determinants of disease emergence and redistribution will ultimately help optimize preventive strategies.

  17. Travel and the emergence of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    Travel is a potent force in the emergence of disease. Migration of humans has been the pathway for disseminating infectious diseases throughout recorded history and will continue to shape the emergence, frequency, and spread of infections in geographic areas and populations. The current volume, speed, and reach of travel are unprecedented. The consequences of travel extend beyond the traveler to the population visited and the ecosystem. When they travel, humans carry their genetic makeup, immunologic sequelae of past infections, cultural preferences, customs, and behavioral patterns. Microbes, animals, and other biologic life also accompany them. Today's massive movement of humans and materials sets the stage for mixing diverse genetic pools at rates and in combinations previously unknown. Concomitant changes in the environment, climate, technology, land use, human behavior, and demographics converge to favor the emergence of infectious diseases caused by a broad range of organisms in humans, as well as in plants and animals. PMID:8903157

  18. Travel and the emergence of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary E

    2004-01-01

    Travel is a potent force in the emergence of disease. Migration of humans has been the pathway for disseminating infectious diseases throughout recorded history and will continue to shape the emergence, frequency, and spread of infections in geographic areas and populations. The current volume, speed, and reach of travel are unprecedented. The consequences of travel extend beyond the traveler to the population visited and the ecosystem. When they travel, humans carry their genetic makeup, immunologic sequelae of past infections, cultural preferences, customs, and behavioral patterns. Microbes, animals, and other biologic life also accompany them. Today's massive movement of humans and materials sets the stage for mixing diverse genetic pools at rates and in combinations previously unknown. Concomitant changes in the environment, climate, technology, land use, human behavior, and demographics converge to favor the emergence of infectious diseases caused by a broad range of organisms in humans, as well as in plants and animals. PMID:19785214

  19. Globalization, international law, and emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    The global nature of the threat posed by new and reemerging infectious diseases will require international cooperation in identifying, controlling, and preventing these diseases. Because of this need for international cooperation, international law will certainly play a role in the global strategy for the control of emerging diseases. Recognizing this fact, the World Health Organization has already proposed revising the International Health Regulations. This article examines some basic problems that the global campaign against emerging infectious diseases might face in applying international law to facilitate international cooperation. The international legal component of the global control strategy for these diseases needs careful attention because of problems inherent in international law, especially as it applies to emerging infections issues. PMID:8903206

  20. Highlights from the 2014 International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID): from cART management to the end of the HIV pandemic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 International Symposium on HIV and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID) provided a forum for investigators to hear the latest research developments in the clinical management of HIV and HCV infections as well as HIV cure research. Combined anti-retroviral therapy (c-ART) has had a profound impact on the disease prognosis and transformed this infection into a chronic disease. However, HIV is able to persist within the infected host and the pandemic is still growing. The main 2014 ISHEID theme was, hence “Together for a world without HIV and AIDS”. In this report we not only give details on this main topic but also summarize what has been discussed in the areas of HCV coinfection and present a short summary on currently emerging viral diseases. PMID:25165483

  1. Social inequalities and emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.

    1996-01-01

    Although many who study emerging infections subscribe to social-production-of-disease theories, few have examined the contribution of social inequalities to disease emergence. Yet such inequalities have powerfully sculpted not only the distribution of infectious diseases, but also the course of disease in those affected. Outbreaks of Ebola, AIDS, and tuberculosis suggest that models of disease emergence need to be dynamic, systemic, and critical. Such models--which strive to incorporate change and complexity, and are global yet alive to local variation--are critical of facile claims of causality, particularly those that scant the pathogenic roles of social inequalities. Critical perspectives on emerging infections ask how large-scale social forces influence unequally positioned individuals in increasingly interconnected populations; a critical epistemology of emerging infectious diseases asks what features of disease emergence are obscured by dominant analytic frameworks. Research questions stemming from such a reexamination of disease emergence would demand close collaboration between basic scientists, clinicians, and the social scientists and epidemiologists who adopt such perspectives. PMID:8969243

  2. Infection control management of patients with suspected highly infectious diseases in emergency departments: data from a survey in 41 facilities in 14 European countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Emergency and Medical Admission Departments (EDs and MADs), prompt recognition and appropriate infection control management of patients with Highly Infectious Diseases (HIDs, e.g. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers and SARS) are fundamental for avoiding nosocomial outbreaks. Methods The EuroNHID (European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases) project collected data from 41 EDs and MADs in 14 European countries, located in the same facility as a national/regional referral centre for HIDs, using specifically developed checklists, during on-site visits from February to November 2009. Results Isolation rooms were available in 34 facilities (82,9%): these rooms had anteroom in 19, dedicated entrance in 15, negative pressure in 17, and HEPA filtration of exhausting air in 12. Only 6 centres (14,6%) had isolation rooms with all characteristics. Personnel trained for the recognition of HIDs was available in 24 facilities; management protocols for HIDs were available in 35. Conclusions Preparedness level for the safe and appropriate management of HIDs is partially adequate in the surveyed EDs and MADs. PMID:22284435

  3. Epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Marjorie

    2010-04-01

    The Homeland Security News Wire has been reporting on new ways to fight epidemics using digital tools such as iPhone, social networks, Wikipedia, and other Internet sites. Instant two-way communication now gives consumers the ability to complement official reports on emerging infectious diseases from health authorities. However, there is increasing concern that these communications networks could open the door to mass panic from unreliable or false reports. There is thus an urgent need to ensure that epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases gives health authorities the capability to identify, analyze, and report disease outbreaks in as timely and efficient a manner as possible. One of the dilemmas in the global dissemination of information on infectious diseases is the possibility that information overload will create inefficiencies as the volume of Internet-based surveillance information increases. What is needed is a filtering mechanism that will retrieve relevant information for further analysis by epidemiologists, laboratories, and other health organizations so they are not overwhelmed with irrelevant information and will be able to respond quickly. This paper introduces a self-organizing ontology that could be used as a filtering mechanism to increase relevance and allow rapid analysis of disease outbreaks as they evolve in real time.

  4. Opinion paper on innovative approach of biomarkers for infectious diseases and sepsis management in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura; Travaglino, Francesco; Lalle, Irene; Fiotti, Nicola; Cervellin, Grianfranco; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Lupia, Enrico; Maisel, Alan; Hein, Frauke; Wagner, Florian; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis is a leading healthcare problem, accounting for the vast majority of fatal events in critically ill patients. Beyond early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, this condition requires a multifaceted approach for monitoring the severity, the potential organ failure as well as the risk of death. Monitoring of the efficacy of treatment is also a major issue in the emergency department (ED). The assessment of critically ill conditions and the prognosis of patients with sepsis is currently based on some scoring systems, which are, however, inefficient to provide definite clues about organ failure and prognosis in general. The discretionary and appropriate use of some selected biomarkers such as procalcitonin, inducible protein 10 (IP10), Group IV phospholipase A2 type II (PLA2 II), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), natriuretic peptides, mature adrenomedullin (ADM), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), copeptin, thrombopoietin, Mer receptor and even red blood cell distribution width (RDW) represent thereby an appealing perspective in the diagnosis and management of patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, at the moment, it is not still clear if it is better to use a multimarkers approach or if a single, most appropriate, biomarker exists. This collective opinion paper is aimed at providing an overview about the potential clinical usefulness of some innovative biomarkers of sepsis in its diagnosis and prognosis, but also in the treatment management of the disease. This manuscript represents a synopsis of the lectures of Third Italian GREAT Network Congress, that was hold in Rome, 15-19 October 2012.

  5. Emerging infectious disease: global response, global alert.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, H

    1997-01-01

    Despite spectacular progress in the eradication of infectious diseases, malaria and tuberculosis are making a comeback in many parts of the world. After years of decline, plague, diphtheria, dengue, meningococcal meningitis, yellow fever, and cholera have reappeared as public health threats. In the last 20 years [before 1997] more than 30 new and highly infectious diseases have been identified, including Ebola-type hemorrhagic fever, HIV/AIDs, and hepatitis C. Antibiotic resistance has also emerged during this period, and fewer new antibiotics are being produced because of high development costs and licensing. Drugs no longer offer protection or cure for many infectious diseases, and consequently more people need hospitalization with higher treatment costs. The causes of the appearance of new diseases and the resurgence of old ones include the rapid increase in international travel, the growth of mega-cities with high population densities, inadequate safe water and sanitation, food-borne diseases by the globalization of trade, and human penetration into remote animal and insect habitats. Meanwhile, resources for public health are being reduced, with the result that either the appearance of new diseases or resistance to drugs go unnoticed. A recent example is the human immunodeficiency virus, which went unrecognized until a large number of people got infected. For this very reason the 1997 World Health Day featured the theme of emerging infectious diseases and global response. Such forums are held to help countries rebuild the foundations of disease surveillance and control, while the public and private sectors may be encouraged to develop better techniques for surveillance to confront a common global threat.

  6. Controlling emerging infectious diseases in salmon aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, J M; Osmundsen, T; Aunsmo, A; Mardones, F O; Rich, K M

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the authors review the impacts of diseases facing salmon aquaculture, drawing lessons from terrestrial animal diseases. They discuss the implementation of current control strategies, taking into account transmission patterns (vertical versus horizontal), disease reservoirs, and interactions with wild fish. In addition, the decision-making context of aquatic disease control and the institutional organisation of control strategies are considered, with particular emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of regulatory authorities and the private sector. Case studies on the emergence and control of infectious salmon anaemia worldwide and pancreas disease in Norway are used to examine some of the controversies that may influence decision making and provide lessons for the future.

  7. Emerging infectious diseases: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Berns, D S; Rager, B

    2000-12-01

    As the twenty-first century begins it becomes increasingly apparent that the twentieth century, which opened with the promise of the eradication of most infectious diseases, closed with the specter of the reemergence of many deadly infectious diseases that have a rapidly increasing incidence and geographic range. Equally if not more alarming is the appearance of new infectious diseases that have become major sources of morbidity and mortality. Among recent examples are HIV/AIDS, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Lyme disease, hemolytic uremic syndrome (caused by a strain of Escherichia coli), Rift Valley fever, Dengue hemorrhagic fever, malaria, cryptosporidiosis, and schistosomiasis. The reasons for this situation are easily identified in some cases as associated with treatment modalities (permissive use of antibiotics), the industrial use of antibiotics, demographic changes, societal behavior patterns, changes in ecology, global warming, the inability to deliver minimal health care and the neglect of well-established public health priorities. In addition is the emergence of diseases of another type. We have begun to characterize the potential microbial etiology of what has historically been referred to as chronic diseases.

  8. Investigating and managing the rapid emergence of white-nose syndrome, a novel, fatal, infectious disease of hibernating bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Janet; Clifford, Deana; Castle, Kevin; Cryan, Paul M.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease of bats that hibernate. The etiologic agent of WNS is the fungus Geomyces destructans, which infects the skin and wing membranes. Over 1 million bats in six species in eastern North America have died from WNS since 2006, and as a result several species of bats may become endangered or extinct. Information is lacking on the pathogenesis of G. destructans and WNS, WNS transmission and maintenance, individual and site factors that contribute to the probability of an outbreak of WNS, and spatial dynamics of WNS spread in North America. We considered how descriptive and analytical epidemiology could be used to fill these information gaps, including a four-step (modified) outbreak investigation, application of a set of criteria (Hill's) for assessing causation, compartment models of disease dynamics, and spatial modeling. We cataloged and critiqued adaptive-management options that have been either previously proposed for WNS or were helpful in addressing other emerging diseases of wild animals. These include an ongoing program of prospective surveillance of bats and hibernacula for WNS, treatment of individual bats, increasing population resistance to WNS (through vaccines, immunomodulators, or other methods), improving probability of survival from starvation and dehydration associated with WNS, modifying hibernacula environments to eliminate G. destructans, culling individuals or populations, controlling anthropogenic spread of WNS, conserving genetic diversity of bats, and educating the public about bats and bat conservation issues associated with WNS.

  9. Factors in the emergence of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    "Emerging" infectious diseases can be defined as infections that have newly appeared in a population or have existed but are rapidly increasing in incidence or geographic range. Among recent examples are HIV/AIDS, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Lyme disease, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (a foodborne infection caused by certain strains of Escherichia coli). Specific factors precipitating disease emergence can be identified in virtually all cases. These include ecological, environmental, or demographic factors that place people at increased contact with a previously unfamiliar microbe or its natural host or promote dissemination. These factors are increasing in prevalence; this increase, together with the ongoing evolution of viral and microbial variants and selection for drug resistance, suggests that infections will continue to emerge and probably increase and emphasizes the urgent need for effective surveillance and control. Dr. David Satcher's article and this overview inaugurate Perspectives, a regular section in this journal intended to present and develop unifying concepts and strategies for considering emerging infections and their underlying factors. The editors welcome, as contributions to the Perspectives section, overviews, syntheses, and case studies that shed light on how and why infections emerge, and how they may be anticipated and prevented. PMID:8903148

  10. Sepsis and Other Infectious Disease Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Liang, Stephen Y

    2016-08-01

    Waning immunity and declining anatomic and physiologic defenses render the elder vulnerable to a wide range of infectious diseases. Clinical presentations are often atypical and muted, favoring global changes in mental status and function over febrile responses or localizing symptoms. This review encompasses early recognition, evaluation, and appropriate management of these common infections specifically in the context of elders presenting to the emergency department. With enhanced understanding and appreciation of the unique aspects of infections in the elderly, emergency physicians can play an integral part in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these often debilitating and life-threatening diseases. PMID:27475012

  11. Controlling emerging infectious diseases in salmon aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, J M; Osmundsen, T; Aunsmo, A; Mardones, F O; Rich, K M

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the authors review the impacts of diseases facing salmon aquaculture, drawing lessons from terrestrial animal diseases. They discuss the implementation of current control strategies, taking into account transmission patterns (vertical versus horizontal), disease reservoirs, and interactions with wild fish. In addition, the decision-making context of aquatic disease control and the institutional organisation of control strategies are considered, with particular emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of regulatory authorities and the private sector. Case studies on the emergence and control of infectious salmon anaemia worldwide and pancreas disease in Norway are used to examine some of the controversies that may influence decision making and provide lessons for the future. PMID:27044162

  12. Emerging infectious diseases and travel medicine.

    PubMed

    Ostroff, S M; Kozarsky, P

    1998-03-01

    International movement of individuals, populations, and products is one of the major factors associated with the emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases as the pace of global travel and commerce increases rapidly. Travel can be associated with disease emergence because (1) the disease arises in an area of heavy tourism, (2) tourists may be at heightened risk because of their activities, or (3) because they can act as vectors to transport the agent to new areas. Examples of recently recognized diseases with relationship to travel include HIV, Legionnaire's disease, cyclosporiasis, Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal, hantavirus, and variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Reemerging diseases include dengue fever, malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, leptospirosis, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. In addition, tuberculosis, drug-resistant shigellosis, and cholera have been major concerns in refugee and migrant populations. Because of the unique role of travel in emerging infections, efforts are underway to address this factor by agencies such as the CDC, WHO, the International Society of Travel Medicine, and the travel industry.

  13. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  14. Emerging and reemerging infectious diseases: a multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D S; Moxon, E R; Adams, J; Altizer, S; Antonovics, J; Aral, S; Berkelman, R; Bond, E; Bull, J; Cauthen, G; Farley, M M; Glasgow, A; Glasser, J W; Katner, H P; Kelley, S; Mittler, J; Nahmias, A J; Nichol, S; Perrot, V; Pinner, R W; Schrag, S; Small, P; Thrall, P H

    1998-02-01

    Predictions that infectious diseases would be eliminated as a major threat to human health have been shattered by emerging and reemerging infections, among them acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemorrhagic fevers, marked increases in infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, and the resurgence of tuberculosis and malaria. Understanding the dynamics of emerging and reemerging infections is critical to efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality of such infections, to establish policy related to preparedness for infectious threats, and for decisions on where to use limited resources in the fight against infections. In order to offer a multidisciplinary perspective, 23 infectious disease specialists, epidemiologists, geneticists, microbiologists, and population biologists participated in an open forum at Emory University on emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. As summarized below, the group addressed questions about the definition, the identification, the factors responsible for, and multidisciplinary approaches to emerging and reemerging infections.

  15. Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Williams, Gail M; Clements, Archie C A; Hu, Wenbiao

    2014-02-01

    Emerging infectious diseases present a complex challenge to public health officials and governments; these challenges have been compounded by rapidly shifting patterns of human behaviour and globalisation. The increase in emerging infectious diseases has led to calls for new technologies and approaches for detection, tracking, reporting, and response. Internet-based surveillance systems offer a novel and developing means of monitoring conditions of public health concern, including emerging infectious diseases. We review studies that have exploited internet use and search trends to monitor two such diseases: influenza and dengue. Internet-based surveillance systems have good congruence with traditional surveillance approaches. Additionally, internet-based approaches are logistically and economically appealing. However, they do not have the capacity to replace traditional surveillance systems; they should not be viewed as an alternative, but rather an extension. Future research should focus on using data generated through internet-based surveillance and response systems to bolster the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for emerging infectious diseases.

  16. Emerging trends in international law concerning global infectious disease control.

    PubMed

    Fidler, David P

    2003-03-01

    International cooperation has become critical in controlling infectious diseases. In this article, I examine emerging trends in international law concerning global infectious disease control. The role of international law in horizontal and vertical governance responses to infectious disease control is conceptualized; the historical development of international law regarding infectious diseases is described; and important shifts in how states, international institutions, and nonstate organizations use international law in the context of infectious disease control today are analyzed. The growing importance of international trade law and the development of global governance mechanisms, most prominently in connection with increasing access to drugs and other medicines in unindustrialized countries, are emphasized. Traditional international legal approaches to infectious disease control--embodied in the International Health Regulations--may be moribund.

  17. A comprehensive infectious disease management system.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Alex; Farley, John D

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electronic management system is now an essential tool for the successful management and monitoring of those affected by communicable infectious diseases (Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV, hepatitis C - HEP C) during the course of the treatment. The current methods which depend heavily on manual collecting, compiling and disseminating treatment information are labor-intensive and time consuming. Clinics specialized in the treatment of infectious diseases use a mix of electronic systems that fail to interact with each other, result in data duplication, and do not support treatment of the patient as a whole. The purpose of the Infectious Disease Management System is to reduce the administrative overhead associated with data collection and analysis while providing correlation abilities and decision support in accordance with defined treatment guidelines. This Infectious Disease Management System was developed to: Ensure cost effectiveness by means of low software licensing costs, Introduce a centralized mechanism of collecting and monitoring all infectious disease management data, Automate electronic retrieval of laboratory findings, Introduce a decision support mechanism as per treatment guidelines, Seamlessly integrate of application modules, Provide comprehensive reporting capabilities, Maintain a high level of user friendliness.

  18. Perspectives of public health laboratories in emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Gubler, Duane J

    2013-01-01

    The world has experienced an increased incidence and transboundary spread of emerging infectious diseases over the last four decades. We divided emerging infectious diseases into four categories, with subcategories in categories 1 and 4. The categorization was based on the nature and characteristics of pathogens or infectious agents causing the emerging infections, which are directly related to the mechanisms and patterns of infectious disease emergence. The factors or combinations of factors contributing to the emergence of these pathogens vary within each category. We also classified public health laboratories into three types based on function, namely, research, reference and analytical diagnostic laboratories, with the last category being subclassified into primary (community-based) public health and clinical (medical) analytical diagnostic laboratories. The frontline/leading and/or supportive roles to be adopted by each type of public health laboratory for optimal performance to establish the correct etiological agents causing the diseases or outbreaks vary with respect to each category of emerging infectious diseases. We emphasize the need, especially for an outbreak investigation, to establish a harmonized and coordinated national public health laboratory system that integrates different categories of public health laboratories within a country and that is closely linked to the national public health delivery system and regional and international high-end laboratories. PMID:26038473

  19. Management of infectious waste by US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rutala, W A; Odette, R L; Samsa, G P

    In July 1987 and January 1988, forty-six percent (441/955) of randomly selected US hospitals responded to a questionnaire intended to identify their waste disposal practices. Survey responses were received from hospitals in 48 states. United States hospitals generated a median of 6.93 kg of hospital waste per patient per day and infectious waste made up 15% of the total hospital waste. Most hospitals (greater than 90%) considered blood, microbiology, "sharps," communicable disease isolation, pathology, autopsy, and contaminated animal carcass waste as infectious. Other sources of hospital waste that were commonly (greater than 80%) designated infectious were surgical, dialysis, and miscellaneous laboratory waste. The infectious waste was normally (80%) treated via incineration or steam sterilization before disposal, whereas noninfectious waste was discarded directly in a sanitary landfill. Eight-two percent of these US hospitals are discarding blood, microbiology, sharps, pathology, and contaminated animal carcass waste in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control's recommendations, while the compliance rate for the Environmental Protection Agency's recommendations (excluding optional waste) is 75%. No hospital could identify an infection problem (excluding needle-stick injuries) that was attributable to the disposal of infectious waste. While the management of infectious waste by US hospitals is generally consistent with the Centers for Disease Control's guidelines, many hospitals employ overly inclusive definitions of infectious waste.

  20. 75 FR 22817 - Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation... Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation Safety'' (EID public... of risk from, and prioritization of response to, emerging infectious diseases relevant to...

  1. New technologies in predicting, preventing and controlling emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Christaki, Eirini

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of emerging infectious diseases is vital for the early identification of public health threats. Emergence of novel infections is linked to human factors such as population density, travel and trade and ecological factors like climate change and agricultural practices. A wealth of new technologies is becoming increasingly available for the rapid molecular identification of pathogens but also for the more accurate monitoring of infectious disease activity. Web-based surveillance tools and epidemic intelligence methods, used by all major public health institutions, are intended to facilitate risk assessment and timely outbreak detection. In this review, we present new methods for regional and global infectious disease surveillance and advances in epidemic modeling aimed to predict and prevent future infectious diseases threats. PMID:26068569

  2. Emerging infectious diseases: vulnerabilities, contributing factors and approaches.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Felissa R

    2004-04-01

    We live in an ever more connected global village linked through international travel, politics, economics, culture and human-human and human-animal interactions. The realization that the concept of globalization includes global exposure to disease-causing agents that were formerly confined to small, remote areas and that infectious disease outbreaks can have political, economic and social roots and effects is becoming more apparent. Novel infectious disease microbes continue to be discovered because they are new or newly recognized, have expanded their geographic range, have been shown to cause a new disease spectrum, have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans, have become resistant to antimicrobial agents, have increased in incidence or have become more virulent. These emerging infectious disease microbes may have the potential for use as agents of bioterrorism. Factors involved in the emergence of infectious diseases are complex and interrelated and involve all classifications of organisms transmitted in a variety of ways. In 2003, outbreaks of interest included severe acute respiratory syndrome, monkeypox and avian influenza. Information from the human genome project applied to microbial organisms and their hosts will provide new opportunities for detection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, control and prognosis. New technology related not only to genetics but also to satellite and monitoring systems will play a role in weather, climate and the approach to environmental manipulations that influence factors contributing to infectious disease emergence and control. Approaches to combating emerging infectious diseases include many disciplines, such as animal studies, epidemiology, immunology, ecology, environmental studies, microbiology, pharmacology, other sciences, health, medicine, public health, nursing, cultural, political and social studies, all of which must work together. Appropriate financial support of the public health infrastructure

  3. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions. PMID:21269678

  4. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions.

  5. Recurrence and emergence of infectious diseases in Djibouti city.

    PubMed

    Rodier, G R; Parra, J P; Kamil, M; Chakib, S O; Cope, S E

    1995-01-01

    Public health authorities are now increasingly concerned by changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases which may have an adverse impact on their budget plans and control strategies. Rapid increases in population and urban migration, various ecological changes, increasing poverty, and a rise in international travel have contributed to the worldwide vulnerability of human populations to the emergence, recurrence or spread of infectious diseases. In the rapidly growing city of Djibouti in East Africa, public health priorities have been altered during the last 10 years by diseases which were unknown or under control until the early 1980s. These diseases, including malaria, AIDS, tuberculosis, dengue fever and cholera, are consuming considerable resources. This article on Djibouti illustrates the epidemiological changes in the region. Besides the specific ecological and behavioural changes, which accompany rapid population growth, poverty seems to be a major cause for the emergence and recurrence of infectious diseases.

  6. Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Williams, Gail M; Clements, Archie C A; Hu, Wenbiao

    2014-02-01

    Emerging infectious diseases present a complex challenge to public health officials and governments; these challenges have been compounded by rapidly shifting patterns of human behaviour and globalisation. The increase in emerging infectious diseases has led to calls for new technologies and approaches for detection, tracking, reporting, and response. Internet-based surveillance systems offer a novel and developing means of monitoring conditions of public health concern, including emerging infectious diseases. We review studies that have exploited internet use and search trends to monitor two such diseases: influenza and dengue. Internet-based surveillance systems have good congruence with traditional surveillance approaches. Additionally, internet-based approaches are logistically and economically appealing. However, they do not have the capacity to replace traditional surveillance systems; they should not be viewed as an alternative, but rather an extension. Future research should focus on using data generated through internet-based surveillance and response systems to bolster the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24290841

  7. Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases. Grades 9-12. NIH Curriculum Supplement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs.

    This curriculum supplement guide brings the latest medical discoveries to classrooms. This module focuses on the objectives of introducing students to major concepts related to emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, and developing an understanding of the relationship between biomedical research and personal and public health. This module…

  8. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

  9. Merging economics and epidemiology to improve the prediction and management of infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Perrings, Charles; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Chowell, Gerardo; Daszak, Peter; Fenichel, Eli P; Finnoff, David; Horan, Richard D; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Kinzig, Ann P; Kuminoff, Nicolai V; Levin, Simon; Morin, Benjamin; Smith, Katherine F; Springborn, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical epidemiology, one of the oldest and richest areas in mathematical biology, has significantly enhanced our understanding of how pathogens emerge, evolve, and spread. Classical epidemiological models, the standard for predicting and managing the spread of infectious disease, assume that contacts between susceptible and infectious individuals depend on their relative frequency in the population. The behavioral factors that underpin contact rates are not generally addressed. There is, however, an emerging a class of models that addresses the feedbacks between infectious disease dynamics and the behavioral decisions driving host contact. Referred to as "economic epidemiology" or "epidemiological economics," the approach explores the determinants of decisions about the number and type of contacts made by individuals, using insights and methods from economics. We show how the approach has the potential both to improve predictions of the course of infectious disease, and to support development of novel approaches to infectious disease management.

  10. The landscape genetics of infectious disease emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Biek, Roman; Real, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    The spread of parasites is inherently a spatial process often embedded in physically complex landscapes. It is therefore not surprising that infectious disease researchers are increasingly taking a landscape genetics perspective to elucidate mechanisms underlying basic ecological processes driving infectious disease dynamics and to understand the linkage between spatially-dependent population processes and the geographic distribution of genetic variation within both hosts and parasites. The increasing availability of genetic information on hosts and parasites when coupled to their ecological interactions can lead to insights for predicting patterns of disease emergence, spread, and control. Here, we review research progress in this area based on four different motivations for the application of landscape genetics approaches: (1) assessing the spatial organization of genetic variation in parasites as a function of environmental variability, (2) using host population genetic structure as a means to parameterize ecological dynamics that indirectly influence parasite populations, e.g. gene flow and movement pathways across heterogeneous landscapes and the concurrent transport of infectious agents, (3) elucidating the temporal and spatial scales of disease processes, and (4) reconstructing and understanding infectious disease invasion. Throughout this review, we emphasise that landscape genetic principles are relevant to infection dynamics across a range of scales from within host dynamics to global geographic patterns and that they can also be applied to unconventional “landscapes” such as heterogeneous contact networks underlying the spread of human and livestock diseases. We conclude by discussing some general considerations and problems for inferring epidemiological processes from genetic data and try to identify possible future directions and applications for this rapidly expanding field. PMID:20618897

  11. A Learner-led, Discussion-based Elective on Emerging Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Clinton

    2015-08-25

    Objective. To implement a learner-led, discussion-based course aimed at exposing second-year pharmacy learners to the study of emerging infectious diseases from a global health perspective and to assess the role and importance of pharmacists in the management of disease outbreaks. Design. Learners examined literature pertinent to an emerging infectious disease in a 3-credit, discussion-based course and participated in peer discussion led by a designated learner. Instructional materials included journal articles, audio-visual presentations, documentaries, book chapters, movies, newspaper/magazine articles, and other materials. Learning outcomes were measured based on the ability of learners to perform critical thinking and analysis, communicate with their peers, and participate in class discussions. Assessment. The course was offered to 2 consecutive cohorts consisting of 14 and 16 learners, respectively. Overall, every learner in the first cohort achieved a final grade of A for the course. In the second cohort, the overall grade distribution consisted of grades of A, B, and C for the course. Learner evaluations indicated that the active-learning, discussion-based environment significantly enhanced interest in the topic and overall performance in the course. Conclusion. The elective course on emerging infectious diseases provided in-depth exposure to disease topics normally not encountered in the pharmacy curriculum. Learners found the material and format valuable, and the course enhanced their appreciation of infectious diseases, research methodology, critical thinking and analysis, and their roles as pharmacists. PMID:26430268

  12. A Learner-led, Discussion-based Elective on Emerging Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a learner-led, discussion-based course aimed at exposing second-year pharmacy learners to the study of emerging infectious diseases from a global health perspective and to assess the role and importance of pharmacists in the management of disease outbreaks. Design. Learners examined literature pertinent to an emerging infectious disease in a 3-credit, discussion-based course and participated in peer discussion led by a designated learner. Instructional materials included journal articles, audio-visual presentations, documentaries, book chapters, movies, newspaper/magazine articles, and other materials. Learning outcomes were measured based on the ability of learners to perform critical thinking and analysis, communicate with their peers, and participate in class discussions. Assessment. The course was offered to 2 consecutive cohorts consisting of 14 and 16 learners, respectively. Overall, every learner in the first cohort achieved a final grade of A for the course. In the second cohort, the overall grade distribution consisted of grades of A, B, and C for the course. Learner evaluations indicated that the active-learning, discussion-based environment significantly enhanced interest in the topic and overall performance in the course. Conclusion. The elective course on emerging infectious diseases provided in-depth exposure to disease topics normally not encountered in the pharmacy curriculum. Learners found the material and format valuable, and the course enhanced their appreciation of infectious diseases, research methodology, critical thinking and analysis, and their roles as pharmacists. PMID:26430268

  13. Preparedness for emerging infectious diseases: pathways from anticipation to action.

    PubMed

    Brookes, V J; Hernández-Jover, M; Black, P F; Ward, M P

    2015-07-01

    Emerging and re-emerging infectious disease (EID) events can have devastating human, animal and environmental health impacts. The emergence of EIDs has been associated with interconnected economic, social and environmental changes. Understanding these changes is crucial for EID preparedness and subsequent prevention and control of EID events. The aim of this review is to describe tools currently available for identification, prioritization and investigation of EIDs impacting human and animal health, and how these might be integrated into a systematic approach for directing EID preparedness. Environmental scanning, foresight programmes, horizon scanning and surveillance are used to collect and assess information for rapidly responding to EIDs and to anticipate drivers of emergence for mitigating future EID impacts. Prioritization of EIDs - using transparent and repeatable methods - based on disease impacts and the importance of those impacts to decision-makers can then be used for more efficient resource allocation for prevention and control. Risk assessment and simulation modelling methods assess the likelihood of EIDs occurring, define impact and identify mitigation strategies. Each of these tools has a role to play individually; however, we propose integration of these tools into a framework that enhances the development of tactical and strategic plans for emerging risk preparedness.

  14. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Emerging Infections Network: Bridging the Gap Between Clinical Infectious Diseases and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Satish K.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Santibanez, Scott; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    In 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention granted a Cooperative Agreement Program award to the Infectious Diseases Society of America to develop a provider-based emerging infections sentinel network, the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Over the past 17 years, the EIN has evolved into a flexible, nationwide network with membership representing a broad cross-section of infectious disease physicians. The EIN has an active electronic mail conference (listserv) that facilitates communication among infectious disease providers and the public health community, and also sends members periodic queries (short surveys on infectious disease topics) that have addressed numerous topics relevant to both clinical infectious diseases and public health practice. The article reviews how the various functions of EIN contribute to clinical care and public health, identifies opportunities to further link clinical medicine and public health, and describes future directions for the EIN. PMID:24403542

  15. Ills in the pipeline: emerging infectious diseases and wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleeman, Jonathan; Gillin, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In the recent film Contagion, a medical thriller released in fall 2011, the fictitious MEV-1 virus—passed from bat to pig to humans—spreads across the globe as easily as the common cold, killing millions of humans and causing mass hysteria as medical researchers race to find a cure. Though it's Hollywood hyperbole, the film holds a kernel of truth: Researchers believe that the close proximity of Malaysian hog farms to forested areas—the natural habitat for fruit bats—allowed the previously unknown Nipah virus to spill from bats into pigs and subsequently into people, resulting in more than 100 human deaths (Epstein et al. 2006). There is no doubt that in recent times we have seen an unprecedented number of emerging infectious diseases, defined by the Institute for Medicine as new, reemerging, or drug-resistant infections whose incidence has increased or whose incidence threatens to increase in the near future. Many of these have a wildlife origin (Taylor et al. 2001). While this jump may be due, in part, to increased vigilance and reporting, there is a general consensus that current global conditions are creating a situation that is very favorable to the transmission of microbes that cause diseases. (For reviews, see Daszak et al. 2001 and Keesing et al. 2010). Likewise, it's increasingly important that wildlife professionals become aware of how and why new infectious diseases spread and what, if anything, can be done to minimize impacts on wildlife.

  16. Antibody-based therapies for emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the 19th century, it was discovered that immune sera were useful in treating infectious diseases. Serum therapy was largely abandoned in the 1940s because of the toxicity associated with the administration of heterologous sera and the introduction of effective antimicrobial chemotherapy. Recent advances in the technology of monoclonal antibody production provide the means to generate human antibody reagents and reintroduce antibody therapies, while avoiding the toxicities associated with serum therapy. Because of the versatility of antibodies, antibody-based therapies could, in theory, be developed against any existing pathogen. The advantages of antibody-based therapies include versatility, low toxicity, pathogen specificity, enhancement of immune function, and favorable pharmacokinetics; the disadvantages include high cost, limited usefulness against mixed infections, and the need for early and precise microbiologic diagnosis. The potential of antibodies as antiinfective agents has not been fully tapped. Antibody-based therapies constitute a potentially useful option against newly emergent pathogens. PMID:8903230

  17. Bats as reservoirs of severe emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui-Ju; Wen, Hong-ling; Zhou, Chuan-Min; Chen, Fang-Fang; Luo, Li-Mei; Liu, Jian-wei; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2015-07-01

    In recent years severe infectious diseases have been constantly emerging, causing panic in the world. Now we know that many of these terrible diseases are caused by viruses originated from bats (Table 1), such as Ebola virus, Marburg, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). These viruses have co-evolved with bats due to bats' special social, biological and immunological features. Although bats are not in close contact with humans, spillover of viruses from bats to intermediate animal hosts, such as horses, pigs, civets, or non-human primates, is thought to be the most likely mode to cause human infection. Humans may also become infected with viruses through aerosol by intruding into bat roosting caves or via direct contact with bats, such as catching bats or been bitten by bats.

  18. Infectious medical waste management. A home care responsibility.

    PubMed

    Ralph, I G

    1993-01-01

    With the proliferation of bloodborne diseases in the United States, more attention is being focused on the issues of infectious medical waste and its disposal. Home care organizations must be aware of the potential risks involved in handling infectious wastes, and adhere to industry standards of disposal and transport. Education of staff, patients, and community about the management of infectious waste is crucial in today's healthcare arena.

  19. Selected Pathogens of Concern to Industrial Food Processors: Infectious, Toxigenic, Toxico-Infectious, Selected Emerging Pathogenic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Robert G.; Eifert, Joseph; Erickson, Marilyn C.; Gurtler, Joshua B.; Kornacki, Jeffrey L.; Line, Erick; Radcliff, Roy; Ryser, Elliot T.; Stawick, Bradley; Yan, Zhinong

    This chapter, written by several contributing authors, is devoted to discussing selected microbes of contemporary importance. Microbes from three categories are described by the following: (1) infectious invasive agents like Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter; (2) toxigenic pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Clostridium botulinum; and (3) toxico-infectious agents like enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens. In addition, emerging pathogens, like Cronobacter (Enterobacter) sakazakii, Arcobacter spp., and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis are also described.

  20. Infectious disease emergencies in returning travelers: special reference to malaria, dengue fever, and chikungunya.

    PubMed

    Wattal, Chand; Goel, Neeraj

    2012-11-01

    This review article discusses important infectious illnesses, namely malaria, dengue, and chikungunya, in travelers returning from endemic areas. Malaria and dengue are two of the most common systemic illnesses reported in returning travelers. Because chikungunya is gaining importance, it is also briefly discussed. The clinical significance of these diseases is mainly due to the possibility of sudden deterioration with high mortality in clinically healthy looking patients. The key clinical features, their diagnosis, and treatment algorithms are discussed in detail to help in early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management of such travelers presenting in emergency departments.

  1. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, and climate change, bacterial and viral infections that were once unrecognized or uncommon are being seen more frequently in the Western Hemisphere. A delay in diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, and management of these emerging bacterial and viral diseases.

  2. An Emerging Infectious Disease Triggering Large-Scale Hyperpredation

    PubMed Central

    Moleón, Marcos; Almaraz, Pablo; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperpredation refers to an enhanced predation pressure on a secondary prey due to either an increase in the abundance of a predator population or a sudden drop in the abundance of the main prey. This scarcely documented mechanism has been previously studied in scenarios in which the introduction of a feral prey caused overexploitation of native prey. Here we provide evidence of a previously unreported link between Emergent Infectious Diseases (EIDs) and hyperpredation on a predator-prey community. We show how a viral outbreak caused the population collapse of a host prey at a large spatial scale, which subsequently promoted higher-than-normal predation intensity on a second prey from shared predators. Thus, the disease left a population dynamic fingerprint both in the primary host prey, through direct mortality from the disease, and indirectly in the secondary prey, through hyperpredation. This resulted in synchronized prey population dynamics at a large spatio-temporal scale. We therefore provide evidence for a novel mechanism by which EIDs can disrupt a predator-prey interaction from the individual behavior to the population dynamics. This mechanism can pose a further threat to biodiversity through the human-aided disruption of ecological interactions at large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:18523587

  3. Polycystic kidney disease: an unrecognized emerging infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Hjelle, M. A.; Hjelle, J. T.; Jones, M.; Mayberry, W. R.; Dombrink-Kurtzman, M. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Nowak, D. M.; Darras, F. S.

    1997-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in humans. We contend that it may be an emerging infectious disease and/or microbial toxicosis in a vulnerable human subpopulation. Use of a differential activation protocol for the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay showed bacterial endotoxin and fungal (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans in cyst fluids from human kidneys with PKD. Fatty acid analysis of cyst fluid confirmed the presence of 3-hydroxy fatty acids characteristic of endotoxin. Tissue and cyst fluid from three PKD patients were examined for fungal components. Serologic tests showed Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida antigens. IgE, but not IgG, reactive with Fusarium and Candida were also detected in cyst fluid. Fungal DNA was detected in kidney tissue and cyst fluid from these three PKD patients, but not in healthy human kidney tissue. We examine the intertwined nature of the actions of endotoxin and fungal components, sphingolipid biology in PKD, the structure of PKD gene products, infections, and integrity of gut function to establish a mechanistic hypothesis for microbial provocation of human cystic disease. Proof of this hypothesis will require identification of the microbes and microbial components involved and multifaceted studies of PKD cell biology. PMID:9204292

  4. Infectious waste management in Japan: A revised regulation and a management process in medical institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, M. . E-mail: motonobu@cis.fukuoka-u.ac.jp; Une, H.

    2005-07-01

    In Japan, the waste management practice is carried out in accordance with the Waste Disposal Law of 1970. The first rule of infectious waste management was regulated in 1992, and infectious wastes are defined as the waste materials generated in medical institutions as a result of medical care or research which contain pathogens that have the potential to transmit infectious diseases. Revised criteria for infectious waste management were promulgated by the Ministry of Environment in 2004. Infectious waste materials are divided into three categories: the form of waste; the place of waste generation; the kind of infectious diseases. A reduction of infectious waste is expected. We introduce a summary of the revised regulation of infectious waste management in this article.

  5. Clinical management of infectious cerebral vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of infections (virus, bacteria, parasite and fungi) may cause cerebral vasculitides. Headache, seizures, encephalopathy and stroke are common forms of presentation. Infection and inflammation of intracranial vessels may cause pathological vascular remodelling, vascular occlusion and ischemia. Vasculitis in chronic meningitis may cause ischemic infarctions, and is associated with poor outcome. Appropriate neuroimaging (CT-angiography, MR-angiography, conventional 4-vessel angiography) and laboratory testing (specific antibodies in blood and CSF, CSF culture and microscopy) and even brain biopsy are needed to quickly establish the aetiology. Enhancement of contrast, wall thickening and lumen narrowing are radiological signs pointing to an infectious vasculitis origin. Although corticosteroids and prophylactic antiplatelet therapy have been used in infectious cerebral vasculitis, there are no randomized clinical trials that have evaluated their efficacy and safety. Stable mycotic aneurysms can be treated with specific antimicrobial therapy. Endovascular therapy and intracranial surgery are reserved for ruptured aneurysms or enlarging unruptured aneurysms. PMID:26689107

  6. Bartonellosis: one health perspectives for an emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Breitschwerdt, Edward Bealmear

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of Bartonella species have been identified as zoonotic pathogens, transmitted by animal bites, scratches, arthropods and even by needle sticks. Considering the diversity of newly discovered Bartonella species and subspecies and the large number and ecologically diverse animal reservoir hosts and the evolving spectrum of arthropod vectors that can transmit these bacteria among animals and humans, the clinical and diagnostic challenges posed by Bartonella transmission in nature are presumably much more complex than is currently appreciated by diagnosticians, vector biologists, ecologists, physicians, or veterinarians. Historically the term "bartonellosis" was attributed to infections with Bartonella bacilliformis, transmitted by sandflies in the Peruvian Andes. Currently, however, bartonellosis now includes infections caused by any Bartonella sp. anywhere in the world. Potentially, because Bartonella spp. can infect erythrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, CD34(+) progenitor cells, and various macrophage-type cells, including microglial cells, dendritic cells, and circulating monocytes in vitro, the clinical and pathological manifestations of bartonellosis appear to be very diverse in both sick animals and human patients. Because 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses, many of which are vector-transmitted by an arthropod, a One Health approach to bartonellosis and other zoonotic infections is needed to properly address animal health, public health, and environmental factors that influence the distribution and transmission of these bacteria. The One Health concept encourages a spirit of cooperation among animal, environmental, and human health professionals and promotes developing integrated solutions for complex problems that impact the health of animals, humans, and the planet. Importantly, substantial research is needed to define the medical importance of this genus as a cause of animal and human illnesses.

  7. Postexposure management of healthcare personnel to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bader, Mazen S; Brooks, Annie A; Srigley, Jocelyn A

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare personnel (HCP) are at risk of exposure to various pathogens through their daily tasks and may serve as a reservoir for ongoing disease transmission in the healthcare setting. Management of HCP exposed to infectious agents can be disruptive to patient care, time-consuming, and costly. Exposure of HCP to an infectious source should be considered an urgent medical concern to ensure timely management and administration of postexposure prophylaxis, if available and indicated. Infection control and occupational health departments should be notified for management of exposed HCP, identification of all contacts of the index case, and application of immediate infection control measures for the index case and exposed HCP, if indicated. This article reviews the main principles of postexposure management of HCP to infectious diseases, in general, and to certain common infections, in particular, categorized by their route of transmission, in addition to primary prevention of these infections.

  8. Prevention and Management of Infectious Complications of Percutaneous Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Philip, Asher; Richter, Michael D.; Gupta, Sanjay; Lessne, Mark L.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications following interventional radiology (IR) procedures can cause significant patient morbidity and, potentially, mortality. As the number and breadth of IR procedures grow, it becomes increasingly evident that interventional radiologists must possess a thorough understanding of these potential infectious complications. Furthermore, given the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, emphasis on cost containment, and attention to quality of care, it is critical to have infection control strategies to maximize patient safety. This article reviews infectious complications associated with percutaneous ablation of liver tumors, transarterial embolization of liver tumors, uterine fibroid embolization, percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous biliary interventions, central venous catheters, and intravascular stents. Emphasis is placed on incidence, risk factors, prevention, and management. With the use of these strategies, IR procedures can be performed with reduced risk of infectious complications. PMID:26038616

  9. Emerging infectious diseases of wildlife: role in amphibian population declines and global implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daszak, P.; Berger, Lee; Cunningham, A.A.; Hyatt, A.D.; Green, D.E.; Speare, R.

    1999-01-01

    We review recent research on the pathology, ecology, and biogeography of two emerging infectious wildlife diseases, chytridiomycosis and ranaviral disease, in the context of host-parasite population biology. We examine the role of these diseases in the global decline of amphibian populations and propose hypotheses for the origins and impact of these panzootics. Finally, we discuss emerging infectious diseases as a global threat to wildlife populations.

  10. Emerging Trends in International Law Concerning Global Infectious Disease Control1

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    International cooperation has become critical in controlling infectious diseases. In this article, I examine emerging trends in international law concerning global infectious disease control. The role of international law in horizontal and vertical governance responses to infectious disease control is conceptualized; the historical development of international law regarding infectious diseases is described; and important shifts in how states, international institutions, and nonstate organizations use international law in the context of infectious disease control today are analyzed. The growing importance of international trade law and the development of global governance mechanisms, most prominently in connection with increasing access to drugs and other medicines in unindustrialized countries, are emphasized. Traditional international legal approaches to infectious disease control—embodied in the International Health Regulations—may be moribund. PMID:12643821

  11. Characteristics and management of infectious industrial waste in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.-C. Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-11-15

    Infectious industrial waste management in Taiwan is based on the specific waste production unit. In other countries, management is based simply on whether the producer may lead to infectious disease. Thus, Taiwan has a more detailed classification of infectious waste. The advantage of this classification is that it is easy to identify the sources, while the disadvantage lies in the fact that it is not flexible and hence increases cost. This study presents an overview of current management practices for handling infectious industrial waste in Taiwan, and addresses the current waste disposal methods. The number of small clinics in Taiwan increased from 18,183 to 18,877 between 2003 and 2005. Analysis of the data between 2003 and 2005 showed that the majority of medical waste was general industrial waste, which accounted for 76.9%-79.4% of total medical waste. Infectious industrial waste accounted for 19.3%-21.9% of total medical waste. After the SARS event in Taiwan, the amount of infectious waste reached 19,350 tons in 2004, an increase over the previous year of 4000 tons. Waste minimization was a common consideration for all types of waste treatment. In this study, we summarize the percentage of plastic waste in flammable infectious industrial waste generated by medical units, which, in Taiwan was about 30%. The EPA and Taiwan Department of Health have actively promoted different recycling and waste reduction measures. However, the wide adoption of disposable materials made recycling and waste reduction difficult for some hospitals. It has been suggested that enhancing the education of and promoting communication between medical units and recycling industries must be implemented to prevent recyclable waste from entering the incinerator.

  12. Managing emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Olshaker, Jonathan S

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion has been an increasingly significant national problem for more than a decade. More than 90% of hospital ED directors reported overcrowding as a problem resulting in patients in hallways, full occupancy of ED beds, and long waits, occurring several times a week. Overcrowding has many other potential detrimental effects including diversion of ambulances, frustration for patients and ED personnel, lesser patient satisfaction, and most importantly, greater risk for poor outcomes. This article gives a basic blueprint for successfully making hospital-wide changes using principles of operational management. It briefly covers the causes, significance, and dangers of overcrowding, and then focuses primarily on specific solutions. PMID:19932394

  13. Land-Use Change and Emerging Infectious Disease on an Island Continent

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Rosemary A.; Sleigh, Adrian C.; McMichael, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    A more rigorous and nuanced understanding of land-use change (LUC) as a driver of emerging infectious disease (EID) is required. Here we examine post hunter-gatherer LUC as a driver of infectious disease in one biogeographical region with a compressed and documented history—continental Australia. We do this by examining land-use and native vegetation change (LUCC) associations with infectious disease emergence identified through a systematic (1973–2010) and historical (1788–1973) review of infectious disease literature of humans and animals. We find that 22% (20) of the systematically reviewed EIDs are associated with LUCC, most frequently where natural landscapes have been removed or replaced with agriculture, plantations, livestock or urban development. Historical clustering of vector-borne, zoonotic and environmental disease emergence also follows major periods of extensive land clearing. These advanced stages of LUCC are accompanied by changes in the distribution and density of hosts and vectors, at varying scales and chronology. This review of infectious disease emergence in one continent provides valuable insight into the association between accelerated global LUC and concurrent accelerated infectious disease emergence. PMID:23812027

  14. [Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases--a challenge for public health].

    PubMed

    Do, P H; Caumes, E; Bricaire, F

    2000-01-20

    We have recently seen a worldwide explosion of infectious diseases: emerging diseases like the HIV/AIDS pandemic, or old diseases like cholera, tuberculosis, diphteria, plague, yellow fever, dengue, or malaria. These reemerging diseases are on the surge because of multiple factors: environmental changes, transformation of ecosystems, ongoing socioeconomic degradation and deterioration of public health systems in many countries. The increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics or virologic resistance to antiviral drugs are becoming a serious problem today. This global danger needs a global response. There must be a cooperation between the different actors in the field of public health. The general practitioner should look for good therapeutic compliance, control vaccinations, and give his patients health education, including prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

  15. Emergency management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, A; O'Neill, J

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia managed by emergency and acute general physicians. There is increasing evidence that selected patients with acute atrial fibrillation can be safely managed in the emergency department without the need for hospital admission. Meanwhile, there is significant variation in the current emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation. This review discusses evidence based emergency management of atrial fibrillation. The principles of emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation and the subset of patients who may not need hospital admission are reviewed. Finally, the need for evidence based guidelines before emergency department based clinical pathways for the management of acute atrial fibrillation becomes routine clinical practice is highlighted. PMID:12840118

  16. Addressing emerging infectious disease threats: a prevention strategy for the United States. Executive summary.

    PubMed

    1994-04-15

    The spectrum of infectious disease is changing rapidly in conjunction with dramatic societal and environmental changes. Worldwide, explosive population growth with expanding poverty and urban migration is occurring; international travel and commerce are increasing; and technology is rapidly changing-all of which affect the risk of exposure to infectious agents. Recent examples of important emerging infectious diseases include prolonged diarrheal illness due to waterborne cryptosporidium, hemorrhagic colitis and renal failure from foodborne Escherichia coli O157:H7, pneumonia and middle-ear infections caused by drug-resistant pneumococci, and rodentborne hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. These diseases as well as resurgent diseases (e.g., tuberculosis and cholera) illustrate human vulnerability to microorganisms in the environment. Three recent reports by the Institute of Medicine document the need to address emerging infectious disease threats. In partnership with representatives from health departments, other federal agencies, medical and public health professional associations, and international organizations, CDC has developed a strategic plan to address emerging infectious disease threats. The plain contains four goals that emphasize surveillance, applied research, prevention and control, and public health infrastructure. To ensure sustainability, plan implementation will be approached in stages, as a long-term endeavor with emphasis on extramural programs. As health-care reform proceeds, priority should be given to strengthening partnerships between health-care providers, microbiologists, and public health professionals to detect and control emerging infectious diseases.

  17. DARWIN'S NECESSARY MISFIT AND THE SLOSHING BUCKET: THE EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evolutionary studies suggest that the potential for rapid emergence of novel host-parasite associations appears to be a “built-in feature” of the complex phenomenon that is Darwinian evolution. The current Emerging Infectious Disease (EID) crisis is thus a new manifestation of an old and repeating p...

  18. How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Neiderud, Carl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    The world is becoming more urban every day, and the process has been ongoing since the industrial revolution in the 18th century. The United Nations now estimates that 3.9 billion people live in urban centres. The rapid influx of residents is however not universal and the developed countries are already urban, but the big rise in urban population in the next 30 years is expected to be in Asia and Africa. Urbanization leads to many challenges for global health and the epidemiology of infectious diseases. New megacities can be incubators for new epidemics, and zoonotic diseases can spread in a more rapid manner and become worldwide threats. Adequate city planning and surveillance can be powerful tools to improve the global health and decrease the burden of communicable diseases. PMID:26112265

  19. Vaccines for mucosal immunity to combat emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, F. W.; Nguyen, H. H.; McGhee, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The mucosal immune system consists of molecules, cells, and organized lymphoid structures intended to provide immunity to pathogens that impinge upon mucosal surfaces. Mucosal infection by intracellular pathogens results in the induction of cell- mediated immunity, as manifested by CD4-positive (CD4 + ) T helper-type 1 cells, as well as CD8 + cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. These responses are normally accompanied by the synthesis of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) antibodies, which provide an important first line of defense against invasion of deeper tissues by these pathogens. New-generation live, attenuated viral vaccines, such as the cold-adapted, recombinant nasal influenza and oral rotavirus vaccines, optimize this form of mucosal immune protection. Despite these advances, new and reemerging infectious diseases are tipping the balance in favor of the parasite; continued mucosal vaccine development will be needed to effectively combat these new threats. PMID:10756145

  20. A world wide public health problem: the principal re-emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    De Luca D'Alessandro, E; Giraldi, G

    2011-01-01

    The extraordinary progress in the knowledge of infectious disease, the discovery of antibiotics and effective vaccines are among the great achievement of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These achievement have led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of mortality from these diseases. According to the World Health Organization, the term "re-emerging infectious diseases" refers to infectious diseases, which although well known, have not been of recent public health importance. However, climate change, migration, changes in health services, antibiotic resistance, population increase, international travel, the increase in the number of immune-depressed patients ,etc have lead to the re-emergence of these diseases. The climate changes are exposing sectors of the population to inadequate fresh air, water, food and resources for survival which, in consequence, provoke increases in both internal and international migration. In this particular period in which we find ourselves, characterized by globalization, the international community has become aware that the re-emergence of these diseases poses an important risk for public health underlines the necessity to adopt appropriate strategies for their prevention and control. The re-emerging diseases of the twenty-first century are a serious problem for public health and even though there has been enormous progress in medical science and in the battle against infectious diseases, they are still a long way from being really brought under control. A well organized monitoring system would enable the epidemiological characteristics of the infectious diseases to be analyzed and the success or otherwise of preventive interventions to be precisely evaluated. For this reason, the World Health Organization and the European Union have discussed the formation of a collaborative network for the monitoring and control of re-emerging diseases and has initiated special programmes. The battle between humanity and infectious disease

  1. Infectious disease management in primary care: perceptions of GPs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is important to keep the level of antibiotic prescribing low to contain the development of resistant bacteria. This study was conducted to reveal new knowledge about how GPs think in relation to the prescribing of antibiotics - knowledge that could be used in efforts toward rational treatment of infectious diseases in primary care. The aim was to explore and describe the variations in GPs' perceptions of infectious disease management, with special reference to antibiotic prescribing. Methods Twenty GPs working at primary care centres in a county in south-west Sweden were purposively selected based on the strategy of including GPs with different kinds of experience. The GPs were interviewed and perceptions among GPs were analysed by a phenomenographic approach. Results Five qualitatively different perceptions of infectious disease management were identified. They were: (A) the GP must help the patient to achieve health and well-being; (B) the management must meet the GP's perceived personal, professional and organisational demands; (C) restrictive antibiotic prescribing is time-consuming; (D) restrictive antibiotic prescribing can protect the effectiveness of antibiotics; and (E) patients benefit personally from restrictive antibiotic prescribing. Conclusions Restrictive antibiotic prescribing was considered important in two perceptions, was not an issue as such in two others, and was considered in one perception although the actual prescribing was greatly influenced by the interaction between patient and GP. Accordingly, to encourage restrictive antibiotic prescribing several aspects must be addressed. Furthermore, different GPs need various kinds of support. Infectious disease management in primary care is complex and time-consuming, which must be acknowledged in healthcare organisation and planning. PMID:21223592

  2. The evolutions of medical building network structure for emerging infectious disease protection and control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Zhang, Hongzhe; Zhang, Shanshan

    2014-12-01

    Emerging infectious disease is one of the most minatory threats in modern society. A perfect medical building network system need to be established to protect and control emerging infectious disease. Although in China a preliminary medical building network is already set up with disease control center, the infectious disease hospital, infectious diseases department in general hospital and basic medical institutions, there are still many defects in this system, such as simple structural model, weak interoperability among subsystems, and poor capability of the medical building to adapt to outbreaks of infectious disease. Based on the characteristics of infectious diseases, the whole process of its prevention and control and the comprehensive influence factors, three-dimensional medical architecture network system is proposed as an inevitable trend. In this conception of medical architecture network structure, the evolutions are mentioned, such as from simple network system to multilayer space network system, from static network to dynamic network, and from mechanical network to sustainable network. Ultimately, a more adaptable and corresponsive medical building network system will be established and argued in this paper.

  3. Infectious agents of bioterrorism: a review for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Kman, Nicholas E; Nelson, Richard N

    2008-05-01

    The terrorist attacks on the United States in 2001 and the anthrax release soon after brought the issue of bioterrorism to the forefront in the medical community. Bioterrorism is the use of a biologic weapon to create terror and panic. Biologic weapons, or bioweapons, can be bacteria, fungi, viruses, or biologic toxins. Because the emergency department represents the front line of defense for the recognition of agents of bioterrorism, it is essential that emergency physicians have the ability to quickly diagnose victims of bioterrorism. This review examines the most deadly and virulent category A agents of bioterrorism, that is, anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism, hemorrhagic fever viruses, and tularemia. The focus is on epidemiology, transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  4. Zoonotic emerging infectious disease in selected countries in Southeast Asia: insights from ecohealth.

    PubMed

    Grace, Delia; Gilbert, Jeffrey; Lapar, M Lucila; Unger, Fred; Fèvre, Sonia; Nguyen-Viet, Hung; Schelling, Esther

    2011-03-01

    Most emerging diseases of humans originate in animals, and zoonotic emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) threaten human, animal, and environment health. We report on a scoping study to assess actors, linkages, priorities, and needs related to management of these diseases from the perspective of key stakeholders in three countries in Southeast Asia. A comprehensive interview guide was developed and in-depth interviews completed with 21 key stakeholders in Vietnam, Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Cambodia. We found numerous relevant actors with a predominance of public sector and medical disciplines. More capacity weaknesses than strengths were reported, with risk analysis and research skills most lacking. Social network analysis of information flows showed policy-makers were regarded as mainly information recipients, research institutes as more information providers, and universities as both. Veterinary and livestock disciplines emerged as an important "boundary-spanning" organization with linkages to both human health and rural development. Avian influenza was regarded as the most important zoonotic EID, perhaps reflecting the priority-setting influence of actors outside the region. Stakeholders reported a high awareness of the ecological and socioeconomic drivers of disease emergence and a demand for disease prioritization, epidemiological skills, and economic and qualitative studies. Evaluated from an ecohealth perspective, human health is weakly integrated with socioeconomics, linkages to policy are stronger than to communities, participation occurs mainly at lower levels, and equity considerations are not fully considered. However, stakeholders have awareness of ecological and social determinants of health, and a basis exists on which transdisciplinarity, equity, and participation can be strengthened. PMID:21174223

  5. [Crisis management in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Mizobata, Yasumitsu

    2016-02-01

    There is no "complete safety" in the medical treatment. Unavoidable events or human errors may frighten the patients' safety. Because of its characteristics, emergency medicine is one of the medical fields where treating the patients under the vast safety is difficult. It is inevitable to understand the background of human errors in the emergency medicine under the "SHEL" model. The implementation of the safety measures, such as minimum encounter, minimum probability, multiple detections, and minimum damage is helpful to prevent unfortunate outcomes. Since the emergency medicine treats the severely injured or critical ill patients, its daily works are the picture of the crisis management, and the most suitable environment to train the crisis management competence. The person in charge of crisis management of the institution should put the emergency department to practical use of medical staffs' crisis management training. PMID:26915239

  6. Common emergencies in cancer medicine: infectious and treatment-related syndromes, Part II.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.; Stelzer, K. J.; Douglas, J. G.; Koh, W. J.; Wood, L. V.; Panicker, R.

    1994-01-01

    This article completes a summary of the common medical emergencies that can occur as a result of infectious processes (Part I) and antitumor treatment secondary to chemotherapy, biological response modifiers, or radiotherapy (Part II). The use of high-dose cytotoxic agents, coupled with the common instillation of indwelling central venous access devices, have altered the spectrum of infectious etiologies that are appreciated in clinical practice. In addition, a myriad of cytotoxic agents and radiotherapeutic treatment schemes are used widely in clinical oncologic practice. While most of their related side effects are not considered life-threatening emergencies, they can be fatal if not recognized early and treated promptly. Moreover, some of these infectious and treatment-related sequelae can be prevented. This article highlights some of these clinical observations. PMID:7807572

  7. Is Chytridiomycosis an Emerging Infectious Disease in Asia?

    PubMed Central

    Swei, Andrea; Rowley, Jodi J. L.; Rödder, Dennis; Diesmos, Mae L. L.; Diesmos, Arvin C.; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Brown, Rafe; Cao, Trung Tien; Cheng, Tina L.; Chong, Rebecca A.; Han, Ben; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoang, Huy Duc; Kusrini, Mirza D.; Le, Duong Thi Thuy; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Meegaskumbura, Madhava; Min, Mi-Sook; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Neang, Thy; Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Rao, Ding-Qi; Reeder, Natalie M.; Schoville, Sean D.; Sivongxay, Niane; Srei, Narin; Stöck, Matthias; Stuart, Bryan L.; Torres, Lilia S.; Tran, Dao Thi Anh; Tunstall, Tate S.; Vieites, David; Vredenburg, Vance T.

    2011-01-01

    The disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has caused dramatic amphibian population declines and extinctions in Australia, Central and North America, and Europe. Bd is associated with >200 species extinctions of amphibians, but not all species that become infected are susceptible to the disease. Specifically, Bd has rapidly emerged in some areas of the world, such as in Australia, USA, and throughout Central and South America, causing population and species collapse. The mechanism behind the rapid global emergence of the disease is poorly understood, in part due to an incomplete picture of the global distribution of Bd. At present, there is a considerable amount of geographic bias in survey effort for Bd, with Asia being the most neglected continent. To date, Bd surveys have been published for few Asian countries, and infected amphibians have been reported only from Indonesia, South Korea, China and Japan. Thus far, there have been no substantiated reports of enigmatic or suspected disease-caused population declines of the kind that has been attributed to Bd in other areas. In order to gain a more detailed picture of the distribution of Bd in Asia, we undertook a widespread, opportunistic survey of over 3,000 amphibians for Bd throughout Asia and adjoining Papua New Guinea. Survey sites spanned 15 countries, approximately 36° latitude, 111° longitude, and over 2000 m in elevation. Bd prevalence was very low throughout our survey area (2.35% overall) and infected animals were not clumped as would be expected in epizootic events. This suggests that Bd is either newly emerging in Asia, endemic at low prevalence, or that some other ecological factor is preventing Bd from fully invading Asian amphibians. The current observed pattern in Asia differs from that in many other parts of the world. PMID:21887238

  8. The emerging infectious disease crisis and pathogen pollution: a question of ecology and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Risk of emerging infectious diseases (EID) on a global scale has accelerated over the past 10,000 years in conjunction with agriculture, domestication, and globalization as the interfaces for people and environments have been altered over time. EID exist at the junction of 3 ongoing global challenge...

  9. Is there a link between pollutant exposure and emerging infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Elizabeth; Tomcej, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    A scoping literature review found evidence supporting the hypothesis that a population’s pollution status could help refine classification of emerging infectious disease (EID) hotspots. Systematic literature reviews and studies designed to specifically test the predictive value of pollutant status on EID risk are recommended. PMID:27152044

  10. Emergency management logistics must become emergency supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard R; Peterson, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about how emergency management (EM) needs to look to the future regarding issues of resource management (monetary, human, and material). Constraints on budgets are ongoing and the staffing of emergency response activities is often difficult because volunteers have little to no training. The management of material resources has also been a challenge because 1) the categories of material vary by the type of emergency, 2) the necessary quantities of material are often not located near the ultimate point of need, and 3) the transportation assets are rarely available in the form and quantity required to allow timely and effective response. The logistics and resource management functions of EM (what we refer to as EM logistics) have been largely reactive, with little to no pre-event planning for potential demand. We applied the Supply Chain Operational Reference (SCOR) model to EM logistics in an effort to transform it to an integrated and scalable system of physical, information, and financial flows into which are woven the functions of sourcing, making, delivering, and returning, with an overarching planning function that transcends the organizational boundaries of participants. The result is emergency supply chain management, which embraces many more participants who share in a larger quantity of more useful information about the resources that need to be deployed when responding to and recovering from emergency events. PMID:24828913

  11. Emergency management logistics must become emergency supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard R; Peterson, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about how emergency management (EM) needs to look to the future regarding issues of resource management (monetary, human, and material). Constraints on budgets are ongoing and the staffing of emergency response activities is often difficult because volunteers have little to no training. The management of material resources has also been a challenge because 1) the categories of material vary by the type of emergency, 2) the necessary quantities of material are often not located near the ultimate point of need, and 3) the transportation assets are rarely available in the form and quantity required to allow timely and effective response. The logistics and resource management functions of EM (what we refer to as EM logistics) have been largely reactive, with little to no pre-event planning for potential demand. We applied the Supply Chain Operational Reference (SCOR) model to EM logistics in an effort to transform it to an integrated and scalable system of physical, information, and financial flows into which are woven the functions of sourcing, making, delivering, and returning, with an overarching planning function that transcends the organizational boundaries of participants. The result is emergency supply chain management, which embraces many more participants who share in a larger quantity of more useful information about the resources that need to be deployed when responding to and recovering from emergency events.

  12. Infectious disease in cervids of North America: data, models, and management challenges.

    PubMed

    Conner, Mary Margaret; Ebinger, Michael Ryan; Blanchong, Julie Anne; Cross, Paul Chafee

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a steady increase in the study and management of wildlife diseases. This trend has been driven by the perception of an increase in emerging zoonotic diseases and the recognition that wildlife can be a critical factor for controlling infectious diseases in domestic animals. Cervids are of recent concern because, as a group, they present a number of unique challenges. Their close ecological and phylogenetic relationship to livestock species places them at risk for receiving infections from, and reinfecting livestock. In addition, cervids are an important resource; revenue from hunting and viewing contribute substantially to agency budgets and local economies. A comprehensive coverage of infectious diseases in cervids is well beyond the scope of this chapter. In North America alone there are a number of infectious diseases that can potentially impact cervid populations, but for most of these, management is not feasible or the diseases are only a potential or future concern. We focus this chapter on three diseases that are of major management concern and the center of most disease research for cervids in North America: bovine tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease, and brucellosis. We discuss the available data and recent advances in modeling and management of these diseases.

  13. Infectious disease in cervids of North America: data, models, and management challenges.

    PubMed

    Conner, Mary Margaret; Ebinger, Michael Ryan; Blanchong, Julie Anne; Cross, Paul Chafee

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a steady increase in the study and management of wildlife diseases. This trend has been driven by the perception of an increase in emerging zoonotic diseases and the recognition that wildlife can be a critical factor for controlling infectious diseases in domestic animals. Cervids are of recent concern because, as a group, they present a number of unique challenges. Their close ecological and phylogenetic relationship to livestock species places them at risk for receiving infections from, and reinfecting livestock. In addition, cervids are an important resource; revenue from hunting and viewing contribute substantially to agency budgets and local economies. A comprehensive coverage of infectious diseases in cervids is well beyond the scope of this chapter. In North America alone there are a number of infectious diseases that can potentially impact cervid populations, but for most of these, management is not feasible or the diseases are only a potential or future concern. We focus this chapter on three diseases that are of major management concern and the center of most disease research for cervids in North America: bovine tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease, and brucellosis. We discuss the available data and recent advances in modeling and management of these diseases. PMID:18566093

  14. Emergency Management Standards and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication discusses emergency management standards for school use and lists standards recommended by FEMA's National Incident Management System (NIMS). Schools are encouraged to review these standards carefully and to adopt, where applicable, those that meet their needs. The lists of standards, resources, and references contained herein…

  15. Emerging infectious diseases and public health policy: insights from Cambodia, Hong Kong and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Burgos, S; Ear, S

    2015-02-01

    Emerging infectious diseases affect the health of animal and human populations, but the impact goes beyond health as it extends to political, economic, social and environmental domains, as well as inter-state relations. Deeper understanding of these impacts aids public health authorities in their duties of protection and improvement of the health of their communities, promotion of healthy practices and research on disease, injury and threat prevention and mitigation. This empirical essay gathers insights from Cambodia, Hong Kong and Indonesia as they attempt to design and implement control and surveillance systems against avian influenza - an infectious disease.

  16. Unhealthy Landscapes: Policy Recommendations on Land Use Change and Infectious Disease Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Patz, Jonathan A.; Daszak, Peter; Tabor, Gary M.; Aguirre, A. Alonso; Pearl, Mary; Epstein, Jon; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Molyneux, David; Bradley, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes drive a range of infectious disease outbreaks and emergence events and modify the transmission of endemic infections. These drivers include agricultural encroachment, deforestation, road construction, dam building, irrigation, wetland modification, mining, the concentration or expansion of urban environments, coastal zone degradation, and other activities. These changes in turn cause a cascade of factors that exacerbate infectious disease emergence, such as forest fragmentation, disease introduction, pollution, poverty, and human migration. The Working Group on Land Use Change and Disease Emergence grew out of a special colloquium that convened international experts in infectious diseases, ecology, and environmental health to assess the current state of knowledge and to develop recommendations for addressing these environmental health challenges. The group established a systems model approach and priority lists of infectious diseases affected by ecologic degradation. Policy-relevant levels of the model include specific health risk factors, landscape or habitat change, and institutional (economic and behavioral) levels. The group recommended creating Centers of Excellence in Ecology and Health Research and Training, based at regional universities and/or research institutes with close links to the surrounding communities. The centers’ objectives would be 3-fold: a) to provide information to local communities about the links between environmental change and public health; b) to facilitate fully interdisciplinary research from a variety of natural, social, and health sciences and train professionals who can conduct interdisciplinary research; and c) to engage in science-based communication and assessment for policy making toward sustainable health and ecosystems. PMID:15238283

  17. Unhealthy landscapes: Policy recommendations on land use change and infectious disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Patz, Jonathan A; Daszak, Peter; Tabor, Gary M; Aguirre, A Alonso; Pearl, Mary; Epstein, Jon; Wolfe, Nathan D; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Molyneux, David; Bradley, David J

    2004-07-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes drive a range of infectious disease outbreaks and emergence events and modify the transmission of endemic infections. These drivers include agricultural encroachment, deforestation, road construction, dam building, irrigation, wetland modification, mining, the concentration or expansion of urban environments, coastal zone degradation, and other activities. These changes in turn cause a cascade of factors that exacerbate infectious disease emergence, such as forest fragmentation, disease introduction, pollution, poverty, and human migration. The Working Group on Land Use Change and Disease Emergence grew out of a special colloquium that convened international experts in infectious diseases, ecology, and environmental health to assess the current state of knowledge and to develop recommendations for addressing these environmental health challenges. The group established a systems model approach and priority lists of infectious diseases affected by ecologic degradation. Policy-relevant levels of the model include specific health risk factors, landscape or habitat change, and institutional (economic and behavioral) levels. The group recommended creating Centers of Excellence in Ecology and Health Research and Training, based at regional universities and/or research institutes with close links to the surrounding communities. The centers' objectives would be 3-fold: a) to provide information to local communities about the links between environmental change and public health; b) to facilitate fully interdisciplinary research from a variety of natural, social, and health sciences and train professionals who can conduct interdisciplinary research; and c) to engage in science-based communication and assessment for policy making toward sustainable health and ecosystems. PMID:15238283

  18. Unhealthy landscapes: Policy recommendations on land use change and infectious disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Patz, Jonathan A; Daszak, Peter; Tabor, Gary M; Aguirre, A Alonso; Pearl, Mary; Epstein, Jon; Wolfe, Nathan D; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Molyneux, David; Bradley, David J

    2004-07-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes drive a range of infectious disease outbreaks and emergence events and modify the transmission of endemic infections. These drivers include agricultural encroachment, deforestation, road construction, dam building, irrigation, wetland modification, mining, the concentration or expansion of urban environments, coastal zone degradation, and other activities. These changes in turn cause a cascade of factors that exacerbate infectious disease emergence, such as forest fragmentation, disease introduction, pollution, poverty, and human migration. The Working Group on Land Use Change and Disease Emergence grew out of a special colloquium that convened international experts in infectious diseases, ecology, and environmental health to assess the current state of knowledge and to develop recommendations for addressing these environmental health challenges. The group established a systems model approach and priority lists of infectious diseases affected by ecologic degradation. Policy-relevant levels of the model include specific health risk factors, landscape or habitat change, and institutional (economic and behavioral) levels. The group recommended creating Centers of Excellence in Ecology and Health Research and Training, based at regional universities and/or research institutes with close links to the surrounding communities. The centers' objectives would be 3-fold: a) to provide information to local communities about the links between environmental change and public health; b) to facilitate fully interdisciplinary research from a variety of natural, social, and health sciences and train professionals who can conduct interdisciplinary research; and c) to engage in science-based communication and assessment for policy making toward sustainable health and ecosystems.

  19. Rapid identification of emerging infectious agents using PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Rangarajan; Hall, Thomas A; Massire, Christian; Li, Feng; Blyn, Lawrence B; Eshoo, Mark W; Hofstadler, Steven A; Ecker, David J

    2007-04-01

    Newly emergent infectious diseases are a global public health problem. The population dense regions of Southeast Asia are the epicenter of many emerging diseases, as evidenced by the outbreak of Nipah, SARS, avian influenza (H5N1), Dengue, and enterovirus 71 in this region in the past decade. Rapid identification, epidemiologic surveillance, and mitigation of transmission are major challenges in ensuring public health safety. Here we describe a powerful new approach for infectious disease surveillance that is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for accurate mass measurements of the PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. This approach is capable of automated analysis of more than 1,500 PCR reactions a day. It is applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens and will facilitate rapid characterization of known and emerging pathogens. PMID:17470915

  20. Emerging infectious diseases in an island ecosystem: the New Zealand perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, J. A.; Murdoch, D. R.; Baker, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Several unique features characterize infectious disease epidemiology in New Zealand. Historically, well-organized, government-run control programs have eliminated several zoonoses. More recently, however, communicable disease control has been mixed. Rates of rheumatic fever, tuberculosis, and enteric infectious are high, and rates of meningococcal disease are increasing. These diseases are over-represented in New Zealanders of Polynesian descent, who generally live in more deprived and overcrowded conditions than do those of European descent. Measles and pertussis epidemics are recurring because of inadequate vaccine coverage, despite a well-developed childhood immunization program. A progressive response to the HIV epidemic has resulted in relatively low rates of infection, particularly among injecting drug users; however, the response to other sexually transmitted infections has been poor. A key challenge for the future is to build on successful strategies and apply them to persisting and emerging infectious disease threats in a small, geographically isolated country with limited economic resources. PMID:11747690

  1. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis.

  2. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis. PMID:27638133

  3. Interaction of the role of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDS).

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, James E

    2016-03-01

    Most significant change in the evolution of the influenza virus is the rapid growth of the Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) on a global scale. These industrial agricultural operations have the potential of housing thousands of animals in a relatively small area. Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs) event can be considered as a shift in the pathogen-host-environment interplay characteristics described by Engering et al. (2013). These changes in the host-environment and the disease ecology are key to creating novel transmission patterns and selection of novel pathogens with a modification of genetic traits. With the development of CAFOs throughout the world, the need for training of animal caretakers to observe, identify, treat, vaccinate and cull if necessary is important to safeguard public health. The best defense against another pandemic of Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs) is the constant monitoring of the livestock and handlers of CAFOs and the live animal markets. These are the most likely epicenter of the next pandemic.

  4. Emerging infectious disease: what are the relative roles of ecology and evolution?

    PubMed

    Schrag, S J; Wiener, P

    1995-08-01

    The increasing threat of infectious diseases in humans has renewed interest in factors leading to the emergence of new diseases and the re-emergence of familiar diseases. Examples of seemingly novel diseases currently spreading in human populations include HIV, dengue hemorrhagic fever and Lyme disease; drug-resistant forms of well-known diseases such as tuberculosis are also increasing. The problem of disease emergence also extends to other animal and plant populations. In most current epidemics, ecological factors (e.g. migration, climate, agricultural practices) play a more significant role in disease emergence than evolutionary changes in pathogens or hosts. Evolutionary biologists and ecologists have much to offer to the development of strategies for the control of emerging diseases.

  5. [Emerging infectious diseases: the example of the Indian Ocean chikungunya outbreak (2005-2006)].

    PubMed

    Flahault, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Factors known to trigger the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases include globalisation, population growth, migration, international trade, urbanisation, forest destruction, climate change, loss of biodiversity, poverty, famine and war. Epidemics not only lead to disastrous loss of human life but may also have catastrophic economic, political and social consequences. Outbreaks may rapidly jeopardize industry, trade or tourism in countries that are unprepared. Dengue is currently spreading throughout the tropics, while another arbovirus, chikungunya, infected 30 to 75% of the population in some parts of the Indian Ocean region between 2005 and 2006. Chikungunya is now spreading through India, where more than a million people have so far been infected. This viral disease can cause lasting disability, and the first deaths were recently reported in La Réunion and Mayotte. All countries are at risk from emerging or re-emerging diseases, but the consequences are far worse in poor countries. Microbial pathogens and wild mammals, birds and arthropods do not respect man-made borders. There is still time to act against this threat of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, through prevention, anticipation, monitoring and research.

  6. [Emerging infectious diseases: the example of the Indian Ocean chikungunya outbreak (2005-2006)].

    PubMed

    Flahault, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Factors known to trigger the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases include globalisation, population growth, migration, international trade, urbanisation, forest destruction, climate change, loss of biodiversity, poverty, famine and war. Epidemics not only lead to disastrous loss of human life but may also have catastrophic economic, political and social consequences. Outbreaks may rapidly jeopardize industry, trade or tourism in countries that are unprepared. Dengue is currently spreading throughout the tropics, while another arbovirus, chikungunya, infected 30 to 75% of the population in some parts of the Indian Ocean region between 2005 and 2006. Chikungunya is now spreading through India, where more than a million people have so far been infected. This viral disease can cause lasting disability, and the first deaths were recently reported in La Réunion and Mayotte. All countries are at risk from emerging or re-emerging diseases, but the consequences are far worse in poor countries. Microbial pathogens and wild mammals, birds and arthropods do not respect man-made borders. There is still time to act against this threat of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, through prevention, anticipation, monitoring and research. PMID:17645111

  7. Nurses' intentions to respond to bioterrorism and other infectious disease emergencies.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Deanna E; Mendias, Elnora P

    2010-01-01

    Although nurses historically have responded to natural disasters, little is known about nurses' intentions to respond during bioterrorism and other infectious disease emergencies where they and their families may be at risk. To investigate that question, we surveyed nurses following their participation in a class on bioterrorism. Participants (N = 292) completed a Personal/Professional Profile (PPP), Test of Bioterrorism Knowledge (BT Knowledge), and an Intention to Respond (IR) instrument. IR was measured by participants' scores on their likelihood to care for patients (0 = extremely unlikely, 10 = extremely likely) for each of 10 infectious disease scenarios reflecting different infection risk. We calculated scores for each scenario, totaled them, and examined the total IR related to the participant's PPP and scores on BT Knowledge. Additionally, we examined participants' written comments explaining the reasons for their IR. Total IR scores ranged from 8-100 (mean and median of 70). The IR was higher in scenarios where the infection risk was lower. Overall IR scores were positively related to BT Knowledge and having had previous emergency and disaster experience. Those less likely to respond had dependent children and more years in nursing. Results indicate that nurses differentiated risks associated with different infectious disease situations and may decide to respond during a real emergency based on such information. Implications for nursing administrators and nursing educators are discussed.

  8. Sustaining a regional emerging infectious disease research network: a trust-based approach.

    PubMed

    Silkavute, Pornpit; Tung, Dinh Xuan; Jongudomsuk, Pongpisut

    2013-01-01

    The Asia Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR) was initiated in 2006 to promote regional collaboration in avian influenza research. In 2009, the partnership expanded its scope to include all emerging infectious diseases. APEIR partners include public health and animal researchers, officials and practitioners from Cambodia, China, Lao PDR, Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. APEIR has accomplished several major achievements in three key areas of activity: (i) knowledge generation (i.e., through research); (ii) research capacity building (e.g., by developing high-quality research proposals, by planning and conducting joint research projects, by adopting a broader Ecohealth/OneHealth approach); and (iii) policy advocacy (e.g., by disseminating research results to policy makers). This paper describes these achievements, with a focus on the partnership's five major areas of emerging infectious disease research: wild migratory birds, backyard poultry systems, socio-economic impact, policy analysis, and control measures. We highlight two case studies illustrating how the partnership's research results are being used to inform policy. We also highlight lessons learned after five years of working hard to build our partnership and the value added by a multi-country, multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary research partnership like APEIR. PMID:23362419

  9. Infectious disease emergence and global change: thinking systemically in a shrinking world

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Concern intensifying that emerging infectious diseases and global environmental changes that could generate major future human pandemics. Method A focused literature review was undertaken, partly informed by a forthcoming report on environment, agriculture and infectious diseases of poverty, facilitated by the Special Programme for Tropical Diseases. Results More than ten categories of infectious disease emergence exist, but none formally analyse past, current or future burden of disease. Other evidence suggests that the dominant public health concern focuses on two informal groupings. Most important is the perceived threat of newly recognised infections, especially viruses that arise or are newly discovered in developing countries that originate in species exotic to developed countries, such as non-human primates, bats and rodents. These pathogens may be transmitted by insects or bats, or via direct human contact with bushmeat. The second group is new strains of influenza arising from intensively farmed chickens or pigs, or emerging from Asian “wet markets” where several bird species have close contact. Both forms appear justified because of two great pandemics: HIV/AIDS (which appears to have originated from bushmeat hunting in Africa before emerging globally) and Spanish influenza, which killed up to 2.5% of the human population around the end of World War I. Insufficiently appreciated is the contribution of the milieu which appeared to facilitate the high disease burden in these pandemics. Additionally, excess anxiety over emerging infectious diseases diverts attention from issues of greater public health importance, especially: (i) existing (including neglected) infectious diseases and (ii) the changing milieu that is eroding the determinants of immunity and public health, caused by adverse global environmental changes, including climate change and other components of stressed life and civilisation-supporting systems. Conclusions The focus on

  10. Biosecurity Measures in 48 Isolation Facilities Managing Highly Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puro, Vincenzo; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C.; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an “insider attack.” PMID:22571373

  11. PET-Based Personalized Management of Infectious and Inflammatory Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass; Basu, Sandip

    2016-07-01

    It is challenging to diagnose and manage infectious and inflammatory diseases; symptoms are relatively nonspecific, the disease patterns are often systemic. Imaging is pivotal and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used due to its high sensitivity whole-body approach. At present, the literature is still relatively sparse, but evidence for FDG-PET/CT is mounting in several domains, for example, detecting culprit lesions in systemic infections and inflammations, evaluation of disease extent and therapy monitoring, and many other domains have shown considerable potential, for example, atherosclerosis in systemic inflammation. We believe FDG-PET/CT is becoming a first-line modality for infections and inflammation. PMID:27321037

  12. Global climate change and the emergence/re-emergence of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Zell, Roland

    2004-04-01

    Variation in the incidence of vector-borne diseases is associated with extreme weather events and annual changes in weather conditions. Moreover, it is assumed that global warming might lead to an increase of infectious disease outbreaks. While a number of reports link disease outbreaks to single weather events, the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and other large-scale climate fluctuations, no report unequivocally associates vector-borne diseases with increased temperature and the environmental changes expected to accompany it. The complexity of not yet fully understood pathogen transmission dynamics with numerous variables might be an explanation of the problems in assessing the risk factors.

  13. Quantifying effectiveness in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study looked at the relationship between the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS). Moreover, it reviewed the interface between their two subordinate organizations (Northern Command under DOD and the Federal Emergency Management Agency under DHS) with primacy over domestic disasters. Understanding the importance of intergovernmental relations (IGRs), the article dissected the interrelatedness of these organizations regarding hurricanes and the subsequent involvement of federal preparation and response efforts. The informal networked relationships were evaluated using regression analysis focusing on secondary sources of data and several variables. The vitality of collaborative networks is grounded in literature and has been espoused by Waugh and Streib in the world of emergency management; this study expanded on their premise. PMID:25350357

  14. Quantifying effectiveness in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study looked at the relationship between the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS). Moreover, it reviewed the interface between their two subordinate organizations (Northern Command under DOD and the Federal Emergency Management Agency under DHS) with primacy over domestic disasters. Understanding the importance of intergovernmental relations (IGRs), the article dissected the interrelatedness of these organizations regarding hurricanes and the subsequent involvement of federal preparation and response efforts. The informal networked relationships were evaluated using regression analysis focusing on secondary sources of data and several variables. The vitality of collaborative networks is grounded in literature and has been espoused by Waugh and Streib in the world of emergency management; this study expanded on their premise.

  15. Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Tarango Md, Stacy M; Liu Md, Deborah R

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Although fatal pediatric ingestions are rare, the prescription medications most responsible for injury and fatality in children include opioids, sedative/hypnotics, and cardiovascular drugs. Evidence regarding the evaluation and management of common pediatric ingestions is comprised largely of case reports and retrospective studies. This issue provides a review of these studies as well as consensus guidelines addressing the initial resuscitation, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric ingestions. Also discussed are current recommendations for decontamination, administration of antidotes for specific toxins, and management of ingested foreign bodies.

  16. Training in Infectious Disease Epidemiology through the Emerging Infections Program Sites

    PubMed Central

    Meek, James I.; Danila, Richard N.; Jones, Timothy F.; Schaffner, William; Baumbach, Joan; Lathrop, Sarah; Farley, Monica M.; Tobin-D’Angelo, Melissa; Miller, Lisa; Harrison, Lee H.; Bennett, Nancy M.; Cieslak, Paul R.; Cartter, Matthew L.; Reingold, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    One objective of the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is to provide training opportunities in infectious disease epidemiology. To determine the extent of training performed since the program's inception in 1995, we reviewed training efforts at the 10 EIP sites. By 2015, all sites hosted trainees (most were graduate public health students and physicians) who worked on a variety of infectious disease surveillance and epidemiologic projects. Trainee projects at all sites were used for graduate student theses or practicums. Numerous projects resulted in conference presentations and publications in peer-reviewed journals. Local public health and health care partners have also benefitted from EIP presentations and training. Consideration should be given to standardizing and documenting EIP training and to sharing useful training initiatives with other state and local health departments and academic institutions. PMID:26291924

  17. Emerging Infectious Disease Leads to Rapid Population Declines of Common British Birds

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Mike P.; Peck, Kirsi M.; Kirkwood, James K.; Chantrey, Julian; Clatworthy, Innes R.; Evans, Andy D.; Hughes, Laura A.; Hutchinson, Oliver C.; John, Shinto K.; Pennycott, Tom W.; Perkins, Matthew W.; Rowley, Peter S.; Simpson, Vic R.; Tyler, Kevin M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly cited as threats to wildlife, livestock and humans alike. They can threaten geographically isolated or critically endangered wildlife populations; however, relatively few studies have clearly demonstrated the extent to which emerging diseases can impact populations of common wildlife species. Here, we report the impact of an emerging protozoal disease on British populations of greenfinch Carduelis chloris and chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, two of the most common birds in Britain. Morphological and molecular analyses showed this to be due to Trichomonas gallinae. Trichomonosis emerged as a novel fatal disease of finches in Britain in 2005 and rapidly became epidemic within greenfinch, and to a lesser extent chaffinch, populations in 2006. By 2007, breeding populations of greenfinches and chaffinches in the geographic region of highest disease incidence had decreased by 35% and 21% respectively, representing mortality in excess of half a million birds. In contrast, declines were less pronounced or absent in these species in regions where the disease was found in intermediate or low incidence. Also, populations of dunnock Prunella modularis, which similarly feeds in gardens, but in which T. gallinae was rarely recorded, did not decline. This is the first trichomonosis epidemic reported in the scientific literature to negatively impact populations of free-ranging non-columbiform species, and such levels of mortality and decline due to an emerging infectious disease are unprecedented in British wild bird populations. This disease emergence event demonstrates the potential for a protozoan parasite to jump avian host taxonomic groups with dramatic effect over a short time period. PMID:20805869

  18. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references.

  19. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  20. Managing marine disease emergencies in an era of rapid change.

    PubMed

    Groner, Maya L; Maynard, Jeffrey; Breyta, Rachel; Carnegie, Ryan B; Dobson, Andy; Friedman, Carolyn S; Froelich, Brett; Garren, Melissa; Gulland, Frances M D; Heron, Scott F; Noble, Rachel T; Revie, Crawford W; Shields, Jeffrey D; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Weil, Ernesto; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Harvell, C Drew

    2016-03-01

    Infectious marine diseases can decimate populations and are increasing among some taxa due to global change and our increasing reliance on marine environments. Marine diseases become emergencies when significant ecological, economic or social impacts occur. We can prepare for and manage these emergencies through improved surveillance, and the development and iterative refinement of approaches to mitigate disease and its impacts. Improving surveillance requires fast, accurate diagnoses, forecasting disease risk and real-time monitoring of disease-promoting environmental conditions. Diversifying impact mitigation involves increasing host resilience to disease, reducing pathogen abundance and managing environmental factors that facilitate disease. Disease surveillance and mitigation can be adaptive if informed by research advances and catalysed by communication among observers, researchers and decision-makers using information-sharing platforms. Recent increases in the awareness of the threats posed by marine diseases may lead to policy frameworks that facilitate the responses and management that marine disease emergencies require. PMID:26880835

  1. Managing hypopituitarism in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    Healthcare professionals manage patients with a vast range of conditions, but often specialise and acquire expertise in specific disease processes. Emergency and pre-hospital clinicians care for patients with various conditions for short periods of time, so have less opportunity to become familiar with more unusual conditions, yet it is vital that they have some knowledge and understanding of these. Patients with rare conditions can present at emergency departments with common complaints, but the effect of their original diagnosis on the presenting complaint may be overlooked or underestimated. This article uses a case study to describe the experience of one patient who presented with vomiting, but who also had hypopituitarism and therefore required specific management she did not at first receive. The article describes hypopituitarism and the initial management of patients with this condition who become unwell, and discusses how the trust responded to the patient's complaint to improve patient safety and care. It has been written with the full participation and consent of the patient and her husband. PMID:26451942

  2. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  3. Epilepsy emergencies: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Brandon; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2012-02-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are epilepsy emergencies with high morbidity and mortality. Early treatment is crucial, and the identification of an underlying etiology informs both continued treatment and prognosis. Many patients have underdiagnosed nonconvulsive seizures or nonconvulsive status epilepticus, particularly the comatose or critically ill. Timely EEG can be useful for diagnosis, management, optimizing treatment response, and determining prognosis in these patients. Refractory conditions can be quite complicated with limited evidence-based guidance, but treatment should not be restricted by nihilism even in the most prolonged cases, especially if there is not widespread irreversible brain injury. PMID:22284053

  4. Earth sciences and emergency management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, R.

    1990-01-01

    As understanding of California's earthquake risk had increased over the past decade, there has been a concurrent expansion of interactions between emergency management professionals and earth scientists. The effort have resulted not from a formal plan-though the U.S National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program has provided much of the support for scientific advances since 1977-but from interactions focused on specific projects. three examples stand out, perhaps suggesting how mutually beneficial exchanges can simultaneously enhance science and public safety. 

  5. Enhanced surveillance for detection and management of infectious diseases: regional collaboration in the middle East.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Alex; Ramlawi, Assad; Belbiesi, Adel; Sheikh, Sami; Haddadin, Akhtam; Husseini, Sari; Abdeen, Ziad; Cohen, Dani

    2013-01-01

    Formed before international negotiations of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR), the Middle East Consortium for Infectious Disease Surveillance (MECIDS) is a regional collaboration aimed at facilitating implementation of the revised IHR and, more broadly, improving the detection and control of infectious disease outbreaks among neighboring countries in an area of continuous dispute. Initially focused on enhancing foodborne disease surveillance, MECIDS has expanded the scope of its work to also include avian and pandemic influenza and other emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Here, we describe the history and governance of MECIDS, highlighting key achievements over the consortium's seven-year history, and discuss the future of MECIDS. PMID:23362413

  6. Bioterrorism and emerging infectious disease - antimicrobials, therapeutics and immune-modulators. SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Shurtleff, Amy C

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum for expert presentations and discussion about the threats of bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases, and to address the issues relating to epidemics, prevention of infection and treatment of some of these emerging infectious diseases classified as potential agents of bioterror. Included in the talks were state-of-the-art presentations about infectious clone technology and recombinant viruses, pathogen and receptor interactions at the cellular and molecular level, genomic responses to infection, and new information on antiviral mechanisms of action. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and progress toward understanding the epidemic was addressed, and other sessions were presented concerning immune therapy and immunopotentiation of disease, siRNA and gene silencing, host responses to pathogen infections, as well as the use of genetic engineering to circumvent and direct the immune response. Many discussions were held and data were presented about possible compounds and new drugs that may have antiviral properties, yet there were few discussions of any available new drugs. This report addresses reverse genetics of SARS virus, as well as its epidemiology, and a host of different recent approaches to developing antivirals effective against SARS, including some potential vaccine candidates. Also presented are hypotheses about the human immune response to SARS infection, as well as immune therapies against botulinum and anthrax toxins. This report also addresses antiviral approaches exploiting siRNAs, and different aspects of the host immune response to many of the different dangerous pathogens discussed at this meeting. Finally, approaches to circumventing and directing the immune response using genetic engineering will be reported.

  7. Host adaptation and the emergence of infectious disease: the Salmonella paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, R A; Bäumler, A J

    2000-06-01

    The recent emergence of food-borne pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, has generated increasing interest in how infectious diseases can invade, persist and spread within new host populations. To alter their host range pathogens require adaptations, which ensure their circulation in a new animal population. Adaptations for circulation in different populations of vertebrate hosts seem to have been acquired multiple times within the genus Salmonella because extant Salmonella serotypes differ greatly with regard to host range. In this article, mechanisms involved in host adaptation are deduced by considering the influence of the host immune response on circulation of Salmonella serotypes within populations of vertebrate animals. This approach contributes to the identification of genes involved in host adaptation and provides new insights into the emergence of food-borne pathogens.

  8. Drivers of Emerging Infectious Disease Events as a Framework for Digital Detection

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sarah H.; Benedum, Corey M.; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Preston, Nicholas D.; Mazet, Jonna A.K.; Joly, Damien O.

    2015-01-01

    The growing field of digital disease detection, or epidemic intelligence, attempts to improve timely detection and awareness of infectious disease (ID) events. Early detection remains an important priority; thus, the next frontier for ID surveillance is to improve the recognition and monitoring of drivers (antecedent conditions) of ID emergence for signals that precede disease events. These data could help alert public health officials to indicators of elevated ID risk, thereby triggering targeted active surveillance and interventions. We believe that ID emergence risks can be anticipated through surveillance of their drivers, just as successful warning systems of climate-based, meteorologically sensitive diseases are supported by improved temperature and precipitation data. We present approaches to driver surveillance, gaps in the current literature, and a scientific framework for the creation of a digital warning system. Fulfilling the promise of driver surveillance will require concerted action to expand the collection of appropriate digital driver data. PMID:26196106

  9. ["Emerging infectious diseases". Dengue-fever, West-Nile-fever, SARS, avian influenza, HIV].

    PubMed

    Haas, W; Krause, G; Marcus, U; Stark, K; Ammon, A; Burger, R

    2004-06-01

    Some emerging infectious diseases have recently become endemic in Germany. Others remain confined to specific regions in the world. Physicians notice them only when travelers after infection in endemic areas present themselves with symptoms. Several of these emerging infections will be explained. HIV is an example for an imported pathogen which has become endemic in Germany. SARS and avian influenza are zoonoses with the potential to spread from person to person. Avian influenza in humans provides a possibility for the reassortment of a potential new pandemic strain. Outbreaks of dengue fever in endemic areas are reflected in increased infections in travelers returning from these areas. Currently, West-Nile-virus infections are only imported into Germany. The timely implementation of diagnostic, therapeutic and infection control measures requires physicians to include these diseases in their differential diagnosis. To achieve this goal, good cooperation between physicians, laboratories and the public health service is essential.

  10. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever

  11. Risks of emerging infectious diseases: evolving threats in a changing area, the mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Vittecoq, M; Thomas, F; Jourdain, E; Moutou, F; Renaud, F; Gauthier-Clerc, M

    2014-02-01

    The Mediterranean basin is a biodiversity hotspot; it has historically had a large human presence that has shaped ecosystems for millennia. As the cradle of many civilizations, the area was one of the main theatres for transitions that punctuated both human and pathogen histories, which are intimately linked. Today we are living through another great historical transition summarized in the expression 'global changes'. In this context, we are witnessing a rise in the emergence of pathogens widely associated with aforementioned global changes. The Mediterranean basin might be especially vulnerable to this phenomenon due to the acute consequences global changes will have in this key intercontinental interface region. In addition, Arab revolutions and European economic crisis are creating both sanitary issues and presenting new opportunities to improve infectious disease control and prevention in the region. The aim of this review is to identify the impacts that ongoing changes might have on the risk of infectious disease emergence in the Mediterranean basin. We focussed on three key domains undergoing transformations: (i) resources, namely safe drinking water and animal products, (ii) socio-economic factors including health inequalities within countries and poor sanitary conditions linked to ongoing conflicts and (iii) movements of people and goods that are reshaped by current changes and are intimately linked to the risk of disease proliferation. Building on recent examples, we try to identify upcoming challenges and discuss ways to meet them in the light of existing international human and veterinary health guidelines and their possible improvements. PMID:22998374

  12. Emerging infectious diseases in cetaceans worldwide and the possible role of environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Raga, Juan Antonio; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Jepson, Paul D; Duignan, Padraig J; Siebert, Ursula; Barrett, Tom; Santos, Marcos César de Oliveira; Moreno, Ignacio B; Siciliano, Salvatore; Aguilar, Alex; Van Waerebeek, Koen

    2009-09-23

    We reviewed prominent emerging infectious diseases of cetaceans, examined their potential to impact populations, re-assessed zoonotic risk and evaluated the role of environmental stressors. Cetacean morbilliviruses and papillomaviruses as well as Brucella spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are thought to interfere with population abundance by inducing high mortalities, lowering reproductive success or by synergistically increasing the virulence of other diseases. Severe cases of lobomycosis and lobomycosis-like disease (LLD) may contribute to the death of some dolphins. The zoonotic hazard of marine mammal brucellosis and toxoplasmosis may have been underestimated, attributable to frequent misdiagnoses and underreporting, particularly in developing countries and remote areas where carcass handling without protective gear and human consumption of fresh cetacean products are commonplace. Environmental factors seem to play a role in the emergence and pathogenicity of morbillivirus epidemics, lobomycosis/LLD, toxoplasmosis, poxvirus-associated tattoo skin disease and, in harbour porpoises, infectious diseases of multifactorial aetiology. Inshore and estuarine cetaceans incur higher risks than pelagic cetaceans due to habitats often severely altered by anthropogenic factors such as chemical and biological contamination, direct and indirect fisheries interactions, traumatic injuries from vessel collisions and climate change.

  13. Risks of emerging infectious diseases: evolving threats in a changing area, the mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Vittecoq, M; Thomas, F; Jourdain, E; Moutou, F; Renaud, F; Gauthier-Clerc, M

    2014-02-01

    The Mediterranean basin is a biodiversity hotspot; it has historically had a large human presence that has shaped ecosystems for millennia. As the cradle of many civilizations, the area was one of the main theatres for transitions that punctuated both human and pathogen histories, which are intimately linked. Today we are living through another great historical transition summarized in the expression 'global changes'. In this context, we are witnessing a rise in the emergence of pathogens widely associated with aforementioned global changes. The Mediterranean basin might be especially vulnerable to this phenomenon due to the acute consequences global changes will have in this key intercontinental interface region. In addition, Arab revolutions and European economic crisis are creating both sanitary issues and presenting new opportunities to improve infectious disease control and prevention in the region. The aim of this review is to identify the impacts that ongoing changes might have on the risk of infectious disease emergence in the Mediterranean basin. We focussed on three key domains undergoing transformations: (i) resources, namely safe drinking water and animal products, (ii) socio-economic factors including health inequalities within countries and poor sanitary conditions linked to ongoing conflicts and (iii) movements of people and goods that are reshaped by current changes and are intimately linked to the risk of disease proliferation. Building on recent examples, we try to identify upcoming challenges and discuss ways to meet them in the light of existing international human and veterinary health guidelines and their possible improvements.

  14. Circulating MicroRNAs: Potential and Emerging Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Verma, Parmila; Pandey, Rajan K; Prajapati, Priyanka; Prajapati, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved, small non-coding RNA with size ranging from 19 to 24 nucleotides. They endogenously regulate the gene expression at the post transcriptional level either through translation repression or mRNA degradation. MiRNAs have shown the potential to be used as a biomarker for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of infectious diseases. Many miRNAs have shown significantly altered expression during infection. The altered expression of miRNA level in an infected human can be identified by the use of advanced diagnostic tools. In this review, we have highlighted the use of miRNA as an emerging tool for the identification of the human infectious disease. Till date, several miRNAs have been reported as a molecular biomarker in infectious diseases, such as miRNA-150 and miRNA-146b-5p in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); miRNA-122, miRNA-21, and miRNA-34a in hepatitis; miRNA-361-5p and miRNA-29c in tuberculosis; miRNA-16 and miRNA-451 in malaria and miRNA-181 in Helicobacter pylori infection. The diagnosis of infection with the help of a biomarker is a non-invasive tool that has shown to have a key role in early diagnosis of infection. The discovery of circulating miRNA in the blood of infected patients has the potential to become a powerful non-invasive biomarker in coming future. PMID:27574520

  15. Circulating MicroRNAs: Potential and Emerging Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Parmila; Pandey, Rajan K.; Prajapati, Priyanka; Prajapati, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved, small non-coding RNA with size ranging from 19 to 24 nucleotides. They endogenously regulate the gene expression at the post transcriptional level either through translation repression or mRNA degradation. MiRNAs have shown the potential to be used as a biomarker for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of infectious diseases. Many miRNAs have shown significantly altered expression during infection. The altered expression of miRNA level in an infected human can be identified by the use of advanced diagnostic tools. In this review, we have highlighted the use of miRNA as an emerging tool for the identification of the human infectious disease. Till date, several miRNAs have been reported as a molecular biomarker in infectious diseases, such as miRNA-150 and miRNA-146b-5p in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); miRNA-122, miRNA-21, and miRNA-34a in hepatitis; miRNA-361-5p and miRNA-29c in tuberculosis; miRNA-16 and miRNA-451 in malaria and miRNA-181 in Helicobacter pylori infection. The diagnosis of infection with the help of a biomarker is a non-invasive tool that has shown to have a key role in early diagnosis of infection. The discovery of circulating miRNA in the blood of infected patients has the potential to become a powerful non-invasive biomarker in coming future. PMID:27574520

  16. Environmental and social influences on emerging infectious diseases: past, present and future.

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, A J

    2004-01-01

    During the processes of human population dispersal around the world over the past 50 000-100 000 years, along with associated cultural evolution and inter-population contact and conflict, there have been several major transitions in the relationships of Homo sapiens with the natural world, animate and inanimate. Each of these transitions has resulted in the emergence of new or unfamiliar infectious diseases.The three great historical transitions since the initial advent of agriculture and livestock herding, from ca. 10 000 years ago, occurred when: (i) early agrarian-based settlements enabled sylvatic enzootic microbes to make contact with Homo sapiens; (ii) early Eurasian civilizations (such as the Greek and Roman empires, China and south Asia) came into military and commercial contact, ca. 3000-2000 years ago, swapping their dominant infections; and (iii) European expansionism, over the past five centuries, caused the transoceanic spread of often lethal infectious diseases. This latter transition is best known in relation to the conquest of the Americas by Spanish conquistadores, when the inadvertent spread of measles, smallpox and influenza devastated the Amerindian populations.Today, we are living through the fourth of these great transitional periods. The contemporary spread and increased lability of various infectious diseases, new and old, reflect the combined and increasingly widespread impacts of demographic, environmental, behavioural, technological and other rapid changes in human ecology. Modern clinical medicine has, via blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and the use of hypodermic syringes, created new opportunities for microbes. These have contributed to the rising iatrogenic problems of hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS and several other viral infections. Meanwhile, the injudicious use of antibiotics has been a rare instance of human action actually increasing 'biodiversity'.Another aspect of this fourth transition is that modern hyper-hygienic living

  17. Environmental and social influences on emerging infectious diseases: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J

    2004-07-29

    During the processes of human population dispersal around the world over the past 50 000-100 000 years, along with associated cultural evolution and inter-population contact and conflict, there have been several major transitions in the relationships of Homo sapiens with the natural world, animate and inanimate. Each of these transitions has resulted in the emergence of new or unfamiliar infectious diseases. The three great historical transitions since the initial advent of agriculture and livestock herding, from ca. 10 000 years ago, occurred when: (i) early agrarian-based settlements enabled sylvatic enzootic microbes to make contact with Homo sapiens; (ii) early Eurasian civilizations (such as the Greek and Roman empires, China and south Asia) came into military and commercial contact, ca. 3000-2000 years ago, swapping their dominant infections; and (iii) European expansionism, over the past five centuries, caused the transoceanic spread of often lethal infectious diseases. This latter transition is best known in relation to the conquest of the Americas by Spanish conquistadores, when the inadvertent spread of measles, smallpox and influenza devastated the Amerindian populations.Today, we are living through the fourth of these great transitional periods. The contemporary spread and increased lability of various infectious diseases, new and old, reflect the combined and increasingly widespread impacts of demographic, environmental, behavioural, technological and other rapid changes in human ecology. Modern clinical medicine has, via blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and the use of hypodermic syringes, created new opportunities for microbes. These have contributed to the rising iatrogenic problems of hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS and several other viral infections. Meanwhile, the injudicious use of antibiotics has been a rare instance of human action actually increasing 'biodiversity'. Another aspect of this fourth transition is that modern hyper-hygienic living

  18. Unexpected redwood mortality from synergies between wildfire and an emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Metz, Margaret R; Varner, J Morgan; Frangioso, Kerri M; Meentemeyer, Ross K; Rizzo, David M

    2013-10-01

    An under-examined component of global change is the alteration of disturbance regimes due to warming climates, continued species invasions, and accelerated land-use change. These drivers of global change are themselves novel ecosystem disturbances that may interact with historically occurring disturbances in complex ways. Here we use the natural experiment presented by wildfires in redwood forests impacted by an emerging infectious disease to demonstrate unexpected synergies of novel disturbance interactions. The dominant tree, coast redwood (fire resistant without negative disease impacts), experienced unexpected synergistic increases in mortality when fire and disease co-occurred. The increased mortality risk, more than fourfold at the peak of the effect, was not predictable from impacts of either disturbance alone. Changes in fire behavior associated with changes to forest fuels that occurred through disease progression overwhelmed redwood's usual resilience to wildfire. Our results demonstrate the potential for interacting disturbances to initiate novel successional trajectories and compromise ecosystem resilience.

  19. Emergence and maintenance of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in Europe: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Nylund, A; Devold, M; Plarre, H; Isdal, E; Aarseth, M

    2003-08-15

    The present study describes the use of molecular methods in studying infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), an important pathogen of farmed salmon in Norway, Scotland, the Faeroe Islands, Canada, USA and Chile. The nucleotide sequences of the haemagglutinin gene (HA) from 70 ISAV isolates have been analysed for phylogenetic relationship and the average mutation rate of nucleotide substitutions calculated. The isolates constitute 2 major groups, 1 European and 1 North American group. The isolate from Chile is closely related to the North American isolates. The European isolates can be further divided into 3 separate groups reflecting geographical distribution, time of collection, and transmission connected with farming activity. Based on existing information about infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and new information emerging from the present study, it is hypothesised that: (1) ISAV is maintained in wild populations of trout and salmon in Europe; (2) it is transmitted between wild hosts mainly during their freshwater spawning phase in rivers; (3) wild salmonids, mainly trout, possibly carry benign wild-type ISAV isolates; (4) a change (mutation) in virulence probably results from deletions of amino acid segments from the highly polymorphic region (HPR) of benign wild-type isolates; (5) ISA emerges in farmed Atlantic salmon when mutated isolates are transmitted from wild salmonids or, following mutation of benign isolates, in farmed salmon after transmission from wild salmonids; (6) farming activity is an important factor in transmission of ISAV between farming sites in addition to transmission of ISAV from wild salmonids to farmed salmon; (7) transmission of ISAV from farmed to wild salmonids probably occurs less frequently than transmission from wild to farmed fish due to lower frequency of susceptible wild individuals; (8) the frequency of new outbreaks of ISA in farmed salmon probably reflects natural variation in the prevalence of ISAV in wild populations of

  20. Social Media's New Role in Emergency Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ethan Huffman; Sara Prentice

    2008-03-01

    As technology continues to evolve, emergency management organizations must adapt to new ways of responding to the media and public. This paper examines a brief overview of social media's new role in emergency management. This includes definitions of social media, the benefits of utilizing social media, examples of social media being used and finally a discussion of how agencies, such as Department of Energy national laboratories, can begin including social media in their emergency management plans.

  1. Differential susceptibility in steelhead trout populations to an emergent MD strain of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, R.; Jones, Amelia; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    A significant emergence of trout-adapted MD subgroup infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) began in the coastal region of Washington State, USA, in 2007. This emergence event lasted until 2011 and caused both asymptomatic adult fish infection and symptomatic epidemic disease and mortality in juvenile fish. Incidence of virus during this emergence demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution among rivers of the coastal region, leaving fish populations of some rivers apparently untouched while others suffered significant and recurrent infection and mortality (Breyta et. al. 2013; Dis Aquat Org 104:179-195). In this study, we examined the possible contribution of variations in susceptibility of fish populations, age-related resistance, and virus virulence to the observed landscape heterogeneity. We found that the most significant variable was host susceptibility: by controlled experimental challenge studies steelhead trout populations with no history of IHNV infection were 1 to 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than a fish population with a long history of IHNV infection. In addition, 2 fish populations from the same river, which descended relatively recently from a common ancestral population, demonstrated 1 to 2 orders of magnitude difference in susceptibility. Fish age-related development of resistance was most evident in the more susceptible of 2 related fish populations. Finally, the strain of virus involved in the 2007 coastal Washington emergence had high virulence but was within the range of other known M group viruses tested. These results suggest that one major driver of landscape heterogeneity in the 2007 coastal Washington IHNV emergence was variation in fish population susceptibility and that this trait may have a heritable component.

  2. The management of overseas emergencies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael John Glyn

    2007-03-01

    Grave shortages of blood occur in over 80% of the countries in the world. These result from cultural taboos against donation, inadequate funding of the local transfusion service, high incidence of transfusion transmissible diseases, and rarity of a particular blood group, such as Rhesus negative in Asia, or any combination of these factors. Someone visiting such a country, requiring a transfusion, may, by receiving local blood, deprive the local community of a scarce resource. To resolve this problem the Blood Care Foundation has developed a fast reliable service to provide blood to travellers in emergency from countries where supplies are more abundant. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) to cover all aspects of sourcing blood and transfusion equipment, quality control and the requesting and transporting of blood to the patient within the shortest possible time have been produced. Five sourcing blood banks (BBs), 3 satellite BBs and over 200 transfusion support points have been established. Alarm centre medical and administrative staff and anaesthetists, who act as blood couriers have been trained. The methods of requesting blood in an emergency have been integrated with major medical assistance companies. By co-operating with a major refrigeration manufacturer, a transport box has been designed and tested, which can maintain a temperature of 2-8 degrees C for over 120h. In addition a rabies service has recently been introduced where supplies of rabies immunoglobulin and/or vaccine are taken by trained couriers to the person who has been bitten. As well as preserving the local blood supply, local health services are helped in 2 ways. Blood, transfusion fluids and equipment, when they have 20% of their shelf life remaining, are donated to local hospitals. Secondly, when the Quality Assurance Manager visits locations, he helps train the local transfusion staff, thereby helping them to improve their own service.

  3. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management: Emergency "Go-Kits"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Tara

    2006-01-01

    "Helpful Hints" offers a quick overview of school emergency preparedness topics that are frequently the subject of inquiries. The Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDFS) encourages schools to consider emergency management in the context of its four phases: mitigation and prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery. The preparedness phase…

  4. The Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONS): A Strategic Approach to Studying Emerging Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rabaa, Maia A; Tue, Ngo Tri; Phuc, Tran My; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Saylors, Karen; Cotten, Matthew; Bryant, Juliet E; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Cuong, Nguyen Van; Pham, Hong Anh; Berto, Alessandra; Phat, Voong Vinh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Bao, Long Hoang; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Wertheim, Heiman; Nadjm, Behzad; Monagin, Corina; van Doorn, H Rogier; Rahman, Motiur; Tra, My Phan Vu; Campbell, James I; Boni, Maciej F; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; van der Hoek, Lia; Simmonds, Peter; Rambaut, Andrew; Toan, Tran Khanh; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Hien, Tran Tinh; Wolfe, Nathan; Farrar, Jeremy J; Thwaites, Guy; Kellam, Paul; Woolhouse, Mark E J; Baker, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The effect of newly emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases of zoonotic origin in human populations can be potentially catastrophic, and large-scale investigations of such diseases are highly challenging. The monitoring of emergence events is subject to ascertainment bias, whether at the level of species discovery, emerging disease events, or disease outbreaks in human populations. Disease surveillance is generally performed post hoc, driven by a response to recent events and by the availability of detection and identification technologies. Additionally, the inventory of pathogens that exist in mammalian and other reservoirs is incomplete, and identifying those with the potential to cause disease in humans is rarely possible in advance. A major step in understanding the burden and diversity of zoonotic infections, the local behavioral and demographic risks of infection, and the risk of emergence of these pathogens in human populations is to establish surveillance networks in populations that maintain regular contact with diverse animal populations, and to simultaneously characterize pathogen diversity in human and animal populations. Vietnam has been an epicenter of disease emergence over the last decade, and practices at the human/animal interface may facilitate the likelihood of spillover of zoonotic pathogens into humans. To tackle the scientific issues surrounding the origins and emergence of zoonotic infections in Vietnam, we have established The Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONS). This countrywide project, in which several international institutions collaborate with Vietnamese organizations, is combining clinical data, epidemiology, high-throughput sequencing, and social sciences to address relevant one-health questions. Here, we describe the primary aims of the project, the infrastructure established to address our scientific questions, and the current status of the project. Our principal objective is to develop an integrated approach to

  5. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This manual contains current guidelines for Illinois school personnel to follow when working with children who have infectious diseases. The first chapter focuses on school district development of policies and procedures and program implementation. The next chapter provides information on characteristics, mode of transmission, prevention, and…

  6. Managing rural emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Van Vonderen, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department visits reached more than 115 million in 2005, a 30% increase over the past decade. Although much has been written regarding these numbers, little attention has been focused on the impact of overcrowding and volume increases on rural emergency departments. Rural emergency departments face challenges unlike their urban counterparts that make implementation of current overcrowding strategies difficult or impossible. This article addresses these challenges and suggests strategies specific to the needs of rural emergency departments. PMID:18820558

  7. Emerging relations between infectious diseases and coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fong, I W

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in developed countries. The cause is multifactorial. A substantial proportion of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) do not have traditional risk factors. Infectious diseases may play a role in these cases, or they may intensify the effect of other risk factors. The association of CAD and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is firmly established, but causality is yet to be proven. The link with other infectious agents or conditions, such as cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Helicobacter pylori and periodontitis, is more controversial. Cytomegalovirus infection is more strongly linked than native CAD to coronary artery restenosis after angioplasty and to accelerated CAD after cardiac transplantation. However, new data on this topic are appearing in the literature almost every month. The potential for novel therapeutic management of cardiovascular disease and stroke is great if infection is proven to cause or accelerate CAD or atherosclerosis. However, physicians should not "jump the gun" and start using antibiotic therapy prematurely for CAD. The results of large randomized clinical trials in progress will help establish causality and the benefits of antimicrobial therapy in CAD. PMID:10920732

  8. The Emerging Amphibian Fungal Disease, Chytridiomycosis: A Key Example of the Global Phenomenon of Wildlife Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Daszak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The spread of amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is associated with the emerging infectious wildlife disease chytridiomycosis. This fungus poses an overwhelming threat to global amphibian biodiversity and is contributing toward population declines and extinctions worldwide. Extremely low host-species specificity potentially threatens thousands of the 7,000+ amphibian species with infection, and hosts in additional classes of organisms have now also been identified, including crayfish and nematode worms.Soon after the discovery of B. dendrobatidis in 1999, it became apparent that this pathogen was already pandemic; dozens of countries and hundreds of amphibian species had already been exposed. The timeline of B. dendrobatidis's global emergence still remains a mystery, as does its point of origin. The reason why B. dendrobatidis seems to have only recently increased in virulence to catalyze this global disease event remains unknown, and despite 15 years of investigation, this wildlife pandemic continues primarily uncontrolled. Some disease treatments are effective on animals held in captivity, but there is currently no proven method to eradicate B. dendrobatidis from an affected habitat, nor have we been able to protect new regions from exposure despite knowledge of an approaching "wave" of B. dendrobatidis and ensuing disease.International spread of B. dendrobatidis is largely facilitated by the commercial trade in live amphibians. Chytridiomycosis was recently listed as a globally notifiable disease by the World Organization for Animal Health, but few countries, if any, have formally adopted recommended measures to control its spread. Wildlife diseases continue to emerge as a consequence of globalization, and greater effort is urgently needed to protect global health. PMID:27337484

  9. Optimal search patterns in honeybee orientation flights are robust against emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stephan; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Andrew M.; Wells, Patricia; Lim, Ka S.; Paxton, Robert J.; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2016-01-01

    Lévy flights are scale-free (fractal) search patterns found in a wide range of animals. They can be an advantageous strategy promoting high encounter rates with rare cues that may indicate prey items, mating partners or navigational landmarks. The robustness of this behavioural strategy to ubiquitous threats to animal performance, such as pathogens, remains poorly understood. Using honeybees radar-tracked during their orientation flights in a novel landscape, we assess for the first time how two emerging infectious diseases (Nosema sp. and the Varroa-associated Deformed wing virus (DWV)) affect bees’ behavioural performance and search strategy. Nosema infection, unlike DWV, affected the spatial scale of orientation flights, causing significantly shorter and more compact flights. However, in stark contrast to disease-dependent temporal fractals, we find the same prevalence of optimal Lévy flight characteristics (μ ≈ 2) in both healthy and infected bees. We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of these surprising insights, arguing that Lévy search patterns are an emergent property of fundamental characteristics of neuronal and sensory components of the decision-making process, making them robust against diverse physiological effects of pathogen infection and possibly other stressors. PMID:27615605

  10. Optimal search patterns in honeybee orientation flights are robust against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Andrew M; Wells, Patricia; Lim, Ka S; Paxton, Robert J; Osborne, Juliet L

    2016-01-01

    Lévy flights are scale-free (fractal) search patterns found in a wide range of animals. They can be an advantageous strategy promoting high encounter rates with rare cues that may indicate prey items, mating partners or navigational landmarks. The robustness of this behavioural strategy to ubiquitous threats to animal performance, such as pathogens, remains poorly understood. Using honeybees radar-tracked during their orientation flights in a novel landscape, we assess for the first time how two emerging infectious diseases (Nosema sp. and the Varroa-associated Deformed wing virus (DWV)) affect bees' behavioural performance and search strategy. Nosema infection, unlike DWV, affected the spatial scale of orientation flights, causing significantly shorter and more compact flights. However, in stark contrast to disease-dependent temporal fractals, we find the same prevalence of optimal Lévy flight characteristics (μ ≈ 2) in both healthy and infected bees. We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of these surprising insights, arguing that Lévy search patterns are an emergent property of fundamental characteristics of neuronal and sensory components of the decision-making process, making them robust against diverse physiological effects of pathogen infection and possibly other stressors. PMID:27615605

  11. Molecular surveillance of traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Larocca, Vittorio; Losurdo, Michele; Lanave, Gianvito; Lucente, Maria Stella; Corrente, Marialaura; Catella, Cristiana; Bo, Stefano; Elia, Gabriella; Torre, Giorgio; Grandolfo, Erika; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2016-08-30

    A molecular survey for traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) was conducted in Italy between 2011 and 2013 on a total of 138 dogs, including 78 early acute clinically ill CIRD animals, 22 non-clinical but exposed to clinically ill CIRD dogs and 38 CIRD convalescent dogs. The results showed that canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) was the most commonly detected CIRD pathogen, followed by canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma cynos, Mycoplasma canis and canine pneumovirus (CnPnV). Some classical CIRD agents, such as canine adenoviruses, canine distemper virus and canid herpesvirus 1, were not detected at all, as were not other emerging respiratory viruses (canine influenza virus, canine hepacivirus) and bacteria (Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus). Most severe forms of respiratory disease were observed in the presence of CPIV, CRCoV and M. cynos alone or in combination with other pathogens, whereas single CnPnV or M. canis infections were detected in dogs with no or very mild respiratory signs. Interestingly, only the association of M. cynos (alone or in combination with either CRCoV or M. canis) with severe clinical forms was statistically significant. The study, while confirming CPIV as the main responsible for CIRD occurrence, highlights the increasing role of recently discovered viruses, such as CRCoV and CnPnV, for which effective vaccines are not available in the market. PMID:27527760

  12. Optimal search patterns in honeybee orientation flights are robust against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stephan; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Andrew M; Wells, Patricia; Lim, Ka S; Paxton, Robert J; Osborne, Juliet L

    2016-01-01

    Lévy flights are scale-free (fractal) search patterns found in a wide range of animals. They can be an advantageous strategy promoting high encounter rates with rare cues that may indicate prey items, mating partners or navigational landmarks. The robustness of this behavioural strategy to ubiquitous threats to animal performance, such as pathogens, remains poorly understood. Using honeybees radar-tracked during their orientation flights in a novel landscape, we assess for the first time how two emerging infectious diseases (Nosema sp. and the Varroa-associated Deformed wing virus (DWV)) affect bees' behavioural performance and search strategy. Nosema infection, unlike DWV, affected the spatial scale of orientation flights, causing significantly shorter and more compact flights. However, in stark contrast to disease-dependent temporal fractals, we find the same prevalence of optimal Lévy flight characteristics (μ ≈ 2) in both healthy and infected bees. We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of these surprising insights, arguing that Lévy search patterns are an emergent property of fundamental characteristics of neuronal and sensory components of the decision-making process, making them robust against diverse physiological effects of pathogen infection and possibly other stressors.

  13. Emerging infectious diseases and pandemic potential: status quo and reducing risk of global spread.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Brian; Dar, Osman; Zumla, Alimuddin; Heymann, David L

    2014-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are an important public health threat and infections with pandemic potential are a major global risk. Although much has been learned from previous events the evidence for mitigating actions is not definitive and pandemic preparedness remains a political and scientific challenge. A need exists to develop trust and effective meaningful collaboration between countries to help with rapid detection of potential pandemic infections and initiate public health actions. This collaboration should be within the framework of the International Health Regulations. Collaboration between countries should be encouraged in a way that acknowledges the benefits that derive from sharing biological material and establishing equitable collaborative research partnerships. The focus of pandemic preparedness should include upstream prevention through better collaboration between human and animal health sciences to enhance capacity to identify potential pathogens before they become serious human threats, and to prevent their emergence where possible. The one-health approach provides a means to develop this and could potentially enhance alignment of global health and trade priorities.

  14. Emerging infectious diseases and pandemic potential: status quo and reducing risk of global spread.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Brian; Dar, Osman; Zumla, Alimuddin; Heymann, David L

    2014-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are an important public health threat and infections with pandemic potential are a major global risk. Although much has been learned from previous events the evidence for mitigating actions is not definitive and pandemic preparedness remains a political and scientific challenge. A need exists to develop trust and effective meaningful collaboration between countries to help with rapid detection of potential pandemic infections and initiate public health actions. This collaboration should be within the framework of the International Health Regulations. Collaboration between countries should be encouraged in a way that acknowledges the benefits that derive from sharing biological material and establishing equitable collaborative research partnerships. The focus of pandemic preparedness should include upstream prevention through better collaboration between human and animal health sciences to enhance capacity to identify potential pathogens before they become serious human threats, and to prevent their emergence where possible. The one-health approach provides a means to develop this and could potentially enhance alignment of global health and trade priorities. PMID:25189351

  15. Protection Conferred by Infectious Coryza Vaccines Against Emergent Avibacterium paragallinarum Serovar C-1.

    PubMed

    Morales-Erasto, V; Maruri-Esteban, E; Trujillo-Ruíz, H H; Talavera-Rojas, M; Blackall, P J; Soriano-Vargas, E

    2015-03-01

    Infectious coryza is an upper respiratory disease of chickens caused by Avibacterium paragallinarum. Outbreaks of infectious coryza caused by Av. paragallinarum serovar C-1 isolates in coryza-vaccinated flocks in Ecuador and Mexico have been reported. In the current study, the protection conferred by four commercially available, trivalent infectious coryza vaccines in chickens challenged with a serovar C-1 isolate from an apparent coryza vaccine failure in a layer flock in Mexico was evaluated. Only one infectious coryza vaccine provided a good protection level (83%) in vaccinated chickens. These results might explain the infectious coryza outbreaks in vaccinated flocks that have been observed in the field. PMID:26292552

  16. Zika--an emerging infectious disease. The risk assessment from Polish perspective.

    PubMed

    Gańczak, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, attention has been paid to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, the emerging vector-borne disease. It is responsible for major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and, more recently, in previously infection-naïve territories of the Pacific area, South America and Caribbean. The etiology, epidemiology, transmission, and clinical manifestations of ZIKV disease are discussed, along with the diagnostic possibilities in the aim to assessing the risk of its introduction to Poland. ZIKV is spread by Aedes mosquitoes which are not found throughout Poland. The prevention strategies adopted by national public health authorities should be based on a surveillance of imported cases and on increasing awareness among healthcare professionals and travelers. Due to a large number of asymptomatic ZIKV infections and limitations in the availability of diagnostic tests, monitoring based on laboratory results is likely to be unreliable in Poland. There are no requirements to report ZIKV infections to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Nevertheless, the global epidemic continues to spread, and despite travels of Poles to countries in which Aedes mosquitoes are active, Polish sportsmen will be travelling to Brazil in August 2016 to participate in the Olympic Games, the will also be true of the many fans who will follow them; therefore imported cases of ZIKV infection are possible. As the awareness of the infection risk will increase among medical staff and travelers, the number of suspected cases of travel-related ZIKV infections may rise in Poland. Medical staff should be informed where and how to report such cases. Thorough surveillance, adequate assessment of possible threats, action plans, rapid and effective intervention development, spread of up to date information of ZIKV, as well as other emerging or re-emerging infectious pathogens can play a key role in guaranteeing population health. PMID:27344465

  17. Zika--an emerging infectious disease. The risk assessment from Polish perspective.

    PubMed

    Gańczak, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, attention has been paid to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, the emerging vector-borne disease. It is responsible for major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and, more recently, in previously infection-naïve territories of the Pacific area, South America and Caribbean. The etiology, epidemiology, transmission, and clinical manifestations of ZIKV disease are discussed, along with the diagnostic possibilities in the aim to assessing the risk of its introduction to Poland. ZIKV is spread by Aedes mosquitoes which are not found throughout Poland. The prevention strategies adopted by national public health authorities should be based on a surveillance of imported cases and on increasing awareness among healthcare professionals and travelers. Due to a large number of asymptomatic ZIKV infections and limitations in the availability of diagnostic tests, monitoring based on laboratory results is likely to be unreliable in Poland. There are no requirements to report ZIKV infections to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Nevertheless, the global epidemic continues to spread, and despite travels of Poles to countries in which Aedes mosquitoes are active, Polish sportsmen will be travelling to Brazil in August 2016 to participate in the Olympic Games, the will also be true of the many fans who will follow them; therefore imported cases of ZIKV infection are possible. As the awareness of the infection risk will increase among medical staff and travelers, the number of suspected cases of travel-related ZIKV infections may rise in Poland. Medical staff should be informed where and how to report such cases. Thorough surveillance, adequate assessment of possible threats, action plans, rapid and effective intervention development, spread of up to date information of ZIKV, as well as other emerging or re-emerging infectious pathogens can play a key role in guaranteeing population health.

  18. The interactive effect of an emerging infectious disease and an emerging contaminant on Woodhouse's toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Miiller, Tyler; Kerby, Jacob L

    2013-09-01

    Two factors that influence amphibian population declines are infectious diseases and exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. The authors examined an emerging fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and its interaction with an emerging contaminant, the antimicrobial triclosan. They first conducted a 2 × 2 × 4 factorial study to examine the interactive impacts of dragonfly predator cues, Bd, and triclosan (0 µg/L, 10 µg/L, 100 µg/L, and 1000 µg/L) on Woodhouse's toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) tadpoles. The authors measured the lethal and sublethal impacts of these stressors on tadpoles over 4 wk. All tadpoles in the 100-µg/L and 1000-µg/L concentrations of triclosan died within 24 h of exposure, but tadpoles in the low concentration (10 µg/L) survived. Tadpoles exposed to only Bd (no triclosan) exhibited a low survival rate (67.5%), whereas those exposed to both 10 µg/L triclosan and Bd exhibited a high survival rate (91.1%), implying that triclosan inhibits effects of Bd on tadpoles. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and predator cue exposure individually increased the developmental rate of the surviving tadpoles, but this effect was absent when these factors were combined with triclosan. In a follow-up study, the authors found Bd growth in culture was significantly inhibited at the 10-µg/L concentration of triclosan and completely inhibited at 100 µg/L. These findings suggest that interactions among multiple stressors can be complex and require examination in conjunction with one another to evaluate actual impacts to aquatic fauna.

  19. [Safe management of waste generated in health care institutions especially with infectious waste].

    PubMed

    Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Głuszyński, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    Health care institutions generate variable waste, including infectious. Since the microorganism can survive on non alive surfaces for up to dozen or so mouth infectious medical waste can be real health risk for patients and personnel. Then it is very important to prepare and introduce the plan of waste management. It must be done by the adequate team. The members of this committee should be representatives from all departments. The plan of management waste from health can institutions include the segregation of waste and management (collecting, storage, transport, neutralization).

  20. Constructive simulation for emergency management training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Mikel D.; Slepow, Mary P.

    1996-06-01

    The Plowshares project applied military constructive simulation technology to training for emergency management. The project team enhanced the US Army's Janus simulation model to support emergency management scenarios that include hurricanes, fires, and chemical spills. The enhanced Janus software, known as TERRA, can be used in a county emergency operations center to provide the stimulus for training events structured as command post exercises. The first phase of the project culminated in a 'proof of principle demonstration' that occurred in August 1995. In that demonstration the emergency operations center of Orange County Florida conducted a hurricane response exercise using the TERRA system.

  1. A systematic review of community-based interventions for emerging zoonotic infectious diseases in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Halton, Kate; Sarna, Mohinder; Barnett, Adrian; Leonardo, Lydia; Graves, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Southeast Asia has been at the epicentre of recent epidemics of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases. Community-based surveillance and control interventions have been heavily promoted but the most effective interventions have not been identified. Objectives This review evaluated evidence for the effectiveness of community-based surveillance interventions at monitoring and identifying emerging infectious disease; the effectiveness of community-based control interventions at reducing rates of emerging infectious disease; and contextual factors that influence intervention effectiveness. Inclusion criteria Participants Communities in Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. Types of intervention(s) Non-pharmaceutical, non-vaccine, and community-based surveillance or prevention and control interventions targeting rabies, Nipah virus, dengue, SARS or avian influenza. Types of outcomes Primary outcomes: measures: of infection or disease; secondary outcomes: measures of intervention function. Types of studies Original quantitative studies published in English. Search strategy Databases searched (1980 to 2011): PubMed, CINAHL, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, Science Direct, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, WHOLIS, British Development Library, LILACS, World Bank (East Asia), Asian Development Bank. Methodological quality Two independent reviewers critically appraised studies using standard Joanna Briggs Institute instruments. Disagreements were resolved through discussion. Data extraction A customised tool was used to extract quantitative data on intervention(s), populations, study methods, and primary and secondary outcomes; and qualitative contextual information or narrative evidence about interventions. Data synthesis Data was synthesised in a narrative summary with the aid of tables. Meta-analysis was used to statistically pool quantitative results. Results

  2. Time for T? Immunoinformatics addresses vaccine design for neglected tropical and emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Terry, Frances E; Moise, Leonard; Martin, Rebecca F; Torres, Melissa; Pilotte, Nils; Williams, Steven A; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines have been invaluable for global health, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs, while also raising the quality of human life. However, newly emerging infectious diseases (EID) and more well-established tropical disease pathogens present complex challenges to vaccine developers; in particular, neglected tropical diseases, which are most prevalent among the world's poorest, include many pathogens with large sizes, multistage life cycles and a variety of nonhuman vectors. EID such as MERS-CoV and H7N9 are highly pathogenic for humans. For many of these pathogens, while their genomes are available, immune correlates of protection are currently unknown. These complexities make developing vaccines for EID and neglected tropical diseases all the more difficult. In this review, we describe the implementation of an immunoinformatics-driven approach to systematically search for key determinants of immunity in newly available genome sequence data and design vaccines. This approach holds promise for the development of 21st century vaccines, improving human health everywhere.

  3. Time for T? Immunoinformatics addresses vaccine design for neglected tropical and emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Frances E; Moise, Leonard; Martin, Rebecca F; Torres, Melissa; Pilotte, Nils; Williams, Steven A; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines have been invaluable for global health, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs, while also raising the quality of human life. However, newly emerging infectious diseases (EID) and more well-established tropical disease pathogens present complex challenges to vaccine developers; in particular, neglected tropical diseases, which are most prevalent among the world’s poorest, include many pathogens with large sizes, multistage life cycles and a variety of nonhuman vectors. EID such as MERS-CoV and H7N9 are highly pathogenic for humans. For many of these pathogens, while their genomes are available, immune correlates of protection are currently unknown. These complexities make developing vaccines for EID and neglected tropical diseases all the more difficult. In this review, we describe the implementation of an immunoinformatics-driven approach to systematically search for key determinants of immunity in newly available genome sequence data and design vaccines. This approach holds promise for the development of 21st century vaccines, improving human health everywhere. PMID:25193104

  4. Using amphibians in laboratory studies: precautions against the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis.

    PubMed

    Schmeller, Dirk S; Loyau, Adeline; Dejean, Tony; Miaud, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis is by far the most widely used amphibian species in laboratories. In the wild, X. laevis is an asymptomatic carrier of an emerging infectious disease called chytridiomycosis. The vector is the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has devastating effects on wild amphibian populations around the world. The impact of Bd on the metabolism of X. laevis has not been comprehended yet. However, even if asymptomatic, an infection is likely to affect the individual's physiology, immunology, development, reproduction and overall response to stress from a purely medical point of view, which will introduce noise and therefore increase variance within experimental groups of X. laevis. This could have implications on the scientific results from studies using this species. Here, we review the current knowledge on treatments of infected amphibians and propose a hygiene protocol adapted to laboratory populations and amphibian husbandry. Following the presented sanitation guidelines could further prevent the spread of Bd and probably of other amphibian pathogens. The sanitation guidelines will help to reduce the impact of amphibian husbandry on natural populations and must be considered a crucial contribution to amphibian conservation, as today 32% of all amphibians are considered threatened. PMID:21075827

  5. The centenary of the discovery of trench fever, an emerging infectious disease of World War 1.

    PubMed

    Anstead, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    In 1915, a British medical officer on the Western Front reported on a soldier with relapsing fever, headache, dizziness, lumbago, and shin pain. Within months, additional cases were described, mostly in frontline troops, and the new disease was called trench fever. More than 1 million troops were infected with trench fever during World War 1, with each affected soldier unfit for duty for more than 60 days. Diagnosis was challenging, because there were no pathognomonic signs and symptoms and the causative organism could not be cultured. For 3 years, the transmission and cause of trench fever were hotly debated. In 1918, two commissions identified that the disease was louse-borne. The bacterium Rickettsia quintana was consistently found in the gut and faeces of lice that had fed on patients with trench fever and its causative role was accepted in the 1920s. The organism was cultured in the 1960s and reclassified as Bartonella quintana; it was also found to cause endocarditis, peliosis hepatis, and bacillary angiomatosis. Subsequently, B quintana infection has been identified in new populations in the Andes, in homeless people in urban areas, and in individuals with HIV. The story of trench fever shows how war can lead to the recrudescence of an infectious disease and how medicine approached an emerging infection a century ago.

  6. Lessons from the Ebola Outbreak: Action Items for Emerging Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Aguirre, A Alonso; Bailey, Charles L; Baranova, Ancha V; Crooks, Andrew T; Croitoru, Arie; Delamater, Paul L; Gupta, Jhumka; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Narayanan, Aarthi; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Rowan, Katherine E; Schwebach, J Reid; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan; Sklarew, Dann M; Stefanidis, Anthony; Agouris, Peggy

    2016-03-01

    As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa wanes, it is time for the international scientific community to reflect on how to improve the detection of and coordinated response to future epidemics. Our interdisciplinary team identified key lessons learned from the Ebola outbreak that can be clustered into three areas: environmental conditions related to early warning systems, host characteristics related to public health, and agent issues that can be addressed through the laboratory sciences. In particular, we need to increase zoonotic surveillance activities, implement more effective ecological health interventions, expand prediction modeling, support medical and public health systems in order to improve local and international responses to epidemics, improve risk communication, better understand the role of social media in outbreak awareness and response, produce better diagnostic tools, create better therapeutic medications, and design better vaccines. This list highlights research priorities and policy actions the global community can take now to be better prepared for future emerging infectious disease outbreaks that threaten global public health and security. PMID:26915507

  7. Environmental fatty acids enable emergence of infectious Staphylococcus aureus resistant to FASII-targeted antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claire; Halpern, David; Kénanian, Gérald; Hays, Constantin; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Brinster, Sophie; Kennedy, Sean; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire; Lamberet, Gilles; Gloux, Karine; Gruss, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis, FASII, is a target for development of new anti-staphylococcal drugs. This strategy is based on previous reports indicating that self-synthesized fatty acids appear to be indispensable for Staphylococcus aureus growth and virulence, although other bacteria can use exogenous fatty acids to compensate FASII inhibition. Here we report that staphylococci can become resistant to the FASII-targeted inhibitor triclosan via high frequency mutations in fabD, one of the FASII genes. The fabD mutants can be conditional for FASII and not require exogenous fatty acids for normal growth, and can use diverse fatty acid combinations (including host fatty acids) when FASII is blocked. These mutants show cross-resistance to inhibitors of other FASII enzymes and are infectious in mice. Clinical isolates bearing fabD polymorphisms also bypass FASII inhibition. We propose that fatty acid-rich environments within the host, in the presence of FASII inhibitors, might favour the emergence of staphylococcal strains displaying resistance to multiple FASII inhibitors. PMID:27703138

  8. Revisiting post-infectious glomerulonephritis in the emerging era of C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Mazdak A.; Wang, Shihtien; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Bock, Margret; Keswani, Mahima; Meehan, Shane M.; Chang, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is an immune complex-mediated glomerular injury that typically resolves. Dominant C3 deposition is characteristic of PIGN, but with the emergence of C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) as a distinct entity, it is unclear how the pathologic similarities between PIGN and C3GN should be reconciled. Therefore, nephrologists and nephropathologists need additional guidance at the time of biopsy. Methods We studied 23 pediatric and young adult patients diagnosed with PIGN. Patients were divided into two groups, one with co-dominance between C3 and immunoglobulins and the other meeting proposed diagnostic criteria for C3GN. Clinical and pathological features were compared. Results No clinical and/or pathological features could distinguish between those with C3-co-dominant deposits and those with C3 dominance. Nearly all patients in both groups regained their baseline renal function without clinical intervention. Conclusions Although the identification of abnormalities of the alternative pathway of complement is characteristic of C3GN, testing is not widely available and the turnaround time often exceeds 1 month. Our study found that PIGN with either co-dominant or dominant C3 deposition in a cohort of young patients has excellent short-term outcomes. Close clinical observation for persistent abnormalities, such as hypocomplementemia, prolonged hematuria or proteinuria, is recommended to single out patients that may harbor intrinsic complement abnormalities. PMID:27274823

  9. Emergence of MD type infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Washington State coastal steelhead trout.

    PubMed

    Breyta, Rachel; Jones, Amelia; Stewart, Bruce; Brunson, Ray; Thomas, Joan; Kerwin, John; Bertolini, Jim; Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Kurath, Gael

    2013-06-13

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) occurs in North America as 3 major phylogenetic groups designated U, M, and L. In coastal Washington State, IHNV has historically consisted of U genogroup viruses found predominantly in sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. M genogroup IHNV, which has host-specific virulence for rainbow and steelhead trout O. mykiss, was detected only once in coastal Washington prior to 2007, in an epidemic among juvenile steelhead trout in 1997. Beginning in 2007 and continuing through 2011, there were 8 IHNV epidemics in juvenile steelhead trout, involving 7 different fish culture facilities in 4 separate watersheds. During the same time period, IHNV was also detected in asymptomatic adult steelhead trout from 6 coastal watersheds. Genetic typing of 283 recent virus isolates from coastal Washington revealed that the great majority were in the M genogroup of IHNV and that there were 2 distinct waves of viral emergence between the years 2007 and 2011. IHNV type mG110M was dominant in coastal steelhead trout during 2007 to 2009, and type mG139M was dominant between 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of viral isolates indicated that all coastal M genogroup viruses detected in 1997 and 2007 to 2011 were part of the MD subgroup and that several novel genetic variants related to the dominant types arose in the coastal sites. Comparison of spatial and temporal incidence of coastal MD viruses with that of the rest of the Pacific Northwest indicated that the likely source of the emergent viruses was Columbia River Basin steelhead trout. PMID:23759556

  10. Emergence of MD type infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in Washington State coastal steelhead trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; Jones, Amelia; Stewart, Bruce; Brunson, Ray; Thomas, Joan; Kerwin, John; Bertolini, Jim; Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Kurath, Gael

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) occurs in North America as 3 major phylogenetic groups designated U, M, and L. In coastal Washington State, IHNV has historically consisted of U genogroup viruses found predominantly in sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. M genogroup IHNV, which has host-specific virulence for rainbow and steelhead trout O. mykiss, was detected only once in coastal Washington prior to 2007, in an epidemic among juvenile steelhead trout in 1997. Beginning in 2007 and continuing through 2011, there were 8 IHNV epidemics in juvenile steelhead trout, involving 7 different fish culture facilities in 4 separate watersheds. During the same time period, IHNV was also detected in asymptomatic adult steelhead trout from 6 coastal watersheds. Genetic typing of 283 recent virus isolates from coastal Washington revealed that the great majority were in the M genogroup of IHNV and that there were 2 distinct waves of viral emergence between the years 2007 and 2011. IHNV type mG110M was dominant in coastal steelhead trout during 2007 to 2009, and type mG139M was dominant between 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of viral isolates indicated that all coastal M genogroup viruses detected in 1997 and 2007 to 2011 were part of the MD subgroup and that several novel genetic variants related to the dominant types arose in the coastal sites. Comparison of spatial and temporal incidence of coastal MD viruses with that of the rest of the Pacific Northwest indicated that the likely source of the emergent viruses was Columbia River Basin steelhead trout. 

  11. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    PubMed

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation. PMID:25193454

  12. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    PubMed

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation.

  13. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics for zoonotic infectious diseases: deciphering variables influencing disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Leo, Sarah S T; Gonzalez, Andrew; Millien, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission systems involve sets of species interacting with each other and their environment. This complexity impedes development of disease monitoring and control programs that require reliable identification of spatial and biotic variables and mechanisms facilitating disease emergence. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a framework that simultaneously examines all species involved in disease emergence by integrating concepts and methods from population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics (MTILG) can reveal how interspecific interactions and landscape variables influence disease emergence patterns. We test the potential of our MTILG-based framework by modelling the emergence of a disease system across multiple species dispersal, interspecific interaction, and landscape scenarios. Our simulations showed that both interspecific-dependent dispersal patterns and landscape characteristics significantly influenced disease spread. Using our framework, we were able to detect statistically similar inter-population genetic differences and highly correlated spatial genetic patterns that imply species-dependent dispersal. Additionally, species that were assigned coupled-dispersal patterns were affected to the same degree by similar landscape variables. This study underlines the importance of an integrated approach to investigating emergence of disease systems. MTILG is a robust approach for such studies and can identify potential avenues for targeted disease management strategies.

  14. Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife–Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

    2014-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

  15. Application of the analytic hierarchy process to a risk assessment of emerging infectious diseases in Shaoxing city in southern China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chunyu; Fang, Yirong; Huang, Zhaohui; Tan, Rongmei

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the likelihood of an outbreak or epidemic of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in Shaoxing city, China, and its resulting impact to provide decision makers with quantitative, directive results. Factors related to the risk of EIDs were selected through meeting with experts and were arranged in a hierarchical structure. These evaluation factors were also weighted to allow the use of a point system for evaluation. As a result, 14 evaluation factors comprising a 3-layer hierarchy were generated. The riskiest top 10 EIDs were HIV/AIDS (consistency index [CI] = 3.206), cholera (CI = 3.103), SARS (CI = 2.804), acute schistosomiasis (CI = 2.784), malaria (CI = 2.777), legionellosis (CI = 2.743), avian influenza A/H5N1 (CI = 2.734), dengue fever (CI = 2.702), Escherichia coli O157:H7 enteritis (CI = 2.593), and plague (CI = 2.553). The risk assessment was specifically intended to support local and national government agencies in the management of high risk EIDs in their efforts to (i) make resource allocation decisions, (ii) make high-level planning decisions, and (iii) raise public awareness of the EID risk. The results showed that the EID risk in Shaoxing could be effectively assessed through an analytic hierarchy process.

  16. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management: Steps for Developing a School Emergency Management Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Helpful Hints" offers a quick overview of school emergency preparedness topics that are frequently the subject of inquiries. The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools strongly encourages schools and school districts to develop emergency management plans within the context of the four phases of emergency management:…

  17. Emergency management: expanding the disaster plan.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kevin L; Bing, Caryn M

    2007-06-01

    A comprehensive emergency management plan (CEMP) is key to minimizing the disruption of patient care and services during and after a natural or man-made disaster. The home health nurse can play a key role in enhancing, expanding, and evaluating the effectiveness of the organization's disaster plan. The components of a CEMP and lessons learned from actual implementation of disaster plans in home care are addressed. The disasters and emergencies of the past few years, such as threats of terrorism, hurricanes, floods, wildfires, tornadoes, and earthquakes, have validated the need to extend the emergency preparedness plan to a more comprehensive approach to emergency management. Communities, healthcare providers, and individuals/families all have been urged to take a more comprehensive look at their readiness for these types of events. Home healthcare organizations, including home health agencies, hospice providers, infusion providers, and medical equipment companies, can take a fresh and comprehensive look at their emergency management plan.

  18. Social media best practices in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Siskey, Ashley; Islam, Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Social media platforms have become popular as means of communications in emergency management. Many people use social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter on a daily basis including during disaster events. Emergency management agencies (EMAs) need to recognize the value of not only having a presence on social media but also actively engaging stakeholders and the public on these sites. However, identifying best practices for the use of social media in emergency management is still in its infancy. The objective of this article is to begin to create or further define best practices for emergency managers to use social media sites particularly Facebook and Twitter in four key areas: 1) implementation, 2) education, 3) collaboration, and 4) communication. A list of recommendations of best practices is formulated for each key area and results from a nationwide survey on the use of social media by county EMAs are discussed in this article.

  19. Need of surveillance response systems to combat Ebola outbreaks and other emerging infectious diseases in African countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern in Sub-Saharan Africa about the spread of the Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and the public health burden that it ensues. Since 1976, there have been 885,343 suspected and laboratory confirmed cases of EVD and the disease has claimed 2,512 cases and 932 fatality in West Africa. There are certain requirements that must be met when responding to EVD outbreaks and this process could incur certain challenges. For the purposes of this paper, five have been identified: (i) the deficiency in the development and implementation of surveillance response systems against Ebola and others infectious disease outbreaks in Africa; (ii) the lack of education and knowledge resulting in an EVD outbreak triggering panic, anxiety, psychosocial trauma, isolation and dignity impounding, stigmatisation, community ostracism and resistance to associated socio-ecological and public health consequences; (iii) limited financial resources, human technical capacity and weak community and national health system operational plans for prevention and control responses, practices and management; (iv) inadequate leadership and coordination; and (v) the lack of development of new strategies, tools and approaches, such as improved diagnostics and novel therapies including vaccines which can assist in preventing, controlling and containing Ebola outbreaks as well as the spread of the disease. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop and implement an active early warning alert and surveillance response system for outbreak response and control of emerging infectious diseases. Understanding the unending risks of transmission dynamics and resurgence is essential in implementing rapid effective response interventions tailored to specific local settings and contexts. Therefore, the following actions are recommended: (i) national and regional inter-sectorial and trans-disciplinary surveillance response systems that include early warnings, as well

  20. Emergent management of scorpion sting.

    PubMed

    Kluz-Zawadzka, Jolanta; Hartman-Ksycińska, Anna; Lewandowski, Bogumił

    2014-01-01

    Scorpionism (syndrome of scorpion stings) is an important public health problem in many regions of the world, not only in tropics and subtropics. As scorpions may be unintentionally transported to any place in the world and keeping scorpions as pets is becoming more popular, scorpion stings occur also in Poland. Therefore, health professionals should have the knowledge on the management of scorpion stings. This article discusses a case who was stung by scorpion and proposes an algorithm of management with such patients.

  1. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Fungal, helminthic, protozoan and ectoparasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, changing climate conditions, and the increased incidence of iatrogenic immunosuppression, fungal, protozoan, helminthic, and ectoparasitic infections that were once uncommon are being seeing more frequently in the Western hemisphere. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. In addition, delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnostic modalities, and treatment options for emerging fungal, protozoan, helminthic, and ectoparasitic infections. It should be noted, however, that throughout this review we cite statistics documenting their increased incidence to back-up these infections as emerging, and although some of the diagnoses are clinical, others rely on newer laboratory tests, and the possibility exists that the increased incidence could be caused by better detection methods.

  2. Tularemia, a re-emerging infectious disease in Iran and neighboring countrie

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Afsaneh; Maurin, Max; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Tularemia is a zoonotic disease transmitted by direct contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation of contaminated aerosols, ingestion of contaminated meat or water, and skin contact with any infected material. It is widespread throughout the northern hemisphere, including Iran and its neighbors to the north, northeast, and northwest. METHODS: In this paper, the epidemiology of tularemia as a re-emerging infectious disease in the world with a focus on Iran and the neighboring countries is reviewed. RESULTS: In Iran, positive serological tests were first reported in 1973, in wildlife and domestic livestock in the northwestern and southeastern parts of the country. The first human case was reported in 1980 in the southwest of Iran, and recent studies conducted among at-risk populations in the western, southeastern, and southwestern parts of Iran revealed seroprevalences of 14.4, 6.52, and 6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors may explain the absence of reported tularemia cases in Iran since 1980. Tularemia may be underdiagnosed in Iran because Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica is likely to be the major etiological agent and usually causes mild to moderately severe disease. Furthermore, tularemia is not a disease extensively studied in the medical educational system in Iran, and empirical therapy may be effective in many cases. Finally, it should be noted that laboratories capable of diagnosing tularemia have only been established in the last few years. Since both recent and older studies have consistently found tularemia antibodies in humans and animals, the surveillance of this disease should receive more attention. In particular, it would be worthwhile for clinical researchers to confirm tularemia cases more often by isolating F. tularensis from infected humans and animals. PMID:25773439

  3. Emerging infectious disease as a proximate cause of amphibian mass mortality.

    PubMed

    Rachowicz, Lara J; Knapp, Roland A; Morgan, Jess A T; Stice, Mary J; Vredenburg, Vance T; Parker, John M; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2006-07-01

    A newly discovered infectious disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is implicated in population declines and possible extinctions throughout the world. The purpose of our study was to examine the effects of B. dendrobatidis on the mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa) in the Sierra Nevada of California (USA). We (1) quantified the prevalence and incidence of B. dendrobatidis through repeat surveys of several hundred R. muscosa populations in the southern Sierra Nevada; (2) described the population-level effects of B. dendrobatidis on R. muscosa population abundance; and (3) compared the mortality rates of infected and uninfected R. muscosa individuals from pre- through post-metamorphosis using both laboratory and field experiments. Mouthpart inspections conducted in 144 and 132 R. muscosa populations in 2003 and 2004, respectively, indicated that 19% of R. muscosa populations in both years showed indications of chytridiomycosis. Sixteen percent of populations that were uninfected in 2003 became infected by 2004. Rana muscosa population sizes were reduced by an average of 88% following B. dendrobatidis outbreaks at six sites, but at seven B. dendrobatidis-negative sites, R. muscosa population sizes increased by an average of 45% over the same time period. In the laboratory, all infected R. muscosa developed fatal chytridiomycosis after metamorphosis, while all uninfected individuals remained healthy. In the field experiment in which R. muscosa tadpoles were caged at infected and uninfected sites, 96% of the individuals that metamorphosed at infected sites died vs. 5% at the uninfected sites. These studies indicate that chytridiomycosis causes high mortality in post-metamorphic R. muscosa, that this emerging disease is the proximate cause of numerous observed R. muscosa population declines, and that the disease threatens this species with extirpation at numerous sites in California's Sierra Nevada.

  4. Management of infectious processes of the pleural space: a review.

    PubMed

    Girdhar, Ankur; Shujaat, Adil; Bajwa, Abubakr

    2012-01-01

    Pleural effusions can present in 40% of patients with pneumonia. Presence of an effusion can complicate the diagnosis as well as the management of infection in lungs and pleural space. There has been an increase in the morbidity and mortality associated with parapneumonic effusions and empyema. This calls for employment of advanced treatment modalities and development of a standardized protocol to manage pleural sepsis early. There has been an increased understanding about the indications and appropriate usage of procedural options at clinicians' disposal.

  5. Lateral epicondylosis: emerging management options.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carolyn; Visco, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Lateral epicondylosis is one of the most prevalent disorders of the arm and results in significantly decreased function among the workforce and athletes. Historically, the disorder has been diagnosed clinically and treated as an inflammatory entity. Management strategies have included anti-inflammatory medications and techniques, including oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, injected corticosteroid, and physical therapy with modalities. More recent literature postulates a degenerative or compressive etiology, directing some clinicians to try new, more regenerative management strategies such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cell injections. To date, literature evaluating these new treatment methods has shown positive results, although no definitive conclusions can be drawn. More research is needed to evaluate these new treatment methods, and a new look at the diagnosis of the disorder with ultrasound imaging may be reasonable to consider. PMID:25968855

  6. Current Management of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infections by Infectious Disease Specialists.

    PubMed

    Liang, Stephen Y; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Warren, David K

    2016-10-15

    Management guidelines for cardiac implantable electronic device infections exist, but practice patterns of infectious disease (ID) specialists are not well known. We found that while many ID specialist practices mirror existing guidelines, a combination of complete device removal and prolonged antimicrobial therapy is favored when Staphylococcus aureus is involved.

  7. Highlights from the 2016 International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID): 25-27 May, Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Routy, Jean-Pierre; Psomas, Christina; Soriano, Vicente; Philibert, Patrick; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Lafeuillade, Alain

    2016-01-01

    For three days in May 2016, the International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases gathered participants from all over the world around the theme 'Fighting deadly viruses'. HIV infection remained the main topic of the meeting but hepatitis, Ebola and Zika viruses as well as other emergent pathogens were also extensively covered. In this article we have tried to summarise what was presented during the plenary lectures, the two keynote lectures, and some of the work accepted for oral presentation. However, all abstracts can be found on the Journal of Virus Eradication website ( viruseradication.com/abstract.php). PMID:27482461

  8. Highlights from the 2016 International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases (ISHEID): 25-27 May, Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Routy, Jean-Pierre; Psomas, Christina; Soriano, Vicente; Philibert, Patrick; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Lafeuillade, Alain

    2016-07-01

    For three days in May 2016, the International Symposium on HIV & Emerging Infectious Diseases gathered participants from all over the world around the theme 'Fighting deadly viruses'. HIV infection remained the main topic of the meeting but hepatitis, Ebola and Zika viruses as well as other emergent pathogens were also extensively covered. In this article we have tried to summarise what was presented during the plenary lectures, the two keynote lectures, and some of the work accepted for oral presentation. However, all abstracts can be found on the Journal of Virus Eradication website ( viruseradication.com/abstract.php).

  9. [The program of Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: the present status and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshiko; Nagai, Yoshiyuki

    2007-12-01

    The program of Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases was commenced in 2005 with an outline for Japanese universities and research institutions to establish bilateral collaboration research bases in countries where emerging and reemerging infections are breaking out or will likely break out. So far, six universities and two institutions are participating in the program and ten collaboration bases have been established in six countries (five in Asia and one in Africa). Each research base aims to contribute to the security and safety of the partner and own countries by facilitating better understanding of infectious diseases, technology innovation in diagnosis, therapy and prevention, and human resources development. The experiences of the Reseau International des Instituts Pasteur (RIIP), France, and the Wellcome Trust Southeast Asian Tropical Medicine Research Units (Oxford Network), United Kingdom, which appear to share similar missions, suggest that infectious diseases research that is based on overseas research bases can produce first-time results through the building of long-term mutual trust with the counterparts. By referring to these networks as models, Japan's program should be implemented over the long run but not be based on a short-time perspective. Thus, secure funding is a major issue. PMID:18357759

  10. Recognition and management of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Susan P

    2005-08-01

    Although clinical conditions associated with dysfunction of the ad-renal gland are often subtle, even insidious, in their presentation,and diagnosis and treatment usually are confined to outpatient clinics and offices, there are several situations that warrant the attention of emergency physicians. Recognition of the spectrum of presentations of pheochromocytoma, adrenal insufficiency, and pituitary apoplexy, and the sequelae of corticosteroid therapy and withdrawal, are critically important areas to emergency medicine. Prompt diagnosis with appropriate treatment and referral will reduce morbidity and mortality in many patients each year. A related topic pertinent to emergency physicians is the management of incidental adrenal masses that are discovered on abdominal radio-logic imaging.

  11. The infectious diseases impact statement: a mechanism for addressing emerging diseases.

    PubMed

    McSweegan, E

    1996-01-01

    The use of an Infectious Diseases Impact Statement (IDIS) is proposed for predictive assessments of local changes in infectious diseases arising from human-engineered activities. IDIS is intended to be analogous to an Environmental Impact Statement. The drafting of an IDIS for specific activities, particularly in developing nations, would provide a formal mechanism for examining potential changes in local health conditions, including infected and susceptible populations, diseases likely to fluctuate in response to development, existing control measures, and vectors likely to be affected by human activities. The resulting survey data could provide a rational basis and direction for development, surveillance, and prevention measures. An IDIS process that balances environmental alterations, local human health, and economic growth could substantially alter the nature of international development efforts and infectious disease outbreaks.

  12. The infectious diseases impact statement: a mechanism for addressing emerging diseases.

    PubMed

    McSweegan, E

    1996-01-01

    The use of an Infectious Diseases Impact Statement (IDIS) is proposed for predictive assessments of local changes in infectious diseases arising from human-engineered activities. IDIS is intended to be analogous to an Environmental Impact Statement. The drafting of an IDIS for specific activities, particularly in developing nations, would provide a formal mechanism for examining potential changes in local health conditions, including infected and susceptible populations, diseases likely to fluctuate in response to development, existing control measures, and vectors likely to be affected by human activities. The resulting survey data could provide a rational basis and direction for development, surveillance, and prevention measures. An IDIS process that balances environmental alterations, local human health, and economic growth could substantially alter the nature of international development efforts and infectious disease outbreaks. PMID:8903209

  13. 44 CFR 351.20 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... emergency plans and preparedness in accordance with FEMA procedures in 44 CFR part 350. (h) Develop... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true The Federal Emergency Management Agency. 351.20 Section 351.20 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY...

  14. Impacts of biodiversity on the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Keesing, Felicia; Belden, Lisa K; Daszak, Peter; Dobson, Andrew; Harvell, C Drew; Holt, Robert D; Hudson, Peter; Jolles, Anna; Jones, Kate E; Mitchell, Charles E; Myers, Samuel S; Bogich, Tiffany; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2010-12-01

    Current unprecedented declines in biodiversity reduce the ability of ecological communities to provide many fundamental ecosystem services. Here we evaluate evidence that reduced biodiversity affects the transmission of infectious diseases of humans, other animals and plants. In principle, loss of biodiversity could either increase or decrease disease transmission. However, mounting evidence indicates that biodiversity loss frequently increases disease transmission. In contrast, areas of naturally high biodiversity may serve as a source pool for new pathogens. Overall, despite many remaining questions, current evidence indicates that preserving intact ecosystems and their endemic biodiversity should generally reduce the prevalence of infectious diseases.

  15. Quantifying trends in disease impact to produce a consistent and reproducible definition of an emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Funk, Sebastian; Bogich, Tiffany L; Jones, Kate E; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The proper allocation of public health resources for research and control requires quantification of both a disease's current burden and the trend in its impact. Infectious diseases that have been labeled as "emerging infectious diseases" (EIDs) have received heightened scientific and public attention and resources. However, the label 'emerging' is rarely backed by quantitative analysis and is often used subjectively. This can lead to over-allocation of resources to diseases that are incorrectly labelled "emerging," and insufficient allocation of resources to diseases for which evidence of an increasing or high sustained impact is strong. We suggest a simple quantitative approach, segmented regression, to characterize the trends and emergence of diseases. Segmented regression identifies one or more trends in a time series and determines the most statistically parsimonious split(s) (or joinpoints) in the time series. These joinpoints in the time series indicate time points when a change in trend occurred and may identify periods in which drivers of disease impact change. We illustrate the method by analyzing temporal patterns in incidence data for twelve diseases. This approach provides a way to classify a disease as currently emerging, re-emerging, receding, or stable based on temporal trends, as well as to pinpoint the time when the change in these trends happened. We argue that quantitative approaches to defining emergence based on the trend in impact of a disease can, with appropriate context, be used to prioritize resources for research and control. Implementing this more rigorous definition of an EID will require buy-in and enforcement from scientists, policy makers, peer reviewers and journal editors, but has the potential to improve resource allocation for global health.

  16. Climate change influences on marine infectious diseases: implications for management and society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burge, Colleen A.; Eakin, C. Mark; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Froelich, Brett; Hershberger, Paul K.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Petes, Laura E.; Prager, Katherine C.; Weil, Ernesto; Willis, Bette L.; Ford, Susan E.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are common in marine environments, but the effects of a changing climate on marine pathogens are not well understood. Here, we focus on reviewing current knowledge about how the climate drives hostpathogen interactions and infectious disease outbreaks. Climate-related impacts on marine diseases are being documented in corals, shellfish, finfish, and humans; these impacts are less clearly linked to other organisms. Oceans and people are inextricably linked, and marine diseases can both directly and indirectly affect human health, livelihoods, and well-being. We recommend an adaptive management approach to better increase the resilience of ocean systems vulnerable to marine diseases in a changing climate. Land-based management methods of quarantining, culling, and vaccinating are not successful in the ocean; therefore, forecasting conditions that lead to outbreaks and designing tools/approaches to influence these conditions may be the best way to manage marine disease.

  17. Climate Change Influences on Marine Infectious Diseases: Implications for Management and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, Colleen A.; Mark Eakin, C.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Froelich, Brett; Hershberger, Paul K.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Petes, Laura E.; Prager, Katherine C.; Weil, Ernesto; Willis, Bette L.; Ford, Susan E.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are common in marine environments, but the effects of a changing climate on marine pathogens are not well understood. Here we review current knowledge about how the climate drives host-pathogen interactions and infectious disease outbreaks. Climate-related impacts on marine diseases are being documented in corals, shellfish, finfish, and humans; these impacts are less clearly linked for other organisms. Oceans and people are inextricably linked, and marine diseases can both directly and indirectly affect human health, livelihoods, and well-being. We recommend an adaptive management approach to better increase the resilience of ocean systems vulnerable to marine diseases in a changing climate. Land-based management methods of quarantining, culling, and vaccinating are not successful in the ocean; therefore, forecasting conditions that lead to outbreaks and designing tools/approaches to influence these conditions may be the best way to manage marine disease.

  18. Using “Omics” and Integrated Multi-Omics Approaches to Guide Probiotic Selection to Mitigate Chytridiomycosis and Other Emerging Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rebollar, Eria A.; Antwis, Rachael E.; Becker, Matthew H.; Belden, Lisa K.; Bletz, Molly C.; Brucker, Robert M.; Harrison, Xavier A.; Hughey, Myra C.; Kueneman, Jordan G.; Loudon, Andrew H.; McKenzie, Valerie; Medina, Daniel; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.; Walke, Jenifer B.; Weiss, Sophie; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Harris, Reid N.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases in wildlife are responsible for massive population declines. In amphibians, chytridiomycosis caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd, has severely affected many amphibian populations and species around the world. One promising management strategy is probiotic bioaugmentation of antifungal bacteria on amphibian skin. In vivo experimental trials using bioaugmentation strategies have had mixed results, and therefore a more informed strategy is needed to select successful probiotic candidates. Metagenomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic methods, colloquially called “omics,” are approaches that can better inform probiotic selection and optimize selection protocols. The integration of multiple omic data using bioinformatic and statistical tools and in silico models that link bacterial community structure with bacterial defensive function can allow the identification of species involved in pathogen inhibition. We recommend using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and methods such as indicator species analysis, the Kolmogorov–Smirnov Measure, and co-occurrence networks to identify bacteria that are associated with pathogen resistance in field surveys and experimental trials. In addition to 16S amplicon sequencing, we recommend approaches that give insight into symbiont function such as shotgun metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, or metabolomics to maximize the probability of finding effective probiotic candidates, which can then be isolated in culture and tested in persistence and clinical trials. An effective mitigation strategy to ameliorate chytridiomycosis and other emerging infectious diseases is necessary; the advancement of omic methods and the integration of multiple omic data provide a promising avenue toward conservation of imperiled species. PMID:26870025

  19. Standardized emergency management system and response to a smallpox emergency.

    PubMed

    Kim-Farley, Robert J; Celentano, John T; Gunter, Carol; Jones, Jessica W; Stone, Rogelio A; Aller, Raymond D; Mascola, Laurene; Grigsby, Sharon F; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2003-01-01

    The smallpox virus is a high-priority, Category-A agent that poses a global, terrorism security risk because it: (1) easily can be disseminated and transmitted from person to person; (2) results in high mortality rates and has the potential for a major public health impact; (3) might cause public panic and social disruption; and (4) requires special action for public health preparedness. In recognition of this risk, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC-DHS) developed the Smallpox Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Plan for LAC to prepare for the possibility of an outbreak of smallpox. A unique feature of the LAC-DHS plan is its explicit use of the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) framework for detailing the functions needed to respond to a smallpox emergency. The SEMS includes the Incident Command System (ICS) structure (management, operations, planning/intelligence, logistics, and finance/administration), the mutual-aid system, and the multi/interagency coordination required during a smallpox emergency. Management for incident command includes setting objectives and priorities, information (risk communications), safety, and liaison. Operations includes control and containment of a smallpox outbreak including ring vaccination, mass vaccination, adverse events monitoring and assessment, management of confirmed and suspected smallpox cases, contact tracing, active surveillance teams and enhanced hospital-based surveillance, and decontamination. Planning/intelligence functions include developing the incident action plan, epidemiological investigation and analysis of smallpox cases, and epidemiological assessment of the vaccination coverage status of populations at risk. Logistics functions include receiving, handling, inventorying, and distributing smallpox vaccine and vaccination clinic supplies; personnel; transportation; communications; and health care of personnel. Finally, finance/administration functions include monitoring

  20. Special Population Planner for Emergency Management

    2003-04-17

    The SPP is a tool for use by emergency management agencies in creating plans for possible events requiring their attention. It incorporates extensive data including those on special needs populations so that this segment of the population will be considered in general plans.

  1. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    SciTech Connect

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-07-19

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

  2. Evaluation of the certificate in emerging infectious disease research and the certificate in one health training programs, University of Florida.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Marissa A; Perdue, Christopher L; Cummings, James F; Smith, Jacqueline C; Gray, Gregory C

    2015-03-01

    In developing countries, public health professionals and scientists need targeted training and practical skills to respond to global emerging infectious disease threats. The Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research was developed in 2008 to aid such professionals to respond to complex emerging disease problems. The short-course was modified slightly in 2013 and renamed the Certificate in One Health. To evaluate the immediate impact of the short-course, an online survey of 176 past participants from both the courses was conducted. The survey tool assessed the program's process, impact, and outcome measures respectively via assessing the courses' perceived strengths and weaknesses, perceived skills gained, and the participants' current position, publication status, funding status, and educational attainment; 85 (48.3%) participants completed the survey. Reported program strengths included the curriculum, expertise of lecturers, and diversity of the training cohort. The principal reported weakness was the compressed academic schedule. The most frequently reported benefits included: epidemiological and biostatistical skills, followed by One-Health knowledge, and research skills. Twenty-eight percent of the survey respondents reported publishing one or more manuscripts since completing the course and 21% reported receiving research funding. The course appears to have had a positive, immediate impact on the students' self-perceived knowledge and capabilities. PMID:25700920

  3. Hazard analysis of critical control points assessment as a tool to respond to emerging infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Hunter, Paul R; Few, Roger; Bell, Diana J

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) strain H5N1 has had direct and indirect economic impacts arising from direct mortality and control programmes in over 50 countries reporting poultry outbreaks. HPAI H5N1 is now reported as the most widespread and expensive zoonotic disease recorded and continues to pose a global health threat. The aim of this research was to assess the potential of utilising Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) assessments in providing a framework for a rapid response to emerging infectious disease outbreaks. This novel approach applies a scientific process, widely used in food production systems, to assess risks related to a specific emerging health threat within a known zoonotic disease hotspot. We conducted a HACCP assessment for HPAI viruses within Vietnam's domestic poultry trade and relate our findings to the existing literature. Our HACCP assessment identified poultry flock isolation, transportation, slaughter, preparation and consumption as critical control points for Vietnam's domestic poultry trade. Introduction of the preventative measures highlighted through this HACCP evaluation would reduce the risks posed by HPAI viruses and pressure on the national economy. We conclude that this HACCP assessment provides compelling evidence for the future potential that HACCP analyses could play in initiating a rapid response to emerging infectious diseases. PMID:23967294

  4. Using social media for disaster emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Wang, T.; Ye, X. Y.; Zhu, J. Q.; Lee, J.

    2016-06-01

    Social media have become a universal phenomenon in our society (Wang et al., 2012). As a new data source, social media have been widely used in knowledge discovery in fields related to health (Jackson et al., 2014), human behaviour (Lee, 2014), social influence (Hong, 2013), and market analysis (Hanna et al., 2011). In this paper, we report a case study of the 2012 Beijing Rainstorm to investigate how emergency information was timely distributed using social media during emergency events. We present a classification and location model for social media text streams during emergency events. This model classifies social media text streams based on their topical contents. Integrated with a trend analysis, we show how Sina-Weibo fluctuated during emergency events. Using a spatial statistical analysis method, we found that the distribution patterns of Sina-Weibo were related to the emergency events but varied among different topics. This study helps us to better understand emergency events so that decision-makers can act on emergencies in a timely manner. In addition, this paper presents the tools, methods, and models developed in this study that can be used to work with text streams from social media in the context of disaster management.

  5. Early Real-Time Estimation of the Basic Reproduction Number of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudi, Bahman; Miller, Joel C.; Meza, Rafael; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Earn, David J. D.; Pourbohloul, Babak

    2012-07-01

    When an infectious disease strikes a population, the number of newly reported cases is often the only available information during the early stages of the outbreak. An important goal of early outbreak analysis is to obtain a reliable estimate for the basic reproduction number, R0. Over the past few years, infectious disease epidemic processes have gained attention from the physics community. Much of the work to date, however, has focused on the analysis of an epidemic process in which the disease has already spread widely within a population; conversely, very little attention has been paid, in the physics literature or elsewhere, to formulating the initial phase of an outbreak. Careful analysis of this phase is especially important as it could provide policymakers with insight on how to effectively control an epidemic in its initial stage. We present a novel method, based on the principles of network theory, that enables us to obtain a reliable real-time estimate of the basic reproduction number at an early stage of an outbreak. Our method takes into account the possibility that the infectious period has a wide distribution and that the degree distribution of the underlying contact network is heterogeneous. We validate our analytical framework with numerical simulations.

  6. Data-model fusion to better understand emerging pathogens and improve infectious disease forecasting.

    PubMed

    LaDeau, Shannon L; Glass, Gregory E; Hobbs, N Thompson; Latimer, Andrew; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2011-07-01

    Ecologists worldwide are challenged to contribute solutions to urgent and pressing environmental problems by forecasting how populations, communities, and ecosystems will respond to global change. Rising to this challenge requires organizing ecological information derived from diverse sources and formally assimilating data with models of ecological processes. The study of infectious disease has depended on strategies for integrating patterns of observed disease incidence with mechanistic process models since John Snow first mapped cholera cases around a London water pump in 1854. Still, zoonotic and vector-borne diseases increasingly affect human populations, and methods used to successfully characterize directly transmitted diseases are often insufficient. We use four case studies to demonstrate that advances in disease forecasting require better understanding of zoonotic host and vector populations, as well of the dynamics that facilitate pathogen amplification and disease spillover into humans. In each case study, this goal is complicated by limited data, spatiotemporal variability in pathogen transmission and impact, and often, insufficient biological understanding. We present a conceptual framework for data-model fusion in infectious disease research that addresses these fundamental challenges using a hierarchical state-space structure to (1) integrate multiple data sources and spatial scales to inform latent parameters, (2) partition uncertainty in process and observation models, and (3) explicitly build upon existing ecological and epidemiological understanding. Given the constraints inherent in the study of infectious disease and the urgent need for progress, fusion of data and expertise via this type of conceptual framework should prove an indispensable tool.

  7. Multi-criteria decision analysis tools for prioritising emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases associated with climate change in Canada.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ruth; Sanchez, Javier; Revie, Crawford W

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is known to result in the emergence or re-emergence of some infectious diseases. Reliable methods to identify the infectious diseases of humans and animals and that are most likely to be influenced by climate are therefore required. Since different priorities will affect the decision to address a particular pathogen threat, decision makers need a standardised method of prioritisation. Ranking methods and Multi-Criteria Decision approaches provide such a standardised method and were employed here to design two different pathogen prioritisation tools. The opinion of 64 experts was elicited to assess the importance of 40 criteria that could be used to prioritise emerging infectious diseases of humans and animals in Canada. A weight was calculated for each criterion according to the expert opinion. Attributes were defined for each criterion as a transparent and repeatable method of measurement. Two different Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis tools were tested, both of which used an additive aggregation approach. These were an Excel spreadsheet tool and a tool developed in software 'M-MACBETH'. The tools were trialed on nine 'test' pathogens. Two different methods of criteria weighting were compared, one using fixed weighting values, the other using probability distributions to account for uncertainty and variation in expert opinion. The ranking of the nine pathogens varied according to the weighting method that was used. In both tools, using both weighting methods, the diseases that tended to rank the highest were West Nile virus, Giardiasis and Chagas, while Coccidioidomycosis tended to rank the lowest. Both tools are a simple and user friendly approach to prioritising pathogens according to climate change by including explicit scoring of 40 criteria and incorporating weighting methods based on expert opinion. They provide a dynamic interactive method that can help to identify pathogens for which a full risk assessment should be pursued.

  8. Multi-criteria decision analysis tools for prioritising emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases associated with climate change in Canada.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ruth; Sanchez, Javier; Revie, Crawford W

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is known to result in the emergence or re-emergence of some infectious diseases. Reliable methods to identify the infectious diseases of humans and animals and that are most likely to be influenced by climate are therefore required. Since different priorities will affect the decision to address a particular pathogen threat, decision makers need a standardised method of prioritisation. Ranking methods and Multi-Criteria Decision approaches provide such a standardised method and were employed here to design two different pathogen prioritisation tools. The opinion of 64 experts was elicited to assess the importance of 40 criteria that could be used to prioritise emerging infectious diseases of humans and animals in Canada. A weight was calculated for each criterion according to the expert opinion. Attributes were defined for each criterion as a transparent and repeatable method of measurement. Two different Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis tools were tested, both of which used an additive aggregation approach. These were an Excel spreadsheet tool and a tool developed in software 'M-MACBETH'. The tools were trialed on nine 'test' pathogens. Two different methods of criteria weighting were compared, one using fixed weighting values, the other using probability distributions to account for uncertainty and variation in expert opinion. The ranking of the nine pathogens varied according to the weighting method that was used. In both tools, using both weighting methods, the diseases that tended to rank the highest were West Nile virus, Giardiasis and Chagas, while Coccidioidomycosis tended to rank the lowest. Both tools are a simple and user friendly approach to prioritising pathogens according to climate change by including explicit scoring of 40 criteria and incorporating weighting methods based on expert opinion. They provide a dynamic interactive method that can help to identify pathogens for which a full risk assessment should be pursued. PMID

  9. Model Selection and Evaluation Based on Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sets including A/H1N1 and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendi; Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to apply simple ODE models in the area of modeling the spread of emerging infectious diseases and show the importance of model selection in estimating parameters, the basic reproduction number, turning point, and final size. To quantify the plausibility of each model, given the data and the set of four models including Logistic, Gompertz, Rosenzweg, and Richards models, the Bayes factors are calculated and the precise estimates of the best fitted model parameters and key epidemic characteristics have been obtained. In particular, for Ebola the basic reproduction numbers are 1.3522 (95% CI (1.3506, 1.3537)), 1.2101 (95% CI (1.2084, 1.2119)), 3.0234 (95% CI (2.6063, 3.4881)), and 1.9018 (95% CI (1.8565, 1.9478)), the turning points are November 7,November 17, October 2, and November 3, 2014, and the final sizes until December 2015 are 25794 (95% CI (25630, 25958)), 3916 (95% CI (3865, 3967)), 9886 (95% CI (9740, 10031)), and 12633 (95% CI (12515, 12750)) for West Africa, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. The main results confirm that model selection is crucial in evaluating and predicting the important quantities describing the emerging infectious diseases, and arbitrarily picking a model without any consideration of alternatives is problematic. PMID:26451161

  10. Model Selection and Evaluation Based on Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sets including A/H1N1 and Ebola.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wendi; Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to apply simple ODE models in the area of modeling the spread of emerging infectious diseases and show the importance of model selection in estimating parameters, the basic reproduction number, turning point, and final size. To quantify the plausibility of each model, given the data and the set of four models including Logistic, Gompertz, Rosenzweg, and Richards models, the Bayes factors are calculated and the precise estimates of the best fitted model parameters and key epidemic characteristics have been obtained. In particular, for Ebola the basic reproduction numbers are 1.3522 (95% CI (1.3506, 1.3537)), 1.2101 (95% CI (1.2084, 1.2119)), 3.0234 (95% CI (2.6063, 3.4881)), and 1.9018 (95% CI (1.8565, 1.9478)), the turning points are November 7,November 17, October 2, and November 3, 2014, and the final sizes until December 2015 are 25794 (95% CI (25630, 25958)), 3916 (95% CI (3865, 3967)), 9886 (95% CI (9740, 10031)), and 12633 (95% CI (12515, 12750)) for West Africa, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. The main results confirm that model selection is crucial in evaluating and predicting the important quantities describing the emerging infectious diseases, and arbitrarily picking a model without any consideration of alternatives is problematic. PMID:26451161

  11. ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

  12. Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The Emergency Management Computer-Aided Trainer (EMCAT) developed by Essex Corporation or NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Administration's (FEMA) National Fire Academy (NFA) is described. It is a computer based training system for fire fighting personnel. A prototype EMCAT system was developed by NASA first using video tape images and then video disk images when the technology became available. The EMCAT system is meant to fill the training needs of the fire fighting community with affordable state-of-the-art technologies. An automated real time simulation of the fire situation was needed to replace the outdated manual training methods currently being used. In order to be successful, this simulator had to provide realism, be user friendly, be affordable, and support multiple scenarios. The EMCAT system meets these requirements and therefore represents an innovative training tool, not only for the fire fighting community, but also for the needs of other disciplines.

  13. [Health alert management and emerging risk].

    PubMed

    Pillonel, J

    2010-12-01

    Following health crisis that have occurred in the nineties (contaminated blood, mad cow, asbestos, etc.) and more recently those generated by the heat wave in 2003 or by emerging infectious pathogens (SARS, West Nile, Chikungunya, H5N1, H1N1…), a real health vigilance system has been progressively developed in France. After a brief historical overview of the health alert system, this article will give the guiding principles of its current organization in France and will present two examples of recent health alerts (Chikungunya in the Reunion Island in 2005-2006 and hepatitis A outbreak in the Côtes-d'Armor in August 2007), that have needed the implementation of preventive measures regarding the blood donor selection. These two examples have shown that the position of the alert in the French health vigilance system needs to be very close to the event. In that case, health alert is a very useful tool for decision making especially when measures have to be taken to prevent transfusion-transmitted pathogens. PMID:21051258

  14. [Health alert management and emerging risk].

    PubMed

    Pillonel, J

    2010-12-01

    Following health crisis that have occurred in the nineties (contaminated blood, mad cow, asbestos, etc.) and more recently those generated by the heat wave in 2003 or by emerging infectious pathogens (SARS, West Nile, Chikungunya, H5N1, H1N1…), a real health vigilance system has been progressively developed in France. After a brief historical overview of the health alert system, this article will give the guiding principles of its current organization in France and will present two examples of recent health alerts (Chikungunya in the Reunion Island in 2005-2006 and hepatitis A outbreak in the Côtes-d'Armor in August 2007), that have needed the implementation of preventive measures regarding the blood donor selection. These two examples have shown that the position of the alert in the French health vigilance system needs to be very close to the event. In that case, health alert is a very useful tool for decision making especially when measures have to be taken to prevent transfusion-transmitted pathogens.

  15. Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM).

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) website from the National Library of Medicine is designed for first responders and medical providers who are planning for and responding to chemical hazards events. It includes pages tailored to the individual interests of specific groups, including first responders, health care providers, mental health professionals, toxicologists, and more. The featured decision support system CHEMM Intelligent Syndromes Tool allows users to identify the chemical a patient was exposed to in a mass casualty event.

  16. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-05-02

    Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients.

  17. [Endovascular management of an infectious and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical report].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Pedro; Sousa, Gonçalo; Vieira, João; C E Sousa, Lourenço; Ribeiro, Karla; Sobrinho, Gonçalo; Vieira, Teresa; Meireles, Nuno; Albino, Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Infectious aneurysms are about 1-3% of all aneurysms of the infrarenal aorta. Its treatment is challenging and the best strategy is far from consensual. The authors report a case of a HIV + patient with multiple other co-morbidities, which was seen in the emergency department with fever and left back pain. These symptoms would prove to be in relation to a ruptured infectious aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Facing this situation it was decided to select an endovascular technique with implantation of an aorto uni - iliac stent graft with a right-left femoro-femoral cross-over using a 8 mm PTFE graft and exclusion of the left common iliac . The patient didn't have any complication from the situation or the procedure, but died 18 months postoperatively because of a pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci. Although it is not the ideal solution for the treatment of infectious elective aneurysms, we believe that endovascular treatment seems to be a viable option and should be taken into account in a subgroup of patients that for their co-morbidities are not good candidates for conventional surgery and for those in rupture, either as a bridge or as a final solution. PMID:25596398

  18. A new asset for pathogen informatics--the Enteropathogen Resource Integration Center (ERIC), an NIAID Bioinformatics Resource Center for Biodefense and Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Greene, John M; Plunkett, Guy; Burland, Valerie; Glasner, Jeremy; Cabot, Eric; Anderson, Brad; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric; Qiu, Yu; Mau, Bob; Rusch, Michael; Liss, Paul; Hampton, Thomas; Pot, David; Shaker, Matthew; Shaull, Lorie; Shetty, Panna; Shi, Chuan; Whitmore, Jon; Wong, Mary; Zaremba, Sam; Blattner, Frederick R; Perna, Nicole T

    2007-01-01

    ERIC (Enteropathogen Resource Information Center) is one of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Bioinformatics Resource Centers for Biodefense and Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Disease. ERIC serves as a comprehensive information resource for five related pathogens: Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pestis, diarrheagenic E. coli, Shigella spp., and Salmonella spp. ERIC integrates genomics, proteomics, biochemical and microbiological information to facilitate the interpretation and understanding of ERIC pathogens and select related non-pathogens for the advancement of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. ERIC (www.ericbrc.org) is evolving to provide state-of-the-art analysis tools and data types, such as genome sequencing, comparative genomics, genome polymorphisms, gene expression, proteomics, and pathways as well as expertly curated community genome annotation. Genome sequence and genome annotation data and a variety of analysis and tools for eight strains of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pestis pathogens (Yersinia pestis biovars Mediaevalis KIM, Mediaevalis 91001, Orientalis CO92, Orientalis IP275, Antiqua Angola, Antiqua Antiqua, Antiqua Nepal516, and Yersinia enterocolitica 8081) and two strains of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and IP31758) are currently available through the ERIC portal. ERIC seeks to maintain a strong collaboration with the scientific community so that we can continue to identify and incorporate the latest research data, tools, and training to best meet the current and future needs of the enteropathogen research community. All tools and data developed under this NIAID contract will be freely available. Please contact info@ericbrc.org for more information.

  19. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    PubMed

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation.

  20. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    PubMed

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation. PMID:27103616

  1. Critical Care Medicine and Infectious Diseases: An Emerging Combined Subspecialty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Sameer S; Rhee, Chanu; Fortna, Gregory S; O'Grady, Naomi P

    2015-08-15

    The recent rise in unfilled training positions among infectious diseases (ID) fellowship programs nationwide indicates that ID is declining as a career choice among internal medicine residency graduates. Supplementing ID training with training in critical care medicine (CCM) might be a way to regenerate interest in the specialty. Hands-on patient care and higher salaries are obvious attractions. High infection prevalence and antibiotic resistance in intensive care units, expanding immunosuppressed host populations, and public health crises such as the recent Ebola outbreak underscore the potential synergy of CCM-ID training. Most intensivists receive training in pulmonary medicine and only 1% of current board-certified intensivists are trained in ID. While still small, this cohort of CCM-ID certified physicians has continued to rise over the last 2 decades. ID and CCM program leadership nationwide must recognize these trends and the merits of the CCM-ID combination to facilitate creation of formal dual-training opportunities.

  2. Critical Care Medicine and Infectious Diseases: An Emerging Combined Subspecialty in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Sameer S.; Rhee, Chanu; Fortna, Gregory S.; O'Grady, Naomi P.

    2015-01-01

    The recent rise in unfilled training positions among infectious diseases (ID) fellowship programs nationwide indicates that ID is declining as a career choice among internal medicine residency graduates. Supplementing ID training with training in critical care medicine (CCM) might be a way to regenerate interest in the specialty. Hands-on patient care and higher salaries are obvious attractions. High infection prevalence and antibiotic resistance in intensive care units, expanding immunosuppressed host populations, and public health crises such as the recent Ebola outbreak underscore the potential synergy of CCM-ID training. Most intensivists receive training in pulmonary medicine and only 1% of current board-certified intensivists are trained in ID. While still small, this cohort of CCM-ID certified physicians has continued to rise over the last 2 decades. ID and CCM program leadership nationwide must recognize these trends and the merits of the CCM-ID combination to facilitate creation of formal dual-training opportunities. PMID:25944345

  3. Emerging Contaminant Issues, Including Management Of Emerging Contaminants In Wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging contaminants are receiving increasing media and scientific attention. These chemicals are sometimes referred to as compounds of emerging concern or trace organic compounds, and include several groups of chemicals including endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and pha...

  4. Get the news out loudly and quickly: the influence of the media on limiting emerging infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Anna; Weiss, Howard

    2013-01-01

    During outbreaks of infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality, individuals closely follow media reports of the outbreak. Many will attempt to minimize contacts with other individuals in order to protect themselves from infection and possibly death. This process is called social distancing. Social distancing strategies include restricting socializing and travel, and using barrier protections. We use modeling to show that for short-term outbreaks, social distancing can have a large influence on reducing outbreak morbidity and mortality. In particular, public health agencies working together with the media can significantly reduce the severity of an outbreak by providing timely accounts of new infections and deaths. Our models show that the most effective strategy to reduce infections is to provide this information as early as possible, though providing it well into the course of the outbreak can still have a significant effect. However, our models for long-term outbreaks indicate that reporting historic infection data can result in more infections than with no reporting at all. We examine three types of media influence and we illustrate the media influence with a simulated outbreak of a generic emerging infectious disease in a small city. Social distancing can never be complete; however, for a spectrum of outbreaks, we show that leaving isolation (stopping applying social distancing measures) for up to 4 hours each day has modest effect on the overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:23990974

  5. Get the news out loudly and quickly: the influence of the media on limiting emerging infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Anna; Weiss, Howard

    2013-01-01

    During outbreaks of infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality, individuals closely follow media reports of the outbreak. Many will attempt to minimize contacts with other individuals in order to protect themselves from infection and possibly death. This process is called social distancing. Social distancing strategies include restricting socializing and travel, and using barrier protections. We use modeling to show that for short-term outbreaks, social distancing can have a large influence on reducing outbreak morbidity and mortality. In particular, public health agencies working together with the media can significantly reduce the severity of an outbreak by providing timely accounts of new infections and deaths. Our models show that the most effective strategy to reduce infections is to provide this information as early as possible, though providing it well into the course of the outbreak can still have a significant effect. However, our models for long-term outbreaks indicate that reporting historic infection data can result in more infections than with no reporting at all. We examine three types of media influence and we illustrate the media influence with a simulated outbreak of a generic emerging infectious disease in a small city. Social distancing can never be complete; however, for a spectrum of outbreaks, we show that leaving isolation (stopping applying social distancing measures) for up to 4 hours each day has modest effect on the overall morbidity and mortality.

  6. Construction and characterization of a full-length cDNA infectious clone of emerging porcine Senecavirus A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhai; Yuan, Fangfeng; Li, Yanhua; Shang, Pengcheng; Schroeder, Robin; Lechtenberg, Kelly; Henningson, Jamie; Hause, Benjamin; Bai, Jianfa; Rowland, Raymond R R; Clavijo, Alfonso; Fang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    A full-length cDNA infectious clone, pKS15-01-Clone, was constructed from an emerging Senecavirus A (SVA; strain KS15-01). To explore the potential use as a viral backbone for expressing marker genes, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged reporter virus (vKS15-01-EGFP) was generated using reverse genetics. Compared to the parental virus, the pKS15-01-Clone derived virus (vKS15-01-Clone) replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo, and induced similar levels of neutralizing antibody and cytokine responses in infected animals. In contrast, the vKS15-01-EGFP virus showed impaired growth ability and induced lower level of immune response in infected animals. Lesions on the dorsal snout and coronary bands were observed in all pigs infected by parental virus KS15-01, but not in pigs infected with vKS15-01-Clone or vKS15-01-EGFP viruses. These results demonstrated that the infectious clone and EGFP reporter virus could be used as important tools in further elucidating the SVA pathogenesis and development of control measures.

  7. Computer Simulation for Emergency Incident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L

    2004-12-03

    This report describes the findings and recommendations resulting from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Incident Management Simulation Workshop held by the DHS Advanced Scientific Computing Program in May 2004. This workshop brought senior representatives of the emergency response and incident-management communities together with modeling and simulation technologists from Department of Energy laboratories. The workshop provided an opportunity for incident responders to describe the nature and substance of the primary personnel roles in an incident response, to identify current and anticipated roles of modeling and simulation in support of incident response, and to begin a dialog between the incident response and simulation technology communities that will guide and inform planned modeling and simulation development for incident response. This report provides a summary of the discussions at the workshop as well as a summary of simulation capabilities that are relevant to incident-management training, and recommendations for the use of simulation in both incident management and in incident management training, based on the discussions at the workshop. In addition, the report discusses areas where further research and development will be required to support future needs in this area.

  8. Infectious Aortitis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, F Daniel; Jamison, Bruce M; Hibbert, Benjamin

    2016-09-28

    Aortitis is broadly divided into infectious and non-infectious etiologies, each with distinct treatment implications. We present the case of a patient who sustained a type A aortic dissection during urgent coronary angiography for acute coronary syndrome. Clinical findings and events during the procedure raised suspicion for an underlying vascular disorder; however, the diagnosis of staphylococcal aortitis was not made until pathological examination of resected tissue. Clues to the diagnosis of infectious aortitis noted throughout the patient's clinical course are detailed as are potential consequences of diagnostic delays and treatment decisions, underscoring the difficulties in recognizing and managing the condition. In addition, we describe a previously unreported complication of cardiac catheterization in the setting of an infectious aortopathy.

  9. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    PubMed

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  10. Multiattribute risk analysis in nuclear emergency management.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, R P; Lindstedt, M R; Sinkko, K

    2000-08-01

    Radiation protection authorities have seen a potential for applying multiattribute risk analysis in nuclear emergency management and planning to deal with conflicting objectives, different parties involved, and uncertainties. This type of approach is expected to help in the following areas: to ensure that all relevant attributes are considered in decision making; to enhance communication between the concerned parties, including the public; and to provide a method for explicitly including risk analysis in the process. A multiattribute utility theory analysis was used to select a strategy for protecting the population after a simulated nuclear accident. The value-focused approach and the use of a neutral facilitator were identified as being useful. PMID:11051070

  11. Infectious disease and worldwide declines of amphibian populations, with comments on emerging diseases in coral reef organisms and in humans.

    PubMed

    Carey, C

    2000-03-01

    Many populations of amphibians are declining on all six continents on which they occur. Some causes of amphibian declines, such as habitat destruction, direct application of xenobiotics, and introduction of predators or competitors, are clearly attributable to human activities. Infectious disease appears to be the direct cause of mass amphibian die-offs in relatively undisturbed areas of the world where anthropomorphic environmental disruption is minimal. In these cases, it is not yet clear whether these epizootics result from the natural evolution of new pathogens or from environmental changes that promote the emergence of pathogenic forms and/or that weaken the immune defenses of amphibians. Because some aspects of pathogen-related amphibian mass mortalities are similar to outbreaks of new diseases in humans and coral reef organisms, amphibian declines may be part of a much larger pattern than previously appreciated.

  12. Infectious disease and worldwide declines of amphibian populations, with comments on emerging diseases in coral reef organisms and in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, C

    2000-01-01

    Many populations of amphibians are declining on all six continents on which they occur. Some causes of amphibian declines, such as habitat destruction, direct application of xenobiotics, and introduction of predators or competitors, are clearly attributable to human activities. Infectious disease appears to be the direct cause of mass amphibian die-offs in relatively undisturbed areas of the world where anthropomorphic environmental disruption is minimal. In these cases, it is not yet clear whether these epizootics result from the natural evolution of new pathogens or from environmental changes that promote the emergence of pathogenic forms and/or that weaken the immune defenses of amphibians. Because some aspects of pathogen-related amphibian mass mortalities are similar to outbreaks of new diseases in humans and coral reef organisms, amphibian declines may be part of a much larger pattern than previously appreciated. PMID:10698730

  13. The configuration management program for the Emergency Management Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, K M; Stephan, E G

    1991-08-01

    Emergency response software is used increasingly by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Emergency Management Project (EMP) personnel at Hanford Site. This software must be reliable, of high quality, and capable of performing critical functions to support assessment of actual or potential consequences of any hazardous accidents onsite or events having potential offsite impacts. To better control the software and ensure its suitability for use as a tool to protect employees, the public, and environment, a method for specifying and certifying its capabilities and documenting its development and implementation was needed. A team of EMP staff, composed of personnel from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Computer Services- Richland (BCSR) under the direction of PNL EMP, responded to this need by developing a software configuration management program (CMP). This report documents the development of the CMP, including the strategies upon which the CMP is based, and describes the program as it has been implemented for EMS System software. The program relies on the integration of its three primary elements: the configuration management staff, tools, and process. Configuration management staff run the program, using specially designed configuration management forms to guide, document, and track the life cycle of the software. The configuration management process itself is reflected in the instructive forms and summarized in flowcharts representing each phase of the process -- from requirements specification through implementation and maintenance. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Tourism and Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases in the Americas: What Physicians Must Remember for Patient Diagnosis and Care.

    PubMed

    Schmunis; Corber

    1999-04-01

    Emerging diseases are those which have shown an increased in humans over the last 20 years. Re-emerging diseases are those which have reappeared after a period of significant decrease in incidence. The etiological agents of these diseases in the Western Hemisphere are viruses (HIV, dengue, oroupuche, sabia, guanarito, or hanta), bacteria (Vibrio cholera, Borrellia burgdorferi, Legionella pneumofila, Eseherichia coli 0157:H7, or other bacteria with a new pattern of antibiotic resistance), or parasites (Cryptosporidia, Cyclosporidia or drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum). Due to the widespread geographical distribution of these infectious diseases in the Americas, and an increasing number of travellers (more than 87 million persons within the region in 1997), there are many opportunities to contract an infection when travelling in developed or undeveloped countries. The infection may present with symptoms during the trip, or following the traveler s return to his or her place of origin. However, too often practicing physicians do not inquire about the travel history of their patients and, when they do, they often lack the information about diseases relevant to travelers. From the regional perspective, the emerging or reemerging agents that pose a higher risk to tourists or travelers are: 1) those that cause enteric infections; 2) sexually transmitted diseases; and 3) vector-borne diseases, including those present in ecotourism areas. Emerging and re-emerging diseases that physicians may encounter in their clinical practice while caring for travelers returning from different countries of the Western Hemisphere are briefly described (Lyme disease, legionellosis, dengue, yellow fever, P. falciparum malaria, cyclosporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis). This report attempts to draw attention to the fact that new clinical and etiological entities are present in several geographical areas of the Americas; to place each of these entities into an epidemiological context; and to

  15. Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tina L; Rovito, Sean M; Wake, David B; Vredenburg, Vance T

    2011-06-01

    Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because ∼40% of all amphibian species are currently in decline. Species have disappeared even in protected habitats (e.g., the enigmatic extinction of the golden toad, Bufo periglenes, from Costa Rica). The emergence of a fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated in a number of declines that have occurred in the last decade, but few studies have been able to test retroactively whether Bd emergence was linked to earlier declines and extinctions. We describe a noninvasive PCR sampling technique that detects Bd in formalin-preserved museum specimens. We detected Bd by PCR in 83-90% (n = 38) of samples that were identified as positive by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at established study sites in southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. A pattern of Bd emergence coincident with decline at these localities is revealed-the absence of Bd over multiple years at all localities followed by the concurrent emergence of Bd in various species at each locality during a period of population decline. The geographical and chronological emergence of Bd at these localities also indicates a southbound spread from southern Mexico in the early 1970s to western Guatemala in the 1980s/1990s and to Monteverde, Costa Rica by 1987. We find evidence of a historical "Bd epidemic wave" that began in Mexico and subsequently spread to Central America. We describe a technique that can be used to screen museum specimens from other amphibian decline sites around the world.

  16. Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tina L.; Rovito, Sean M.; Wake, David B.; Vredenburg, Vance T.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because ∼40% of all amphibian species are currently in decline. Species have disappeared even in protected habitats (e.g., the enigmatic extinction of the golden toad, Bufo periglenes, from Costa Rica). The emergence of a fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated in a number of declines that have occurred in the last decade, but few studies have been able to test retroactively whether Bd emergence was linked to earlier declines and extinctions. We describe a noninvasive PCR sampling technique that detects Bd in formalin-preserved museum specimens. We detected Bd by PCR in 83–90% (n = 38) of samples that were identified as positive by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at established study sites in southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. A pattern of Bd emergence coincident with decline at these localities is revealed—the absence of Bd over multiple years at all localities followed by the concurrent emergence of Bd in various species at each locality during a period of population decline. The geographical and chronological emergence of Bd at these localities also indicates a southbound spread from southern Mexico in the early 1970s to western Guatemala in the 1980s/1990s and to Monteverde, Costa Rica by 1987. We find evidence of a historical “Bd epidemic wave” that began in Mexico and subsequently spread to Central America. We describe a technique that can be used to screen museum specimens from other amphibian decline sites around the world. PMID:21543713

  17. Emergency medicine: an operations management view.

    PubMed

    Soremekun, Olan A; Terwiesch, Christian; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-12-01

    Operations management (OM) is the science of understanding and improving business processes. For the emergency department (ED), OM principles can be used to reduce and alleviate the effects of crowding. A fundamental principle of OM is the waiting time formula, which has clear implications in the ED given that waiting time is fundamental to patient-centered emergency care. The waiting time formula consists of the activity time (how long it takes to complete a process), the utilization rate (the proportion of time a particular resource such a staff is working), and two measures of variation: the variation in patient interarrival times and the variation in patient processing times. Understanding the waiting time formula is important because it presents the fundamental parameters that can be managed to reduce waiting times and length of stay. An additional useful OM principle that is applicable to the ED is the efficient frontier. The efficient frontier compares the performance of EDs with respect to two dimensions: responsiveness (i.e., 1/wait time) and utilization rates. Some EDs may be "on the frontier," maximizing their responsiveness at their given utilization rates. However, most EDs likely have opportunities to move toward the frontier. Increasing capacity is a movement along the frontier and to truly move toward the frontier (i.e., improving responsiveness at a fixed capacity), we articulate three possible options: eliminating waste, reducing variability, or increasing flexibility. When conceptualizing ED crowding interventions, these are the major strategies to consider.

  18. Emergency management of increased intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Pitfield, Alexander Fraser; Carroll, Allison B; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2012-02-01

    Primary neurological injury in children can be induced by diverse intrinsic and extrinsic factors including brain trauma, tumors, and intracranial infections. Regardless of etiology, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) as a result of the primary injury or delays in treatment may lead to secondary (preventable) brain injury. Therefore, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of increased ICP is vital in preventing or limiting secondary brain injury in children with a neurological insult. Present management strategies to improve survival and neurological outcome focus on reducing ICP while optimizing cerebral perfusion and meeting cerebral metabolic demands. Targeted therapies for increased ICP must be considered and implemented as early as possible during and after the initial stabilization of the child. Thus, the emergency physician has a critical role to play in early identification and treatment of increased ICP. This article intends to identify those patients at risk of intracranial hypertension and present a framework for the emergency department investigation and treatment, in keeping with contemporary guidelines. Intensive care management and the treatment of refractory increases in ICP are also outlined.

  19. The Use of Expert Opinion to Assess the Risk of Emergence or Re-Emergence of Infectious Diseases in Canada Associated with Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruth; Revie, Crawford W.; Sanchez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in infectious disease outbreaks. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required, and given limited resources, policy decision makers need rational methods with which to prioritise pathogen threats. Here expert opinion was collected to determine what criteria could be used to prioritise diseases according to the likelihood of emergence in response to climate change and according to their impact. We identified a total of 40 criteria that might be used for this purpose in the Canadian context. The opinion of 64 experts from academic, government and independent backgrounds was collected to determine the importance of the criteria. A weight was calculated for each criterion based on the expert opinion. The five that were considered most influential on disease emergence or impact were: potential economic impact, severity of disease in the general human population, human case fatality rate, the type of climate that the pathogen can tolerate and the current climatic conditions in Canada. There was effective consensus about the influence of some criteria among participants, while for others there was considerable variation. The specific climate criteria that were most likely to influence disease emergence were: an annual increase in temperature, an increase in summer temperature, an increase in summer precipitation and to a lesser extent an increase in winter temperature. These climate variables were considered to be most influential on vector-borne diseases and on food and water-borne diseases. Opinion about the influence of climate on air-borne diseases and diseases spread by direct/indirect contact were more variable. The impact of emerging diseases on the human population was deemed more important than the impact on animal populations. PMID:22848536

  20. Emerging Technologies: Biosecurity and Consequence Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Dana; Nordmann, Brian

    The natural outbreaks of disease and pandemics are transnational threats that create international challenges when detection and containment are not timely due to scarce human and material resources. Whether the cause of those outbreaks is natural or intentional in origin, the main goal of consequence management operations is to save lives. The consequence management process is a continuum of inter-connected phases such as planning, preparation, response, and recovery. The rapid advances of life sciences and the emergence of dual-use technologies such as synthetic biology and nanotechnology pose additional challenges in terms of planning for the unknown potential threats whether they may be synthetic microorganisms with unpredictable dissemination patterns or nanoscale-manipulated biological agents evading current detection capabilities. The US National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats is emphasizing prevention while continuing to support the national preparedness goals and response/recovery capabilities. The recent policies, guidelines, and recommendations on overhauling the biological risk management in the United States are a proactive stance to a rapidly changing global environment. They include optimization of the current oversight frameworks and active engagement of the industry and academia in order to reduce the risk that individuals with ill intent may exploit the commercial application of nucleic acid synthesis technology to access genetic material derived from or by encoding Biological Select Agents or Toxins. We are also actively seeking to increase our knowledge of health effects of various types of nanomaterials, and how to assess, control, and prevent harmful exposure, taking into consideration the numerous gaps that currently exist with regard to the distinct behavior of nanoparticles compared to the same chemical or material at "macro-scale". Fundamentally, a biological incident, whether it is of natural, accidental, or deliberate origin

  1. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    PubMed

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  2. Infectious disease surveillance in the 21st century: an integrated web-based surveillance and case management system.

    PubMed

    Troppy, Scott; Haney, Gillian; Cocoros, Noelle; Cranston, Kevin; DeMaria, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    The Massachusetts Virtual Epidemiologic Network (MAVEN) was deployed in 2006 by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Bureau of Infectious Disease to serve as an integrated, Web-based disease surveillance and case management system. MAVEN replaced program-specific, siloed databases, which were inaccessible to local public health and unable to integrate electronic reporting. Disease events are automatically created without human intervention when a case or laboratory report is received and triaged in real time to state and local public health personnel. Events move through workflows for initial notification, case investigation, and case management. Initial development was completed within 12 months and recent state regulations mandate the use of MAVEN by all 351 jurisdictions. More than 300 local boards of health are using MAVEN, there are approximately one million events, and 70 laboratories report electronically. MAVEN has demonstrated responsiveness and flexibility to emerging diseases while also streamlining routine surveillance processes and improving timeliness of notifications and data completeness, although the long-term resource requirements are significant.

  3. Will the damage be done before we feel the heat? Infectious disease emergence and human response.

    PubMed

    Kock, R A

    2013-12-01

    The global political economy is facing extreme challenges against a backdrop of large-scale expansion of human and domestic animal populations and related impacts on the biosphere. Significant global socio-ecological changes have occurred in the period of a single lifetime, driven by increased technology and access to physical and biological resources through open markets and globalization. Current resource consumption rates are not sustainable and ecological tipping points are being reached and one of the indicators of these may be a changing balance between hosts and pathogens. A period of extraordinary progress in reducing infection risk and disease impact on humans and domestic animals in the 20th Century is reversing in the 21st, but not always and not everywhere. Drivers for this shift are discussed in terms of demographics, agroecology, biodiversity decline and loss of resilience in ecosystems, climate change and increasing interconnectedness between species globally. Causality of disease emergence remains highly speculative, but patterns and data are emerging to commend a precautionary approach, while reassessing our global political, social and economic systems.

  4. Will the damage be done before we feel the heat? Infectious disease emergence and human response.

    PubMed

    Kock, R A

    2013-12-01

    The global political economy is facing extreme challenges against a backdrop of large-scale expansion of human and domestic animal populations and related impacts on the biosphere. Significant global socio-ecological changes have occurred in the period of a single lifetime, driven by increased technology and access to physical and biological resources through open markets and globalization. Current resource consumption rates are not sustainable and ecological tipping points are being reached and one of the indicators of these may be a changing balance between hosts and pathogens. A period of extraordinary progress in reducing infection risk and disease impact on humans and domestic animals in the 20th Century is reversing in the 21st, but not always and not everywhere. Drivers for this shift are discussed in terms of demographics, agroecology, biodiversity decline and loss of resilience in ecosystems, climate change and increasing interconnectedness between species globally. Causality of disease emergence remains highly speculative, but patterns and data are emerging to commend a precautionary approach, while reassessing our global political, social and economic systems. PMID:24152741

  5. Interventions to Mitigate Emergency Department and Hospital Crowding During an Infectious Respiratory Disease Outbreak: Results from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Andrea Freyer; Morton, Melinda; Beard, Raphaelle; Pines, Jesse M.; Bayram, Jamil D.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kelen, Gabor; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Jeng, Kevin; Cole, Gai; Rothman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify and prioritize potential Emergency Department (ED) and hospital-based interventions which could mitigate the impact of crowding during patient surge from a widespread infectious respiratory disease outbreak and determine potential data sources that may be useful for triggering decisions to implement these high priority interventions. Design: Expert panel utilizing Nominal Group Technique to identify and prioritize interventions, and in addition, determine appropriate “triggers” for implementation of the high priority interventions in the context of four different infectious respiratory disease scenarios that vary by patient volumes (high versus low) and illness severity (high versus low). Setting: One day in-person conference held November, 2011. Participants: Regional and national experts representing the fields of public health, disease surveillance, clinical medicine, ED operations, and hospital operations. Main Outcome Measure: Prioritized list of potential interventions to reduce ED and hospital crowding, respectively. In addition, we created a prioritized list of potential data sources which could be useful to trigger interventions. Results: High priority interventions to mitigate ED surge included standardizing admission and discharge criteria and instituting infection control measures. To mitigate hospital crowding, panelists prioritized mandatory vaccination and an algorithm for antiviral use. Data sources identified for triggering implementation of these interventions were most commonly ED and hospital utilization metrics. Conclusions: We developed a prioritized list of potentially useful interventions to mitigate ED and hospital crowding in various outbreak scenarios. The data sources identified to “trigger” the implementation of these high priority interventions consist mainly of sources available at the local, institutional level. PMID:23856917

  6. Role of the Infectious Disease Consultant in Management of Patients With Tuberculosis-Associated Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Marjorie M.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Wongskhaluang, Jeff V.; Ferenchak, Kevin; Asano, Matthew K.; Becker, Norbert; DeMarais, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a disease with continued worldwide prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Tuberculosis-associated ocular inflammation (TB-AOI) is a manifestation that can occur with pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB. Evaluation of these ocular presentations and treatment in the United States are limited. Our objective was to describe cases in an urban area and assess the role of the infectious diseases specialist in managing these complex patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective case series of all patients referred to our infectious disease clinic for presumed TB-AOI from 2005 through 2013. Patients with ocular inflammation were determined to have presumed TB-AOI based on clinical presentation with correlative positive tuberculin skin test and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold. Attempts were made to exclude other diagnoses. Data were collected and analyzed with respect to demographics, ocular manifestations, and treatment. Results. Sixty eyes of 42 patients were included in the study; anterior uveitis was the most common site of involvement. The median age was 46 years, and 33 patients (79%) were foreign born. Forty patients (95%) received a course of antituberculous therapy with 38% experiencing treatment-related side effects. A 6-month duration was recommended in 78% cases. There was improvement or stability of the vision in 42 eyes (74%) of those treated. Conclusions. Ocular involvement is an uncommon but important manifestation of TB. Our data further characterize TB-AOI cases in the United States. Treatment provides significant benefit to properly selected patients. A multidisciplinary approach, with care provided by ophthalmology and infectious disease providers, should be used to allow for the most efficacious treatment. PMID:26811844

  7. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis; Lima, Estêvão; Autorino, Riccardo; Marcelo, Filinto

    2008-10-01

    Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators' experience, patients' preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  8. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dinesh; Akingbola, Olugbenga; Yosypiv, Ihor; El-Dahr, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH), particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information. PMID:22577545

  9. Group A Streptococcus: a re-emergent pathogen. Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is still rare in North America but must continue to be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. Invasive or severe GABHS disease remains unusual and is unlikely to be missed by the practitioner; however, it is essential that GABHS infection be considered as a possible cause of a severe sepsis-like syndrome. Currently the routine management of GABHS infection is unchanged; however, heightened awareness of the infection's rare, more serious complications is needed. PMID:8500028

  10. Simulation for emergency management; Taking advantage of automation in emergency preparedness

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.A.; Ruberg, G.E.; O'Dell, J.J. . Management Systems Labs.)

    1989-09-01

    Currently, emergency responders are better prepared than emergency managers to accomplish their critically important functions. Emergency responders are those responsible for operational tasks during an emergency, e.g., fire fighters, emergency medical technicians, and rescue workers. Emergency managers are strategic or tactical decision-makers in leadership roles, either in the field or in remote command and control centers, who must manage an emergency, best characterized as an ill-defined problem with potentially severe consequences. Training and standards of proficiency currently exist for emergency responders in specific activities. In contrast, training and standards of proficiency are less advanced for emergency managers. Fortunately, understanding the reasons for this difference, and combining those reasons with the increased availability of computers in emergency management, offer real potential for improvement. This paper elaborates on the need for improvements in emergency management training. The reasons why training for emergency managers is difficult to develop and what currently available methods exist, including their usefulness and shortcomings, are discussed.

  11. Adult bacterial meningitis-a quality registry study: earlier treatment and favourable outcome if initial management by infectious diseases physicians.

    PubMed

    Grindborg, Ö; Naucler, P; Sjölin, J; Glimåker, M

    2015-06-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is challenging for the admitting physician because it is a rare but fulminant disease, usually presenting without typical symptoms, and rapid treatment is pivotal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of initial management by infectious diseases (ID) physicians vs. non-ID physicians. A total of 520 consecutive adults (>17 years old), 110 with initial ID management and 410 with non-ID management, registered in the Swedish quality registry for community-acquired ABM January 2008 to December 2013, were analysed retrospectively. Primary outcome was appropriate treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids <1 hour from admission. Secondary analyses were mortality during hospital stay and persisting neurological and hearing deficits at follow-up after 2 to 6 months. Differences in diagnostic treatment sequences also were analysed. Appropriate treatment <1 hour from admission was achieved significantly more often (41%) by ID physicians vs. non-ID physicians (24%) with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40 to 4.14; p < 0.01) adjusted for confounders. The door-to-antibiotic time was significantly shorter, and significantly more patients were administered corticosteroids together with the first doses of antibiotics in the ID group. A trend of decreased mortality (4.5% vs. 8.0%) and sequelae at follow-up (24% vs. 44%; adjusted OR 0.55: 95% CI 0.31 to 1.00; p 0.05) were observed in the ID group vs. the non-ID group. Antibiotics were started without prior neuroimaging more often in the ID group (86% vs. 57%; p < 0.001). Initial management at the emergency department by ID physicians is associated with earlier appropriate treatment, more appropriate diagnostic treatment sequences and favourable outcome.

  12. Barrett's Esophagus: Emerging Knowledge and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Stairs, Douglas B.; Mani, Haresh; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased exponentially in the last 3 decades. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of EAC. Patients with BE have a greater than 40 folds higher risk of EAC compared with the general population. Recent years have witnessed a revolution in the clinical and molecular research related to BE. However, several aspects of this condition remain controversial. Data regarding the true prevalence of BE have varied widely. Recent studies have suggested a lower incidence of EAC in nondysplastic BE (NDBE) than previously reported. There is paucity of prospective data showing a survival benefit of screening or surveillance for BE. Furthermore, the ever-increasing emphasis on healthcare cost containment has called for reexamination of the screening and surveillance strategies for BE. There is a need for identification of reliable clinical predictors or molecular biomarkers to risk-stratify patients who might benefit the most from screening or surveillance for BE. Finally, new therapies have emerged for the management of dysplastic BE. In this paper, we highlight the key areas of controversy and uncertainty surrounding BE. The paper discusses, in detail, the current literature about the molecular pathogenesis, biomarkers, histopathological diagnosis, and management strategies for BE. PMID:22701199

  13. First-aid management of psychological emergencies: 1.

    PubMed

    Castledine, G

    Psychological emergencies are complex events whose management requires considerable skill on the part of the nurse aider. This article, the first in a series on the management of psychological emergencies, outlines the main areas of assessment and the nurse-aid management of a psychologically disturbed person. PMID:8260801

  14. Evolution in action: climate change, biodiversity dynamics and emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, Eric P; Brooks, Daniel R

    2015-04-01

    Climatological variation and ecological perturbation have been pervasive drivers of faunal assembly, structure and diversification for parasites and pathogens through recurrent events of geographical and host colonization at varying spatial and temporal scales of Earth history. Episodic shifts in climate and environmental settings, in conjunction with ecological mechanisms and host switching, are often critical determinants of parasite diversification, a view counter to more than a century of coevolutionary thinking about the nature of complex host-parasite assemblages. Parasites are resource specialists with restricted host ranges, yet shifts onto relatively unrelated hosts are common during phylogenetic diversification of parasite lineages and directly observable in real time. The emerging Stockholm Paradigm resolves this paradox: Ecological Fitting (EF)--phenotypic flexibility and phylogenetic conservatism in traits related to resource use, most notably host preference--provides many opportunities for rapid host switching in changing environments, without the evolution of novel host-utilization capabilities. Host shifts via EF fuel the expansion phase of the Oscillation Hypothesis of host range and speciation and, more generally, the generation of novel combinations of interacting species within the Geographic Mosaic Theory of Coevolution. In synergy, an environmental dynamic of Taxon Pulses establishes an episodic context for host and geographical colonization.

  15. Evolution in action: climate change, biodiversity dynamics and emerging infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoberg, Eric P.; Brooks, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Climatological variation and ecological perturbation have been pervasive drivers of faunal assembly, structure and diversification for parasites and pathogens through recurrent events of geographical and host colonization at varying spatial and temporal scales of Earth history. Episodic shifts in climate and environmental settings, in conjunction with ecological mechanisms and host switching, are often critical determinants of parasite diversification, a view counter to more than a century of coevolutionary thinking about the nature of complex host–parasite assemblages. Parasites are resource specialists with restricted host ranges, yet shifts onto relatively unrelated hosts are common during phylogenetic diversification of parasite lineages and directly observable in real time. The emerging Stockholm Paradigm resolves this paradox: Ecological Fitting (EF)—phenotypic flexibility and phylogenetic conservatism in traits related to resource use, most notably host preference—provides many opportunities for rapid host switching in changing environments, without the evolution of novel host-utilization capabilities. Host shifts via EF fuel the expansion phase of the Oscillation Hypothesis of host range and speciation and, more generally, the generation of novel combinations of interacting species within the Geographic Mosaic Theory of Coevolution. In synergy, an environmental dynamic of Taxon Pulses establishes an episodic context for host and geographical colonization. PMID:25688014

  16. Evolution in action: climate change, biodiversity dynamics and emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, Eric P; Brooks, Daniel R

    2015-04-01

    Climatological variation and ecological perturbation have been pervasive drivers of faunal assembly, structure and diversification for parasites and pathogens through recurrent events of geographical and host colonization at varying spatial and temporal scales of Earth history. Episodic shifts in climate and environmental settings, in conjunction with ecological mechanisms and host switching, are often critical determinants of parasite diversification, a view counter to more than a century of coevolutionary thinking about the nature of complex host-parasite assemblages. Parasites are resource specialists with restricted host ranges, yet shifts onto relatively unrelated hosts are common during phylogenetic diversification of parasite lineages and directly observable in real time. The emerging Stockholm Paradigm resolves this paradox: Ecological Fitting (EF)--phenotypic flexibility and phylogenetic conservatism in traits related to resource use, most notably host preference--provides many opportunities for rapid host switching in changing environments, without the evolution of novel host-utilization capabilities. Host shifts via EF fuel the expansion phase of the Oscillation Hypothesis of host range and speciation and, more generally, the generation of novel combinations of interacting species within the Geographic Mosaic Theory of Coevolution. In synergy, an environmental dynamic of Taxon Pulses establishes an episodic context for host and geographical colonization. PMID:25688014

  17. International Health Regulations, Ebola, and Emerging Infectious Diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Aldighieri, Sylvain; John, Ronald St.; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Etienne, Carissa

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization’s determination of the Ebola virus disease outbreak as a public health event of international concern prompted nonaffected countries to implement measures to prevent, detect, and manage the introduction of the virus in their territories. The outbreak provided an opportunity to assess the operational implementation of the International Health Regulations’ core capacities and health systems’ preparedness to handle a potential or confirmed case of Ebola virus disease. A public health framework implemented in Latin America and Caribbean countries encompassing preparatory self-assessments, in-country visits, and follow-up suggests that the region should increase efforts to consolidate and sustain progress on core capacities and health system preparedness to face public health events with national or international repercussions. PMID:26691130

  18. Strategies in infectious disease prevention and management among US-bound refugee children.

    PubMed

    Dang, Khoi; Tribble, Alison C

    2014-08-01

    For multiple reasons, including exposure to violence or trauma, nutritional deficiencies, and an inconsistent medical infrastructure, refugee children are at an increased risk for many infectious diseases. Among these are tuberculosis, malaria, helminthic infections, and neglected tropical diseases. Our purposes are to review the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's pre-departure program of testing and presumptive therapy for these infections and to review the possible presentations, symptomatology, diagnostic tools, and recommended therapies, if necessary, upon arrival to the US. An understanding of these non-endemic infections, their diagnosis, and their management will improve the domestic medical exam and help to ease the transition for newly arrived immigrant children, their families, and their receiving communities.

  19. Promising new assays and technologies for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Mitsuma, S F; Mansour, M K; Dekker, J P; Kim, J; Rahman, M Z; Tweed-Kent, A; Schuetz, P

    2013-04-01

    In the first decade of the 21st century, we have seen the completion of the human genome project and marked progress in the human microbiome project. The vast amount of data generated from these efforts combined with advances in molecular and biomedical technologies have led to the development of a multitude of assays and technologies that may be useful in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases. Here, we identify several new assays and technologies that have recently come into clinical use or have potential for clinical use in the near future. The scope of this review is broad and includes topics such as the serum marker procalcitonin, gene expression profiling, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and nucleic acid aptamers. Principles that underlie each assay or technology, their clinical applications, and potential strengths and limitations are addressed.

  20. How next-generation sequencing and multiscale data analysis will transform infectious disease management.

    PubMed

    Pak, Theodore R; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Recent reviews have examined the extent to which routine next-generation sequencing (NGS) on clinical specimens will improve the capabilities of clinical microbiology laboratories in the short term, but do not explore integrating NGS with clinical data from electronic medical records (EMRs), immune profiling data, and other rich datasets to create multiscale predictive models. This review introduces a range of "omics" and patient data sources relevant to managing infections and proposes 3 potentially disruptive applications for these data in the clinical workflow. The combined threats of healthcare-associated infections and multidrug-resistant organisms may be addressed by multiscale analysis of NGS and EMR data that is ideally updated and refined over time within each healthcare organization. Such data and analysis should form the cornerstone of future learning health systems for infectious disease.

  1. Strategies in infectious disease prevention and management among US-bound refugee children.

    PubMed

    Dang, Khoi; Tribble, Alison C

    2014-08-01

    For multiple reasons, including exposure to violence or trauma, nutritional deficiencies, and an inconsistent medical infrastructure, refugee children are at an increased risk for many infectious diseases. Among these are tuberculosis, malaria, helminthic infections, and neglected tropical diseases. Our purposes are to review the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's pre-departure program of testing and presumptive therapy for these infections and to review the possible presentations, symptomatology, diagnostic tools, and recommended therapies, if necessary, upon arrival to the US. An understanding of these non-endemic infections, their diagnosis, and their management will improve the domestic medical exam and help to ease the transition for newly arrived immigrant children, their families, and their receiving communities. PMID:25042432

  2. How Next-Generation Sequencing and Multiscale Data Analysis Will Transform Infectious Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Theodore R.; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Recent reviews have examined the extent to which routine next-generation sequencing (NGS) on clinical specimens will improve the capabilities of clinical microbiology laboratories in the short term, but do not explore integrating NGS with clinical data from electronic medical records (EMRs), immune profiling data, and other rich datasets to create multiscale predictive models. This review introduces a range of “omics” and patient data sources relevant to managing infections and proposes 3 potentially disruptive applications for these data in the clinical workflow. The combined threats of healthcare-associated infections and multidrug-resistant organisms may be addressed by multiscale analysis of NGS and EMR data that is ideally updated and refined over time within each healthcare organization. Such data and analysis should form the cornerstone of future learning health systems for infectious disease. PMID:26251049

  3. Code orange: Towards transformational leadership of emergency management systems.

    PubMed

    Caro, Denis H J

    2015-09-01

    The 21(st) century calls upon health leaders to recognize and respond to emerging threats and systemic emergency management challenges through transformative processes inherent in the LEADS in a caring environment framework. Using a grounded theory approach, this qualitative study explores key informant perspectives of leaders in emergency management across Canada on pressing needs for relevant systemic transformation. The emerging model points to eight specific attributes of transformational leadership central to emergency management and suggests that contextualization of health leadership is of particular import.

  4. Code orange: Towards transformational leadership of emergency management systems.

    PubMed

    Caro, Denis H J

    2015-09-01

    The 21(st) century calls upon health leaders to recognize and respond to emerging threats and systemic emergency management challenges through transformative processes inherent in the LEADS in a caring environment framework. Using a grounded theory approach, this qualitative study explores key informant perspectives of leaders in emergency management across Canada on pressing needs for relevant systemic transformation. The emerging model points to eight specific attributes of transformational leadership central to emergency management and suggests that contextualization of health leadership is of particular import. PMID:26135294

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  6. Urbanization, Agricultural Intensification, and Habitat Alteration in Vietnam: Modeling Transitional Development and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J.; Saksena, S.; Spencer, J.; Finucane, M.; Sultana, N.

    2012-12-01

    Our overarching hypothesis is that new risks, in this case the H5N1 strain of avian influenza, emerge during transitions between stages of development. Moreover, these risks are not coincidental but occur precisely because of the in-between nature of the coupled human-natural system at the point when things are neither traditional nor modern but resemble the state of chaos, release and reorganization. We are testing this hypothesis in Vietnam using demographic, social, economic, and environmental data collected in national censuses and analyzed at commune and district levels to identify communes and districts that are traditional, modern, and transitional (peri-urban). Using data from the 2006 agricultural census that capture both the changing nature of the built environment (types of sanitation systems) and the loss of and diversification of agriculture systems (percent of households whose major source of income is from agriculture, and percent of land under agriculture, forests, and aquaculture), and a normalized difference vegetation index from 2006 Landsat images we created a national scale urbanicity map for Vietnam. Field work in the summer of 2011 showed this map to be an accurate (approximately 85%) approximation of traditional (rural), transitional (periurban), and modern (urban) communes. Preliminary results suggest that over 7% of the country's land area and roughly 15% of its population resides in periurban neighborhoods, and that these areas do have a statistically significant greater incidence of AVI as measured in chicken deaths than traditional and modern communes (Table 1). Transitional neighborhoods such as these force planners to ask two questions. To what extent does the dichotomy of urban/rural makes sense in the context of Vietnam, when large areas and parts of the population are caught between the two? Second, how can planners and policy makers effectively provide for basic public goods and services in these contexts?Classification of places

  7. The Microbial Rosetta Stone Database: A compilation of global and emerging infectious microorganisms and bioterrorist threat agents

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, David J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Willett, Paul; Wyatt, Jacqueline R; Samant, Vivek; Massire, Christian; Hall, Thomas A; Hari, Kumar; McNeil, John A; Büchen-Osmond, Cornelia; Budowle, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Background Thousands of different microorganisms affect the health, safety, and economic stability of populations. Many different medical and governmental organizations have created lists of the pathogenic microorganisms relevant to their missions; however, the nomenclature for biological agents on these lists and pathogens described in the literature is inexact. This ambiguity can be a significant block to effective communication among the diverse communities that must deal with epidemics or bioterrorist attacks. Results We have developed a database known as the Microbial Rosetta Stone. The database relates microorganism names, taxonomic classifications, diseases, specific detection and treatment protocols, and relevant literature. The database structure facilitates linkage to public genomic databases. This paper focuses on the information in the database for pathogens that impact global public health, emerging infectious organisms, and bioterrorist threat agents. Conclusion The Microbial Rosetta Stone is available at . The database provides public access to up-to-date taxonomic classifications of organisms that cause human diseases, improves the consistency of nomenclature in disease reporting, and provides useful links between different public genomic and public health databases. PMID:15850481

  8. Emergency medicine in pediatric dentistry: preparation and management.

    PubMed

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2003-10-01

    Medical emergencies can and do occur in the practice of dentistry. Although most emergencies take place in adults, serious problems can also develop in younger patients. The contemporary dentist must be prepared to manage expeditiously and effectively those few problems that do arise. Basic life support (as necessary) is all that is required to manage many emergency situations, with the addition of specific drug therapy in some others. Preparation of the office and staff includes basic life support (annually), pediatric advanced life support, development of an emergency team, consideration for emergency medical services, and the availability of emergency drugs and equipment with the ability to use these items effectively. As with the adult patient, effective management of pain (local anesthesia) and anxiety (behavioral management, conscious sedation) will minimize the development of medical emergencies.

  9. [Emergency treatment and management of anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2013-02-01

    Anaphylaxis, the maximal manifestation of an immediate allergic reaction, is a life-threatening systemic reaction. The immediate therapy is chosen according to the clinical manifestations and new German guidelines are in preparation. Required measures include immediate removal of allergen, adequate positioning, assessment of severity and organ involvement and activation of emergency medical services. In anaphylaxis with primarily cardiovascular involvement, epinephrine is the treatment of choice and given together with volume substitution, oxygen, H(1)-antihistamines and corticosteroids. Obstruction of the airways is treated with intramuscular and inhaled epinephrine, or alternatively β(2)-sympathicomimetics, and oxygen. Abdominal or cutaneous involvement, such as generalized urticaria, usually can be treated with intravenous H(1)-antihistamines, glucocorticoids and surveillance. In patients with anaphylaxis, the elicitor of the reaction has to be diagnosed by allergy testing. Patients with sustained risk for anaphylaxis should receive a self-medication kit and should be educated about behavioral patterns needed for prophylaxis and therapy of anaphylactic reactions. Patient educational intervention increases knowledge about anaphylaxis, and practical competence and thus, is a basis of a successful management of anaphylaxis. PMID:23385622

  10. Managing Pediatric Pain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Benoit; Trottier, Evelyne D

    2016-08-01

    Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain. For patients who still require pain relief, oral opioids could be considered; however, many EDs have now replaced this with intranasal fentanyl, which allows faster onset of pain relief and can be administered on arrival pending either intravenous access or definitive care. Intravenous opioids are often required for severe pain, and paracetamol or ibuprofen can still be considered for their likely opioid-sparing effects. Specific treatment should be used for patients with migraine. In children requiring intravenous access or venipuncture, non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies to decrease pain and anxiety associated with needle punctures are mandatory. These strategies can also be used for laceration repairs and other painful procedures. Despite the gaps in knowledge, pain should be treated with the most up-to-date evidence in children seen in EDs. PMID:27260499

  11. Special event planning for the emergency manager.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Peter T

    2009-11-01

    In the domain of emergency management and homeland security there is a lack of a formal planning process at the local level when it comes to special event planning. The unique nature of special event planning demands an understanding of the planning process for both traditional and non-traditional planning partners. This understanding will make certain that local governments apply due diligence when planning for the safety of the public. This paper offers a practical roadmap for planning at the local level. It will address those 'special events' that are beyond routine local events but not of a sufficient scale to be granted National Special Security Event status. Due to the infrequency of 'special events' in most communities, it is imperative that deliberate planning takes place. Upon conclusion, the reader will be able to construct a planning process tailored to the needs of their community, guide both traditional and non-traditional planning partners through the planning process, determine priorities, explore alternatives, plan for contingencies, conduct a confirmation brief, facilitate operations and assemble an after-action report and improvement plan. PMID:20378490

  12. Quality assurance measurement for emergency management

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, M.S.

    1993-12-31

    Under the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is charged with maintenance of a nationwide inventory of 4.3 million radiological instruments procured and granted by the federal government to state and local governments. These instruments are used by trained state Radiological Response Team Members, first responders, and critical workers to support the population from a national security or large-scale peacetime radiological disaster, e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Satellite Reentry, etc. The inventory is maintained through a network of 100% federally funded state maintenance and calibration facilities, with overall technical guidance and standardization provided by the FEMA Radiological Instrumentation Test Facility. The system used to support maintenance and standardized calibration of the inventory consists of CDV-794 Radiation Calibrator (High Range), CDV-765 Model 2 Gamma Transfer Standard, CDV-790 Model 1 Calibrator (Low Range), and Dosimeter Transfer Standards. Past studies have indicated the {open_quotes}Readiness{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Reliability{close_quotes} of the inventory to meet mission requirements based upon a standardized system of maintenance and calibration. FEMA has just initiated a new instrument Readiness and Reliability study with the State of Ohio Radiological Instrument Maintenance and Calibration Program to provide data to reassess the capability of the current inventory to support all types of peacetime and national security missions.

  13. 44 CFR 351.20 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PLANNING AND PREPAREDNESS... emergency plans and preparedness in accordance with FEMA procedures in 44 CFR part 350. (h) Develop... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Federal...

  14. Action Guide for Emergency Management at Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This "Action Guide for Emergency Management at Higher Education Institutions" has been developed to give higher education institutions a useful resource in the field of emergency management. It is intended for community colleges, four-year colleges and universities, graduate schools, and research institutions associated with higher education…

  15. Comprehensive emergency management: Evacuating threatened populations. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of emergency management is outlined and emergency management tasks including mitigation and preparedness activities, are addressed. Four actors in the emergency management system are described: local governments, state governments, Federal government, and private organizations. Man-made and natural disasters are compared and human response to three emergency situations is described: (1) the nuclear reaction incident at Three Mile Island, (2) the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens volcano, and (3) a riverine flood. Citizen response comparisons among these disaster events is focused on: (1) the source and credibility of evacuation warnings; and (2) citizen evacuation decisions. Information is supplied on the way citizens make decisions in emergencies, social-psychological responses to emergencies, the context of evacuation planning in hazard management, and strategies for enhancing citizen compliance with evacuation warnings.

  16. Implementation of an Infectious Disease Fellow-Managed Penicillin Allergy Skin Testing Service

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Emily L.; Bork, Jacqueline T.; Schmalzle, Sarah A.; Kleinberg, Michael; Kewalramani, Anupama; Gilliam, Bruce L.; Buchwald, Ulrike K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large percentage of patients presenting to acute care facilities report penicillin allergies that are associated with suboptimal antibiotic therapy. Penicillin skin testing (PST) can clarify allergy histories but is often limited by access to testing. We aimed to implement an infectious diseases (ID) fellow-managed PST program and to assess the need for PST via national survey. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study of the implementation of an ID fellow-managed penicillin allergy skin testing service. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an ID fellow-managed PST service and its impact on the optimization of antibiotic selection. In addition, a survey of PST practices was sent out to all ID fellowship program directors in the United States. Results. In the first 11 months of the program, 90 patients were assessed for PST and 76 patients were tested. Of the valid tests, 96% were negative, and 84% with a negative test had antibiotic changes; 63% received a narrower spectrum antibiotic, 80% received more effective therapy, and 61% received more cost-effective therapy. The majority of survey of respondents (n = 50) indicated that overreporting of penicillin allergy is a problem in their practice that affects antibiotic selection but listed inadequate personnel and time as the main barriers to PST. Conclusions. Inpatient PST can be successfully managed by ID fellows, thereby promoting optimal antibiotic use in patients reporting penicillin allergies. This model can increase access to PST at institutions without adequate access to allergists while also providing an important educational experience to ID trainees. PMID:27704011

  17. Municipal resilience: A paradigm shift in emergency and continuity management.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Greg; Luchia, Mike

    More than a decade of emergency and continuity management vision was instrumental in providing the unprecedented level of response and recovery from the great flood of 2013. Earlier assessments, planning and validation promulgated development of corporate continuity, emergency and contingency plans along with tactical, strategic and recovery operations centres that all led to a reliable emergency management model that will continue to provide the backbone for municipal resilience.

  18. Municipal resilience: A paradigm shift in emergency and continuity management.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Greg; Luchia, Mike

    More than a decade of emergency and continuity management vision was instrumental in providing the unprecedented level of response and recovery from the great flood of 2013. Earlier assessments, planning and validation promulgated development of corporate continuity, emergency and contingency plans along with tactical, strategic and recovery operations centres that all led to a reliable emergency management model that will continue to provide the backbone for municipal resilience. PMID:26642170

  19. Responding to global infectious disease outbreaks: lessons from SARS on the role of risk perception, communication and management.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D

    2006-12-01

    With increased globalisation comes the likelihood that infectious disease appearing in one country will spread rapidly to another, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) being a recent example. However, although SARS infected some 10,000 individuals, killing around 1000, it did not lead to the devastating health impact that many feared, but a rather disproportionate economic impact. The disproportionate scale and nature of this impact has caused concern that outbreaks of more serious disease could cause catastrophic impacts on the global economy. Understanding factors that led to the impact of SARS might help to deal with the possible impact and management of such other infectious disease outbreaks. In this respect, the role of risk--its perception, communication and management--is critical. This paper looks at the role that risk, and especially the perception of risk, its communication and management, played in driving the economic impact of SARS. It considers the public and public health response to SARS, the role of the media and official organisations, and proposes policy and research priorities for establishing a system to better deal with the next global infectious disease outbreak. It is concluded that the potential for the rapid spread of infectious disease is not necessarily a greater threat than it has always been, but the effect that an outbreak can have on the economy is, which requires further research and policy development. PMID:16978751

  20. Responding to global infectious disease outbreaks: lessons from SARS on the role of risk perception, communication and management.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D

    2006-12-01

    With increased globalisation comes the likelihood that infectious disease appearing in one country will spread rapidly to another, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) being a recent example. However, although SARS infected some 10,000 individuals, killing around 1000, it did not lead to the devastating health impact that many feared, but a rather disproportionate economic impact. The disproportionate scale and nature of this impact has caused concern that outbreaks of more serious disease could cause catastrophic impacts on the global economy. Understanding factors that led to the impact of SARS might help to deal with the possible impact and management of such other infectious disease outbreaks. In this respect, the role of risk--its perception, communication and management--is critical. This paper looks at the role that risk, and especially the perception of risk, its communication and management, played in driving the economic impact of SARS. It considers the public and public health response to SARS, the role of the media and official organisations, and proposes policy and research priorities for establishing a system to better deal with the next global infectious disease outbreak. It is concluded that the potential for the rapid spread of infectious disease is not necessarily a greater threat than it has always been, but the effect that an outbreak can have on the economy is, which requires further research and policy development.

  1. Model-Informed Risk Assessment and Decision Making for an Emerging Infectious Disease in the Asia-Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Robert; Hickson, Roslyn I.; McVernon, Jodie; McCaw, James M.; Hort, Krishna; Black, Jim; Madden, John R.; Tran, Nhi H.; McBryde, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective response to emerging infectious disease (EID) threats relies on health care systems that can detect and contain localised outbreaks before they reach a national or international scale. The Asia-Pacific region contains low and middle income countries in which the risk of EID outbreaks is elevated and whose health care systems may require international support to effectively detect and respond to such events. The absence of comprehensive data on populations, health care systems and disease characteristics in this region makes risk assessment and decisions about the provision of such support challenging. Methodology/principal findings We describe a mathematical modelling framework that can inform this process by integrating available data sources, systematically explore the effects of uncertainty, and provide estimates of outbreak risk under a range of intervention scenarios. We illustrate the use of this framework in the context of a potential importation of Ebola Virus Disease into the Asia-Pacific region. Results suggest that, across a wide range of plausible scenarios, preemptive interventions supporting the timely detection of early cases provide substantially greater reductions in the probability of large outbreaks than interventions that support health care system capacity after an outbreak has commenced. Conclusions/significance Our study demonstrates how, in the presence of substantial uncertainty about health care system infrastructure and other relevant aspects of disease control, mathematical models can be used to assess the constraints that limited resources place upon the ability of local health care systems to detect and respond to EID outbreaks in a timely and effective fashion. Our framework can help evaluate the relative impact of these constraints to identify resourcing priorities for health care system support, in order to inform principled and quantifiable decision making. PMID:27661978

  2. Practices and challenges of infectious waste management: A qualitative descriptive study from tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Somrongthong, Ratana; Chapman, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Infectious waste management practices among health care workers in the tertiary care hospitals have been questionable. The study intended to identify issues that impede a proper infectious waste management. Methods: Besides direct observation, in-depths interviews were conducted with the hospital administrators and senior management involved in healthcare waste management during March 2014. We looked at the processes related to segregation, collection, storage and disposal of hospital waste, and identified variety of issues in all the steps. Results: Serious gaps and deficiencies were observed related to segregation, collection, storage and disposal of the hospital wastes, hence proving to be hazardous to the patients as well as the visitors. Poor safety, insufficient budget, lack of trainings, weak monitoring and supervision, and poor coordination has eventually resulted in improper waste management in the tertiary hospitals of Rawalpindi. Conclusion: Study has concluded that the poor resources and lack of healthcare worker’s training in infectious waste results in poor waste management at hospitals. PMID:26430405

  3. Multivariate analysis of traditional pig management practices and their potential impact on the spread of infectious diseases in Corsica.

    PubMed

    Relun, A; Charrier, F; Trabucco, B; Maestrini, O; Molia, S; Chavernac, D; Grosbois, V; Casabianca, F; Etter, E; Jori, F

    2015-10-01

    Corsica is a French Mediterranean island with traditional extensive pig farming oriented towards the production of high quality cured meat products. The increasing success of these cured products in continental Europe has triggered the development and organisation of an extensive pig farming industry. However, these pig farming practices have seldom been described and analysed to understand the potential risk of introduction and spread of infectious diseases. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Corsica in 2013 to characterise the main pig management practices and to identify groups of farms with similar practices and therefore homogeneous risk of introduction and spread of infectious diseases. We interviewed 68 pig farmers and investigated different farm management practices which could lead to contact between herds, such as trading animals, sharing pastures, feed and reproduction management (direct contacts), slaughtering and carcass waste management, and contacts with people and vehicles (indirect contacts). The practices were described and the farms grouped by multiple factor and hierarchical clustering analyses. Results revealed interesting patterns in the introduction and spread of infectious disease, such as the seasonality of pig production, the potential local spread of diseases in pastures due to the presence of free-ranging boars, carcasses, and animal waste. Multivariate analyses identified four groups of farms with different levels of risk of the spread of infectious disease, illustrating changes in farmers' customs from free-range uncontrolled farming systems to more controlled systems aimed at the production of high quality pork products. These results will be useful to more realistically simulate the spread of infectious diseases among Corsican pig farms and highlight the need for awareness raising campaigns among the stakeholders to reduce risky practices.

  4. Steps for Developing a School Emergency Management Plan. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools strongly encourages schools and school districts to develop emergency management plans within the context of the four phases of emergency management: prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. In addition, schools should collaborate closely with police, fire…

  5. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  6. Nurse-aid management of neurological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Platt, W D; Walton, J

    People with altered levels of consciousness cannot be responsible for themselves. This article highlights the steps a nurse aider must take at the scene of an accident and discusses the importance of the environment in the neurological emergency. PMID:8485364

  7. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:25208106

  8. Diagnosis and management of common gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Marc J; Sultan, Mohamed; Stevens, Michael; Charabaty, Aline; Mattar, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, stretches beyond control of flares. Some infections of the gastrointestinal tract are more commonly seen in patients with IBD. Work from the Human Microbiome Project has been instrumental in our understanding of the interplay between the vast gut microbiota and host immune responses. Patients with IBD may be more prone to infectious complications based on their underlying inflammatory disease and variations in their microbiome. Immunosuppressant medications commonly used to treat patients with Crohn's and colitis also play a role in predisposing these patients to acquire these infections. Here, we present a detailed review of the data focusing on the most common infections of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with IBD: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). We will discuss appropriate diagnostic tools and treatment options for these infections. Other less common infections will also be reviewed briefly. Studying the various infections of the gastrointestinal tract in these patients could enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD.

  9. Evidence of genetic drift and reassortment in infectious bursal disease virus and emergence of outbreaks in poultry farms in India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Pandey, Vinod C; Pal, Joy K

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of infectious bursal disease (IBD) have become a burning problem to the poultry industry worldwide. Here, we performed genetic analysis of IBD virus (IBDV) field isolates from recent outbreaks in various poultry farms in India. The sequence analysis of IBDV VP2 hypervariable region revealed amino acid pattern similar to that of very virulent (222A, 242I, 253Q, 256I, 272I, 279D, 284A, 294I, 299S and 330S) and intermediate plus virulent (222A, 242I, 253Q, 256I, 272T, 279N, 284A, 294I, 299S and 330S) type whereas analysis of VP1 revealed presence of sequence similar to that of very virulent (61I, 145T) and unique (61I, 141I, 143D, 145S) type in field isolates. Among the eight field isolates, two isolates contained very virulent type VP2 and unique type VP1, three contained intermediate plus virulent type VP2 and unique type VP1 whereas five contained both VP2 and VP1 of very virulent type. The phylogenetic analysis based on VP2 nucleotide sequence showed clustering of all eight isolates close to known very virulent strains whereas based on VP1, five isolates formed unique cluster and three isolates were placed close to very virulent strains. The isolates forming unique VP1 cluster showed highest similarity with classical virulent IBDVs suggesting their possible evolution from segment B of non-very virulent IBDVs. Interestingly, these five isolates were responsible for outbreaks in four different farms located at three different geographic locations in India. These observations indicates genetic reassortment between segment A and segment B from co-infecting IBDV strains leading to emergence of very virulent strains and their widespread prevalence in Indian poultry farms. The presence of 272I and 279D in VP2 protein of five field isolates may explain possible cause of Gumboro intermediate plus vaccine failure in prevention of the outbreaks. However, mortality caused by other three strains which are antigenically similar to VP1 of intermediate plus

  10. Emergency Department Management Of Acute Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A; Cuenca, Peter John

    2014-11-01

    Infective endocarditis has a high rate of mortality, and most patients suspected of having the disease will require hospital admission. This review examines the literature as it pertains specifically to emergency clinicians who must maintain vigilance for risk factors and obtain a thorough history, including use of intravenous drugs, in order to guide the workup and treatment. Properly obtained cultures are critical during the evaluation, as they direct the course of antibiotic therapy. Although transthoracic echocardiography is widely available in United States emergency departments, it is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out a diagnosis of infective endocarditis. In high-risk patients, transesophageal echocardiography should be considered.

  11. Management of traumatic wounds in the Emergency Department: position paper from the Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care (AcEMC) and the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES).

    PubMed

    Prevaldi, Carolina; Paolillo, Ciro; Locatelli, Carlo; Ricci, Giorgio; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic wounds are one of the most common problems leading people to the Emergency Department (ED), accounting for approximately 5,4 % of all the visits, and up to 24 % of all the medical lawsuits. In order to provide a standardized method for wound management in the ED, we have organized a workshop, involving several Italian and European experts. Later, all the discussed statements have been submitted for external validation to a multidisciplinary expert team, based on the so called Delphi method. Eight main statements have been established, each of them comprising different issues, covering the fields of wound classification, infectious risk stratification, tetanus and rabies prophylaxis, wound cleansing, pain management, and suture. Here we present the results of this work, shared by the Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care (AcEMC), and the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES). PMID:27330546

  12. [Contribution of the rapid diagnostic tests for infectious diseases to the patient management in the Great East Japan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Hatta, Masumitsu; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale off the northeast coast of Honshu Island, Japan, produced a devastating tsunami that destroyed many towns and villages near the coast in Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures. Miyagi Prefecture was the area most severely devastated by the tsunami, with extensive loss of life and property; hundreds of thousands of people lost their houses and were forced to move to evacuation areas. In the days and weeks following devastating natural disasters, the threat of infectious disease outbreak is high. Rapid diagnostic tests can be performed at or near the site of patient care and the tests were very useful in this disaster, because they enabled us to manage patients appropriately in the settings where medical resources were limited. Here we report actual cases where the rapid diagnostic tests for infectious diseases were useful in the patient management. PMID:23547484

  13. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  14. How do emergency managers use social media platforms?

    PubMed

    Bennett, DeeDee M

    2014-01-01

    Social media platforms are increasingly becoming a useful tool for victims, humanitarians, volunteers, and the general public to communicate during disasters. Research has shown that there are multiple advantages to using social media and the applicability of these platforms crosses several different types of disasters (human-caused, natural, and terrorist) here in the United States and abroad. However, some emergency management agencies have been reluctant to use social media as one of their many communications tools. In this study, the usefulness of social media for emergency management was examined over a 30-day period following a series of tornadoes. Using an observational approach, the public posts disseminated from an emergency management agency were analyzed to determine how two social media platforms were used. The findings show how emergency management agencies could leverage the connectedness of social media to reach victims and make unlikely partnerships.

  15. How do emergency managers use social media platforms?

    PubMed

    Bennett, DeeDee M

    2014-01-01

    Social media platforms are increasingly becoming a useful tool for victims, humanitarians, volunteers, and the general public to communicate during disasters. Research has shown that there are multiple advantages to using social media and the applicability of these platforms crosses several different types of disasters (human-caused, natural, and terrorist) here in the United States and abroad. However, some emergency management agencies have been reluctant to use social media as one of their many communications tools. In this study, the usefulness of social media for emergency management was examined over a 30-day period following a series of tornadoes. Using an observational approach, the public posts disseminated from an emergency management agency were analyzed to determine how two social media platforms were used. The findings show how emergency management agencies could leverage the connectedness of social media to reach victims and make unlikely partnerships. PMID:25062826

  16. Increasing access and support for emergency management higher education programs.

    PubMed

    Cwiak, Carol L

    2014-01-01

    The number of emergency management higher education programs has grown dramatically since 1994 when the FEMA Higher Education Program was created to propagate and support such growth. Data collected annually since 2007 from emergency management higher education programs shows that these programs face some consistent challenges. These challenges were coupled with annual data on program access and support indicators via dimensional analysis to answer the questions: To what extent are the challenges linked to a lack of access or support? If there is linkage, what can be gleaned from these linkages that can help address the challenges through improving access and support? The analysis showed that lack of access to funding and resources, and lack of support from partner organizations, has an impact on emergency management higher education. Discussion of that impact is followed with detailed recommendations that are focused on strengthening both internal and external access and support relationships for emergency management higher education programs.

  17. MS ANTWERPEN: Emergency Management Training for Low-Risk Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohschneider, Stefan; Gerdes, Jurgen

    2004-01-01

    Emergency management training programs have been developed mostly for trainees from high-risk environments such as aviation or the chemical industry. This article describes a training program for staff members from low-risk environments such as hospitals or hotels, where the awareness of potential dangers is usually low and emergency plans are…

  18. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  19. The Role of Spatial Information Systems in Environmental Emergency Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondschein, Lawrence G.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the use of spatial data and information technology by environmental managers and emergency responders. Discussion includes environmental legislation, the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) database, public access to environmental information, information standardization problems, emergency response software development and a case study…

  20. Open and social leadership: a new paradigm in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The world is changing and so are disasters. Citizens are leveraging emerging technology and social media communication tools to send, receive and process information. It is time for professional emergency management and disaster response to do the same. This paper presents an overview of these changing public patterns, and expectations must be met with a new leadership approach.

  1. Management of migraine headache in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Carrie E; Black, David F; Swanson, Jerry W

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the more common reasons for adults to visit an emergency department. Most of these visits are for primary headache disorders, most commonly migraine headache. The authors discuss management options for patients presenting to the emergency department with prolonged, severe, or refractory migraine headaches. Particular attention is given to parenteral treatments and protocols that would not be options as an outpatient. The epidemiology, investigation, and outpatient management of migraine headache are discussed in other articles in this issue. PMID:20352590

  2. Emergency management: Implementing a new strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, G.

    1997-09-01

    Many of the problems resulting from a release incident stem from lack of preparation for such incidents; lack of control and coordination of the activities performed during the incident response; and mistaken assumptions regarding responsibility for the clean up. One unique approach to this type of situation addresses these and other issues thereby facilitating the primary objectives of cost control and incident closure. The Arrowhead Concept{reg_sign} to emergency response separates a release incident into two main phases: response phase and resolution phase. Each phase has three stages or activities. The response phase is the part of the incident that is typically performed under emergency conditions; it is urgent and fast-paced, with the need for a lot of decisions to be made without a lot of information. This phase is broken down into three concurrent activities: initial communication and coordination; release containment and control (abatement); and regulatory notification and negotiation.

  3. 76 FR 63308 - Data and Data Needs To Advance Risk Assessment for Emerging Infectious Diseases Relevant to Blood...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Infectious Diseases Relevant to Blood and Blood Products; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Diseases Relevant to Blood and Blood Products.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss data and... diseases (EIDs) that are relevant to blood and blood products and the benefits of mitigation options....

  4. Health care emergency management: establishing the science of managing mass casualty and mass effect incidents.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Anthony G; Barbera, Joseph A; Brewster, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Particularly since 2001, the health care industry has witnessed many independent and often competing efforts to address mitigation and preparedness for emergencies. Clinicians, health care administrators, engineers, safety and security personnel, and others have each developed relatively independent efforts to improve emergency response. A broader conceptual approach through the development of a health care emergency management profession should be considered to integrate these various critical initiatives. When based on long-standing emergency management principles and practices, health care emergency management provides standardized, widely accepted management principles, application concepts, and terminology. This approach could also promote health care integration into the larger community emergency response system. The case for a formally defined health care emergency management profession is presented with discussion points outlining the advantages of this approach. PMID:19491589

  5. Architecture for a Generalized Emergency Management Software System

    SciTech Connect

    Hoza, Mark; Bower, John C.; Stoops, LaMar R.; Downing, Timothy R.; Carter, Richard J.; Millard, W. David

    2002-12-19

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) was originally developed for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It has evolved from a CSEPP-specific emergency management software system to a general-purpose system that supports multiple types of hazards. The latest step in the evolution is the adoption of a hazard analysis architecture that enables the incorporation of hazard models for each of the hazards such that the model is seamlessly incorporated into the FEMIS hazard analysis subsystem. This paper describes that new architecture.

  6. A unified emergency care system for the early management of emergencies in medicine.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Jones, D; Hodgetts, T J

    1999-06-01

    Emergency medicine is increasingly compartmentalised. The Unified Emergency Care System (UECS) requires the user to consider every option for emergency care for each patient, in a logical manner that transcends these artificial compartments and recognises the relative priority of concomitant medical, surgical, environmental and toxicological problems. The system is presented as a series of icons, allowing considerations to be made at a glance. Drop shadows refer the user to detailed management protocols for specific conditions. The system follows the logical sequence of quick history, quick look, primary survey with resuscitation and secondary survey. Established management principles of airway-breathing-circulation-disability (ABCD) are incorporated. The complexity of the management algorithms increases from first aider through medic, paramedic, and primary care physician to emergency physician. The stepwise care facilitates seamless immediate medical care between providers, teamwork, and the development of a structured series of training programmes. PMID:10420340

  7. Updating and Maintaining School Emergency Management Plans. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 3, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Helpful Hints" offers a quick overview of school emergency preparedness topics that are frequently the subject of inquiries. Developing and implementing comprehensive, multi-hazard emergency management plans is an ongoing process that must be consistently reinforced and strengthened. Opportunities for reviewing, strengthening and updating…

  8. Operation Windshield and the simplification of emergency management.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Large, complex, multi-stakeholder exercises are the culmination of years of gradual progression through a comprehensive training and exercise programme. Exercises intended to validate training, refine procedures and test processes initially tested in isolation are combined to ensure seamless response and coordination during actual crises. The challenges of integrating timely and accurate situational awareness from an array of sources, including response agencies, municipal departments, partner agencies and the public, on an ever-growing range of media platforms, increase information management complexity in emergencies. Considering that many municipal emergency operations centre roles are filled by staff whose day jobs have little to do with crisis management, there is a need to simplify emergency management and make it more intuitive. North Shore Emergency Management has accepted the challenge of making emergency management less onerous to occasional practitioners through a series of initiatives aimed to build competence and confidence by making processes easier to use as well as by introducing technical tools that can simplify processes and enhance efficiencies. These efforts culminated in the full-scale earthquake exercise, Operation Windshield, which preceded the 2015 Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.

  9. Operation Windshield and the simplification of emergency management.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Large, complex, multi-stakeholder exercises are the culmination of years of gradual progression through a comprehensive training and exercise programme. Exercises intended to validate training, refine procedures and test processes initially tested in isolation are combined to ensure seamless response and coordination during actual crises. The challenges of integrating timely and accurate situational awareness from an array of sources, including response agencies, municipal departments, partner agencies and the public, on an ever-growing range of media platforms, increase information management complexity in emergencies. Considering that many municipal emergency operations centre roles are filled by staff whose day jobs have little to do with crisis management, there is a need to simplify emergency management and make it more intuitive. North Shore Emergency Management has accepted the challenge of making emergency management less onerous to occasional practitioners through a series of initiatives aimed to build competence and confidence by making processes easier to use as well as by introducing technical tools that can simplify processes and enhance efficiencies. These efforts culminated in the full-scale earthquake exercise, Operation Windshield, which preceded the 2015 Emergency Preparedness and Business Continuity Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. PMID:26897621

  10. Developing Higher Education Programs in Emergency Management: Ghana's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubu, Mariama Bisongu

    2013-01-01

    Ghana is highly vulnerable and threatened by several hazards and has sought ways of minimizing impacts of hazards events over time including demonstrating an interest in developing an emergency management training and an higher education degree program. Yet, as of 2013, the country has not developed a disaster management training program or a…

  11. I consensus for the management and treatment of hepatitis B carried out by the Brazilian society of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso de; Barone, Antonio Alci; Junior, Fernando Lopes G; Ferreira, João Silva Mendonça Simão; Focaccia, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports on the conclusions reached by the Hepatitis Committee of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases in their I Consensus for the Management and Treatment of Hepatitis B. The subjects considered most relevant or controversial among those discussed by the Consensus Group, which met in the city of São Roque on July 21-23, 2006, are summarized in this report. A systematic review on topics related to hepatitis B was carried out and published in the Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases. We strongly recommend that readers consult the Proceedings of the Consensus Meeting in which a full, detailed report on the topics discussed is published, whereas in the Consensus, these topics are concisely and objectively summarized.

  12. Emergency managers as change agents: recognizing the value of management, leadership, and strategic management in the disaster profession.

    PubMed

    Urby, Heriberto; McEntire, David A

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the influence of management theory, some principles of leadership, four strategic management considerations, that are applied to emergency management, allow emergency managers to transform their followers, organizations, and communities at large. The authors argue that in the past there has been little recognition of the value, or application, of these three areas of emphasis in the disaster profession. Using more of these principles, emergency managers may transform into transformational change agents who make a difference in their followers' lives, who themselves transform other people and improve emergency management.

  13. The emergency management of caustic ingestions.

    PubMed

    Wason, S

    1985-01-01

    Controversial therapeutic issues in patients with caustic ingestions concern the reliability of symptoms and signs in predicting esophageal injury, the appropriate use of endoscopy in evaluating esophageal damage, and the use of steroids in preventing late strictures. The conclusions of this review are: The majority of pediatric caustic ingestions involve a "lick and taste" whereas adolescents and adults often ingest substantial quantities. Oral burns and dysphagia are sensitive predictors of esophageal injury; however, esophageal injury may occur in the absence of the findings. Household bleach and nonphosphate detergents represent a low risk of injury whereas button batteries greater than 20 mm in diameter and Clinitest tablets represent high risk. Endoscopy should be an elective rather than emergency procedure and should be undertaken in all symptomatic patients, and in asymptomatic patients when history indicates substantial ingestion. Steroid therapy should be considered only for patients who have deep or circumferential esophageal burns. PMID:3833918

  14. Skin and soft tissue infection management, outcomes, and follow-up in the emergency department of an urban academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Seeleang, Kanokwan; Manning, Mary Lou; Saks, Mark; Winstead, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are among the most common infections treated by emergency department clinicians. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) as the cause of these infections prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Disease Society of America to publish guidelines for the outpatient management of SSTIs. This study describes the management and outcomes of emergency department patients treated for uncomplicated SSTIs who returned within 30 days of the initial visit. The study found that of 857 eligible patients, only 17.6% returned and of these, 80% had their wound checked or packing removed. The clinicians prescribed antibiotics for the majority of patients, and the selection of antibiotics typically was active against CA-MRSA. Of 91 lesions drained, 24 specimens were obtained for culture and sensitivity. The majority of the initial treatment of patients consisted of incision and drainage with antibiotic prescription. PMID:25356895

  15. Industrial ecology: an emerging management science.

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, B

    1992-01-01

    Pollution is a complex equation, compounded by population, rate of consumption, and toxic emissions per unit of resource consumed. This article defines industrial ecology as a management science that focuses a corporation's expertise on the third variable. Thus, industrial ecology is involved with changing the efficiency of machines, not just changing the law or a firm's compliance strategy. This article also explores how this emphasis allows a profoundly different orientation than the end-of-the-pipe regulatory approach of the last 20 yr. PMID:11607271

  16. Post-emergency department management of stroke.

    PubMed

    Brown, Devin L; Haley, E Clarke

    2002-08-01

    All stroke patients ideally should be admitted to a stroke unit in which personnel are familiar with strategies for taking care of stroke patients. Prevention of worsening cerebral ischemia by appropriate blood pressure and serum glucose management, fever control, and supplemental oxygen for hypoxemic patients is recommended. Recognition of common complications, such as aspiration pneumonia and deep venous thrombosis, highlights the need for swallowing evaluation and the use of pneumatic compression devices or subcutaneous heparin. Patients should be monitored closely for deterioration in their neurologic status and should have complications appropriately addressed. After evaluation of stroke etiology, appropriate secondary stroke prophylaxis should be selected and initiated before hospital discharge.

  17. Waste Water Management and Infectious Disease. Part II: Impact of Waste Water Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of various treatment processes, such as oxidation ponds, chemical coagulation and filtration, and the soil mantle, to remove the agents of infectious disease found in waste water is discussed. The literature concerning the efficiency of removal of these organisms by various treatment processes is reviewed. (BT)

  18. Dodging a Bullet: WHO, SARS, and the Successful Management of Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Evan S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the policy decisions made by the World Health Organization (WHO) in working to fight the spread of the first truly global infectious disease, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), of the 21st century. In particular, the author pays attention to the WHO's Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network…

  19. Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyuk, V.D.; Grebenyuk, O.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

  20. Some considerations for mass casualty management in radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hopmeier, Michael; Abrahams, Jonathan; Carr, Zhanat

    2010-06-01

    Radiation emergencies are rather new to humankind, as compared to other types of emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, or hurricanes. Fortunately, they are rare, but because of that, planning for response to large-scale radiation emergencies is least understood. Along with the specific technical aspects of response to radiation emergencies, there are some general guiding principles of responding to mass casualty events of any nature, as identified by the World Health Organization in its 2007 manual for mass casualty management systems. The paper brings forward such general considerations as applicable to radiation mass casualty events, including (1) clear lines of communication; (2) scalability of approach; (3) whole-of-health approach; (4) knowledge based approach; and (5) multisectoral approach. Additionally, some key considerations of planning for mass casualty management systems are discussed, namely, health systems surge capacity and networking, risk and resources mapping, and others. PMID:20445382

  1. Emergency department management of seizures in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Santillanes, Genevieve; Luc, Quyen

    2015-03-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all emergency department visits for children, and the etiologies range from benign to life-threatening. The challenge for emergency clinicians is to diagnose and treat the life-threatening causes of seizures while avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure and painful procedures in patients who are unlikely to have an emergent pathology. When treating patients in status epilepticus, emergency clinicians are also faced with the challenge of choosing anticonvulsant medications that will be efficacious while minimizing harmful side effects. Unfortunately, evidence to guide the evaluation and management of children presenting with new and breakthrough seizures and status epilepticus is limited. This review summarizes available evidence and guidelines on the diagnostic evaluation of first-time, breakthrough, and simple and complex febrile seizures. Management of seizures in neonates and seizures due to toxic ingestions is also reviewed.

  2. Some considerations for mass casualty management in radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hopmeier, Michael; Abrahams, Jonathan; Carr, Zhanat

    2010-06-01

    Radiation emergencies are rather new to humankind, as compared to other types of emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, or hurricanes. Fortunately, they are rare, but because of that, planning for response to large-scale radiation emergencies is least understood. Along with the specific technical aspects of response to radiation emergencies, there are some general guiding principles of responding to mass casualty events of any nature, as identified by the World Health Organization in its 2007 manual for mass casualty management systems. The paper brings forward such general considerations as applicable to radiation mass casualty events, including (1) clear lines of communication; (2) scalability of approach; (3) whole-of-health approach; (4) knowledge based approach; and (5) multisectoral approach. Additionally, some key considerations of planning for mass casualty management systems are discussed, namely, health systems surge capacity and networking, risk and resources mapping, and others.

  3. Emergency mental health management in bioterrorism events.

    PubMed

    Benedek, David M; Holloway, Harry C; Becker, Steven M

    2002-05-01

    The United States has not suffered significant psychosocial or medical consequences from the use of biological weapons within its territories. This has contributed to a "natural" state of denial at the community level. This denial could amplify the sense of crisis, anxiety, fear, chaos, and disorder that would accompany such a bioterrorist event. A key part of primary prevention involves counteracting this possibility before an incident occurs. Doing so will require realistic information regarding the bioterrorism threat followed by the development of a planned response and regular practice of that response. Unlike in natural disasters or other situations resulting in mass casualties, emergency department physicians or nurses and primary care physicians (working in concert with epidemiologic agencies), rather than police, firemen, or ambulance personnel, will be most likely to first identify the unfolding disaster associated with a biological attack. Like community leaders, this group of medical responders must be aware of its own susceptibility to mental health sequelae and performance decrement as the increasing demands of disaster response outpace the availability of necessary resources. A bioterrorist attack will necessitate treatment of casualties who experience neuropsychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Although symptoms may result from exposure to infection with specific biological agents, similar symptoms may result from the mere perception of exposure or arousal precipitated by fear of infection, disease, suffering, and death. Conservative use of psychotropic medications may reduce symptoms in exposed and uninfected individuals, as may cognitive-behavioral interventions. Clear, consistent, accessible, reliable, and redundant information (received from trusted sources) will diminish public uncertainty about the cause of symptoms that might otherwise prompt persons to seek unnecessary treatment. Training and preparation for contingencies experienced in an

  4. Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan. PMID:22576137

  5. Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan.

  6. Resuscitation algorithm for management of acute emergencies.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, W C; Hopkins, J A; Greenfield, S; Chang, P C; Umof, P; Shabot, M M; Spenler, C W; State, D

    1978-10-01

    Assuming that unrecognized or inadequately corrected hypovolemia results in higher mortality and morbidity rates, we developed a systematic approach to resuscitation that would: 1) identify criteria to aid in the recognition of hypovolemia and ensure the expeditious correction of this defect without interfering with diagnostic workup and management; 2) define criteria to prevent fluid overload which may jeopardize the patient's course, and 3) express these criteria in an explicit, systematic, patient care algorithm, ie, protocol, useful to both the resident and the practicing physician. We are now conducting prospective clinical trials with one service using the algorithm and the others acting as the control group. Preliminary results comparing patient outcomes suggest that the algorithm improves patient care by shortening resuscitation time and results in fewer hospital days, intensive care unit days, febrile days, and days on mechanical ventilation as well as reduced mortality. The algorithm provides a systematic plan to organize patient care so that the most urgently needed procedures are not delayed or overlooked.

  7. A Risk Management Architecture for Emergency Integrated Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlynn, Gregory E.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced engine operation--operation that is beyond normal limits--has the potential to improve the adaptability and safety of aircraft in emergency situations. Intelligent use of enhanced engine operation to improve the handling qualities of the aircraft requires sophisticated risk estimation techniques and a risk management system that spans the flight and propulsion controllers. In this paper, an architecture that weighs the risks of the emergency and of possible engine performance enhancements to reduce overall risk to the aircraft is described. Two examples of emergency situations are presented to demonstrate the interaction between the flight and propulsion controllers to facilitate the enhanced operation.

  8. Active management of food allergy: an emerging concept.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Katherine; Stiefel, Gary; Brough, Helen; du Toit, George; Lack, Gideon; Fox, Adam T

    2015-04-01

    IgE-mediated food allergies are common and currently there is no cure. Traditionally, management has relied upon patient education, food avoidance and the provision of an emergency medication plan. Despite this, food allergy can significantly impact on quality of life. Therefore, in recent years, evolving research has explored alternative management strategies. A more active approach to management is being adopted, which includes early introduction of potentially allergenic foods, anticipatory testing, active monitoring, desensitisation to food allergens and active risk management. This review will discuss these areas in turn.

  9. Emergency management of decompensated peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lata, Indu; Gupta, Renu; Sahu, Sandeep; Singh, Harpreet

    2009-05-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown cause that occurs in the peripartum period in previously healthy women.[1] the symptomatic patients should receive standard therapy for heart failure, managed by a multidisciplinary team. The diagnosis of PPCM rests on the echocardiographic identification of new left ventricular systolic dysfunction during a limited period surrounding parturition. Diagnostic criteria include an ejection fraction of less than 45%, fractional shortening of less than 30%, or both, and end-diastolic dimension of greater than 2.7 cm/m(2) body surface-area. This entity presents a diagnostic challenge because many women in the last month of a normal pregnancy experience dyspnea, fatigue, and pedal edema, symptoms identical to early congestive heart failure. There are no specific criteria for differentiating subtle symptoms of heart failure from normal late pregnancy. Therefore, it is important that a high index of suspicion be maintained to identify the rare case of PPCM as general examination showing symptoms of heart failure with pulmonary edema. PPCM remains a diagnosis of exclusion. No additional specific criteria have been identified to allow distinction between a peripartum patient with new onset heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction as PPCM and another form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, all other causes of dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure must be systematically excluded before accepting the designation of PPCM. Recent observations from Haiti[2] suggest that a latent form of PPCM without clinical symptoms might exist. The investigators identified four clinically normal postpartum women with asymptomatic systolic dysfunction on echocardiography, who subsequently either developed clinically detectable dilated cardiomyopathy or improved and completely recovered heart function. PMID:19561973

  10. Handling Emergency Management in [an] Object Oriented Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokgoz, Berna Eren; Cakir, Volkan; Gheorghe, Adrian V.

    2010-01-01

    It has been understood that protection of a nation from extreme disasters is a challenging task. Impacts of extreme disasters on a nation's critical infrastructures, economy and society could be devastating. A protection plan itself would not be sufficient when a disaster strikes. Hence, there is a need for a holistic approach to establish more resilient infrastructures to withstand extreme disasters. A resilient infrastructure can be defined as a system or facility that is able to withstand damage, but if affected, can be readily and cost-effectively restored. The key issue to establish resilient infrastructures is to incorporate existing protection plans with comprehensive preparedness actions to respond, recover and restore as quickly as possible, and to minimize extreme disaster impacts. Although national organizations will respond to a disaster, extreme disasters need to be handled mostly by local emergency management departments. Since emergency management departments have to deal with complex systems, they have to have a manageable plan and efficient organizational structures to coordinate all these systems. A strong organizational structure is the key in responding fast before and during disasters, and recovering quickly after disasters. In this study, the entire emergency management is viewed as an enterprise and modelled through enterprise management approach. Managing an enterprise or a large complex system is a very challenging task. It is critical for an enterprise to respond to challenges in a timely manner with quick decision making. This study addresses the problem of handling emergency management at regional level in an object oriented modelling environment developed by use of TopEase software. Emergency Operation Plan of the City of Hampton, Virginia, has been incorporated into TopEase for analysis. The methodology used in this study has been supported by a case study on critical infrastructure resiliency in Hampton Roads.

  11. epiPATH: an information system for the storage and management of molecular epidemiology data from infectious pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Amadoz, Alicia; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Background Most research scientists working in the fields of molecular epidemiology, population and evolutionary genetics are confronted with the management of large volumes of data. Moreover, the data used in studies of infectious diseases are complex and usually derive from different institutions such as hospitals or laboratories. Since no public database scheme incorporating clinical and epidemiological information about patients and molecular information about pathogens is currently available, we have developed an information system, composed by a main database and a web-based interface, which integrates both types of data and satisfies requirements of good organization, simple accessibility, data security and multi-user support. Results From the moment a patient arrives to a hospital or health centre until the processing and analysis of molecular sequences obtained from infectious pathogens in the laboratory, lots of information is collected from different sources. We have divided the most relevant data into 12 conceptual modules around which we have organized the database schema. Our schema is very complete and it covers many aspects of sample sources, samples, laboratory processes, molecular sequences, phylogenetics results, clinical tests and results, clinical information, treatments, pathogens, transmissions, outbreaks and bibliographic information. Communication between end-users and the selected Relational Database Management System (RDMS) is carried out by default through a command-line window or through a user-friendly, web-based interface which provides access and management tools for the data. Conclusion epiPATH is an information system for managing clinical and molecular information from infectious diseases. It facilitates daily work related to infectious pathogens and sequences obtained from them. This software is intended for local installation in order to safeguard private data and provides advanced SQL-users the flexibility to adapt it to their

  12. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  13. Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Sarah; Whalen, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    In a trauma situation, it is essential that emergency room physicians are able to think clearly, make decisions quickly and manage patients in a way consistent with their injuries. In order for emergency medicine residents to adequately develop the skills to deal with trauma situations, it is imperative that they have the opportunity to experience such scenarios in a controlled environment with aptly timed feedback. In the case of infant trauma, sensitivities have to be taken that are specific to pediatric medicine. The following describes a simulation session in which trainees were tasked with managing an infantile patient who had experienced a major trauma as a result of a single vehicle accident. The described simulation session utilized human patient simulators and was tailored to junior (year 1 and 2) emergency medicine residents. PMID:26487992

  14. Bariatric emergencies: current evidence and strategies of management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for bariatric surgery is increasing and the postoperative complications are seen more frequently. The aim of this paper is to review the current outcomes of bariatric surgery emergencies and to formulate a pathway of safe management. Methods The PubMed and Google search for English literatures relevant to emergencies of bariatric surgery was made, 6358 articles were found and 90 papers were selected based on relevance, power of the study, recent papers and laparoscopic workload. The pooled data was collected from these articles that were addressing the complications and emergency treatment of bariatric patients. 830,998 patients were included in this review. Results Bariatric emergencies were increasingly seen in the Accident and Emergency departments, the serious outcomes were reported following complex operations like gastric bypass but also after gastric band and the causes were technical errors, suboptimal evaluation, failure of effective communication with bariatric teams who performed the initial operation, patients factors, and delay in the presentation. The mortality ranged from 0.14%-2.2% and increased for revisional surgery to 6.5% (p = 0.002). Inspite of this, mortality following bariatric surgery is still less than that of control group of obese patients (p = value 0.01). Conclusions Most mortality and catastrophic outcomes following bariatric surgery are preventable. The awareness of bariatric emergencies and its effective management are the gold standards for best outcomes. An algorithm is suggested and needs further evaluation. PMID:24373182

  15. Emergency Management Instruction. Instructor's Guide for Grades 7-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Div. of Emergency Management, Raleigh.

    Emergency Management education seeks to give students basic information about natural and man-made disasters, preparedness procedures, and survival techniques. The intent of this guide is to aid teachers in presenting disaster survival instruction in the junior high school grades. The materials are designed to supplement existing curricula, where…

  16. Curriculum Guidelines for Management of Medical Emergencies in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' revised guidelines for curriculum on managing medical emergencies give an introduction to the scope of the curriculum, describe educational goals and prerequisites, and outline the course content and structure, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, needed faculty, and continuing clinical…

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION OF LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3) for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the ...

  18. Emergency management and homeland security: Exploring the relationship.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    In the years after the 9/11 tragedy, the United States continues to face risks from all forms of major disasters, from potentially dangerous terrorist attacks to catastrophic acts of nature. Professionals in the fields of emergency management and homeland security have responsibilities for ensuring that all levels of government, urban areas and communities, nongovernmental organizations, businesses, and individual citizens are prepared to deal with such hazards though actions that reduce risks to lives and property. Regrettably, the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the nation's ability to deal with disasters is unnecessarily challenged by the absence of a common understanding on how these fields are related in the workforce and educational arenas. Complicating matters further is the fact that neither of these fields has developed agreed definitions. In many ways, homeland security and emergency management have come to represent two different worlds and cultures. These conditions can have a deleterious effect on preparedness planning for public and private stakeholders across the nation when coordinated responses among federal, state, and local activities are essential for dealing with consequential hazards. This article demonstrates that the fields of emergency management and homeland security share many responsibilities but are not identical in scope or skills. It argues that emergency management should be considered a critical subset of the far broader and more strategic field of homeland security. From analytically based conclusions, it recommends five steps that be taken to bring these fields closer together to benefit more from their synergist relationship as well as from their individual contributions.

  19. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  20. Seeking Accountability through State-Appointed Emergency District Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsen, David; Mason, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Michigan's Local Government and School District Accountability Act of 2011 empowers the governor to appoint emergency managers (EMs) in financially troubled school districts. EMs assume all powers of the superintendent and school board. They can reshape academic programs, nullify labor contracts, and open and close schools. This article analyzes…

  1. Emerging infectious diseases: Focus on infection control issues for novel coronaviruses (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-CoV and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-CoV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa and Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9).

    PubMed

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Fischer, William A; Kanamori, Hajime; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E

    2016-05-01

    Over the past several decades, we have witnessed the emergence of many new infectious agents, some of which are major public threats. New and emerging infectious diseases which are both transmissible from patient-to-patient and virulent with a high mortality include novel coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa, Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9). All healthcare facilities need to have policies and plans in place for early identification of patients with a highly communicable diseases which are highly virulent, ability to immediately isolate such patients, and provide proper management (e.g., training and availability of personal protective equipment) to prevent transmission to healthcare personnel, other patients and visitors to the healthcare facility.

  2. Emergence of infectious malignant thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by SRV-4 after transmission to a novel host

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Ono, Fumiko; Nakamura, Shota; Sato, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakai, Kouji; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagata, Noriyo; Takano, Jun-ichiro; Okabayashi, Sachi; Hamano, Masataka; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakaya, Takaaki; Iida, Tetsuya; Horii, Toshihiro; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Watanabe, Akino; Kaneko, Akihisa; Saito, Akatsuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Juri; Akari, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a lethal hemorrhagic syndrome arising from severe thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques kept at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Extensive investigation identified that simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4) was the causative agent of the disease. SRV-4 had previously been isolated only from cynomolgus macaques in which it is usually asymptomatic. We consider that the SRV-4 crossed the so-called species barrier between cynomolgus and Japanese macaques, leading to extremely severe acute symptoms in the latter. Infectious agents that cross the species barrier occasionally amplify in virulence, which is not observed in the original hosts. In such cases, the new hosts are usually distantly related to the original hosts. However, Japanese macaques are closely related to cynomolgus macaques, and can even hybridize when given the opportunity. This lethal outbreak of a novel pathogen in Japanese macaques highlights the need to modify our expectations about virulence with regards crossing species barriers. PMID:25743183

  3. Emergence of infectious malignant thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by SRV-4 after transmission to a novel host.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Ono, Fumiko; Nakamura, Shota; Sato, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakai, Kouji; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagata, Noriyo; Takano, Jun-ichiro; Okabayashi, Sachi; Hamano, Masataka; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakaya, Takaaki; Iida, Tetsuya; Horii, Toshihiro; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Watanabe, Akino; Kaneko, Akihisa; Saito, Akatsuki; Matsui, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Juri; Akari, Hirofumi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-03-06

    We discovered a lethal hemorrhagic syndrome arising from severe thrombocytopenia in Japanese macaques kept at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Extensive investigation identified that simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4) was the causative agent of the disease. SRV-4 had previously been isolated only from cynomolgus macaques in which it is usually asymptomatic. We consider that the SRV-4 crossed the so-called species barrier between cynomolgus and Japanese macaques, leading to extremely severe acute symptoms in the latter. Infectious agents that cross the species barrier occasionally amplify in virulence, which is not observed in the original hosts. In such cases, the new hosts are usually distantly related to the original hosts. However, Japanese macaques are closely related to cynomolgus macaques, and can even hybridize when given the opportunity. This lethal outbreak of a novel pathogen in Japanese macaques highlights the need to modify our expectations about virulence with regards crossing species barriers.

  4. On-line modeling tutorials for emergency managers

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maintains two simulation models of interest to Federal, State, and local government managers: MESORAD, a model of radiological plume dispersion and dose; and IDYNEV, a model of traffic movement during evacuation. Users of these models include government staff and technical consultants with simulation experience ranging from extensive to none. To train these users, Argonne National Laboraory has developed two on-line tutorials. The tutorials provide a self-paced, interactive mode of learning about the models. Though user manuals about the models exist, the tutorials afford self-contained instruction to users who lack access to the manuals. The tutorials describe: dose assessment and transportation analysis using computer models; the input parameters needed by the models; how to use forms management software to prepare the data; and how to run the models and view outputs. The tutorials have evolved with upgrades to the models, including the need at various times to emulate three different forms management packages. The tutorials have been used for individual study; in continuing education courses at FEMA's Emergency Management Institute; and are being considered for college classroom use. Persons trained in using the models have applied them to actual emergency planning problems for nuclear power plants. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS AND ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF TREATED SLUDGES (BIOSOLIDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation looks at the pathogenic microorganisms present in municipal sludges and the public's concerns with the land application of sludges/biosolids. Methods for reducing pathogens in sludge; methods for reducing the vector attractiveness of sludge; and issues associate...

  6. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Airway management, particularly in non-theatre settings, is an area of anaesthesia and critical care associated with significant risk of morbidity & mortality, as highlighted during the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (NAP4). A survey of junior anaesthetists at our hospital highlighted a lack of confidence and perceived lack of safety in emergency airway management, especially in non-theatre settings. We developed and implemented a multifaceted airway package designed to improve the safety of remote site airway management. A Rapid Sequence Induction (RSI) checklist was developed; this was combined with new advanced airway equipment and drugs bags. Additionally, new carbon dioxide detector filters were procured in order to comply with NAP4 monitoring recommendations. The RSI checklists were placed in key locations throughout the hospital and the drugs and advanced airway equipment bags were centralised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It was agreed with the senior nursing staff that an appropriately trained ICU nurse would attend all emergency situations with new airway resources upon request. Departmental guidelines were updated to include details of the new resources and the on-call anaesthetist's responsibilities regarding checks and maintenance. Following our intervention trainees reported higher confidence levels regarding remote site emergency airway management. Nine trusts within the Northern Region were surveyed and we found large variations in the provision of remote site airway management resources. Complications in remote site airway management due lack of available appropriate drugs, equipment or trained staff are potentially life threatening and completely avoidable. Utilising the intervention package an anaesthetist would be able to safely plan and prepare for airway management in any setting. They would subsequently have the drugs, equipment, and trained assistance required to manage any difficulties or complications

  7. The application of supply chain management principles to emergency management logistics: An empirical study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew R; Young, Richard R; Gordon, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Key elements of supply chain theory remain relevant to emergency management (EM) logistics activities. The Supply Chain Operations Reference model can also serve as a useful template for the planning, organizing, and execution of EM logistics. Through a series of case studies (developed through intensive survey of organizations and individuals responsible for EM), the authors identified the extent supply chain theory is being adopted and whether the theory was useful for emergency logistics managers. The authors found several drivers that influence the likelihood of an organization to implement elements of supply chain management: the frequency of events, organizational resources, population density, range of events, and severity of the disaster or emergency. PMID:27575640

  8. The application of supply chain management principles to emergency management logistics: An empirical study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew R; Young, Richard R; Gordon, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Key elements of supply chain theory remain relevant to emergency management (EM) logistics activities. The Supply Chain Operations Reference model can also serve as a useful template for the planning, organizing, and execution of EM logistics. Through a series of case studies (developed through intensive survey of organizations and individuals responsible for EM), the authors identified the extent supply chain theory is being adopted and whether the theory was useful for emergency logistics managers. The authors found several drivers that influence the likelihood of an organization to implement elements of supply chain management: the frequency of events, organizational resources, population density, range of events, and severity of the disaster or emergency.

  9. Review article: Crisis resource management in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Carne, Belinda; Kennedy, Marcus; Gray, Tim

    2012-02-01

    Effective team management is a core element of expert practice in emergency medicine. Thus far, training in emergency medicine has focussed predominantly on proficiency in medical and technical skills, with emergency physicians acquiring these 'non-technical' skills in an ad hoc manner or by trial and error with varying levels of success. This paper describes a set of behaviours that, when practised in conjunction with medical and technical expertise, can reduce the incidence of clinical error and contribute to effective teamwork and the smooth running of an ED. Teaching and practice of these behaviours is now a core element of training and skills maintenance in other high-risk areas, such as aviation, and is becoming part of the routine training for anaesthetists. They address areas, such as communication, leadership, knowledge of environment, anticipation and planning, obtaining timely assistance, attention allocation and workload distribution. We outline the application of these behaviours in the speciality of emergency medicine, and suggest that the teaching and practice of crisis resource management principles should become part of the curriculum for training and credentialing of emergency medicine specialists.

  10. Ebola virus disease: Case management in the Institute of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Sassari, Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Giulia; Mannazzu, Marco; Madeddu, Giordano; Are, Riccardo; Muredda, Alberto; Babudieri, Sergio; Calia, Giovanna; Lovigu, Carla; Maida, Ivana; Contini, Luciana; Miscali, Anna; Rubino, Salvatore; Delogu, Fiorenzo; Mura, Maria Stella

    2016-01-01

    Since the onset of the worst epidemic of Ebola virus disease in December 2013, 28,637 cases were reported as confirmed, probable, or suspected. Since the week of 3 January 2016, no more cases have been reported. The total number of deaths have amounted to 11,315 (39.5%). In developed countries, seven cases have been diagnosed: four in the United States, one in Spain, one in the United Kingdom, and one in Italy. On 20 July 2015, Italy was declared Ebola-free. On 9 May 2015, an Italian health worker came back to Italy after a long stay in Sierra Leone working for a non-governmental organization. Forty-eight hours after his arrival, he noticed headache, weakness, muscle pains, and slight fever. The following day, he was safely transported to the Infectious Diseases Unit of University Hospital of Sassari. The patient was hospitalized for 19 hours until an Italian Air Force medical division transferred him to Rome, to the Lazzaro Spallanzani Institute. Nineteen people who had contacts with the patient were monitored daily for 21 days by the Public Health Office of Sassari and none presented any symptoms. So far, neither vaccine nor treatment is available to be proposed on an international scale. Ebola is considered a re-emerging infectious disease which, unlike in the past, has been a worldwide emergency. This case study aimed to establish a discussion about the operative and logistic difficulties to be faced and about the discrepancy arising when protocols clash with the reality of facts.

  11. Ebola virus disease: Case management in the Institute of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Sassari, Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Giulia; Mannazzu, Marco; Madeddu, Giordano; Are, Riccardo; Muredda, Alberto; Babudieri, Sergio; Calia, Giovanna; Lovigu, Carla; Maida, Ivana; Contini, Luciana; Miscali, Anna; Rubino, Salvatore; Delogu, Fiorenzo; Mura, Maria Stella

    2016-01-01

    Since the onset of the worst epidemic of Ebola virus disease in December 2013, 28,637 cases were reported as confirmed, probable, or suspected. Since the week of 3 January 2016, no more cases have been reported. The total number of deaths have amounted to 11,315 (39.5%). In developed countries, seven cases have been diagnosed: four in the United States, one in Spain, one in the United Kingdom, and one in Italy. On 20 July 2015, Italy was declared Ebola-free. On 9 May 2015, an Italian health worker came back to Italy after a long stay in Sierra Leone working for a non-governmental organization. Forty-eight hours after his arrival, he noticed headache, weakness, muscle pains, and slight fever. The following day, he was safely transported to the Infectious Diseases Unit of University Hospital of Sassari. The patient was hospitalized for 19 hours until an Italian Air Force medical division transferred him to Rome, to the Lazzaro Spallanzani Institute. Nineteen people who had contacts with the patient were monitored daily for 21 days by the Public Health Office of Sassari and none presented any symptoms. So far, neither vaccine nor treatment is available to be proposed on an international scale. Ebola is considered a re-emerging infectious disease which, unlike in the past, has been a worldwide emergency. This case study aimed to establish a discussion about the operative and logistic difficulties to be faced and about the discrepancy arising when protocols clash with the reality of facts. PMID:27249532

  12. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  13. Initial management of patients in an emergency situation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rick; Mulligan, Joe

    Success in first aid is based on the ability to make the most of the resources available and on maintaining the casualty in the best possible condition until specialist help arrives. This article, the second in a series of eight, discusses how to assess and stabilise the casualty's condition and how to manage the emergency situation. Using case examples, it provides a methodical approach to risk assessment for casualties, bystanders and rescuers, as well as ascertaining and providing clear and accurate information for the relevant emergency services.

  14. Evaluation of a novel strain of infectious bronchitis virus emerged as a result of spike gene recombination between two highly diverged parent strains.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Kylie A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F; Schultz, Bridie K; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new variant strains of the poultry pathogen infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is continually reported worldwide, owing to the labile nature of the large single-stranded RNA IBV genome. High resolution melt curve analysis previously detected a variant strain, N1/08, and the present study confirmed that this strain had emerged as a result of recombination between Australian subgroup 2 and 3 strains in the spike gene region, in a similar manner reported for turkey coronaviruses. The S1 gene for N1/08 had highest nucleotide similarity with subgroup 2 strains, which is interesting considering subgroup 2 strains have not been detected since the early 1990s. SimPlot analysis of the 7.2-kb 3' end of the N1/08 genome with the same region for other Australian reference strains identified the sites of recombination as immediately upstream and downstream of the S1 gene. A pathogenicity study in 2-week-old chickens found that N1/08 had similar pathogenicity for chicken respiratory tissues to that reported for subgroup 2 strains rather than subgroup 3 strains. The results of this study demonstrate that recombination is a mechanism utilized for the emergence of new strains of IBV, with the ability to alter strain pathogenicity in a single generation.

  15. The Ebola Vaccine Team B: a model for promoting the rapid development of medical countermeasures for emerging infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, Michael; Moore, Kristine; Ostrowsky, Julie; Kimball-Baker, Kathleen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In support of accelerated development of Ebola vaccines from preclinical research to clinical trials, in November, 2014, the Wellcome Trust and the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota established the Wellcome Trust-CIDRAP Ebola Vaccine Team B initiative. This ongoing initiative includes experts with global experience in various phases of bringing new vaccines to market, such as funding, research and development, manufacturing, determination of safety and efficacy, regulatory approval, and vaccination delivery. It also includes experts in community engagement strategies and ethical issues germane to vaccination policies, including eight African scientists with direct experience in developing and implementing vaccination policies in Africa. Ebola Vaccine Team B members have worked on a range of vaccination programmes, such as polio eradication (Africa and globally), development of meningococcal A disease vaccination campaigns in Africa, and malaria and HIV/AIDS vaccine research. We also provide perspective on how this experience can inform future situations where urgent development of vaccines is needed, and we comment on the role that an independent, expert group such as Team B can have in support of national and international public health authorities toward addressing a public health crisis.

  16. The Ebola Vaccine Team B: a model for promoting the rapid development of medical countermeasures for emerging infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, Michael; Moore, Kristine; Ostrowsky, Julie; Kimball-Baker, Kathleen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In support of accelerated development of Ebola vaccines from preclinical research to clinical trials, in November, 2014, the Wellcome Trust and the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota established the Wellcome Trust-CIDRAP Ebola Vaccine Team B initiative. This ongoing initiative includes experts with global experience in various phases of bringing new vaccines to market, such as funding, research and development, manufacturing, determination of safety and efficacy, regulatory approval, and vaccination delivery. It also includes experts in community engagement strategies and ethical issues germane to vaccination policies, including eight African scientists with direct experience in developing and implementing vaccination policies in Africa. Ebola Vaccine Team B members have worked on a range of vaccination programmes, such as polio eradication (Africa and globally), development of meningococcal A disease vaccination campaigns in Africa, and malaria and HIV/AIDS vaccine research. We also provide perspective on how this experience can inform future situations where urgent development of vaccines is needed, and we comment on the role that an independent, expert group such as Team B can have in support of national and international public health authorities toward addressing a public health crisis. PMID:26526664

  17. DIAGNOSIS AND MEDICAL AND SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC INFECTIOUS FIBRINOUS PLEURITIS IN AN OKAPI (OKAPIA JOHNSTONI).

    PubMed

    Franzen, Dana; Lamberski, Nadine; Zuba, Jeffery; Richardson, G Lynn; Fischer, A T; Rantanen, Norman W

    2015-06-01

    A 10-yr-old female okapi (Okapia johnstoni) at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park was evaluated for intermittent malaise, inappetence, occasional cough, abdominal splinting, and licking at both flanks. Physical examination revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and fluid sounds on thoracic auscultation. Transthoracic ultrasound showed multiple uniform, anechoic filled structures in the right and left pleural space. Surgical exploration of the thoracic cavity revealed bilateral, mature, fibrous, compartmentalizing adhesions between the visceral and parietal pleura, confirming a diagnosis of chronic, infectious, fibrinous pleuritis. The suspected etiology was occult aspiration pneumonia secondary to historical episodes of regurgitation associated with general anesthesia. Culture of the pleural fluid and fibrous adhesions grew Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, and few Fusobacterium species. Treatment consisted of chest-tube placement to establish drainage, thoracic lavage, unilateral surgical debridement, and long-term antibiotics. The animal made a complete clinical recovery over 7 mo. PMID:26056911

  18. GNSS-based network positioning technology for cooperative emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caicong; Chu, Tianxing; Tang, Anning; Su, Huaihong

    2009-06-01

    Personal digital assistant (PDA) with built-in GPS chip begins to be used for city management and emergency response management nowadays. The intelligent terminal can be used for event recording, multimedia (photo, audio, and video) capturing, wireless communication, GPS positioning and navigation. In the near future, PDA would take place of the vehicle GPS monitoring terminal to provide more functions and convenient. This article organizes the PDA of the same team for emergency response event into an integrated network through wireless communication so that each terminal can see each other on the map, including the vehicle GPS monitoring terminals. All of the terminals should send its GPS position and collected information to the emergency response center (ERC) through GPRS with a customized protocol. Then the center would create the socket connection to push the neighbors' location and common or special information to the others in the team according to the terminal's requirement and its authorities, and the leader or commander could send commands and messages to all of the underling members also. The GNSS based positioning and communication network organizes the dispersive emergency response personnel handheld with PDA and vehicles equipped with vehicle GPS monitoring terminal into an organic and cooperative network, each member in the network can see where its colleagues are, so as to seek for the help or support and exchange information in real time without calling which avoids exposure to the tracked objects. The Compass-1 satellite positioning and communication terminal is also used for personnel and vehicle positioning and message reporting. Altay is selected as the demonstration area. The prototype emergency management system is established for the local public security bureau and well validates the terminals and network function.

  19. An information management and communications system for emergency operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, C.A.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    In the mid 1980s the US Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need to dramatically expand its Emergency Operations Centers to deal with the large variety of emergencies for which DOE has an obligation to manage, or provide technical support. This paper describes information management, display, and communications systems that have been implemented at the DOE Headquarters Forestall Operations Center (OC), DOE Operations Offices, and critical laboratory locations. Major elements of the system at the DOE Headquarters facility include computer control, information storage and retrieval, processing, Local Area Networks (LANs), videoconferencing, video display, and audio systems. These Headquarters systems are linked by Wide Area Networks (WANs) to similar systems at the Operations Office and critical Laboratory locations.

  20. Development of emergency response support system for accident management

    SciTech Connect

    Taminami, Tatsuya; Kubota, Ryuji; Kubota, Tadashi; Yamane, Noriyuki

    1997-12-01

    Specific measures for the accident management (AM) are proposed to prevent the severe accident and to mitigate their effects in order to upgrade the safety of nuclear power plants even further. To ensure accident management effective, it is essential to grasp the plant status accurately. In consideration of the above mentioned background, the Emergency Response Support System (ERSS) was developed as a computer assisted prototype system by a joint study of Japanese BWR group. This system judges and predicts the plant status at the emergency condition in a nuclear power plant. This system displays the results of judgment and prediction. The effectiveness of the system was verified through the test and good prospects for applying the system to a plant was obtained. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Syncope: a review of emergency department management and disposition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranjal R; Quinn, James V

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion with spontaneous return to baseline function without intervention. It is a common chief complaint of patients presenting to the emergency department. The differential diagnosis for syncope is broad and the management varies significantly depending on the underlying etiology. In the emergency department, determining the cause of a syncopal episode can be difficult. However, a thorough history and certain physical exam findings can assist in evaluating for life-threatening diagnoses. Risk-stratifying patients into low, moderate and high-risk groups can assist in medical decision making and help determine the patient’s disposition. Advancements in ambulatory monitoring have made it possible to obtain prolonged cardiac evaluations of patients in the outpatient setting. This review will focus on the diagnosis and management of the various types of syncope. PMID:27752576

  2. Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Godinez, Melanie A.

    2010-08-31

    On March 10, 2010 the workshop titled Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety was held in Seattle, WA. The objective of this workshop was to showcase ways social media networking technologies can be used to support emergency management and public safety operations. The workshop highlighted the current state of social networking and where this dynamic engagement is heading, demonstrated some of the more commonly used technologies, highlighted case studies on how these tools have been used in a variety of jurisdictions and engaged the private sector on how these tools might serve as a conduit for two way communication between with the public sector to address regional recovery issues and decision making.

  3. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  4. Urinary Schistosomiasis in an Adolescent Refugee from Africa: An Uncommon Cause of Hematuria and an Emerging Infectious Disease in Europe.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Castelli, Lucia; Pulcrano, Giovanna; Grosini, Alessia; Balzaretti, Michela; Spadaro, Salvatore; Bruni, Paola

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of urinary schistosomiasis in an adolescent refugee from Gambia (arrived to Italy illegally), who was brought to the Emergency Department of our hospital. The patient complained of gross hematuria and, in the absence of clinical evidence of bacterial urinary infection, was admitted to the pediatric ward, considering his provenience and social setting. An appropriate collection and microscopic analysis of urine samples led to the detection of bilharzia. Much attention should be paid to this emerging disease in Europe by physicians in order to recognize and treat it timely, which could prevent future and higher costs for public health systems and could reduce the potential risk of environmental spreading. In fact, there are some areas in Italy where the parasite can find its intermediate host to complete its lifecycle. PMID:26335551

  5. Urinary Schistosomiasis in an Adolescent Refugee from Africa: An Uncommon Cause of Hematuria and an Emerging Infectious Disease in Europe.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Castelli, Lucia; Pulcrano, Giovanna; Grosini, Alessia; Balzaretti, Michela; Spadaro, Salvatore; Bruni, Paola

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of urinary schistosomiasis in an adolescent refugee from Gambia (arrived to Italy illegally), who was brought to the Emergency Department of our hospital. The patient complained of gross hematuria and, in the absence of clinical evidence of bacterial urinary infection, was admitted to the pediatric ward, considering his provenience and social setting. An appropriate collection and microscopic analysis of urine samples led to the detection of bilharzia. Much attention should be paid to this emerging disease in Europe by physicians in order to recognize and treat it timely, which could prevent future and higher costs for public health systems and could reduce the potential risk of environmental spreading. In fact, there are some areas in Italy where the parasite can find its intermediate host to complete its lifecycle.

  6. Extreme Space Weather Impact: An Emergency Management Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAlester, Mark H.; Murtagh, William

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) to investigate the potential for extreme space weather conditions to impact National Security/Emergency Preparedness communications—those communications vital to a functioning government and to emergency and disaster response—in the United States. Given the interdependencies of modern critical infrastructure, the initial systematic review of academic research on space weather effects on communications expanded to other critical infrastructure sectors, federal agencies, and private sector organizations. While the effort is ongoing, and despite uncertainties inherent with this hazard, FEMA and the SWPC did draw some conclusions. If electric power remains available, an extreme space weather event will result in the intermittent loss of HF and similar sky wave radio systems, minimal direct impact to public safety line-of-sight radio and commercial cellular services, a relatively small loss of satellite services as a percentage of the total satellite fleet, interference or intermittent loss of satellite communications and GPS navigation and timing signals, and no first-order impact to consumer electronic devices. Vulnerability of electric power to an extreme geomagnetic storm remains the primary concern from an emergency management perspective, but actual impact is not well understood at present. A discussion of potential impacts to infrastructure from the loss of electric power from any hazard is provided using the 2011 record tornado outbreak in Alabama as an example.

  7. Nurse-aid management of ear and nose emergencies: 1.

    PubMed

    Butler, K; Malem, F

    Ear, nose and throat emergencies cause a great deal of discomfort and distress and in certain cases may compromise safety. They therefore demand skilful intervention on the part of the nurse aider. In this article, the first of a two-part series, the nurse-aid management of ear problems will be described. The next article in the series will concentrate on the nose. PMID:8400786

  8. Diagnosing and managing acute heart failure in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dick C.; Peacock, W. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results from the impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood and affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis may not be straightforward and at times may be difficult in an undifferentiated patient. However, rapid evaluation and diagnosis is important for the optimal management of acute heart failure. We review the many aspects of diagnosing and treating acute heart failure in the emergency department. PMID:27752588

  9. Emergency management and homeland security: Exploring the relationship.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    In the years after the 9/11 tragedy, the United States continues to face risks from all forms of major disasters, from potentially dangerous terrorist attacks to catastrophic acts of nature. Professionals in the fields of emergency management and homeland security have responsibilities for ensuring that all levels of government, urban areas and communities, nongovernmental organizations, businesses, and individual citizens are prepared to deal with such hazards though actions that reduce risks to lives and property. Regrettably, the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the nation's ability to deal with disasters is unnecessarily challenged by the absence of a common understanding on how these fields are related in the workforce and educational arenas. Complicating matters further is the fact that neither of these fields has developed agreed definitions. In many ways, homeland security and emergency management have come to represent two different worlds and cultures. These conditions can have a deleterious effect on preparedness planning for public and private stakeholders across the nation when coordinated responses among federal, state, and local activities are essential for dealing with consequential hazards. This article demonstrates that the fields of emergency management and homeland security share many responsibilities but are not identical in scope or skills. It argues that emergency management should be considered a critical subset of the far broader and more strategic field of homeland security. From analytically based conclusions, it recommends five steps that be taken to bring these fields closer together to benefit more from their synergist relationship as well as from their individual contributions. PMID:26750811

  10. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning: Emergency management and hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Severance, H.W.; Kolb, J.C.; Carlton, F.B.; Jorden, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    An ice storm in February 1989 resulted in numerous incidences of carbon monoxide poisoning in central Mississippi secondary to exposure to open fires in unventilated living spaces. Sixteen cases were treated during this period at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and 6 received Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. These 6 cases and the mechanisms of CO poisoning are discussed and recommendations for emergency management are reviewed.10 references.

  11. Veterinary aspects of ecological monitoring: the natural history of emerging infectious diseases of humans, domestic animals and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Michael H

    2009-10-01

    Proliferation of disease pathogens capable of affecting humans, domestic livestock and wildlife increasingly threatens environmental security and biodiversity. Livestock and wild animals in proximity to human beings are often in the chain of transmission and infection. Globalization of industrial livestock production (especially poultry upon which so much of the burgeoning human population depends) often permits transcontinental disease spread. Rapidly expanding (and often illegal) international trade in wild and domestic animals and their products are increasingly involved in the emergence of new diseases that may have the ability to transmit among humans, livestock and wildlife. Rapidly increasing urbanization has led in many places to overcrowded townships that rely on "bushmeat" for sustenance and has contributed to the emergence of virulent zoonotic pathogens. The emergence and proliferation of pathogens are exacerbated by anthropogenic transformation of natural landscapes in order to increase agricultural and livestock production. This paper posits that data gathered by veterinary ecologists should be interpreted and used by other disciplines. The importance of a thorough knowledge of the "natural history" (ecology) of the disease agent and its human, domestic and wild hosts is stressed.

  12. Visualizing diurnal population change in urban areas for emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management. PMID:21491706

  13. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  14. Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

  15. Visualizing diurnal population change in urban areas for emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Medina, Richard M; Cova, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

  16. Coastal emergency managers' preferences for storm surge forecast communication.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Betty Hearn; Lazo, Jeffrey K

    2014-01-01

    Storm surge, the most deadly hazard associated with tropical and extratropical cyclones, is the basis for most evacuation decisions by authorities. One factor believed to be associated with evacuation noncompliance is a lack of understanding of storm surge. To address this problem, federal agencies responsible for cyclone forecasts are seeking more effective ways of communicating storm surge threat. To inform this process, they are engaging various partners in the forecast and warning process.This project focuses on emergency managers. Fifty-three emergency managers (EMs) from the Gulf and lower Atlantic coasts were surveyed to elicit their experience with, sources of, and preferences for storm surge information. The emergency managers-who are well seasoned in hurricane response and generally rate the surge risk in their coastal areas above average or extremely high-listed storm surge as their major concern with respect to hurricanes. They reported a general lack of public awareness about surge. Overall they support new ways to convey the potential danger to the public, including the issuance of separate storm surge watches and warnings, and the expression of surge heights using feet above ground level. These EMs would like more maps, graphics, and visual materials for use in communicating with the public. An important concern is the timing of surge forecasts-whether they receive them early enough to be useful in their evacuation decisions.

  17. [Structural requirements for the management of patients with highly contagious life-threatening infectious diseases: update 2015].

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The care of highly contagious life-threatening infectious diseases (HLID) requires specialized treatment facilities that are capable of strict isolation measures and appropriate medical treatment. The German approach to the management of these diseases, which is maintained by the Permanent Working Group of Medical Competence and Treatment Centers for Highly Contagious and Life-Threatening Diseases (STAKOB) is adjusted in the present publication with regards to recent experiences and upcoming needs. Clear synergies in using infrastructures and bundling of resources have led to similar efforts at the European level. The German concept, therefore, has a pioneering role. This update is intended to improve professional patient care and also minimize the risk of disease spread and transmission.

  18. Initial management of open hand fractures in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Hall, Michael; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Tan, Virak; Henry, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients with open hand fractures and/or dislocations managed at our institution between 2001 and 2009. The management protocol consisted of irrigation and debridement, reduction (if necessary), splinting, and antibiotics administration in the emergency department. Patients with vascular compromise or severe mangling open wounds were taken to the operating room for treatment. Data regarding demographics, wound size and modified Gustilo-Anderson classification, and timing of interventions were recorded. Included in the study were 145 cases (91 class III, 41 class II, and 13 class I injuries). In 102 cases, definitive and final management took place in the emergency department; in the other 43 cases, additional management took place in the operating room. Antibiotics were administered within 4 hours after injury, and irrigation and debridement were performed within 6 hours. Each of the 2 infections (1.4%) developed in a class III injury. In open hand fractures, particularly type I and type II wounds, the protocol we followed can be appropriate when the injury is not the severe mangling type and does not require acute vascular repair. PMID:22268015

  19. Reconstructing the emergence of a lethal infectious disease of wildlife supports a key role for spread through translocations by humans

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Andrew A.; Langton, Tom E. S.

    2016-01-01

    There have been few reconstructions of wildlife disease emergences, despite their extensive impact on biodiversity and human health. This is in large part attributable to the lack of structured and robust spatio-temporal datasets. We overcame logistical problems of obtaining suitable information by using data from a citizen science project and formulating spatio-temporal models of the spread of a wildlife pathogen (genus Ranavirus, infecting amphibians). We evaluated three main hypotheses for the rapid increase in disease reports in the UK: that outbreaks were being reported more frequently, that climate change had altered the interaction between hosts and a previously widespread pathogen, and that disease was emerging due to spatial spread of a novel pathogen. Our analysis characterized localized spread from nearby ponds, consistent with amphibian dispersal, but also revealed a highly significant trend for elevated rates of additional outbreaks in localities with higher human population density—pointing to human activities in also spreading the virus. Phylogenetic analyses of pathogen genomes support the inference of at least two independent introductions into the UK. Together these results point strongly to humans repeatedly translocating ranaviruses into the UK from other countries and between UK ponds, and therefore suggest potential control measures. PMID:27683363

  20. Management of atrial fibrillation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Crozier, I; Melton, I; Pearson, S

    2003-04-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and is a frequent cause for presentation to the emergency department. With an understanding of the pathophysiology and types of AF, efficient and effective management strategies for AF can be formulated. Patients with paroxysmal AF will often revert spontaneously and can initially be managed on an outpatient basis, unless an antiarrhythmic is commenced. In patients with AF and severe underlying heart disease, the management is primarily directed at the underlying heart disease, supplemented with rate-controlling measures, and prevention of thromboembolic complications. In patients with persistent AF good rate control, early cardioversion and initiation of an antiarrhythmic are likely to reduce the risk of recurrence. PMID:12680985

  1. Federal Emergency Management Information system (FEMIS) data management guide. Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Winters, C.

    1996-05-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS Data Management Guide provides the background, as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain the data resources in the system. Database administrators, system administrators, and general users can use this guide to manage the data files and database that support the administrative, user-environment, database management, and operational capabilities of FEMIS. This document provides a description of the relational and spatial information present in FEMIS. It describes how the data was assembled, how it is loaded, and how it is managed while the system is in operation.

  2. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management.

  3. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management. PMID:16622359

  4. Emerging issues with diagnosis and management of fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Farmakiotis, D; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-05-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are being increasingly recognized in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients, and delayed diagnosis can lead to graft loss and death. Therefore, there is a low threshold for prophylaxis and early initiation of empiric antifungal treatment, in this patient population. Meanwhile, the increasing consumption of antifungals is associated with high cost, medication toxicities and the emergence of resistance in Candida species, all of which call for rational use of antifungal agents. The implementation of fungal biomarkers, molecular diagnostic methods and direct detection of volatile fungal metabolites in breath samples could lead to faster diagnosis, early appropriate treatment and improved clinical outcomes, but also aid in the de-escalation of antifungal treatment. Those novel diagnostic modalities need to be validated specifically in SOT recipients. Infectious diseases consultation can contribute to optimization of care through prompt initiation and appropriate modification of antifungal treatment, management of medication toxicities and drug-drug interactions, as well as source control. In this review, we conceptually summarize recent advances in the diagnosis and management of IFI in SOT recipients, and highlight the importance of early diagnostic tools and good stewardship of antifungal drugs. PMID:25655091

  5. Emergency Neurologic Life Support (ENLS): Evolution of Management in the First Hour of a Neurological Emergency.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad M; Pineda, Jose; Corry, Megan; Brophy, Gretchen; Smith, Wade S

    2015-12-01

    Emergency neurological life support (ENLS) is an educational program designed to provide users advisory instruction regarding management for the first few hours of a neurological emergency. The content of the course is divided into 14 modules, each addressing a distinct category of neurological injury. The course is appropriate for practitioners and providers from various backgrounds who work in environments of variable medical complexity. The focus of ENLS is centered on a standardized treatment algorithm, checklists to guide early patient care, and a structured format for communication of findings and concerns to other healthcare professionals. Certification and training in ENLS is hosted by the Neurocritical Care Society. This document introduces the concept of ENLS and describes the revisions that constitute this second version. PMID:26438452

  6. Risk management of viral infectious diseases in wastewater reclamation and reuse: Review.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Toru; Katayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Inappropriate usage of reclaimed wastewater has caused outbreaks of viral infectious diseases worldwide. International and domestic guidelines for wastewater reuse stipulate that virus infection risks are to be regulated by the multiple-barrier system, in which a wastewater treatment process composed of sequential treatment units is designed based on the pre-determined virus removal efficiency of each unit. The objectives of this review were to calculate representative values of virus removal efficiency in wastewater treatment units based on published datasets, and to identify research topics that should be further addressed for improving implementation of the multiple-barrier system. The removal efficiencies of human noroviruses, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in membrane bioreactor (MBR) and conventional activated sludge (CAS) processes were obtained by a systematic review protocol and a meta-analysis approach. The log10 reduction (LR) of norovirus GII and enterovirus in MBR were 3.35 (95% confidence interval: 2.39, 4.30) and 2.71 (1.52, 3.89), respectively. The LR values of rotavirus, norovirus GI and GII in CAS processes were 0.87 (0.20, 1.53), 1.48 (0.96, 2.00) and 1.35 (0.52, 2.18), respectively. The systematic review process eliminated a substantial number of articles about virus removal in wastewater treatment because of the lack of information required for the meta-analysis. It is recommended that future publications should explicitly describe their treatment of left-censored datasets. Indicators, surrogates and methodologies appropriate for validating virus removal performance during daily operation of wastewater reclamation systems also need to be identified. PMID:26985655

  7. Risk management of viral infectious diseases in wastewater reclamation and reuse: Review.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Toru; Katayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Inappropriate usage of reclaimed wastewater has caused outbreaks of viral infectious diseases worldwide. International and domestic guidelines for wastewater reuse stipulate that virus infection risks are to be regulated by the multiple-barrier system, in which a wastewater treatment process composed of sequential treatment units is designed based on the pre-determined virus removal efficiency of each unit. The objectives of this review were to calculate representative values of virus removal efficiency in wastewater treatment units based on published datasets, and to identify research topics that should be further addressed for improving implementation of the multiple-barrier system. The removal efficiencies of human noroviruses, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in membrane bioreactor (MBR) and conventional activated sludge (CAS) processes were obtained by a systematic review protocol and a meta-analysis approach. The log10 reduction (LR) of norovirus GII and enterovirus in MBR were 3.35 (95% confidence interval: 2.39, 4.30) and 2.71 (1.52, 3.89), respectively. The LR values of rotavirus, norovirus GI and GII in CAS processes were 0.87 (0.20, 1.53), 1.48 (0.96, 2.00) and 1.35 (0.52, 2.18), respectively. The systematic review process eliminated a substantial number of articles about virus removal in wastewater treatment because of the lack of information required for the meta-analysis. It is recommended that future publications should explicitly describe their treatment of left-censored datasets. Indicators, surrogates and methodologies appropriate for validating virus removal performance during daily operation of wastewater reclamation systems also need to be identified.

  8. Health systems perspectives - infectious diseases of poverty.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Dale

    2012-11-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization's charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty - its social, political and economic dimensions - remain in the reader's mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal's first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions.

  9. Health systems perspectives - infectious diseases of poverty.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Dale

    2012-01-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization's charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty - its social, political and economic dimensions - remain in the reader's mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal's first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions. PMID:23848993

  10. [Management of attention to emergency rooms and the federal role].

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Gisele

    2010-08-01

    Attention to the emergency care has been criticized, and since 2002 the Brazilian State has assumed the efforts to standardize the level of attention. It was proposed the analysis of documents and acts based on the Structuration Theory that considers the mobilization of allocative and authoritarian resources as dimensions of structure in interaction, which would justify the legitimacy exercised since the establishment of regulations. The National Emergency Plan (PNAU) had as guides: the federal funding, regionalization, professional education, management by urgency committees, and the expansion of the network. It was identified the density of the documental proposals as the facilitator trend of the structural resource, innovative due to the regionalization and responsibilization proposals presented by the several actors and by the alleged centrality of the user. The financing of SUS, despite its persistent state of embarrassment, had no coercive action on the technology investment. Under the current administration there was a vigorous expansion and structuring of the network, which was made by a strong inflow of federal funds. The management by committees should be investigated and points out how fragile the management of labor is. PMID:20802872

  11. Stochasticity and the limits to confidence when estimating R0 of Ebola and other emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bradford P; Dushoff, Jonathan; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic models - often deterministic in nature - were used to estimate the basic reproductive number, R0, of the 2014-5 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic outbreak in West Africa. Estimates of R0 were then used to project the likelihood for large outbreak sizes, e.g., exceeding hundreds of thousands of cases. Yet fitting deterministic models can lead to over-confidence in the confidence intervals of the fitted R0, and, in turn, the type and scope of necessary interventions. In this manuscript we propose a hybrid stochastic-deterministic method to estimate R0 and associated confidence intervals (CIs). The core idea is that stochastic realizations of an underlying deterministic model can be used to evaluate the compatibility of candidate values of R0 with observed epidemic curves. The compatibility is based on comparing the distribution of expected epidemic growth rates with the observed epidemic growth rate given "process noise", i.e., arising due to stochastic transmission, recovery and death events. By applying our method to reported EVD case counts from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, we show that prior estimates of R0 based on deterministic fits appear to be more confident than analysis of stochastic trajectories suggests should be possible. Moving forward, we recommend including process noise among other sources of noise when estimating R0 CIs of emerging epidemics. Our hybrid procedure represents an adaptable and easy-to-implement approach for such estimation. PMID:27524644

  12. Emergency Management Students' Perceptions of the Use of WebEOC[R] to Support Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the use of software technology that is used by emergency management professionals to create an authentic learning environment in emergency and disaster management courses in the classroom. Participants were 235 upper-level students enrolled in residential and online emergency and disaster management courses at a mid-sized…

  13. Telemedicine and telepresence for trauma and emergency care management.

    PubMed

    Latifi, R; Weinstein, R S; Porter, J M; Ziemba, M; Judkins, D; Ridings, D; Nassi, R; Valenzuela, T; Holcomb, M; Leyva, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only in recent years has it been applied to the specialities of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Despite being relatively new, the concept of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery is evolving and is being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This paper will address the current applications of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application. The University Medical Center and the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) in Tucson, Arizona have two functional teletrauma and emergency telemedicine programs and one ad-hoc program, the mobile telemedicine program. The Southern Arizona Telemedicine and Telepresence (SATT) program is an inter-hospital telemedicine program, while the Tucson ER-link is a link between prehospital and emergency room system, and both are built upon a successful existing award winning ATP and the technical infrastructure of the city of Tucson. These two programs represent examples of integrated and collaborative community approaches to solving the lack of trauma and emergency care issue in the region. These networks will not only be used by trauma, but also by all other medical disciplines, and as such have become an example of innovation and dedication to trauma care. The first case of trauma managed over the telemedicine trauma program or "teletrauma" was that of an 18-month-old girl who was the only survival of a car crash with three fatalities. The success of this case and the pilot project of SATT that ensued led to the development of a regional teletrauma program serving close to 1.5 million people. The telepresence of the trauma surgeon, through teletrauma, has infused confidence among local doctors and communities and is being used to identify knowledge gaps of rural health care providers and the needs for instituting new outreach educational programs.

  14. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  15. Role of emergency care staff in managing acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Caroline; Anderson, Craig; Forshaw, Denise; Lightbody, Liz

    2014-09-01

    In June, the University of Central Lancashire opened its clinical trials unit, where staff will run complex intervention trials in a range of care areas, including stroke, musculoskeletal health, public health and mental health. One of the first trials looks at how hospital nursing policies in the first 24 hours after patients have had stroke affect their subsequent survival and disabilities. Known as HeadPoST, the study will recruit 20,000 patients globally, with the 6,000 UK research participants managed by Lancashire. This article explores the role of emergency nurses in supporting the research.

  16. Lessons learned in public health emergency management: personal reflections.

    PubMed

    Kizer, K W

    2000-01-01

    Multiple environmental, ecological, and socio-political forces are converging to increase the occurrence of both natural and technological disasters. Ten forces are of most concern in this regard. These are: 1) global warming, with its consequent weather extremes and climate changes; 2) continued rapid human population growth and concomitant increased urbanization; 3) decreased bio-diversity and consequent ecological fragility; 4) deforestation and loss of natural habitat for animal species, with resultant greater overlap of human and animal habitats, human exposure to animal pathogens, and other ecological perturbations; 5) increased technological development throughout the world (especially in developing countries with their typically immature safety programs); 6) globalization and increased population mobility; 7) sub-national religious and ethnic conflicts, and their potential for conflict escalation and large scale displacement of populations; 8) the collapse of several major countries and consequent unraveling of national identity and social order; 9) the rise of terrorism; and 10) dramatic advances in the science and technology of computing, communications, biotechnology, and genomics. This paper describes 10 lessons learned relative to the public health aspects of emergency management, especially as they pertain to disasters. 1) Planning pays; 2) A bad situation can be made worse by inappropriate responses; 3) Most life saving interventions will occur before the disaster happens and immediately afterwards by local action; 4) Public health emergency management is not a democratic process; 5) Psychological impacts are usually greater than anticipated; 6) Communications and information management are vital, but often are the weak link in the response chain; 7) Collaboration and partnerships are essential; 8) Unsolicited volunteers and aid are inevitable and must be planned for and managed; 9) Never assume anything, and always expect the unexpected; and 10

  17. Medical marijuana: emerging applications for the management of neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Ugalde, Vivian

    2004-11-01

    Marijuana contains over 60 different types of cannabinoids, which are its medicinally active ingredients. Cannabinoids have the capacity for neuromodulation--through direct, receptor-based mechanisms--at many levels within the nervous system, providing therapeutic properties that may be applicable to the treatment of neurologic disorders. These include antioxidation, neuroprotection, analgesia, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, modulation of glial cells, and tumor growth regulation. This article reviews the current and emerging research on the physiologic mechanisms of endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids and their applications in the management of neurologic disease. PMID:15458761

  18. Emergency department management of patients internally contaminated with radioactive material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kazzi, Ziad; Buzzell, Jennifer; Bertelli, Luiz; Christensen, Doran

    2014-11-15

    After a radiation emergency that involves the dispersal of radioactive material, patients can become externally and internally contaminated with one or more radionuclides. Internal contamination can lead to the delivery of harmful ionizing radiation doses to various organs and tissues or the whole body. The clinical consequences can range from acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to the long term development of cancer. Estimating the amount of radioactive material absorbed into the body can guide the management of patients. Treatment includes, in addition to supportive care and long term monitoring, certain medical countermeasures like Prussian blue, Calcium DTPA and Zinc DTPA.

  19. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. • Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. • Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. • Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. • Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not “forget” or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors’ role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information

  20. Impact of routine bedside infectious disease consultation on clinical management and outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Saunderson, R.B.; Gouliouris, T.; Nickerson, E.K.; Cartwright, E.J.P.; Kidney, A.; Aliyu, S.H.; Brown, N.M.; Limmathurotsakul, D.; Peacock, S.J.; Török, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is a common, serious infection that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Evidence suggests that infectious disease consultation (IDC) improves clinical management in patients with SAB. We examined whether the introduction of a routine bedside IDC service for adults with SAB improved clinical management and outcomes compared to telephone consultation. We conducted an observational cohort study of 571 adults with SAB at a teaching hospital in the United Kingdom between July 2006 and December 2012. A telephone consultation was provided on the day of positive blood culture in all cases, but an additional bedside IDC was provided after November 2009 (routine IDC group). Compared to patients in the pre-IDC group, those in the routine IDC group were more likely to have a removable focus of infection identified, echocardiography performed and follow-up blood cultures performed. They also received longer courses of antimicrobial therapy, were more likely to receive combination antimicrobial therapy and were more likely to have SAB recorded in the hospital discharge summary. There was a trend towards lower mortality at 30 days in the routine IDC group compared to the pre-IDC group (12% vs. 22%, p 0.07). Our findings suggest that routine bedside IDC should become the standard of care for adults with SAB. PMID:26033668

  1. Identification and Management of Information Problems by Emergency Department Staff

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alison R.; Reddy, Madhu C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient-care teams frequently encounter information problems during their daily activities. These information problems include wrong, outdated, conflicting, incomplete, or missing information. Information problems can negatively impact the patient-care workflow, lead to misunderstandings about patient information, and potentially lead to medical errors. Existing research focuses on understanding the cause of these information problems and the impact that they can have on the hospital’s workflow. However, there is limited research on how patient-care teams currently identify and manage information problems that they encounter during their work. Through qualitative observations and interviews in an emergency department (ED), we identified the types of information problems encountered by ED staff, and examined how they identified and managed the information problems. We also discuss the impact that these information problems can have on the patient-care teams, including the cascading effects of information problems on workflow and the ambiguous accountability for fixing information problems within collaborative teams. PMID:25954457

  2. Ethics and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2005-06-01

    Bioethics apparently suffers from a misdistribution of research resources analogous to the '10/90' divide in medical research. Though infectious disease should be recognized as a topic of primary importance for bioethics, the general topic of infectious disease has received relatively little attention from the discipline of bioethics in comparison with things like abortion, euthanasia, genetics, cloning, stem cell research, and so on. The fact that the historical and potential future consequences of infectious diseases are almost unrivalled is one reason that the topic of infectious disease warrants more attention from bioethicists. The 'Black Death' eliminated one third of the European population during the 14th Century; the 1989 flu killed between 20 and 100 million people; and, in the 20th Century smallpox killed perhaps three times more people than all the wars of that period. In the contemporary world, epidemics (AIDS, multi-drug resistant turberculosis, and newly emerging infectious diseases such as SARS) continue to have dramatic consequences. A second reason why the topic of infectious disease deserves further attention is that it raises difficult ethical questions of its own. While infected individuals can threaten the health of other individuals and society as a whole, for example, public health care measures such as surveillance, isolation, and quarantine can require the infringement of widely accepted basic human rights and liberties. An important and difficult ethical question asks how to strike a balance between the utilitarian aim of promoting public health, on the one hand, and libertarian aims of protecting privacy and freedom of movement, on the other, in contexts involving diseases that are--to varying degrees--contagious, deadly, or otherwise dangerous. Third, since their burden is most heavily shouldered by the poor (in developing countries), infectious diseases involve issues of justice--which should be a central concern of ethics. I conclude

  3. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide for FEMIS Version 1.4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, L.K.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Fangman, P.M.; Hoza, M.; Johnson, D.M.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Millard, W.D.; Schulze, S.A.; Wood, B.M.

    1999-06-29

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information necessary for the system administrator to maintain the FEMIS system. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are corrected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). Thus, FEMIS is an integrated software product that resides on client/server computer architecture. The main body of FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Application Software, resides on the PC client(s) and is directly accessible to emergency management personnel. The remainder of the FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Support Software, resides on the UNIX server. The Support Software provides the communication data distribution and notification functionality necessary to operate FEMIS in a networked, client/server environment.

  4. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-09-01

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world's population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China's current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country's capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future. PMID:26371017

  5. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-09-07

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world's population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China's current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country's capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future.

  6. Infectious Diseases, Urbanization and Climate Change: Challenges in Future China

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Cameron, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    China is one of the largest countries in the world with nearly 20% of the world’s population. There have been significant improvements in economy, education and technology over the last three decades. Due to substantial investments from all levels of government, the public health system in China has been improved since the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. However, infectious diseases still remain a major population health issue and this may be exacerbated by rapid urbanization and unprecedented impacts of climate change. This commentary aims to explore China’s current capacity to manage infectious diseases which impair population health. It discusses the existing disease surveillance system and underscores the critical importance of strengthening the system. It also explores how the growing migrant population, dramatic changes in the natural landscape following rapid urbanization, and changing climatic conditions can contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of infectious disease. Continuing research on infectious diseases, urbanization and climate change may inform the country’s capacity to deal with emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the future. PMID:26371017

  7. Quarantine as a public health measure against an emerging infectious disease: syphilis in Zurich at the dawn of the modern era (1496–1585)

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Gabriella Eva Cristina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is considered as one of the most devastating sexually transmitted diseases in human history. Based on historical records, the “Böse Blattern” (German for “Evil Pocks”) spread through Europe after 1495 and shared symptoms with what we know today as syphilis. Many cities took measures to protect their population. Here, transliterations of archival documents from the 15th and 16th century (provided in the appendix) are used to trace the steps taken by the governing authorities in Zurich to deal with this emerging infectious disease. One of the central measures taken by the city was to establish a quarantine facility referred to as the “Blatternhaus”. The city doctors, including the well-known physician and naturalist Conrad Gessner, oversaw the obligatory quarantine and treatment of patients with symptoms. Treatment could range from better nutrition, herbal remedies and skin ointments to aggressive heat therapy and “smoking”. Furthermore, the affliction was suspected as a sexually acquired disease, hence prostitutes and infected foreigners were extradited from the city. Meanwhile, the church used its social influence to promote a more “Christian” behavior. In several respects, the public health measures taken in the 16th century against a new and menacing epidemic do not diverge in their basic rationale from approaches used during the 20th century and today. PMID:27303653

  8. Deciphering the bat virome catalog to better understand the ecological diversity of bat viruses and the bat origin of emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Li; Ren, Xianwen; He, Guimei; Zhang, Junpeng; Yang, Jian; Qian, Zhaohui; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Du, Jiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Shuyi; Jin, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Studies have demonstrated that ~60%-80% of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in humans originated from wild life. Bats are natural reservoirs of a large variety of viruses, including many important zoonotic viruses that cause severe diseases in humans and domestic animals. However, the understanding of the viral population and the ecological diversity residing in bat populations is unclear, which complicates the determination of the origins of certain EIDs. Here, using bats as a typical wildlife reservoir model, virome analysis was conducted based on pharyngeal and anal swab samples of 4440 bat individuals of 40 major bat species throughout China. The purpose of this study was to survey the ecological and biological diversities of viruses residing in these bat species, to investigate the presence of potential bat-borne zoonotic viruses and to evaluate the impacts of these viruses on public health. The data obtained in this study revealed an overview of the viral community present in these bat samples. Many novel bat viruses were reported for the first time and some bat viruses closely related to known human or animal pathogens were identified. This genetic evidence provides new clues in the search for the origin or evolution pattern of certain viruses, such as coronaviruses and noroviruses. These data offer meaningful ecological information for predicting and tracing wildlife-originated EIDs.

  9. Quarantine as a public health measure against an emerging infectious disease: syphilis in Zurich at the dawn of the modern era (1496-1585).

    PubMed

    Gall, Gabriella Eva Cristina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is considered as one of the most devastating sexually transmitted diseases in human history. Based on historical records, the "Böse Blattern" (German for "Evil Pocks") spread through Europe after 1495 and shared symptoms with what we know today as syphilis. Many cities took measures to protect their population. Here, transliterations of archival documents from the 15(th) and 16(th) century (provided in the appendix) are used to trace the steps taken by the governing authorities in Zurich to deal with this emerging infectious disease. One of the central measures taken by the city was to establish a quarantine facility referred to as the "Blatternhaus". The city doctors, including the well-known physician and naturalist Conrad Gessner, oversaw the obligatory quarantine and treatment of patients with symptoms. Treatment could range from better nutrition, herbal remedies and skin ointments to aggressive heat therapy and "smoking". Furthermore, the affliction was suspected as a sexually acquired disease, hence prostitutes and infected foreigners were extradited from the city. Meanwhile, the church used its social influence to promote a more "Christian" behavior. In several respects, the public health measures taken in the 16(th) century against a new and menacing epidemic do not diverge in their basic rationale from approaches used during the 20(th) century and today. PMID:27303653

  10. Continuing challenge of infectious diseases in India.

    PubMed

    John, T Jacob; Dandona, Lalit; Sharma, Vinod P; Kakkar, Manish

    2011-01-15

    In India, the range and burden of infectious diseases are enormous. The administrative responsibilities of the health system are shared between the central (federal) and state governments. Control of diseases and outbreaks is the responsibility of the central Ministry of Health, which lacks a formal public health department for this purpose. Tuberculosis, malaria, filariasis, visceral leishmaniasis, leprosy, HIV infection, and childhood cluster of vaccine-preventable diseases are given priority for control through centrally managed vertical programmes. Control of HIV infection and leprosy, but not of tuberculosis, seems to be on track. Early success of malaria control was not sustained, and visceral leishmaniasis prevalence has increased. Inadequate containment of the vector has resulted in recurrent outbreaks of dengue fever and re-emergence of Chikungunya virus disease and typhus fever. Other infectious diseases caused by faecally transmitted pathogens (enteric fevers, cholera, hepatitis A and E viruses) and zoonoses (rabies, leptospirosis, anthrax) are not in the process of being systematically controlled. Big gaps in the surveillance and response system for infectious diseases need to be addressed. Replication of the model of vertical single-disease control for all infectious diseases will not be efficient or viable. India needs to rethink and revise its health policy to broaden the agenda of disease control. A comprehensive review and redesign of the health system is needed urgently to ensure equity and quality in health care. We recommend the creation of a functional public health infrastructure that is shared between central and state governments, with professional leadership and a formally trained public health cadre of personnel who manage an integrated control mechanism of diseases in districts that includes infectious and non-infectious diseases, and injuries.

  11. Borderline Personality Disorder in the Emergency Department: Good Psychiatric Management.

    PubMed

    Hong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are high utilizers of psychiatric emergency services and present unique challenges in that setting. Frequently advised to visit an emergency department (ED) if safety is in question, their experiences once there often do not have beneficial effects. Issues specific to patients with BPD in the ED include volatile interactions with staff, repeat visits, concerns about safety (and liability), and disposition. Emergency department staff attitudes toward these patients are frequently negative when compared to patients with other diagnoses, and can detrimentally affect outcomes and perpetuate stigma regarding BPD. These attitudes are often due to lack of education and training about how to understand, approach, and treat the patient with BPD. The limited literature regarding the treatment of BPD in the ED offers few guidelines. This article presents an approach based on Good Psychiatric Management that can reduce negative reactions by ED staff and make ED visits more effective and less harmful. Relevant principles include psychoeducation, the reinforcement of the connection between symptoms and interpersonal stressors, and employment of an active, authentic therapeutic stance. Training ED staff in these principles could lead to attitudinal changes, reduced stigma, and potentially improved outcomes. PMID:27603743

  12. Insertion Success of the Laryngeal Tube in Emergency Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Gries, André; Ramshorn-Zimmer, Alexandra; Wenzel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emergency airway management (AM) is a priority when resuscitating critically ill or severely injured patients. The goal of this study was to determine the success rates of LT insertion during AM. Methods. Studies that included LT first-pass insertion (FPI) and overall-pass insertion (OPI) success by emergency medical services and in-hospital providers performing AM for emergency situations as well as for scheduled surgery published until July 2014 were searched systematically in Medline. Results. Data of 36 studies (n = 1,897) reported a LT FPI success by physicians of 82.5% with an OPI success of 93.6% (p < 0.001). A cumulative analysis of all 53 studies (n = 3,600) led to FPI and OPI success of 80.1% and 92.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. The results of 26 studies (n = 2,159) comparing the LT with the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) demonstrated a FPI success of 77.0 versus 78.7% (p = 0.36) and an OPI success of 92.2 versus 97.7% (p < 0.001). Conclusion. LT insertion failed in the first attempt in one out of five patients, with an overall failure rate in one out of 14 patients. When compared with the LT, the LMA had a cumulative 5.5% better OPI success rate. PMID:27642595

  13. Insertion Success of the Laryngeal Tube in Emergency Airway Management.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Michael; Gries, André; Ramshorn-Zimmer, Alexandra; Wenzel, Volker; Hossfeld, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emergency airway management (AM) is a priority when resuscitating critically ill or severely injured patients. The goal of this study was to determine the success rates of LT insertion during AM. Methods. Studies that included LT first-pass insertion (FPI) and overall-pass insertion (OPI) success by emergency medical services and in-hospital providers performing AM for emergency situations as well as for scheduled surgery published until July 2014 were searched systematically in Medline. Results. Data of 36 studies (n = 1,897) reported a LT FPI success by physicians of 82.5% with an OPI success of 93.6% (p < 0.001). A cumulative analysis of all 53 studies (n = 3,600) led to FPI and OPI success of 80.1% and 92.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. The results of 26 studies (n = 2,159) comparing the LT with the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) demonstrated a FPI success of 77.0 versus 78.7% (p = 0.36) and an OPI success of 92.2 versus 97.7% (p < 0.001). Conclusion. LT insertion failed in the first attempt in one out of five patients, with an overall failure rate in one out of 14 patients. When compared with the LT, the LMA had a cumulative 5.5% better OPI success rate. PMID:27642595

  14. Insertion Success of the Laryngeal Tube in Emergency Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Gries, André; Ramshorn-Zimmer, Alexandra; Wenzel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emergency airway management (AM) is a priority when resuscitating critically ill or severely injured patients. The goal of this study was to determine the success rates of LT insertion during AM. Methods. Studies that included LT first-pass insertion (FPI) and overall-pass insertion (OPI) success by emergency medical services and in-hospital providers performing AM for emergency situations as well as for scheduled surgery published until July 2014 were searched systematically in Medline. Results. Data of 36 studies (n = 1,897) reported a LT FPI success by physicians of 82.5% with an OPI success of 93.6% (p < 0.001). A cumulative analysis of all 53 studies (n = 3,600) led to FPI and OPI success of 80.1% and 92.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. The results of 26 studies (n = 2,159) comparing the LT with the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) demonstrated a FPI success of 77.0 versus 78.7% (p = 0.36) and an OPI success of 92.2 versus 97.7% (p < 0.001). Conclusion. LT insertion failed in the first attempt in one out of five patients, with an overall failure rate in one out of 14 patients. When compared with the LT, the LMA had a cumulative 5.5% better OPI success rate.

  15. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions. PMID:27615348

  16. Sustainable risk management of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Martin, O V; Voulvoulis, N

    2009-10-13

    The presence of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewaters, particularly endocrine-disrupting compounds such as oestrogenic substances, has been the focus of much public concern and scientific attention in recent years. Due to the scientific uncertainty still surrounding their effects, the Precautionary Principle could be invoked for the interim management of potential risks. Therefore, precautionary prevention risk-management measures could be employed to reduce human exposure to the compounds of concern. Steroid oestrogens are generally recognized as the most significant oestrogenically active substances in domestic sewage effluent. As a result, the UK Environment Agency has championed a 'Demonstration Programme' to investigate the potential for removal of steroid oestrogens and alkylphenol ethoxylates during sewage treatment. Ecological and human health risks are interdependent, and ecological injuries may result in increased human exposures to contaminants or other stressors. In this context of limiting exposure to potential contaminants, examining the relative contribution of various compounds and pathways should be taken into account when identifying effective risk-management measures. In addition, the explicit use of ecological objectives within the scope of the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive poses new challenges and necessitates the development of ecosystem-based decision tools. This paper addresses some of these issues and proposes a species sensitivity distribution approach to support the decision-making process related to the need and implications of sewage treatment work upgrade as risk-management measures to the presence of oestrogenic compounds in sewage effluent. PMID:19736227

  17. Emergency planning and management in health care: priority research topics

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alan; Chambers, Naomi; French, Simon; Shaw, Duncan; King, Russell; Whitehead, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Many major incidents have significant impacts on people's health, placing additional demands on health-care organisations. The main aim of this paper is to suggest a prioritised agenda for organisational and management research on emergency planning and management relevant to U.K. health care, based on a scoping study. A secondary aim is to enhance knowledge and understanding of health-care emergency planning among the wider research community, by highlighting key issues and perspectives on the subject and presenting a conceptual model. The study findings have much in common with those of previous U.S.-focused scoping reviews, and with a recent U.K.-based review, confirming the relative paucity of U.K.-based research. No individual research topic scored highly on all of the key measures identified, with communities and organisations appearing to differ about which topics are the most important. Four broad research priorities are suggested: the affected public; inter- and intra-organisational collaboration; preparing responders and their organisations; and prioritisation and decision making. PMID:25013721

  18. D Geo-Information Requirements for Disaster and Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir Ozbek, E.; Zlatanova, S.; Ates Aydar, S.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    A conceptual approach is proposed to define 3D geo-information requirement for different types of disasters. This approach includes components such as Disaster Type-Sector-Actor-Process-Activity-Task-Data. According to disaster types processes, activities, tasks, sectors, and responsible and operational actors are derived. Based on the tasks, the needed level of detail for 3D geo-information model is determined. The levels of detail are compliant with the 3D international standard CityGML. After a brief introduction on the disaster phases and geo-information requirement for actors to perform the tasks, the paper discusses the current situation of disaster and emergency management in Turkey and elaborates on components of conceptual approach. This paper discusses the 3D geo-information requirements for the tasks to be used in the framework of 3D geo-information model for Disaster and Emergency Management System in Turkey. The framework is demonstrated for an industrial fire case in Turkey.

  19. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide Version 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L.; Hoza, M.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Millard, W.D.; Winters, C.; Wood, B.M.

    1996-12-01

    FEMIS is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command. FEMIS is designed to help civilian emergency management personnel to plan for and support their responses to a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. This guide provides the background as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain the data resources in the system. Database administrators, system administrators, and general users can use this guide to manage the datafiles and database. This document provides a description of the relational and spatial information present in FEMIS. It describes how the data was assembled, loaded, and managed while the system is in operation.

  20. Emergency euthanasia of cattle challenged with Escherichia coli O157:H7 - A case study for evaluating the response to an infectious disease outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Gilroyed, Brandon H.; Reuter, Tim; Kastelic, John P.

    2013-01-01

    In the event of an infectious disease outbreak in cattle, carcasses must be disposed of in a rapid and contained manner. This brief communication details injection of a barbiturate to euthanize cattle inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 followed by carcass composting in a manner that prevents the spread of infectious agents. PMID:23388438

  1. Management of Fever in postpneumococcal vaccine era: comparison of management practices by pediatric emergency medicine and general emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Khine, Hnin; Goldman, David L; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Background. The primary objective of this study was to compare management practices of general emergency physicians (GEMPs) and pediatric emergency medicine physicians (PEMPs) for well-appearing young febrile children. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of well-appearing febrile children aged 3-36 months who presented to a large urban children's hospital (PED), staffed by PEMPs, or a large urban general emergency department (GED), staffed by GEMPs. Demographics, immunization status, laboratory tests ordered, antibiotic usage, and final diagnoses were collected. Results. 224 cases from the PED and 237 cases from the GED were reviewed. Children seen by PEMPs had significantly less CXRs (23 (10.3%) versus 51 (21.5%), P = 0.001) and more rapid viral testing done (102 (45%) versus 40 (17%), P < 0.0001). A diagnosis of a viral infection was more common in the PED, while a diagnosis of bacterial infection (including otitis media) was more common in the GED. More GED patients were prescribed antibiotics (41% versus 27%, P = 0.002), while more PED patients were treated with oseltamivir (6.7% versus 0.4%, P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our findings identify important differences in the care of the young, well-appearing febrile child by PEMPs and GEMPs and highlight the need for standardization of care.

  2. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC “usability”. To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found “easy to use” (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post

  3. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC "usability". To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found "easy to use" (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post-intervention 97

  4. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) data management guide, version 1.4.5

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L.

    1998-06-26

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) information resources are described in this FEMIS Data Management Guide. To comprehend what types of data are present, where the data is located, and how it is managed during the life span of the system, a basic understanding of the FEMIS architecture is necessary. The system is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). The capability to connect to remote CSEPP sites and share information will be present in a future release. Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide efficient EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via telecommunications links. FEMIS is a client/server system where much of the application software is located in the client PC. This client software integrates the FEMIS application, government furnished dispersion and evacuation models, and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software tools such as the ArcView geographic information system (GIS) and Microsoft Project (electron planning). A UNIX server provides data management services, ARC/INFO GIS capabilities, evacuation (Evac) modeling, electron main (E-mail), and meteorological (Met) input processing. A PC communication utility is available to interface with external subsystems. At this time, the weather collection system (Handar Met System) is the only external subsystem.

  5. Research on Group Decision-Making Mechanism of Internet Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kefan; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wu; Shi, Zhao

    With the development of information technology, internet has become a popular term and internet emergency has an intensive influence on people's life. This article offers a short history of internet emergency management. It discusses the definition, characteristics, and factor of internet emergency management. A group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency is presented based on the discussion. The authors establish a so-called Rough Set Scenario Flow Graphs (RSSFG) of group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency management and make an empirical analysis based on the RSSFG approach. The experimental results confirm that this approach is effective in internet emergency decision-making.

  6. Knowledge and confidence of a convenience sample of australasian emergency doctors in managing dental emergencies: results of a survey.

    PubMed

    Samaei, Hossein; Weiland, Tracey Joy; Dilley, Stuart; Jelinek, George Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background. We aimed to determine Australasian Specialist Emergency Physicians' and Emergency Physicians in Training (Trainees') level of knowledge of common dental emergencies. We also explored confidence in managing dental emergencies; predictors of confidence and knowledge; and preferences for further dental education. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed electronically (September 2011) and directly (November 2011) to Fellows and Trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. It explored demographics, confidence, knowledge of dental emergencies, and educational preferences. Results. Response rate was 13.6% (464/3405) and college members were proportionally represented by region. Fewer than half (186/446; 42%) had received dental training. Sixty-two percent (244/391, 95% CI 57.5-67.1) passed (>50%) a knowledge test. More than 60% incorrectly answered questions on dental fracture, periodontal abscess, tooth eruption dates, and ulcerative gingivitis. Forty percent (166/416) incorrectly answered a question about Ludwig's Angina. Eighty-three percent (360/433) were confident in the pharmacological management of toothache but only 26% (112/434) confident in recognizing periodontal disease. Knowledge was correlated with confidence (r = 0.488). Interactive workshops were preferred by most (386/415, 93%). Conclusions. The knowledge and confidence of Australasian Emergency Physicians and Trainees in managing dental emergencies are varied, yet correlated. Interactive training sessions in dental emergencies are warranted.

  7. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS). Data Management Guide, FEMIS: Phase 1, Version 1.1u

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, R.A.; Johnson, D.M.; Johnson, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS Data Management Guide provides the background, as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain the data resources in the system.

  8. 44 CFR 351.20 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PLANNING AND PREPAREDNESS... providing radiological emergency planning and preparedness assistance to State and local governments. (c... radiological emergency planning and preparedness of State and local governments. (d) Develop and...

  9. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: a step towards a holistic assessment.

    PubMed

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not "forget" or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors' role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information about organization, communication between stakeholders and their perception about operation, environmental and health impact, and potential alternatives for the system was collected in a systematic way. The survey results suggest that stakeholders are generally satisfied with the system operation, though communication should be improved. Moreover, stakeholders should be strategically more involved in system development planning

  10. An integrated web system to support veterinary activities in Italy for the management of information in epidemic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, S; Savini, L; Palma, D; Calistri, P; Natale, F; Di Lorenzo, A; Cerella, A; Giovannini, A

    2014-03-01

    The management of public health emergencies is improved by quick, exhaustive and standardized flow of data on disease outbreaks, by using specific tools for data collection, registration and analysis. In this context, the National Information System for the Notification of Outbreaks of Animal Diseases (SIMAN) has been developed in Italy to collect and share data on the notifications of outbreaks of animal diseases. SIMAN is connected through web services to the national database of animals and holdings (BDN) and has been integrated with tools for the management of epidemic emergencies. The website has been updated with a section dedicated to the contingency planning in case of epidemic emergency. EpiTrace is one such useful tool also integrated in the BDN and based on the Social Network Analysis (SNA) and on network epidemiological models. This tool gives the possibility of assessing the risk associated to holdings and animals on the basis of their trade, in order to support the veterinary services in tracing back and forward the animals in case of outbreaks of infectious diseases.

  11. An integrated web system to support veterinary activities in Italy for the management of information in epidemic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, S; Savini, L; Palma, D; Calistri, P; Natale, F; Di Lorenzo, A; Cerella, A; Giovannini, A

    2014-03-01

    The management of public health emergencies is improved by quick, exhaustive and standardized flow of data on disease outbreaks, by using specific tools for data collection, registration and analysis. In this context, the National Information System for the Notification of Outbreaks of Animal Diseases (SIMAN) has been developed in Italy to collect and share data on the notifications of outbreaks of animal diseases. SIMAN is connected through web services to the national database of animals and holdings (BDN) and has been integrated with tools for the management of epidemic emergencies. The website has been updated with a section dedicated to the contingency planning in case of epidemic emergency. EpiTrace is one such useful tool also integrated in the BDN and based on the Social Network Analysis (SNA) and on network epidemiological models. This tool gives the possibility of assessing the risk associated to holdings and animals on the basis of their trade, in order to support the veterinary services in tracing back and forward the animals in case of outbreaks of infectious diseases. PMID:24485707

  12. Distributed visual analytics for collaborative emergency response management.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sriram; Ganz, Aura

    2009-01-01

    In emergency response management, there is a large volume of incoming data and minimal time to process it before making critical decisions. Multiple experts, physicians, incident commander who are geographically distributed, collaboratively work on the collected data to make efficient and timely decisions. In this paper we introduce a distributed visualization environment that supports collaboration among geographically dispersed users. To achieve synchronized update among multiple users we introduce a group synchronization technique which employs an adaptive time adjusting algorithm to modify the output time of the visualization unit. In order to evaluate our system we have developed an interactive synchronous visualization unit, and tested our work by running it on varying network delay collaborative servers and achieve time synchronization among them.

  13. A bed management strategy for overcrowding in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Lynn; Ford, Suzanne; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the Institute of Medicine cited growing visit volumes, hospital closures, financial pressures, and operational inefficiencies as the principal reasons for emergency department (ED) overcrowding and called for regulatory measures to resolve the problem. A Midwest medical center with 59,000 annual ED visits instituted a bed management strategy to decrease the need to board, or hold, admitted hospital patients in the ED awaiting transfer to an inpatient care unit. This strategy was successful in improving the hold time from an average of 216 minutes to 103 minutes, or by 52%. This allowed the staff at the hospital to care for an additional 2,936 patients. During this same time, the overall hospital mortality decreased by 0.07% and patient satisfaction scores improved 1%. The greatest outcome from this intervention was realized in the potential revenue increase of over $2 million. PMID:22558725

  14. Transient Global Amnesia: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea

    2016-08-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department. PMID:27416582

  15. Enhanced risk management by an emerging multi-agent architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sin-Jin; Hsu, Ming-Fu

    2014-07-01

    Classification in imbalanced datasets has attracted much attention from researchers in the field of machine learning. Most existing techniques tend not to perform well on minority class instances when the dataset is highly skewed because they focus on minimising the forecasting error without considering the relative distribution of each class. This investigation proposes an emerging multi-agent architecture, grounded on cooperative learning, to solve the class-imbalanced classification problem. Additionally, this study deals further with the obscure nature of the multi-agent architecture and expresses comprehensive rules for auditors. The results from this study indicate that the presented model performs satisfactorily in risk management and is able to tackle a highly class-imbalanced dataset comparatively well. Furthermore, the knowledge visualised process, supported by real examples, can assist both internal and external auditors who must allocate limited detecting resources; they can take the rules as roadmaps to modify the auditing programme.

  16. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management.

  17. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management. PMID:26684558

  18. Genetic diversity of spike, 3a, 3b and e genes of infectious bronchitis viruses and emergence of new recombinants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Mo, Mei-Lan; Hong, Seung-Min; Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Il-Hwan; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-01-31

    The nucleotide sequences of a region including S1, S2, 3a, 3b and E genes of twenty-seven infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolates in Korea between 1990-2011 were determined and phylogenetic and computational recombination analyses were conducted. The sizes of coding regions of some genes varied among IBV isolates due to deletion or insertion of nucleotides; the nucleotide similarities of S1, S2, 3a, 3b and E genes among the 27 isolates were 75.9%-100.0%, 85%-100.0%, 64.0%-100.0%, 60.4%-100.0% and 83.1%-100.0%, respectively. According to phylogenetic analysis of S1 gene, the 27 isolates were divided into five genotypes, Mass, Korean-I (K-I), QX-like, KM91-like and New cluster 1. The phylogenetic trees based on the S2, 3a, 3b, E genes and S1-S2-3a-3b-E (S1-E) region nucleotide sequences did not closely follow the clustering based on the S1 sequence. The New cluster 1 prevalent during 2009 and 2010 was not found in 2011 but QX-like viruses became prevalent in 2011. The recombination analysis revealed two new S gene recombinants, 11036 and 11052 which might have been derived from recombinations between the New cluster 1 and QX-like viruses and between the K-I and H120 (vaccine) viruses, respectively. In conclusion, multiple IBV genotypes have co-circulated; QX-like viruses have recurred and new recombinants have emerged in Korea. This has enriched molecular epidemiology information of IBV and is useful for the control of IB in Korea.

  19. Emergent aquatics: stand establishment, management, and species screening

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, D.C.; Andrews, N.J.; Dubbe, D.R.; Garver, E.G.; Penko, M.; Read, P.E.; Zimmerman, E.S.

    1982-11-01

    Several emergent aquatic species have been identified as potential biomass crops, including Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus spp. (rush), Sparganium spp. (bur reed), and Phragmites (reed). This report discusses first year results from studies of stand establishment and management, Typha nutrient requirements, wetland species yield comparisons, and Typha micropropagation. In a comparison of the relative effectiveness of seed, seedlings, and rhizomes for stand establishment, rhizomes appeared to be more consistent and productive under a wire variety of conditions. Both rhizomes and seedling established plots grew successfully on excavated peatland sites. First season results from a multiyear fertilizer rate experiment indicate that fertilizer treatment resulted in significantly increased tissue nutrient concentrations which should carry over into subsequent growing seasons. Shoot density and belowground dry weight were also significantly increased by phosphorus + potassium and potassium applications, respectively. First season yields of selected wetland species from managed paddies generally were comparable to yields reported from natural stands. Several particularly productive clones of Typha spp. have been identified. A method of establishing Typha in tissue culture is described.

  20. [Management of anaphylaxis : part 2: treatment and emergency equipment].

    PubMed

    Klimek, L; Goebel, U; Glowania, A

    2012-12-01

    Anaphylaxis is an extreme form of allergic reaction that can be life-threatening. Early treatment of circulatory and pulmonary disturbances is decisive for prognosis. Initial management of anaphylaxis comprises, where possible, interrupting allergen exposure; ensuring a stable airway; summoning emergency services; placing the patient in a safe position, obtaining venous access and monitoring vital signs. Adrenaline, histamine-antagonists and glucocorticoids have proven effective, as has administration of oxygen and volume substitutes. Many anaphylaxis patients are unable to successfully avoid the elicitor and the feasibility of self-treatment is limited if the patient is inadequately informed. An educational program for adult patients and parents of children with a high risk of anaphylaxis has been developed by the German Working Group for Anaphylaxis Training and Education (AGATE). This program aims to help prevent anaphylactic attacks, foster optimal first-line treatment and offer psychological and social support for anaphylaxis patients. Preliminary results confirm the efficacy of the AGATE approach. This article presents an overview of the stage-wise management of anaphylaxis in accordance with the S2 position paper of the German allergological societies and international guidelines. PMID:23202869

  1. [Management of anaphylaxis : part 2: treatment and emergency equipment].

    PubMed

    Klimek, L; Goebel, U; Glowania, A

    2012-12-01

    Anaphylaxis is an extreme form of allergic reaction that can be life-threatening. Early treatment of circulatory and pulmonary disturbances is decisive for prognosis. Initial management of anaphylaxis comprises, where possible, interrupting allergen exposure; ensuring a stable airway; summoning emergency services; placing the patient in a safe position, obtaining venous access and monitoring vital signs. Adrenaline, histamine-antagonists and glucocorticoids have proven effective, as has administration of oxygen and volume substitutes. Many anaphylaxis patients are unable to successfully avoid the elicitor and the feasibility of self-treatment is limited if the patient is inadequately informed. An educational program for adult patients and parents of children with a high risk of anaphylaxis has been developed by the German Working Group for Anaphylaxis Training and Education (AGATE). This program aims to help prevent anaphylactic attacks, foster optimal first-line treatment and offer psychological and social support for anaphylaxis patients. Preliminary results confirm the efficacy of the AGATE approach. This article presents an overview of the stage-wise management of anaphylaxis in accordance with the S2 position paper of the German allergological societies and international guidelines.

  2. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system. PMID:15528586

  3. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  4. Guidelines for non-medical care providers to manage the first steps of emergency triage of elderly evacuees.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takashi; Iijima, Katsuya; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Hattori, Hideyuki; Yokono, Koichi; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2011-10-01

    On 11 March 2011, a strong earthquake occurred off of Japan's Pacific coast and hit northeastern Japan. The earthquake was followed by huge tsunamis, which destroyed many coastal cities. As a result, the Study Group on Guidelines for the First Steps and Emergency Triage to Manage Elderly Evacuees quickly established guidelines enabling non-medical care providers (e.g. volunteer, helpers, and family members taking care of elderly relatives), public health nurses, or certified social workers to rapidly detect illnesses in elderly evacuees, and 20 000 booklets were distributed to care providers in Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures. The aim of this publication is to reduce susceptibility to disaster-related illnesses (i.e. infectious diseases, exacerbation of underlying illnesses, and mental stress) and deaths in elderly evacuees.

  5. 76 FR 78227 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Emergency Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Collection; Emergency Management Response System AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... Emergency Management Response System. DATES: We will consider all comments that we receive on or before... Management Response System, contact Dr. Steven Finch, Senior Staff Veterinarian, Preparedness and...

  6. 77 FR 43100 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency-009...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Agency--2006--0002 National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS)--Mitigation (MT) Electronic... of records titled, ``DHS/FEMA--2006--0002 National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS)--Mitigation (MT) Electronic Grants Management System of Records (69 FR 75079, December 15, 2004),''...

  7. A Quantitative Study of Critical Thinking Skills amongst Local Emergency Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peerbolte, Stacy L.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency managers must be able to think critically to identify and anticipate situations, solve problems, and make judgments and decisions to effectively and efficiently assume and manage risks. An assessment of the extent to which local emergency managers are able to think critically has not yet been conducted. Based in systems theory and the…

  8. 76 FR 58523 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Town Hall Meeting on the Future of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Hall Meeting on the Future of the Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious... Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (RCE) Program (...

  9. [Blood transfusion: control of infectious risks].

    PubMed

    Laperche, Syria; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Morel, Pascal; Pouchol, Elodie; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    From blood donor collection to transfusion of the recipient, there are several layers of protection of the blood supply. These measures combined with huge progresses over the three past decades in pathogen discovery and blood testing for specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses, Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)), provide the greatest safety. With the implementation of serological and molecular testing, at least in high-income countries, transfusion-transmitted infections have become extremely rare. However, for pathogen agents, which are not tested and especially those which are responsible for emerging infectious disease, it became apparent that full control of infectious disease had not been achieved. In addition, the immune status of the recipient has also an impact in the outcome of infectious diseases transmitted by transfusion. Blood safety is based on several measures: education and deferral of donors with risk factors for transmissible disease, blood testing, pathogen reduction interventions, and patient blood management. This paper proposes a review of the residual risk of transmission of infectious diseases by transfusion and of the additional interventions able to further reduce it.

  10. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  11. Multiplex molecular testing for management of infectious gastroenteritis in a hospital setting: a comparative diagnostic and clinical utility study.

    PubMed

    Halligan, E; Edgeworth, J; Bisnauthsing, K; Bible, J; Cliff, P; Aarons, E; Klein, J; Patel, A; Goldenberg, S

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory diagnosis and clinical management of inpatients with diarrhoea is complex and time consuming. Tests are often requested sequentially and undertaken in different laboratories. This causes prolonged unnecessary presumptive isolation of patients, because most cases are non-infectious. A molecular multiplex test (Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP)) was compared with conventional testing over 8 months to determine diagnostic accuracy, turnaround times, laboratory costs, use of isolation facilities and user acceptability. A total of 262 (12%) patients had a pathogen detected by conventional methods compared with 483 (22.1%) by GPP. Most additional cases were detected in patients developing symptoms in the first 4 days of admission. Additional cases were detected because of presumed improved diagnostic sensitivity but also because clinicians had not requested the correct pathogen. Turnaround time (41.8 h) was faster than bacterial culture (66.5 h) and parasite investigation (66.5 h) but slower than conventional testing for Clostridium difficile (17.3 h) and viruses (27 h). The test could allow simplified requesting by clinicians and a consolidated laboratory workflow, reducing the overall number of specimens received by the laboratory. A total of 154 isolation days were saved at an estimated cost of £30 800. Consumables and labour were estimated at £150 641 compared with £63 431 for conventional testing. Multiplex molecular testing using a panel of targets allowed enhanced detection and a consolidated laboratory workflow. This is likely to be of greater benefit to cases that present within the first 4 days of hospital admission. PMID:24274687

  12. Municipal Emergency Management System: a strategy towards information and managing resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Azores archipelago is located in the North Atlantic Ocean, on a complex geological setting where the North American, Eurasian and African plates meet. Throughout its history the geological and meteorological hazards have been the most significant and had cause thousands of deaths and extensive damages. To prepare and mitigate the impact of catastrophic events there are emergency plans to guide the authorities and to instruct the population. However, a key point on the effectiveness of any emergency plan is the efficiency on getting the relevant information from the existing plans and conveying quality information to the operational teams and to the population. To address this issue the Municipal Emergency Management System was designed as a modular software with a core database and two different applications; one back-office to input and manage data and one front-end to query the database. The database is installed in a server and the system runs over an Intranet or the Internet, allowing its management and query to be done anywhere. The information on the system comprises two sets of data: (a) static data, regarding guidelines from the official Municipal Emergency Plan and a broad characterization of the county that does not need to be updated frequently (geography, geomorphology, climatology and the main hazards to consider) and (b) dynamic information, concerning data that requires regular updating such as available resources, administrative officials, pertinent private organisations etc.. All dynamic data in the core database is organised in three layers: (1) administrative organisations with geographical expression (such as province or district), (2) entities with capability to provide aid on provisions, accommodations, health, infrastructures, construction, transportation and security (public services, non-governmental organisations, enterprises or individual persons) and (3) operative information (applicable laws, tasks of each operative structure of the

  13. Delaware Estuary situation reports. Emergency response: How do emergency management officials address disasters in the Delaware Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Sylves, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    From hurricanes and other natural threats to oil spills and other manmade emergencies, the Delaware Estuary has experienced a variety of disasters over the years. The toll that these events take on the estuary and those who live on its shores depends largely upon the degree of emergency preparedness, speed of response, and effectiveness of recovery operations. In Emergency Response: How Do Emergency Management Officials Address Disasters in the Delaware Estuary, the latest addition to its Delaware Estuary Situation Report series, the University of Delaware Sea Grant College Program defines emergency management; examines the roles that the Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers, and Environmental Protection Agency play in an emergency; and reviews how each of these federal agencies operated during an actual disaster--the 1985 Grand Eagle oil spill. The report was written by Dr. Richard T. Sylves, a professor of political science at the University of Delaware. Sylves has been studying emergency management for the past 15 years, with special emphasis on oil spill preparedness and response in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The Delaware Estuary Situation Report is 12 pages long and contains maps and photographs, as well as a detailed account of response and recovery operations undertaken during the Grand Eagle oil spill. A comparison of the 1985 Grand Eagle spill and the 1989 Presidente Rivera spill also is included.

  14. Molecular epidemiology reveals emergence of a virulent infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus strain in wild salmon and its transmission to hatchery fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Eric D.; Engelking, H. Mark; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) has been known to be a significant salmonid pathogen in the Pacific Northwest of North America for decades. The goal of this study was to characterize the IHNV genetic heterogeneity and viral traffic over time at a study site in the Deschutes River watershed in Oregon, with an emphasis on the epidemiology of IHNV types causing epidemics in wild kokanee Oncorhynchus nerkabetween 1991 and 1995. The study site included kokanee spawning grounds in the Metolius River and Lake Billy Chinook downstream, in which the IHNV epidemics occurred in 2- and 3-year-old kokanee, and the Round Butte Fish Hatchery at the outflow of the lake. Forty-two IHNV isolates collected from this area between 1975 and 1995 were characterized on a genetic basis by ribonuclease (RNase) protection fingerprint analyses of the virus nucleocapsid, glycoprotein, and nonvirion genes. Analysis of the 16 identified composite haplotypes suggested that both virus evolution and introduction of new IHNV strains contributed to the genetic diversity observed. The results indicated that the 1991–1995 epidemics in kokanee from Lake Billy Chinook were due to a newly introduced IHNV type that was first detected in spawning adult kokanee in 1988 and that this virus type was transmitted from the wild kokanee to hatchery fish downstream in 1991. Twelve IHNV haplotypes were found at Round Butte Fish Hatchery, indicating a series of virus displacement events during the 20-year period examined. This work shows that IHNV traffic can be much more complex than was previously recognized, and the results have implications for fisheries management at the hatchery and throughout the watershed.

  15. Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infectious uveitis is one of the most common and visually devastating causes of uveitis in the US and worldwide. This review provides a summary of the identification, treatment, and complications associated with certain forms of viral, bacterial, fungal, helminthic, and parasitic uveitis. In particular, this article reviews the literature on identification and treatment of acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus, varicella virus, and cytomegalovirus. While no agreed-upon treatment has been identified, the characteristics of Ebola virus panuveitis is also reviewed. In addition, forms of parasitic infection such as Toxoplasmosis and Toxocariasis are summarized, as well as spirochetal uveitis. Syphilitic retinitis is reviewed given its increase in prevalence over the last decade. The importance of early identification and treatment of infectious uveitis is emphasized. Early identification can be achieved with a combination of maintaining a high suspicion, recognizing certain clinical features, utilizing multi-modal imaging, and obtaining specimens for molecular diagnostic testing. PMID:26618074

  16. Components of Comprehensive School and School District Emergency Management Plans. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 2, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Helpful Hints" offers a quick overview of school emergency preparedness topics that are frequently the subject of inquiries. This issue describes and contains a checklist that can assist schools and school districts in developing a new emergency management plan or refreshing their current one. To use the checklist, individuals should consider…

  17. 44 CFR 351.20 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... emergency plans and preparedness in accordance with FEMA procedures in 44 CFR part 350. (h) Develop... governments for developing, reviewing, assessing and testing the State and local radiological emergency plans..., for the preparation, review and testing of State and local radiological emergency plans. (e)...

  18. Automatic search of geospatial features for disaster and emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanrong; Zhao, Tian; Li, Weidong

    2010-12-01

    Although the fast development of OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) WFS (Web Feature Service) technologies has undoubtedly improved the sharing and synchronization of feature-level geospatial information across diverse resources, literature shows that there are still apparent limitations in the current implementation of OGC WFSs. Currently, the implementation of OGC WFSs only emphasizes syntactic data interoperability via standard interfaces and cannot resolve semantic heterogeneity problems in geospatial data sharing. To help emergency responders and disaster managers find new ways of efficiently searching for needed geospatial information at the feature level, this paper aims to propose a framework for automatic search of geospatial features using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies and natural language interfaces. We focus on two major tasks: (1) intelligent geospatial feature retrieval using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies; (2) a natural language interface to a geospatial knowledge base and web feature services over the Semantic Web. Based on the proposed framework we implemented a prototype. Results show that it is practical to directly discover desirable geospatial features from multiple semantically heterogeneous sources using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies and natural language interfaces.

  19. 78 FR 69861 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Agency, Federal Government--001 National Defense Executive Reserve System of Records AGENCY.../Federal Emergency Management Agency/Federal Government--001 National Defense Executive Reserve System...

  20. 76 FR 72712 - Agency Emergency Processing Under the Office of Management and Budget Review; Submission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Emergency Processing Under the Office of Management and Budget Review; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review; Comment Request; Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Economic Hardship Fee Reduction Guidance...

  1. Incident Management Systems and Building Emergency Management Capacity during the 2014-2016 Ebola Epidemic - Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jennifer C; Pinto, Meredith; Gill, Adrienne; Hills, Katherine E; Murthy, Shivani; Podgornik, Michelle N; Hernandez, Luis F; Rose, Dale A; Angulo, Frederick J; Rzeszotarski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a functional incident management system (IMS) is important in the management of public health emergencies. In response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC established the Emergency Management Development Team (EMDT) to coordinate technical assistance for developing emergency management capacity in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. EMDT staff, deployed staff, and partners supported each country to develop response goals and objectives, identify gaps in response capabilities, and determine strategies for coordinating response activities. To monitor key programmatic milestones and assess changes in emergency management and response capacities over time, EMDT implemented three data collection methods in country: coordination calls, weekly written situation reports, and an emergency management dashboard tool. On the basis of the information collected, EMDT observed improvements in emergency management capacity over time in all three countries. The collaborations in each country yielded IMS structures that streamlined response and laid the foundation for long-term emergency management programs.The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html). PMID:27389463

  2. Incident Management Systems and Building Emergency Management Capacity during the 2014-2016 Ebola Epidemic - Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jennifer C; Pinto, Meredith; Gill, Adrienne; Hills, Katherine E; Murthy, Shivani; Podgornik, Michelle N; Hernandez, Luis F; Rose, Dale A; Angulo, Frederick J; Rzeszotarski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a functional incident management system (IMS) is important in the management of public health emergencies. In response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC established the Emergency Management Development Team (EMDT) to coordinate technical assistance for developing emergency management capacity in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. EMDT staff, deployed staff, and partners supported each country to develop response goals and objectives, identify gaps in response capabilities, and determine strategies for coordinating response activities. To monitor key programmatic milestones and assess changes in emergency management and response capacities over time, EMDT implemented three data collection methods in country: coordination calls, weekly written situation reports, and an emergency management dashboard tool. On the basis of the information collected, EMDT observed improvements in emergency management capacity over time in all three countries. The collaborations in each country yielded IMS structures that streamlined response and laid the foundation for long-term emergency management programs.The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html).

  3. Nursing management of aggression in a Singapore emergency department: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mei Fen; Lopez, Violeta; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    In Singapore, anecdotal evidence suggests that nurses are concerned about managing aggressive incidents in the emergency department. In this study, registered nurses' perceptions of managing aggressive patients in an emergency department were explored. Ten registered nurses from the emergency department of an acute public hospital in Singapore were interviewed. Four overarching themes emerged from the thematic analysis: (i) impact of aggressive patients on nurses; (ii) nursing assessment of aggressive behaviors; (iii) nursing management of aggressive behaviors; and (iv) organizational support and responsiveness. Further research is required to better support nurses to deliver optimal care for aggressive patients and achieve positive and effective outcomes.

  4. Effective Behavior Management in Preschool Classrooms and Children's Task Orientation: Enhancing Emergent Literacy and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among preschool teachers' behavior management, children's task orientation, and children's emergent literacy and language development, as well as the extent to which task orientation moderated the relation between teachers' behavior management and children's emergent literacy and language development.…

  5. Emergency Management Standards for NCAA Division I-A Football Stadia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoogstra, Joshua R.

    2012-01-01

    In the best of times, emergency managers of athletic event venues struggle with the responsibilities of venue security. The possibility of terrorist threats exacerbates the situation, especially when security threats can involve a critical mass of spectators at an event. Emergency managers at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)…

  6. Like a Hurricane: A Citation Analysis of Emergency Management Scholarly Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Jennifer; Furay, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This bibliometric study used citation analysis to uncover citing characteristics in the burgeoning academic field of emergency management. Of the 281 degree programs listed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency nationwide, those at community colleges accounted for 17% of the total. Using the interdisciplinary database of Academic Search…

  7. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases. PMID:19220349

  8. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases.

  9. Emergent Percutaneous Nephrostomy for the Diagnosis and Management of Pyonephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Albert C.; Regalado, Sidney P.

    2012-01-01

    Emergent percutaneous nephrostomy is a potentially lifesaving procedure with a high technical success rate, minimal morbidity, and long safety record that is often used in the setting of an obstructed and infected renal collecting system (i.e., pyonephrosis). This article discusses all aspects of the emergent placement of nephrostomy catheters including indications, techniques, results, and complications. Differences between emergent and nonemergent placement of percutaneous nephrostomy catheters are also addressed. PMID:23997415

  10. Emergencies in the air: problems, management, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, C A; Pak, F

    1997-01-01

    Medical emergencies may arise on board commercial airlines. Although infrequent, such events annually affect a substantial number of air travelers. Physicians should be aware of the options available to them should they find themselves in an emergency situation on an aircraft. This article examines the incidence of in-flight emergencies, surveys the onboard medical kit, and explores various in-flight medical problems and treatments. It concludes with a discussion of various methods of prevention.

  11. Emergency management communication on university Web sites: A 7-year study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kelly L; Holguin, Gina; Scott, Tara Halbrook

    2016-01-01

    In the last several years, disasters-both manmade and natural-have taken their toll on college campuses. Extant research shows that college campuses have greatly increased their emergency management efforts. One area in which colleges and universities have made strides is emergency management communication. There has been some research examining emergency management communication across campuses, but there is still much to learn. This research fills a gap in this area by investigating the use of university Web sites to disseminate emergency management information to the university stakeholders. Data were gathered in 2007 and 2014 from the Web sites of public, 4-year universities in Indiana. The results show that universities are using the Internet to communicate emergency management information to their stakeholders. Among the most common categories of information available on the Web sites are links to other agencies, university response information, and threat levels. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27575641

  12. Project management plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-12-12

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the Hanford Site will involve the handling and cleanup of toxic substances. Thousands of workers involved in these new activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and associated risks. This project is an important part of the Hanford Site mission and will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet high standards for safety. The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER) project will construct a centralized regional training center dedicated to training hazardous materials workers and emergency responders in classrooms and with hands-on, realistic training aids representing actual field conditions. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a cost-effective, high-quality way to meet the Hanford Site training needs. The training center creates a partnership among DOE; government contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and selected institutions of higher education.

  13. WORKSHOP ON EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS AND ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH ANIMAL MANURES, BIOSOLIDS, AND OTHER SIMILAR BY-PRODUCTS: THE REST OF THE STORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will:

    Discuss the purpose of the workshop
    Discussion publication of "Contemporary Perspectives on Infectious Disease Agents in Sewage Sludge and Manure.
    Present Table of Contents
    Discuss summary
    Discuss synthesis document

  14. Emergency department management of ventriculoperitoneal cerebrospinal fluid shunts.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M A

    1986-11-01

    Emergency physicians must be familiar with VP shunts in order to recognize critical complications associated with these devices. Knowledge of the major types of shunt devices commonly used and the mechanics of those devices allows emergency physicians to evaluate patients with shunts in an orderly manner.

  15. Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Dunmire, Samantha K.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Balfour, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity characterized by sore throat, cervical lymph node enlargement, fatigue and fever most often seen in adolescents and young adults and lasting several weeks. It can be caused by a number of pathogens, but this chapter only discusses infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that infects at least 90% of the population worldwide. The virus is spread by intimate oral contact among teenagers and young adults. How preadolescents acquire the virus is not known. A typical clinical picture with a positive heterophile test is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis, but heterophile antibodies are not specific and do not develop in some patients. EBV-specific antibody profiles are the best choice for staging EBV infection. In addition to causing acute illness, there can also be long-term consequences as the result of acquisition of the virus. Several EBV related illnesses occur including certain cancers and autoimmune diseases, as well as complications of primary immunodeficiency in persons with the certain genetic mutations. A major obstacle to understanding these sequelae has been the lack of an efficient animal model for EBV infection, although progress in primate and mouse models has recently been made. Key future challenges are to develop protective vaccines and effective treatment regimens. PMID:26424648

  16. Towards a better management of complex emergencies through crisis management meta-modelling.

    PubMed

    Lauras, Matthieu; Truptil, Sébastien; Bénaben, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Managing complex emergency situations is a challenging task, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the partners involved and the critical nature of such events. Whatever approach is adopted to support this objective, one unavoidable issue is knowledge management. In the context of our research project, gathering, formalising and exploiting all the knowledge and information about a given crisis situation is a critical requirement. This paper presents some research results concerning this specific topic: from a theoretical point of view, the generic dimensions of crisis characterisation are defined, while from a technical point of view, we describe a software solution able to collect that knowledge (based on meta-models and ontologies). This is used to confront the characteristics of the situation (context) with characteristics of the resources (relief system) in order to design a suitable response. Finally, an illustrative example concerning a crash between a tanker truck and a train is described.

  17. Towards a better management of complex emergencies through crisis management meta-modelling.

    PubMed

    Lauras, Matthieu; Truptil, Sébastien; Bénaben, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Managing complex emergency situations is a challenging task, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the partners involved and the critical nature of such events. Whatever approach is adopted to support this objective, one unavoidable issue is knowledge management. In the context of our research project, gathering, formalising and exploiting all the knowledge and information about a given crisis situation is a critical requirement. This paper presents some research results concerning this specific topic: from a theoretical point of view, the generic dimensions of crisis characterisation are defined, while from a technical point of view, we describe a software solution able to collect that knowledge (based on meta-models and ontologies). This is used to confront the characteristics of the situation (context) with characteristics of the resources (relief system) in order to design a suitable response. Finally, an illustrative example concerning a crash between a tanker truck and a train is described. PMID:25754216

  18. Policy-based approach to emergency bio-data management for mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chun, Seung-Man; Park, Jong-Tae

    2014-01-01

    In m-healthcare service, accurate detection and notification of emergency situation are critical to chronic patients' life. Since they are usually performed by a limited number of medical staff, it is difficult to simultaneously support many patients in real-time. This article presents an architecture to support the emergency bio-data management for m-healthcare service using personalized emergency policy. The salient feature of the proposed architecture is that the decision on emergency is made using personalized emergency policy. Specifically, the structure of the detailed system components has also been designed. The emergency condition of the individual bio-data collected from wireless body area network is detected automatically using personalized emergency policy. The message flow diagram based on the personalized emergency policy is described. This enables quick emergency rescue service provided to the patient both accurately and immediately. The prototype of proposed system has been built to demonstrate the design concept.

  19. Seasonal influenza in adults and children--diagnosis, treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and institutional outbreak management: clinical practice guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Harper, Scott A; Bradley, John S; Englund, Janet A; File, Thomas M; Gravenstein, Stefan; Hayden, Frederick G; McGeer, Allison J; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Pavia, Andrew T; Tapper, Michael L; Uyeki, Timothy M; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2009-04-15

    Guidelines for the treatment of persons with influenza virus infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The evidence-based guidelines encompass diagnostic issues, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal (interpandemic) influenza. They are intended for use by physicians in all medical specialties with direct patient care, because influenza virus infection is common in communities during influenza season and may be encountered by practitioners caring for a wide variety of patients.

  20. Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases updated guidelines for the management of Clostridium difficile infection in adults and children in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, J A; Cheng, A C; Korman, T M; Roder, C; Campbell, A; May, M L A; Blyth, C C; Ferguson, J K; Blackmore, T K; Riley, T V; Athan, E

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to rise, whilst treatment remains problematic due to recurrent, refractory and potentially severe nature of disease. The treatment of C. difficile is a challenge for community and hospital-based clinicians. With the advent of an expanding therapeutic arsenal against C. difficile since the last published Australasian guidelines, an update on CDI treatment recommendations for Australasian clinicians was required. On behalf of the Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases, we present the updated guidelines for the management of CDI in adults and children.

  1. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Cancer.gov

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  2. Targeting the non-neuronal cholinergic system in macrophages for the management of infectious diseases and cancer: challenge and promise

    PubMed Central

    Reichrath, Sandra; Reichrath, Jörg; Moussa, Amira-Talaat; Meier, Carola; Tschernig, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent key players of the immune system exerting highly effective defense mechanisms against microbial infections and cancer that include phagocytosis and programmed cell removal. Recent findings highlight the relevance of the non-neuronal cholinergic system for the regulation of macrophage function that opens promising new concepts for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. This mini review summarizes our present knowledge on this topic and gives an outlook on future developments. PMID:27785369

  3. Collection and Dissemination of Volcanic Hazard Information for Emergency Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Horton, K. A.; Garbeil, H.

    2010-12-01

    At the companion AGU special session in 2000, we predicted a significant future increase in the use of volcanic hazard information by emergency managers, such as the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC). Improvements in digital elevation models for volcanoes, the understanding of plume eruption dynamics, lava flow emplacement, and dome growth would all contribute to more accurate estimations of the likely damage and area affected. Automated "event detection algorithms" based on remote monitoring sensors, and on more frequent high resolution satellite coverage, were expected to provide quantitative data that would be distributed to the disaster management community via user-interactive web pages tailored to their geographic region of interest and the on-going style of volcanism. This year's activity at Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano highlighted the need for a wide diversity of remote sensing capabilities around the world. It became clear that airline officials and trans-Atlantic flyers required detailed regional information that was often unavailable from the suite of orbital sensors. Contrast this with the wealth of orbital data, from more than a dozen different spacecraft, that was collected daily over the Gulf Oil Spill in mid-2010, and used for near real-time deployment of ships and coastal crews dealing with the event. So what has limited the use of remote sensing data for volcano hazard assessment? There have been some remote sensing successes. The on-going eruption of Halema'uma'u has prompted the development of an array of FLYSPEC SO2 measurement instruments that will be deployed downwind of the vent in order to provide better monitoring and prediction of hazardous conditions for the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This array will provide high resolution, real-time measurement of SO2 flux from the vent during the daylight hours. However, this is a ground-based capability, rather than orbital. One of the inhibitors to

  4. 44 CFR 351.20 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... emergency plans and preparedness in accordance with FEMA procedures in 44 CFR part 350. (h) Develop... leadership via the FRPCC in the coordination of all Federal assistance and guidance to State and...

  5. Quality function deployment in emergency planning and management

    SciTech Connect

    Schaub, D.; Tufekci, S.

    1995-12-31

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is an engineering tool for organizing and ranking information into matrix form in order to understand the attributes or actions that are needed to achieve a common goal, and to align cross-functional teams strategically to quickly and efficiently meet that common goal. Although this tool has been used primarily in the manufacturing world for product or process planning, it can easily and effectively be applied at various levels within the emergency planning/response environment as an aid to prioritize critical resources. Applications will be discussed at the personal or user level, local emergency response level, state and federal levels. By utilizing QFD, these entities will be better able to address emergency situations. QFD can also be a cornerstone to continuously improve readiness to handle the crucial time just prior to, and just after, the emergency occurs.

  6. Infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H

    1998-10-01

    Infectious tolerance can be induced in many ways, does not require a thymus or clonal deletion and can spread to third-party antigens linked on the same antigen-presenting cell-the process being variously described as linked-, bystanderor epitope-suppression. We here review the evidence concerning the mechanisms involved and attempt to make a consistent hypothesis, that during tolerance induction in the Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and transplantation systems there would seem to be a phase of immune deviation towards Th2 cytokines, like IL-4 and IL-10; however, this may lead to an IL-10-induced form of anergy or nonresponsiveness and generation of the recently characterized Th3/T-regulatory-1 CD4+ T cell subset which is thought to downregulate the antigen-presenting cell, possibly via transforming growth factor beta. PMID:9794831

  7. The emerging problem of biological treatment in migrant and travelling populations: it is time to extend guidelines for the screening of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartalesi, F; Bartoloni, A; Bisoffi, Z; Spinicci, M; Giménez Sánchez, F; Muñoz, J; Richi, P; Minisola, G; Muñoz-Fernandez, S; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2014-05-01

    The use of biological agents in the treatment of rheumatic diseases has been widely associated with an increased risk of reactivation of several latent infections. National and international guidelines recommend screening for infectious diseases before starting these drugs. In Western countries screening is limited to latent tuberculosis infection, HIV and viral hepatitis. However, the increasing globalisation and the remarkable number of migrating and travelling people worldwide make this approach no longer adequate. The Italian and Spanish Societies of Rheumatology and Tropical Medicine wish to issue a warning about the need to improve awareness of doctors about the risk of reactivation of infectious tropical diseases in migrant or travelling patients who undergo biological therapy. Thus, the Italian and Spanish Societies are now planning to issue specific recommendations, based on a multidisciplinary contribution and a systematic review of the literature, for screening and follow-up of active and latent chronic infections in candidate patients for biological agents, taking into account the patient's area of origin and risk of infectious diseases.

  8. MDR-TB--its characteristics and control in Asia-Pacific rim symposium in USJCMSP 10th international conference on emerging infectious diseases in the Pacific rim.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toru

    2007-08-01

    The strategy of directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS) is achieving substantial progress in coverage and quality improvements worldwide. However, the problem of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a new challenge to TB control in both developing and industrialized countries. The effort of various countries of the Pacific Rim to fight this problem, one of the negative progenies from the 20th century, was a major theme of the conference. Asia, WHO's Southwest Asia and Western Pacific Regions, combined, account globally for almost 60% of the newly occurring MDR-TB cases. However, the problem has likely been overlooked, as it was masked by taking averages for countries or wider regions. In this way, we may have lost sight of "hot zones" with extremely high prevalence of MDR-TB in smaller areas or in population segments. The problem was basically a result of the low-quality treatment program, but recently it may be amplified in some areas by the HIV epidemic that is another new challenge to TB strategies. So far, developing countries have not been taking active measures to manage this problem. However, some countries, such as the Philippines and Peru, have undertaken aggressive efforts, supported technically and financially by the new international mechanisms, such as the Stop TB Partnership and the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. These efforts would be more effective if there were further technical innovation in diagnosis and treatment, supported by a strong political commitment.

  9. Enhancing the Relevance of Incident Management Systems in Public Health Emergency Preparedness: A Novel Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Bochenek, Richard; Grant, Moira; Schwartz, Brian

    2015-08-01

    We outline a conceptual framework developed to meet the needs of public health professionals in the province of Ontario for incident management system-related education and training. By using visual models, this framework applies a public health lens to emergency management, introducing concepts relevant to public health and thereby shifting the focus of emergency preparedness from a strict "doctrine" to a more dynamic and flexible approach grounded in the traditional principles of incident management systems. These models provide a foundation for further exploration of the theoretical foundations for public health emergency preparedness in practice.

  10. The management of radioactive wastes resulting from emergency situations on land and sea.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J A

    1975-06-01

    The term 'emergency' applies to unplanned events that have generated, or had the potential to generate, radioactive wastes that could not be handled locally. Reports of past emergencies form the basis for discussion of future trends in emergency situations, the factors that influence waste management, the technology of waste management and personnel requirements. The number of past emergencies has been small and these have not increased the volume of radioactive wastes significantly. The majority of future emergencies are likely to be associated with reactors as they have been in the past. Little change in the nature of the waste is expected, although the greater use of separated plutonium may create some new problems. The factors that influence emergency waste management fall into two categories, those that are concerned with the location of the emergency event, and those concerned with the characteristics of the wastes. As in the past, it can be expected that in most emergencies proven waste management techniques will be adapted to suit the local circumstances but there is a need for simpler and more economic methods. Trained personnel and comprehensive planning are cited as key factors in successful waste management operations.

  11. Why infectious disease research needs community ecology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pieter T J; de Roode, Jacobus C; Fenton, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Infectious diseases often emerge from interactions among multiple species and across nested levels of biological organization. Threats as diverse as Ebola virus, human malaria, and bat white-nose syndrome illustrate the need for a mechanistic understanding of the ecological interactions underlying emerging infections. We describe how recent advances in community ecology can be adopted to address contemporary challenges in disease research. These analytical tools can identify the factors governing complex assemblages of multiple hosts, parasites, and vectors, and reveal how processes link across scales from individual hosts to regions. They can also determine the drivers of heterogeneities among individuals, species, and regions to aid targeting of control strategies. We provide examples where these principles have enhanced disease management and illustrate how they can be further extended. PMID:26339035

  12. Why infectious disease research needs community ecology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pieter T. J.; de Roode, Jacobus C.; Fenton, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases often emerge from interactions among multiple species and across nested levels of biological organization. Threats as diverse as Ebola virus, human malaria, and bat white-nose syndrome illustrate the need for a mechanistic understanding of the ecological interactions underlying emerging infections. We describe how recent advances in community ecology can be adopted to address contemporary challenges in disease research. These analytical tools can identify the factors governing complex assemblages of multiple hosts, parasites, and vectors, and reveal how processes link across scales from individual hosts to regions. They can also determine the drivers of heterogeneities among individuals, species, and regions to aid targeting of control strategies. We provide examples where these principles have enhanced disease management and illustrate how they can be further extended. PMID:26339035

  13. Preoperative anxiety management, emergence delirium, and postoperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Banchs, Richard J; Lerman, Jerrold

    2014-03-01

    Preoperative anxiolysis is important for children scheduled for surgery. The nature of the anxiety depends on several factors, including age, temperament, past hospitalizations, and socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. A panoply of interventions effect anxiolysis, including parental presence, distraction, and premedication, although no single strategy is effective for all ages. Emergence delirium (ED) occurs after the use of sevoflurane and desflurane in preschool-aged children in the recovery room. Symptoms usually last approximately 15 minutes and resolve spontaneously. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale is used to diagnose ED and evaluate therapeutic interventions for ED such as propofol and opioids. PMID:24491647

  14. The Role of Veterans Affairs in Emergency Management: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Claver, Maria; Friedman, Darya; Dobalian, Aram; Ricci, Karen; Horn Mallers, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a key player in emergency management for both veterans and civilians. Unfortunately, limited evidence-based research findings exist regarding the role and experience of VA during disasters. The present study is a systematic literature review of 41 published, peer-reviewed articles regarding VA and emergency management. Trained researchers utilized a data abstraction tool and conducted a qualitative content analysis. A description of article characteristics include methodology, phase of emergency management addressed in the research, and study design. Five topic categories emerged from the review including effects of disaster on mental health status and services use, effects of disaster on general health services use, patient tracking, evacuation, and disaster planning/preparation. Findings were used to generate suggestions for future research. Keywords: Veterans Affairs, veterans, disaster, emergency PMID:24678439

  15. Management Education in Emerging Economies: The Impossible Dream?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, N. K.; Harvey, Michael; Usui, Kengo

    2008-01-01

    Providing management education in countries where poverty is rampant seems a contradiction in terms. Yet it may help the country to develop stronger competitiveness and economic development. The article proposes a tentative framework to show how management education might be implemented in the world's poorest countries. The proposed framework…

  16. School Management and Contingency Theory: An Emerging Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, E. Mark

    An understanding of the "situational" characteristics of the organizational forces that influence the relationships between environmental, management, and performance variables is now coming to be seen as a key to understanding the management process itself. This paper is a synthesis of the contingency theory literature drawn from the public,…

  17. High-Fidelity Simulation: Preparing Dental Hygiene Students for Managing Medical Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bilich, Lisa A; Jackson, Sarah C; Bray, Brenda S; Willson, Megan N

    2015-09-01

    Medical emergencies can occur at any time in the dental office, so being prepared to properly manage the situation can be the difference between life and death. The entire dental team must be properly trained regarding all aspects of emergency management in the dental clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new educational approach using a high-fidelity simulator to prepare dental hygiene students for medical emergencies. This study utilized high-fidelity simulation (HFS) to evaluate the abilities of junior dental hygiene students at Eastern Washington University to handle a medical emergency in the dental hygiene clinic. Students were given a medical emergency scenario requiring them to assess the emergency and implement life-saving protocols in a simulated "real-life" situation using a high-fidelity manikin. Retrospective data were collected for four years from the classes of 2010 through 2013 (N=114). The results indicated that learning with simulation was effective in helping the students identify the medical emergency in a timely manner, implement emergency procedures correctly, locate and correctly utilize contents of the emergency kit, administer appropriate intervention/treatment for a specific patient, and provide the patient with appropriate follow-up instructions. For dental hygiene programs seeking to enhance their curricula in the area of medical emergencies, this study suggests that HFS is an effective tool to prepare students to appropriately handle medical emergencies. Faculty calibration is essential to standardize simulation.

  18. Health systems perspectives – infectious diseases of poverty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization’s charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty – its social, political and economic dimensions – remain in the reader’s mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal’s first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions. PMID:23848993

  19. Assessment and Management of Bullied Children in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ryan, Mary; Foster, Carla Boutin; Peterson, Janey

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is an important public health issue in the United States. Up to 30% of children report exposure to such victimization. Not only does it hurt bully victim, but it also negatively impacts the bully, other children, parents, school staff, and health care providers. Because bullying often presents with accompanying serious emotional and behavioral symptoms, there has been an increase in psychiatric referrals to emergency departments. Emergency physicians may be the first responders in the health care system for bullying episodes. Victims of bullying may present with nonspecific symptoms and be reluctant to disclose being victimized, contributing to the underdiagnosis and underreporting of bully victimization. Emergency physicians therefore need to have heightened awareness of physical and psychosocial symptoms related to bullying. They should rapidly screen for bullying, assess for injuries and acute psychiatric issues that require immediate attention, and provide appropriate referrals such as psychiatry and social services. This review defines bullying, examines its presentations and epidemiology, and provides recommendations for the assessment and evaluation of victims of bullying in the emergency department. PMID:23462401

  20. Cloud-Based Data Sharing Connects Emergency Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Under an SBIR contract with Stennis Space Center, Baltimore-based StormCenter Communications Inc. developed an improved interoperable platform for sharing geospatial data over the Internet in real time-information that is critical for decision makers in emergency situations.