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Sample records for mandibular implant overdentures

  1. Early Loaded Single Implant Reinforced Mandibular Overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, R.

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitating atrophied mandible with two-implant supported denture is a common treatment modality for implant retained removable overdenture in mandible. This paper aims to design a treatment modality where single implant reinforced overdenture is fabricated for a severely atrophied mandibular ridge with early loading protocol. Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. Midline fracture of the prosthesis is the most common complication related to single implant and two-implant retained mandibular overdentures. To manage such complication, a thin metal mesh is used to reinforce the overdenture and also to make the prostheses lighter and cost effective as compared to conventional cast metal framework. PMID:27403350

  2. Mandibular two-implant telescopic overdentures.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Siegfried M; Schrott, Alexander; Graef, Friedrich; Wichmann, Manfred G; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2004-10-01

    To stabilize mandibular overdentures in edentulous patients, various connector types which can be attached to between two and four implants placed in the anterior mandible are possible. Treatment using non-rigid telescopic connectors on two interforaminal implants for overdenture stabilization began in 1989. The objective of this study is to investigate soft- and hard-tissue conditions as well as prosthesis function after a period of 10 years. This also involved an evaluation of correlations between radiographic and clinical parameters. Twenty-three subjects with 46 interforaminal implants (ITI solid screw implants, 12 mm in length, 4.1 mm in diameter; 10.4 years in situ, range, 8-12.8 years) were investigated. Modified plaque index (mPI), sulcus fluid flow rate (SFFR), modified sulcus bleeding index (mBI), probing depth (PD), distance from implant crown margin to the coronal border of the peri-implant mucosa (DIM), attachment level (AL), width of keratinized mucosa (KM), Periotest values (PTVs) and prosthesis function were evaluated. In the radiographic evaluation, the distance between implant shoulder and first crestal bone-implant contact (DIB) in mm and the horizontal bone loss (HBL) in mm were measured. The relatively high mPI scores (mean, 0.82; score, 0 in 44.4%; SD, 0.83) did not result in increased SFFR scores (mean, 12; min, 3, max, 38; SD, 7.43) or higher mBI scores (mean, 0.35; score, 0 in 70.8%; SD, 0.59), which was commensurate with healthy peri-implant mucosa. A mean PD value of 2.15 mm (min, 1 mm; max, 5 mm; SD, 0.96) and a mean DIM value of 0.28 mm (min, 0 mm; max, 2 mm; SD, 0.52) were measured. The implants were stable, showing a mean Periotest value of -1.91 (max, 02, min, -6; SD, 1.76). A mean DIB of 3.19+/-0.95 mm (range, 1.3-5.16 mm) and a mean HBL of 1.6+/-1.52 mm (range, 0.28-8.33 mm) were calculated. A correlation was found between DIB and the parameters SFFR (P=0.060), DIM (P=0.042), AL (P=0.050) and especially PTV (P<0.01), leading to the

  3. Mini vs. Standard Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    de Souza, R F; Ribeiro, A B; Della Vecchia, M P; Costa, L; Cunha, T R; Reis, A C; Albuquerque, R F

    2015-10-01

    A mandibular implant-retained overdenture is considered a first-choice treatment for edentulism. However, some aspects limit the use of standard implants-for example, the width of edentulous ridges, chronic diseases, fear, or costs. This randomized trial compared mandibular overdentures retained by 2 or 4 mini-implants with standard implants, considering oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), patient satisfaction, and complications such as lost implant. In sum, 120 edentulous men and women (mean age, 59.5 ± 8.5 y) randomly received 4 mini-implants, 2 mini-implants, or 2 standard implants. Participants provided data regarding OHRQoL and satisfaction until 12 mo. Clinical parameters, including implant survival rate, were also recorded. Both 2 and 4 mini-implants led to better OHRQoL, compared with 2 standard implants. Treatment with 4 mini-implants was more satisfying than 2 standard implants, with 2 mini-implants presenting intermediate results. Implant survival rate was 89%, 82%, and 99% for 4 mini-implants, 2 mini-implants, or 2 standard implants, respectively. Overdentures retained by 4 or 2 mini-implants can achieve OHRQoL and satisfaction at least comparable with that of 2 standard implants. However, the survival rate of mini implants is not as high as that of standard implants (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01411683).

  4. Survival of single crystal sapphire implants supporting mandibular overdentures.

    PubMed

    Berge, T I; Grønningsaeter, A G

    2000-04-01

    One hundred and sixteen sapphire (Bioceram, Kyocera) implants were inserted in 30 patients between 1984 and 1991 to support mandibular overdentures. Survival analyses were made on the basis of clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation for 15 patients with 56 implants. For the 15 patients who were lost to follow-up, 7 of whom were deceased, reviews of records and available radiographs determined outcome and observation time. The resulting Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival rate for the sapphire implants was 68.66%, mean survival time 11.44 years, 95% confidence interval 10.56-12.32 years. Uni- and multivariate analysis using the Cox Regression model, indicated an increased risk of implant failure in patients over 60 years at time of operation, and in patients who smoke. Limited experience in implant surgery were associated with increased implant failure rate. A qualitative analysis of survived implants showed a mean annual bone loss of 0.2 mm, moderate to excellent plaque control, and excellent to good subjective global assessment of the treatment. The long-term results of the sapphire implant system used for mandibular overdenture support are inferior to other implants systems.

  5. Metal-reinforced single implant mandibular overdenture retained by an attachment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Grageda, Edgar; Rieck, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. The single implant-retained overdenture has the additional advantage of being less expensive and invasive than a 2-implant supported overdenture but has a high incidence of fracture of the acrylic resin base at the point of the implant. The treatment, design, and fabrication of a metal-reinforced single-implant mandibular overdenture with the Locator attachment as a retention device is described.

  6. Implant-supported Mandibular Overdentures in Very Old Adults

    PubMed Central

    Müller, F.; Duvernay, E.; Loup, A.; Vazquez, L.; Herrmann, F.R.; Schimmel, M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate denture satisfaction following the conversion of existing mandibular complete dentures to implant overdentures (IOD) in very old edentulous patients who depend on help for activities of daily living and (2) to evaluate secondary end points, such as functional, structural, nutritional, and patient-centered aspects. For this randomized clinical trial, 2 interforaminal short implants were placed in the intervention group (n = 16, 85.0 ± 6.19 yrs) to retain mandibular IODs; the control group (n = 18, 84.1 ± 5.55 yrs) received conventional relines. During the first year, no implant was lost; however, 2 patients died. IODs proved more stable, and participants in the intervention group demonstrated significantly higher denture satisfaction as well as an increased oral health–related quality of life compared to the control group. Maximum voluntary bite force improved significantly with IODs, yet the chewing efficiency was not different between groups. Masseter muscle thickness increased with IODs, mainly on the preferred chewing side. Body mass index decreased in both groups, but the decline tended to be smaller in the intervention group; blood markers and the Mini Nutritional Assessment did not confirm this tendency. These results indicate that edentulous patients who depend on help for activities of daily living may benefit from IODs even late in life (ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01928004). PMID:24158342

  7. Two-Year Success Rate of Implant-Retained Mandibular Overdentures by Novice General Dentistry Residents.

    PubMed

    Malmstrom, Hans; Xiao, Jin; Romanos, Georgios; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical success and patient satisfaction when dental implant-retained mandibular overdentures are placed and restored by novice general dentistry residents. A total of 50 subjects who were dissatisfied with their mandibular complete dentures were enrolled in the study. Two dental implants were placed in the anterior mandible between the mental foramina by novice general dentistry residents under the direct supervision of the principal investigator. The resident attached the denture to the implants 3 to 4 months later using locator attachments. The implant success rate was determined by measuring bone loss, mobility, pocket probing depth, and gingival and plaque indices. Subjects were asked to complete a satisfaction questionnaire with the prosthesis at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after overdenture delivery. A total of 100 implants were placed in the 50 study subjects. Of these, 2 implants were lost in 1 subject, and 1 subject died due to unrelated causes. Of the 48 remaining subjects, 45 have had their implants restored with overdentures. The subjects' overall satisfaction with fit and ability to chew hard foods with their mandibular overdentures improved significantly (P < .05) following the denture attachment to the dental implants. We conclude that novice general dentistry residents can successfully place mandibular implants and restore them with overdentures under direct supervision, subsequently enhancing the subjects' satisfaction with their mandibular dentures.

  8. The implant-supported milled-bar mandibular overdenture.

    PubMed

    Galindo, D F

    2001-03-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants have been proven successful in the treatment of edentulism. The predictability of the implant-supported prosthesis has also been established. Several techniques have been described for the successful restoration of the edentulous mandible: fixed-detachable prostheses with either the original Brånemark hybrid prosthesis design or conventional implant-supported fixed partial dentures, implant-retained overdentures, and implant-supported overdentures. However, in cases of advanced ridge resorption in which facial tissue support is needed from the flanges of the prosthesis or when a removable type of prosthesis is preferred by the patient, an implant-supported prosthesis is indicated. Electric discharge machining is often used in the fabrication of the bar for an implant-supported overdenture. This procedure is very costly and technique sensitive. An alternative procedure to fabricate a milled-bar implant-supported overdenture is described. This procedure is simple and uses inexpensive equipment and materials. The milled-bar minimizes lateral and rotational displacement. The overdenture incorporates attachments that provide retention, minimizing possible movement along the path of insertion. This type of prosthesis is available to a broad patient population, especially those with advanced ridge resorption, providing an excellent result at a reduced cost. J Prosthodont 2001;10:46-51.

  9. Effect of cantilever length on stress distribution around implants in mandibular overdentures supported by two and three implants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Mosharraf, Ramin; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is no definitive study comparing stress distribution around two versus three implants in implant-retained overdentures with different cantilever length. The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate stress pattern around the implants of the 2 or 3 implant- supported mandibular overdenture with different cantilevered length. Materials and Methods: The models used in this study were 2 and 3 implant-supported overdenture with bar and clip attachment system on an edentulous mandibular arch. Each model was modified according to cantilever length (0 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm); thus, 6 models were obtained. The vertical load of 15 and 30 pounds were applied unilaterally to the first molar and 15 pounds to the first premolar, and the stress in bone was analyzed. Results: With increasing cantilever length, no similar stress pattern changes were observed in different areas, but in most instances, an increase in cantilever length did not increase the stress around the implant adjacent to cantilever. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increasing of cantilever length in mandibular overdentures retained by 2–3 implants did not cause distinct increasing in stress, especially around the implant adjacent to cantilever, it may be helpful to use cantilever in cases of mandibular overdenture supported by splinted implants with insufficient retention and stability. Based on the findings of this study, optimal cantilever length in mandibular overdenture cannot be determined. PMID:27403049

  10. Maintenance requirements associated with mandibular implant overdentures: clinical results after first year of service.

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Mumcu, Emre; Bilmenoglu, Caglar

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the prosthodontic maintenance requirements during the first year of service of mandibular overdentures supported by interforaminal implants and to assess the influence of attachment type, implant number, and bite force on these requirements. Fifty-nine patients treated with mandibular implant overdentures between the years 2004 and 2009 and appearing in the 12th-month recall were included in this study. The overdentures constituted 4 groups: 2 single interforaminal implants (1 group with locator and 1 group with ball attachments), 3 single interforaminal implants, 3 splinted interforaminal implants (bar), and 4 splinted interforaminal implants (bar). During the examination, prosthetic parameters such as occlusion, tissue adaptation, condition of the retentive mechanism (matrice and patrice), and the condition of the denture-bearing tissues were evaluated and recorded. No statistically significant relation was found between attachment type, bite force values, implant number, and the occurring complications except the need for relining, which was found significantly more in the ball attachments than in other attachment groups (P  =  .03). After 12 months following the overdenture insertion, there seems to be no relation between occurring complications and patient-related factors, such as maximum bite force, age, and gender, as well as factors related to the overdentures such as number and type of attachments.

  11. Stud attachments for the mandibular implant-retained overdentures: Prosthetic complications. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Daou, Elie E

    2013-04-01

    A plethora of attachment systems for mandibular two-implant overdentures is currently available often without evidence-based support. Technical aspects are now parameters considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Despite the increasing use of the Locator attachments, studies regarding their properties remain scarce. Peer reviewed articles published in English up to 2011, were identified through a MEDLINE search (Pubmed and Elsevier) and a hand search of relevant textbooks and annual publications. Emphasis was made on the technical complications as well as the loss of retention related to the attachments in implant-retained overdentures, primarily the Locator attachment. The evaluation of the long-term outcome of implant overdentures and complications associated with different attachment systems may provide useful guidelines for the clinician in selecting the type of attachment system and overdenture design.

  12. Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: attachment systems, and number and locations of implants--Part I.

    PubMed

    Warreth, Abdulhadi; Alkadhimi, Aslam Fadel; Sultan, Ahmed; Byrne, Caroline; Woods, Edel

    2015-01-01

    The use of dental implants in replacing missing teeth is an integral part of restorative dental treatment. Use of conventional complete dentures is associated with several problems such as lack of denture stability, support and retention. However, when mandibular complete dentures were used with two or more implants, an improvement in the patients' psychological and social well-being could be seen. There is general consensus that removable implant-supported overdentures (RISOs) with two implants should be considered as the first-choice standard of care for an edentulous mandible. This treatment option necessitates the use of attachment systems that connect the complete denture to the implant. Nevertheless, each attachment system has its inherent advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered when choosing a system. The first part of this article provides an overview on options available to restore the mandibular edentulous arch with dental implants. Different types of attachment systems, their features and drawbacks are also reviewed.

  13. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  14. Masticatory efficiency and oral health-related quality of life with implant-retained mandibular overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xu; Zhai, Jun-Jiang; Liao, Jian; Teng, Min-Hua; Tian, Ai; Liang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate masticatory efficiency (ME) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients rehabilitated with implant-retained mandibular overdentures. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 50 edentulous patients visiting the Implant Center and Department of Prosthodontics, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China between June 2010 and June 2012 were selected and received 2 implant-retained mandibular overdenture treatments. All patients were rehabilitated with maxillary complete dentures. The ME and OHRQoL were determined both one month before the mandibular complete denture was anchored to the osseointegrated implants, and 6 months after anchoring. Paired t-tests were used to compare means of ME, and oral health impact profile-49 (OHIP-49) domains scores between pre- and post-implant. Linear regression models were utilized to seek correlations between ME and OHIP domains scores. Results: The ME increased from pre- to post-implant retained mandibular overdentures significantly (p<0.001). The total OHIP score and 4 subscales scores were changed significantly from pre- to post-implant; namely, functional limitation, psychological discomfort, physical disability, and physical pain. The total OHIP score, functional limitation, physical disability, and physical pain subscale scores were related to ME. Conclusion: Implant-retained mandibular over dentures can significantly improve patients’ ME and OHRQoL. The improvement in OHRQoL is mainly because of the improved ME. An improved chewing experience, and pain relief also contributes to improvement of OHRQoL. PMID:25316463

  15. Clinical evaluation of mandibular implant overdentures via Locator implant attachment and Locator bar attachment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong-Ho; Bae, Eun-Bin; Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, So-Hyoun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical findings and patient satisfaction on implant overdenture designed with Locator implant attachment or Locator bar attachment in mandibular edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Implant survival rate, marginal bone loss, probing depth, peri-implant inflammation, bleeding, plaque, calculus, complications, and satisfaction were evaluated on sixteen patients who were treated with mandibular overdenture and have used it for at least 1 year (Locator implant attachment: n=8, Locator bar attachment: n=8). RESULTS Marginal bone loss, probing depth, plaque index of the Locator bar attachment group were significantly lower than the Locator implant attachment group (P<.05). There was no significant difference on bleeding, peri-implant inflammation, and patient satisfaction between the two denture types (P>.05). The replacement of the attachment components was the most common complication in both groups. Although there was no correlation between marginal bone loss and plaque index, a significant correlation was found between marginal bone loss and probing depth. CONCLUSION The Locator bar attachment group indicates lesser marginal bone loss and need for maintenance, as compared with the Locator implant attachment group. This may be due to the splinting effect among implants rather than the types of Locator attachment. PMID:27555901

  16. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible. PMID:26963740

  17. Strains around distally inclined implants retaining mandibular overdentures with Locator attachments: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Setta, Fathi Abo; Khirallah, Ahmed Samir

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of strain gauge analysis, the effect of different implant angulations on strains around two implants retaining mandibular overdenture with Locator attachments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four duplicate mandibular acrylic models were constructed. Two implants were inserted in the canine regions using the following degrees of distal inclinations: group I (control); 0°, group II; 10°, group III; 20°, and group IV; 30°. Locator pink attachments were used to connect the overdenture to the implants and Locator red (designed for severely angled implants) was used for group IV (group IVred). For each group, two linear strain gauges were attached at the mesial and distal surfaces of the acrylic resin around each implant. Peri-implant strain was measured on loading and non-loading sides during bilateral and unilateral loading. RESULTS For all groups, the mesial surfaces of the implants at loading and non-loading sides experienced compressive (negative) strains, while the distal implant surfaces showed tensile (positive) strains. Group IV showed the highest strain, followed by group III, group II. Both group I and group IVred showed the lowest strain. The strain gauges at the mesial surface of the loading side recorded the highest strain, and the distal surface at non-loading side showed the lowest strain. Unilateral loading recorded significantly higher strain than bilateral loading. CONCLUSION Peri-implant strains around two implants used to retain mandibular overdentures with Locator attachments increase as distal implant inclination increases, except when red nylon inserts were used. PMID:27141255

  18. Mandibular two-implant overdentures: three-year prosthodontic maintenance using the locator attachment system.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Andrew; Lyons, Karl; Thomson, W Murray; Payne, Alan G T

    2011-01-01

    Limited clinical research identifies prosthodontic maintenance requirements of mandibular overdentures using the Locator attachment system. Sixty-five edentulous participants received complete maxillary dentures opposing mandibular two-implant overdentures with either Locator nylon (n = 21), Southern plastic (n = 24), or Straumann gold (n = 20) matrices. Prosthodontic maintenance was recorded prospectively for 3 years using defined categories. Over the 3-year period, a mean 3.52 ± 4.8, 2.08 ± 1.9, and 5.5 ± 4.2 maintenance events occurred for Locator, Southern, and Straumann participants, respectively. Prosthodontic success rates of 90% in the Locator nylon group, 88% in the Southern plastic group, and 75% in the Straumann gold group were achieved. Int J Prosthodont 2011;24:328-331.

  19. Standardizing the evaluation criteria on treatment outcomes of mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Young; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this review was to analyze the evaluation criteria on mandibular implant overdentures through a systematic review and suggest standardized evaluation criteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) and clinical trial studies comparing attachment systems on mandibular implant overdentures until December, 2011 were selected. Twenty nine studies were finally selected and the data about evaluation methods were collected. RESULTS Evaluation criteria could be classified into 4 groups (implant survival, peri-implant tissue evaluation, prosthetic evaluation, and patient satisfaction). Among 29 studies, 21 studies presented implant survival rate, while any studies reporting implant failure did not present cumulative implant survival rate. Seventeen studies evaluating peri-implant tissue status presented following items as evaluation criteria; marginal bone level (14), plaque Index (13), probing depth (8), bleeding index (8), attachment gingiva level (8), gingival index (6), amount of keratinized gingiva (1). Eighteen studies evaluating prosthetic maintenance and complication also presented following items as evaluation criteria; loose matrix (17), female detachment (15), denture fracture (15), denture relining (14), abutment fracture (14), abutment screw loosening (11), and occlusal adjustment (9). Atypical questionnaire (9), Visual analog scales (VAS) (4), and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) (1) were used as the format of criteria to evaluate patients satisfaction in 14 studies. CONCLUSION For evaluation of implant overdenture, it is necessary to include cumulative survival rate for implant evaluation. It is suggested that peri-implant tissue evaluation criteria include marginal bone level, plaque index, bleeding index, probing depth, and attached gingiva

  20. The 2-implant maxillary overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Dudley, James

    2014-08-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures present a number of different challenges in comparison to the established and predictable benefits of mandibular implant overdentures. This report highlights the lack of evidence and conflicting findings in the maxillary implant overdenture literature and presents a clinical treatment of a 2-implant and subsequently 1-implant maxillary overdenture with reduced palatal coverage.

  1. The impact on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped and cuspless teeth

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects on bone tissues of immediate implant-supported mandibular overdentures with cusped or cuspless teeth. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dental Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Azhar University, Assiut Branch, Egypt, over a 12-month period from September 2013 to September 2014. Twenty patients were treated with immediate implant-supported overdentures: one group received overdentures with cusped teeth, and the other group received overdentures with cuspless teeth. The rate of implant success was assessed clinically and radiographically at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The data were collected by a questionnaire, an observation checklist, and radiography. The data were then analyzed using computerized methods. Results: Overdentures with cusped teeth showed a significant improvement in the clinical criteria, including the absence of clinical implant mobility, pain, and bone resorption, while the clinical criteria for the absence of peri-implant radiolucency were insignificantly different between the 2 groups (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in the clinical evaluations for bone levels at the time of insertion or 3 months after insertions, while significant differences were found at 6, 9, and 12 months after insertion. Conclusion: Overdentures with cusped teeth supported by immediate implants were found superior regarding many clinical criteria than those cuspless counterparts. PMID:26739979

  2. Training needs for general dentistry residents to place and restore two-implant-retained mandibular overdentures.

    PubMed

    Malmstrom, Hans; Xiao, Jin; Romanos, Georgios E; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Implant therapy is rapidly becoming a standard of care for replacing missing dentition. Predoctoral dental curricula include some training in the implant restorative phase but offer limited exposure to the surgical phase, so it is important for postdoctoral general dentistry residency programs to provide competency training in all phases of implant therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the training needed for general dentistry residents to achieve competence in this area, specifically by defining the number of clinical experiences necessary in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant-retained mandibular overdenture construction (IRMOD). Fifteen Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) residents at one academic dental institution placed two implants in a total of 50 patients with edentulous mandibles and subsequently restored them with IRMOD. The supervising faculty member and the residents evaluated the competency level on a five-point scale after each implant placement and prosthetic case completion. According to the faculty evaluations, the residents achieved surgical competence after placing two implants in four to six cases and prosthetic management competence after restoring two to four cases of IRMOD. All 50 patients were satisfied with the treatment outcomes of IRMOD. This study concluded that general dentistry residents could potentially achieve competence in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant therapy while enrolled in an AEGD program.

  3. Implant-supported mandibular overdentures in very old adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, F; Duvernay, E; Loup, A; Vazquez, L; Herrmann, F R; Schimmel, M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate denture satisfaction following the conversion of existing mandibular complete dentures to implant overdentures (IOD) in very old edentulous patients who depend on help for activities of daily living and (2) to evaluate secondary end points, such as functional, structural, nutritional, and patient-centered aspects. For this randomized clinical trial, 2 interforaminal short implants were placed in the intervention group (n = 16, 85.0 ± 6.19 yrs) to retain mandibular IODs; the control group (n = 18, 84.1 ± 5.55 yrs) received conventional relines. During the first year, no implant was lost; however, 2 patients died. IODs proved more stable, and participants in the intervention group demonstrated significantly higher denture satisfaction as well as an increased oral health-related quality of life compared to the control group. Maximum voluntary bite force improved significantly with IODs, yet the chewing efficiency was not different between groups. Masseter muscle thickness increased with IODs, mainly on the preferred chewing side. Body mass index decreased in both groups, but the decline tended to be smaller in the intervention group; blood markers and the Mini Nutritional Assessment did not confirm this tendency. These results indicate that edentulous patients who depend on help for activities of daily living may benefit from IODs even late in life. PMID:24158342

  4. Photoelastic stress analysis surrounding implant-supported prosthesis and alveolar ridge on mandibular overdentures.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Dorival Pedroso; Cazal, Claudia; de Almeida, Fernanda Campos Sousa; Dias, Reinaldo Brito E; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the maximum stress around osseointegrated implants and alveolar ridge, in a mandible with left partial resection through a photoelastic mandibular model. The first group consisted of two implants: traditional model (T), implants placed in the position of both canines; fulcrum model (F), implants placed in the position of left canine CL and right lateral incisor LiR. Both models linked through a bar and clips. The second group was consisted of three implants, with implants placed in the position of both canines (CR and CL) and the right lateral incisor (LiR), which composed four groups: (1) model with 3 "O" rings, (2) model 2 ERAs, bar with clips, (3) model 2 ERAs bar without clips; (4) model "O" ring bar and ERA. An axial and an oblique load of 6.8 kgf was applied on a overdenture at the 1st Pm, 2nd Pm, and 1st M. Results showed that the area around the left canine (CL) was practically free of stress; the left lateral incisor (LiL) developed only small tensions, and low stress in all the other cases; the right canine tooth suffered the largest concentrations of stress, mainly with the ERA retention mechanism. PMID:20467562

  5. Photoelastic Stress Analysis Surrounding Implant-Supported Prosthesis and Alveolar Ridge on Mandibular Overdentures

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Dorival Pedroso; Cazal, Claudia; de Almeida, Fernanda Campos Sousa; Dias, Reinaldo Brito e; Ballester, Rafael Yagüe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the maximum stress around osseointegrated implants and alveolar ridge, in a mandible with left partial resection through a photoelastic mandibular model. The first group consisted of two implants: traditional model (T), implants placed in the position of both canines; fulcrum model (F), implants placed in the position of left canine CL and right lateral incisor LiR. Both models linked through a bar and clips. The second group was consisted of three implants, with implants placed in the position of both canines (CR and CL) and the right lateral incisor (LiR), which composed four groups: (1) model with 3 “O” rings, (2) model 2 ERAs, bar with clips, (3) model 2 ERAs bar without clips; (4) model “O” ring bar and ERA. An axial and an oblique load of 6.8 kgf was applied on a overdenture at the 1st Pm, 2nd Pm, and 1st M. Results showed that the area around the left canine (CL) was practically free of stress; the left lateral incisor (LiL) developed only small tensions, and low stress in all the other cases; the right canine tooth suffered the largest concentrations of stress, mainly with the ERA retention mechanism. PMID:20467562

  6. Effect of attachment type on load distribution to implant abutments and the residual ridge in mandibular implant-supported overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Matsudate, Yoshiki; Abue, Masaru; Hong, Guang; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of attachment type on the load transmitted to implants and the residual ridge in a mandibular two-implant-supported overdenture in a model study. Ball attachments, locator attachments, and round-bar attachments were selected and examined. Static and dynamic vertical loads of 100 N were applied in the right first molar region. The load on the implants was measured by piezoelectric three-dimensional force transducers, and the load on the residual ridge beneath the denture base was measured using a tactile sheet sensor. The load on the implants with ball attachments was significantly higher than that with the other two attachments. The load on the residual ridge with round-bar attachments was significantly higher than that with the other two attachments. Our findings indicate that the three-dimensional load on implants and the residual ridge beneath the denture base is significantly associated with the type of attachment used in implant-supported overdentures. PMID:25798201

  7. Effect of attachment type on load distribution to implant abutments and the residual ridge in mandibular implant-supported overdentures.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Nobuhiro; Matsudate, Yoshiki; Abue, Masaru; Hong, Guang; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of attachment type on the load transmitted to implants and the residual ridge in a mandibular two-implant-supported overdenture in a model study. Ball attachments, locator attachments, and round-bar attachments were selected and examined. Static and dynamic vertical loads of 100 N were applied in the right first molar region. The load on the implants was measured by piezoelectric three-dimensional force transducers, and the load on the residual ridge beneath the denture base was measured using a tactile sheet sensor. The load on the implants with ball attachments was significantly higher than that with the other two attachments. The load on the residual ridge with round-bar attachments was significantly higher than that with the other two attachments. Our findings indicate that the three-dimensional load on implants and the residual ridge beneath the denture base is significantly associated with the type of attachment used in implant-supported overdentures.

  8. Two Versus Three Narrow-Diameter Implants with Locator Attachments Supporting Mandibular Overdentures: A Two-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Ali M.; Shihabuddin, Omar F.; Ghoraba, Sahar M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To compare treatment outcome (survival rate, condition of hard and soft peri-implant tissues) and prosthodontic maintenance requirements of two versus three narrow-diameter bone level implants with Locator attachments supporting mandibular overdentures. Materials and Methods. Twenty completely edentulous patients with atrophic mandibles were treated. Ten patients (Group A) were treated with overdentures supported by two narrow (3.3-mm diameter) implants (Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) and ten patients (Group B) were treated with overdentures supported by three narrow implants. Locator (Zest Anchors, USA) attachments were used for prosthetic anchorage. Standardized clinical and radiographic parameters (survival rate, plaque index, calculus index, gingival index, bleeding index, probing depth and marginal bone loss) were evaluated at the time of the completion of the prosthetic treatment (baseline) and after 6, 12 and 24 months of functional loading. Prosthodontic maintenance requirements were also scored. Results. Only one implant was lost (Group B) during the healing period. There were no significant differences with regards to any of the studied clinical and radiographic parameters between the two groups (P > 0.05). Few prosthetic complications were recorded. Conclusions. No need to insert more than two narrow-diameter bone level implants with Locator attachments in cases of atrophic mandible to support an overdenture, however, long-term prospective studies are required to support this notion. PMID:22754570

  9. Comparison of marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction in single and double-implant assisted mandibular overdenture by immediate loading

    PubMed Central

    Khoshhal, Masume; Ebrahimzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal bone level and patient satisfaction in 1-implant and 2-implant assisted mandibular overdentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty patients who had maladaptive mandibular dentures were treated in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received 1 implant (Simple line II, Implantium, South Korea) in their mandibular midline and the second group received 2 implants in their B and D regions (according to Misch's category). If the primary stability of each implant was at least 60 ISQ, ball attachment was placed and denture relined with soft liner. After 6 weeks, retentive cap incorporated with hard acrylic resin. In the 6 and 12 months recalls, periapical digital radiograph were made and visual analogue scale questionnaires were used to record patient satisfaction. The Friedman test was done for comparing the presurgical and postsurgical parameters in each group and the U-Mann Whitney test (P<.05) was done for comparison of post-treatment results between the two groups. RESULTS All implants achieved sufficient primary stability to be immediately loaded. Patient satisfaction was high, and there were no significant differences between two groups (P>.05). In addition, mean marginal bone loss was 0.6 ± 0.67 mm in the first group and 0.6 ± 0.51 mm in the second group, after 12 month. Mean marginal bone loss showed no significant differences between two groups. CONCLUSION This preliminary one-year result indicated that mandibular overdentures anchored to a single implant can be a safe and cost-effective method as a starting step for implant-overdenture treatment. PMID:26140170

  10. Effect of attachment types and number of implants supporting mandibular overdentures on stress distribution: a computed tomography-based 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Arat Bilhan, Selda; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Bilhan, Hakan; Kutay, Omer; Mugan, Ata

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses in bone tissue surrounding uncoupled and splinted implants that are induced by a bite force applied to the mandible and to determine whether the number of mandibular overdenture supporting implants in mandibular bone influence the stress distribution. A human adult edentulous mandible retrieved from a formalin fixed cadaver was used to define the geometry of finite element (FE) model and the FE model was verified with experimental measurements. Following the FE model validation, three different biting situations were simulated for the 2-, 3- and 4-implant retentive anchor as well as bar attachment overdentures under vertical loading of 100 N. As a result of the analyses, it was concluded that an increment in implant number and the splinted attachment type tended to cause lower stresses and the use of two single attachments seems to be a safe and sufficient solution for the treatment of mandibular edentulism with overdentures.

  11. Locators versus magnetic attachment effect on peri-implant tissue health of immediate loaded two implants retaining a mandibular overdenture: a 1-year randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Elsyad, M A; Mahanna, F F; Elshahat, M A; Elshoukouki, A H

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate peri-implant tissue health of immediate loaded two implants retaining a mandibular overdenture with either magnetic or locator attachment. Thirty two completely edentulous patients (20 males/12 females) were randomly assigned into two groups. Each patient received two implants in the canine area of the mandible using flapless surgical technique. Mandibular overdentures were immediately connected to the implants with either magnetic (group I, GI) or locator (group II, GII) attachments. Peri-implant tissue health was evaluated clinically in terms of plaque scores (PI), bleeding scores (BI), probing depth (PD), implant stability (ISQ) and interleukin-1-β (IL-1b) concentrations in peri-implant sulcular fluid. PI, BI and PD were measured at mesial, distal, buccal and lingual surfaces of each implant. Radiographic evaluation was performed in terms of vertical (VBL) and horizontal (HBLO) alveolar bone loss. Evaluations were performed 2 weeks (T0), 6 months (T1) and 12 months (T2) after overdenture insertion. Plague scores, PD, IL-1b, VBL and HBLO increased significantly with time. ISQ decreased significantly with time. BI showed no significant differences between observation times. GI recorded significant higher PI, ISQ and IL-1b at T2 compared to GII. GII recorded significant higher VBL than GI at T2 only. For HBLO, no significant differences between groups were noted. VBL and HBLO showed a significant positive correlation with PD. Locator attachments for immediate loaded implants retaining mandibular overdentures are associated with decreased plaque accumulation, decreased implant stability, decreased interleukin-1β concentration in peri-implant crevicular fluid and increased per-implant vertical bone loss compared to magnetic attachments after 1 year.

  12. The Effect of Inter-Implant Distance on Retention and Resistance to Dislodging Forces for Mandibular Implant-Tissue-Supported Overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaian, Farhad; Saboury, Abolfazl; Sobhani, Zahra Sadat; Petropoulos, Vicki C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of inter-implant distance on retention and resistance of implant-tissue-supported overdentures is lacking in the literature. An in vitro study was performed to evaluate this effect for mandibular implant-tissue-supported overdentures retained by two ball attachments. Materials and Methods: An acrylic cast of an edentulous mandible was fabricated. Three pairs of implants were symmetrically placed at both sides of the midline. The inter-implant distance was 10, 25, and 35 millimeters in positions A, B and C, respectively. A framework simulating the overdenture was fabricated on the cast. Six attachment housings were placed within the overdenture. For each sample, two ball abutments were screwed onto the implant pairs and two pink nylon inserts were seated in their respective attachment housings. The samples were tested in three groups of 15 (A, B, and C). The testing machine applied tensile dislodging forces and peak loads were measured in three directions: vertical, oblique, and anterior-posterior. A one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s HSD was used to determine groups that were significantly different. Tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Results: Peak loads for the anterior-posteriorly directed dislodging forces were significantly the highest for group C (P<0.05); 21.25 N±3.05 N, while there were no statistically significant differences among groups with vertically and obliquely directed forces (P>0.05). Conclusion: Inter-implant distance did not affect the vertical retention and oblique resistance of mandibular implant-tissue-supported overdentures; however, it affected anterior-posterior resistance. PMID:25628676

  13. Lowering of the mouth floor and vestibuloplasty to support a mandibular overdenture retained by two implants. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    In Oral Implantology most of the procedures are predictable and have high success rates. The use of osseointegrated implants as a therapeutic option for the rehabilitation of patients with severe mandibular atrophy has decreased the need for pre-prosthetic surgery Nevertheless, complications may occur during implant surgery and also once the prosthesis has been placed. This paper describes the case of a totally edentulous patient with an upper complete removable denture and an implant-retained overdenture with two implants in the intermentonian region. During clinical examination, the implant abutments were totally covered by soft tissue since the floor of the mouth was elevated. The panoramic radiography showed severe mandibular atrophy. Vestibuloplasty was performed together with the lowering of the floor of the mouth under general anesthesia and nasotracheal intubation to expose the implants. A new prosthesis was fabricated for the patient to prevent recurrence and improve the patient’s chewing ability as it formed a physical barrier against soft tissue migration on prosthetic attachments. Key words:Vestibuloplasty, lowering of the mouth floor, complications in oral implantology. PMID:25136438

  14. Clinical outcomes of three Parkinson's disease patients treated with mandibular implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, S M; Heckmann, J G; Weber, H P

    2000-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) often affects the oro-pharyngeal musculature, leading to problems with speaking, chewing and swallowing. The inevitable reduction in food and fluid intake contributes to the further deterioration of neurological symptoms. Parkinson's disease patients have great difficulties in adjusting to the use of complete dentures. It is the purpose of this report to evaluate the benefit of using dental implants combined with overdentures to improve chewing and predigestion capacity in severely handicapped PD patients. Three edentulous PD patients (2 male, 1 female; mean age 75.7 years; mean PD duration 4.3 years; PD severity grade III according to Hoehn and Yahr; mean edentulousness 19.3 years) complaining of poor chewing ability were included in this evaluation. One-stage dental implants were placed in the interforaminal region of the mandible. After completion of healing, new overdentures were fabricated. Custom-made non-rigid (resilient) telescopic attachments were used for retention of the overdentures on the implants. Follow-up examinations of the 3 patients were made between 28 and 42 months after the completion of treatment, and peri-implant tissue conditions as well as the patients' self-assessed satisfaction level were recorded. A modified gastrointestinal symptoms questionnaire, Hoehn and Yahr Scale and body weight measurements were used to monitor gastrointestinal impairment and PD severity. The peri-implant parameters indicated healthy soft tissue conditions and all Periotest values were in the negative range. The patients judged their chewing abilities to be greatly improved. Since placing the implants, PD severity had deteriorated to grade IV (Hoehn and Yahr scale) in 2 patients and was stable in 1 patient. The body weight had improved slightly in all patients (mean 2.2 kg). On the gastrointestinal scale, all patients had improved from a mean score of 8.7 to 5.7. Non-rigid telescopic attachments for overdenture stabilization are

  15. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  16. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Cervino, G; Bramanti, E; Lauritano, F; Lo Gudice, G; Scappaticci, L; Rapparini, A; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  17. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Cervino, G; Bramanti, E; Lauritano, F; Lo Gudice, G; Scappaticci, L; Rapparini, A; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  18. A finite element analysis of stress distribution in the bone, around the implant supporting a mandibular overdenture with ball/o ring and magnetic attachment.

    PubMed

    John, Jins; Rangarajan, V; Savadi, Ravindra C; Satheesh Kumar, K S; Satheesh Kumar, Preeti

    2012-03-01

    Today implant dentistry has made great inroads into the treatment modalities that are available in treating an edentulous patient. Popularity of a two implant retained overdenture has created a necessity to examine the various attachment systems being used and the stresses that are transmitted to the alveolar bone. Hence a Three dimensional Finite Element Analysis was done to analyze the stress distribution in the mandibular bone with implant-supported overdenture having Ball/O-ring and Magnet attachments of different diameters. A segment of the anterior region of the mandible was modeled with implant and the overdenture. Four different models were generated having Ball/O-Ring and Magnet Attachments. Forces of 10 N, 35 N and 70 N were applied from the horizontal, vertical and oblique directions respectively and the stress distribution studied. It was concluded that the greatest stress concentrations were seen at the crest of the cortical bone and could be reduced by using smaller sized attachments for implant supported-overdenture. PMID:23450217

  19. Rehabilitation of mandibular edentulism by single crystal sapphire implants and overdentures: 3-12 year results in 86 patients. A dual center international study.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Tangerud, T; Silness, J; Arvidson, K

    1996-09-01

    86 patients, in 2 Scandinavian centers, participated in a prospective study of mandibular edentulism, treated with overdentures supported by Bioceram sapphire implants. Implant success and prosthesis stability as well as parameters for peri-implant health were evaluated. Masticatory function and complications were also documented. The study began in 1991 and clinical treatment of the last patients was completed in 1991. The patients have been followed for at least 3 years, and up to 12 years. 4 patients were lost to follow-up. Of the initial 324 implants, 7 implants failed before prosthetic treatment. 3 patients lost 1 implant each within the 1st year, and 4 patients lost all 4 implants. 16 implants were lost between 36 and 42 months in function, due to lack of osseointegration and pain. The loss of implants could be attributable to an association, not statistically verified, between bone quality and anatomy, with heavy smoking as a risk factor. Based on the remaining implants, the cumulative implant success rates were 95.2%, 91.3%, 91.3%, 91.3% at 3, 5, 10 and 12 year follow-up respectively. The cumulative success rates for overdentures were 96.4%, 92.8% and 92.8% respectively, for the same follow-up periods. Indices for the health of the peri-implant mucosa disclosed no serious inflammatory reactions in the surrounding soft tissues. Patient satisfaction with this form of oral rehabilitation was high in all but 2 patients who experienced discomfort.

  20. Effect of Implant Height Differences on Different Attachment Types and Peri-Implant Bone in Mandibular Two-Implant Overdentures: 3D Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Ozan, Oguz; Ramoglu, Serhat

    2015-06-01

    Implant-supported overdentures with self-aligning attachment systems are preferred to improve the stability and retention of complete dentures. The positioning of the implant attachments is a very important aspect of two-implant overdentures in obtaining better stress distribution. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare two different attachment systems in a two-implant overdenture by evaluating the stress distributions in peri-implant bone and stresses on the attachments with positioning at different height levels using the 3D FEA method. Six models with ball attachments and 6 models with locator attachments-totaling 12 models (including 2 controls)-with the left implant positioned unilaterally at different height levels were subjected to 3 loading conditions (anterior, right posterior, and left posterior). Data for Von Misses stresses were produced numerically, color coded, and compared among the models for attachments and peri-implant cortical bone. The configurations in which implants presented 3 mm height differences in the bone level showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. When stresses on the attachments were compared, greater stress values were obtained from the ball attachments. As a conclusion, the configurations with a considerable (3 mm) height difference between quadrants of the mandible in the anterior segment showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. On the contrary, peak stress values around the implant observed from the models with less (1 mm) bone height difference may require leveling of the bone during surgery. However, these findings should be corroborated with clinical studies.

  1. Replacing worn overdenture abutments of an unknown implant system by using laser welding: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Mohunta, Vrinda V; Stevenson, James A; Lee, Damian J

    2014-09-01

    This clinical report describes a procedure for replacing worn ball abutments with low-profile resilient abutments by using laser welding when the implant system for a mandibular implant-supported overdenture could not be identified.

  2. Five- to six-year results of a prospective clinical trial using the ENDOPORE dental implant and a mandibular overdenture.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D; Watson, P; Pharoah, M; Levy, D; Todescan, R

    1999-04-01

    This report is an update on a group of 46 clinical trial patients who each received 3 free-standing Endopore dental implants placed using a 2-stage surgical approach in the anterior mandible. After an initial healing interval of 10 weeks, the implants were used in each case to retain an over-denture, and at the time of the report, all patients had passed 5 years of continuous function. The 5-year cumulative "survival" rate based on a life table analysis was 93.4% and this remained unchanged after 6 years. The 5-year "success rate" was 83.3% when assessed qualitatively with the published criteria of others using a four-field table analysis categorizing every implant in the study as one of "Grade 1 Success", "survival", "unaccounted for" or "failure". Modified periodontal parameters verified continued peri-implant soft tissue health. No implant still in function had more than 1.8 mm cumulative bone loss during the first 5 years of function. These results provide clear evidence that Endopore implants despite their short lengths function at least as well as other dental implant designs used in much longer lengths.

  3. Impact of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Bone Height Changes around Platform Switched Implants Supporting Mandibular Overdentures in Controlled Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Eldeen, Amany Mohy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The platform switching concept was recently introduced to implant dentistry involving the reduction of restoration abutment diameter with respect to the diameter of dental implant. Long-term follow-up around these implants showed higher levels of bone preservation and proper stress distribution and improved esthetics. AIM: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes in bone height by means of radiographic examination around platform switched implant supporting mandibular overdentures in controlled diabetic patients. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fourteen male complete edentulous patients were selected and enrolled in a follow-up study plan. Split mouth technique was applied; one side implant chosen randomly with Platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) and the other without PRP, bone height changes was assessed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) radiographic examination after 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year later. RESULTS: There was increase in bone height loss in both sides but with no statistical significance difference between the two sides after 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year respectively. CONCLUSION: The result of this article satisfied the patients both esthetically and functionally with recorded increase in bone height loss. PMID:27275316

  4. Stress analysis of mandibular implant-retained overdenture with independent attachment system: effect of restoration space and attachment height.

    PubMed

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Talebi, Saeid; Khodaeian, Niloufar; Farzin, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study, 2 implants were embedded in the interforaminal region of an acrylic model. Two kinds of retention mechanisms were used to construct complete overdentures: ball type and direct abutment (Locator). The ball-type retention mechanism models included 3 different collar heights (1, 2, and 3 mm) with 15 mm occlusal plane height, and 3 different occlusal plane heights (9, 12, and 15 mm) with 1 mm collar height. The direct abutment models included 3 different occlusal plane heights (9, 12, and 15 mm) with 1 mm cuff height. Vertical unilateral and bilateral loads of 150 N were applied to the central fossa of the first molar. The stress of the bone around the implant was analyzed by finite element analysis. The results showed that by increasing vertical restorative space, the maximum stress values around implants were decreased in both unilateral and bilateral loading models. The results also showed that the increase in maximum stress values around implants correlated with the ball attachment collar height. The Locator attachment with a 1 mm cuff height and 9 mm occlusal plane height demonstrated 6.147 and 3.914 MPa in unilateral and bilateral loading conditions, respectively. While a reduction in the collar height of a ball-type retention mechanism and an increase in the vertical restorative space in direct abutment retention mechanisms are both biomechanically favorable, and may result in reduced stress in peri-implant bone, a ball attachment seems to be more favorable in the stress distribution around an implant than a Locator attachment.

  5. A 5-year randomized trial to compare 1 or 2 implants for implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S R; Walton, J N; MacEntee, M I

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this 5-y randomized clinical trial was that there would be no significant difference in the satisfaction of edentulous participants with removable complete overdentures attached to 1 or 2 mandibular implants. Secondary aims were to test changes in satisfaction between and within the groups from baseline to 5 y and differences between the groups in implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance over 5 y. Each of the 86 participants (mean age, 67 y) was randomly allocated to receive either 1 implant in the midline (group 1) or 2 implants in the canine areas (group 2) attached to a mandibular overdenture opposing a maxillary complete denture. Satisfaction was self-assessed by participants on a visual analog scale at baseline prior to implants, as well as at 2 mo and 1, 3, and 5 y with implant overdentures, whereas implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance were assessed by clinical examination. After 5 y, 29 participants in group 1 and 33 in group 2 were available, with most dropouts due to death. Satisfaction with the implant denture after 5 y was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than at baseline in both groups and remained with no significant difference (P = 0.32) between the groups. No implants failed in group 1 but 5 failed before loading in 4 participants in group 2. Most participants required maintenance or occasionally denture replacement, and although differences between the groups were not statistically significant, group 1 experienced almost twice as many fractured dentures usually adjacent to the implant attachment. We conclude that there were no significant differences after 5 y in satisfaction or survival of implants with mandibular overdentures retained by 1 implant or 2 implants. Additional research is required to confirm long-term treatment effectiveness of single-implant dentures and the implications of prosthetic maintenance with implant overdentures (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02117856).

  6. Tissue-supported dental implant prosthesis (overdenture): the search for the ideal protocol. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Laurito, Domenica; Lamazza, Luca; Spink, Michael J.; De Biase, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims The success of maxillary and mandibular tissue supported implant prostheses varies in the literature, and the ideal protocol may be elusive from given the numerous studies. The oral rehabilitation option is an alternative to conventional dentures and should improve function, satisfaction, and retention. The purpose of this review article is to clarify these questions. Methods The search of literature reviews English non-anecdotal implant overdentures articles from 1991 to 2011. Results The results display an aggregate comprehensive list of categorical variables from the literature review. Overall success of maxillary and mandibular implant overdenture was respectively, 86.6% and 95.8%. Conclusion The literature indicates that the implant overdenture prosthesis provides predictable results – enhanced stability, function and a high-degree of satisfaction compared to conventional removable dentures. PMID:22783448

  7. Prosthodontic maintenance requirements of implant-retained overdentures using the locator attachment system.

    PubMed

    Vere, Joe; Hall, Derek; Patel, Raj; Wragg, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prosthodontic maintenance requirements of patients rehabilitated with maxillary and mandibular implant-retained overdentures using the Locator Attachment System by retrospectively reviewing case records. Fifty patients made 112 unplanned return visits over a 3-year period. The most common reasons for returning were denture adjustments (n = 45), inadequate retention (n = 39), and loosening of the implant abutments (n = 14). Implant-retained overdentures using the Locator Attachment System have comparable prosthodontic maintenance requirements to other attachment systems. Problems associated with these prostheses are usually simple to resolve chairside.

  8. An overview of the O-ring implant overdenture attachment: clinical reports.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sheldon; Piermatti, Jack; Rothman, Amy; Siamos, Georgios

    2002-01-01

    The O-ring is used to increase retention of implant complete and partial overdenture prostheses. They possess a number of advantages, including ease of use and maintenance, low cost, and possible elimination of a superstructure bar. O-rings wear over time, gradually lose retention, and must be replaced periodically. It is essential that O-ring abutments be parallel to each other. Two cases are presented showing the use of O-rings with a complete mandibular implant overdenture and a maxillary removable partial denture. PMID:12498450

  9. A Sequential Approach to Implant-Supported Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Fabrication of implant-supported maxillary or mandibular overdentures can seem to be difficult procedures. Many things could go wrong and/or unnoticed until the fabrication has been completed. Implants must be correctly surgically placed in viable bone at the proper angulation and spacing within an arch. The type of attachment must be considered and future treatment of the appliance should be simple and efficient. The appliance must function not only initially but also for many years to come. The author has found the use of the GPS attachment to be an ideal tool to achieve the goals of retention and stability. Careful planning is the most important part of this process, and understanding the benefits and risks of creating overdentures should be well understood by the dentists. By sequentially planning and treating these types of cases, the patient is able to function reasonably during the stages of implant healing. The final prosthesis is created and remaining teeth that held the transitional appliance in place are remove on the day of final seating. This is an excellent simplified retentive system option for those patients who are anxious about losing their teeth, even those teeth that are diseased and ugly. PMID:27039540

  10. Effect of neutral zone technique on marginal bone loss around implant-supported overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare changes in marginal bone height around immediately loaded implants supporting a mandibular overdenture constructed according to the neutral zone technique with changes around overdentures constructed according to the conventional methods. Materials and Methods: Twelve completely edentulous male patients were randomly allocated to two equal groups of patients. Patients in the first group received conventionally constructed complete dentures and patients in the second group received complete dentures constructed using the neutral zone record. All the patients received two single-piece titanium implants placed bilaterally in the mandibular canine regions using flapless surgery, which were then immediately loaded by the dentures. Marginal bone height was radiographically evaluated at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months after implant loading. Results: There was a significant loss in marginal bone height around the supporting implants in each study group. However, no significant differences in marginal bone height were recorded between the study groups over the observation period (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Marginal bone height changes induced by overdentures constructed with neutral zone technique on immediately loaded implants are not different from those changes induced by overdentures constructed with a conventional method. PMID:26942118

  11. Single implant in the mandibular molar region of edentulous patient.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun-Jiang; Wen, Cai; Teng, Ming-Hua; Liang, Xing

    2013-09-01

    Implant-retained overdentures are a valid treatment option for edentulous patients, especially for patients with severe alveolar ridge atrophy. A central single implant is considered adequate to retain an overdenture in the edentulous mandible. However, for some patients, there is no sufficient bone height, or width in the interforaminal region of the mandible for insertion of the implant. This case report illustrates that the insertion of a single implant in the mandibular molar region might stabilize the prosthesis, and might improve the oral health-related quality of life and chewing function. A Locator attachment was used in this case to retain the overdenture. The one-year clinical results are promising. However, long-term clinical results and randomized clinical trials are needed before this method can be widely used in clinical application.

  12. Comparison of Three Attachments in Implant-Tissue Supported Overdentures: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaian, F.; Alaie, F.; Seyedan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Retention and resistance of the implant-tissue supported overdenture may be affected by the type of attachment. The aim of this research was to compare the retention and resistance of Nobel Biocare Ball (NBB), Nobel Biocare Bar and Clip (NBBC) and Sterngold ERA Red (ERAR) attachments on an implant-tissue supported overdenture model. Materials and Methods: The attachment samples were divided into 3 groups of NBB, NBBC, and ERAR (5 samples in each group). Two parallel Nobel Biocare Branemark implants were placed symmetrically at the symphysis region of a mandibular test model. A metallic overdenture was fabricated precisely adapted to the model and attached to a Zwick testing machine (crosshead speed of 51 mm/min). Dislodging tensile forces were applied in three vertical, oblique, anterior-posterior directions and two situations, at the beginning and after 100 times of insertion/removal of the overdenture, for each sample. The maximum dislodging force was measured. A One-way ANOVA test was employed followed by Tukey’s test. Results: ERAR was the most retentive and resistant in both situations. NBB and NBBC showed the same anterior-posterior resistance at the beginning. All test groups represented a large amount of retention and resistance loss after the insertion/removal of the overdenture, while NBBC showed a higher loss of anterior-posterior resistance than NB. Conclusion: A highest level of retention and resistance was seen in ERAR. The retention and resistance were affected by the wear of attachments. PMID:21998784

  13. Implant overdenture and Locator system in edentulous patient with severely resorbed mandible - a case report.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Camelia; Gălbinaşu, Bogdan Mihai; Manolea, Horia; Pătraşcu, Ion

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that the main objective of implants in the edentulous jaw is to provide support for fixed prostheses or to stabilize complete dentures. Various attachment systems were developed for universal use in partially and completely edentulous patients such as clasps, cone-shape telescope copings, magnets, bar systems, locators. The aim of this case report is to present the Locator attachment that does not use the splinting of implants. Four implants were placed in the foraminal region and the Locator attachment system was used to connect overdentures to mandibular dental implants. The results proved that the Locator attachment system offers the possibility to obtain a higher retention and an improved stability for overdentures in edentulous patients with a severely resorbed mandible and lack of vertical space between the arches.

  14. A finite element study on stress distribution of two different attachment designs under implant supported overdenture

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Yousief, Salah A.; Soliman, Tarek A.; Saleh, Mahmoud M.; Omar, Wael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate stress patterns generated within implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained by two different attachment types: ball and socket and locator attachments. Materials and methods Commercial CAD/CAM and finite element analysis software packages were utilized to construct two 3D finite element models for the two attachment types. Unilateral masticatory compressive loads of 50, 100, and 150 N were applied vertically to the overdentures, parallel to the longitudinal axes of the implants. Loads were directed toward the central fossa in the molar region of each overdenture, that linear static analysis was carried out to find the generated stresses and deformation on each part of the studied model. Results According to FEA results the ball attachment neck is highly stressed in comparison to the locator one. On the other hand mucosa and cortical bone received less stresses under ball and socket attachment. Conclusions Locator and ball and socket attachments induce equivalent stresses on bone surrounding implants. Locator attachment performance was superior to that of the ball and socket attachment in the implants, nylon caps, and overdenture. Locator attachments are highly recommended and can increase the interval between successive maintenance sessions. PMID:26644755

  15. Preliminary In Vitro Study on O-Ring Wear in Mini-Implant-Retained Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Carolina Andrade; Souza, Raphael Freitas; Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Vecchia, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Bruniera, João Felipe; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha

    2016-01-01

    This preliminary in vitro study evaluated the simulated retention force of O-rings used for mini-implant overdenture treatment and the effect of mechanical fatigue corresponding to 6 months of wear. A mandibular overdenture analog device was attached to two mini-implants and underwent a tensile strength test before and after the application of insertion-removal and simulated masticatory cycles. Insertion-removal cycles led to a retention loss of 24%, whereas masticatory cycles did not influence retention. Micro-CT scans showed minor deformation following mechanical cycling, but the changes were milder than those observed in similar clinical specimens. Both experimental loading methods led to physical changes in the O-rings, which explains in part the similar clinically observed wear. PMID:27479342

  16. Biomaterial aspects: A key factor in the longevity of implant overdenture attachment systems

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: New attachment systems are released for mandibular two-implant overdentures often without evidence-based support. Biomaterial aspects are now the parameters considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Studies regarding their properties remain scarce. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to help the clinician in selrcting the most adapted stud attachments according evidence-based dentistry. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted using specific databases (PubMed, Medline, and Elsevier libraries). Peer-reviewed articles published in English up to July 2014 were identified. Emphasis was given on the biomaterial aspects and technical complications. No hand search was added. Results: The electronic search generated 115 full-text papers, of which 84 papers were included in the review. The majority were clinical and in vitro studies. Some review articles were also considered. Papers reported survival and failures of overdenture connection systems. Emphasis was laid on attachment deformation. Conclusion: Implant overdentures long-term follow-up studies may provide useful guidelines for the clinician in selecting the type of attachment system and overdenture design. Locator attachments are more and more used, with lesser complications reported. PMID:26312224

  17. Does a mandibular overdenture improve nutrient intake and markers of nutritional status better than conventional complete denture? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Toru; Martiniuk, Alexandra LC; Irie, Koichiro; Sokejima, Shigeru; Lee, Crystal Man Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The need for denture treatment in public health will increase as the population ages. However, the impact of dentures on nutrition, particularly overdenture treatment, remains unclear although the physical and psychological effects are known. We investigated whether treatment with a mandibular implant supported overdenture improves nutrient intake and markers of nutritional status better than a conventional complete denture in edentulous patients. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for eligible studies published up to April 2016. We included studies which compared the treatment effect of an overdenture to conventional denture on nutrition, in which primary outcomes included changes in intake of macronutrients and/or micronutrients and/or indicators of nutritional status. Two reviewers independently evaluated eligible studies and assessed the risk of bias. We used a fixed effects model to estimate the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% CI for change in body mass index (BMI), albumin and serum vitamin B12 between overdenture and conventional denture 6 months after treatment. Results Of 108 eligible studies, 8 studies involving 901 participants were included in the narrative appraisal. Four studies reported changes in markers of nutritional status and nutrient intake after treatment with a prosthetic, regardless of type. In a meta-analysis of 322 participants aged 65 years or older from three studies, pooled analysis suggested no significant difference in change in BMI between an overdenture and conventional denture 6 months after treatment (WMD=−0.18 kg/m2 (95% CI −0.52 to 0.16)), and no significant difference in change in albumin or vitamin B12 between the two treatments. Conclusions The modifying effect of overdenture treatment on nutritional status might be limited. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of

  18. Rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures in total edentulous patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Andrés, Gustavo; Faus-López, Joan; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The main aim of this review article is to discuss implant-supported overdentures (ISOs) as treatment in edentulous patients. Besides, we will try to discuss among the different treatment options in such patients and to analyze their validity when ISOs are compared with other clinical modalities. At the same time, we will try to suggest clinical guidelines supported by current clinical studies. Material and methods: We performed a Medline search and review of pertinent articles on the mentioned subject from 1986 to 2011. As a searching strategy, we used the following words: implant-supported overdentures, attachment systems, Locator attachment, cantilever, fixed prosthesis. Results and conclusions: Implant-supported overdentures constitute an accurate and predictable treatment option and achieve a higher patients’ satisfaction. This type of treatment constitutes a cheaper treatment than fixed prostheses and in some patients, with loss of lip support or with an interoclusal space larger than 15 mm, the choice of implant-supported overdentures seems to prevent future aesthetic or phonetic problems. Key words:Overdentures, implant occlusion, implant rehabilitation, total edentulous rehabilitation, fixed prosthesis. PMID:24455093

  19. Telescopic Overdenture and Implant Supported Fixed Partial Denture: A Pragmatic Treatment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Cenk Durmuşlar, M.; Şahın, Onur; Köroğlu, Ayşegül; İşısağ, Özer

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents a patient who had been rehabilitated with a telescopic overdenture and implant supported fixed partial denture (ISFPD). The treatment process was as follows: (1) fabricating telescopic crowns and overdenture prosthesis for the lower jaw and a temporary complete denture for the upper jaw, (2) using the temporary denture as diagnostic and surgical guide to optimize dental implant placement, and (3) fabricating ISFPD for the upper jaw. Using the patient's existing or temporary denture not only serves as an alternative surgical guide to calibrate the dental implant locations but also helps to finish the restoration at desired dimension, size, and anatomic form. PMID:26106491

  20. Prosthetic rehabilitation with HA-coated root form implants after restoration of mandibular continuity.

    PubMed

    Judy, K W; Robertson, E; Chabra, D; Ogle, O; Aykac, Y

    1991-01-01

    Utilization of implants to aid in oral reconstruction after partial mandibular resection entails coordination of multiple health care co-therapists as well as funding sources for the underprivileged. An illustrative case emphasizes these points. Ablation of a squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue resulted in a partial mandibulectomy, as well as multiple sensory, physical and psychosocial deficits. Continuity of the mandible was restored with a vascularized iliac crest bone graft. (Fig. 1) Total functional restoration, however, was only possible with implant supported overdenture prostheses. (Figs. 3-5).

  1. Retrospective Analysis of Implant Overdenture Treatment in the Advanced Prosthodontic Clinic at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

    PubMed

    Marinis, Aristotelis; Afshari, Fatemeh S; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Syros, George; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of implant-supported overdenture treatment provided by prosthodontic specialty residents. Twenty-three patients with 25 implant-supported overdentures (IODs) participated in the study. Seventy-four implants were placed by periodontic, prosthodontics, or oral and maxillofacial surgery students. All prostheses were fabricated in the advanced prosthodontics clinic at University of Illinois at Chicago. The condition of the peri-implant soft tissue, implants, and prostheses were evaluated. Complications and any maintenance were documented. Patients completed an oral health impact profile-14 and semantic differential scale questionnaires. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS statistical software. Twenty mandibular and 5 maxillary IODs were evaluated. Ninety-seven percent of the attachments were locators (Zest Anchors) and 3% ball attachments. None of the implants had lost osseointegration, but 14 implants (19%) had developed marginal bone loss in one-third of the implant length or more. Fourteen (19%) implants had developed dehiscence, which ranged from 1 to 4 mm. A variation in the width of the keratinized tissue, gingival, plaque, and calculus index was observed. There was a statistically significant relationship between the presence of plaque and the bleeding on probing on the buccal aspect of implants (P = .012). The incidence of dehiscence was significantly higher on the midfacial when the keratinized tissue was less than 2 mm (P < .0001). The majority of the complications were prosthetic in nature, such as broken denture teeth (74%) and worn or loose matrices (35%). Debris was observed in 19% of the locator abutments, and 36% of the overdentures were not stable in application of anterior force. Patients were compliant with oral hygiene protocols and their chewing ability was high (mean = 8.0). The overall experience was pleasant (mean = 7.5); the treatment provided good

  2. [Application of isolated canine teeth and single implant supported telescopic overdenture in a case with defective dentition of maxillary].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haihong; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Yingshuang

    2012-12-01

    A patient with defective dentition in the upper jaw was placed with implant in left upper jaw. Telescopic overdenture was fabricated and supported by the implant and canine tooth in right upper jaw. The patient felt very comfortable, and this type of restoration could provide sufficient stability and maintain tooth and peri-implant tissues healthy. The preliminary clincal results of this restoration show that isolated canine tooth and single implant supported telescopic overdenture are feasible.

  3. Rehabilitation of geriatric hemiglossectomy patient with implant-supported overdentures. Clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sudhindra S; Kumar, Sampath N; Guttal, Satyabodh S; Patil, Narendra P; Thakur, Srinath

    2011-03-01

    Carcinomas of the tongue constitute approximately 5% to 10% of oral carcinomas. Rehabilitation of these patients postsurgery is challenging because the motor control of the tongue is lost and postsurgical scarring reduces the vestibular depth needed to support and retain a denture. Implant-supported overdentures are a viable option to rehabilitate such patients. The restoration provides enhanced function and wearer comfort. PMID:21678871

  4. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant facial prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted for use in the functional reconstruction of mandibular deficits. The device...

  5. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant facial prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted for use in the functional reconstruction of mandibular deficits. The device...

  6. Fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture using CAD/CAM technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Sven; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes a new method for the fabrication of implant-supported overdentures that are rigidly retained by custom tapered abutments milled from commercially pure titanium using CAD/CAM technology. The dentition of a 60-year-old woman was restored with six implants in the edentulous maxilla. An implant-supported overdenture retained by custom tapered abutments was fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. Screw-retained abutments were designed and milled with a taper of 6 degrees. The reinforcing metallic denture base with integrated secondary crowns, exactly fitting on the tapered abutments, was fabricated from the same data set. The secondary structures could be seated tensionfree on the six abutments, creating friction in the final position. No clinical complications were observed at the 12-month follow-up examination, and the patient remained satisfied with the function and esthetics of the restoration. This case demonstrates the practicality of a fully CAD/CAM fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture retained by friction only. Controlled clinical studies are needed to evaluate the long-term performance of this type of restoration.

  7. Comparison of the Masticatory Functions of Complete Dentures and Implant-Retained Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Cheol; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the masticatory functions of complete dentures before and after the insertion of a LOCATOR attachment. The mixing ability index with a two-colored paraffin wax cube was used to quantify masticatory performance. In addition, degree of satisfaction with the treatment was assessed using a visual analog scale. The mixing ability index for the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures were calculated (-0.03±1.38 and -2.10±1.57, respectively), as were the visual analog scales of the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures (8.9±1.5 and 4.3±1.7, respectively). The paired t test revealed significant improvements (P<.001).

  8. Comparison of the Masticatory Functions of Complete Dentures and Implant-Retained Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Cheol; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the masticatory functions of complete dentures before and after the insertion of a LOCATOR attachment. The mixing ability index with a two-colored paraffin wax cube was used to quantify masticatory performance. In addition, degree of satisfaction with the treatment was assessed using a visual analog scale. The mixing ability index for the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures were calculated (-0.03±1.38 and -2.10±1.57, respectively), as were the visual analog scales of the implant-retained overdentures and the complete dentures (8.9±1.5 and 4.3±1.7, respectively). The paired t test revealed significant improvements (P<.001). PMID:26218014

  9. Alternative procedure for making a metal suprastructure in a milled bar implant-supported overdenture.

    PubMed

    Ercoli, C; Graser, G N; Tallents, R H; Hagan, M E

    1998-08-01

    The predictability of implant-supported prostheses has been established. Although the original Brånemark design has been successfully used in the mandible, esthetic, speech, and hygiene-related problems have been reported in maxillary fixed prostheses. Implant-overdentures can overcome some of the problems encountered in maxillary fixed prostheses. Milled-bar implant-supported overdentures fabricated by electric discharge machining are characterized by stability similar to a fixed prostheses and are removable for hygiene procedures. However, the procedure is costly and requires highly trained technicians. An alternative procedure to produce an accurately fitting metal suprastructure is presented. This procedure does not require additional technical skills and uses instruments and materials that are readily available and relatively inexpensive. The use of simple and easy to replace attachments allows repairs to be performed in the dental office, thus reducing maintenance cost. The overall result is a prosthesis that incorporates the features of a spark erosion overdenture at a fraction of the cost and that is available to a broader patient population.

  10. Comparison of immediate complete denture, tooth and implant-supported overdenture on vertical dimension and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Farhan Khalid; Gebreel, Ashraf; Elshokouki, Ali hamed; Habib, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the changes in the occlusal vertical dimension, activity of masseter muscles and biting force after insertion of immediate denture constructed with conventional, tooth-supported and Implant-supported immediate mandibular complete denture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were selected and treatment was carried out with all the three different concepts i.e, immediate denture constructed with conventional (Group A), tooth-supported (Group B) and Implant-supported (Group C) immediate mandibular complete dentures. Parameters of evaluation and comparison were occlusal vertical dimension measured by radiograph (at three different time intervals), Masseter muscle electromyographic (EMG) measurement by EMG analysis (at three different positions of jaws) and bite force measured by force transducer (at two different time intervals). The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA-F test at 5% level of significance. If the F test was significant, Least Significant Difference test was performed to test further significant differences between variables. RESULTS Comparison between mean differences in occlusal vertical dimension for tested groups showed that it was only statistically significant at 1 year after immediate dentures insertion. Comparison between mean differences in wavelet packet coefficients of the electromyographic signals of masseter muscles for tested groups was not significant at rest position, but significant at initial contact position and maximum voluntary clench position. Comparison between mean differences in maximum biting force for tested groups was not statistically significant at 5% level of significance. CONCLUSION Immediate complete overdentures whether tooth or implant supported prosthesis is recommended than totally mucosal supported prosthesis. PMID:22737309

  11. Retentive force of O-ring attachment to use Immediate Provisional Implant (IPI)-retained overdenture.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Suzuki, Yasunori; Aoki, Takayuki; Sato, Jun-ichi; Hosoi, Toshio

    2005-12-01

    This study evaluated the retentive force of the O-ring attachment to an Immediate Provisional Implant (IPI)-retained overdenture. Two sizes of O-rings (#1, #2) were placed on the IPI abutment head. As the controls, soft relining material, silicone lining material, and the PMMA resin were used to connect the IPI abutment head. The retentive forces (n=5, N) obtained at a crosshead speed of 40 mm/min were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). O-ring #1 showed the significantly greatest force among all materials tested (p0.05). Appropriate retention was obtained using the smaller O-ring#1 for the IPI-retained overdenture. PMID:16411569

  12. Prosthetic Complications and Maintenance Requirements in Locator-attached Implant-Supported Overdentures: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Frank; Zeman, Florian; Behr, Michael; Hahmel, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Retrospective data of 32 patients supplied with implant-supported and Locator-attached overdentures were screened for prosthetic complications and maintenance requirements, which were recorded and statistically analyzed. Mean observation time was 4.78 ± 1.72) years. Loss of retention was the most frequently observed event (n = 22). Damage and exchange of the insert holders (n = 4) and loosening of locator attachments (n = 2) and fracture of the insert holder (n = 2) were uncommon events; no loss of locator attachments was observed. Loss of retention in Locator-attached overdentures is frequent; correlating patient-specific parameters with prosthetic complications is necessary to define recommendations for the use of Locator attachments.

  13. Treatment outcome with implant-retained overdentures: Part II--Patient satisfaction and predictability of subjective treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Cune, M S; de Putter, C; Hoogstraten, J

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of implant-overdenture treatment (IOT) on patients' complaints about dentures and the degree to which subjective treatment outcome could be predicted from baseline patient and treatment characteristics. Four groups of patients were distinguished: one pretreatment group, two posttreatment groups (1 year after treatment) and one reference group of denture wearers, who had not applied for any kind of treatment. They finished a questionnaire with 20 statements on denture complaints. Four scales concerning denture complaints could be distinguished and named after their underlying variables. Differences between the groups were analyzed. IOT treatment was shown to be very effective on a wide range of denture complaints. Little change was seen in patient satisfaction with regard to maxillary dentures when measured on the scales, although many patients wanted improvement in retention and stability for the maxillary denture after IOT treatment in the mandible. Sixteen percent of the denture wearers who had not applied for IOT expressed complaints regarding their mandibular dentures that matched or were more severe than those of the patients that had applied for IOT, before the actual start of treatment. Although generally the subjective treatment outcome of IOT was favorable, it could not be individually predicted from baseline patient and treatment characteristics. PMID:7932261

  14. Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; PRETE, V.; PUJIA, M.; CERUSO, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year. Objective The aim of this study is to compare functional efficiency and patients satisfaction between tooth-supported and implant-supported overdenture through a questionnaire that accurately reflects the real concerns of patients with dental prosthesis. Methods Forty-three patients were selected from the out patient clinic, Department of Dentistry “Fra G.B. Orsenigo Ospedale San Pietro F.B.F.”, Rome, Italy. Their age were ranging from 61 to 83 years. Eighteen patients were rehabilitated with overdentures supported by natural teeth and twenty-five with overdentures implant-supported. Discussion and Result The questionnaire proposed one year after the insertion of the prosthetis has showed that there isn’t difference statistically significant in terms of function, phonetics and aesthetics between overdenture implant-supported and tooth-supported. Conclusions The results of the questionnaire showed that the patients generally had a high level of satisfaction concern to the masticatory function, esthetics and phonetics. In addition, on average, they haven’t difficulty in removal and insertion of the denture and in oral hygiene. They haven’t in both groups problems related to fractures. PMID:23741602

  15. Transition from a fixed implant dental prosthesis to an implant overdenture in an edentulous patient: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bolouri; Bhavani, Venkatachalam

    2014-09-01

    The lack of planning before implant placement and restoration in edentulous patients can lead to a number of problems. Prosthodontists are often faced with the challenge of re-treating patients who have only recently been treated. Although many reports discuss retreatment by fabricating all new prosthetic components, few discuss salvaging parts of the patient's existing prosthesis. This report details the treatment of an edentulous patient who presented with an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis in the maxillary arch and no opposing prosthesis. The transition from an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis to a removable implant- and tissue-supported overdenture that uses the patient's existing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing milled titanium substructure is described.

  16. Effect of simulated masticatory loading on the retention of stud attachments for implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Abi Nader, S; de Souza, R F; Fortin, D; De Koninck, L; Fromentin, O; Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2011-03-01

    This study assessed the effect of simulated mastication on the retention of two stud attachment systems for 2-implants overdentures. Sixteen specimens, each simulating an edentulous ridge with implants and an overdenture were divided into two groups, according to the attachment system: Group I (Nobel Biocare ball-socket attachments) and Group II (Locator attachments). Retention forces were measured before and after 400,000 simulated masticatory loads in a customised device. Data were compared by two-way anova followed by Bonferroni test (α = 0·05). Group I presented significantly lower retention forces (Newtons) than Group II at baseline (10·6 ± 3·6 and 66·4 ± 16·0, respectively). However, differences were not significant after 400,000 loads (7·9 ± 4·3 and 21·6 ± 17·0). The number of cycles did not influence the measurements in Group I, whereas a non-linear descending curve was found for Group II. It was concluded that simulated mastication resulted in minor changes for the ball attachment tested. Nevertheless, it reduced the retention of Locator attachments to 40% of the baseline values, what suggests that mastication is a major factor associated with maintenance needs for this system.

  17. Maxillary Overdentures Supported by Four Splinted Direct Metal Laser Sintering Implants: A 3-Year Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Francesco; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Nowadays, the advancements in direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technology allow the fabrication of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate implant survival, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss of DMLS implants used to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures. Materials and Methods. Over a 2-year period, 120 implants were placed in the maxilla of 30 patients (18 males, 12 females) to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures (ODs). Each OD was supported by 4 implants splinted by a rigid cobalt-chrome bar. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The outcome measures were implant failure, biological and prosthetic complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss (distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact, DIB). Results. The 3-year implant survival rate was 97.4% (implant-based) and 92.9% (patient-based). Three implants failed. The incidence of biological complication was 3.5% (implant-based) and 7.1% (patient-based). The incidence of prosthetic complication was 17.8% (patient-based). No detrimental effects on marginal bone level were evidenced. Conclusions. The use of 4 DMLS titanium implants to support bar-retained maxillary ODs seems to represent a safe and successful procedure. Long-term clinical studies on a larger sample of patients are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25580124

  18. The Effects of Denture Cleansing Solutions on the Retention of Attachments of Implant Supported Overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Derafshi, Reza; Mohaghegh, Mina; Saki, Maryam; Safari, Anahita; Rabee Haghighi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Implant-retained overdenture can improve the stability of dentures and prevent bone loss. Overdenture-wearing patients need special hygiene care. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various denture cleansers on the retention of Dio orange O-rings. Method and Materials In this experimental study, 40 Dio orange O-rings were divided into 4 groups (10 O-rings each) and each group was soaked for equivalent of 6 months in the following solutions: 5.25% NaOCl (1:10 dilution), Corega cleanser tabs, Professional cleanser tabs and water (as the control group). After 6 months, O-rings were tested for 2inch/minutes of tensile force. The peak load-to-dislodgement was recorded. Data were imported to SPSS18 and were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (p≤ 0.05). Results Denture cleansing solutions have significant effects on the reduction of retentive value of O-rings (p≤ 0.001). Corega tabs caused the reduction of 15.7% (9.91±0.53 N) in the retentive value of O-rings and Professional tabs caused 15% (10.00±0.86 N). NaOCl caused significant decrease (48%) in retentive value of O-rings (6.10±0.91 N in comparison with the control group (11.76±1 N). Conclusion This in-vitro study demonstrated that the retention of O-rings was affected when soaked in cleansing solutions. NaOCl caused more reduction in retentive value compared to effervescent cleansers and would not be recommended for cleansing O-rings. These results should be interpreted clinically and the role of other factors in the retention of O-rings should be considered in order to recommend the best cleanser for O-ring overdentures. PMID:26106638

  19. Implant overdenture impressions using a dynamic impression concept

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Kil; Park, Sang-Hun; Lee, Cheong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic impression is a functional impression that records the functional movement of the patient's own muscle and muscle attachment. This process reduces the number of random factors. This article describes a method for making a special tray using a dynamic impression concept that was made from provisional dentures used for implant healing. The individual tray is used to make a wash-impression to record the features of the mucosa in detail. The main advantage of this technique is that it provides a functional relationship of the implant components to the supporting tissues without overextension because provisional denture had been used for 2 months and the border length of individual tray was nearly the same as that of provisional denture. The delivery of the prosthesis constructed using this impression technique is time-saving because there is no need for border molding and there are fewer post-insertion appliance adjustments. PMID:24605209

  20. Clinical outcome of double crown-retained implant overdentures with zirconia primary crowns

    PubMed Central

    Buergers, Ralf; Ziebolz, Dirk; Roediger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This retrospective study aims at the evaluation of implant-supported overdentures (IODs) supported by ceramo-galvanic double crowns (CGDCs: zirconia primary crowns + galvano-formed secondary crown). MATERIALS AND METHODS In a private practice, 14 patients were restored with 18 IODs (mandible: 11, maxilla: 7) retained by CGDCs on 4 - 8 implants and annually evaluated for technical and/or biological failures/complications. RESULTS One of the 86 inserted implants failed during the healing period (cumulative survival rate (CSR) implants: 98.8%). During the prosthetic functional period (mean: 5.9 ± 2.2 years), 1 implant demonstrated an abutment fracture (CSR-abutments: 98.2%), and one case of peri-implantitis was detected. All IODs remained in function (CSR-denture: 100%). A total of 15 technical complications required interventions to maintain function (technical complication rate: 0.178 treatments/patients/year). CONCLUSION Considering the small sample size, the use of CGDCs for the attachment of IODs is possible without an increased risk of technical complications. However, for a final evaluation, results from a larger cohort are required. PMID:26330981

  1. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  3. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  4. Implant overdenture using a locator bar system by drill and tapping technique in a mandible edentulous patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Su; Yoon, Mi-Jung; Huh, Jung-Bo; Jeon, Young-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2012-05-01

    Various options have been introduced for the selection of implant overdenture attachments. Attachment wear due to the repeated insertion and removal of dentures has caused problems such as decreased retention and the requirement for suprastructure remanufacturing. In these cases, a Locator bar system was applied using the drill and tapping technique to achieve total retrievability. In a 55-year-old female patient who showed three degrees of mobility in most of her teeth due to severe alveolar bone loss, a complete denture in the maxilla and an implant supported type overdenture in the mandible were planned after extracting all the remaining teeth. Six implants were placed from canine region to the distal molar region, and the locator was connected to the milled bar using the drill and tapping technique. For a 61-year-old female edentulous patient who complained of poor retention with old denture, a complete denture in the maxilla and an implant-tissue supported type overdenture in the mandible were planned. Four implants were placed in front of mental foramen, and the Locator was also connected to the Hader bar using the drill and tapping technique. With this technique, female parts can be easily replaced, and retention can be continuously maintained.

  5. An in vitro investigation into retention strength and fatigue resistance of various designs of tooth/implant supported overdentures.

    PubMed

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-02-01

    Previously, the choice of prosthetic implant-retained overdentures has depended on data from previous studies about the retention-fatigue strength of the attachment system selected. Little or no data have been available on the correlation between the attachment system selected and the overdenture support configuration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the retention force and fatigue resistance of three attachment systems and four support designs of overdenture prosthesis. Four lower edentulous acrylic models were prepared and eight combinations of attachments groups were investigated in the study. These included: O-Rings with mini-dental implants (MDIs), Dalbo elliptic with Dalbo Rotex and fabricated flexible acrylic attachments with both MDI and Dalbo Rotex. The study was divided into four test groups: groups A and B, controls, and groups C and D, experimental groups. Control group A contained three overdenture supports: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with Dalbo Rotex screwed in. Control group B contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with Dalbo Rotex screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Experimental group C contained three overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with MDI screwed in. Experimental group D contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with MDIs screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to attachment type used. Five samples were prepared for each group. Retention force (N) values were recorded initially (0 cycles) and after 360, 720, 1440

  6. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient's discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities. PMID:26770841

  7. Testing the retention of attachments for implant overdentures - validation of an original force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, O; Lassauzay, C; Abi Nader, S; Feine, J; de Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate an original portable device to measure attachment retention of implant overdentures both in the lab and in clinical settings. The device was built with a digital force measurement gauge (Imada) secured to a vertical wheel stand associated with a customized support to hold and position the denture in adjustable angulations. Sixteen matrix and patrix cylindrical stud attachments (Locator) were randomly assigned as in vitro test specimens. Attachment abutments were secured in an implant analogue hung to the digital force gauge or to the load cell of a traction machine used as the gold standard (Instron Universal Testing Machine). Matrices were secured in a denture duplicate attached to the customized support, permitting reproducibility of their position on both pulling devices. Attachment retention in the axial direction was evaluated by measuring maximum dislodging force or peak load during five consecutive linear dislodgments of each attachment on both devices. After a wear simulation, retention was measured again at several time periods. The peak load measurements with the customized Imada device were similar to those obtained with the gold standard Instron machine. These findings suggest that the proposed portable device can provide accurate information on the retentive properties of attachment systems for removable dental prostheses.

  8. Finite element analysis on stress distribution of maxillary implant-retained overdentures depending on the Bar attachment design and palatal coverage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of anchorage systems and palatal coverage of denture base on load transfer in maxillary implant-retained overdenture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Maxillary implant-retained overdentures with 4 implants placed in the anterior region of edentulous maxilla were converted into a 3-D numerical model, and stress distribution patterns in implant supporting bone in the case of unilateral vertical loading on maxillary right first molar were compared with each other depending on various types of anchorage system and palatal coverage extent of denture base using three-dimensional finite element analysis. RESULTS In all experimental models, the highest stress was concentrated on the most distal implant and implant supporting bone on loaded side. The stress at the most distal implant-supporting bone was concentrated on the cortical bone. In all anchorage system without palatal coverage of denture base, higher stresses were concentrated on the most distal implant and implant supporting bone on loaded side. CONCLUSION It could be suggested that when making maxillary implant retained overdenture, using Hader bar instead of milled bar and full palatal coverage rather than partial palatal coverage are more beneficial in distributing the stress that is applied on implant supporting bone. PMID:27141251

  9. Comparison of changes in retentive force of three stud attachments for implant overdentures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Min; Choi, Jae-Won; Jeon, Young-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Lee, So-Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the changes in retentive force of stud attachments for implant overdentures by in vitro 2-year-wear simulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three commercially available attachment systems were investigated: Kerator blue, O-ring red, and EZ lock. Two implant fixtures were embedded in parallel in each custom base mounting. Five pairs of each attachment system were tested. A universal testing machine was used to measure the retentive force during 2500 insertion and removal cycles. Surface changes on the components were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Pairwise comparison, was used to compare the retentive force between the groups, and to determine groups that were significantly different (α<.05). RESULTS A comparison of the initial retentive force revealed the highest value for Kerator, followed by the O-ring and EZ lock attachments. However, no significant difference was detected between Kerator and O-ring (P>.05). After 2500 insertion and removal cycles, the highest retention loss was recorded for O-ring, and no significant difference between Kerator and EZ lock (P>.05). Also, Kerator showed the highest retentive force, followed by EZ lock and O-ring, after 2500 cycles (P<.05). Based on SEM analysis, the polymeric components in O-ring and Kerator were observed to exhibit surface wear and deformation. CONCLUSION After 2500 insertion and removal cycles, all attachments exhibited significant loss in retention. Mechanism of retention loss can only be partially explained by surface changes. PMID:26330977

  10. Assessment of Candida species colonization and denture-related stomatitis in bar- and locator-retained overdentures.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Kerem; Koc, Ayse Nedret; Tekinsen, Fatma Filiz; Yildiz, Pinar; Kilic, Duygu; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Kilic, Erdem

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of denture-related stomatitis (DRS) in different attachment-retained overdenture wearers and its association with particular colonizing Candida species. Thirty-seven edentulous patients with implant-supported maxillary or mandibular overdentures were enrolled. A full clinical history was obtained, including details of patients' oral hygiene practices and the levels of erythema based on Newton's classification scale. Swabs were taken from the palate and investigated mycologically to identify the yeast colonies. Quantitative and qualitative microbiological assessments were performed, which included recording the total numbers of colonies (cfu), their color, and their morphological characteristics. Significant differences were found in cfu values between the attachment and inner surfaces of locator- and bar-retained overdentures (P < .05). Candida albicans was the most common species in both evaluations, being isolated from 81.3% of bar-retained overdentures and 38.1% of locator-retained overdentures. DRS developed in all patients using bar-retained overdentures but in only 71.4% of those using locator-retained overdentures. No statistically significant relationship was found between bar and locator attachments according to smoking habit, overnight removal, or plaque and gingival indices (P > .05).

  11. Interforaminal hemorrhage during anterior mandibular implant placement: An overview.

    PubMed

    Kusum, Chandan Kumar; Mody, Pranav V; Indrajeet; Nooji, Deviprasad; Rao, Suhas K; Wankhade, Bhushan Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Implant surgery in mandibular anterior region may turn from an easy minor surgery into a complicated one for the surgeon, due to inadequate knowledge of the anatomy of the surgical area and/or ignorance toward the required surgical protocol. Hence, the purpose of this article is to present an overview on the: (a) Incidence of massive bleeding and its consequences after implant placement in mandibular anterior region. (b) Its etiology, the precautionary measures to be taken to avoid such an incidence in clinical practice and management of such a hemorrhage if at all happens. An inclusion criterion for selection of article was defined, and an electronic Medline search through different database using different keywords and manual search in journals and books was executed. Relevant articles were selected based upon inclusion criteria to form the valid protocols for implant surgery in the anterior mandible. Further, from the selected articles, 21 articles describing case reports were summarized separately in a table to alert the dental surgeons about the morbidity they could come across while operating in this region. If all the required adequate measures for diagnosis and treatment planning are taken and appropriate surgical protocol is followed, mandibular anterior region is no doubt a preferable area for implant placement. PMID:26288617

  12. Interforaminal hemorrhage during anterior mandibular implant placement: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kusum, Chandan Kumar; Mody, Pranav V.; Indrajeet; Nooji, Deviprasad; Rao, Suhas K.; Wankhade, Bhushan Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Implant surgery in mandibular anterior region may turn from an easy minor surgery into a complicated one for the surgeon, due to inadequate knowledge of the anatomy of the surgical area and/or ignorance toward the required surgical protocol. Hence, the purpose of this article is to present an overview on the: (a) Incidence of massive bleeding and its consequences after implant placement in mandibular anterior region. (b) Its etiology, the precautionary measures to be taken to avoid such an incidence in clinical practice and management of such a hemorrhage if at all happens. An inclusion criterion for selection of article was defined, and an electronic Medline search through different database using different keywords and manual search in journals and books was executed. Relevant articles were selected based upon inclusion criteria to form the valid protocols for implant surgery in the anterior mandible. Further, from the selected articles, 21 articles describing case reports were summarized separately in a table to alert the dental surgeons about the morbidity they could come across while operating in this region. If all the required adequate measures for diagnosis and treatment planning are taken and appropriate surgical protocol is followed, mandibular anterior region is no doubt a preferable area for implant placement. PMID:26288617

  13. Immediately loaded implants in a patient with involuntary mandibular movements: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Shek, Justin W; Plesh, Octavia; Curtis, Donald A

    2014-07-01

    Immediately loaded implant prostheses have been used to successfully rehabilitate completely edentulous arches. Risk factors for successful treatment have not included involuntary mandibular movements. The treatment was completed on a patient with a history of neuroleptic medications who had remaining mandibular teeth extracted and then developed involuntary mandibular movements. The patient was dissatisfied with a mandibular removable prosthesis and wanted a fixed prosthesis. The immediate implant loading of a complete arch fixed prosthesis was delivered, and the patient lost 3 of the 6 implants. The patient continued to have problems with her definitive prostheses as the symptoms of her involuntary mandibular movements worsened.

  14. Immediately loaded implants in a patient with involuntary mandibular movements: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Shek, Justin W; Plesh, Octavia; Curtis, Donald A

    2014-07-01

    Immediately loaded implant prostheses have been used to successfully rehabilitate completely edentulous arches. Risk factors for successful treatment have not included involuntary mandibular movements. The treatment was completed on a patient with a history of neuroleptic medications who had remaining mandibular teeth extracted and then developed involuntary mandibular movements. The patient was dissatisfied with a mandibular removable prosthesis and wanted a fixed prosthesis. The immediate implant loading of a complete arch fixed prosthesis was delivered, and the patient lost 3 of the 6 implants. The patient continued to have problems with her definitive prostheses as the symptoms of her involuntary mandibular movements worsened. PMID:24393329

  15. Stress distribution patterns of implant supported overdentures-analog versus finite element analysis: A comparative in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Soumyadev; Babu, C. L. Satish; Shetty, Shilpa; Raj, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to asses & compare the load transfer characteristics of Ball/O-ring and Bar/Clip attachment systems in implant supported overdentures using analog and finite element analysis models. Methodology: For the analog part of the study, castable bar was used for the bar and clip attachment and a metallic housing with a rubber O-ring component was used for the ball/O-ring attachment. The stress on the implant surface was measured using the strain-gauge technique. For the finite element analysis, the model were fabricated and load applications were done in a similar manner as in analog study. Results: The difference between both the attachment systems was found to be statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: Ball/O-ring attachment system transmitted lesser amount of stresses to the implants on the non-loading side, as compared to the Bar-Clip attachment system. When overall stress distribution is compared, the Bar-Clip attachment seems to perform better than the Ball/O-ring attachment, because the force was distributed better. PMID:26929521

  16. Implant-supported overdenture manufactured using CAD/CAM techniques to achieve horizontal path insertion between the primary and secondary structure: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of an edentulous patient with an atrophic maxilla and severe class III malocclusion. Prosthetic rehabilitation was performed using CAD/CAM techniques for manufacturing an implant-supported overdenture with horizontal insertion. A vestibulo-lingual insertion overdenture is a precision prosthesis with a fixation system affording a good fit between the primary and secondary structure. Both structures exhibit passive horizontal adjustment. This treatment option requires the same number of implants as implant-supported fixed dentures. The horizontal assembly system prevents the prosthesis from loosening or moving in response to axial and non-axial forces. The technique was used to rehabilitate a patient presenting an atrophic upper maxilla, with the insertion of 8 implants. No complications were reported at follow-up 3, 6 and 12 months after fitting of the prosthesis. This system offers solutions to the clinical and laboratory complications associated with hybrid prostheses, concealing emergence of the chimneys and improving implant-prosthesis hygiene. PMID:26140179

  17. A technique for relining bar-retained overdentures.

    PubMed

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Abolhasani, Majid; Givehchian, Pirooz

    2014-12-01

    This article describes a technique for relining a mandibular bar-retained overdenture that allows recording the soft tissue beneath the bar and makes it possible to replace or modify the retentive bar attachment simultaneously with the reline procedure.

  18. Implant supported overdenture in the patients with history of radio and chemotherapy for the prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Aeran, Himanshu; Nautiyal, Vijay; Kumar, Varun; Uniyal, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The success of dental implants in patients that have undergone chemo and radiotherapy for a region other than head and neck remain unclear, although some local and systemic factors could be contraindications to dental implant treatment. As there are very few absolute medical contraindications to dental implant treatment, but a number of conditions may increase the risk of treatment failure or complications. The case report describes the successful survival of dental implants placed in maxilla and mandible of a patient who had undergone radio and chemotherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:27390497

  19. Implant supported overdenture in the patients with history of radio and chemotherapy for the prostate malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Aeran, Himanshu; Nautiyal, Vijay; Kumar, Varun; Uniyal, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The success of dental implants in patients that have undergone chemo and radiotherapy for a region other than head and neck remain unclear, although some local and systemic factors could be contraindications to dental implant treatment. As there are very few absolute medical contraindications to dental implant treatment, but a number of conditions may increase the risk of treatment failure or complications. The case report describes the successful survival of dental implants placed in maxilla and mandible of a patient who had undergone radio and chemotherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:27390497

  20. Comparison of different designs of implant-retained overdentures and fixed full-arch implant-supported prosthesis on stress distribution in edentulous mandible--a computed tomography-based three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Barão, V A R; Delben, J A; Lima, J; Cabral, T; Assunção, W G

    2013-04-26

    A finite element analysis was used to compare the effect of different designs of implant-retained overdentures and fixed full-arch implant-supported prosthesis on stress distribution in edentulous mandible. Four models of an human mandible were constructed. In the OR (O'ring) group, the mandible was restored with an overdenture retained by four unsplinted implants with O'ring attachment; in the BC (bar-clip) -C and BC groups, the mandibles were restored with overdentures retained by four splinted implants with bar-clip anchor associated or not with two distally placed cantilevers, respectively; in the FD (fixed denture) group, the mandible was restored with a fixed full-arch four-implant-supported prosthesis. Models were supported by the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints. A 100-N oblique load was applied on the left first molar. Von Mises (σvM), maximum (σmax) and minimum (σmin) principal stresses (in MPa) analyses were obtained. BC-C group exhibited the highest stress values (σvM=398.8, σmax=580.5 and σmin=-455.2) while FD group showed the lowest one (σvM=128.9, σmax=185.9 and σmin=-172.1). Within overdenture groups, the use of unsplinted implants reduced the stress level in the implant/prosthetic components (59.4% for σvM, 66.2% for σmax and 57.7% for σmin versus BC-C group) and supporting tissues (maximum stress reduction of 72% and 79.5% for σmax, and 15.7% and 85.7% for σmin on the cortical and trabecular bones, respectively). Cortical bone exhibited greater stress concentration than the trabecular bone for all groups. The use of fixed implant dentures and removable dentures retained by unsplinted implants to rehabilitate edentulous mandible reduced the stresses in the periimplant bone tissue, mucosa and implant/prosthetic components. PMID:23518207

  1. Physical and metallurgical considerations of failures of soldered bars in bar attachment systems for implant overdentures: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Waddell, J Neil; Payne, Alan G T; Swain, Michael V

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify the etiological factors of failure of soldered bars in bar attachment systems for removable implant overdentures. A search of MEDLINE using the key words "bar attachment systems" was performed of English language peer-reviewed journals published between 1975 and 2005. Clinical studies of implant overdentures with prosthodontic maintenance complications of bar attachment systems were identified to establish the perceived etiology of failure. A further search of MEDLINE using the key words "solder joint" was also performed of the fixed prosthodontic literature to identify specific factors affecting the strength, fatigue resistance, and quality of gold solder joints used for bar attachment systems. The first search on bar attachment systems produced evidence of low failure rates of interabutment bars, but higher failure rates of bars where distal cantilever extensions were used. There were no explanations or descriptions of the nature of those failures in the clinical studies reviewed. The second search on fixed prosthodontic literature identified multiple factors that could potentially relate to the failed solder joints with bar attachments. Two potential sites of failure in bar attachments with distal cantilevers were identified, and a simple estimate of the tensile stresses at the solder joints was performed. The values found are comparable to the fatigue failure stresses reported in the searched literature.

  2. Mandibular single crystal sapphire implants: changes in crestal bone levels over three years.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Eliasson, S; Arvidson, K

    1995-09-01

    A total of 190 single crystal sapphire implants, 85 short (4S9S) and 105 long (4S9L), were monitored with panoramic and intraoral radiographs for 3 years. The implants were used as abutments for overdentures in edentulous mandibles in 51 patients. Within the first year, 2 patients lost one implant each due to pain and lack of osseointegration. Neither was replaced and the superstructures remained stable. At baseline registration, i.e., immediately after the prosthetic installation, the bone height relative to the length of the implant was calculated. The mean bone implant score (BIS) was 63.55 +/- 1.34% (mean +/- SE). BIS decreased during the first year 62.18 +/- 1.51%. At the 2- and 3-year recordings, the mean BIS were 61.81 +/- 1.58% and 61.73 +/- 1.63%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in BIS changes over the 3-year period or between men and women. The decrease in mean BIS was greater for implants in the premolar region than in the incisor region and for short implants than for long implants.

  3. [Bone regeneration over plastic implants after mandibular resection breaking the continuity].

    PubMed

    Utz, W

    1977-04-01

    In young patients, bone regeneration may start from the region of the temporo-mandibular joint and from the peripheral mandibular stump in cases of continuity defects of the mandible. A resin graft implanted for soft tissue reconstruction is collar-like surrounded by bone which is developing into a functionally and anatomically full regenerate over many years, in correspondence to periosteal and desmal growth stimuli. In adults, regeneration is minimal.

  4. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Neerja; Thakkur, Rahul K

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40° of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction. PMID:24403798

  5. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Neerja; Thakkur, Rahul K

    2013-10-01

    Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40° of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction.

  6. Overdentures on Implants for Better Quality of Life Among the Fully Edentulous Patients - Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Nikolovska, Julijana; Petrovski, Dragan; Petricevic, Nikola; Kapusevska, Biljana; Korunoska-Stevkovska, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Global aging population has brought several challenges for their medical systems and total edentulism is one of them. The fabrication of removable acrylic dentures seems to be a simple and cheap treatment solution, but a majority of patients is not satisfied with their functional instability, causing limited diets, mouth soreness, speech and psycho-social problems etc. The results in many studies indicate an impact of oral conditions associated with the full denture wearing on oral-health related quality of life, especially in lower jaw. The reason for improper denture retention could be alveolar ridge bone resorption and numerous studies about this problem are plausible. Bone resorption in lower jaw may turn the alveolar ridge into a flabby soft tissue which is unable to sustain proper denture retention. The implant-retained prosthesis is an alternative treatment option in these situations. Implants will provide retention, stability, function and aesthetics and they are not so expensive solution. The aim of this article is to show solving of retention problems of a lower denture in two different clinical cases using implants and without any special technology. PMID:27442389

  7. Effect of vertical misfit and clip material on stress distribution of overdentures under masticatory loading.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Zen, Bruno Massucato; Bacchi, Atais

    2016-10-01

    Framework misfit is a common problem observed in overdentures, which might result in prosthetic and biological complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit and clip material on the stress distribution in an overdenture-retaining bar system under masticatory loading. A 3-D finite element model of a resorbed jaw was created, including two implants and a bar-clip retained overdenture. A pressure of 100 MPa was applied to the right mandibular first molar. Different vertical misfit levels (50, 100, and 200 µm) and clip materials (plastic or gold) were evaluated. Data were evaluated using von Mises stress and microstrain. Vertical misfit amplification caused an increase in the microstrain values in the peri-implant bone tissue next to the ill-fitted component and increased the stresses in the prosthetic screws. The clip material influenced the stress and microstrain distribution in the prosthetic components and bone tissue. The levels of vertical misfit seem to be closely linked with the stress values in the prosthetic screws, mainly to that of the ill-fitted component. The gold clip presented an increase in the stress compared to the plastic clip.

  8. Strain of implants depending on occlusion types in mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Byoung-Sup; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE This study investigated the strain of implants using a chewing simulator with strain gauges in mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses under various dynamic loads. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three implant-supported 5-unit fixed prostheses were fabricated with three different occlusion types (Group I: Canine protected occlusion, Group II: Unilaterally balanced occlusion, Group III: Bilaterally balanced occlusion). Two strain gauges were attached to each implant abutment. The programmed dynamic loads (0 - 300 N) were applied using a chewing simulator (MTS 858 Mini Bionix II systems, MTS systems corp., Minn, USA) and the strains were monitored. The statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test and the ANOVA. RESULTS The mean strain values (MSV) for the working sides were 151.83 µε, 176.23 µε, and 131.07 µε for Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. There was a significant difference between Group II and Group III (P < .05). Also, the MSV for non-working side were 58.29 µε, 72.64 µε, and 98.93 µε for Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. One was significantly different from the others with a 95% confidence interval (P < .05). CONCLUSION The MSV for the working side of Groups I and II were significantly different from that for the non-working side (Group I: t = 7.58, Group II: t = 6.25). The MSV for the working side of Group II showed significantly larger than that of Group III (P < .01). Lastly, the MSV for the non-working side of Group III showed significantly larger than those of Group I or Group II (P < .01). PMID:21503186

  9. Management of fractured dental implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gustavo; Mendonça, Daniela Baccelli Silveira; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Neves, Flávio Domingues

    2009-02-01

    An implant fracture may be one of the major causes of late implant failures. Complications, such as loosening or fracture of the prosthesis restorative components, or even fracture of the implant, may occur and dental professionals should be aware of the causes of these complications. This study reports a clinical situation involving a patient restored with a mandibular overdenture that presented a fractured implant 2 years after placement. The probable cause of the implant fracture was due to biomechanical overload caused by parafunctional habits. The implant head was flattened to make it smooth, retapping the internal screw, installing a new abutment (longer), and fabricating part of the overdenture bar. This treatment was timesaving for the patient in that the prosthesis was repaired in the shortest time possible. PMID:19212233

  10. Telescopic overdenture for oral rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Verma, Mahesh; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra

    2015-01-01

    Reduced number of teeth with underdeveloped alveolar ridges poses a greatest prosthetic challenge in rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patients (ED). Furthermore, surgical risks and financial constraints may preclude the implant supported prosthesis, the most desirable treatment option in an adult ED patient. Long edentulous span does not permit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) as well. Telescopic denture by incorporating the best of both fixed and removable prosthesis can be a viable treatment alternative for ED patients with compromised dentition and limited finances. A 21-year-old young girl presented with chief complaint of esthetics and mastication due to missing upper and lower teeth. A provisional diagnosis of ED was made based on familial history, physical, and oral examination. This clinical report describes management of an adult ED patient by means of telescopic overdenture prosthesis in mandibular arch and FDP in maxillary arch which restored esthetics, function, and social confidence of the patient in a cost effective manner. PMID:26604583

  11. Telescopic overdenture for oral rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Verma, Mahesh; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra

    2015-09-01

    Reduced number of teeth with underdeveloped alveolar ridges poses a greatest prosthetic challenge in rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patients (ED). Furthermore, surgical risks and financial constraints may preclude the implant supported prosthesis, the most desirable treatment option in an adult ED patient. Long edentulous span does not permit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) as well. Telescopic denture by incorporating the best of both fixed and removable prosthesis can be a viable treatment alternative for ED patients with compromised dentition and limited finances. A 21-year-old young girl presented with chief complaint of esthetics and mastication due to missing upper and lower teeth. A provisional diagnosis of ED was made based on familial history, physical, and oral examination. This clinical report describes management of an adult ED patient by means of telescopic overdenture prosthesis in mandibular arch and FDP in maxillary arch which restored esthetics, function, and social confidence of the patient in a cost effective manner. PMID:26604583

  12. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed. PMID:12500871

  13. An Alternative Technique for Fabrication of Frameworks in an Immediate Loading Implant Fixed Mandibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paleari, André Gustavo; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Vasconcelos, Juliano Alencar; Nunes Reis, José Maurício dos Santos; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Tavares da Silva, Regina Helena Barbosa; Quishida, Cristiane Campos Costa

    2015-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation of edentulous patients with immediate loading has become a safe procedure with high predictability. The success is related to immediate fabrication of a passive fit framework to attach the implants. Based on these considerations, this case report shows an alternative technique for mandibular rehabilitation using implants immediately loaded, where the framework was fabricated using cylinders with internal reinforcement and precast pieces, electrowelding, and conventional welding providing esthetics and function to the patient in a short period of time. PMID:25628899

  14. Conventional radiography and cross-sectional imaging when planning dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible to support an overdenture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A M; Glenny, A-M; Goodwin, M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for this systematic review were to determine if the pre-operative availability of cross-sectional imaging, such as cone beam CT, has a diagnostic impact, therapeutic impact or impact on patients' outcome when placing two dental implants in the anterior mandible to support an overdenture. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (CENTRAL), MEDLINE® and Embase were searched up to, and including, February 2013. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they compared the impact of conventional and cross-sectional imaging when placing dental implants in sites including the anterior mandible. An adapted quality assessment tool was used for the assessment of the risk of bias in included studies. Pooled quantitative analysis was not possible and, therefore, synthesis was qualitative. Of 2374 potentially eligible papers, 5 studies were included. Little can be determined from a synthesis of these studies because of their small number, clinical diversity and high risks of bias. Notwithstanding, it may be tentatively inferred that cross-sectional imaging has a therapeutic impact in the more challenging cases. In terms of impact, this review has found no evidence to support any specific imaging modality when planning dental implant placement in any region of the mouth. Therefore, those who argue that cross-sectional imaging should be used for the assessment of all dental implant sites are unsupported by evidence.

  15. Management of mandibular nerve injuries from dental implants.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Shahrokh C; Meyer, Roger A

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of the patient who has sustained a nerve injury from dental implant procedures involves prompt recognition of this complication, evaluation of sensory dysfunction, the position of the nerve vis-à-vis the implant, and timely management of the injured nerve. In some patients, removal or repositioning of the implant and surgical exploration and repair of the injured nerve will maximize the implant patient's potential for a successful recovery from nerve injury.

  16. Dental restoration with endosseous implants after mandibular reconstruction using a fibula free flap and TMJ prosthesis: a patient report.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Martinez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2006-01-01

    This patient report describes the secondary reconstruction of a hemimandibular and condylar defect and the dental restoration of a 56-year-old woman who had been subjected to radical ablative surgery 30 years earlier to remove a tumor. In the first phase, a fibula free flap was used in combination with a total TMJ prosthesis for the reconstruction of the hemimandible and condyle. Secondly, 3 endosseous implants were placed in the residual mandible. These implants were used to support an overdenture prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of 2 years.

  17. Experimental findings on customized mandibular implants in Göttingen minipigs - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, J; Sembdner, P; Lesche, R; Jung, R; Spekl, K; Mai, R; Schulz, M C; Reitemeier, B

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing continuity defects of the mandible is still challenging for surgeons. The currently applied conventional titanium bridging plates have considerable rates of complications. Now, a new technology enables an individual shape-identical creation of a mandibular implant in a form-board design by the method of LaserCUSING using pure titanium. This technology has been successfully performed in previous examinations to individually reconstruct mandibular continuity defects. This pilot study evaluated the surgical procedure in 10 female Göttingen mini pigs. First, a computed tomography scan from a mini pig cranium was performed. A three-dimensional model of the mandible was designed by data conversion. Based on the data, a customized mandibular implant resembling the natural shape was virtually created and manufactured. Then, a continuity defect of the left mandible was created in a standardized way. The implants were inserted into the defect and the wounds were allowed to heal for 21, 35, 56 and 180 days. During the healing period, no signs of inflammation or infection were observed. After the sacrifice of the minipigs the mandibles were resected. Histological microsections using Donath's sawing and grinding technique were manufactured and stained with Masson Goldner trichrome staining. The histomorphological results showed a pronounced ossification at the outer and inner surface of the implants. This animal study describes a promising approach to optimize customized implants for the application in humans. PMID:24189298

  18. Mandibular fracture after endosseous implant placement in conjunction with inferior alveolar nerve transposition: a patient treatment report.

    PubMed

    Kan, J Y; Lozada, J L; Boyne, P J; Goodacre, C J; Rungcharassaeng, K

    1997-01-01

    A patient with a severely atrophic right posterior mandible had three endosseous implants placed in conjunction with transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve. Three weeks following implant placement surgery, the patient experienced a spontaneous fracture of the mandible involving the two anterior implants. The two implants were removed, and the fracture was treated with open reduction and fixation with titanium mesh. The fracture healed, and the posterior implant integrated. This report suggests that the buccolingual and superior-inferior position of the mandibular canal can increase the possibility of mandibular fracture by increasing the size of the buccal cortical plate that is removed to expose the nerve during surgery. PMID:9337027

  19. [Removable dentures with implants for edentulous lower jaw].

    PubMed

    Oszlánszky, Judit; Kádár, László; Hermann, Péter; Schmidt, Péter; Gyulai-Gaál, Szabolcs

    2013-09-01

    Fabrication of a complete mandibular denture that offers patient comfort, function, and aesthetics along with stability and acceptable retention remains one of the most challenging procedures in dental practice. Based on a thorough treatment planning and a successful surgical procedure implants have been shown to be reliable abutment for both retention and support of overdentures. During planning important relevant factors must be considered such as old age, systemic diseases, increased financial capability, etc. Implants retained overdentures can be divided into three groups according to the type of support: mucosal, muco-implantal and implantal. Key factors concerning the planning of prosthetic rehabilitation are the number and length of the implants, together with the quality and quantity of the anchoring bone tissue.

  20. Evaluation of Hi-Tec Implant Restoration in Mandibular First Molar Region- A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, Roopa Rani. S.; Prasad, L Krishna; Chakravarthi, P Srinivas; Devi, Naga Neelima; Sreeram, Sanjay Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Missing teeth lead to loss of structural balance, inefficient function, poor aesthetics and psychological effects on human beings, which needs restoration for normal contour, function and aesthetics. Several natural or synthetic substitutes are being used for replacement of missing tooth since centuries. Implants are the latest modality of replacement. So, the study was aimed to assess clinical success rate of Hi-Tec implant; which is economical and new in market. Results of the study will help clinician for appropriate implant selection. Materials and Methods The study included 10 patients from 19 to 31 years and needed restoration of missing mandibular first molar. Restoration had done using Hi Tec Single-tooth implants with metal-ceramic single crown prosthesis after three months of osseointegration. The implants were evaluated clinically (bleeding on probing, probing depth, implant mobility- periotest) and radiographically (marginal bone loss and peri-implant radiolucency) for six years. The observers were blinded for the duration of the study to prevent bias. Results All the patients had uneventful post-surgical healing. No bleeding on probing, Implant mobility, peri-implant radiolucency with minimal marginal bone loss and constant probing depths were observed well within the normal range during follow-up periods. Conclusion Two stage single-tooth Hi Tec implant restoration can be used as a successful treatment modality for replacing mandibular first molar in an economic way. However, these results were obtained after 6 years of follow up with a smaller sample size, so long term multi center studies with a larger sample size is recommended for the predictability of success rate conclusively. PMID:26436053

  1. Assessment of mandibular posterior regional landmarks using cone-beam computed tomography in dental implant surgery.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lílian Azevedo; Souza Picorelli Assis, Neuza Maria; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida; Pires Carvalho, Antônio Carlos; Devito, Karina Lopes

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate and correlate the anatomical features of the posterior mandibular region (submandibular fossa depth, bone height and thickness, and mandibular canal corticalization) to improve accident prevention and allow safe planning in implantology. Four parasagittal sections of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) from 100 patients were bilaterally analyzed. Linear measurements of the submandibular fossa depth, bone height and thickness were performed. The submandibular fossa was also classified into non-influential undercuts and influential undercuts for implant placement. Mandibular canal corticalization was also evaluated and classified according to the visualization. Data on patient age and gender were also collected. Forty-one scans (41%) were from male patients, and 59 (59%) were from female patients. Patient age ranged between 18 and 84 years, with an average age of 51.37 years. The submandibular fossa depth and implant bone thickness had a significant effect on the variability of the sample (46.1% and 22.3%, respectively). The submandibular fossa depth was quite variable, and the highest values were observed in the posterior regions. In 18.27% of the cases, the presence of the fossa directly influenced implant placement, considering a bone height of 10mm (standard implant). A significant correlation was observed between fossa depth and bone thickness. Thus, greater attention should be paid to thick ridges; although thick ridges are favorable, they may be associated with deeper submandibular fossae. The mandibular canal was the most influential anatomical structure in the premolar region due to the reduced bone height in this region and the greater difficulty in viewing the canal, and the submandibular fossa was the most influential structure in the molar region due to lower bone height leading up to the fossa and the greater fossa depth in this region. Therefore, CBCT is an important tool for assessing the mandibular region

  2. Design and finite element analysis of a novel sliding rod microscrew implantation device for mandibular prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Lv, Yuan; Lu, Yongjin; Zeng, Pan; Zeng, Xianglong; Guo, Xiaoqian; Han, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Tooth distalization is an effective approach for mandibular prognathism. Current distalization devices are bulky and clinically complicated. Here, we designed a novel molar distalization device by using a sliding rod and a microscrew and performed a mechanical analysis and finite element model (FEM) analysis of force distribution and displacement of the upper canine, first and second premolar and first molar. A 2D FEM was constructed using the Beam3 element and a 3D FEM was constructed of the mandibular teeth, the periodontal membrane, and the alveolar bones using the UG software. The upper first molar was divided into 12 points on the dental surface to facilitate stress analysis. Force analysis using the ANSYS WORKBECNH revealed that, both horizontally and vertically, the traction force causing distalization of the first molar decreased when the spring coil moved down the L shaped sliding rod. The 3D FEM force analysis revealed distomedial displacement of the upper first molar when the sliding rod microscrew implantation device caused distalization of the molar. These findings support further exploration for the use of the sliding rod microscrew implants as an anchorage for group distal movement of the teeth of patients with mandibular prognathism. PMID:26379860

  3. Use of Orthodontic Mini-Implants for Maxillomandibular Fixation in Mandibular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mario Sergio Medeiros; Reinhardt, Leandro Calcagno; Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Torres do Couto, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic appliances for skeletal anchorage are becoming increasingly more common in clinical practice. Similarly, different terms such as mini-implants, microimplants, and miniscrews have been used. There is a wide array of appliances currently on the market, in different designs and sizes, diameters, degree of titanium purity, and surface treatment. These appliances have been used for a variety of indications, including tooth retraction, intrusion, and traction. This study aimed to report the clinical case of a 19-year-old patient with a fractured mandible and to propose a novel use of mini-implants: the perioperative placement of mini-implants as anchors for maxillomandibular fixation steel wire ligatures. We concluded that this appliance provides an effective maxillomandibular fixation in patients with mandibular fracture, with little increase in the cost of surgery. PMID:23205173

  4. Immediate loading of maxillary and mandibular implant-supported fixed complete dentures: a 1- to 10-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting-Jen; Kan, Joseph Y K; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Roe, Phillip; Lozada, Jaime L

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the success rates of 50 full-arch maxillary and/or mandibular implant-supported fixed complete dentures. After a mean follow-up time of 42.1 months, 269 implants remained in function, which corresponded to cumulative implant success rates of 85.2% and an absolute success rate of 90.6% (269/297 implants). This study suggested that higher implant failure rates might be associated with a dental history of bruxism (29.3%) vs no history of bruxism (4.6%) and surgeons with limited experience (≤5 years; 12.2%) vs surgeons with experience (2.4%). PMID:21942324

  5. Fabrication of the mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration using CAD/CAM technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Reshad, Mamaly; Cascione, Domenico; Aalam, Alexandre Amir

    2009-11-01

    The mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration is an appropriate treatment choice for patients with inadequate bone volume in the posterior mandible. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has broadened the scope and application for this treatment option. A milled titanium bar retaining individual all-ceramic zirconium oxide crowns, with composite resin replicating gingival tissues, is recommended as an acceptable variation for this type of prosthesis. An alternative method for fabricating a mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration using CAD/CAM technology is described.

  6. Replacement of mandibular central incisors with implant-supported crowns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Daniel; Zuhr, Otto; Hürzeler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Anterior teeth are often affected by accidental dental trauma and may eventually be lost. When the neighboring teeth are unharmed, implant-supported crowns are often the preferred treatment choice. When not only the teeth but also the supporting hard and soft tissue has been lost, surgical reconstruction may be needed. However, in combined horizontal and vertical class III defects, the available augmentation techniques are often not predictable. In this case report, two neighboring mandibular central incisors were replaced by two implants after soft and hard tissue augmentation with the cortical bone plate method. The interdental soft tissue was reconstructed with remarkable success, making this an example of what can be achieved in cases such as this. PMID:27092347

  7. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Incidence of Altered Sensation of Mandibular Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Altered sensation (including paresthesia, dysesthesia and hypoesthesia) after mandibular implant surgery may indicate transient or permanent injury of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental branch, and considerably lower patients' satisfaction about the therapy. Previous studies have shown a great degree of variability on the incidence of altered sensation. We here reported the incidence of altered sensation after mandibular implant surgery based on a meta-analysis of 26 articles published between 1990.1.1 and 2016.1.1. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed and the studies with a lower score were excluded in the meta-analysis. Data synthesis was performed using the logistic-normal random-effect model. The meta-analyses revealed that the short-term (10 days after implant placement) and long-term (1 year after implant placement) incidence was 13% (95% CI, 6%-25%) and 3% (95% CI, 1%-7%), respectively. (2) For the patients who initially reported altered sensation, 80% (95% CI, 52%-94%) of them would return to normal sensation within 6 months after surgery, and 91% (95% CI, 78%-96%) of them would return to normal sensation one year after surgery. We concluded that dentist-patient communication about the risk of altered sensation is critical to treatment planning, since the short-term incidence of altered sensation is substantial (13%). When a patient reports altered sensation, regular assessment for 6 months would help tracing the changes of symptoms. In terms of long-term follow-up (1 year after surgery), the incidence is much lower (3%) and most patients (91%) would return to normal sensation. PMID:27100832

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Incidence of Altered Sensation of Mandibular Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Altered sensation (including paresthesia, dysesthesia and hypoesthesia) after mandibular implant surgery may indicate transient or permanent injury of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental branch, and considerably lower patients’ satisfaction about the therapy. Previous studies have shown a great degree of variability on the incidence of altered sensation. We here reported the incidence of altered sensation after mandibular implant surgery based on a meta-analysis of 26 articles published between 1990.1.1 and 2016.1.1. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed and the studies with a lower score were excluded in the meta-analysis. Data synthesis was performed using the logistic-normal random-effect model. The meta-analyses revealed that the short-term (10 days after implant placement) and long-term (1 year after implant placement) incidence was 13% (95% CI, 6%-25%) and 3% (95% CI, 1%-7%), respectively. (2) For the patients who initially reported altered sensation, 80% (95% CI, 52%-94%) of them would return to normal sensation within 6 months after surgery, and 91% (95% CI, 78%-96%) of them would return to normal sensation one year after surgery. We concluded that dentist-patient communication about the risk of altered sensation is critical to treatment planning, since the short-term incidence of altered sensation is substantial (13%). When a patient reports altered sensation, regular assessment for 6 months would help tracing the changes of symptoms. In terms of long-term follow-up (1 year after surgery), the incidence is much lower (3%) and most patients (91%) would return to normal sensation. PMID:27100832

  9. Accuracy of vertical height measurements on direct digital panoramic radiographs using posterior mandibular implants and metal balls as reference objects

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, L; Nizamaldin, Y; Combescure, C; Nedir, R; Bischof, M; Dohan Ehrenfest, DM; Carrel, J-P; Belser, UC

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Conventional panoramic radiography, a widely used radiographic examination tool in implant treatment planning, allows evaluation of the available bone height before inserting posterior mandibular implants. Image distortion and vertical magnification due to projection geometry is well described for rotational panoramic radiographs. To assess the accuracy of vertical height measurements on direct digital panoramic radiographs, implants and metal balls positioned in the posterior mandible were used as radio-opaque reference objects. The reproducibility of the measuring method was assessed by the inter- and intraobserver agreements. Methods: Direct digital panoramic radiographs, performed using a Kodak 8000C (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY), of 17 partially edentulous patients (10 females, 7 males, mean age 65 years) were selected from an X-ray database gathered during routine clinical evaluation of implant sites. Proprietary software and a mouse-driven calliper were used to measure the radiological length of 25 implants and 18 metal reference balls, positioned in mandibular posterior segments. The distortion ratio (DR) was calculated by dividing the radiological implant length by the implant's real length and the radiological ball height by the ball's real height. Results: Mean vertical DR was 0.99 for implants and 0.97 for balls, and was unrelated to mandibular sites, side, age, gender or observer. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were acceptable for both reference objects. Conclusions: Vertical measurements had acceptable accuracy and reproducibility when a software-based calibrated measurement tool was used, confirming that digital panoramic radiography can be reliably utilized to determine the pre-operative implant length in premolar and molar mandibular segments. PMID:23360688

  10. Remedy for Repeated Implant Retained Denture Fracture-A Challenging Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy M, Ramu; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Charry N, Sudheer; B, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    The most common site of fracture in a maxillary or a mandibular complete denture is along an anteroposterior line that coincides with the labial notch in in the denture which used to provide the frenum relief. Osseointegrated implants have been a boon to the patients who are completelly edentulous and are not satisfied with the conventional removable complete denture approach.Implant supported dentures have proven to provide superior retention and support for removable complete dentures. Nevertheless, fracture of the denture bases is a common complication of implant-supported mandibular overlay dentures,ecspecially when the artificial denture is opposing natural dentition. This article describes and illustrates a method of reinforcing implant-supported mandibular overdentures to overcome this problem. PMID:25584333

  11. A comparative study on complete and implant retained denture treatments: a biomechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although implant-retained overdenture allows edentulous patients to take higher occlusal forces than the conventional complete dentures, the biomechanical influences have not been explored yet. Clinically, there is limited knowledge and means for predicting localized bone remodelling after denture treatment with and without implant support. By using finite element (FE) analysis, this article provides an in-silico approach to exploring the treatment effects on the oral mucosa and potential resorption of residual ridge under three different denture configurations in a patient-specific manner. Based on cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans, a 3D heterogeneous FE model was created; and the supportive tissue, mucosa, was characterized as a hyperelastic material. A measured occlusal load (63N) was applied onto three virtual models, namely complete denture, two and four implant-retained overdentures. Clinically, the bone resorption was measured after one year in the two implant-retained overdenture treatment. Despite the improved stability and enhanced masticatory function, the implant-retained overdentures demonstrated higher hydrostatic stress in mucosa (43.6kPa and 39.9kPa for two and four implants) at the posterior ends of the mandible due to the cantilever effect, than the complete denture (33.4kPa). Hydrostatic pressure in the mucosa signifies a critical indicator and can be correlated with clinically measured bone resorption, pointing to severer mandibular ridge resorption posteriorly with implant-retained overdentures. This study provides a biomechanical basis for denture treatment planning to improve long-term outcomes with minimal residual ridge resorption.

  12. Orthodontic Microimplants Assisted Intrusion of Supra-erupted Maxillary Molar Enabling Osseointegrated Implant Supported Mandibular Prosthesis: Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Rai, Deepak; Bhasin, Saranjeet Singh; Rai, Sheetal

    2014-12-01

    Loss of mandibular molars, when not replaced in time, are usually associated with overeruption of maxillary molars. To provide prosthetic replacement for missing lower posteriors, over erupted maxillary teeth have been intruded in past with great difficulty in adults with conventional orthodontics, along with associated problems of root resorption. Currently orthodontic microimplants provide stable intraoral anchorage, allow predictable maxillary molar intrusion enabling reestablishment of functional posterior occlusion with mandibular implant supported prosthesis, thereby reducing need for prosthetic crown reduction in maxillary arch. The added advantage of microimplant is it enables use of sectional appliance in area of concern instead of full arch bracketed appliance which an adult may not accept. The case reports demonstrates, overerupted maxillary molars were intruded using orthodontic microimplants to enable prosthetic rehabilitation of mandibular dentition by osseointegrated implant supported prosthesis. The second case report also demonstrates use of CBCT scan in planning and execution.

  13. The root-supported overdenture using the Locator overdenture attachment.

    PubMed

    Pavlatos, James

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the rationale for the use of overdentures in the partially edentulous and fully edentulous maxilla and mandible. Treatment options, prosthetic designs, indications, and fundamental principles for the successful applications of overdentures are discussed. A detailed step-by-step procedure and technique for the construction of overdentures is provided.

  14. Bar overdentures utilizing the Locator attachment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A L; Kurtzman, G M

    2001-01-01

    Implant-retained overdentures are a restorative option for both the fully and partially edentulous arches. A new attachment, the Locator, which features a reduced interarch requirement and the advantage of built-in guide planes providing precise insertion, is described. The Locator is an advancement in attachment technology, with an improved design combined from the best features of a ball attachment, an ERA attachment, and a cap attachment.

  15. Within-subject comparisons of implant-supported mandibular prostheses: choice of prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Feine, J S; de Grandmont, P; Boudrias, P; Brien, N; LaMarche, C; Taché, R; Lund, J P

    1994-05-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that implant-supported prostheses are more satisfactory and efficient for edentulous patients than are conventional prostheses, until now no investigation has directly compared different types of implant-supported prostheses. We carried out a within-subject cross-over clinical trial with fixed and long-bar removable implant-supported mandibular prostheses. Fifteen subjects were randomly divided into two groups. One group received the fixed prosthesis first, while the other first received the removable. After a two-month adaptation period, psychometric measurements of various aspects of the prostheses and physiological tests of masticatory efficiency were carried out. The prostheses were then changed, and the procedures repeated. At the end of the study, subjects chose the prosthesis they wished to keep. In this paper, we report on the data gathered at this last appointment. Eight subjects chose the fixed (F group), and seven chose the removable (R group). Both groups rated stability and ability to chew with the fixed as significantly better than with the removable. However, the R group rated ease of cleaning as the most important factor governing their decision, followed by esthetics and stability. The F group considered stability to be the most important factor in their decision, followed by chewing ability and ability to clean. There was a tendency for the removable to be chosen by older subjects (+50 years). These results suggest that patients choose fixed or removable implant-supported prostheses for specific reasons, and that patient attitudes should be considered when the design of a prosthesis is being planned for an individual patient. PMID:8006238

  16. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  17. Mandibular remodeling measured on cephalograms. 1. Osseous changes relative to superimposition on metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Ben-Bassat, Y; Korn, E L; Bravo, L A; Curry, S

    1992-08-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying remodeling of mandibular surfaces in a sample of growing children who represent those usually treated by orthodontists in the mixed and early adult dentition. The sample, 31 patients with metallic implants of the Björk-type, was monitored at annual intervals between 8 1/2 and 15 1/2 years of age. (Maxillary remodeling changes for the sample have been reported earlier.) The present article reports findings concerning changes at condyle, gonion, menton, pogonion, and point B as identified on lateral cephalograms. Data are reported in the Frankfort plane frame of reference with the cephalograms from different time points superimposed on the metallic implants. Mean displacement at condyle was larger than that at any other landmark and was similar in magnitude and direction to the observations of Björk when the difference in orientation of the vertical axis in the two studies is taken into account. The mean displacement of gonion was in an upward and backward direction at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to the Frankfort plane. Mean displacements at menton and pogonion were in a downward and backward direction but were very small. Mean displacement at point B was somewhat greater than that of menton and gonion, oriented in an upward and backward direction. Individual variation for most of the parameters measured was sufficiently large to warrant the inference that caution should be used when mean values are applied to the analysis of individual cases.

  18. A first experience with digital complete overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bajunaid, Salwa Omar

    2016-07-01

    The development of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing systems for dentistry in the 1980s resulted in the successful fabrication of crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and superstructures for both natural teeth and dental implants. Today, this technology is available for constructing digitally designed and milled, completely removable dental prostheses. The procedure uses clinical and laboratory protocols that allow fabrication of completely removable prostheses within two clinical appointments. The aim of this clinical report is to present the author's first experience with digital complete overdentures, the practicality of this technology, and patient feedback. Compared with conventional overdentures, the fit of the digital prostheses was improved because the cameo and flanges of the prostheses were nicely shaped and rolled, and this enhanced their stability and retention. Occlusion was also excellent. However, aesthetics in terms of the alignment, shape, and size of the maxillary overdenture teeth were inacceptable. Despite some of the drawbacks identified in our study, the use of removable digital dentures does provide excellent adaptation of the denture base and requires fewer clinic visits. We anticipate that the unsatisfactory aesthetic outcomes presented in this report can be corrected with more experience. We also believe that acquiring an in-house scanning machine would be beneficial. We highly recommend including this technique in dental school curriculums at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in order to keep students and residents up to date on the latest technology available. PMID:27656082

  19. A first experience with digital complete overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bajunaid, Salwa Omar

    2016-07-01

    The development of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing systems for dentistry in the 1980s resulted in the successful fabrication of crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and superstructures for both natural teeth and dental implants. Today, this technology is available for constructing digitally designed and milled, completely removable dental prostheses. The procedure uses clinical and laboratory protocols that allow fabrication of completely removable prostheses within two clinical appointments. The aim of this clinical report is to present the author's first experience with digital complete overdentures, the practicality of this technology, and patient feedback. Compared with conventional overdentures, the fit of the digital prostheses was improved because the cameo and flanges of the prostheses were nicely shaped and rolled, and this enhanced their stability and retention. Occlusion was also excellent. However, aesthetics in terms of the alignment, shape, and size of the maxillary overdenture teeth were inacceptable. Despite some of the drawbacks identified in our study, the use of removable digital dentures does provide excellent adaptation of the denture base and requires fewer clinic visits. We anticipate that the unsatisfactory aesthetic outcomes presented in this report can be corrected with more experience. We also believe that acquiring an in-house scanning machine would be beneficial. We highly recommend including this technique in dental school curriculums at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in order to keep students and residents up to date on the latest technology available.

  20. Pain Sensation and Postsurgical Complications in Posterior Mandibular Implant Placement Using Ridge Mapping, Panoramic Radiography, and Infiltration Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate intrasurgical and after surgical, pain and the incidence of after surgical alteration of sensation in the mandible and lower lip when placing implants in the posterior mandible using ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia. Methods. This was a longitudinal clinical study of healthy patients needing implant placement in the posterior mandible. After thorough examination and treatment plan using ridge mapping and panoramic radiography, all patients received dental implants under local infiltration anesthesia. The patients were then given a questionnaire to assess the pain during anesthesia and implant surgery. Change of sensation in the lower lip was evaluated by standard neurosensory examination tests at 7 days and 1 and 4 months. Prosthetic treatment was carried out 4 months postsurgery and the patients were followed for an average of 28.5 months afterwards. Results. A total of 103 implants were placed in 62 patients. Patients reported very minor pain during injection. No pain was reported during either implant placement or bone grafting procedures. No alteration of sensation in the mandible or lower lip was recorded postsurgery. Conclusion. In most cases, ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia are sufficient for posterior mandibular implant placement without pain or complications. PMID:23762571

  1. The Value of SPECT/CT in Monitoring Prefabricated Tissue-Engineered Bone and Orthotopic rhBMP-2 Implants for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miao; Peng, Xin; Mao, Chi; Tian, Jia-he; Zhang, Shu-wen; Xu, Fang; Tu, Jing-jing; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Min; Yu, Guang-yan

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering shows good prospects for mandibular reconstruction. In recent studies, prefabricated tissue-engineered bone (PTEB) by recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) applied in vivo has found to be an effective alternative for autologous bone grafts. However, the optimal time to transfer PTEB for mandibular reconstruction is still not elucidated. Thus, here in an animal experiment of rhesus monkey, the suitable transferring time for PTEB to reconstruct mandibular defects was evaluated by 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT, and its value in monitoring orthotopic rhBMP-2 implants for mandibular reconstruction was also evaluated. The result of SPECT/CT showed higher 99mTc-MDP uptake, indicating osteoinductivity, in rhBMP-2 incorporated demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) implants than those without BMP stimulation. 99mTc-MDP uptake of rhBMP-2 implant peaked at 8 weeks following implantation while CT showed the density of these implants increased after 13 weeks’ prefabrication. Histology confirmed that mandibular defects were repaired successfully with PTEB or orthotopically rhBMP-2 incorporated CHA implants, in accordance with SPECT/CT findings. Collectively, data shows 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool to monitor osteoinductivity and bone regeneration of PTEB and orthotopic implants. The PTEB achieved peak osteoinductivity and bone density at 8 to 13 weeks following ectopic implantation, which would serve as a recommendable time frame for its transfer to mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26340447

  2. [Mandibular bone tissue regeneration after the introduction of the implantation system performed on the basis of carbon composite material].

    PubMed

    Chetvertnykh, V A; Loginova, N P; Astashina, N B; Rogozhnikov, G I; Rapekta, S I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the processes of regeneration of bone tissue after the introduction of new implant systems. In the experiment, performed on 10 male pigs of Landras breed aged 50-55 days and weighing 17-18.5 kg, the time course of histological changes was studied in the area of mandibular regeneration after the formation of tissue defect and the introduction of the implant of a proposed construction. Morphological analysis of the experimental results 90, 180 and 270 days after the operation demonstrated the process of reparative regeneration of damaged bone along implant-bone block boundaries. Bone repair proceeded through the stage of formation of the woven bone with its progressive substitution by the lamellar bone, with the maintenance of the shape, size and symmetry of the damaged organ. PMID:23805619

  3. [Mandibular bone tissue regeneration after the introduction of the implantation system performed on the basis of carbon composite material].

    PubMed

    Chetvertnykh, V A; Loginova, N P; Astashina, N B; Rogozhnikov, G I; Rapekta, S I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the processes of regeneration of bone tissue after the introduction of new implant systems. In the experiment, performed on 10 male pigs of Landras breed aged 50-55 days and weighing 17-18.5 kg, the time course of histological changes was studied in the area of mandibular regeneration after the formation of tissue defect and the introduction of the implant of a proposed construction. Morphological analysis of the experimental results 90, 180 and 270 days after the operation demonstrated the process of reparative regeneration of damaged bone along implant-bone block boundaries. Bone repair proceeded through the stage of formation of the woven bone with its progressive substitution by the lamellar bone, with the maintenance of the shape, size and symmetry of the damaged organ.

  4. Influence of ridge inclination and implant localization on the association of mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Lígia Del' Arco Pignatta; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tendency of displacement of the supporting structures of the distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated to the implant with different inclinations of alveolar ridge and implant localizations through a two-dimensional finite-element method. Sixteen mandibular models were fabricated, presenting horizontal, distally descending, distally ascending, or descending-ascending ridges. All models presented the left canine and were rehabilitated with conventional DERPD or implant-retained prosthesis with the ERA system. The models were obtained by the AutoCAD software and transferred to the finite-element software ANSYS 9.0 for analysis. A force of 50 N was applied on the cusp tips of the teeth, with 5 points of loading of 10 N. The results were visualized by displacement maps. For all ridge inclinations, the assembly of the DERPD with distal plate retained by an anterior implant exhibited the lowest requisition of the supporting structures. The highest tendency of displacement occurred in the model with distally ascending ridge with incisal rest. It was concluded that the association of the implant decreased the displacement of the DERPD, and the anterior positioning of the implant associated to the DERPD with the distal plate preserved the supporting structures for all ridges. PMID:21558932

  5. Influence of ridge inclination and implant localization on the association of mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Lígia Del' Arco Pignatta; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tendency of displacement of the supporting structures of the distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated to the implant with different inclinations of alveolar ridge and implant localizations through a two-dimensional finite-element method. Sixteen mandibular models were fabricated, presenting horizontal, distally descending, distally ascending, or descending-ascending ridges. All models presented the left canine and were rehabilitated with conventional DERPD or implant-retained prosthesis with the ERA system. The models were obtained by the AutoCAD software and transferred to the finite-element software ANSYS 9.0 for analysis. A force of 50 N was applied on the cusp tips of the teeth, with 5 points of loading of 10 N. The results were visualized by displacement maps. For all ridge inclinations, the assembly of the DERPD with distal plate retained by an anterior implant exhibited the lowest requisition of the supporting structures. The highest tendency of displacement occurred in the model with distally ascending ridge with incisal rest. It was concluded that the association of the implant decreased the displacement of the DERPD, and the anterior positioning of the implant associated to the DERPD with the distal plate preserved the supporting structures for all ridges.

  6. Clinical results of autologous bone augmentation harvested from the mandibular ramus prior to implant placement. An analysis of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Andreas; Ioannis, Konstantinidis; Winter, Karsten; Schramm, Alexander; Wilde, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was the evaluation of the clinical success and complication rates associated with autologous bone grafts harvested from the mandibular ramus for alveolar ridge augmentation and the identification of possible risk factors for graft failure. Methods: In a consecutive retrospective study 86 patients could be included. In these patients a total of 104 bone grafts from the mandibular ramus were harvested for alveolar ridge augmentation. Medical history, age of patient, smoking status, periodontal status and complications were recorded. The need for bone grafting was defined by the impossibility of installing dental implants of adequate length or diameter to fulfill prosthetic requirements, or for aesthetic reasons. The surgical outcome was evaluated concerning complications at the donor or at the recipient site, risk factors associated with the complications and graft survival. All patients were treated using a two-stage technique. In the first operation bone blocks harvested from the retromolar region were placed as lateral or vertical onlay grafts using augmentation templates and were fixed with titanium osteosynthesis screws after exposure of the deficient alveolar ridge. After a healing period of 3–5 months computed tomography scans were performed followed by virtual implant planning and the implants were inserted using guided dental implantation. Results: 97 of the 104 onlay bone grafts were successful. In only 7 patients a graft failure occurred after a postsurgical complication. No long-term nerve damage occurred. Postoperative nerve disturbances were reported by 11 patients and had temporary character only. After the healing period between 4 to 5 months, 155 implants were placed (39 in the maxilla, 116 in the mandible). A final rehabilitation with dental implants was possible in 82 of the 86 patients. Except the 7 graft failures, all recorded complications were minor complications which could be easily treated successfully

  7. Mandibular remodeling measured on cephalograms: 2. A comparison of information from implant and anatomic best-fit superimpositions.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Ben-Bassat, Y; Korn, E L; Bravo, L A; Curry, S

    1992-09-01

    This study quantifies the differences in the perceived pattern of mandibular remodeling when two different methods are used to superimpose roentgenographic images of the mandible. Lateral cephalograms for a group of subjects with metallic implants of the Björk type were superimposed twice; first on the metallic implants and then independently on mandibular anatomic structures according to a common "best fit" rule. In this article, we compare the between-superimposition differences in the perceived displacements of condyle, gonion, menton, pogonion, and Point B. Mean differences between the two superimpositional techniques were smaller than had been anticipated. For the 7-year time interval between 8.5 and 15.5 years, the largest mean differences between methods were 2.70 mm in the horizontal direction at condyle, 1.90 mm in the vertical direction at condyle, and 1.52 mm in the vertical direction at gonion. None of the other between-superimposition differences had a mean value in excess of 1 mm. The individual case variability between the two methods was, however, quite considerable, a finding that we believe has bearing on the confidence that can be placed in individual case analyses in clinical orthodontics. A preliminary attempt has been made to represent and discuss the magnitude of this problem.

  8. Evaluation of immediately loaded dental implants bioactivated with platelet-rich plasma placed in the mandibular posterior region: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ullas; Mehta, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to clinically and radiographically assess the soft and hard tissue changes around the immediately loaded single tooth implants bioactivated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), placed in the mandibular posterior region. Materials and Methods: A total of 11 patients having single tooth edentulous space in the mandibular posterior region were selected. An endosseous implant was placed after clinical and radiographic examination in each selected site using single stage surgical approach. The patients were followed up at 3, 6, 9, and at 12 months of post implant insertion. The patients were subjected to recording of clinical parameters like modified plaque index, modified gingival index, probing depth, and clinical implant mobility scale. Radiographs made at different intervals were subjected to assessment of bone level mesial and distal to each implant using computer assisted image analysis. Results: Scores for clinical parameters were minimal and comparable. The probing depth around the implant was measured during the follow-up period and the changes observed were statistically non-significant. None of the implants were clinically mobile during the follow-up period. Radiographically, the peri-implant bone resorption both on mesial and distal sides was within normal limit after one year of immediate loading. Finally, the overall success rate for the immediately loaded bioactivated implant placed in the mandibular posterior region was recorded as 100%. Interpretation and Conclusion: The use of platelet-rich plasma may lead to improved early bone apposition around the implant; and thus, results in increased rate of osseointegration. Single stage implant procedure with the adjunctive use of PRP enhances the ability of peri-implant healing tissue to create favorable soft and hard tissue relationships. It also gives the added advantage of psychological boost for the patient by getting fixed replacement of tooth

  9. Role of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture on mandibular bone response: biological-data-based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yoda, N; Liao, Z; Chen, J; Sasaki, K; Swain, M; Li, Q

    2016-09-01

    Implant-supported fixed partial denture with cantilever extension can transfer the excessive load to the bone around implants and stress/strain concentration potentially leading to bone resorption. This study investigated the effects of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) on the stress and strain distribution in the peri-implant bone by combining clinically measured time-dependent loading data and finite element (FE) analysis. A 3-dimensional mandibular model was constructed based on computed tomography (CT) images. Four different configurations of implants supporting 3-unit FPDs, namely three implant-supported FPD, conventional three-unit bridge FPD, distal cantilever FPD and mesial cantilever FPD, were modelled. The FPDs were virtually inserted to the molar area in the mandibular FE models. The FPDs were loaded according to time-dependent in vivo-measured 3-dimensional loading data during chewing. The von Mises stress (VMS) and equivalent strain (EQS) in peri-implant bone regions were evaluated as mechanical stimuli. During the chewing cycles, the regions near implant necks and bottom apexes experienced high VMS and EQS than the middle regions in all implant-supported FPD configurations. Higher VMS and EQS values were also observed at the implant neck region adjacent to the cantilever extension in the cantilevered configurations. The patient-specific dynamic loading data and CT-based reconstruction of full 3D mandibular allowed us to model the biomechanical responses more realistically. The results provided data for clinical assessment of implant configuration to improve longevity and reliability of the implant-supported FPD restoration. PMID:27224022

  10. A prospective 15-year follow-up study of mandibular fixed prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants. Clinical results and marginal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, L W; Carlsson, G E; Jemt, T

    1996-12-01

    In this prospective study 47 edentulous patients were treated with mandibular fixed prostheses supported by osseointegrated Brånemark implants and followed for 12 to 15 years. Three (1%) of the 273 inserted implants were lost, two before and one six years after placement of the fixed prosthesis. The cumulative success rate (CSR) of the implants was 98.9% both after 10 and 15 years. None of the fixed prostheses was lost and at the last follow-up, all patients had stable fixed prostheses in function (CSR 100%). The marginal bone loss around the implants was small, on average 0.5 mm during the first post surgical year and thereafter about 0.05 mm annually. More bone was lost around the anterior implants than around the most posterior ones. Smoking and poor oral hygiene had significant influence on bone loss, while occlusal loading factors such as maximal bite force, tooth clenching and length of cantilevers were of minor importance. It is concluded that the long-term results of the mandibular implant treatment were extremely successful, regarding both the fixed prostheses and implant stability. Bone resorption around the implants, albeit limited, was influenced by several factors, smoking and oral hygiene appeared to be most important. PMID:9151599

  11. Effect of the additional installation of implants in the posterior region on the prognosis of treatment in the edentulous mandibular jaw.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Youji; Fujisawa, Kenji; Takechi, Masaaki; Momota, Yukihiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Tatehara, Seiko; Nagayama, Masaru; Yamauchi, Eiji

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of the additional installation of implants in the posterior region on the prognosis of treatment in the edentulous mandibular jaw. Fifteen patients who had received implants (Brånemark system, Nobel Biocare, Gotebörg, Sweden) in the edentulous mandible and completed a 1-year follow-up after the fitting of implant-anchored fixed prostheses were selected. In seven patients (Group A), four or five implants were installed between the mental foramina, and in eight patients (Group P), one or two implants, one on each side, were installed in the posterior regions in addition to the implants between the foramina. All implants of both groups achieved osseointegration. In Group A, there was no implant loss after loading. Six implants were lost in five patients of Group P within 1 year after loading. All of them were located in the posterior region. To elucidate whether or not the failure rate of the implants in the posterior region of Group P after loading was especially high, the failures were also compared with 89 implants, which were installed in the posterior region of the mandibles to support implant-anchored fixed partial prosthesis, during the same period (Group C). The cumulative survival rate of the implants of Group P was 60%, while that of the implants of Group C was 100% (P<0.001). When the survival rates of posterior implants with the same length of the two groups were compared, there were significant differences for the 7- and 10-mm-length implants only. These data demonstrate that the posterior implants in Group P are at greater risk. Deformation of the mandible due to jaw movement was thought to be the most likely cause of the implant loss. Therefore, when such modified treatment is chosen, it should be performed with meticulous attention. PMID:15015949

  12. The use of phentolamine mesylate to evaluate mandibular nerve damage following implant placement.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Malamed, Stanley F

    2010-09-01

    High success rates and long-term predictability of implant therapy have been well documented in the literature. However, complications in implant treatment can arise and include sensory disturbances, especially in the posterior mandible in areas close to the inferior alveolar nerve. Treatment efficacy of sensory disturbances caused by implant placement in this area relies on the expeditious diagnosis of an induced paresthesia. Recently, phentolamine mesylate has been introduced as a reversal agent of local anesthesia with the ability to decrease the requisite time for a patient to return to normal sensation. This article introduces a method for faster detection of a potential paresthesia induced by implant placement in the posterior mandible.

  13. Influence of implant inclination associated with mandibular class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Santos, Ciandrus Moraes; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Moraes, Sandra Lúcia Dantas; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use two-dimensional finite element method to evaluate the displacement and stress distribution transmitted by a distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant placed at different inclinations (0, 5, 15, and 30 degrees) in the second molar region of the edentulous mandible ridge. Six hemimandibular models were created: model A, only with the presence of the natural tooth 33; model B, similar to model A, with the presence of a conventional DERPD replacing the missing teeth; model C, similar to the previous model, with a straight implant (0 degrees) in the distal region of the ridge, under the denture base; model D, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 5 degrees in the mesial direction; model E, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 15 degrees in the mesial direction; and model F, similar to ME, with the implant angled at 30 degrees in the mesial direction. The models were created with the use of the AutoCAD 2000 program (Autodesk, Inc, San Rafael, CA) and processed for finite element analysis by the ANSYS 8.0 program (Swanson Analysis Systems, Houston, PA). The force applied was vertical of 50 N on each cusp tip. The results showed that the introduction of the RPD overloaded the supporting structures of the RPD and that the introduction of the implant helped to relieve the stresses of the mucosa alveolar, cortical bone, and trabecular bone. The best stress distribution occurred in model D with the implant angled at 5 degrees. The use of an implant as a support decreased the displacement of alveolar mucosa for all inclinations simulated. The stress distribution transmitted by the DERPD to the supporting structures was improved by the use of straight or slightly inclined implants. According to the displacement analysis and von Mises stress, it could be expected that straight or slightly inclined implants do not represent biomechanical risks to use. PMID:21415633

  14. Influence of implant inclination associated with mandibular class I removable partial denture.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Santos, Ciandrus Moraes; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Moraes, Sandra Lúcia Dantas; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use two-dimensional finite element method to evaluate the displacement and stress distribution transmitted by a distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant placed at different inclinations (0, 5, 15, and 30 degrees) in the second molar region of the edentulous mandible ridge. Six hemimandibular models were created: model A, only with the presence of the natural tooth 33; model B, similar to model A, with the presence of a conventional DERPD replacing the missing teeth; model C, similar to the previous model, with a straight implant (0 degrees) in the distal region of the ridge, under the denture base; model D, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 5 degrees in the mesial direction; model E, similar to model C, with the implant angled at 15 degrees in the mesial direction; and model F, similar to ME, with the implant angled at 30 degrees in the mesial direction. The models were created with the use of the AutoCAD 2000 program (Autodesk, Inc, San Rafael, CA) and processed for finite element analysis by the ANSYS 8.0 program (Swanson Analysis Systems, Houston, PA). The force applied was vertical of 50 N on each cusp tip. The results showed that the introduction of the RPD overloaded the supporting structures of the RPD and that the introduction of the implant helped to relieve the stresses of the mucosa alveolar, cortical bone, and trabecular bone. The best stress distribution occurred in model D with the implant angled at 5 degrees. The use of an implant as a support decreased the displacement of alveolar mucosa for all inclinations simulated. The stress distribution transmitted by the DERPD to the supporting structures was improved by the use of straight or slightly inclined implants. According to the displacement analysis and von Mises stress, it could be expected that straight or slightly inclined implants do not represent biomechanical risks to use.

  15. Piezoelectric surgery in mandibular split crest technique with immediate implant placement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BELLEGGIA, F.; POZZI, A.; ROCCI, M.; BARLATTANI, A.; GARGARI, M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Implant supported rehabilitation of thin edentulous ridges with horizontal atrophy necessitates a regenerative approach. Within the procedures for horizontal bone defects augmentation, ridge expansion techniques permit dislocation of the buccal bone plate in a labial direction and simultaneous implant insertion in single-stage surgery, abbreviating overall treatment time. The piezoelectric ridge expansion technique permits to obtain the expansion of very mineralized bone crests without excessive traumas or the risk of ridge fractures. The case reported shows an implant treatment for partial edentulous lower arch rehabilitation. A full-split thickness flap was raised. The mucoperiosteal reflection permitted to identify alveolar crest contour where osteotomies had to be performed. Split thickness dissection allowed periosteal blood supply to be mainteined on the buccal bone plate. After horizontal and vertical osteotomies were performed with OT7 piezoelectric microsaw (Piezo-surgery, Mectron), a single-bevel scalpel was used to move the buccal bone plate to the labial. Two Straumann TE 3.3/4.8 mm wide implants were inserted in the lower right premolar area, and 1 Straumann 4.8 mm Wide Neck implant was inserted to replace lower right first molar. The amount of bone expansion was equal to the cervical diameter of the placed implants (4.8 mm) and residual bone gap was packed with Bio-Oss granules (Geistlich). Healing was uneventful and 3 months later final restorations with implant-supported porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were cemented. PMID:23285347

  16. Mandibular rehabilitation using immediate implant loading after computer-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Margonar, Rogério; Queiroz, Thallita P; Luvizuto, Eloá R; Betoni-Júnior, Walter; Zocal, Emílio A C

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomographic scan is a precise complementary examination of diagnostic imaging and a noninvasive surveying technique that enables the professional to improve precision of implant placement by building a prototype that allows the confection of surgical guides. The authors present a clinical case of mandible rehabilitation based on computed tomography of a patient; the cross sections were reformatted and used to construct a virtual planning of the implants and a guide template in Dental Slice. Immediate loading of 5 titanium implants were placed in the mandible using a Slice Guide System. This technique allows a better surgical planning, makes the procedures more accurate, and reduces surgery time.

  17. The use of phentolamine mesylate to evaluate mandibular nerve damage following implant placement.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Malamed, Stanley F

    2010-09-01

    High success rates and long-term predictability of implant therapy have been well documented in the literature. However, complications in implant treatment can arise and include sensory disturbances, especially in the posterior mandible in areas close to the inferior alveolar nerve. Treatment efficacy of sensory disturbances caused by implant placement in this area relies on the expeditious diagnosis of an induced paresthesia. Recently, phentolamine mesylate has been introduced as a reversal agent of local anesthesia with the ability to decrease the requisite time for a patient to return to normal sensation. This article introduces a method for faster detection of a potential paresthesia induced by implant placement in the posterior mandible. PMID:20879205

  18. Metastatic Breast Cancer in Medication-Related Osteonecrosis Around Mandibular Implants

    PubMed Central

    Favia, Gianfranco; Tempesta, Angela; Limongelli, Luisa; Crincoli, Vito; Piattelli, Adriano; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Breast cancer metastasis in medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Clinical and radiological examination • surgical treatment Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many authors have considered dental implants to be unrelated to increased risk of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Nevertheless, more recently, more cases of peri-implant MRONJ (PI-MRONJ) have been described, thus becoming a challenging health problem. Also, metastatic cancer deposits are not infrequently found at peri-implant sites and this may represent an additional complication for such treatments. We present the case of a breast cancer patient with PI-MRONJ, presenting a clinically and radiologically undetected metastasis within the necrotic bone, and highlight the necessity of an accurate histopathological analysis. Case Report: A 66-year-old female patient, who had received intravenous bisphosphonates for bone breast cancer metastases, came to our attention for a non-implant surgery-triggered PI-MRONJ. After surgical resection of the necrotic bone, conventional and immunohistochemical examinations were performed, which showed breast cancer deposits within the necrotic bone. Conclusions: Cancer patients with metastatic disease, who are undergoing bisphosphonate treatment, may develop unusual complications, including MRONJ, which is a site at risk for hosting additional metastatic deposits that may be clinically and radiologically overlooked. Such risk is increased by previous or concomitant implant procedures. Consequently, clinicians should be prudent when performing implant surgery in cancer patients with advanced-stage disease and consider the possible occurrence of peri-implant metastases while planning adequate treatments in such patients. PMID:26371774

  19. Evaluation of the effect of the residual bone angulation on implant-supported fixed prosthesis in mandibular posterior edentulism. Part II: 3-D finite element stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Akça, K; Iplikçioğlu, H

    2001-01-01

    Buccolingual angulation of the mandibular posterior edentulous region may affect the prosthetic load conditions, so as to cause high stress concentrated areas that may easily lead to failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various predetermined buccolingual angulation values on stress distribution in the mandibular posterior edentulous region restored with implant-supported fixed partial dentures, using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Stress analyses were performed applying 400N oblique force to implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Stress analyses indicated tensile stress values on the buccal surface and compressive stress values on the lingual surface of cortical bone were increased as the angulation of the edentulous bone increased (especially corresponding to the cervical region of the implants). Compressive stress values, observed where two implants were placed at the second premolar and second molar regions (5-7 design) and first and second molar regions (6-7 design), respectively, were very close to or even exceeded the ultimate compressive strength of bone. It is concluded that when a definite buccolingual angulation is added to other existing risk factors such as bruxism, placing an implant for every missing tooth might reduce the high stress concentration areas. PMID:11813664

  20. The validity of two methods of mandibular superimposition: a comparison with tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Springate, S D; Jones, A G

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine and compare the validity of Björk's and Ricketts' methods for the superimposition of serial cephalometric radiographs of the mandible for the analysis of changes over the duration of routine orthodontic treatment in growing subjects (approximately 2 years). Pre- and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of 23 children, with tantalum markers implanted in the mandible, were studied. The differences in position of six dental and skeletal landmarks between superimposition on Björk's structures and on Ricketts' corpus axis were compared with those on the basis of the implants. A rotational effect was found for corpus axis resulting from differential movement of Xi point with growth, whereas Björk's method yielded results essentially similar to those of the implant-based superimposition. This resulted in statistically significant median differences between the two methods for all landmarks except pogonion and menton. The magnitude of the differences increased with distance from the central core of the mandible and were generally greater horizontally than vertically. Although most differences were less than 2 mm, approximately 10% of the subjects showed differences greater than 4 mm for molar and incisor landmarks. These findings suggest that, for growing subjects, Björk's method should be preferred Ricketts', which cannot be relied on to indicate the true (intramandibular) changes during orthodontic treatment in growing subjects.

  1. Comparative stress distribution of implant-retained mandibular ball-supported and bar-supported overlay dentures: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Fariborz; Khoshhal, Masoumeh; Bayat-Movahed, Saeed; Ahangary, Ahmad Hassan; Firooz, Farnaz; Izady, Alireza; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2011-08-01

    Implant-retained mandibular ball-supported and bar-supported overlay dentures are the two most common treatment options for the edentulous mandible. The superior option in terms of strain distribution should be determined. The three-dimensional model of mandible (based on computerized tomography scan) and its overlying implant-retained bar-supported and ball-supported overlay dentures were simulated using SolidWorks, NURBS, and ANSYS Workbench. Loads A (60 N) and B (60 N) were exerted, respectively, in protrusive and laterotrusive motions, on second molar mesial, first molar mesial, and first premolar. The strain distribution patterns were assessed on (1) implant tissue, (2) first implant-bone, and (3) second implant-bone interfaces. Protrusive: Strain was mostly detected in the apical of the fixtures and least in the cervical when bar design was used. On the nonworking side, however, strain was higher in the cervical and lower in the apical compared with the working side implant. Laterotrusive: The strain values were closely similar in the two designs. It seems that both designs are acceptable in terms of stress distribution, although a superior pattern is associated with the application of bar design in protrusive motion.

  2. Periodontal considerations of the removable partial overdenture.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B C; Renner, R P

    1990-10-01

    1. An overdenture, whether complete or partial, is an excellent mode of treatment in the mutilated dentition for the preservation of the residual ridge. 2. Selection of patients for an overdenture should be based on past history of dental neglect, the status of the teeth and their periodontium, including present oral hygiene status, and patient motivation. The patients with a history of dental neglect, poor oral hygiene, and lack of motivation in having the teeth and the periodontium restored to health as well as strict compliance to a home-care regimen and recall schedule are not good candidates for treatment with an overdenture. 3. The choice of teeth or roots to serve as overdenture abutments must include their periodontal evaluation, which should consist of a detailed periodontal examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment when this is indicated, including chemical protection (fluoride gel) and an oral hygiene regimen tailored to individual needs. 4. The knowledge and expertise in the selection and implementation of appropriate periodontal treatment modalities is of paramount importance in restoring optimum periodontal health to the overdenture abutments before overdenture fabrication. 5. The maintenance phase of the overdenture abutments as well as of the existing natural teeth is of critical importance in the preservation of health of these abutments and teeth. This maintenance phase should consist of periodic recalls based on individual needs; a detailed periodontal evaluation, including patient's motivation and status of oral hygiene and denture hygiene; and detection of caries. If necessary, appropriate periodontal and/or restorative therapy should be performed, and oral hygiene measures reinforced. This will ensure longevity of both abutment teeth or roots and of the existing natural teeth resulting in a long-term success of an overdenture. 6. Because there is evidence of high incidence of periodontal disease and dental caries in overdenture wearers

  3. Determining optimal surface roughness of TiO(2) blasted titanium implant material for attachment, proliferation and differentiation of cells derived from human mandibular alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, K; Wennerberg, A; Wroblewski, J; Hultenby, K; Lopez, B S; Arvidson, K

    2001-10-01

    In the complex process of bone formation at the implant-tissue interface, implant surface roughness is an important factor modulating osteoblastic function. In this study, primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells, derived from human mandibular bone, were used. The aim was to examine the effect of varying surface roughness of titanium implant material on cellular attachment, proliferation and differentiation. A recognized method of increasing surface roughness and enlarging the surface area of titanium implants is by blasting with titanium dioxide particles: the four specimen types in the study comprised surfaces which were machine-turned only, or blasted after turning, with 63-90 microm, 106-180 microm, or 180-300 microm TiO(2) particles, respectively. The specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning. The turned samples had the smoothest surfaces: average height deviation (S(a)) of 0.20 microm. The roughest were those blasted with 180-300 microm particles, S(a) value 1.38 microm. Blasting with intermediate particle sizes yielded S(a) values of 0.72 microm and 1.30 microm, respectively. Cell profile areas were measured using a semiautomatic interactive image analyzer. Figures were expressed as percentage of attachment. DNA synthesis was estimated by measuring the amount of [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble cell precipitates. The specific activity of alkaline phosphatase was assayed using p-nitrophenylphosphate as a substrate. The ability of the cells to synthesize osteocalcin was investigated in serum-free culture medium using the ELSA-OST-NAT immunoradiometric kit. After 3 h of culture, the percentage of cellular attachment did not differ significantly between specimens blasted with 180-300 micromparticles and the turned specimens. All blasted surfaces showed significantly higher [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation than the turned surfaces (P<0.05), with the highest on the surfaces blasted

  4. Implant-supported denture rehabilitation on a hemimandibulectomized patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Gatti, Giambattista; Saggese, Vito; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study the treatment of oral cancer requires different surgical approaches such as marginal or segmental mandibular resection in order to allow a safe removal of the neoplastic lesion. The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of an implant-supported denture rehabilitation for restoring oral function and facial appearance on a hemimandibulectomized patient. Materials and methods the patient was a 64 years old man, hard smoker and moderate drinker. Due to a jaw neoplastic lesion, he underwent a hemimandibulectomy, followed by the insertion of 4 implant fixtures at the chin cap symphysis site. The denture rehabilitation consisted in an over-denture mounted onto a bar furnished by a condylar eminence in articulation with the glenoid fossa of the upper denture. Results this type of implant-supported denture rehabilitation allows the recovery of the masticatory function and the mandibular reposition with a satisfactory restoration of the proper facial symmetry and appearance. Conclusion in the edentulous patient implant-supported denture with artificial condyle allows the recovery of the masticatory function without the need of additional operations to re-establish the temporomandibular joint anatomy. It is currently considered as a low invasive technique with very low risk of side effects. PMID:23285319

  5. Use of Transalveolar Sutures in Conjunction With Grafting to Preserve Vestibular Depth and Augment Gingival Thickness Around Mandibular Implants.

    PubMed

    Deeb, George R; Deeb, Janina Golob; Kain, Nicholas J; Wilson, Graham H; Laskin, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Preservation or reconstruction of the soft tissues around dental implants is an essential component of implant dentistry. Increased width and thickness of the keratinized tissue surrounding dental implants has been recognized as an important factor associated with long-term implant success. When extractions and ridge reduction are performed concurrently with implant placement, maintaining vestibular depth also is of utmost importance. A previous report described a technique for applying bone-anchoring sutures to preserve keratinized tissue and vestibular depth around implants. The present report describes a variation of the procedure for the simultaneous correction of situations in which the existing keratinized tissue is thin and narrow and preserving and apically positioning it might not provide an appropriate gingival cuff. PMID:26745993

  6. Pre-operative planning for mandibular reconstruction - A full digital planning workflow resulting in a patient specific reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reconstruction of large mandiblular defects following ablative oncologic surgery could be done by using vascularized bone transfer or, more often, primarily with simultaneous or delayed bone grafting, using load bearing reconstruction plates. Bending of these reconstruction plates is typically directed along the outer contour of the original mandible. Simultaneously or in a second operation vascularized or non-vascularized bone is fixed to the reconstruction plate. However, the prosthodontic-driven backward planning to ease bony reconstruction of the mandible in terms of dental rehabilitation using implant-retained overdentures might be an eligible solution. The purpose of this work was to develop, establish and clinically evaluate a novel 3D planning procedure for mandibular reconstruction. Materials and methods Three patients with tumors involving the mandible, which included squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of the mouth and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, were treated surgically by hemimandibulectomy. Results In primary alloplastic mandible reconstruction, shape and size of the reconstruction plate could be predefined and prebent prior to surgery. Clinical relevance This study provides modern treatment strategies for mandibular reconstruction. PMID:21968330

  7. Biomechanical analysis of alveolar bone stress around implants with different thread designs and pitches in the mandibular molar area.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ting-Hsun; Du, Je-Kang; Pan, Chin-Yun; Lee, Huey-Er; Chung, Wei-Hao

    2012-04-01

    Threaded implants have been shown to play an important role in increasing mechanical osseointegration. The aim of this study was to determine bone stress distribution when using different types of implant thread pitches and designs. Five 3D finite element models were constructed to simulate bone stresses induced in implant bodies with two types of thread form: triangular ("Tri" prefix) and trapezoidal ("Trap" prefix). The former had thread pitches of 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mm, while the latter had thread pitches of 1.2 and 1.6 mm. A biting load of 143 N was applied vertically and obliquely to the occlusal central fossa of the crown. The main effects of each level of the three factors investigated (loading type, pitch, and thread form) in terms of the stress value were computed for all models. Results indicated that the loading type was the main factor of influence on the peak compressive stress of the alveolar bone. Optimal thread pitch was 1.2 mm for a triangular-thread implant, and a trapezoidal-threaded implant with thread pitch of 1.6 mm had the lowest stress value among trapezoidal-threaded implants. This study concluded that each thread form has its unique optimal thread pitch with regard to lower concentration of bone stress. Clinically, this study suggests that in biomechanical consideration, thread pitch exceeding 0.8 mm is more appropriate for a screwed implant. For clinical cases that require greater bone-implant interface, trapezoidal-threaded implants with thread pitch of 1.6 mm provide greater primary stability and lower concentration of bone stress under different loading directions. PMID:21301903

  8. Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Defects requiring reconstruction in the mandible are commonly encountered and may result from resection of benign or malignant lesions, trauma, or osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular defects can be classified according to location and extent, as well as involvement of mucosa, skin, and tongue. Vascularized bone flaps, in general, provide the best functional and aesthetic outcome, with the fibula flap remaining the gold standard for mandible reconstruction. In this review, we discuss classification and approach to reconstruction of mandibular defects. We also elaborate upon four commonly used free osteocutaneous flaps, inclusive of fibula, iliac crest, scapula, and radial forearm. Finally, we discuss indications and use of osseointegrated implants as well as recent advances in mandibular reconstruction. PMID:22550439

  9. Mandibular fracture as a complication of inferior alveolar nerve transposition and placement of endosseous implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karlis, Vasiliki; Bae, Richard D; Glickman, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Placement of endosseous implants and inferior alveolar nerve transposition is a treatment option for patients with an edentulous posterior mandible with inadequate bone height superior to the inferior alveolar canal. Complications associated with these procedures include infection, prolonged neurosensory disturbances, and/or pathologic fracture. This report presents the surgical management of a patient with a mandible fracture after inferior alveolar nerve transposition with concurrent placement of two endosseous implants. PMID:14560480

  10. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  11. Correction of a mandibular asymmetry after fibula reconstruction using a custom-made polyetheretherketone (PEEK) onlay after implant supported occlusal rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Berrone, M; Aldiano, C; Pentenero, M; Berrone, S

    2015-10-01

    This study describes an unusual case of mandibular asymmetry after fibula free flap reconstruction in a young man following major facial trauma that was corrected using a custom-made polyetheretherketone prosthesis. There is little information in the literature on the use of alloplasts to correct mandibular asymmetry as interest in 'aesthetic re-modelling' has traditionally focused on nasal, zygomatic and chin regions. This report demonstrates that this technique can be used successfully to address selected cases of mandibular asymmetry.

  12. Correction of a mandibular asymmetry after fibula reconstruction using a custom-made polyetheretherketone (PEEK) onlay after implant supported occlusal rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Berrone, M; Aldiano, C; Pentenero, M; Berrone, S

    2015-10-01

    This study describes an unusual case of mandibular asymmetry after fibula free flap reconstruction in a young man following major facial trauma that was corrected using a custom-made polyetheretherketone prosthesis. There is little information in the literature on the use of alloplasts to correct mandibular asymmetry as interest in 'aesthetic re-modelling' has traditionally focused on nasal, zygomatic and chin regions. This report demonstrates that this technique can be used successfully to address selected cases of mandibular asymmetry. PMID:26824216

  13. Irradiation autogenous mandibular grafts in primary reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The procedure, irradiated mandibular autografts, for primary reconstruction, is presented with an immediate success rate of 88%. Eight cases have undergone primary mandibular reconstruction with the tumorous mandible irradiated to 10,000 rads in a single dose. The longest follow-up is 2 3/4 years. The autograft has proven to be an ideal implant. Major resections of the mandible in conjunction with large myocutaneous flaps have been reconstructed utilizing this implant.

  14. [Restoration materials in overdenture abutment teeth].

    PubMed

    Keltjens, H M; Creugers, T J; van 't Hof, M A; Creugers, N H

    2000-08-01

    To assess the performance of amalgam, resin composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement as filling material in overdenture abutment teeth, 155 restorations were made to seal the root canal orifices in 49 patients. The three restorative materials were randomly assigned to the abutment teeth using a number of balancing criteria. All patients were reviewed every six months and received the same preventive regimen. Survival was assessed at two levels: complete survival even without maintenance treatments (Scomp) and survival of the original restoration independent from eventual maintenance treatments (Sorig). The calculated overall survival of Sorig and Scomp were 63 +/- 6% and 57 +/- 6% respectively (mean +/- SE). At both levels no statistically significant differences were observed between the survival of the investigated materials. The results of this study did not point out a superior restorative material for the seal of root canal orifices of overdenture abutment teeth. The distribution of failures over the patients indicated a certain patient dependency.

  15. Wear simulation effects on overdenture stud attachments.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate wear effects on overdenture resilient attachments. Six commercially available attachments were investigated: ERA orange and white (EO and EW), Locator pink, white and blue (LRP, LRW and LRB) and OP anchor (OP). Five specimens were used for wear simulation while other two specimens served as controls. Fifteen thousands insertion-removal cycles were simulated. Dimensional changes and surface characteristics were evaluated using light microscopy and SEM, respectively. Sudden decrease of retentive force was characteristic for EO and EW attachments. Retentive force of Locator attachments fluctuated throughout the wear simulation period. Dimensional changes and surface wear was more expressed on plastic cores than on plastic rings of attachment males. Based on SEM analysis, some of the specimens obtained smoother surface after wear simulation. Mechanism of retention loss of resilient overdenture attachments can be only partially explained by dimensional changes and surface alterations.

  16. Evaluation of crestal bone loss and stability of immediate functional loading versus immediate non-functional loading of single-mandibular posterior implants: A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mantena, Satyanarayana Raju; Sivagami, G.; Gottumukkala, Sruthima NVS

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the crestal bone loss and stability of single mandibular posterior dental implants placed in immediate functional loading (IFL) and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL) during 6 months after placement. Materials and Methods: Forty single piece root form titanium implants were placed in 20 patients using IFL and INFL techniques. The change in the level of crestal bone was measured on standardized digital periapical radiographs using SOPRO imaging software and stability of implants using resonance frequency analyser taken at the baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. The measurements were statistically analyzed using the independent and paired t-test (P < 0.05, statistically significant). Results: The mean change in the crestal bone level from baseline to 6 months was significant in both techniques. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) values at first and third months were lower than those at the baseline for both the groups. However, the ISQ values at the sixth month were similar to baseline for both the groups. The crestal bone changes and the ISQ values when compared between the groups showed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: IFL of dental implants have equivalent results and success rate as that of immediately provisionalized implants within the limitations of this study. PMID:25426151

  17. Cemented and screw-retained implant-supported single-tooth restorations in the molar mandibular region: A retrospective comparison study after an observation period of 1 to 4 years

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Pradíes, Guillermo; Sola-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival and compare the appearance of different mechanical and biological complications, in screw-retained and cemented-retained single-tooth implant-supported restorations localized in the molar mandibular region, over a period of 1 to 4 years. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out with a total of eighty implant-supported restorations, which were placed in eighty patients for prosthetic rehabilitation of a mandibular molar. Forty patients were rehabilitated with a cemented-retained restoration and the other forty with a screw-retained restoration. The presence of the following complications was recorded for both types of prostheses: Fractures of the ceramic veneering, loosening screws, mucositis and peri-implantitis. Debonding of the restoration was analyzed in the cemented-retained restoration group. The clinical survival of crowns was analyzed with a Kaplan-Meier test and the clinical complications were compared, using a Student t test and Log-rank test. Results: 27 patients registered some complication. The average rate of complications was 37,5% for cemented-retained restorations and 30% for screw-retained restorations. The complications more common in the cemented-retained restoration were the presence of mucositis (14,87%), while in the screw-retained restorations was the loosening screw (20%). Student t test and Log-Rank test found significant differences (p=0,001) between the screw loosening and presence of mucositis. Conclusions: The cemented-retained restorations seem to prevent screw loosening, but the presence of cement seem to increase the complications around the soft tissues, however in the screw-retained restorations the presence of mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than cemented-retained restorations. The incidence of fracture of ceramic veneering was similar in both groups. Key words:Screw-retained restorations, cemented-retained restorations, screw loosening

  18. Costal Grafting in Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bourlet, Jerôme; Château, Joseph; Jacquemart, Mathieu; Dufour, Clémence; Mojallal, Ali; Gleizal, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery, and free fibular flap is the gold standard for this indication. However, there are alternatives; nonvascular bone grafting is one of them, and we present the costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction, a classic technique that is reliable, efficient, and produced less morbidity than the technique of using composite free flaps. Method: A 9-year retrospective review of 54 patients treated surgically for mandibular reconstruction was performed. The criterion mainly analyzed was graft survival. The surgical technique was described in detail. Results: A total of 54 patients with mandibular bone defect were identified. Five symphysis, 46 corpus, and 20 ramus defects were considered. These patients underwent reconstruction by costal grafting, and the engrafting was successful in 92.6% of cases. Dental rehabilitation with dental implants was realized in 70% of cases. Conclusions: The approach described in this article allowed the authors to obtain good results with costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction and dental rehabilitation. Costal grafting is a good alternative for fibula free flap in specific indications. Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Since the 1980s, the gold standard for these defects is the use of free fibular flap.1 In some cases, this technique is contradicted; the surgeon then has several possibilities for the use of free osteomyocutaneous flaps (iliac crest, scapula, and serrato-costal flaps).2–8 PMID:26893990

  19. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures. PMID:25534058

  20. Endodontic considerations in restoration of partial overdenture abutments.

    PubMed

    Safavi, K E; Grasso, J E

    1990-10-01

    Overdenture abutment teeth often require endodontic treatment. Various factors, such as status of the pulp, periodontal state of the tooth, and the sequence of overdenture treatment, influence endodontic management of the patient. After completion of endodontic treatment, the coronal part of the root filling is removed, leaving an adequate amount of the root filling in the apical part of the root canal undisturbed. The abutment tooth is then permanently restored with a filling material, or is prepared for a cast restoration.

  1. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  2. Bifid Mandibular Canal: A Rare or Underestimated Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Nasseh, Ibrahim; Aoun, Georges

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare anatomical variations that can be of significant importance for the dentist is the bifid mandibular canal. Many complications can occur from this condition such as failure of anesthesia when performing inferior alveolar nerve block, difficulties during the surgical extraction of the third mandibular molar, and during implants placement. Therefore, good knowledge of this condition is essential. In this report, we describe the radiographic finding of a unilateral bifid mandibular canal. PMID:27777715

  3. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part I: Mandibular Canal and Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives It is critical to determine the location and configuration of the mandibular canal and related vital structures during the implant treatment. The purpose of the present study was to review the literature concerning the mandibular canal and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle anatomical variations related to the implant surgery. Material and Methods Literature was selected through the search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1973 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, prosthetic and periodontal journals and books were performed. Results In total, 46 literature sources were obtained and morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to implant treatment in posterior mandible were presented as two entities: intraosseous mandibular canal and associated inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Conclusions A review of morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to mandibular canal and mandibular vital structures are very important especially in implant therapy since inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle exists in different locations and possesses many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that osteotomies in implant dentistry should not be developed in the posterior mandible until the position of the mandibular canal is established. PMID:24421958

  4. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  5. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions. PMID:27688385

  6. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kršek, Hrvoje; Dulčić, Nikša

    2015-03-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients' lost functions.

  7. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions.

  8. Implant success lies in complications management: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Sapna; Devi, Jyoti; Verma, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    At present, implant supported or retained prostheses are considered as a first therapeutic alternative for patients. Although the success rate of dental implants is very high, no treatment is without complications; same applies to implants also. Implant failure can be due to biological factors, i.e., loss of osseointegration or due to technical complications. This case report presents implant complications involving both factors along with the management of these cases. In implant supported overdenture patient, loss of implant on the right side and implant body fracture of the left side implant is reported and in another patient abutment screw fracture and its management is reported. PMID:27307672

  9. Complications associated with implant-retained removable prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Farhad; Pinto-Sinai, Gitanjali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported removable prostheses improve patients' satisfaction with treatment and quality of life. Improvements in the implant's surface and in attachment elements have made this treatment method very successful. However, some biological and mechanical complications remain. Mechanical complications associated with implant-supported overdentures and implant-supported removable partial dentures are loss of retention of attachment systems, the need to replace retention elements and to reline or repair the resin portion of the denture, and implant fracture. Despite their success, implant-supported removable prostheses require periodic maintenance.

  10. Three dimensional finite element analysis of the stress distribution around the mandibular posterior implant during non-working movement according to the amount of cantilever

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Man; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE In case of large horizontal discrepancy of alveolar ridge due to severe resorption, cantilevered crown is usually an unavoidable treatment modality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical criteria for the placement of the aforementioned implant crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS The mandible model with 2 mm thick cortical bone and cancellous bone was fabricated from CT cross-section image. An external connection type implant was installed and cantilevered crowns with increasing offset of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 mm were connected. Vertical load and 30° oblique load of 300 N was applied and stress around bone and implant component was analyzed. A total of 14 cases were modeled and finite element analysis was performed using COSMOS Works (Solid works Inc, USA). RESULTS As for the location of the vertical load, the maximum stress generated on the lingual side of the implant became larger according to the increase of offset distance. When the oblique load was applied at 30°, the maximum stress was generated on the buccal side and its magnitude gradually decreased as the distance of the offset load increased to 5 mm. After that point, the magnitude of implant component's stress increased gradually. CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that for the patient with atrophied alveolar ridge following the loss of molar teeth, von-Mises stress on implant components was the lowest under the 30° oblique load at the 5 mm offset point. Further studies for the various crown height and numbers of occusal points are needed to generalize the conclusion of present study. PMID:25352958

  11. Simultaneous Bimaxillary Surgery and Mandibular Reconstruction With a 3-Dimensional Printed Titanium Implant Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting: A Preliminary Mechanical Testing of the Printed Mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ui-Lyong; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Woo, Su-Heon; Choi, Young-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A woman presented with a long history of mandibular defects posterior to the left lower first premolar caused by inadequate reconstruction after removal of a tumor on the left side of the mandible. In the frontal view, extreme facial asymmetry was apparent. The dental midline of the mandible was deviated 10 mm to the left compared with the dental midline of the maxilla, and all maxillary teeth were inclined to the left owing to dental compensation. There was an 8-mm maxillary occlusal cant relative to the maxillary first molar. Bimaxillary surgery using computer-assisted designed and computer-assisted manufactured devices without an intermediate occlusal splint was performed to align the maxilla and mandible at the correct position, and reconstructive surgery for the mandible using a 3-dimensional printed titanium mandible was concurrently performed. In particular, during the virtual mandible design, 2 abutments that enabled the prosthetic restoration were included in the mandible using a computer-assisted design program. This report describes the successful functional and esthetic reconstruction of the mandible using electron beam melting technology, an alternative technique for reconstruction of mandibles that did not undergo radiation therapy. PMID:27060494

  12. Pathological mandibular fracture: A severe complication of periimplantitis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Campo, Francisco; Naval-Parra, Beatriz; Sastre-Pérez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, dental implant treatment is a very common option for patients even in medical compromised conditons. Some complications related to them have been described. Periimplantitis (PI) is one of the biggest concerns complications of these kind of treatments, probably has a multifactorial aethiology. Usually the consequences of PI are the loss of the implants and prostheses, expenses of money and time for dentists and patients. Very often PI implies the necesity of repeating the treatment . Pathological mandibular fracture due to PI is a severe but infrequent complication after dental implant treatment, especially after PI. In this study we present three cases of mandibular pathologic fractures among patients with different medical and dental records but similar management: two of them had been treated years ago of oral squamous cell carcinoma with surgery and radiotherapy, the other patient received oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis some years after implantation. We analized the causes, consequences and posible prevention of these fractures as well as the special features of this kind of mandibular fractures and the different existing treatments. Key words:Periimplantitis, pathological mandibular fracture, mandibular atrophy, bicortical implants. PMID:26155355

  13. [Complications in patients with oral implants. Recommendations for routine preventive inspections].

    PubMed

    Meijer, H J A; Raghoebar, G M; Goené, R J; van der Weijden, G A

    2011-09-01

    Oral implantology is a very fast growing and dynamic area of oral healthcare, carried out by an increasing number of oral healthcare providers. Recommendations for routine preventive inspections are needed to control and monitor the quality of treatment. Routine preventive inspection can be divided into inspection of the peri-implant hard and soft tissues and inspection of the prosthetic construction. The most frequently occurring complications, each with its own treatment, are peri-implant mucositis, peri-implantitis, recession of peri-implant tissues, the loosening or fracturing of overdenture attachment components, deterioration of the fit of overdentures, and the loosening of the screw with which a crown is secured on an implant or implant abutment. Carrying out routine preventive inspections will make it possible to detect and treat complications in a timely fashion.

  14. Splinted mandibular protraction appliance

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of mandible rather than tooth movement is an ideal treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion resulting from mandibular retrusion. In growing patients, forward repositioning of mandible by mandibular repositioning appliances is considered as a treatment of choice. Correction of mandibular retrusion by the conventional mandibular protraction appliances (MPAs) is mainly due to dento-alveolar changes and by altering the design of original MPAs, these limitations were minimized. The modified design enhanced the mandibular growth and contributed for the better skeletal correction of Class II malocclusion as compared to the conventional MPAs. This article highlights the design and fabrication of a splinted MPA for the correction of Class II malocclusion due to mandibular retrusion and also describes a patient managed by this appliance. PMID:25821367

  15. Implants and all-ceramic restorations in a patient treated for aggressive periodontitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin-Sun; Yeo, In-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with aggressive periodontitis was treated using dental implants and LAVA system. The severely compromised teeth were extracted irrespective of initial conservative periodontal treatment. An implant-supported overdenture with 4 implants was fabricated for the maxilla and all-ceramic restorations for the mandible. Esthetic and functional goals were achieved with team approach involving periodontists and prosthodontists. This case report describes a treatment procedure for a generalized aggressive periodontitis patient with severe bone resorption. PMID:21165277

  16. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 3: implant and external impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2009-06-01

    Today, dental implant therapy is considered a valuable asset of mainstream dental therapeutics by both patients and clinicians. In many ways, the availability of implant therapy to facilitate the support, stability, and retention of dental prostheses has revolutionized the profession and the procedures dentists accomplish on a daily basis. From another perspective, the procedures used to fabricate dental implant restorations are but modifications of previously existing, proven, and reliable techniques. This is particularly true when considering impression making for implant overdentures. Part 3 of this article series looks at the use of vinyl polysiloxane impression material systems for making definitive impressions for implant overdentures. Once constructed, it is critical that all removable dental prostheses possess external contours that are geometrically compatible with the anatomic and functional requirements of the oral tissues. Therefore, this article also will address a technique for diagnostically assessing external denture contours using vinyl polysiloxane external impression procedures.

  17. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics part 3: implant and external impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2007-10-01

    Today, dental implant therapy is considered a valuable asset of mainstream dental therapeutics by both patients and clinicians. In many ways, the availability of implant therapy to facilitate the support, stability, and retention of dental prostheses has revolutionized the profession and the procedures dentists accomplish on a daily basis. From another perspective, the procedures used to fabricate dental implant restorations are but modifications of previously existing, proven, and reliable techniques. This is particularly true when considering impression making for implant overdentures. Part 3 of this article series looks at the use of vinyl polysiloxane impression material systems for making definitive impressions for implant overdentures. Once constructed, it is critical that all removable dental prostheses possess external contours that are geometrically compatible with the anatomic and functional requirements of the oral tissues. Therefore, this article also will address a technique for diagnostically assessing external denture contours using vinyl polysiloxane external impression procedures.

  18. Use of porous space maintainers in staged mandibular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Henslee, Allan M; Spicer, Patrick P; Shah, Sarita R; Tatara, Alexander M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Wong, Mark E

    2014-05-01

    The success of mandibular reconstructions depends not only on restoring the form and function of lost bone but also on the preservation of the overlying soft tissue layer. In this case study, 5 porous polymethylmethacrylate space maintainers fabricated via patient-specific molds were implanted initially to maintain the vitality of the overlying oral mucosa during staged mandibular reconstructions. Three of the 5 patients healed well; the other 2 patients developed dehiscences, likely due to a thin layer of soft tissue overlying the implant. The results presented provide evidence that a larger investigation of space maintainers fabricated using this method is warranted.

  19. Lower lip numbness due to the mandibular canal narrowing after dental reimplantation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shamloo, Nafiseh; Safi, Yaser; Fathpour, Kamyar; Yaghmaei, Masood; Bahemmat, Nika

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular canal is the most important anatomical landmark in the body of mandible which always must be considered for implant surgery in posterior mandibular region. Damage to vessels and inferior alveolar nerve that passes through the mandibular canal can cause problems such as hemorrhage and neurosensory disturbances. Damage to the mandibular canal can occur during implant surgery. Depending on the severity of injuries, it would result in temporary or permanent neurosensory disturbances. We have reported a case that mandibular canal narrowing occurred following implant surgery and resulted in anesthetic and hypoesthetic areas in the lower lip. Patient had a history of implant surgery in the region of teeth numbered 30 and numbered 31. The inserted implant failed after 6 years, and reimplantation was done in this area, but due to lower lip numbness in the right side, the second implant was removed, and another implant was inserted in the region of the tooth numbered 32. After 2 years, right lower lip numbness was reported again by the patient. Cone beam computed tomography images showed canal narrowing in the region of the tooth numbered 31 where the second implant was inserted. It seems that the main cause for anesthesia and hypoesthesia in this patient is canal narrowing due to damage during implant replacement and removal. PMID:26288630

  20. An accelerated clinical chairside technique for casting overdenture attachment copings.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Michael D; Campagni, Wayne V

    2011-11-01

    An accelerated technique for casting a direct-pattern post and core restoration for use in fixed prosthodontics has been previously described. Similar techniques for use in removable prosthodontics show potential for clinical use, specifically for the fabrication of radicular stud overdenture attachments and their corresponding copings. The procedure uses a chairside technique and readily available components to fabricate a direct, acrylic resin pattern combining the elements of a cast coping with a fixed radicular attachment. This pattern can subsequently be invested, cast, finished and polished, luted, and attached to the removable prosthesis in a single clinical appointment. PMID:22024184

  1. Lower molar and incisor displacement associated with mandibular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Bravo, L A; Ben-Bassat, Y; Curry, S; Korn, E L

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of alveolar modeling at the apices of the mandibular incisor and first molar specifically associated with appositional and resorptive changes on the lower border of the mandible during growth and treatment. Cephalometric data from superimpositions on anterior cranial base, mandibular implants of the Björk type, and anatomical "best fit" of mandibular border structures were integrated using a recently developed strategy, which is described. Data were available at annual intervals between 8.5 and 15.5 years for a previously described sample of approximately 30 children with implants. The average magnitudes of the changes at the root apices of the mandibular first molar and central incisor associated with modeling/remodeling of the mandibular border and symphysis were unexpectedly small. At the molar apex, mean values approximated zero in both anteroposterior and vertical directions. At the incisor apex, mean values approximated zero in the anteroposterior direction and averaged less than 0.15 mm/year in the vertical direction. Standard deviations were roughly equal for the molar and the incisor in both the anteroposterior and vertical directions. Dental displacement associated with surface modeling plays a smaller role in final tooth position in the mandible than in the maxilla. It may also be reasonably inferred that anatomical best-fit superimpositions made in the absence of implants give a more complete picture of hard tissue turnover in the mandible than they do in the maxilla.

  2. Autotransplantation of Mandibular Third Molar: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ravi kumar, Pabbati; Jyothi, Mandava; Sirisha, Kantheti; Racca, Khushboo; Uma, Chalasani

    2012-01-01

    Autogenous transplantation is a feasible, fast, and economical option for the treatment of nonsalvageable teeth when a suitable donor tooth is available. This paper presents successful autotransplantation of a mature mandibular left third molar (38) without anatomical variances is used to replace a mandibular left second molar (37). The mandibular second molar was nonrestorable due to extensive root caries and resorption of distal root. After extraction of mandibular second and third molars, root canal therapy was done for the third molar extraorally, and the tooth was reimplanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. After one year, clinical and radiographic examination revealed satisfactory outcome with no signs or symptoms suggestive of pathology. In selected cases, autogenous tooth transplantation, even after complete root formation of the donor tooth, may be considered as a practical treatment alternative to conventional prosthetic rehabilitation or implant treatment. PMID:23346422

  3. In vivo bioreactors for mandibular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tatara, A M; Wong, M E; Mikos, A G

    2014-12-01

    Large mandibular defects are difficult to reconstruct with good functional and aesthetic outcomes because of the complex geometry of craniofacial bone. While the current gold standard is free tissue flap transfer, this treatment is limited in fidelity by the shape of the harvested tissue and can result in significant donor site morbidity. To address these problems, in vivo bioreactors have been explored as an approach to generate autologous prefabricated tissue flaps. These bioreactors are implanted in an ectopic site in the body, where ossified tissue grows into the bioreactor in predefined geometries and local vessels are recruited to vascularize the developing construct. The prefabricated flap can then be harvested with vessels and transferred to a mandibular defect for optimal reconstruction. The objective of this review article is to introduce the concept of the in vivo bioreactor, describe important preclinical models in the field, summarize the human cases that have been reported through this strategy, and offer future directions for this exciting approach.

  4. Neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flores, Roberto L

    2014-11-01

    Mandibular distraction has revolutionized the treatment of Robin sequence associated with severe airway obstruction. The distraction technique remains the only intervention that directly corrects mandibular hypoplasia and the retropositioned tongue, providing efficient relief of airway stenosis. Multiple studies have demonstrated the efficacy of distraction in avoiding tracheostomy and decreasing the severity airway obstruction in this patient population. The benefit to avoiding tracheostomy and relieving airway obstruction is superior to that of tongue-lip adhesion. It is, therefore, not surprising that mandibular distraction has become the first-line intervention at many centers for the surgical treatment of Robin sequence. The complication profile associated with mandibular distraction appears low; the most common complication is infection, which can be treated by antibiotics alone. The severity of airway obstruction can be quantified by polysomnogram: This tool has become one of the most widely used objective metrics in the Robin sequence population. Therefore indications for surgery, timing of palatoplasty and long-term assessment of airway function should be performed in conjunction with sleep study analysis. The effects of mandibular lengthening on feeding difficulty in Robin sequence patient remains a topic of controversy. Studies have demonstrated conflicting results: This can be an area of future study. Agreed-upon indications for surgery and definitive protocols of care have yet to be formulized; future research should focus on achieving these goals. Such studies would require agreed-upon terminology for Robin sequence, an increase in comparative and prospective analysis, and the use of quantifiable metrics of clinical results.

  5. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  6. Mandibular fibular graft reconstruction with CAD/CAM technology: A clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mamta; Somohano, Tanya; Choi, Mijin

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of a partially dentate patient who presented with dental implants placed in a reconstructed fibula graft in the mandible. A complete mouth rehabilitation with a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular implant-supported fixed complete denture was fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided machining technology.

  7. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  8. Mandibular incisive canal in relation to periapical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bilginaylar, Kani; Orhan, Kaan; Uyanik, Lokman Onur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to emphasize the importance of the mandibular interforaminal neurovascular bundle with a case and make a warning to dentists and surgeons during oral and maxillofacial surgeries, such as implant replacement, bone harvesting, genioplasty, open reduction of a mandibular fracture, and cyst enucleations at this region. In this paper, we present a 58-year-old male who referred with pain and a tingling sensation on the left lower lip. After radiographical, extraoral and intraoral examinations, findings indicated the lesion to be a cyst which was related with a periapical lesion of the canine tooth and extracted socket of first premolar tooth. After removal of a cyst, the mandibular incisive nerve was documented which was in relation to cyst cavity. PMID:27041907

  9. The influence of mandibular ridge anatomy on treatment outcome with conventional complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jaiane A M; de Resende, Camila M B M; Lopes, Ana L C; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da F P

    2014-01-01

    Since prognostic indicators are likely to take on increasing importance as a diagnostic tool for selection of patients for implant provision, this study investigated the influence of the shape and resiliency of the mandibular alveolar ridge on the retention and stability of conventional complete dentures. Ninety- three edentulous patients wearing both maxillary and mandibular conventional complete dentures composed the sample. Data were collected regarding shape and resiliencyof the mandibular residual ridge. Dentures were assessed for retention and stability using an objective and reproducible tool.The associations between the clinical characteristics of the mandibular alveolar ridge and denture retention and stability were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact tests (a = 0.05). A significant association between ridge shape and denture stability (p < 0.05) was found, while ridge resiliency was significantly associated to denture retention (p < 0.001). Based on the results, mandibular ridge shape and resiliency influenced the retention and stability of conventional complete dentures.

  10. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  11. Effects of chemotherapy on osseointegration of implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A R; Pogrel, M A; Sharma, A

    1998-01-01

    A patient underwent mandibular resection for high-grade osteosarcoma with immediate reconstruction with a microvascular fibula free bone graft and simultaneous placement of osseointegrated implants. Following initial healing, she underwent six cycles of chemotherapy and had further revision surgery prior to implant exposure and construction of a prosthesis. The chemotherapy appears to have had no deleterious effects on implant osseointegration or survival.

  12. Bone contact around osseointegrated implants: histologic analysis of a dual-acid-etched surface implant in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Bugea, Calogero; Luongo, Roberto; Di Iorio, Donato; Cocchetto, Roberto; Celletti, Renato

    2008-04-01

    The clinical applicability and predictability of osseointegrated implants in healthy patients have been studied extensively. Although successful treatment of patients with medical conditions including diabetes, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease has been described, insufficient information is available to determine the effects of diabetes on the process of osseointegration. An implant placed and intended to support an overdenture in a 65-year-old diabetic woman was prosthetically unfavorable and was retrieved after 2 months. It was then analyzed histologically. No symptoms of implant failure were detected, and histomorphometric evaluation showed the bone-to-implant contact percentage to be 80%. Osseointegration can be obtained when implants with a dual-acid-etched surface are placed in properly selected diabetic patients. PMID:18546810

  13. A new technique for retaining double crowns on implants via custom-positioned vertical screws.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ziebolz, Dirk; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Rinke, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the use of custom-positioned vertical screws (CVS) to attach primary telescopic crowns to implant abutments. In a private practice setting, 37 patients with 40 double crown-retained implant overdentures (IODs) with a clearance fit (Marburg double crowns) were followed. All primary crowns on the 120 implant abutments were retained using CVS. After a mean followup period of 3.55 ± 1.37 years (range: 1.5 to 6.3 years), one abutment screwloosening incident was reported (incidence: 0.08%). No loosening of any of the screw-retained primary crowns occurred. CVS may represent a viable fixation concept for IODs.

  14. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load.

  15. Implant-connected versus tooth-connected implant-supported partial dentures: 2-year clinical and radiographic comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Tamer Mohamed; El-Sheikh, Mohamed M; Abd El-Fattah, Fadel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically and radiographically compare implant-connected and tooth-connected implant-supported fixed-detachable mandibular partial dentures. Twenty partially edentulous patients (age range: 25 to 50 years) with mandibular Kennedy Class II configurations were equally divided into two groups receiving a three-unit, fixed-detachable, screw-retained partial denture. Group 1 comprised patients with unilateral missing mandibular molars and premolars. Two implants were placed at the mandibular first premolar and first molar areas. Group 2 comprised patients with missing mandibular molars and second premolars. An implant was placed at the mandibular first molar area, the first premolar was prepared, and a coping was cemented to the tooth with permanent cement. Each case was evaluated clinically and radiographically at baseline (partial denture insertion) and after 6, 12, and 24 months. Data were collected and statistically analyzed using repeated-measures one-way and two-way analysis of variance tests. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P > .05). The implant-tooth-supported prosthesis provided an equally predictable treatment option compared to the totally implant-supported prosthesis in terms of implant survival and loss of marginal bone. PMID:25909533

  16. Prosthetic aspects of osseointegrated fixtures supporting overdentures. A 4-year report.

    PubMed

    Naert, I; Quirynen, M; Theuniers, G; van Steenberghe, D

    1991-05-01

    Eighty-six consecutive patients, provided with 84 resilient and two nonresilient overdentures (six in the upper and 80 in the lower jaw), were examined. The overdentures were supported by a total of 173 osseointegrated titanium fixtures (the standard Branemark abutment), with a mean loading time of 19.1 months (range 4 to 48 months). In each jaw only two fixtures anchored the overdentures. No failures occurred during the observation period but two fixtures were lost before loading. The radiographic annual bone loss around fixtures in the lower jaw was -0.8 mm for the first year and less than -0.1 mm for the following years. The change in marginal bone height did not correlate with parameters such as the occlusion and articulation pattern, the presence or absence of a soft liner around the abutments, and the magnitude of the interabutment distance. The patients' reactions to overdenture treatment were, on the whole, positive concerning chewing function, phonetics, and comfort. The need for maintenance care of the clip-bar attachment was minimal.

  17. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part II: Mandibular Incisive Canal, Mental Foramen and Associated Neurovascular Bundles in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of the present study was to review the literature of how to identify the mental foramen, mandibular incisive canal and associated neurovascular bundles during implant surgery and how to detect and avoid the damage of these vital structures during implant therapy. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen, mental nerve, anterior mental loop. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1979 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, and periodontal journals and books was performed. Results In total, 47 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The morphology and variations of the mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles were presented as two entities. It suggested that clinicians should carefully assess these vital structures to avoid nerve/artery damage. Conclusions The mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles exist in different locations and possess many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that the clinicians should carefully identify these anatomical landmarks, by analyzing all influencing factors, prior to their implant surgical operation. PMID:24421959

  18. Experience with Mandibular Reconstruction Using Transport-Disc-Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pingarrón-Martín, Lorena; Otero, T. González; Gallo, L.J. Arias

    2014-01-01

    The goal of transport-disc-distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) is to restore bone continuity by using in-situ bone. It may be useful following trauma, gunshot injuries, or tumor ablation, especially when there may be contraindications at the donor site or for prolonged surgery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time TDDO has been used for mandibular reconstruction reporting additional procedures, which include osseointegrated dental implants rehabilitation and orthognathic surgery. A retrospective study is performed analyzing all mandibular reconstruction cases that may be suitable for distraction from January 2006 to December 2011. A thorough description of the documented cases includes details about sex, gender, complications, duration of hospitalization, etiology, size, and location of the defect. Eight cases of mandibular reconstruction were included. Six cases correspond to mandibular ameloblastoma. The remaining two cases were mandibular gunshot comminuted fractures. Range of the defects was from 45 to 60 mm. Length of the transport disc was 15 to 20 mm. Protocolized technique consisted of 5 days of latency period, 19 to 45 days of activation term (average 30 days), and 8 to 12 weeks for consolidation. Mean distraction length achieved was 40.45 mm. We can conclude that TDDO is an alternative to conventional and more invasive procedures, when we face severe segmental mandibular defects reconstruction. It shows the potential to restore a better anatomical bone regeneration, also providing soft tissues and reducing donor-site morbidity. Patients' education and awareness about the proper use of the transport-disc-distraction device is important to optimize functional outcomes. PMID:26000082

  19. In Vivo Bioreactors for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, A.M.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Large mandibular defects are difficult to reconstruct with good functional and aesthetic outcomes because of the complex geometry of craniofacial bone. While the current gold standard is free tissue flap transfer, this treatment is limited in fidelity by the shape of the harvested tissue and can result in significant donor site morbidity. To address these problems, in vivo bioreactors have been explored as an approach to generate autologous prefabricated tissue flaps. These bioreactors are implanted in an ectopic site in the body, where ossified tissue grows into the bioreactor in predefined geometries and local vessels are recruited to vascularize the developing construct. The prefabricated flap can then be harvested with vessels and transferred to a mandibular defect for optimal reconstruction. The objective of this review article is to introduce the concept of the in vivo bioreactor, describe important preclinical models in the field, summarize the human cases that have been reported through this strategy, and offer future directions for this exciting approach. PMID:25139360

  20. Retention force and fatigue strength of overdenture attachment systems.

    PubMed

    Botega, D M; Mesquita, M F; Henriques, G E P; Vaz, L G

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated retention force and fatigue resistance of two overdenture attachment systems. Twenty samples (O-ring and Bar-Clip) from two manufacturers (Conexão Sistemas de Prótese and Lifecore Biomedical) were prepared and divided into four groups: (i) Conexão/O-ring; (ii) Conexão/Bar-Clip; (iii) Lifecore/O-ring and (iv) Lifecore/Bar-Clip, with five samples in each group. They were submitted to mechanical fatigue test using a servohydraulic machine performing 5500 cycles of insertion and removal (f=0.8 Hz), immersed in artificial saliva. Retention force values were obtained three times (0, 3000 and after 5500 cycles) simulating the clinical service, using a tensile strength at 1 mm min(-1) and load cell of 1 kN. Data were analysed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test at 5% level. Results showed that Conexão/Bar-Clip specimens had significantly higher retention values than Lifecore/Bar-Clip (44.61 and 18.44 N, respectively), Conexão/O-ring specimens had significantly lower values than Lifecore/O-ring (13.91 and 19.75 N, respectively). Conexão/Bar-Clip values were always significantly higher than those of Conexão/O-ring group (44.61 and 13.91 N, respectively). Lifecore (O-ring and Bar-Clip) presented similar values (19.75 and 18.44 N, respectively). The systems evaluated showed satisfactory retention force values, before and after fatigue testing. Conexão/Bar-Clip specimens presented the highest values. A 5-year simulation of insertion and removal did not decrease retention values or fracture components.

  1. Molarization of mandibular second premolar.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Neha; Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

    2014-05-01

    Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

  2. [Statistical study of mandibular resections].

    PubMed

    Sidibe, C A; Dichamp, J; Razouk, O; Bertrand, J C; Guilbert, G

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study of mandibular resections performed from 1980 to 1984 was conducted to evaluate age, sex, aetiology, etc. The number of mandibular resections appears to have declined at the Institute of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital. Different factors are involved included early diagnosis, improved surgical techniques and better patient follow-up. Partial mandibular resections are increasingly performed (52% of the cases) compared with total resections. Finally, a better understanding of the pathologies involved, especially tumours, has led to an adaptation of the resection techniques to avoid extensive mutilations.

  3. Skeletal implants in aesthetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Wang, T D

    1999-01-01

    The features of the nose, mentum, and malar complex define a person's profile and give the essence of character to the visage. Whether profile deficiencies are due to congenital, traumatic, or aging factors, facial plastic surgeons are able to meet patients' and their own exacting demands more thoroughly with skeletal implants. Although the search for the perfect implant continues, today's armamentarium of implant materials is vast and, with appropriate selection and attention to technique, facial skeletal implants can be successful in creating change impossible to obtain with soft tissue techniques alone. This article reviews both the biomaterials used in mandibular and malar complex implants and the techniques.

  4. Mandibular condylectomy in a horse.

    PubMed

    Patterson, L J; Shappell, K K; Hurtig, M B

    1989-07-01

    Mandibular condylectomy was effective in improving mastication and stopping weight loss in a horse. The horse had a history of intermittent purulent drainage from a facial wound and unilateral ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:2759880

  5. Mandibular shape and skeletal divergency.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; De Franco, D J

    1999-04-01

    Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms of 41 skeletal Class I girls aged 11 to 15 were divided according to MP-SN angle: lower than 28 degrees (hypodivergent, 10 girls), between 31 and 34 degrees (normodivergent, 18 girls), or larger than 37 degrees (hyperdivergent, 13 girls). The mandibular outlines were traced and digitized, and differences in shape were quantified using the elliptic Fourier series. Size differences were measured from the areas enclosed by the mandibular outlines. Shape differences were assessed by calculating a morphological distance (MD) between the size-independent mean mathematical reconstructions of the mandibular outlines of the three divergency classes. Mandibular shape was different in the three classes: large variations were found in hyperdivergent girls versus normodivergent girls (MD = 4.61), while smaller differences were observed in hypodivergent girls (MD versus normodivergent 2.91). Mean size-independent mandibular shapes were superimposed on an axis passing through the centres of gravity of the condyle and of the chin. Normodivergent and hyperdivergent mandibles differed mostly at gonion, the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, alveolar process, posterior border of the ramus, and along the mandibular plane. A significant size effect was also found, with smaller mandibles in the hyperdivergent girls.

  6. Early and immediate restoration and loading of implants in completely edentulous patients.

    PubMed

    Chiapasco, Matteo

    2004-01-01

    Primary stability and postponement of loading of dental implants for approximately 3 to 6 months have been considered for years the "conditio sine qua non" to allow osseointegration of dental implants. However, in recent years, an increasing number of publications on immediate and early loading of dental implants in completely edentulous patients have appeared in the literature, and high survival rates were generally reported. Nevertheless, much controversy still exists over the reliability of the reported data, frequently because the publications are of insufficient methodologic quality (insufficient follow-up, inadequate sample size, absence of randomization, lack of well-defined exclusion and inclusion criteria, lack of well-defined success criteria, etc). The objective of this study was to review the literature to evaluate the reliability of early and immediate loading of implants placed in the edentulous mandible and maxilla and rehabilitated either with implant-supported overdentures or with implant-supported fixed prostheses.

  7. Treatment of mandibular prognathism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Po; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Hsin-Fu

    2006-10-01

    Mandibular prognathism (MP) or skeletal Class III malocclusion with a prognathic mandible is one of the most severe maxillofacial deformities. Facial growth modification can be an effective method of resolving skeletal Class III jaw discrepancies in growing children with dentofacial orthopedic appliances including the chincup, face mask, maxillary protraction combined with chincup traction and the Fränkel functional regulator III appliance. Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment is required for the correction of adult MP. The two most commonly applied surgical procedures to correct MP are sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy. Both procedures are suitable for patients in whom a desirable occlusal relationship can be obtained with a setback of the mandible, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. In bilateral SSRO, the intentional ostectomy of the posterior part of the distal segment can offer long-term positioned stability. This may be attributable to reduction of tension in the pterygomasseteric sling that applies force in the posterior mandible. While various environmental factors have been found to contribute to the development of MP, heredity plays a substantial role. The relative contributions of genetic and environmental components in the etiology of MP are unclear. The recent identification of the genetic susceptibilities to MP constitutes the first step toward understanding the molecular pathogenesis of MP. Further studies in molecular biology are needed to identify the gene-environment interactions associated with the phenotypic diversity of MP and the heterogenic developmental mechanisms thought to be responsible for them.

  8. Adenocarcinoma metastatic to the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Webster, K

    1988-07-01

    Two cases of metastatic lesions presenting in the mandibular condyle as Temporo-Mandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome are presented with a discussion on the mechanisms of tumour metastases to bone.

  9. Exposed Dental Implant? Local Autograft A Saviour!

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Raj; Punde, Prashant A; Suryavanshi, Harshal; Shree, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Implant exposure due to faulty placement, posses as the most common reason for implant failure. The implant placed too close to buccal or lingual cortex have lead to such failure on numerous occasions. Also, anatomic variations like the thin buccolingual width of alveolar ridge predispose exposure of the implant. 25-year-old female patient had undergone surgical placement of implants in mandibular anterior region 2 months back in the private dental clinic. The clinician noted Grade I mobility in one of the implants placed. The case was referred to the author. Thin overlying gingiva depicted an entire buccal aspect of the implant, which suggested more than 90 % loss of buccal cortex. According to literature and review of similar case reports, the only way suggested was to surgically remove the implant and wait for 12-24 months for the bone to heal for subsequent placement. Rather than the removal of implants as suggested, the author followed a naval approach of reinforcing buccal cortex using an autogenous cortical block from mandibular symphysis. The reinforcement surgery had certainly saved patients time, money and most importantly limits a crucial period of edentulism, which may be enforced on a patient in case the implant was removed. PMID:26668490

  10. Evaluation of three-dimensional mandibular movements after reconstruction with free fibula flap.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, A; Mapelli, A; Baj, A; Sidequersky, F V; Giannì, A B; Sforza, C

    2015-12-01

    Seven patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with a fibula free flap (one on the midline, six on either right or left side) and were rehabilitated with implant supported prostheses, performed free mandibular border movements (maximal mouth opening and closing, right and left lateral excursions, protrusion) that were recorded by a non-invasive motion analyser. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) kinematic parameters were compared to those calculated in healthy control subjects using z-scores. Maximum mouth opening was reduced in all patients, with z-scores ranging from -2.742 to -0.106, and performed with a reduced sagittal plane mandibular rotation. Interincisal point forward movement during protrusion was reduced in all but one patient. Lateral mandibular movements (displacement of the interincisal point) and bilateral condylar movements during mouth opening were very variable and sometimes asymmetrical. Mandibular rotation was also variable, with z-scores ranging from -1.265 to 1.388. Together with mandibular range of motion, we investigated biomechanical characteristics of TMJ motion that can provide further information about the joint without submitting the patient to harmful procedures, and that can be followed-up during healing. The investigation indicates those areas that need to be given special attention in preoperative planning, patient information and rehabilitation.

  11. Overwhelming hypercalcaemia in mandibular ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Villafuerte, Cesar Vincent; Acampado, Laura Trajano

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is considered to be a benign odontogenic tumour of epithelial in origin that is slow growing but recurrent and invasive in nature. Some of its features have been sources of debate among experts regarding its benign or malignant character. We report a case of a 20-year-old Filipino woman with right mandibular ameloblastoma presenting with overwhelming hypercalcaemia. Work ups for hypercalcaemia eventually revealed tumoral hypercalcaemia, which was initially controlled with intravenous bisphosphanate. The patient eventually underwent tumour excision and mandibular reconstruction, which totally corrected hypercalcaemia. This case will highlight the rare association of hypercalcaemia among patients with ameloblastoma. PMID:25326561

  12. Overwhelming hypercalcaemia in mandibular ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Villafuerte, Cesar Vincent; Acampado, Laura Trajano

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is considered to be a benign odontogenic tumour of epithelial in origin that is slow growing but recurrent and invasive in nature. Some of its features have been sources of debate among experts regarding its benign or malignant character. We report a case of a 20-year-old Filipino woman with right mandibular ameloblastoma presenting with overwhelming hypercalcaemia. Work ups for hypercalcaemia eventually revealed tumoral hypercalcaemia, which was initially controlled with intravenous bisphosphanate. The patient eventually underwent tumour excision and mandibular reconstruction, which totally corrected hypercalcaemia. This case will highlight the rare association of hypercalcaemia among patients with ameloblastoma. PMID:25326561

  13. Closed reduction of the mandibular fracture.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Meredith; Notarnicola, Kurt

    2009-03-01

    The search for the ideal method of treatment for mandibular fractures has continued for thousands of years. These injuries have unique and problematic features for adequate reliable wound healing. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must learn and master several techniques for mandibular fracture treatment. The age-old successful management of these injuries using closed reduction techniques always should be considered when mandibular trauma presents. The closed reduction remains a mainstay of mandibular fracture treatment. An adequate knowledge of anatomy, multiple closed reduction techniques, and the physiology of fracture healing must be adequately understood and technically mastered by the oral and maxillofacial surgical team for the present and future of mandibular fracture management.

  14. The position of the mandibular canal and histologic feature of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Kilic, C; Kamburoğlu, K; Ozen, T; Balcioglu, H A; Kurt, B; Kutoglu, T; Ozan, H

    2010-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is the one of the large branches of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. It is vulnerable during surgical procedures of the mandible. Despite its importance, no anatomical and histological examination has been conducted to provide a detailed cross-sectional morphology of the mandibular canal according to dental status. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify the position of the mandibular canal through direct measurement and to determine the branches of the inferior alveolar nerve through histologic examination. The area between the anterior margin of the third molar and the anterior margin of the second premolar of dentulous, partially dentulous, and edentulous hemimandible specimens (n = 49) from 26 human cadavers was serially sectioned into seven segments, and specific distances were measured using digital calipers. Following this, 5-microm cross-sections were prepared along the mandibular canal and mental foramen, and examined by fluorescence microscopy. The mandibular canal was located at a mean distance of 10.52 mm above the inferior margin of the mandible. The mean maximum diameters of the mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, inferior alveolar artery, and inferior alveolar vein were 2.52, 1.84, 0.42, and 0.58 mm, respectively. This study found that the inferior alveolar nerve often gives rise to several branches at each level (range 0-3). To minimize the risk of injury, knowledge of the small branches of the nerve and of the detailed findings regarding the position of the mandibular canal reported here should be considered when planning mandibular surgery, especially during implant placement. PMID:19918867

  15. Surgical repair of a mandibular bony defect following the removal of an amelobalstoma.

    PubMed

    Ejiofor, Kandi

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 35-year-old Caucasian radiographer who presented with a significant mandibular bony defect following multiple excisions of an ameloblastoma. As a result, there was an absence of teeth on the lower-right mandible and a clear defect in the mandible. The treatment objectives were to rebuild the mandibular defect, with a long-term view of inserting dental implants. In a novel approach outlined in this presentation, tissue expansion of the submucosa, a titanium construct and an iliac bone graft were used to rebuild the patient's jaw. This surgical technique is recommended for the reconstruction of bony defects. PMID:24963929

  16. A Posterior Lingual Sulcoplasty in Implant Therapy: A Case History Report.

    PubMed

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This case history report describes the deepening of a patient's posterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth. PMID:26929959

  17. A study on the changes in attractive force of magnetic attachments for overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Although magnetic attachment is used frequently for overdenture, it is reported that attractive force can be decreased by abrasion and corrosion. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical basis about considerations and long term prognosis of overdenture using magnetic attachments by investigating the change in attractive force of magnetic attachment applied to the patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Among the patients treated with overdenture using magnetic attachments in Dankook University Dental Hospital, attractive force records of 61 magnetic attachments of 20 subjects who re-visited from July 2013 to June 2014 were analyzed. Dental magnet tester (Aichi Micro Intelligent Co., Aichi, Japan) was used for measurement. The magnetic attachments used in this study were Magfit IP-B Flat, Magfit DX400, Magfit DX600 and Magfit DX800 (Aichi Steel Co., Aichi, Japan) filled with Neodymium (NdFeB), a rare-earth magnet. RESULTS Reduction ratio of attractive force had no significant correlation with conditional variables to which attachments were applied, and was higher when the maintenance period was longer (P<.05, r=.361). Reduction ratio of attractive force was significantly higher in the subject group in which attachments were used over 9 years than within 9 years (P<.05). Furthermore, 16.39% of total magnetic attachments showed detachment of keeper or assembly. CONCLUSION Attractive force of magnetic attachment is maintained regardless of conditional variables and reduction ratio increased as the maintenance period became longer. Further study on adhesive material, attachment method and design improvement to prevent detachment of magnetic attachment is needed. PMID:26949482

  18. Overdenture restoration in a growing patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Pae, Ahran; Kim, Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2011-03-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disorder of ectodermal origin. A 12-year-old boy was referred for management of the oral manifestations of his ectodermal dysplasia. An overdenture retained by natural teeth for the maxilla and a double-crown-retained denture for the mandible were made. Double-crown-retained dentures may be modified into complete dentures if the abutment teeth are lost. The patient was instructed to maintain oral hygiene and return periodically for follow-up visits. This report describes a potential routine approach to restoring the appearance, function, and psyche of a growing boy with ectodermal dysplasia.

  19. Cell sheet-engineered bones used for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    DU, CHUNHUA; YAO, CHAO; LI, NINGYI; WANG, SHUANGYI; FENG, YUANYONG; YANG, XUECAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the generation of cell sheet-engineered bones used for the reconstruction of mandibular defects. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) were cultured and induced to generate osteoblasts. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds were wrapped with or without cell sheets and then implanted into dogs with mandibular defects in the right side (experimental group) or the left side (control group), respectively. Subsequently, X-ray analyses, and hematoxylin and eosin staining were performed at various time points (at 4, 8, 12 or 16 weeks post-implantation; n=4 at each time point). The osteogenesis in the experimental group was significantly improved compared with that in the control group. At 16 weeks after implantation, numerous Haversian systems and a few lamellar bones were observed at the periphery. In the control group, the engineered bone (without BMSC sheets) presented fewer Haversian systems and no lamellar bones. The optical density of the fresh bone in the experimental group was significantly higher compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, tissue-engineered bone with the structure of lamellar bones can be generated using BMSC sheets and implantation of these bones had an improved effects compared with the control group. Cell sheet transplantation was found to enhance bone formation at the reconstruction site of the mandibular defects. PMID:26668619

  20. Relevance of anterior mandibular body ostectomy in mandibular prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pankaj; Singh, Virender; Anand, S. C.; Bansal, Sumidha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We tried to find out the relevance of anterior mandibular body ostectomy in deformities of the mandible specially prognathism, which is primarily limited to anterior part only. Patients and Methods: Ten patients with skeletal deformity along with malocclusion, which was limited to anterior body of mandible were selected. Selected patients had proper molar interdigitation (even if class 3) and in general had anterior crossbite (except one). All patients had crossed their growth spurts and had no hormonal influence on facial deformity. Specific protocol, including cephelometric analysis cephalometry for orthognathic surgery, prediction tracing and model surgeries were devised. Pre and post-surgical orthodontics and body ostectomy were performed in all patients along with 18-month post-op follow-up. Results: There was significant reduction in prognathism and horizontal dysplasia in all ten patients. Anterior crossbite as well as axis of incisiors over mandibular plane was corrected in all patients due to decrease in length of mandibular body. All patients showed decreased facial height and better lip competence with intact posterior occlusion and no (negligible or transient) sensory loss. Conclusions: Our study could confirm that people whose deformity is limited to the anterior part of mandible with reasonable occlusion posteriorly can get satisfactory cosmetic and functional results through body ostectomy alone rather than going for surgical procedure in the ramal area, which is liable to cause sensory and occlusal disturbances. PMID:24163554

  1. The effect of bite-opening appliances on mandibular rotational growth and remodeling in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Rowe, T K; Carlson, D S

    1990-12-01

    Previous experimental studies that have used a bite-block cemented to the maxillary dental arch have shown that the direction of growth of the maxillary complex is redirected in a superior and anterior direction for approximately 12 weeks but reassumes a normal inferior and anterior direction after that time. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine the effect of increased vertical dimension and altered mandibular posture on growth of the mandible and (2) to determine whether or not an alteration in chronic mandibular position alters mandibular intramatrix rotation. Eleven Macaca mulatta monkeys wore 15 mm vertical bite-opening appliances for 24 or 48 weeks. Nine untreated animals were used as controls. All animals received tantalum bone implants to facilitate cephalometric analysis. Serial lateral radiographs of the mandible were traced and superimposed on bone implants for each animal to determine overall changes in mandibular shape (gonial angle) and the location of bone remodeling. During normal growth, the gonial angle closed an average of 0.1 degrees over a 48-week period. In the experimental animals, the gonial angle opened 6.4 degrees (p less than 0.005) as a result of remodeling during the period that mandibular posture was altered. Once normal mandibular posture was restored, this process was reversed; the gonial angle once again became more acute over time, and remodeling along the body and ramus of the mandible was similar to that observed in control animals. These results suggest that mandibular growth and remodeling can be influenced by altered mandibular vertical posture.

  2. Comparison of sexual dimorphism of permanent mandibular canine with mandibular first molar by odontometrics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Aditi; Manjunatha, Bhari Shranesha; Dholia, Bhavik; Althomali, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Sexual dimorphism is one of important tool of forensic science. The objective of this study is to assess the dimorphic status of mesio-distal (MD) and bucco-lingual (BL) diameter of mandibular canine with mandibular first molar among the students of dental college. This study is of definite significance as sex chromosomes and hormonal production influenced tooth morphology. Materials and Methods: The descriptive study adopted the purposive sampling technique, of 50 male and 50 female aged 17-25 years, using study casts for mesio-distal and bucco-lingual dimensions of mandibular canine with mandibular first molar were taken using digital Vernier caliper. The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using descriptive statistics and t-test to compare MD and BL dimensions in male and female populations and P ≤ 0.05 was found statistically significant. Results: Sexual dimorphism can be predicted by measuring mesiodistal dimension of mandibular canine and mandibular first molar. The left mandibular canine showed more sexual dimorphism (12.66%) in comparison to left mandibular first molar (0.824%) only. Right mandibular canine showed greater dimorphism in MD dimensions (10.94%) in comparison to right mandibular first molar (6.96%). In bucco-lingual dimensions mandibular canine showed less variability when compared with mandibular first molar, thus our study showed more significance on mesio-distal dimensions of both teeth. Conclusion: The present study concludes statistically significant sexual dimorphism in mandibular canine over mandibular first molar on study casts. The MD dimensions in mandibular canine and mandibular first molar can help in determining sex and identification of unknown person. PMID:26816466

  3. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with bruxism and cluster implant failures in the edentulous maxilla: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Lowenguth, Roxanne; Yerke, Lisa M; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    For most patients with failed dental implants, the placement of new implants is the only option that allows for retreatment with a fixed dental prosthesis. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a history of bruxism and cluster implant failures in the edentulous maxilla 10 years after the insertion of a milled bar overdenture. Seven failed implants were removed and simultaneous bone grafting was performed. After an 8-month healing period, 8 dental implants with new surfaces were placed. These supported a metal ceramic fixed complete denture with a metal occlusal surface. The prosthesis was retained with 3 sections of milled bars and 3 set screws. This clinical report describes the details of the treatment with an emphasis on prosthetics. PMID:22765983

  4. Exostosis of the mandibular coronoid process.

    PubMed

    Michel, R G; Hudson, W R; Drawbaugh, E J; Baylin, G J

    1977-01-01

    Abnormal enlargement of one or both mandibular coronoid processes may lead to a limited mandibular excursion. A case of unilateral coronoid process exostosis severely limiting mandibular function is described. A review of the literature pertinent to this uncommon abnormality is presented. The various entities of coronoid process osteochondroma, osteoma, exostosis, hypertrophy and developmental anomaly, all producing a similar picture of coronoid process enlargement are discussed. The proper use of the available radiographic techniques simplifies the diagnosis of these uncommon maladies, as long as a coronoid process abnormality is considered in the differential diagnosis of restricted mandibular movement.

  5. Distraction Osteogenesis Correction of Mandibular Ramis Fracture Malunion in a Juvenile Mute Swan ( Cygnus olor ).

    PubMed

    Calvo Carrasco, Daniel; Dutton, Thomas A G; Shimizu, Naomi; Sabater, Mikel; Forbes, Neil A

    2016-03-01

    A juvenile mute swan (Cygnus olor) was presented with right lateral deviation of the mandible. Radiographs demonstrated a healed fracture of the right mandibular ramis, which had compromised osteogenesis. A corrective osteotomy was performed and an osteogenic distractor was inserted over the lateral aspect of the right mandible. Dental acrylic implants were fixed to the rhinotheca to correct rotational alignment. A pharyngostomy tube was placed to facilitate administration of nutrition and medication. Postoperative images confirmed correct alignment of the mandible in relation to the maxilla. Implants were removed and postoperative complications were not reported. This is the first report of an osteogenic distractor used to correct mandibular deviation in an avian species. Distraction osteogenesis should be considered as a valid surgical option in juvenile or adult avian patients with pathologic bone shortening.

  6. Effects of altered mandibular function on mandibular growth after condylectomy.

    PubMed

    Tsolakis, A I; Spyropoulos, M N; Katsavrias, E; Alexandridis, K

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of protruded mandibular function on bilaterally condylectomized mandibles of growing rats. Sixty 4-week-old rats were divided into three experimental and two control groups each consisting of 12 animals as follows: (A) bilateral condylectomy was performed and the mandible was left to function normally; (B) the mandible was protracted forward without any condylectomy; (C) after bilateral condylectomy, the mandible was forced to function in a protruded position; (D) the animals were used as controls without any operation or appliance; and (E) a sham operation was performed in the condylar area but no appliance was used. Mandibular protraction was achieved by means of a specific appliance acting via rubber bands pulling the mandible in a straight, forward direction with a force of 25 g for 12 hours/day. The experimental period was 30 days. Lateral and dorsoventral radiographs were taken and vital dyes were administered on days 1 and 30 for all animals. Cephalometric analysis included 10 measurements. Findings resulting from statistical analysis of measurements in the five groups are summarized as follows: (i) between group A and groups D and E, less growth was found in group A; (ii) between group B and groups D and E, more growth was found in group B; (iii) between group A and group B, more growth was found in group B; (iv) between group A and group C, more growth was found in group C; and (v) between group B and group C, more growth was found in group B. These findings support the conclusion that although mandibular propulsion enhances growth even after condylectomy, the condyle seems to be an essential element for normal growth and development. PMID:9071041

  7. Immediate loading in oral implants. Present situation.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Roberto; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Balaguer, José; Fulgueiras, Nerea

    2005-01-01

    The earliest antecedents of immediate loading were introduced by Ledermann in 1979. He placed overdenture in four interforaminal implants on the same day the surgery was carried out. In the original implantological protocol of Brånemark the immediate loading did not appear indicated, currently, it is being presented as a predictable alternative in several studies. We revised different articles on immediate loading from 1997 to 2002. We analysed different variables and concluded that immediate loading produces a success rate in posterior maxilla similar to the differed loading (90-100%). The characteristics of the implant, favourable to immediate loading, are: screw-shaped, with a rough surface, sand blasted and acid etching processed and a minimum length of 10 mm. The initial stability and a micro movement of the implant, inferior to 150 microm and a marginal to the insertion equal or superior to 32 N/cm are defined as a proper osseous. The bruxism stands out as an adverse factor according to several authors. PMID:15995575

  8. Immediate loading in oral implants. Present situation.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Roberto; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Balaguer, José; Fulgueiras, Nerea

    2005-07-01

    The earliest antecedents of immediate loading were introduced by Ledermann in 1979. He placed overdenture in four interforaminal implants on the same day the surgery was carried out. In the original implantological protocol of Brånemark the immediate loading did not appear indicated, currently, it is being presented as a predictable alternative in several studies. We revised different articles on immediate loading from 1997 to 2002. We analysed different variables and concluded that immediate loading produces a success rate in posterior maxilla similar to the differed loading (90-100%). The characteristics of the implant, favourable to immediate loading, are: screw-shaped, with a rough surface, sand blasted and acid etching processed and a minimum length of 10 mm. The initial stability and a micro movement of the implant, inferior to 150 microm and a marginal to the insertion equal or superior to 32 N/cm are defined as a proper osseous. The bruxism stands out as an adverse factor according to several authors.

  9. Accuracy of Computerized Vertical Measurements on Digital Orthopantomographs: Posterior Mandibular Region

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, Mohammad; Gharbyah, Alaa’ Z. Abu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Orthopantomographs are commonly used for diagnosis in clinical dentistry. Although the manufacturers claim a constant magnification effect, the reliability of measuring dimensions on the panoramic radiographs is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of measuring vertical dimensions in the posterior mandibular area on digital orthopantomographs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective survey of 20 orthopantomographs with unrestored implants (only with cover screw) in the mandibular posterior region (molars and premolars) was conducted. All radiographs were taken using the same machine by skilled technicians. Two examiners were asked to measure the vertical dimension of the implants seen on the radiographs viewed using two differently sized display screens. Inter-examiner and intra-examiner reliability tests were performed. Differences between the measured length and the actual length using each screen type were compared. Results: High coefficients of reliability were observed on intra- and inter-examiner correlation. The overall reliability of measuring the vertical dimensions of implants between both examiners for the large screen and the small screen were 97.4% (Cronbach's alpha 0.993) and 94.0% (Cronbach's alpha 0.984), respectively. There were no significant differences between the errors seen with either the large screen or the small screen, when each of them was compared to the original length (P = 0.146). Conclusion: This study shows that vertical dimensions in the posterior mandibular region (molar and premolars) can be reliably measured on an orthopantomograph using a calibrated machine and special software. PMID:25806135

  10. Giant osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, MR Muthu; Loganathan, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondroma or osteocartilaginous exostosis is an exophytic lesion that arises from the cortex of the bone and is cartilage-capped. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle is extremely rare. The following is a case report of an osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle removed via extended preauricular approach to the temporomandibular joint. PMID:26980978

  11. Teeth in the line of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Spinnato, Gaetano; Alberto, Pamela L

    2009-03-01

    Many mandibular fractures occur through tooth sockets. The treatment plan for teeth in the line of fracture has evolved through the years because of the development of new antibiotics and fixation techniques. In this article we review the history and current studies and discuss treatment protocols for teeth in the line of mandibular fractures.

  12. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  13. The Relevance of the Use of Radiographic Planning in Order to Avoid Complications in Mandibular Implantology: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Sammartino, Gilberto; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Riccitiello, Francesco; Felice, Pietro; Cerone, Vincenzo; Gasparro, Roberta; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective radiological study was to evaluate the variability of the mandibular anatomy in the presence and absence of teeth and to consider how it could influence implant planning. 187 mandibular CT DentaScans were selected from our department archive according to the inclusion criteria. The axial height, vertical height, angulation of the bone crest, and the bone available for ideal implant placement were measured. The analysis of the data shows that the mandible contour presents a constant degree of angulation. The variation of angulation in the absence of teeth was statistically significant only in the region between the canine and the first premolar and in that between the second premolar and the first molar. The difference between the crest height and the available distance to place the implant was greater in the region of the second molar while in the other regions the implant planning was made complex by postextraction resorption. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth loss can be considered as a risk factor for lingual cortical perforation during the insertion of an implant. To avoid potential intra/postoperative complications, 3D radiographic examination is recommended in order to study the mandibular anatomy and identify the risk areas.

  14. The Relevance of the Use of Radiographic Planning in Order to Avoid Complications in Mandibular Implantology: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sammartino, Gilberto; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Riccitiello, Francesco; Felice, Pietro; Cerone, Vincenzo; Gasparro, Roberta; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective radiological study was to evaluate the variability of the mandibular anatomy in the presence and absence of teeth and to consider how it could influence implant planning. 187 mandibular CT DentaScans were selected from our department archive according to the inclusion criteria. The axial height, vertical height, angulation of the bone crest, and the bone available for ideal implant placement were measured. The analysis of the data shows that the mandible contour presents a constant degree of angulation. The variation of angulation in the absence of teeth was statistically significant only in the region between the canine and the first premolar and in that between the second premolar and the first molar. The difference between the crest height and the available distance to place the implant was greater in the region of the second molar while in the other regions the implant planning was made complex by postextraction resorption. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth loss can be considered as a risk factor for lingual cortical perforation during the insertion of an implant. To avoid potential intra/postoperative complications, 3D radiographic examination is recommended in order to study the mandibular anatomy and identify the risk areas. PMID:27294136

  15. [Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning in implant surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardekian, L; Salnea, J; Abu el-Naaj, I; Gutmacher, T; Peled, M

    2001-04-01

    Severe resorption of the posterior mandible possesses one of the most difficult restorative challenges to the implant surgery today. This resorption may prevent the placement of dental implants without the potentially damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. To create the opportunity of insertion dental implants of adequately length in those cases, the technique of nerve repositioning has been advocated. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of nerve repositioning combined with placement of dental implants. Both cases showed appropriate postoperative healing without damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. The inferior alveolar nerve repositioning technique seems to be an acceptable alternative to augmentation procedure prior to dental implants placement in cases exhibiting atrophic posterior mandibular ridges. PMID:11494807

  16. Some issues related to evidence-based implantology.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews relevant dental literature to answer some frequent questions related to evidence-based implantology. There are hundreds of implant systems on the market, but the majority lack clinical documentation. Recommended number of implants for full-arch fixed prostheses is four or five in the mandible but at least six in the maxilla. Less expensive implant-retained overdentures make implant treatment available to a greater portion of edentulous subjects. Mandibular overdentures on two implants, and even one implant, have shown excellent long-term outcomes. In the maxilla, less than four implants are not recommended for good results. Single implant restorations have good prognosis, but placement of the implant should be postponed until adulthood. Osseointegrated implants have revolutionized clinical dentistry. However, in a global perspective, implants make up only a small part of all prosthodontic treatment. Knowledge and skill in conventional prosthodontics must be maintained as it will remain the most common part of the specialty.

  17. [The temporo-mandibular articulation].

    PubMed

    Dargaud, J; Vinkka-Puhakka, H

    2004-04-01

    The standing posture of humans has created both morphological and functional adaptations in the temporo-mandibular joint and the masticatory function. This biped state is the one of the most important characteristic of human evolution. It is furthermore the agent determining most of the functional changes in the whole body. This survey will be carried out in several levels including, a descriptive anatomy, biomechanics, radiological imaging, functioning in the articulation of TMJ. The descriptive anatomic picture will be obtained by the traditional dissection techniques. 20 TMJ joints are dissected from 10 cadavers: 7 cadavers, 65-75 year old, 3 cadavers, 60-65 year old. The x-rays are lateral view and the subjects of the radiological imaging are young's, adults and olds: 1, 3 y-old Male; 1, 7 y-old Female; 1, 14 y-old Female; 10, 19-23 y-old Male; 1, 26 y-old Female; 1, 34 y-old Male; 1, 75 y-old Female. The anatomic elements in the TMJ well resembled the ones described in the literature of the capsule, the ligament, the masticator muscles (masseter, temporal, medial and lateral pterygoids). The temporo-mandibular ligament proved to be difficult to separate from the capsule in some of the specimens. Sometimes it was not always found after a dissection.

  18. [Surgical correction of mandibular cyst and tumour defects (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Raveh, J

    1979-01-01

    The various surgical techniques for the repair of mandibular defects following ablative surgery are discussed. The methods used in the treatment of large mandibular cysts are described and a modification of the osteoplastic technique is presented. The importance of reconstruction and functional rehabilitation with so caused mandibular defects and temporo-mandibular joint substitutions are stressed.

  19. A multi-centre retrospective study of mandibular fractures: do occlusal support and the mandibular third molar affect mandibular angle and condylar fractures?

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Sadakane, H; Kobayashi, M; Tachibana, A; Oko, T; Ishida, Y; Fujita, T; Takenono, I; Komatsubara, H; Takeuchi, J; Ichiki, K; Miyai, D; Komori, T

    2016-09-01

    This retrospective study was performed to investigate the influence of occlusal support and the presence, state, and position of mandibular third molars on the incidence of mandibular angle and condylar fractures. The following variables were investigated: age, sex, cause of fracture, presence and state (impaction, angulation, and the number of roots) of the mandibular third molars, site of the mandibular fracture, presence of occlusal support, duration of intermaxillary fixation, and postoperative complications. Various risk factors for mandibular angle and condylar fractures were investigated by univariate analysis. The risk of mandibular angle fracture was significantly higher in patients with occlusal support and mandibular third molars. The risk of condylar fracture was significantly higher in patients without occlusal support or mandibular third molars. The position and angulation of the mandibular third molars were not significant risk factors in mandibular angle and condylar fractures. This study demonstrated the influence of occlusal support and the presence of mandibular third molars on the incidence of mandibular angle and condylar fractures. The presence of occlusal support may be a more important factor affecting mandibular angle or condylar fractures than the position of the mandibular third molars.

  20. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  1. Removable Partial Denture Supported by Implants with Prefabricated Telescopic Abutments - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Komal

    2014-01-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapy—biologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs. PMID:25121066

  2. Augmented mandibular bone structurally adapts to functional loading.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, J W; Ruijter, J M; Koole, R; de Putter, C; Terlou, M; Cune, M S

    2013-12-01

    Long-term changes in trabecular bone structure during the 10 years following onlay grafting with simultaneous mandibular implant placement were studied. Extraoral radiographs of both mandibular sides in eight patients were taken regularly. Bone structure was analysed using a custom-written image analysis program. Parameters studied were trabecular area and perimeter and marrow cavity area and perimeter. After skeletonisation of the trabecular network, the number of end points and branching points, skeleton length, and branch angle were determined. The observed structural changes agree with the development of a more complex and more delicate or fine osseous structure. The bone shows more trabecular branching. All changes are most pronounced in the graft spongiosa, but are also found in the graft cortex and in the original mandible. The mean trabecular branch angle becomes more horizontal. The applied technique can be used to analyse long-term changes in the architecture of bone grafts. Changes found in the graft architecture correspond to changes expected after functional adaptation to loading. PMID:23791249

  3. Enhancing Fracture and Wear Resistance of Dentures/Overdentures Utilizing Digital Technology: A Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Afify, Ahmed; Haney, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Since it was first introduced into the dental world, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has improved dramatically in regards to both data acquisition and fabrication abilities. CAD/CAM is capable of providing well-fitting intra- and extraoral prostheses when sound guidelines are followed. As CAD/CAM technology encompasses both surgical and prosthetic dental applications as well as fixed and removable aspects, it could improve the average quality of dental prostheses compared with the results obtained by conventional manufacturing methods. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction into the methods in which this technology may be used to enhance the wear and fracture resistance of dentures and overdentures. This article will also showcase two clinical reports in which CAD/CAM technology has been implemented. PMID:26916680

  4. Difficult laryngoscopy caused by massive mandibular tori.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Yoshihiro; Shiba, Mayuka; Okamoto, Shinji; Hatta, Koji; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular tori, defined as bony protuberances located along the lingual aspect of the mandible, are a possible cause of difficult intubation. We describe a case of mandibular tori that resulted in difficult intubation. A 62-year-old woman who had speech problems was diagnosed with mandibular tori, and was scheduled for surgical resection. On physical assessment, the patient had a class II Mallampati view and bilateral mandibular tori. Preoperative computed tomography images demonstrated that the bilateral mandibular tori arose from the lingual aspects of the second incisor to the first molar regions of the mandibular corpus, and occupied the floor of the mouth. In the operating room, anesthesia was induced with remifentanil and propofol. After complete paralysis was achieved, laryngoscopy was attempted several times with Macintosh blades. The massive tori prevented insertion of the tip of the blade into the oropharynx, and neither the epiglottis nor the arytenoids could be visualized, i.e., Cormack and Lehane grade IV. Blind nasotracheal intubation was successful and the surgery proceeded uneventfully. The anesthesiologist should examine any space-occupying lesion of the oral floor and should be vigilant for speech problems in order to detect mandibular tori that might impede intubation. PMID:19444571

  5. Individual lithium disilicate crowns in a full-arch, implant-supported rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Maló, Paulo; de Sousa, Sérgio Tavares; De Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Moura Guedes, Carlos; Almeida, Ricardo; Roma Torres, António; Legatheaux, João; Silva, António

    2014-08-01

    This clinical report presents the clinical outcome of a maxillary full-arch implant-supported fixed rehabilitation with lithium disilicate reinforced glass ceramic monolithic crowns opposing a mandibular metal-acrylic implant-supported fixed rehabilitation in a 62-year-old woman. Eight implants were successfully placed (four maxillary, four mandibular), and no complications occurred in the postoperative or maintenance periods. Six months after delivery, the maxillary and mandibular prostheses were found to be clinically, biologically, and mechanically stable, and the patient was satisfied with the esthetics and her ability to function. Although the present indications for the use of lithium disilicate are still restricted to tooth-borne restorations, it is possible to successfully rehabilitate edentulous patients through implant-supported fixed prostheses using lithium disilicate reinforced glass ceramic monolithic crowns.

  6. Management of malunited mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Rubens, B C; Stoelinga, P J; Weaver, T J; Blijdorp, P A

    1990-02-01

    The non-surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures, may occasionally result in articular imbalance and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. This may be attributed to condylar head displacement and resorption, resulting in a shortened vertical ramus and lost posterior vertical facial height. Restoring the vertical ramus height is essential in the treatment of such dysfunction, and may be accomplished by unilateral, or bilateral ramus osteotomies. Four examples of patients treated with mandibular ramus osteotomies to restore vertical ramus height, with subsequent improvement in occlusal balance and function are presented. The use of the sagittal split mandibular osteotomy and the external vertical ramus osteotomy, stabilized with small osseous plates, and monocortical screws, is discussed.

  7. Digital orthopantomograms in osteoporosis detection: mandibular density and mandibular radiographic indices as skeletal BMD predictors

    PubMed Central

    Savic Pavicin, I; Jukic, T; Badel, T; Badanjak, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the correlation of skeletal bone mineral density (BMD) with mandibular density and mandibular radiographic indices estimated on digital panoramic radiographs. Methods: Study comprised 112 female subjects older than 45 years. Digital panoramic radiographs were taken, and patients were referred to densitometric measuring (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) of BMD in the hip bones and lumbar spine regions (L1–L4). On the radiographs, mandibular bone density was estimated and the following indices were measured by the DIGORA® software (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland): mental index (MI), gonial index (GI), antegonial index (AI), panoramic mandibular index (PMI) and alveolar crest resorption degree (M/M). Mandibular cortical index (MCI) was visually estimated. Results: Mandibular density and visual index MCI are significant predictors of hip and spine BMD. Mandibular density was marked by a significant square trend: it decreased until the age of 54 years and remained constant until the age of 64 years when it started to increase. Significant correlations were found between MI, AI and PMI values and BMD in the hip but not in the lumbar spine region. The GI and M/M values did not show statistically significant correlations with BMD of either region. Conclusions: Mandibular bone density and mandibular radiographic indices are useful in detecting patients with decreased BMD. The applicability of orthopantomograms in diagnosing osteoporosis/osteopenia should be recognized as the potential greatest benefit of this everyday diagnostic method in dental practice. PMID:24969554

  8. New Therapeutics in Promoting and Modulating Mandibular Growth in Cases with Mandibular Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alhadlaq, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Children with mandibular growth deficiency may develop airway obstruction. The standard treatment of severe airway obstruction involves invasive procedures such as tracheostomy. Mandibular distraction osteogenesis has been proposed in neonates with mandibular deficiency as a treatment option to avoid tracheostomy procedure later in life. Both tracheostomy and distraction osteogenesis procedures suffer from substantial shortcomings including scarring, unpredictability, and surgical complications. Forward jaw positioning appliances have been also used to enhance mandible growth. However, the effectiveness of these appliances is limited and lacks predictability. Current and future approaches to enhance mandibular growth, both experimental and clinical trials, and their effectiveness are presented and discussed. PMID:23819121

  9. Paradental (mandibular inflammatory buccal) cyst.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Reis, Brenda Mayra Maciel Vasconcelos; Freire-Maia, Belini

    2011-06-01

    The paradental cyst is commonly misinterpreted when associated with atypical clinical and radiographic characteristics, in turn causing diagnostic problems. For this reason, the study of the differential diagnosis of this lesion has become extremely important. In addition, the correlation of clinical, histologic, and radiographic findings are also of great value in obtaining accurate diagnoses. The minor variations in the clinical appearance of paradental cysts make it feasible to consider the two main groups of cysts separately: those associated with 1st and 2nd permanent molars of the mandible and those associated with the 3rd mandibular molar. Moreover, this distinction in localization may well dictate the necessary treatment. Bearing in mind the minor clinical variations, the present article aims to discuss the differential diagnosis of this lesion and its different possible treatments by presenting a case report to illustrate the findings. PMID:21161456

  10. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... prosthesis (interpositional implant) shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  11. Facial nerve paralysis and frey syndrome in an infant following removal of an internal mandibular distraction device.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Sameer Mehbub; Golinko, Michael Samuel; Williams, Joseph Kerwin

    2013-05-01

    Mandibular distraction using an implantable device has become a widely accepted and utilized procedure for the treatment of retrognathia. Although excellent results have been reported and observed with distraction osteogenesis, complications such as facial nerve injury have been previously reported. Often, this injury is usually temporary and corrects over the course of time. Frey syndrome has been classically described as an injury or severance of the auricotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve. It is commonly seen as a complication of parotid surgery and has never been reported in association with mandibular distraction. The authors report a unique case of both facial nerve paralysis and Frey syndrome in a patient following the removal of an internal mandibular distraction device. A review of the literature along with diagnosis and management are discussed.

  12. Parotid sialocele and fistula after mandibular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dierks, E J; Granite, E L

    1977-04-01

    Two cases are presented that show the progression to sialocele or salivary fistula, or both, after a modified Risdon approach is used for mandibular subcondylar osteotomy. Use of antisialogogues and conservative management is recommended.

  13. Analysis of Fibular Single Graft and Fibular Double-barrel Graft for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Ihara, Jyun; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-quality mandibular reconstruction using vascularized free fibular graft is necessary to provide an osseointegrated dental implant and fixed denture. An appropriate crown–implant ratio is needed, and a good match between bones is extremely important. There are no articles describing the analysis and evaluation of both the fibula and mandible in the same patients. Methods: Computed tomography images of both mandible and fibula of 80 patients were selected in a random manner. We measured bone height of the fibula and mandible at specified points and evaluated the difference of bone height between the fibula and mandible using fibular single or double-barrel grafts. Results: The percentage of patients who had a “good” result for a fibular single graft was only 13.8%. There was no significant difference in bone heights when analyzed by gender. Whether patients were dentulous or not had a large influence on the difference between fibular and mandibular bone heights. Most young patients, but only half of older patients, needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Overweight patients with a high body mass index more often needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Conclusions: For mandibular reconstruction using a fibular graft, preoperative analysis of the patient’s profile and proper use of a fibular single or double-barrel graft contribute to minimizing the difference between the height of the grafted fibula and native mandible and are keys to an ideal reconstruction with good cosmetics and function. PMID:27622091

  14. Analysis of Fibular Single Graft and Fibular Double-barrel Graft for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Ihara, Jyun; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-quality mandibular reconstruction using vascularized free fibular graft is necessary to provide an osseointegrated dental implant and fixed denture. An appropriate crown–implant ratio is needed, and a good match between bones is extremely important. There are no articles describing the analysis and evaluation of both the fibula and mandible in the same patients. Methods: Computed tomography images of both mandible and fibula of 80 patients were selected in a random manner. We measured bone height of the fibula and mandible at specified points and evaluated the difference of bone height between the fibula and mandible using fibular single or double-barrel grafts. Results: The percentage of patients who had a “good” result for a fibular single graft was only 13.8%. There was no significant difference in bone heights when analyzed by gender. Whether patients were dentulous or not had a large influence on the difference between fibular and mandibular bone heights. Most young patients, but only half of older patients, needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Overweight patients with a high body mass index more often needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Conclusions: For mandibular reconstruction using a fibular graft, preoperative analysis of the patient’s profile and proper use of a fibular single or double-barrel graft contribute to minimizing the difference between the height of the grafted fibula and native mandible and are keys to an ideal reconstruction with good cosmetics and function.

  15. Concomitant reconstruction of mandibular basal and alveolar bone with a free fibular flap.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, M J; Choi, W S; Yoon, P Y; Ahn, K M; Myung, H; Hwang, S J; Seo, B M; Choi, J Y; Choung, P H; Kim, S M

    2004-03-01

    Repair of long-span mandibular defects with a free fibular flap is now a routine procedure. However, the bone height of the neo-mandible after reconstruction with a fibular flap is about half that of the dentulous mandible. When a fibular graft is placed only at the inferior border of the mandible, the resulting vertical discrepancy between the graft segment and the occlusal plane can adversely affect implant mechanics or denture stability and retention. To overcome these problems, we developed a technique for two-strut type mandibular reconstruction. A vascularized fibular segment is used to reconstruct the inferior basal portion of the neo-mandible, while a non-vascularized residual fibular segment is used to simulate the superior alveolar portion. We used this technique in 22 patients. Graft survival, graft resorption, and the ability to place implants were assessed as compared with those after the conventional one-strut type technique. The fibular segment grafted to the alveolar region was removed in one patient with intraoral wound dehiscence and in two with postoperative infection. All vascularized fibular flaps were successful. The resorption rate was 13.6+/-7.2% for non-vascularized segments and 3.0+/-3.7% for vascularized segments. Dental implants were placed in five of our 22 patients. The crown:fixture length ratio was improved to 1:1.7, as compared with a ratio of 1:1.21 with use of a conventional fibular flap. We conclude that our technique is very easy and safe and provides substantially improved lower-lip and cheek support and implant-prosthetic mechanics than conventional procedures for the repair of long-span mandibular defects. PMID:15050071

  16. [Dental implantations of ceramics-coated metals].

    PubMed

    Cini, L; Gasparini, F; Michieli, S; Pizzoferrato, A; Sandrolini-Cortesi, S

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies and personal experience of the Authors in the field of dental implants have encountered the same fundamental problem which arises with orthopedic prosthesis procedures. The basic problem is that of adhesion between the bone tissue and the metal implant. Chrome-cobalt alloy, Tantalum and Titanium are the metals of most recent use. The Authors therefore proceeded to investigate the behaviour of alveolar bone tissue in the proximity of artificial teeth made of alloy (platinum-gold) covered with ceramic, as used in prosthetic dentistry. The experiment was carried out in a dog and a man. In the dog, two of its mandibular teeth were substituted with the same ceramic-gold implants: the first, a replica of natural tooth, was placed in the socket and held in place by metal splint and mandibular circumferential wirings. The other implant, without a replicated crown, was left free, within the alveolus, without contacting the near or opposing teeth. A solid smooth surfaced alumina device, shaped like a small cylinder, was implanted in the upper femoral epiphysis of the same animal.

  17. Nonsurgical correction of a Class III malocclusion in an adult by miniscrew-assisted mandibular dentition distalization.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yan; Han, Xianglong; Guo, Yongwen; Li, Jingyu; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    This article reports the successful use of miniscrews in the mandible to treat a 20-year-old Mongolian woman with a chief complaint of anterior crossbite. The patient had a skeletal Class III malocclusion with a mildly protrusive mandible, an anterior crossbite, and a deviated midline. In light of the advantages for reconstruction of the occlusal plane and distal en-masse movement of the mandibular arch, we used a multiloop edgewise archwire in the initial stage. However, the maxillary incisors were in excessive labioversion accompanied by little retraction of the mandibular incisors; these results were obviously not satisfying after 4 months of multiloop edgewise archwire treatment. Two miniscrews were subsequently implanted vertically in the external oblique ridge areas of the bilateral mandibular ramus as skeletal anchorage for en-masse distalization of the mandibular dentition. During treatment, the mandibular anterior teeth were retracted about 4.0 mm without negative lingual inclinations. The movement of the mandibular first molar was almost bodily translation. The maxillary incisors maintained good inclinations by rotating their brackets 180° along with the outstanding performance of the beta-titanium wire. The patient received a harmonious facial balance, an attractive smile, and ideal occlusal relationships. The outcome was stable after 1 year of retention. Our results suggest that the application of miniscrews in the posterior area of the mandible is an effective approach for Class III camouflage treatment. This technique requires minimal compliance and is particularly useful for correcting Class III patients with mild mandibular protrusion and minor crowding. PMID:23726338

  18. Coated vs uncoated implants: bone defect configurations after progressive peri-implantitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Madi, Marwa; Zakaria, Osama; Kasugai, Shohei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, hydroxyapatite coated vs uncoated implants were used to evaluate the type and dimensions of bone defects after progressive peri-implantitis in dogs. Thirty-two dental implants with 4 different surfaces-machined (M), sandblasted acid-etched (SA), 1-μm thin sputter hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated (S), and plasma-sprayed HA-coated (P)-were inserted into the mandibles of 4 beagle dogs after extracting all mandibular premolars. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced after 3 months using ligature to allow for plaque accumulation. After 4 months, ligatures were removed and plaque accumulation continued for 5 months (progression period). The open flap surgery demonstrated 3 patterns of peri-implantitis bone defect: (1) Class I defect: represented as circumferential intra-alveolar bone loss; (2) Class II defect: circumferential intra-alveolar defect with supra-alveolar bone loss exposing the implant surface; and (3) Class III defect: represented as circumferential intra-alveolar defect with supra-alveolar bone loss and buccal dehiscence. Class I was the most frequent (62.5%) defect pattern around implant types M, SA, and S; while implant type-P showed a recurring majority of Class II (62.5%). Comparison among the 4 implant groups revealed a significant defect width (DW) in implant type-P relative to other types (P < 0.01). However, no statistically significant differences were noted for defect depth (DD) (P > 0.05). We concluded that the shape and size of peri-implantitis bone defects were influenced by the type and thickness of the HA coat together with the quantity of the available peri-implant bone. Plasma-sprayed HA-coated implants showed larger peri-implant defects than did thin sputter HA-coated implants.

  19. Paresthesia of the mental nerve stem from periapical infection of mandibular canine tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Birkan Taha; Celik, Salih; Durmus, Ercan

    2008-05-01

    Sensory disturbances such as paresthesia, anesthesia, hypoesthesia, and hyperesthesia may be present in the oral cavity. Paresthesia is defined as a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness caused by neural injury. Paresthesia in dentistry can be caused by local or systemic factors. Local factors include traumatic injuries such as mandibular fractures, expanding compressive lesions (benign or malignant neoplasia and cysts), impacted teeth, local infections (osteomyelitis, periapical, and peri-implant infections), iatrogenic lesions after tooth extractions, anesthetic injection, endodontic therapy (overfilling and apical surgery), implantology, orthodontic surgery, and preprosthetic surgery. The main purpose of this case report is to present the treatment and resolution of a mental nerve paresthesia stemming from apical pathosis of a mandibular canine tooth and the follow-up of 3 years. PMID:18442732

  20. Clinical and biologic factors related to oral implant failure: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Moheng, Patrick; Feryn, Jean-Marc

    2005-09-01

    failure. In multilevel logistic regression analysis, only tobacco consumption and single-tooth replacement or removable prosthesis were independent and significant predictive factors of oral implant failure. Serum osteocalcin, and urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were not predictive of oral implant failure in this study. These results suggest that oral implants are more likely to fail for posterior single-tooth replacements and removable prostheses rather than for complete edentulous fixed bridgeworks or overdentures. Tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor of oral implant failure.

  1. Anterior Mandibular Lingual Foramina: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Claudio; Leuter, Cinzia; Gatto, Roberto; Continenza, Maria Adelaide

    2014-01-01

    In descriptions of surgical procedures in mandible, often there is no mention of an anatomical variance, the genial spinal foramina, where nerves and vessels go through. Aim of this study is to investigate frequency, shape, and dimensions of these foramina. 56 computed tomography dentascans were analyzed with an implant planning software. The considered parameters were frequency, number, position, diameters, and length of canals; the collected data were inserted in a spreadsheet and statistically analyzed; therefore, they were compared with those found in the literature. The measurements agree with the ones found in earlier studies, except for the length of the inferior spinal canals, which resulted lesser than that found in the literature. The frequency of the inferior spinal foramina, the data related to the inferior spinal foramina diameter (cross scan), and the measurements related to the superior spinal foramina diameter (axial scan) resulted to be major compared to those reported in literature. These obtained results are clinically interesting because an implant planning software has been employed, daily used by operators, and that permits in vivo investigations. Furthermore, due to the possibility of hemorrhagic accidents in this mandibular region, these data are particularly interesting for all of the operators who make interventions in this area. PMID:25215238

  2. Unilateral mandibular condylectomy in lambs.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, H; Matsuura, H; Jones, R H; Kurita, K; Goss, A N

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the degree of regeneration of the mandibular condyle after unilateral condylectomy in 10-week-old lambs. The lambs were killed three months after the operation, and the joints examined radiologically and histologically. Scoring systems were used to assess the radiological changes and histological regeneration of the condyle. All joints showed regeneration of the condylar head postoperatively. The maximum degree of regeneration occurred on the medial side rather than the central or lateral areas. There was a significant correlation among the medial, central, and lateral planes (P<0.05). The reformed articular cartilage was irregular and thin (P<0.01), and the disc was thick in the central plane (P<0.01) compared with the control joints. The temporal bone was normal. This study shows that unilateral condylectomy in the growing period results in some condylar regeneration particularly on the medial side and reformation of some irregular and thin articular cartilage. PMID:11437430

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  4. Alveolar buccal bone maintenance after immediate implantation with a surgical flap approach: a study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Lima, Cirilo P; Oliveira, Sergio; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Suzuki, Mercelo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated buccal bone maintenance after implantation with a surgical flap approach immediately following tooth extraction in a dog model. Mandibular premolars of six dogs were extracted, and threaded implants of 4-mm diameter and 8-mm length with as-machined and dual acid-etched surfaces were placed through balanced procedures in the distal root extraction sockets with a full-thickness flap design. Submerged healing was allowed for 4 weeks, and following euthanization, bone-to-implant contact and buccal and lingual bone loss were evaluated. None of the parameters evaluated were indicative of an effect of implant surface in hindering bone loss around immediately placed implants. PMID:22140672

  5. Mandibular osteonecrosis due to bisphosphonate use.

    PubMed

    Şalvarcı, Ahmet; Altınay, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    Due to their efficient osteoclastic inhibitor effect in bone metabolism and antiangiogenic activity, bisphosphonates are widely used in many cancer diseases particularly in prostate cancers with bone metastasis, lung cancer, breast cancer and multiple myeloma, as well as in systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, osteopenia, Paget disease and osteogenesis imperfect for the last 13 years. Prostate cancer is a common cancer in males and it is the leading cause of bone metastasis. Mandibular metastasis is rarely encountered during the course of prostate cancer. Mandibular osteonecrosis as well has begun to be observed along with the availability of more efficient and stronger formulations developed following the use of bisphosphonates. Zolendronic acid, which has been used also by our patient, has widely come into practice as a 3(rd) generation bisphosphonate. Because of prostate cancer and widespread bone metastases, our patient has been receiving zolendronic acid with maximum androgen blockage for 4 years. Tomography of the patient, who has undergone intensive treatment because of submandibular abscess, demonstrated extensive osteonecrosis in the fovea sublingual region of the mandible corpus. In large series, although, mandibular osteonecrosis was widely seen due to bisphosphonate use for the metastases of lung and breast cancers, this rate was between 9.6% and 11% for prostate cancer within the series. Although our patient had no mandibular metastasis before, mandibular necrosis was observed due to long-term bisphosphonate use. We are going to present our patient who had this rare complication with his clinical picture. PMID:26328198

  6. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, P U; Hof, A L; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G

    1999-02-01

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women and 32 men (mean age 27.2 years, s.d. 7.5 years, range 13-56 years) were recruited from the patients of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of University Hospital, Groningen. Mouth opening, mobility of TMJs and mandibular length were measured. The mobility of TMJs was measured as the angular displacement of the mandible relative to the cranium, the angle of mouth opening (AMO). Mouth opening (MO) correlated significantly with mandibular length (ML) (r = 0.36) and AMO (r = 0.66). The regression equation MO = C1 x ML x AMO + C2, in which C = 0.53 and C2 = 25.2 mm, correlated well (r = 0.79) with mouth opening. It is concluded that mouth opening reflects both mobility of the TMJs and mandibular length. PMID:10080308

  7. Biomechanical scaling of the hominoid mandibular symphysis.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J

    2001-10-01

    Experimental investigation of mandibular bone strain in cercopithecine primates has established that the mandible is bent in the transverse plane during the power stroke of mastication. Additional comparative work also supports the assumption that the morphology of the mandibular symphysis is functionally linked to the biomechanics of lateral transverse bending, or "wishboning" of the mandibular corpus. There are currently no experimental data to verify that lateral transverse bending constitutes an important loading regime among hominoid primates. There are, however, allometric models from cercopithecoid primates that allow prediction of scaling patterns in hominoid mandibular dimensions that would be consistent with a mechanical environment that includes wishboning as a significant component. This study uses computed tomography (CT) scans to visualize cortical bone distribution in the anterior corpus of a sample of four genera of extant hominoids. From the cortical bone contours, area properties of the mandibular symphysis are calculated, and these variables are subjected to an allometric analysis to detect whether scaling of jaw dimensions are consistent with a wishboning loading regime. Scaling of the hominoid symphysis recalls patterns observed in cercopithecoid monkeys, which lends indirect support for the hypothesis that wishboning is an integral part of the masticatory loading environment in living apes. Inclination of the symphysis, rather than changes in cross-sectional shape or development of the superior transverse torus, represents a morphological solution for minimizing the potentially harmful effects of wishboning in the jaws of these primates.

  8. Mandibular osteonecrosis due to bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    Şalvarcı, Ahmet; Altınay, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Due to their efficient osteoclastic inhibitor effect in bone metabolism and antiangiogenic activity, bisphosphonates are widely used in many cancer diseases particularly in prostate cancers with bone metastasis, lung cancer, breast cancer and multiple myeloma, as well as in systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, osteopenia, Paget disease and osteogenesis imperfect for the last 13 years. Prostate cancer is a common cancer in males and it is the leading cause of bone metastasis. Mandibular metastasis is rarely encountered during the course of prostate cancer. Mandibular osteonecrosis as well has begun to be observed along with the availability of more efficient and stronger formulations developed following the use of bisphosphonates. Zolendronic acid, which has been used also by our patient, has widely come into practice as a 3rd generation bisphosphonate. Because of prostate cancer and widespread bone metastases, our patient has been receiving zolendronic acid with maximum androgen blockage for 4 years. Tomography of the patient, who has undergone intensive treatment because of submandibular abscess, demonstrated extensive osteonecrosis in the fovea sublingual region of the mandible corpus. In large series, although, mandibular osteonecrosis was widely seen due to bisphosphonate use for the metastases of lung and breast cancers, this rate was between 9.6% and 11% for prostate cancer within the series. Although our patient had no mandibular metastasis before, mandibular necrosis was observed due to long-term bisphosphonate use. We are going to present our patient who had this rare complication with his clinical picture. PMID:26328198

  9. Semirigid Cantilever Extension System for Splinting Implants: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Raissa Micaella Marcello; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Chagas Júnior, Otacílio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    In mandibular edentulous patients, treatment based on immediate loading with rigid splinting in the mandible is well accepted; however, it is cost and time dependent, which sometimes limits this type of rehabilitation. To overcome these problems, the technique of immediate loading using a semirigid splinting extension system has been developed. Its advantages include low cost, technical feasibility, and reduced clinic time. This clinical report presents the applicability and the predictability of semirigid splinting of implants in the mandibular arch of an edentulous patient using a distal extension bar prosthesis system. PMID:25161775

  10. Retention of overdenture posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mohamed Ezzat; El-Mowafy, Omar; Fenton, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two self-adhesive resin cements on the retention of overdenture anchor posts after 30 days of aging in water. Forty caries-free human canines were randomly assigned to four test groups. Uni-Anchor posts were cemented to specimens in groups A and B with Breeze and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements, respectively. In groups C and D, Fuji glass-ionomer cement and Fleck's zinc phosphate cement were used, respectively. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each post was recorded. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Means and SDs were 706.5 +/- 204.6 N for Breeze, 585.1 +/- 213.5 N for Maxcem, 449.2 +/- 181.1 N for Fuji, and 330.4 +/- 120.6 N for Fleck's. ANOVA revealed significant differences among the means (P < .0003). Adhesive failure was observed with all groups except group A, in which eight specimens underwent a cohesive fracture of the dentin. Breeze cement (group A) resulted in the highest retention force and most frequent cohesive failure and thus would be expected to clinically perform in a superior manner.

  11. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  12. 21 CFR 872.4770 - Temporary mandibular condyle reconstruction plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... device that is intended to stabilize mandibular bone and provide for temporary reconstruction of the... surgical procedures requiring removal of the mandibular condyle and mandibular bone. This device is not intended for treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. (b) Classification. Class II (special...

  13. Effect of Healing Time on Bone-Implant Contact of Orthodontic Micro-Implants: A Histologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Fatemi, Kazem; Dehghani, Mahboobe; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed loading of orthodontic micro-implants on bone-implant contact. Materials and Methods. Sixty four micro-implants were implanted in dog's jaw bone. The micro-implants were divided into loaded and unloaded (control) groups. The control group had two subgroups: four and eight weeks being implanted. The loaded group had two subgroups of immediate loading and delayed (after four weeks healing) loading. Loaded samples were subjected to 200g load for four weeks. After sacrificing the animals micro-implants and surrounding tissues were observed histologically. Bone-implant contact ratios (BIC) were calculated and different groups' results were compared by three-way ANOVA. Results. Mean survival rate was 96.7% in general. Survival rates were 96.7%, 94.4% and 100% for control, immediate and delayed loaded groups, respectively. BIC values were not significantly different in loaded and control groups, immediate and delayed loading groups, and pressure and tension sides. Mandibular micro-implants had significantly higher BIC than maxillary ones in immediate loading, 4-weeks control, and 8-weeks control groups (P = 0.021, P = 0.009, P = 0.003, resp.). Conclusion Immediate or delayed loading of micro-implants in dog did not cause significant difference in Bone-implant contact which could be concluded that healing time had not significant effect on micro-implant stability. PMID:25006463

  14. 3D Assessment of Mandibular Growth Based on Image Registration: A Feasibility Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, I.; Oliveira, M. E.; Duncan, W. J.; Cioffi, I.; Farella, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Our knowledge of mandibular growth mostly derives from cephalometric radiography, which has inherent limitations due to the two-dimensional (2D) nature of measurement. Objective. To assess 3D morphological changes occurring during growth in a rabbit mandible. Methods. Serial cone-beam computerised tomographic (CBCT) images were made of two New Zealand white rabbits, at baseline and eight weeks after surgical implantation of 1 mm diameter metallic spheres as fiducial markers. A third animal acted as an unoperated (no implant) control. CBCT images were segmented and registered in 3D (Implant Superimposition and Procrustes Method), and the remodelling pattern described used color maps. Registration accuracy was quantified by the maximal of the mean minimum distances and by the Hausdorff distance. Results. The mean error for image registration was 0.37 mm and never exceeded 1 mm. The implant-based superimposition showed most remodelling occurred at the mandibular ramus, with bone apposition posteriorly and vertical growth at the condyle. Conclusion. We propose a method to quantitatively describe bone remodelling in three dimensions, based on the use of bone implants as fiducial markers and CBCT as imaging modality. The method is feasible and represents a promising approach for experimental studies by comparing baseline growth patterns and testing the effects of growth-modification treatments. PMID:24527442

  15. Multiple Mandibular Exostoses: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Mansi; Rastogi, Sanjay; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-01-01

    Multiple maxillary and mandibular exostoses are common localized overgrowths of the bone. They are non-neoplastic and are thought to be reactive or developmental in origin. These exostoses need to be accurately distinguished from the other more diagnostically significant lesions, notably from the exosteal osteomas. The aetiology of exostosis has been investigated by different authors, but no consensus has been reached so far. We are reporting a rare case of an otherwise healthy 38 year old female with multiple exostoses in the mandibular anterior region, which correlated both clinically and radiographically. PMID:24086919

  16. Multiple mandibular exostoses: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Mansi; Rastogi, Sanjay; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-08-01

    Multiple maxillary and mandibular exostoses are common localized overgrowths of the bone. They are non-neoplastic and are thought to be reactive or developmental in origin. These exostoses need to be accurately distinguished from the other more diagnostically significant lesions, notably from the exosteal osteomas. The aetiology of exostosis has been investigated by different authors, but no consensus has been reached so far. We are reporting a rare case of an otherwise healthy 38 year old female with multiple exostoses in the mandibular anterior region, which correlated both clinically and radiographically.

  17. Supplemental mandibular mesiodens: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Naganahalli, Manjunath; Honnappa, Adarsh; Chaitanya, Nallan Csk

    2013-12-01

    Developmental anomalies affecting the number of teeth are occasionally encountered clinically. The incidence of supernumerary teeth is approximately 1-3%. Among these are the maxillary anterior teeth, the maxillary molars, and the maxillo-mandubular premolars, in terms of descending order of occurrence. Supernumeraries occur rarely in the mandibular anterior teeth region. They may be either supplemental or rudimentary. We are reporting case of a supplemental type of supernumerary tooth in the mandibular anterior region and steps which were followed to distinguish supernumerary tooth from the normal series. PMID:24551732

  18. Dens invaginatus (dilated odontome) in mandibular canine

    PubMed Central

    Halawar, Sangamesh S; Satyakiran, GVV; Krishnanand, PS; Prashanth, R

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental malformation of teeth related to shape of the teeth. Affected teeth show a deep infolding of enamel and dentin starting from the tip of the cusps and may extend deep into the root. It results from the invagination of the enamel organ into the dental papilla before calcification has occurred. Teeth most affected are maxillary lateral incisors. The presence of dens invaginatus in mandibular canine is extremely rare. The tooth was symptomatic in that it was mobile and was oriented horizontally. This article presents a case of symptomatic dens invaginatus in mandibular canine. PMID:25364169

  19. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations. PMID:12271847

  20. An experimental study on mandibular movement and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shimahara, M; Ono, K; Hashiguchi, N; Yoshida, Y; Kono, K; Dote, T

    1991-12-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between mandibular movement and osteoporosis, the authors secured the temporo-mandibular joints of 8-week-old rats to immobilize their jaws; then conducted histologic studies chronologically, up to the fifth week. After three weeks, an expansion of the marrow cavity and a reduction of the trabecular were observed in the mandibular process and mandibular fossa. During the fifth week, an osteoporosis-like state was clearly observed. Further, an irregularity in the form of mandibular process was recognized, as well as a remarkable disturbance caused by cartilaginous ossification of the articular cartilage of the condyle.

  1. A retrospective analysis of factors associated with multiple implant failures in maxillae.

    PubMed

    Ekfeldt, A; Christiansson, U; Eriksson, T; Lindén, U; Lundqvist, S; Rundcrantz, T; Johansson, L A; Nilner, K; Billström, C

    2001-10-01

    This retrospective study was designed to verify the factors that influence implant failures. Six prosthodontic clinics in Sweden participated in the study, and together they included a total of 54 patients treated between January 1988 and December 1996. All patients were completely edentulous in the maxilla, and received either a fixed prosthesis or an overdenture supported by at least 4 implants (Brånemark System). Half of the patients belonged to the study group, and an inclusion criterion for this group was that they had lost at least half of their implants. To reduce bias, the patients in the control group were matched to the study group, i.e. they were selected so that both groups were as identical as possible. The results of the study indicate that the control group had a better initial bone support than the study group. Furthermore, the patients in the study group suffered from circumstances that could induce implant failure, such as bruxism, personal grief, depression, as well as addictions to cigarettes, alcohol and/or narcotics. On the study form the clinicians were asked to give their own opinion of the reason for implant failure. The answers given could easily be grouped into 5 different topics, and this experience can be useful to improve patient selection. This study suggests that there are certain factors of importance to consider to prevent a cluster phenomenon of implant failures i.e. lack of bone support, heavy smoking habits and bruxism. PMID:11564105

  2. Mandibular and para-mandibular tumors in children. Report of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K; Masel, J; Sprague, P; Tamaela, L; Kan, A; Middleton, R

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen cases of mandibular tumors or paramandibular soft tissue tumors with mandibular involvement are reported. These include such rare mandibular tumors or tumor-like conditions as melanotic progonoma, intraosseous haematoma secondary to von Willebrand's disease, post-irradiation osteosarcoma, monostotic eosinophilic granuloma, aneurysmal bone cyst and osseous hemangiopericytoma. Three cases of cherubism, one of fibrous dysplasia or aggressive fibromatosis and one of central giant cell reparative granuloma are also reported. The soft tissue tumors comprise round cell sarcoma, parotid adeno-carcinoma with generalised metastases, embryonal rhabdo-myo-sarcoma, neuro-fibro-sarcoma and congenital cystic hygroma. In all the cases the disease was well advanced when the patient presented for X-ray examination. The specific X-ray diagnosis of mandibular and paramandibular tumors in childhood is more difficult than that of similar tumors in other parts of the body. PMID:6275331

  3. Survival of Implants in Immediate Extraction Sockets of Anterior Teeth: Early Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims and objectives of this study were placement of implants in freshly extracted sockets of anterior teeth and to evaluate the implant stability, peri-implant radiolucency and gingival inflammation around implant over a short period of 30 months. Materials and Methods A total of 12 patients (8 male and 4 female), ranging in the age from 20 to 50 years, from March 2007 to June 2007, were evaluated for immediate implant placement into 22 fresh extraction sockets. Only maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth/roots (central incisors, lateral incisors and canines) were considered for replacement with implants. One piece implant with integrated abutment and integrated surface, non-submerged, threaded and tapered at apical 5 mm, sand-blasted and acid etched surfaced implants (HI-TEC TRX-OP Implants of Life Care Company) were used. Results The mobility was not present in any of the implants at all the follow up visits. There were 2 implants at 6 month, 1 implant at 12 month, 1 implant at 18 month visits, showing peri-implant radiolucency at some sites at bone to implant contact site. Severe gingival inflammation was not observed in any of the implant site. At every follow-up visit, every implant met the criteria of success and none was found to be failed over a 30 months duration i.e. 100% success rate was achieved by implants in immediate extraction socket. Conclusion The success rate of implant survival in this study was found 100%. These implants have fulfilled all the criteria of implant success and based on the defined criteria, the success rate of implants placed in immediate extraction sockets of anterior teeth compared favorably with the conventional implants. The early results of the present study showed that high survival rates with the implants in immediate extraction sockets can be achieved. PMID:26266220

  4. Deciduous Mandibular Second Molar with Supernumerary Roots and Root Canals Associated with Missing Mandibular Permanent Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Shabina; Gambhir, Natasha; Rehani, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Morphological variations like additional roots and root canals in human deciduous dentition are rare. Knowledge of the morphology, variation of root and root canals of deciduous teeth are useful for successful endodontic treatment and exodontia. Presented here is a case report of the supernumerary roots and additional root canals of deciduous mandibular second molar (85) with congenitally bilateral missing of mandibular permanent second premolar (35 and 45) tooth bud.

  5. Implant success rates in full-arch rehabilitations supported by upright and tilted implants: a retrospective investigation with up to five years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the cumulative success rate, the implant survival rate, and the occurrence of biological complications in implants supporting full-arch immediately loaded rehabilitations supported by upright and tilted implants. Methods The clinical records and periapical radiographs of patients who attended follow-up visits were collected, and information was recorded regarding marginal bone loss resorption, the occurrence of peri-implant infectious diseases, and the implant survival rate. Implants were classified as successful or not successful according to two distinct classifications for implant success. Results A total of 53 maxillary and mandibular restorations including 212 implants were analysed, of which 56 implants were studied over the full five-year follow-up period. After five years, the cumulative success rate was 76.04% according to the Misch classification and 56.34% according to the Albrektsson classification. The cumulative implant survival rate was 100%, although one implant was found to be affected by peri-implantitis at the second follow-up visit. Conclusions The cumulative success rate of the implants dropped over time, corresponding to the progression of marginal bone resorption. The prevalence of peri-implantitis was very low, and the implant survival rate was not found to be related to the cumulative success rate. PMID:26734491

  6. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  7. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial.

  8. Comparative implant research in dogs: a prosthodontic model.

    PubMed

    Parr, G R; Gardner, L K; Steflik, D E; Sisk, A L

    1992-09-01

    One-hundred twenty endosteal dental implants were inserted bilaterally in the mandibles of 30 adult mongrel dogs after bilateral extraction of all premolars. The 120 implants were evenly divided into one- and two-stage systems and included ceramic and titanium cylindrical root-form implants and titanium blade implants. The research design of this investigation divided the 30 animals into 10 groups of three dogs. This article describes an animal model that is useful in evaluating dental implant designs and compares the results with those from humans. In particular, this article delineates the prosthodontic approach appropriate for this model using one- and two-stage titanium implants. Rexillium alloy fixed prostheses were placed on 32 endosteal implants and 16 natural mandibular molar teeth. The implants and prosthetic components of the Sterio-Oss implant system were used. All prostheses are functional with minimal maintenance. To date, after 1-year of follow-up, none of the implants have been lost and none of the fixed prostheses have required recementation or maintenance other than normal hygiene. Histologic and survival data as well as results with other implant systems will be presented in other reports.

  9. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  10. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2–8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  11. Anodisation Increases Integration of Unloaded Titanium Implants in Sheep Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Warwick J.; Lee, Min-Ho; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Jeong; Gay, Jennifer; Loch, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Spark discharge anodic oxidation forms porous TiO2 films on titanium implant surfaces. This increases surface roughness and concentration of calcium and phosphate ions and may enhance early osseointegration. To test this, forty 3.75 mm × 13 mm titanium implants (Megagen, Korea) were placed into healed mandibular postextraction ridges of 10 sheep. There were 10 implants per group: RBM surface (control), RBM + anodised, RBM + anodised + fluoride, and titanium alloy + anodised surface. Resonant frequency analysis (RFA) was measured in implant stability quotient (ISQ) at surgery and at sacrifice after 1-month unloaded healing. Mean bone-implant contact (% BIC) was measured in undemineralised ground sections for the best three consecutive threads. One of 40 implants showed evidence of failure. RFA differed between groups at surgery but not after 1 month. RFA values increased nonsignificantly for all implants after 1 month, except for controls. There was a marked difference in BIC after 1-month healing, with higher values for alloy implants, followed by anodised + fluoride and anodised implants. Anodisation increased early osseointegration of rough-surfaced implants by 50–80%. RFA testing lacked sufficient resolution to detect this improvement. Whether this gain in early bone-implant contact is clinically significant is the subject of future experiments. PMID:26436099

  12. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  13. Intra-mandibular adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bouaichi, A; Aimad-Eddine, S; Mommers, X-A; Ella, B; Zwetyenga, N

    2014-04-01

    Intra-mandibular localization of adenoid cystic carcinoma is rare. This tumor is characterized by progressive local, regional, and distant aggressiveness. We reviewed the latest data on this rare type of cancer with a small number of reported cases, alack of consensus for its treatment, and its bad prognosis.

  14. Repair of Bovine and Equine Mandibular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Murch, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    Clinical findings, surgical repair and postsurgical care of a unilateral fracture of the mandible of a bull and of a bilateral mandibular fracture in a horse are described. Compression plating limited the pain suffered by the animals and resulted in a quick return to function of the mandibles. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 1.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7363268

  15. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    PubMed

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed.

  16. Full-arch metal-resin cement- and screw-retained provisional restoration for immediately loaded implants.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Rustum; Rajan, Gunaseelan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the clinical and laboratory procedures involved in the fabrication of laboratory-processed, provisional, screw-retained, implant-supported maxillary and mandibular fixed complete dentures incorporating a cast metal reinforcement for immediate loading of implants. Precise fit is achieved by intraoral luting of the cast frame to milled abutments. Effective splinting of all implants is attained by the metal substructure and retrievability is provided by the screw-retention of the prosthesis. PMID:20553176

  17. Effect of unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K; Pedersen, T K; Svendsen, P; Hauge, E M; Schou, S; Nørholt, S E

    2015-08-01

    Aim was to evaluate effect of unilateral distraction osteogenesis (DO) on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Forty 8-week-old rabbits were divided into four groups. In groups A,C, arthritis was induced in the right TMJ. Groups A,B underwent DO. Group D served as control group. Cephalometric analysis of mandibular angle, mandibular ramus height, mandibular collum height, and total posterior mandibular height was done on CT-scans preoperatively (T0), after distraction (T1), and at euthanasia (T2). Two-factor ANOVA evaluated the effect of DO and antigen-induced arthritis. No effect of DO or arthritis was observed on mandibular angle or mandibular collum height. For T0-T1, DO increased mandibular ramus height 12.3% (95% CI 5.2-19.4%) in group B (P=0.001) and total posterior mandibular height 6.2% (95% CI 0.3-12.1%) in group A (P=0.04) and 10.0% (95% CI 4.3-15.7%) in group B (P=0.001). For T1-T2, no significant changes occurred in arthritic rabbits (group A). In conclusion, DO increased total posterior mandibular height in rabbits with arthritis. Postoperatively, no significant effect of DO was observed in rabbits with arthritis. Mandibular DO could be a viable treatment modality in patients with TMJ-arthritis.

  18. Histologic analysis of resorbable blasting media surface implants retrieved from humans: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung-In; Kim, Young-Kyun; Moon, Sang-Woon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yun, Pil-Young

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of osseointegration of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants retrieved from humans. Three implants in the mandibular molar region that were surface-treated with RBM were retrieved from two patients. The implants were used to manufacture specimens in order to measure the bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio. The BIC ratios of the three implants were found to be an average of 69.0%±9.1%. In conclusion, that RBM surface implants are integrated into the host environment with histological significance and the BIC ratio of the RBM surface-treated implant was not significantly different from that of other surface-treated implants. PMID:26904493

  19. Histologic analysis of resorbable blasting media surface implants retrieved from humans: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of osseointegration of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants retrieved from humans. Three implants in the mandibular molar region that were surface-treated with RBM were retrieved from two patients. The implants were used to manufacture specimens in order to measure the bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio. The BIC ratios of the three implants were found to be an average of 69.0%±9.1%. In conclusion, that RBM surface implants are integrated into the host environment with histological significance and the BIC ratio of the RBM surface-treated implant was not significantly different from that of other surface-treated implants. PMID:26904493

  20. Immediate placement of bone level Sraumann implants: a case series.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Roberto; D'Amario, Maurizio; De Dominicis, Alessandro; Garocchio, Santo; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Giannoni, Mario

    2011-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the methods clinicians use to treat edentulous and partially edentulous patients. Traditional implant protocol specifies a healing period of several months after tooth extraction, as well as an unloaded healing period prior to restoration. Over the last decade, numerous studies have documented successful immediate placement of endosseous dental implants in fresh extraction sites and have found positive results with early functional loading. The purpose of this article is to present a clinical treatment protocol for the immediate placement and early loading of dental implants and to report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the SLActive surface Straumann Bone Level implant placed in either maxillary or mandibular fresh extraction sockets.

  1. Long-term behaviour of active glasses in sheep mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Gatti, A M; Zaffe, D; Gatti, A M; Zaffe, D

    1991-04-01

    Granules of a glass (A) prepared according to Hench's formula and a new vitreous material for biological applications (AKRA 15) were used for repair of bone defects in the dental field. The behaviour of these materials implanted in holes drilled in sheep's mandibular bone was examined 4, 8, 12 month after implantation. Microradiographic analyses, optical and scanning electron microscopic observations, and X-ray microprobe evaluations were carried out using undecalcified, methacrylate-embedded sections of the jaw containing the granules. After one year the granules of A disappeared, but not important bone growth was observed also in the holes containing AKRA 15. SEM and microprobe showed: disappearance of Na and Si ions at different stages; increase of P and Ca up to 4 month and then decrease, but in different ways in the two glasses; unexpected appearance of K ions after 4 month only in AKRA 15.

  2. Autotransplantation of a Buccally Erupted Matured Mandibular Third Molar to Replace a Grossly Decayed Second Molar

    PubMed Central

    Bodh, Ranjeet; Kaushik, Aishvarya; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Autotransplantation can be a treatment option for tooth loss as an alternative to fixed or implant-supported prostheses. It has predictable results comparable to implants, with reported success rates often greater than 90%. In present case, buccally erupted matured third molar was autotransplanted in extraction socket of grossly carious mandibular second molar. The tooth was splinted for 1 week followed by root canal treatment. After 12 months follow up, tooth was in perfect state of function and aesthetic with healthy periapical and periodontal architecture. High success rate was found in immature tooth transplantation in previous case reports. This case report describes that even matured tooth can also be used as donor if atraumatic extraction is possible and endodontic treatment is well performed. PMID:27042593

  3. Analysis of general facial growth, maxillary and mandibular growth and treatment changes ("Structural analysis").

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ib Leth

    2011-12-01

    General facial growth has in the past mostly been analyzed by superimposing on the nasion-sella line using the so-called "best fit" technique. Best fit approaches have also been used to analyze maxillary and mandibular growth and treatment changes. In this article we shall present a more reliable method for analyzing the changes that occur as a result of growth and treatment using the so-called "Structural technique" developed by Björk et al. This technique is based on the results of studies of facial growth using metallic implants over more than 25years. We will discuss how this technique can be applied without the benefit of implants to provide a better and more reliable understanding of the skeletal and dental changes in treated cases.

  4. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  5. Stress and strain analysis of the bone-implant interface: a comparison of fiber-reinforced composite and titanium implants utilizing 3-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Akikazu; Ballo, Ahmed M; Lassila, Lippo V J; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-03-01

    This study analyzed stress and strain mediated by 2 different implant materials, titanium (Ti) and experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), on the implant and on the bone tissue surrounding the implant. Three-dimensional finite element models constructed from a mandibular bone and an implant were subjected to a load of 50 N in vertical and horizontal directions. Postprocessing files allowed the calculation of stress and strain within the implant materials and stresses at the bone-to-implant interface (stress path). Maximum stress concentrations were located around the implant on the rim of the cortical bone in both implant materials; Ti and overall stresses decreased toward the Ti implant apex. In the FRC implant, a stress value of 0.6 to 2.0 MPa was detected not only on the screw threads but also on the implant surface between the threads. Clear differences were observed in the strain distribution between the materials. Based on the results, the vertical load stress range of the FRC implant was close to the stress level for optimal bone growth. Furthermore, the stress at the bone around the FRC implant was more evenly distributed than that with Ti implant.

  6. Maxillofacial-derived stem cells regenerate critical mandibular bone defect.

    PubMed

    Steinhardt, Yair; Aslan, Hadi; Regev, Eran; Zilberman, Yoram; Kallai, Ilan; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2008-11-01

    Stem cell-based bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex is a clinical necessity. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to follow specific differentiation pathways may enhance the ability of these cells to regenerate and increase their clinical relevance. MSCs isolated from maxillofacial bone marrow (BM) are good candidates for tissue regeneration at sites of damage to the maxillofacial complex. In this study, we hypothesized that MSCs isolated from the maxillofacial complex can be engineered to overexpress the bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene and induce bone tissue regeneration in vivo. To demonstrate that the cells isolated from the maxillofacial complex were indeed MSCs, we performed a flow cytometry analysis, which revealed a high expression of mesenchyme-related markers and an absence of non-mesenchyme-related markers. In vitro, the MSCs were able to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. Gene delivery of the osteogenic gene BMP2 via an adenoviral vector revealed high expression levels of BMP2 protein that induced osteogenic differentiation of these cells in vitro and induced bone formation in an ectopic site in vivo. In addition, implantation of genetically engineered maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs into a mandibular defect led to regeneration of tissue at the site of the defect; this was confirmed by performing micro-computed tomography analysis. Histological analysis of the mandibles revealed osteogenic differentiation of implanted cells as well as bone tissue regeneration. We conclude that maxillofacial BM-derived MSCs can be genetically engineered to induce bone tissue regeneration in the maxillofacial complex and that this finding may be clinically relevant. PMID:18636943

  7. [Treatment of implant-induced pain conditions in the maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, M; Riediger, D; Schwenzer, N; Eichhorst, U

    1990-01-01

    The implantation of dental implants may lead to severe pain syndromes (not reckoning postoperative pain and discomfort). Pain in the upper jaw is usually caused by inflammations like sinusitis, often in combination with an oroantral communication, rhinitis and osteitis, whereas pain in the lower jaw is often caused by injuries of sensitive branches of the mandibular nerve, mostly the inferior alveolar nerve. In these cases the therapy of pain should be causal, which means removal of the implant and treatment of the pathologic consequences of implantation. Especially the possibilities of micronerval surgery are emphasized within this article. PMID:2257804

  8. Indications of Free Grafts in Mandibular Reconstruction, after Removing Benign Tumors: Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Alister, Juan Pablo; Uribe, Francisca; Olate, Sergio; Arriagada, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mandibular reconstruction has been the subject of much debate and research in the fields of maxillofacial surgery and head and neck surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was undertaken with 14 patients diagnosed with benign tumorous pathologies and who underwent immediate mandibular resection and reconstruction at the Hospital del Salvador Maxillofacial Surgery Unit and Dr. Rodrigo Fariña’s private clinic between the years 2002 and 2012. We propose a treatment algorithm, which is previous teeth extractions in area that will be removed. Results: Fourteen patients underwent surgery, and a total of 40 dental implants were installed in 6 men and 8 women, the mean age of 33.5 (age range, 14–58 y). Reconstruction with iliac crest bone graft, and rehabilitation following this protocol (average of reconstruction was 8.7 cm), was successful with no complications at all in 12 patients. One patient had a minor complication, and the graft was partially reabsorbed because of communication of the graft with the oral cavity. This complication did not impede rehabilitation with dental implants. Another patient suffered the total loss of the graft due to infection because of dehiscence of oral mucosa and great communication with the mouth. Another iliac crest free graft reconstruction was undertaken 6 months later. Conclusions: The scientific evidence suggests that mandibular reconstruction using free grafts following the removal of benign tumors is a biologically sustainable alternative. The critical factor to improve the prognosis of free grafts reconstruction in benign tumors is to have good quality soft tissue and avoid communication with the oral cavity. For this, it is vital to do dental extractions before removing the tumor.

  9. Indications of Free Grafts in Mandibular Reconstruction, after Removing Benign Tumors: Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Alister, Juan Pablo; Uribe, Francisca; Olate, Sergio; Arriagada, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mandibular reconstruction has been the subject of much debate and research in the fields of maxillofacial surgery and head and neck surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was undertaken with 14 patients diagnosed with benign tumorous pathologies and who underwent immediate mandibular resection and reconstruction at the Hospital del Salvador Maxillofacial Surgery Unit and Dr. Rodrigo Fariña’s private clinic between the years 2002 and 2012. We propose a treatment algorithm, which is previous teeth extractions in area that will be removed. Results: Fourteen patients underwent surgery, and a total of 40 dental implants were installed in 6 men and 8 women, the mean age of 33.5 (age range, 14–58 y). Reconstruction with iliac crest bone graft, and rehabilitation following this protocol (average of reconstruction was 8.7 cm), was successful with no complications at all in 12 patients. One patient had a minor complication, and the graft was partially reabsorbed because of communication of the graft with the oral cavity. This complication did not impede rehabilitation with dental implants. Another patient suffered the total loss of the graft due to infection because of dehiscence of oral mucosa and great communication with the mouth. Another iliac crest free graft reconstruction was undertaken 6 months later. Conclusions: The scientific evidence suggests that mandibular reconstruction using free grafts following the removal of benign tumors is a biologically sustainable alternative. The critical factor to improve the prognosis of free grafts reconstruction in benign tumors is to have good quality soft tissue and avoid communication with the oral cavity. For this, it is vital to do dental extractions before removing the tumor. PMID:27622113

  10. Mandibular Reconstruction Using the Free Vascularized Fibula Graft: An Overview of Different Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Robin; Powers, David B.; Erdmann, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the mandible is a complex procedure because various cosmetic as well as functional challenges must be addressed, including mastication and oral competence. Many surgical techniques have been described to address these challenges, including non-vascularized bone grafts, vascularized bone grafts, and approaches related to tissue engineering. This review summarizes different modifications of the free vascularized fibula graft, which, since its introduction by Hidalgo in 1989, has become the first option for mandibular reconstruction. The fibula free flap can undergo various modifications according to the individual requirements of a particular reconstruction. Osteocutaneous flaps can be harvested for reconstruction of composite defects. 'Double-barreling' of the fibula can, for instance, enable enhanced aesthetic and functional results, as well as immediate one-stage osseointegrated dental implantation. Recently described preoperative virtual surgery planning to facilitate neomandible remodeling could guarantee good results. To conclude, the free fibula bone graft can currently be regarded as the "gold standard" for mandibular reconstruction in case of composite (inside and outside) oral cavity defects as well as a way of enabling the performance of one-stage dental implantation. PMID:26848439

  11. Mandibular adaptations following total maxillary osteotomy in adolescent monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nanda, R; Sugawara, J

    1983-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the growth and remodeling changes of the mandible following superior anterior surgical repositioning (Le Fort I) of the maxilla in adolescent Macaca fascicularis monkeys. Eight adolescent monkeys served as controls, and seven monkeys underwent surgical procedures. All monkeys received tantalum implants on both sides of certain facial bones for stereometric and conventional cephalometry. The animals were followed up to 24 months postoperatively. Analysis of cephalometric head films taken at monthly intervals shows that both the maxillas and the mandibles of the experimental monkeys grew harmoniously, although the amount and direction of growth showed significant changes compared to the controls. The mandibles of experimental monkeys that underwent autorotation immediately following the surgical procedures showed 36 to 60 percent less growth as measured from condylion to menton, condylion to gonion, and gonion to menton. Similarly, the anterior dental-alveolar-symphyseal height showed 75 percent less increase as compared to the controls. The results show that, although the surgical procedure was performed on the maxilla, the mandibular growth showed significant modulation to adapt to the surgically changed maxillary environment. The role of occlusion and function is discussed in the context of the present findings.

  12. Mandibular growth following Le Fort I osteotomy in adolescent monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nanda, R; Bouayad, O; Topazian, R G

    1987-06-01

    Le Fort I osteotomy with anterior and superior repositioning of the maxilla was performed on adolescent Macaca fascicularis monkeys to study its effect on the subsequent growth and remodeling changes of the mandible. Six adolescent Macaca fascicularis monkeys were randomly divided into two surgical groups and eight others served as controls. Group I animals underwent a Le Fort I advancement and Group II animals experienced a Le Fort I advancement and impaction. All monkeys received tantalum implants in the anterior part of the cranial base, on opposite sides of craniofacial sutures and in multiple sites of the maxilla and mandible. The immediate postsurgical occlusion of all experimental animals was a Class II molar relationship. The animals were followed for up to 12 months postoperatively. Analysis of cephalometric head films taken at monthly intervals showed that both the maxilla and the mandible of all experimental monkeys grew in a coordinated fashion, although the amount, rate, and direction of growth varied between control and experimental animals as well as between Group I and Group II animals. The largest increments and rates of growth were observed in the control animals, Group I animals, and Group II animals, respectively. This study indicates that the growth changes in both maxilla and mandible are related to the extent of injury caused by maxillary surgery. The results also showed that although the surgical procedures were performed in the maxilla, mandibular growth was significantly modulated by the surgically changed maxillary environment.

  13. 3-D Volumetric Evaluation of Human Mandibular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mathew; Reynolds, Michael; Adeeb, Samer; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Bone growth is a complex process that is controlled by a multitude of mechanisms that are not fully understood.Most of the current methods employed to measure the growth of bones focus on either studying cadaveric bones from different individuals of different ages, or successive two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. Both techniques have their known limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore a technique for quantifying the three dimensional (3D) growth of an adolescent human mandible over the period of one year utilizing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken for regular orthodontic records. Three -dimensional virtual models were created from the CBCT data using mainstream medical imaging software. A comparison between computer-generated surface meshes of successive 3-D virtual models illustrates the magnitude of relative mandible growth. The results of this work are in agreement with previously reported data from human cadaveric studies and implantable marker studies. The presented method provides a new relatively simple basis (utilizing commercially available software) to visualize and evaluate individualized 3D (mandibular) growth in vivo. PMID:22046201

  14. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

    PubMed

    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  15. Primate experiments on mandibular growth direction.

    PubMed

    Tomer, B S; Harvold, E P

    1982-08-01

    Induced oral respiration in eight growing monkeys led to a lowering of the chin, a steeper mandibular plane angle, and an increase in the gonial angle as compared with eight control animals. The posterior border of the mandible maintained its normal inclination relative to the skull. The mandible underwent a posterior rotation in the experimental animals and an anterior rotation in the controls. The findings suggest that the position of the chin and the inclination of the mandibular plane are controlled by the balance between the suprahyoid and the orofacial muscles. Since the posterior border of the ramus undergoes gradual remodeling and maintains its normal inclination, it is assumed that the masticatory muscles are not significantly affected by the altered respiratory function. It is therefore concluded that the ramus with the masticatory muscles and the chin with its suprahyoid and orofacial muscles represent two relatively independent systems.

  16. Intrusion of an overerupted molar using orthodontic miniscrew implant: A preprosthodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Indumathi; Sivakumar, Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of orthodontic miniscrew implant in the intrusion of overerupted molar as a preprosthodontic therapy. A 37-year-old woman with an overerupted maxillary right first molar encroaching on the opposing mandibular edentulous space was successfully intruded using a single miniscrew implant and partial fixed orthodontic appliance. The prosthodontic clinician may adopt this conservative and cost-effective strategy in their routine practice and avoid clinical crown reduction. PMID:25191088

  17. Mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    You, Tae Min; Kim, Kee-Deog; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2015-01-01

    Tumors metastasizing from distant regions to the oral and maxillofacial region are uncommon, comprising only 1%-2% of all malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignancy that arises from cholangiocytes, which are epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. These cancers are difficult to diagnose and have a poor prognosis. In this paper, we report a rare case of mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma diagnosed at the primary site and discuss the radiographic findings observed in this case. PMID:26730373

  18. Facial pressure sore complicated by mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Obisesan, O

    1999-10-01

    A case is reported of an 85-year-old woman with mandibular osteomyelitis secondary to a submental pressure sore. The main aetiological factors in the development of the pressure sore were dementia and severe senile kyphosis. Pressure sores are rare in the head and neck region and, though osteomyelitis is a common complication at other anatomical sites, it has not been previously reported in the mandible.

  19. Mandibular mass in a child on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa M; Mohammed, Faten F; Adham, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    We here with report a 13-year-old female patient on regular hemodialysis for the past five years who presented with a large mandibular mass. This was detected to be a brown tumor due to severe renal osteodystrophy as a complication of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The tumor did not regress even with intensive treatment with intravenous active vitamin D and needed surgical removal. PMID:26787582

  20. Complicated canal morphology of mandibular first premolar

    PubMed Central

    Pallavi, Vyapaka; Kumar, Janga Ravi; Mandava, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Subramanian Hari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to report an unusual anatomic variation of mandibular first premolar, with one root and three distinct canals, which leave pulp chamber and merge short of apex to exit as two separate apical foramina. The incidence of three canals existing as two apical foramina has only been documented in the literature by a few case reports. To achieve successful endodontic treatment, the clinician has to identify the different canal configurations and treat them properly. PMID:26538977

  1. An overlay partial denture to restore worn mandibular anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Samant, Asha; DeSciscio, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Restoring worn anterior mandibular teeth is a challenge, especially when teeth are small, esthetics are a concern, the long-term prognosis is questionable, and/or patient finances are an issue. This article describes an alternate treatment for a patient with a collapsed bite, missing posterior mandibular teeth, an ill-fitting complete maxillary denture with poor esthetics, and irregular, worn mandibular anterior teeth.

  2. Malignant mixed salivary tumor presenting as a mandibular metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mellor, T K; Scott, J

    1985-11-01

    A rare case of a central mandibular metastatic mixed salivary gland tumor is reported which presented following a 45-year history of recurrent benign mixed salivary gland tumor of the parotid gland on the same side. The mandibular tumor included a predominantly benign mixed salivary gland component as well as frankly invasive adenocarcinoma. The clinicopathologic features of the mandibular and residual parotid tumors suggested that the metastatic event may have occurred prior to the development of frank carcinoma in the parotid tumor.

  3. Mandibular nerve entrapment in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, Maria N; Demesticha, T; Piagkos, G; Androutsos, G; Skandalakis, P

    2011-05-01

    The posterior trunk of the mandibular nerve (V(3)) comprises of three main branches. Various anatomic structures may entrap and potentially compress the mandibular nerve branches. A usual position of mandibular nerve (MN) compression is the infratemporal fossa (ITF) which is one of the most difficult regions of the skull base to access surgically. The anatomical positions of compression are: the incomplete or complete ossified pterygospinous (LPs) or pterygoalar (LPa) ligament, the large lamina of the lateral plate of the pterygoid process and the medial fibres of the lower belly of the lateral pterygoid (LPt). A contraction of the LPt, due to the connection between nerve and anatomic structures (soft and hard tissues), might lead to MN compression. Any variations of the course of the MN branches can be of practical significance to surgeons and neurologists who are dealing with this region, because of possibly significant complications. The entrapment of the MN motor branches can lead to paresis or weakness in the innervated muscle. Compression of the sensory branches can provoke neuralgia or paraesthesia. Lingual nerve (LN) compression causes numbness, hypoesthesia or even anaesthesia of the mucous of the tongue, anaesthesia and loss of taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, anaesthesia of the lingual gums, as well as pain related to speech articulation disorders. Dentists should be very suspicious of possible signs of neurovascular compression in the region of the ITF.

  4. Unilateral Mydriasis After Mandibular Fracture Fixation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nesioonpour, Sholeh; Khiabani, Kazem; Hassanijirdehi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral mydriasis is a seriously significant finding in neurologic examinations indicating life-threatening conditions such as cerebral vascular injuries. Case Presentation: A 24 year old woman with mandibular trauma was referred to our center after five days for a reduction of the right mandibular angle fracture. The patient had no history of any loss of consciousness after the accident. Her physical examination showed no abnormalities, except those related to her mandibular fracture. The laboratory results were normal as well. At 8:30 am a general anesthesia was induced. The patient’s eyes were kept shut throughout the surgical procedure. The operation included an intraoral open reduction and fixation using two miniplates without any complications. After the operation, it was noticed that the left eye was completely dilated with no reaction to light, while the right eye was normal. The management and outcomes in this patient were described in the present case report. Conclusions: Evaluating the size of the patient’s pupils before, during and after the operation, careful history, consult, CT scan and MRI would help to diagnosis. Although no probable cause was found to explain the transient mydriasis in our patient. PMID:24829881

  5. New prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary mandibular canine and premolar widths from mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths: A digital model study

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of the study was to generate new prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths based on mandibular incisors and first permanent molar widths. Methods A total of 2,340 calculations (768 based on the sum of mandibular incisor and first permanent molar widths, and 1,572 based on the maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths) were performed, and a digital stereomicroscope was used to derive the the digital models and measurements. Mesiodistal widths of maxillary and mandibular teeth were measured via scanned digital models. Results There was a strong positive correlation between the estimation of maxillary (r = 0.85994, r2 = 0.7395) and mandibular (r = 0.8708, r2 = 0.7582) canine and premolar widths. The intraclass correlation coefficients were statistically significant, and the coefficients were in the strong correlation range, with an average of 0.9. Linear regression analysis was used to establish prediction equations. Prediction equations were developed to estimate maxillary arches based on Y = 15.746 + 0.602 × sum of mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths (sum of mandibular incisors [SMI] + molars), Y = 18.224 + 0.540 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 16.186 + 0.586 × (SMI + molars) for both genders, and to estimate mandibular arches the parameters used were Y = 16.391 + 0.564 × (SMI + molars), Y = 14.444 + 0.609 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 19.915 + 0.481 × (SMI + molars). Conclusions These formulas will be helpful for orthodontic diagnosis and clinical treatment planning during the mixed dentition stage. PMID:27226963

  6. Comparison of microstructures between block grafts from the mandibular ramus and calvarium for horizontal bone augmentation of the maxilla: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; Monje, Florencio; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Suarez, Fernando; Villanueva-Alcojol, Laura; Garcia-Nogales, Agustin; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this clinical study was to compare architectural metric parameters using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) between sites grafted with blocks harvested from the mandibular ramus and calvarium for horizontal bone augmentation in the maxilla. The second aim was to compare the primary stability of implants placed in both types of block grafts. Ten consecutive healthy partially edentulous patients requiring extensive horizontal bone reconstruction in the maxilla were included. A total of 14 block grafts (7 each from the mandibular ramus and calvarium) were studied. After 4 to 6 months of healing, 41 implants were placed: 24 implants (58.5%) in calvarial (group 1) and 17 (41.5%) in ramus grafts (group 2). A resonance frequency analysis (RFA) was performed to test implant stability. Furthermore, two biopsy specimens were randomly selected for histomorphometric analysis. Micro-CT analyses showed no significant difference in the morphometric parametric values analyzed between groups. Furthermore, RFA also showed no difference between groups. However, slightly higher RFA values were noted for implants placed in ramus grafts. Bone quality, as assessed by micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses, was similar in both ramus and calvarial block grafts. In addition, there was no difference in primary implant stability between groups.

  7. Congenital cheek teratoma with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis managed with ultra-thin silicone sheet interpositional arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ankur; Verma, Vinay Kumar; Purohit, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Primary cheek teratomas are rare with < 5 reported cases. None had associated temporo mandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). The fundamental aim in the treatment of TMJA is the successful surgical resection of ankylotic bone, prevention of recurrence, and aesthetic improvement by ensuring functional occlusion. Early treatment is necessary to promote proper growth and function of mandible and to facilitate the positive psychological development of child. Inter-positional arthroplasty with ultra-thin silicone sheet was performed. Advantages include short operative time, less foreign material in the joint space leading to negligible foreign body reactions and least chances of implant extrusion. Instead of excising a large bony segment, a thin silicone sheet was interposed and then sutured ensuring preservation of mandibular height. Aggressive post-operative physiotherapy with custom made dynamic jaw exerciser was used to prevent recurrence.

  8. Congenital cheek teratoma with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis managed with ultra-thin silicone sheet interpositional arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Ankur; Verma, Vinay Kumar; Purohit, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Primary cheek teratomas are rare with < 5 reported cases. None had associated temporo mandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). The fundamental aim in the treatment of TMJA is the successful surgical resection of ankylotic bone, prevention of recurrence, and aesthetic improvement by ensuring functional occlusion. Early treatment is necessary to promote proper growth and function of mandible and to facilitate the positive psychological development of child. Inter-positional arthroplasty with ultra-thin silicone sheet was performed. Advantages include short operative time, less foreign material in the joint space leading to negligible foreign body reactions and least chances of implant extrusion. Instead of excising a large bony segment, a thin silicone sheet was interposed and then sutured ensuring preservation of mandibular height. Aggressive post-operative physiotherapy with custom made dynamic jaw exerciser was used to prevent recurrence. PMID:24163567

  9. Mandibular hypo-hyperdontia: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Nirmala, S. V. S. G.; Sandeep, C.; Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Mallineni, Sreekanth Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Dental anomalies of tooth number in development of the permanent dentition are quite common than the primary dentition, however, the combined occurrence of hypodontia and hyperdontia is a rare phenomenon, especially in the same dental arch. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of concomitant hypo-hyperdontia (CHH) in three patients (one girl and two boys) with missing mandibular central incisor and an erupted mandibular mesiodens. Three rare cases of mandibular CHH were observed during routine examination, where the two anomalies manifested in the anterior region of the mandible. Furthermore, these are the only cases exhibited taurodontism in association with mandibular CHH. PMID:24778987

  10. Technetium-99m bone scintigraphy and mandibular condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M J; Wastie, M L; Bromige, M; Selwyn, P; Smith, A

    1990-06-01

    Radionuclide skeletal scintigraphy has been successfully used in the assessment of mandibular condylar hyperplasia (condylar hyperplasia) causing mandibular asymmetry to identify the presence of continued active growth in the condylar region. This study reviews 14 cases of mandibular asymmetry and concludes that symmetrical radionuclide uptake in the condylar regions on the bone scintigram excludes a continuing asymmetrical growth focus. Unilateral increased radionuclide uptake may often indicate an abnormally active condylar growth focus but false positive results may be encountered in patients with associated temporo-mandibular joint disease. PMID:2383957

  11. [Mandibular reconstruction in benign tumors of the mandible].

    PubMed

    Kadiri, F; Raji, A; Touhami, M; Chekkoury, I A; Benchakroun, Y

    1996-01-01

    The authors report ten cases of reconstruction in the mandibular interrupter substance wast after excision of the large benign tumors which dominated by ameloblastoma. The reparation is realised by free no vascularized bone graft, of ten with the iliac crest, rarely with costochondral graft. The lateral mandibular interrupter substance waste concerning the temporo-mandibular joint (type III) is frequent. The reparation often immediate, is realised by the iliac crest graft fixed to mandibular stump with miniatures plaques and intermaxillar blocking. The fonctioning and morphology results in majority is qualified to be mean with a follow-up between 14 and 24 months.

  12. Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n = 4), 12 (n = 4), 24 (n = 4) or 48 weeks (n = 3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a

  13. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  15. Rehabilitation of an edentulous mandible with an implant-supported prosthesis.

    PubMed

    LoCascio, S J; Salinas, T J

    1997-04-01

    The advances in osseointegration have resulted in an increased utilization of implants for restoration of the edentulous jaw. The success of osseointegrated implants supporting full arch prostheses has become more predictable. All implant restorations require a thorough diagnosis and a definitive treatment plan. Following a diagnostic wax-up, an optimal surgical implant template must be fabricated; it serves as a guide or prescription for placement of implants in an optimal anatomic location. The slightest misangulation of an implant may create restorative limitations. In such circumstances, alteration of the restorative design or selection of alternate materials may be required. The learning objective of this article is to review the fabrication of a combined ceramometal and resin-metal fixed/removable implant-supported mandibular hybrid prosthesis. Diagnosis, surgical template fabrication, vertical dimensions, buccal/lingual space limitations, and aesthetics are discussed.

  16. Safe placement techniques for self-drilling orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, R; Motoyoshi, M; Shinohara, A; Shigeeda, T; Shimizu, N

    2012-11-01

    Self-drilling mini-implants are being used more frequently as an orthodontic anchorage, but the placement torque of self-drilling mini-implants can easily become excessive in the thick, mandibular cortical bone. The purpose of this study is to examine a safe self-drilling placement technique that provides adequate placement torque for orthodontic mini-implants. The mini-implants were placed using self-drilling and pre-drilling methods into the ribs of pigs. Specimens were classified into two groups, thin and thick, with cortical bone thicknesses of 1.2 ± 0.02 and 2.0 ± 0.03 mm, respectively, and used to model the human maxillary and the mandibular bones. The peak mini-implant placement torque value was measured and the surrounding cortical bone was observed histologically. In the mandible model, the torque in the self-drilling and pre-drilling groups exceeded 10 N cm, except in one case which had a 1.3 mm diameter pilot hole. Histology revealed cracks in the surrounding cortical bone in the groups whose torque value was 10 N cm or more. Therefore, when using the self-drilling technique to place a 1.6mm diameter mini-implant in the mandibular alveolar bone, it is preferable to drill a 1.3mm diameter pilot hole first.

  17. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. PMID:27612745

  18. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis.

  19. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  20. Mathematical evaluation of the influence of multiple factors on implant stability quotient values in clinical practice: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hairong; Wismeijer, Daniel; Shao, Xianhong; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to mathematically evaluate the influence of multiple factors on implant stability quotient values in clinical practice. Patients and methods Resonance frequency analysis was performed at T1 (measured immediately at the time of implant placement) and at T2 (measured before dental restoration) in 177 patients (329 implants). Using a multivariate linear regression model, we analyzed the influence of the following eleven candidate factors: sex, age, maxillary/mandibular location, bone type, immediate/delayed implantation, bone grafting (presence or absence), insertion torque, I-/II-stage healing pattern, implant diameter, implant length, and T1–T2 time interval. Results The following factors were identified to significantly influence the implant stability quotient (ISQ) values at T1: insertion torque, bone grafting, I-/II-stage healing pattern, immediate/delayed implantation, maxillary/mandibular location, implant diameter, and sex. In contrast, the ISQ values at T2 were significantly influenced only by three factors: implant diameter, T1–T2 time interval, and insertion torque. Conclusion Among the eleven candidate factors, seven key factors were found to influence the T1-ISQ values, while only three key factors influenced the T2-ISQ values. Both T1 and T2-ISQ values were found to be influenced by implant diameter and insertion torque. T1 was influenced specifically by the sex of the patient, the location (maxillary or mandibular), the implantation mode (immediate/delayed implantation), the healing stage, and the absence or presence of bone graft materials. PMID:27785040

  1. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis. PMID:26733193

  2. Segmental osteotomy for mobilization of dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Benjamin; Marín, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to evaluate a surgical technique for mobilization of mal posed dental implant in anterior area. Methods A 38-year-old patient consulted our unit for esthetic dissatisfaction with the implant treatment of a central incisor. An implant was observed in 11 and 21, where 11 was 3 mm above the ideal limit, with excessive vestibular angulation. The choice was made to perform a segmental osteotomy and mobilize the bone block and the implant down and forward; a bone block extracted from the mandibular ramus was installed between the implant block and the bed to stabilize the segment. Results After 4 months, a conventional fixed prosthesis was created and the esthetic result achieved was close to what the patient wanted, with no need for further surgery. The surgical condition was stabilized and maintained for the long-time and no complications how necrosis, infection or bone defects was present. Conclusions It was concluded that the procedure is efficient, and the biological arguments in favor of the procedure are discussed. PMID:24236247

  3. Development and functionality of isoelastic dental implants of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Breme, J; Biehl, V; Schulte, W; d'Hoedt, B; Donath, K

    1993-10-01

    Two types of isoelastic endosseous dental implants were produced and their functionality was tested. One type consisted of a porous sintered TiTa30 alloy, the other had a special surface structure consisting of titanium wire loops. Their mechanical properties were optimized by the production parameter (sintering and diffusion bonding, respectively). The functionality was tested after insertion into an artificial jaw which had properties corresponding to the natural mandibular. The elastic properties of both implants were similar to the properties of the bone. In addition the implants have a safe anchorage bone ingrowth. In animal experiments using the implant with surface loops it was observed that the bone entered the loops and even extremely small surface cavities in the wire loops.

  4. Clinical evaluation of implant survival based on size and site of placement: A retrospective study of immediate implants at single rooted teeth sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Hindi, Maryam; Al-Eid, Raniah Abdullah; Nooh, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective clinical study sought to evaluate the survival of immediate implants placed at maxillary and mandibular single-rooted tooth extraction sites and to determine the relationship among implant size, placement site, and implant survival. Methods Between January 2010 and June 2011, 85 patients (33 males, 52 females; mean age: 45 years) underwent immediate implant placement after extraction of single-rooted teeth. All implants were restored between 12 and 14 weeks after implant placement. The implant survival and its relationship with implant size and implantation site were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs). Results Implants were placed at the following sites: upper central incisor (UCI, n = 35), upper lateral incisor (ULI, n = 27), upper second premolar (U2ndP, n = 36), lower incisor (LI, n = 53), and lower premolar (LP, n = 22). Implants of the following sizes were used: 5 × 10 mm (n = 24), 5 × 8 mm (n = 21), 4.3 × 10 mm (n = 77), 4.3 × 8 mm (n = 36), 3.5 × 10 mm (n = 12), and 3.5 × 8 mm (n = 3). After a mean follow-up time of 47 months, the overall implant survival rate was 96%. Survival rate was highest at the LI site (98.1%) and lowest at the ULI site (92.6%). All of the 5-mm implants survived (100%), as did most of the 4.3 × 10 mm implants (96.1%). Implants of 4.3 × 8 mm and 3.5 × 10 mm were the least successful (91.7%). Mandibular implants had a better survival rate (97.3%) than maxillary implants (94.9%). There was no significant OR of increased survival for any particular implant size or site. Conclusions Immediate implant placement in fresh extraction sockets can give predictable clinical outcomes, regardless of the implant size and site of placement. PMID:26082578

  5. Double mandibular osteotomy with segmental mandibular swing approach to parapharyngeal space.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Shouvanik; Dam, Aniruddha; Hossain, Mollah Arafat; Chatterjee, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Surgical removal of benign tumors of the Parapharyngeal space (PPS) is the treatment of choice. PPS tumors may remain undetected for long periods of time and large tumors in the PPS can extend into the Retropharyngeal Space or into the Infra-Temporal Fossa. Anatomically, the mandible represents a significant obstacle to successful PPS surgery. Except for very small tumors, it is difficult to remove larger tumors from this region without some form of mandibular retraction. The standard mandibular "swing" approach involves splitting of the lower lip and a single parasymphysis osteotomy for retraction of the mandible laterally to expose the PPS. However, the morbidity associated with midline lip split and anesthesia of the hemi-labial region caused by the severing of the mental nerve is an unwanted complication of this approach. In this article, we describe an easier double mandibular osteotomy (Segmental Mandibular Swing Approach) which avoids the morbidity associated with lip splitting or intra-oral mucosal incision but allows excellent exposure of the superior and lateral aspect of PPS for easier removal of large tumors in this region.

  6. Harmonization of free mandibular movements by orthodontic-surgical treatment of patients with mandibular retrognathism.

    PubMed

    Schwestka-Polly, R; Kubein-Meesenburg, D; Nägerl, H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the following study was to investigate whether adult patients with mandibular retrognathism combined with a dental Class II relationship without craniomandibular pain show a characteristic structure of free mandibular movements caused by the neuromuscular system compared to patients with neutral skeletal and dental relationships. The authors also analyzed whether these characteristic structures changed following orthodontic-surgical treatment. To record the spatial movement of the mandible, an ultrasound measurement system was chosen and diagnostic software was developed for computer analysis of the recorded movements based on physical and biomechanical concepts. Clinically complaint-free, adult patients with mandibular retrognathism and distal bite exhibited a structure of mandibular movement that was markedly displaced as compared to patients with neutral skeletal and dental alignment. After completion of orthodontic and surgical treatment, it is apparent that the entire neuromuscular system of movement was transformed from one characterized by massive dysco-ordination to one of harmonized, coordinated motion, as is seen in patients with nonpathologic, neutral relation.

  7. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Wael; Panigrahy, Ashok; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare syndrome that includes a constellation of mandibular hypoplasia and posterior rib defects as its basic features. Additional features can include hearing loss, tracheal cartilage abnormalities, scoliosis, elbow hypoplasia, and spina bifida. Here we report two cases of CCMS and discuss the reported long-term outcome of the disease.

  8. Cancer risk among patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular joint prostheses in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Fryzek, J P; Mellemkjaer, L; McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J; Olsen, J H

    1999-05-31

    The use of artificial joint implants has risen greatly over the past years. However, few investigations of the cancer risk associated with implants have been performed. We investigated cancer risk in patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular (TMJ) joint implants. A nationwide cohort in Denmark of patients with finger and hand joint prostheses (n = 858) or TMJ implants (n = 389) was followed from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1995, to evaluate any potential cancer risks subsequent to receiving these implants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all cancers were 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2) for the finger and hand joint cohort and 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.7) for the TMJ cohort. A significant risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in the finger and hand joint cohort (SIR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-7.8). When the finger and hand joint cohort was stratified by diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess risk was seen only in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. This is consistent with past studies, which have found an association between rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results provide evidence that the cancer risk for patients with finger and hand joint prostheses and TMJ implants is similar to that for the general population.

  9. Predictors of treatment preference for mandibular fracture

    PubMed Central

    Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Gironda, Melanie W.; Black, Edward E.; Belin, Thomas R.; Atchison, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient treatment preferences do not necessarily remain stable over time. Objective This study focuses on predictors of patient treatment choice and on the extent to which patients are willing to take risks by choosing surgical versus non-surgical treatment for mandibular fracture. Methods Surveys of African-American and Hispanic adults receiving treatment at King/Drew Medical Center for either a mandibular fracture (n = 98) or third-molar removal (n = 105) were used to investigate patterns of patient preference over the course of a 4-month study period using generalized estimating equations controlling for age, gender, income, and fracture versus third-molar patient. The study examined the effects of symptom rating and a “standard gamble” measure reflecting a patient’s willingness to accept scarring or nerve damage. This analysis is based on 169 patients who participated in four waves of data collection. Results The most salient predictor of patient treatment was the standard gamble measure at 1-month follow-up. Subjects with higher risk tolerance were more likely to select surgery versus jaw wiring. A higher likelihood of choosing surgery was associated with higher income and greater symptom severity. Fracture patients were more likely to select surgery compared with third-molar patients. Conclusions The significance of symptom severity 1-month post-surgery raises an important issue regarding the healing process. Moreover, the significance of standard gamble as a predictor of treatment choice for mandibular fracture should encourage other researchers to use this measure of willingness to accept risk when studying acute conditions such as jaw fracture. PMID:19694938

  10. Progressive condylar resorption after mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tadaharu; Izumi, Naoya; Kojima, Taku; Sakagami, Naoko; Saito, Isao; Saito, Chikara

    2012-03-01

    Progressive condylar resorption is an irreversible complication and a factor in the development of late skeletal relapse after orthognathic surgery. We have evaluated cephalometric characteristics, signs and symptoms in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and surgical factors in six patients (one man and five women) who developed it after orthognathic surgery. The findings in preoperative cephalograms indicated that the patients had clockwise rotation of the mandible and retrognathism because of a small SNB angle, a wide mandibular plane angle, and a "minus" value for inclination of the ramus. There were erosions or deformities of the condyles, or both, on three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) taken before treatment. The mean (SD) anterior movement of the mandible at operation was 12.1 (3.9)mm and the mean relapse was -6.4 (2.5)mm. The mean change in posterior facial height was 4.5 (2.1)mm at operation and the mean relapse was -5.3 (1.8)mm. Two patients had click, or pain, or both, preoperatively. The click disappeared in one patient postoperatively, but one of the patients who had been symptom-free developed crepitus postoperatively. In the classified resorption pattern, posterior-superior bone loss was seen in three cases, anterior-superior bone loss in two, and superior bone loss in one. Progressive condylar resorption after orthognathic surgery is multifactorial, and some of the risk factors are inter-related. Patients with clockwise rotation of the mandible and retrognathism in preoperative cephalograms; erosion, or deformity of the condyle, or both, on preoperative CT; and wide mandibular advancement and counterclockwise rotation of the mandibular proximal segment at operation, seemed to be at risk. The mandible should therefore be advanced only when the condyles are stable on radiographs, and careful attention should be paid to postoperative mechanical loading on the TMJ in high-risk patients. PMID:21440343

  11. Effects of mandibular advancement on growth after condylectomy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Fujita, T; Ohtani, J; Kawata, T; Kaku, M; Motokawa, M; Tsuka, N; Hayashi, H; Tanne, K

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that an injured condyle during adolescence is a causative factor for reduced mandibular growth and resulting asymmetry of the mandible. The aim of this study was to examine the nature of mandibular growth after unilateral condylectomy and to elucidate the effects of mandibular advancement. Sixty growing mice were subjected to unilateral condylectomy, and then one-half of them underwent treatment with a functional appliance. After 4 wks, a unilateral condylectomy produced reduced growth of the mandible and a subsequent lateral shift to the affected side. However, reduced growth and a lateral shift of the mandible were eliminated by a functional appliance, and prominent regeneration of the condyle was also demonstrated. It was shown that mandibular advancement provides for the regeneration of cartilaginous tissues on injured condyles and recovery of reduced mandibular growth, leading to correction of the lateral shift of the mandible. PMID:19329461

  12. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components.

  13. Surgical orthodontic correction of mandibular laterognathism

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Kapoor, Pranav; Sharma, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of a patient with mandibular laterognathism and associated facial asymmetry with combined surgical orthodontic approach. After 7 months of presurgical orthodontic treatment, intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy, and straightening genioplasty were performed as two step surgeries to reposition the deviated mandible and chin, respectively. The total active treatment period was 14 months. After surgical orthodontic treatment, significant improvement in occlusion, masticatory function, and facial appearance was discernible. Posttreatment records at 3 years showed stable results with good occlusion. PMID:27127755

  14. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article.

  15. Cephradine (Velosef) penetration of mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Middlehurst, R J; Rood, J P

    1990-04-01

    The concentration of cephradine in serum and mandibular bone was assayed in 28 patients undergoing 3rd molar surgery following a single 1 g intravenous injection. Serum and cortical bone samples taken simultaneously, contained mean cephradine concentrations of 42.11 micrograms/ml and 2.61 micrograms/g respectively. These results, when compared with those reported for other bony sites including the femoral head and knee, show a reduced bone penetration with a bone-to-serum ratio of approximately 0.06:1. PMID:2111359

  16. Biomechanical stress in bone surrounding an implant under simulated chewing.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Shoichi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yamada, Shinichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Takashima, Fumio

    2003-02-01

    The concept of reducing nonaxial loading of dental implants has been widely regarded as the standard procedure. The aim of this study was to reveal the biomechanical stress distribution in supporting bone around an implant and a natural tooth under chewing function. Three-dimensional finite element models of the mandibular first molar and the titanium implant both with the mandible in the molar region were constructed. The directions of displacement constraints were determined according to the angles of the closing pathways of chopping type and grinding type chewing patterns. The tooth model showed smooth stress distribution in the supporting bone with low stress concentration around the neck of the tooth. The implant model showed stress concentration in the supporting bone around the neck of the implant, especially in the buccal area. The grinding type model of the implant showed higher tensile stress concentration than the chopping type model at the lingual neck of the implant. The results of this study suggested the importance of considering occlusion under chewing function for understanding the biomechanics of oral implants.

  17. Interdisciplinary treatment of a nonsyndromic oligodontia patient with implant-anchored orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shingo; Iwata, Mitsuhiro; Tamamura, Nagato; Ganzorig, Khaliunaa; Hichijo, Natsuko; Tomita, Yuko; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-04-01

    We successfully treated a nonsyndromic oligodontia patient with implant-anchored orthodontics and prosthetic restorations. A woman, age 18 years 11 months, had a straight profile and a skeletal Class I jaw-base relationship but had spaced arches because of 7 congenitally missing teeth. After leveling and alignment of the dentition, a titanium miniscrew was temporarily placed at the distal alveolus of the mandibular right first premolar, and the posterior teeth were mesialized to reduce the restorative spaces. After determination of the incisor positions, 3 dental implants were respectively inserted at the sites of the maxillary canines and the mandibular left lateral incisor with guided bone regeneration procedures. Then, screw-retained temporary prostheses were delivered after subepithelial connective tissue grafting and used for molar mesialization as absolute anchorage. After 36 months of active orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved, both functionally and esthetically, with the 3 dental implants. The maxillary and mandibular molars were mesialized, but the changes of incisor position were minimal. As a result, a proper facial profile was maintained, and an attractive smile was achieved. The resultant occlusion was stable throughout a 3-year retention period. In conclusion, interdisciplinary treatment combined with orthodontics, implant surgery, and prosthodontics was useful for a nonsyndromic oligodontia patient. Especially, the new strategy-implant-anchored orthodontics-can facilitate the treatment more simply with greater predictability. PMID:24680022

  18. Long-term evaluation of single crystal sapphire implants as abutments in fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Arvidson, K

    1997-02-01

    49 patients participated in a prospective study of treatment of total or partial edentulism with fixed prosthodontics supported by Bioceram sapphire implants. 15 patients were treated for maxillary or mandibular edentulism, and 7 for a missing maxillary anterior tooth. The remaining 27 patients, with Applegate-Kennedy Class I-IV residual dentitions, were treated with fixed bridges supported by free-standing implants, or bridges supported by teeth and implants. Implant success, prosthesis stability, radiographic marginal bone level as well as parameters for peri-implant health were evaluated. The study began in 1982, and clinical treatment of the last patients was completed in 1988, i.e., a follow-up period ranging from 7 to 13 years. Of the patients treated for total mandibular edentulism, one implant fractured after 6 years in situ. The bone implant score (BIS) values for those implants were at the time for the bridge cementation 63.5 +/- 1.4 and at 1, 2, 3 and 5 year follow-ups 62.1 +/- 1.4, 61.9 +/- 1.5, 61.5 +/- 1.6, and 60.95 +/- 1.3, respectively. The success rate was 100%, 100% and 97.7% for the mandible at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Of the 7 edentulous patients treated with maxillary fixed bridges, 6 implants in 1 patient had to be removed after 1 year in service. Another 2 patients lost all their implants, 6 each, after 36 months. 6 implants in the 4th patient did not fulfil the criteria for success and were rated as failures at the four year follow-up. The success rate was thus 58.1%, 44.2% and 44.2% for the maxilla at 3, 5 and 10 year follow-ups, respectively. Of the 7 patients in whom single missing teeth were replaced, 1 implant in the premolar region was lost during the 1st year post-operatively, but no other complications or changes in BIS were observed. Of the 27 patients treated for partial edentulism (56 implants total) 1 implant, of a 4-unit free standing maxillary bridge fractured after 6 years and was later replaced. There were no

  19. Immediate Dental Implant Placements Using Osteotome Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case describes the effect of the osteotome technique on the osseointegration of a mandibular dental implant in a 42-year-old female patient with dento-alveolar bony defects and to review the literature regarding immediate implant placement using osteotome technique. The amount of bone expansion at the alveolar ridge and the marginal bone resorption from the time of implant placement to one year after the implant’s functional loading were recorded clinically. The esthetic outcome for the restored implant (the gingival margin) was achieved one years after the implant’s functional loading. The surgical and prosthetic sites for the implant showed no postoperative complications, and no infection or wound dehiscence was recorded during the follow-up period. The osteotome technique is good for the purpose for which it was introduced, and its advantages with immediate implant placement include reduced surgical trauma and a shorter treatment time. PMID:27583046

  20. Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Mandibular Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Chun-Ming; Du, Je-Kang

    2015-09-01

    Previously, arsenic was a popular devitalizing agent used to necrotize inflamed dental pulp to lower the pulp sensitivity owing to the unavailability of appropriate anesthesia. However, leakage from the apical foramen, lateral or accessory canals, or cracks in the tooth is common. This can be dangerous because of the reportedly high toxic effects of arsenic in both hard and soft tissues, leading to gingival and osseous necrosis and, consequently, osteomyelitis. Therefore, arsenic can prove fatal for both bones and teeth and is no longer used. We encountered a case involving a 50-year-old man who had developed mandibular osteomyelitis with lower lip paresthesia caused by arsenic trioxide used during endodontic treatment. The patient was treated with appropriate antibiotics, adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and adequate surgical debridement. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can induce neovascularization in necrosed tissues and improve bone and soft tissue healing. At a 4-year follow-up visit, bone healing was observed, with restoration of periodontal health, although the paresthesia had persisted. We describe this case, present a review of the relevant published data, and discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up protocol of mandibular osteomyelitis caused by arsenic trioxide. PMID:25896568

  1. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  2. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  3. Effects of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Dose and Ceramic Composition on New Bone Formation and Space Maintenance in a Canine Mandibular Ridge Saddle Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Talley, Anne D; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Shimko, Daniel A; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Cochran, David L; Guelcher, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of mandibular osseous defects is a significant clinical challenge. Maintenance of the height and width of the mandibular ridge is essential for placement of dental implants and restoration of normal dentition. While guided bone regeneration using protective membranes is an effective strategy for maintaining the anatomic contour of the ridge and promoting new bone formation, complications have been reported, including wound failure, seroma, and graft exposure leading to infection. In this study, we investigated injectable low-viscosity (LV) polyurethane/ceramic composites augmented with 100 μg/mL (low) or 400 μg/mL (high) recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) as space-maintaining bone grafts in a canine mandibular ridge saddle defect model. LV grafts were injected as a reactive paste that set in 5-10 min to form a solid porous composite with bulk modulus exceeding 1 MPa. We hypothesized that compression-resistant LV grafts would enhance new bone formation and maintain the anatomic contour of the mandibular ridge without the use of protective membranes. At the rhBMP-2 dose recommended for the absorbable collagen sponge carrier in dogs (400 μg/mL), LV grafts maintained the width and height of the host mandibular ridge and supported new bone formation, while at suboptimal (100 μg/mL) doses, the anatomic contour of the ridge was not maintained. These findings indicate that compression-resistant bone grafts with bulk moduli exceeding 1 MPa and rhBMP-2 doses comparable to that recommended for the collagen sponge carrier support new bone formation and maintain ridge height and width in mandibular ridge defects without protective membranes. PMID:26800574

  4. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective. PMID:10093565

  5. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa--oral rehabilitation using stereolithography and immediate endosseous implants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcio A; Ortega, Karem L; Martins, Fabiana M; Maluf, Paulo S Z; Magalhães, Marina G

    2010-01-01

    Dental management of patients with epi-dermolysis bullosa (EB) is challenging because of the severe soft tissue lesions associated with this disease. A case history is presented where two immediate endosseous implants were placed in the mandible of a patient with recessive dystrophic EB using computer-aided technology to plan the surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation. After a 24-month follow-up, the prosthesis was stable with healthy asymptomatic soft tissue around the implants. The stereolithographic model provides a precise and noninvasive copy of the mandibular and maxillary arches of patients with EB for rehabilitation of the dentition with immediate endosseous implants and a prosthesis.

  6. Implant placement and restoration following bone marrow transplantation for chronic leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J W

    1996-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is used with increasing frequency to treat various hematologic diseases, particularly the leukemias. A case involving dental implant therapy in a woman who had undergone successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is presented to illustrate specific considerations in treatment planning, surgical management, and overall prosthetic rehabilitation. Five mandibular endosseous implants were placed in November 1991 and subsequently restored with a fixed detachable prosthesis. The patient experienced no complications related to the implants or prosthesis during the 3 years after restoration.

  7. Panoramic radiographs underestimate extensions of the anterior loop and mandibular incisive canal

    PubMed Central

    Nejaim, Yuri; de Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; de Oliveira Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to detect the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal in panoramic radiographs (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, as well as to determine the anterior/mesial extension of these structures in panoramic and cross-sectional reconstructions using PAN and CBCT images. Materials and Methods Images (both PAN and CBCT) from 90 patients were evaluated by 2 independent observers. Detection of the anterior loop and the incisive canal were compared between PAN and CBCT. The anterior/mesial extension of these structures was compared between PAN and both cross-sectional and panoramic CBCT reconstructions. Results In CBCT, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were observed in 7.7% and 24.4% of the hemimandibles, respectively. In PAN, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were detected in 15% and 5.5% of cases, respectively. PAN presented more difficulties in the visualization of structures. The anterior/mesial extensions ranged from 0.0 mm to 19.0 mm on CBCT. PAN underestimated the measurements by approximately 2.0 mm. Conclusion CBCT appears to be a more reliable imaging modality than PAN for preoperative workups of the anterior mandible. Individual variations in the anterior/mesial extensions of the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal mean that is not prudent to rely on a general safe zone for implant placement or bone surgery in the interforaminal region. PMID:27672611

  8. Panoramic radiographs underestimate extensions of the anterior loop and mandibular incisive canal

    PubMed Central

    Nejaim, Yuri; de Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; de Oliveira Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to detect the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal in panoramic radiographs (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, as well as to determine the anterior/mesial extension of these structures in panoramic and cross-sectional reconstructions using PAN and CBCT images. Materials and Methods Images (both PAN and CBCT) from 90 patients were evaluated by 2 independent observers. Detection of the anterior loop and the incisive canal were compared between PAN and CBCT. The anterior/mesial extension of these structures was compared between PAN and both cross-sectional and panoramic CBCT reconstructions. Results In CBCT, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were observed in 7.7% and 24.4% of the hemimandibles, respectively. In PAN, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were detected in 15% and 5.5% of cases, respectively. PAN presented more difficulties in the visualization of structures. The anterior/mesial extensions ranged from 0.0 mm to 19.0 mm on CBCT. PAN underestimated the measurements by approximately 2.0 mm. Conclusion CBCT appears to be a more reliable imaging modality than PAN for preoperative workups of the anterior mandible. Individual variations in the anterior/mesial extensions of the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal mean that is not prudent to rely on a general safe zone for implant placement or bone surgery in the interforaminal region.

  9. Backward distraction osteogenesis in a patient with severe mandibular micrognathia.

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Morishita, Tadashi; Saiga, Atsuomi; Akita, Shinsuke; Kubota, Yoshitaka; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2013-09-01

    Maxillary skeletal prognathism can involve severe mandibular micrognathia with marked mandibular retrognathism or hypoplasia. For patients with such a condition, a conventional treatment is mandibular advancement by sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO). This procedure has problems such as insufficient advancement, instability of jaw position, and postoperative relapse. Thus, in recent years, mandibular distraction osteogenesis has been used in some patients. Mandibular distraction has many advantages, but an ideal occlusion is difficult to achieve using this procedure. That is, 3-dimensional control cannot be attained using an internal device that is unidirectional. This report describes a case of severe mandibular micrognathia in a 14-year-old girl treated using backward distraction osteogenesis. This procedure was first reported by Ishii et al (Jpn J Jaw Deform 2004; 14:49) and involves a combination of SSRO and ramus distraction osteogenesis. In the present study, intermaxillary fixation in centric occlusion was performed after osteotomy, and proximal bone segments were distracted in a posterosuperior direction. This procedure is a superior surgical technique that avoids the drawbacks of SSRO and conventional mandibular distraction. However, it applies a large load to the temporomandibular joints and requires thorough management. Thus, careful evaluation needs to be made of the indication for backward distraction osteogenesis.

  10. Mandibular canine dimensions as an aid in gender estimation

    PubMed Central

    Rajarathnam, Basetty Neelakantam; David, Maria Priscilla; Indira, Annamalai Ponnuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: All humans have an identity in life; compassionate societies require this identity to be recognized even after death. Objectives: To measure the dimensions of the mandibular canine and assess the usefulness of the mandibular canine as an aid in gender estimation. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised 200 subjects inclusive of 100 males and 100 females with an age range of 18–25 years. Measurements made in mm at the contact point were of mesiodistal width of the right and left canines and intercanine distance both intraorally and on casts, and the mandibular canine index (MCI) was calculated. The obtained data were subjected to t-test/Mann-Whitney test and discriminant function analysis. Results: All parameters of mandibular canines, namely, intercanine distance, canine width, and canine index were greater in males compared to females suggesting significant sexual dimorphism of mandibular canines. On subjecting the data to discriminant function analysis, it classified sex correctly in 73% of the samples. Conclusion: The result of our study establishes the existence of significant sexual dimorphism in mandibular canines. We can therefore, recommend the use of mandibular canine dimensions as an applicable and additional method for gender determination in human identification. PMID:27555724

  11. Endosseous implant placement in conjunction with inferior alveolar nerve transposition: a report of an unusual complication and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Luna, Anibal H B; Passeri, Luis A; de Moraes, Márcio; Moreira, Roger W F

    2008-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve transposition and placement of endosseous implants is one of the treatment options for patients with an edentulous posterior mandible with inadequate bone height superior to the inferior alveolar canal. The possible complications associated with this technique include prolonged neurosensory disturbances, infection, and pathologic fracture. This report presents the surgical management of a patient who sustained a mandibular fracture after inferior alveolar nerve transposition for the placement of 3 endosseous implants. PMID:18416424

  12. Maintenance of implant hybrid prostheses: clinical and laboratory procedures.

    PubMed

    Drago, Carl; Gurney, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Fixed implant hybrid prostheses have been used for the last 40+ years in the treatment of edentulous patients. These prostheses have provided long-term masticatory function for thousands of patients. The original treatment protocol included fabrication of cast metal frameworks that fit accurately on the restorative platforms or abutments and/or endosseous implants. Frameworks were designed to splint implants together; they also provided retention and support for the functional and esthetic portions of the fixed hybrid prostheses. Initially, edentulous patients were treated with maxillary complete dentures and mandibular fixed, hybrid prostheses. Denture teeth were used in both prostheses. Over the span of many years, occlusal surfaces of the denture teeth in the mandibular prostheses exhibited signs of occlusal abrasion and wear, sometimes completely abrading the teeth and denture bases, resulting in framework exposures. Ultimately, this resulted in decreased chewing efficiency and loss of vertical facial height. Patients would then return to clinicians and ask for retreatment. In certain instances, the underlying frameworks would have to be remade. This involved replicating the original series of appointments and significant additional expense to patients and clinicians alike. The protocol presented in this article avoids having to remake the most expensive portion of fixed implant prostheses--the frameworks. The protocol identifies the clinical and laboratory procedures involved in using existing frameworks and replacing preexisting denture bases and denture teeth, with minimal inconvenience to patients.

  13. GMP-level adipose stem cells combined with computer-aided manufacturing to reconstruct mandibular ameloblastoma resection defects: Experience with three cases

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jan; Sándor, George K.; Miettinen, Aimo; Tuovinen, Veikko J.; Mannerström, Bettina; Patrikoski, Mimmi; Miettinen, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current management of large mandibular resection defects involves harvesting of autogenous bone grafts and repeated bending of generic reconstruction plates. However, the major disadvantage of harvesting large autogenous bone grafts is donor site morbidity and the major drawback of repeated reconstruction plate bending is plate fracture and difficulty in reproducing complex facial contours. The aim of this study was to describe reconstruction of three mandibular ameloblastoma resection defects using tissue engineered constructs of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) level autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) with progressively increasing usage of computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Materials and Methods: Patients’ three-dimensional (3D) images were used in three consecutive patients to plan and reverse-engineer patient-specific saw guides and reconstruction plates using computer-aided additive manufacturing. Adipose tissue was harvested from the anterior abdominal walls of three patients before resection. ASCs were expanded ex vivo over 3 weeks and seeded onto a β-TCP scaffold with rhBMP-2. Constructs were implanted into patient resection defects together with rapid prototyped reconstruction plates. Results: All three cases used one step in situ bone formation without the need for an ectopic bone formation step or vascularized flaps. In two of the three patients, dental implants were placed 10 and 14 months following reconstruction, allowing harvesting of bone cores from the regenerated mandibular defects. Histological examination and in vitro analysis of cell viability and cell surface markers were performed and prosthodontic rehabilitation was completed. Discussion: Constructs with ASCs, β-TCP scaffolds, and rhBMP-2 can be used to reconstruct a variety of large mandibular defects, together with rapid prototyped reconstruction

  14. Intentional replantation of a mandibular canine with multiple iatrogenic endodontic complications.

    PubMed

    Sübay, R K; Sübay, M O; Balkaya, C M

    2014-09-01

    Teeth being exposed to multiple iatrogenic complications during root canal treatment are usually extracted and replaced with a dental implant. This case report presents the treatment of a mandibular canine that had multiple endodontic complications using an intentional replantation technique. The case was showing swelling and pain, unusual canal anatomy, periapical lesion, broken instruments, and root perforation in association with overfilling. After extraction of the root, the resected root end and perforation were sealed using mineral trioxide aggregate. The root was replanted extrusively, fixed and restored with a crown. Appearances of slowly progressing replacement resorption were detected radio graphically at 6-, 12- and 24-month recalls. The tooth was functioning successfully without showing clinical symptoms at 6-, 12-and 24-month recalls.

  15. [Congenital malformations of the temporo-mandibular joint and the mandibular ramus: Grafting vs distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Gallucci, A; Graillon, N; Foletti, J M; Chossegros, C; Cheynet, F

    2016-09-01

    Congenital deformities of the mandibular ramus and of the temporo-mandibular joint are treated by surgery since the early 20th century. However, morphological and functional results are often disappointing, accounting for iterative operations. Today, a clear consensus concerning the type of intervention to be proposed, and at what age it should be carried out does not yet exist. For mild cases, "conventional" orthognathic or osteogenic distraction procedures seem to work well, especially if they are carried out at the end of growth. In severe cases, it is often necessary to proceed in several surgical steps, usually starting with a chondrocostal graft, especially when interceptive surgery, performed before the end of growth, is preferred in order to improve the patient's quality of life.

  16. Modified trans-oral approach for mandibular condylectomy.

    PubMed

    Deng, M; Long, X; Cheng, A H A; Cheng, Y; Cai, H

    2009-04-01

    Different approaches to the mandibular condyle have been described. In this paper, a modified trans-oral technique to access the mandibular condyle is described and illustrated. This technique was used in a small group of patients; the clinical outcomes are promising. The technique can be used in various temporomandibular joint (TMJ) operations, such as condylar resection, high condylectomy or tumor removal. It provides adequate intra-oral surgical access to the mandibular condyle and avoids complications from extra-oral approaches to the TMJ. PMID:19282151

  17. Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    PubMed Central

    Munavalli, Anil; Kambale, Sharnappa; Ramesh, Sachhi; Ajgaonkar, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal. PMID:26180424

  18. Clinical trial of pantomography for the evaluation of mandibular trauma.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Doris, P E

    1980-08-01

    A trial study was conducted comparing the standard "four view" mandibular series and pantomography for th evaluation of mandibular trauma. During the six-month trial period a series of 17 patients with a total of 24 mandibular fractures was compiled. The pantomographs were more easily interpreted than the standard views because overlapping structures were blurred and spatial orientation was clear. In eight of the 17 patients the fractures were more clearly visualized by pantomography. Because the entire mandibule was seen so well on the pantomographs, no special views were required. Eleven patients had single fractures, which are in fact quite common.

  19. Radiographic Evaluation of Crestal Bone Loss Around Dental Implants in Maxilla and Mandible: One Year Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ajanović, Muhamed; Hamzić, Adis; Redžepagić, Sead; Kamber-Ćesir, Alma; Tosum, Selma

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to analyze the amount of maxillary and mandibular crestal bone loss around Bredent Sky Blue type of implants of different dimensions one year after implantation. Materials and Methods 36 implants of diameter 3.5 x 10 mm were inserted in the maxilla and 12 in the mandible. 52 implants of diameter 4.0 x 8 mm were inserted in the maxilla, and 61 in the mandible (two-stage implant surgery). Results No statistically significant differences were found between the right and left side of the maxilla and between the right and left side of the mandible at the implant sites regarding distal and mesial bone losses as shown by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Conclusion Statistically significant differences were found between anterior maxilla, posterior maxilla and anterior mandible and posterior mandible at implant sites regarding distal and mesial bone losses as shown by analysis of variance (ANOVA). PMID:27688395

  20. Radiographic Evaluation of Crestal Bone Loss Around Dental Implants in Maxilla and Mandible: One Year Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ajanović, Muhamed; Hamzić, Adis; Redžepagić, Sead; Kamber-Ćesir, Alma; Tosum, Selma

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to analyze the amount of maxillary and mandibular crestal bone loss around Bredent Sky Blue type of implants of different dimensions one year after implantation. Materials and Methods 36 implants of diameter 3.5 x 10 mm were inserted in the maxilla and 12 in the mandible. 52 implants of diameter 4.0 x 8 mm were inserted in the maxilla, and 61 in the mandible (two-stage implant surgery). Results No statistically significant differences were found between the right and left side of the maxilla and between the right and left side of the mandible at the implant sites regarding distal and mesial bone losses as shown by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Conclusion Statistically significant differences were found between anterior maxilla, posterior maxilla and anterior mandible and posterior mandible at implant sites regarding distal and mesial bone losses as shown by analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  1. Case presentation of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia with concomitant cemento-ossifying fibroma discovered during implant explantation.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert C; Dixon, Douglas R; Goksel, Tamer; Castle, James T; Henry, Walter A

    2013-03-01

    A 39-year-old African American woman presented for treatment of a symptomatic mandibular right first molar with a large, periapical radiolucency. After initial attempts at endodontic therapy, this tooth was ultimately extracted owing to unabated symptoms. The extraction site underwent ridge preservation grafting, implant placement, and restoration. After 26 months of implant function, the patient returned with clinical symptoms of pain, buccal swelling, and the sensation of a "loose" implant. This case report details a diagnosis of 2 distinct disease entities associated with the implant site, a cemento-ossifying fibroma and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia of the mandible. This diagnosis was determined from clinical, surgical, radiographic, and histopathologic evidence after biopsy and removal of the previously osseointegrated implant following postinsertion failure by fibrous encapsulation. Before implant therapy, it is essential to conduct a thorough radiographic evaluation of any dental arch with suspected bony lesions to prevent implant failure.

  2. Impact of impacted mandibular third molars in mandibular angle and condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, A; Yoganandha, R; Vaidhyanathan, A

    2010-02-01

    Previous retrospective analyses prove that impacted mandibular third molars (M3s) increase the risk of angle fractures and decrease the risk of concomitant fractures to the condyle. The authors have attempted to verify these relationships and identify the underlying mechanism of injury. A retrospective cohort was designed for patients attending the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from January 2001 till October 2008. The primary predictor variable was M3. The secondary predictor variables were: M3 position, classified using the Pell and Gregory system; angulation, classified using Shiller's method; and the number of visible dental roots. The outcome variables were angle and condyle fractures. Hospital charts and radiographs were used to determine and classify these variables. The study sample comprised 1102 mandibular fractures in 600 patients. For patients injured by moderate traumatic force resulting in two fractures of the mandible, the presence/absence of impacted M3s played an important role in angle/condylar fractures. Patients with impacted M3s were three times more likely to develop angle fractures and less likely to develop condylar fractures than those without impacted M3s. This study provides clinical evidence to suggest that the removal of unerupted mandibular third molars predisposes the mandible to condyle fractures.

  3. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  4. [Oromandibular reconstruction with free peroneal flap and osseointegrated implants].

    PubMed

    Navarro Cuéllar, C; Cuesta Gil, M; Plasencia Delgado, J; Guerra Martínez, B; Acero Sanz, J; López de Atalaya, F J; Ochandiano Caicoya, S; Navarro Vila, C

    2003-01-01

    Free fibula flaps have proved to be one of the most versatile for oromandibular reconstruction due to the available length of bone and the possibility of incorporating a long skin paddle to cover intraoral soft tissues. The use of a osseointegrated dental implants is an important technique for the oral rehabilitation of these patients. Osseointegrated implants provide the most rigid prosthetic stabilization available to withstand masticatory forces. These implants can be placed immediately or in second time procedure. In our case, implantation in the fibula free flap is done after 6-9 months because of the large amount of osteosynthesis material required for the fixation of the flap. Four or six months later, when osseointegration has taken place, the implants are loaded with a dental rehabilitation. We analize 10 cases of mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flap and their aesthetic and functional rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants with a 2 year follow up. Forty-six dental implants were placed developing all of them but one a correct osseointegration. All these patients recovered masticatory function and underwent a considerable improvement in labial competence, salivary continence, speech articulation and facial harmony.

  5. Deletion of the Pitx1 genomic locus affects mandibular tooth morphogenesis and expression of the Barx1 and Tbx1 genes.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Drouin, Jacques

    2008-01-15

    Pitx1 is a bicoid-related homeodomain factor that exhibits preferential expression in the developing hindlimb, mandible, pituitary gland and teeth. Pitx1 gene-deleted mice exhibit striking abnormalities in morphogenesis and growth of both hindlimb and mandible, suggesting a proliferative defect in these two structures. Here, we studied the expression and regulation of Pitx1 in both mandible and developing teeth and analyzed tooth morphology, cell proliferation, apoptosis and expression of Pitx2, Barx1 and Tbx1 in dental tissues of Pitx1-/- mouse embryos. Pitx1 expression is restricted to the epithelium of the growing tooth anlagen. Tissue recombination and bead implantation experiments demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-4 down-regulates Pitx1 expression in both mandibular mesenchyme and dental epithelium. Deletion of the Pitx1 locus results in micrognathia and abnormal morphology of the mandibular molars. Although Pitx2 expression in teeth of Pitx1-/- embryos is not altered, expression of Barx1 decreased in the mesenchyme of the mandibular molars. Furthermore, Pitx1 deletion results in suppression of Tbx1 expression in dental epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that independent genetic pathways in mandibular and maxillary processes determine tooth development and morphology.

  6. Dynamic relationships of the mandibular anterior segment.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Hnat, W P

    1997-05-01

    The hyperbolic cosine function is shown to be an accurate representation of the form of the mandibular anterior teeth from the canine/first premolar contact on one side around the perimeter to the opposite side (r = 0.951). On the basis of this mathematical function, the changes in canine width, anterior segment depth, arch perimeter, and their related incisor angular alterations are forecastable. This knowledge will allow the clinician to predict the effects on various aspects of the anterior segment arch form as one or more of these variables are altered without resorting to trial and error or performing a wax-up. For example, the clinician can predict the change in the anterior segment arch depth and incisor angulation that would occur with alterations in canine width.

  7. Paediatric mandibular fractures: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Ghalib Walid; Mokhtar, Sarimah Mohd

    2008-12-01

    The conservative approach in the treatment of maxillofacial trauma in children has been widely adopted. The type of fracture and its presence within the growing facial skeleton along with the presence of tooth buds may result in different management strategies to that employed in adults. An understanding of conservative treatment options is essential to make informed choices which will best manage these injuries, and an example is presented in this paper. This case report describes a 14-year-old boy who sustained trauma to the chin as a result of a fall, causing a mandibular symphyseal fracture. He was successfully treated by the means of applying direct interdental wiring combined with an acrylic splint.

  8. Reconstruction of mandibular defects in irradiated patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klotch, D.W.; Gump, J.; Kuhn, L. )

    1990-10-01

    In this prospective study, mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates was evaluated in 31 patients treated between July 1988 and January 1990. Sixteen patients had prior surgery; 13 had prior radiotherapy. In 11 patients, prior radiation and surgery had failed. Sixteen patients received postoperative radiotherapy either in standard or accelerated fractions. Twelve patients had complications of either intraoral (8), extraoral (5), or combined (1) plate exposure or fistula formation (2). Factors significantly related to complications were poor nutrition, accelerated radiation, and recurrence. Sixty-one percent of all patients healed uneventfully. When patients with complications secondary to recurrence who subsequently died were excluded, the success rate was 73%. Only one patient had an unacceptable result that produced a cosmetic and functional deformity despite secondary repair.

  9. Material Properties of the Mandibular Trabecular Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Éva; Magyar, Lóránt; Bojtár, Imre

    2014-01-01

    The present paper introduces a numerical simulation aided, experimental method for the measurement of Young's modulus of the trabecular substance in the human mandible. Compression tests were performed on fresh cadaveric samples containing trabecular bone covered with cortical layer, thus avoiding the destruction caused by the sterilization, preservation, and storage and the underestimation of the stiffness resulting from the individual failure of the trabeculae cut on the surfaces. The elastic modulus of the spongiosa was determined by the numerical simulation of each compression test using a specimen specific finite element model of each sample. The received mandibular trabecular bone Young's modulus values ranged from 6.9 to 199.5 MPa. PMID:27006933

  10. Mandibular coronoid hyperplasia in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Jaskolka, Michael S; Eppley, Barry L; van Aalst, John A

    2007-07-01

    Bilateral coronoid hyperplasia is a relatively rare condition in the pediatric population and yet may be an unrecognized cause of limited mouth opening in children. There are multiple theories as to the causes of the hyperplasia, which include temporalis hyperactivity, hormonal stimulus, and genetic inheritance. The resulting excess growth of the coronoids results in impingement on the zygomatic processes leading to mandibular hypomobility. The diagnosis is confirmed with plain films and computed tomography scans. Treatment involves bilateral coronoidectomies to relieve impingement on the zygoma. Postoperative physical therapy is crucial for success; the therapy focuses on maintaining the mouth opening achieved at the time of surgery. Outcome reports have been variable despite good physical therapy, suggesting that the exact pathology of the condition is not well understood.

  11. Comparison of Marginal Bone Changes with Internal Conus and External Hexagon Design Implant Systems: A Prospective, Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lyndon F; Tarnow, Dennis; Froum, Stuart; Moriarty, John; De Kok, Ingeborg J

    2016-01-01

    A central dental implant success criterion is the marginal bone response as measured longitudinally. Factors that influence marginal bone changes include osseous and soft tissue architecture, occlusal loading factors, implant position, implant design, and inflammatory processes. The evolution of implant design is multifactorial and includes the implant-abutment interface geometries. The primary objective of this study was to compare the proximal marginal bone changes following placement and loading of internal conus design implants (ICI) and external hex design implants (EXI) used in the treatment of posterior partial edentulism. Among 45 enrolled participants, 39 were treated with 47 ICI or 46 EXI implants using a one-stage implant protocol. Prosthetic restoration was completed after 12 weeks using stock titanium abutments and all-ceramic crowns. Follow-up visits including clinical and radiographic examinations were performed 6 months after permanent restoration and then annually for 3 years. Marginal bone level changes, papilla index scores, condition of the peri-implant mucosa, presence of complications, and participant satisfaction were evaluated. The mean marginal bone level change from implant placement to 3 years was -0.25 ± 0.60 mm and -0.5 ± 0.93 mm for ICI and EXI implants, respectively. The change recorded from permanent restoration to 3 years was a gain of 0.31 ± 0.41 mm versus 0.04 ± 0.51 mm for ICI and EXI implants, respectively (P < .05). In the evaluation of interproximal soft tissue 3 years after permanent restoration, 80% of mandibular and 66% of maxillary interproximal ICI sites received papilla scores of 2 and 3, compared with 50% of mandibular and 60% of maxillary interproximal EXI sites. No significant differences in plaque or bleeding scores were recorded. Abutment/healing abutment complications were recorded for 11 EXI versus 1 ICI participant. The vast majority (> 90%) of participants stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with

  12. Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mofid, Mehrdad M; Inoue, Nozomu; Tufaro, Anthony P; Vander Kolk, Craig A; Manson, Paul N

    2003-09-01

    Successful performance of distraction osteogenesis requires rigorous patient compliance with a daily activation regimen of a percutaneous screw. Previous clinical studies have found that failure of patient compliance with this regimen is the most common complication leading to technical failure of the distraction process. The authors have developed an internalized spring-mediated device for mandibular distraction osteogenesis that can potentially abrogate the risks associated with patient compliance by allowing for automated distraction across an osteotomy. Twenty adult New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral mandibular osteotomy. A segment of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy reinforced at both ends with a pinball was fashioned into an inferiorly based arc and secured to the mandible with stainless steel wire. On postoperative day 12, spring activation commenced by cutting a wire binding the two pinballs to one another. Animals were observed for 6 weeks before they were killed. Radiographic studies and decalcified histologic analysis were performed on extracted mandibles. Temperature- and displacement-dependent properties of the shape memory alloy were also examined. Five animals were excluded from the study due to infection, nonunion, or device failure. A mean distraction of 1.2 mm in the distracted hemimandible relative to the nonoperated hemimandible was found (P <.001, two-tailed paired t test). The maximum distraction achieved in an experimental specimen using the spring distractor was 3.7 mm. There were no other histologic or radiographic differences found between study specimens and specimens subjected to traditional distraction methods. Biomechanical testing of the shape memory alloy revealed a temperature-dependent increase in force at body temperature compared with room temperature and a reduction in force with increased displacement of the spring. This study demonstrates the feasibility of spring-mediated distraction osteogenesis across an

  13. Volumetric stability of autogenous bone graft with mandibular body bone: cone-beam computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate the volumetric change of augmented autobone harvested from mandibular body cortical bone, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and three-dimensional reconstruction. In addition, the clinical success of dental implants placed 4 to 6 months after bone grafting was also evaluated. Materials and Methods Ninety-five patients (48 men and 47 women) aged 19 to 72 years were included in this study. A total of 128 graft sites were evaluated. The graft sites were divided into three parts: anterior and both posterior regions of one jaw. All patients included in the study were scheduled for an onlay graft and implantation using a two-stage procedure. The dental implants were inserted 4 to 6 months after the bone graft. Volumetric stability was evaluated by serial CBCT images. Results No major complications were observed for the donor sites. A total of 128 block bones were used to augment severely resorbed alveolar bone. Only 1 of the 128 bone grafts was resorbed by more than half, and that was due to infection. In total, the average amount of residual grafted bone after resorption at the recipient sites was 74.6%±8.4%. Conclusion Volumetric stability of mandibular body autogenous block grafts is predictable. The procedure is satisfactory for patients who want dental implants regardless of atrophic alveolar bone. PMID:26568924

  14. Reliability of Panoramic Radiographs in the Localization of Mandibular Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Karthikeya; Guledgud, Mahima V

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the reliability and accuracy of panoramic radiographs in the localization of mandibular foramen. Materials and Methods Twenty five Indian dry human adult mandibles constituted the study material. Ten measurements were carried on each of them to evaluate the location of mandibular foramen with respect to adjacent anatomic landmarks. Panoramic radiographs were then made of the mandibles. Same distances were measured on the traced images of the radiographs. Paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation test were applied to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of panoramic radiographs in localization of mandibular foramen. Results The mean distances measured on dry mandibles and panoramic radiographs showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05). There was strong positive correlation between the measurements on dry mandible and panoramic radiographs. Conclusion The panoramic radiographs can serve as a guide in locating the anterosuperior point of mandibular foramen on panoramic radiographs. PMID:26155559

  15. Unilateral sagittal split mandibular ramus osteotomy: indications and geometry.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Jacques; Reyneke, Johan P; Damstra, Janalt

    2016-02-01

    Small mandibular asymmetries may be corrected by unilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (USSO). This study had two objectives: first to define the geometric changes in the mandibular condyle and the lower incisor teeth that result from the rotation of the major segment (n=26), and secondly to examine in a clinical study the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of 23 patients after correction of mandibular asymmetry by USSO to find out if there were any long-term adverse effects. Small mandibular asymmetries (<5mm) can be corrected by USSO. Secondary anteroposterior changes as a result of setback or advancement on the operated side should be taken into account during the planning of treatment. The small rotational changes of the condyle did not adversely affect the TMJ. PMID:26774360

  16. Mandibular destructive radiolucent lesion: The first sign of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fregnani, Eduardo-Rodrigues; Leite, Amanda-Almeida; Parahyba, Claudia-Joffily; Nesrallah, Ana-Cristina-Alo; Ramos-Perez, Flávia-Maria-de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a mandibular lesion as the first sign of multiple myeloma (MM) is uncommon. This report describes a case of MM diagnosed because of a mandibular lesion. A 62-year-old woman presented a destructive radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular ramus. The lesion caused rupture of the anterior cortical bone and extended from the retromolar area to the coronoid process. An incisional biopsy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed numerous pleomorphic plasma cells, some with binucleated nuclei. The tumor cells showed kappa light-chain restriction. Bone marrow biopsy showed findings of massive infiltration of neoplastic plasma cells, besides lesions in the vertebrae. The diagnosis of MM was established. The patient underwent autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Currently, the patient is under regular follow up after 40 months of initial treatment. In conclusion, MM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of destructive mandibular lesions. Key words:Mandible, multiple myeloma, radiolucent lesion. PMID:27703618

  17. Intra-mandibular canalicular adenoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Dayisoylu, Ezher Hamza; Pampu, Ali Alper; Mungan, Sevdegul; Taskesen, Fatih

    2012-11-01

    Canalicular adenomas are uncommon benign salivary gland neoplasms of the oral cavity. They are typically located on the upper lip, buccal mucosa and infrequently found on the palate and derived from minor salivary glands. Intra-mandibular localization of canalicular adenoma is extremely rare. Due to benign character of the tumour, canalicular adenomas rarely present with bone erosion. Histologically, trabecular type of basal cell adenoma, pleomorphic adenoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma should be discriminated from canalicular adenomas. A-56- year old female patient with asymptomatic intra-mandibular canalicular adenoma was presented. The lesion was managed surgically under local anesthesia and 2 year's follow up was uneventful. Only two other intra-mandibular canalicular adenoma cases have been reported up till now. This case report describes the third intra-mandibular canalicular adenoma, and reviews the literature.

  18. A Precise Method of Measuring Simultaneous Intrusion and Uprighting of Mandibular Molar Using Denta Scan - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Padmaprabha, Biswas Palukunnu; Ponnambathayil, Shaji Aboobacker; Aynipully, Hariprasad; Vinod, Midhun; Reghunathan, Deepak Parambath

    2015-07-01

    A commonly encountered problem in prosthetic dentistry is the supra eruption of teeth due to absence of opposing teeth. Consequently, replacement of the missing teeth with prosthesis becomes difficult due to lack of vertical dimension of the edentulous area. This article describes the space regaining procedure in a 14-year-old female patient who wanted a fixed prosthesis for her missing maxillary 1st molar. On examination, it was observed that mandibular 1st molar had supraerupted and tipped lingually. After considering the various treatment modalities it was decided to simultaneously intrude and upright the mandibular molar using a mini-implant. The precise measurements of intrusion and uprighting were done using Dentascan software. Intrusion of 1.8mm and buccolingual uprighting of 2.3mm was achieved in 45 days. The mini-implant is an efficient non-compliance device to intrude and upright the tooth simultaneously. Dentascan is an accurate and very precise method of measuring the intrusion and uprighting of teeth. PMID:26393217

  19. A Precise Method of Measuring Simultaneous Intrusion and Uprighting of Mandibular Molar Using Denta Scan – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Padmaprabha, Biswas Palukunnu; Ponnambathayil, Shaji Aboobacker; Aynipully, Hariprasad; Reghunathan, Deepak Parambath

    2015-01-01

    A commonly encountered problem in prosthetic dentistry is the supra eruption of teeth due to absence of opposing teeth. Consequently, replacement of the missing teeth with prosthesis becomes difficult due to lack of vertical dimension of the edentulous area. This article describes the space regaining procedure in a 14-year-old female patient who wanted a fixed prosthesis for her missing maxillary 1st molar. On examination, it was observed that mandibular 1st molar had supraerupted and tipped lingually. After considering the various treatment modalities it was decided to simultaneously intrude and upright the mandibular molar using a mini-implant. The precise measurements of intrusion and uprighting were done using Dentascan software. Intrusion of 1.8mm and buccolingual uprighting of 2.3mm was achieved in 45 days. The mini-implant is an efficient non-compliance device to intrude and upright the tooth simultaneously. Dentascan is an accurate and very precise method of measuring the intrusion and uprighting of teeth. PMID:26393217

  20. Computer-aided design and manufacturing and rapid prototyped nanoscale hydroxyapatite/polyamide (n-HA/PA) construction for condylar defect caused by mandibular angle ostectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Hsu, Yuchun; Luo, En; Khadka, Ashish; Hu, Jing

    2011-08-01

    The fracture or defect of the mandibular condyle is one of the serious complications during angle-reduction ostectomy. Reconstruction of such defects also is a daunting task. The case report describes a method based on computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and rapid prototyping nanoscale hydroxyapatite/polyamide (n-HA/PA) for individual design, fabrication, and implantation of a mandibular condyle. A 27-year-old woman with a square-shaped face who had previously undergone mandibular angle reduction reported with malocclusion, deviated mouth, collapse of the right side of the face, and masticatory problems. The reason for the problems was the unintended removal of the condyle during the ostectomy procedure. Using computed tomography (CT) data, a biomimetic n-HA/PA scaffold, and CAD/CAM for rapid prototyping by three-dimensional (3D) printing, a perfect-fitting condylar implant was fabricated. A surgical guide system also was developed to reproduce the procedures accurately so a perfect fit could be obtained during surgery. The patient ultimately regained reasonable jaw contour and appearance, as well as appreciable temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function.

  1. Geriatric slim implants for complete denture wearers: clinical aspects and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Cedric; Bessadet, Marion; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Veyrune, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances made in prevention have helped postpone complete edentulism in older patients. However, in the elderly, the physiological state reduces patients’ ability to adapt to oral rehabilitation and degrades the patient’s oral condition. Consequently, elderly edentulous subjects avoid many types of foods, which can lead to substantial nutritional consequences. Complete dentures retained by implants are, currently, the treatment of reference in prosthodontic mandibular rehabilitation. Indeed, the mandibular symphysis generally tolerates implantation, even when the mandible is strongly resorbed. However, in the elderly, implant rehabilitation is compromised by the complexity of the surgical protocol and possible postoperative complications. In this context, the use of geriatric “slim implants” (GSI) offers an interesting alternative. Methods In the present study, the surgical and prosthetic procedures for the use of GSI in a French dental hospital are presented. The objective was the stabilization of a complete mandibular denture in an elderly person, with the immediate implantation of four GSI. Results The operating procedure was found to be less invasive, less expensive, simpler, and more efficient than the conventional procedure. Conclusion The result strongly suggests that this protocol could be used systematically to treat complete edentulism in very elderly patients. Long-term monitoring and the evaluation of the reliability of this type of rehabilitation should be undertaken. PMID:24009432

  2. Mandibular condylar pseudocyst: an introduction to the orthodontist.

    PubMed

    Yitschaky, Oded; Friedlander-Barenboim, Silvina; Friedman, Menahem; Tzur-Gadassi, Liat; Zadik, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this article are to introduce mandibular condylar pseudocysts to orthodontists, present 2 relevant case reports, and discuss possible differential diagnoses. Condylar pseudocyst is a radiologic variant of pterygoid fovea, which is the site of insertion of the lateral pterygoid muscle to the head of the mandibular condyle. A pathognomonic picture of a solitary well-defined radiolucency with radiopaque borders, located on the anterior aspect of the condyle in an asymptomatic orthodontic patient, is characteristic. PMID:24075670

  3. Development of a Drilling Simulator for Dental Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Nagahata, Masahiro; Takano, Naoki; Takemoto, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a dental implant surgery simulator that allows learners to experience the drilling forces necessary to perform an osteotomy in the posterior mandibular bone. The simulator contains a force-sensing device that receives input and counteracts this force, which is felt as resistance by the user. The device consists of an actuator, a load cell, and a control unit. A mandibular bone model was fabricated in which the predicted forces necessary to drill the cortical and trabecular bone were determined via micro CT image-based 3D finite element analysis. The simulator was evaluated by five dentists from the Department of Implantology at Tokyo Dental College. The ability of the evaluators to distinguish the drilling resistance through different regions of the mandibular bone was investigated. Of the five dentists, four sensed the change in resistance when the drill perforated the upper cortical bone. All five dentists were able to detect when the drill made contact with lingual cortical bone and when the lingual bone was perforated. This project successfully developed a dental implant surgery simulator that allows users to experience the forces necessary to drill through types of bone encountered during osteotomy. Furthermore, the researchers were able to build a device by which excessive drilling simulates a situation in which the lingual cortical bone is perforated--a situation that could lead to negative repercussions in a clinical setting. The simulator was found to be useful to train users to recognize the differences in resistance when drilling through the mandibular bone. PMID:26729688

  4. Finite Element Reconstruction of a Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sara; Mirhashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mandibular first molar is the most important tooth with complicated morphology. In finite element (FE) studies, investigators usually prefer to model anterior teeth with a simple and single straight root; it makes the results deviate from the actual case. The most complicated and time-consuming step in FE studies is modeling of the desired tooth, thus this study was performed to establish a finite element method (FEM) of reconstructing a mandibular first molar with the greatest precision. Materials and Methods An extracted mandibular first molar was digitized, and then radiographed from different aspects to achieve its outer and inner morphology. The solid model of tooth and root canals were constructed according to this data as well as the anatomy of mandibular first molar described in the literature. Result A three-dimensional model of mandibular first molar was created, giving special consideration to shape and root canal system dimensions. Conclusion This model may constitute a basis for investigating the effect of different clinical situations on mandibular first molars in vitro, especially on its root canal system. The method described here seems feasible and reasonably precise foundation for investigations. PMID:23717327

  5. Mandibular Ramus Fracture: An Overview of Rare Anatomical Subsite

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Anendd; Mundada, Bhushan; Deshmukh, Rahul; Bhutekar, Umesh; Kala, Atul; Waghwani, Kapil; Mishra, Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The present study aims at exemplifying the incidence, and aetiology and analyses the outcomes of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) over closed treatment of mandibular ramus fractures. Patients and Method. In the present retrospective analysis of mandibular fracture patients, variables analysed were age, sex, cause of injury, pretreatment occlusion, treatment given, period of maxillo-mandibular fixation (MMF), and posttreatment occlusion. Results. Out of 388 mandibular fractures treated, ramus fractures were 12 (3.09%). In the present study, predominant cause of mandibular ramus fracture was road traffic accident (RTA) n = 07 (58.33%) followed by fall n = 04 (33.33%) and assault n = 1 (8.33%). The average age was 35.9 years with a male predilection. Of these, 9 patients were treated with ORIF while remaining 3 with closed treatment. The average MMF after closed treatment was 21 days and 3 to 5 days after ORIF. There was improvement in occlusion in all 12 patients posttreatment with no major complication except for reduced mouth opening in cases treated with ORIF which recovered with physiotherapy and muscle relaxants. Conclusion. Mandibular ramus fractures accounted for 3.09% with RTA as a common aetiology. ORIF of ramus fractures facilitated adequate functional and anatomic reduction with early return of function. PMID:26613050

  6. Optimal restoration of dental esthetics and function with advanced implant-supported prostheses: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Meulen, Peter van der; Linden, Wynand van der; Eeden, Ronnie van

    2012-07-01

    For more than 25 years, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used in implant restorative dentistry. Today this technology offers a means of milling titanium frameworks that fit dental implants accurately. This report presents a restoratively driven protocol employing advanced implant restorative and surgical techniques. Treatment of a patient with advanced periodontitis with extensive loss of hard and soft tissues is presented. After extraction of the patient's remaining hopeless teeth, dental implants were placed, along with interim, fixed-margin abutments and abutment protection caps. Two days later, acrylic resin fixed-interim prostheses restored the patient's esthetics and partial masticatory function. After implant osseointegration, maxillary, and mandibular frameworks for definitive prostheses were milled from Ti alloy, using one specific CAD/CAM technology. The benefits of this technology are also discussed.

  7. Effect of early exposure on the integration of dental implants in the baboon: Part 1--Clinical findings at uncovering.

    PubMed

    Severson, S; Vernino, A R; Caudill, R; Holt, R; Church, C; Davis, A

    2000-04-01

    There has been increased discussion on the advantages of a one- versus a two-stage surgical approach in the placement of dental endosseous implants. This study evaluated the influence of early implant exposure on crestal bone height adjacent to the implant surface and Periotest values at uncovering in the baboon. Forty-eight implants (24 commercially pure titanium, 24 titanium alloy) were placed in maxillary and mandibular posterior sites in 6 baboons. Implant exposure was evaluated weekly for 3 weeks after implant placement. The level of bone adjacent to the dental implants was measured at placement from the top of the implant collar to the crest of the bone at the mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual surfaces. The maxillary sites were measured again at a 6-month uncovering, while the mandibular sites were measured at a 3-month uncovering. Periotest readings were also recorded at uncovering. Early implant exposure was more common in the mandible, with the majority occurring by the second week postplacement. There were no significant differences in the crestal bone height changes at uncovering between the pure titanium and alloy implants in either arch. In the maxilla, the changes in crestal bone height were not statistically different between exposed and nonexposed implants at any aspect. In the mandible, the difference in 3-month changes between exposed and nonexposed implants was significant for the distal, buccal, and lingual aspects. The overall percentage of implants with a Periotest reading in the "good" category was greater for the nonexposed sites as compared to exposed sites. The results of this study suggest that the two-stage surgical approach results in a better clinical outcome as compared to the one-stage approach in the baboon model.

  8. Mandibular incisor extraction treatment in Angle's Class I malocclusion with peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisors

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankit H; Shah, Darshit H

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning are essential for obtaining ideal treatment result in cases involving mandibular incisor extraction. This case report describes a 15-year-old female with balanced soft-tissue profile, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisors, and moderate mandibular anterior crowding treated with a mandibular incisor extraction. Ideal overbite and overjet were achieved. “Black triangle” formation was avoided due to the bodily movement of mandibular incisors and the use of uprighting springs for ideal axial inclination of mandibular incisors. A mandibular incisor extraction can be an effective treatment option in carefully selected clinical situations. PMID:27556022

  9. Preoperative Planning of Virtual Osteotomies Followed by Fabrication of Patient Specific Reconstruction Plate for Secondary Correction and Fixation of Displaced Bilateral Mandibular Body Fracture.

    PubMed

    Thor, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the course of treatment of a severely diplaced bilateral mandibular body fracture, where the first osteosynthesis failed. The subject developed an open bite due to a posterior rotation of the distal part of the mandible and anterior rotation of the proximal parts of the mandible. This situation was evaluated with CBCT and the facial skeleton was segmented using computer software. Correct occlusion was virtually established by bilateral virtual osteotomies in the fracture areas of the mandible. After segmentation, the mandible was virtually rotated back into position and the open bite was closed. A patient specific mandibular reconstruction plate was outlined and fabricated from the new virtual situation and the plate was thereafter installed utilizing the preoperative plan. Osteotomy- and drill-guides was used and thus simplified the surgery resulting in uneventful healing. Virtual planning and patient specific implants and guides were valuable in this case of secondary reconstructive trauma surgery. PMID:27162581

  10. Effect of bite force on orthodontic mini-implants in the molar region: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon-Jung; Lee, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Min-Ji

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of bite force on the displacement and stress distribution of orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) in the molar region according to placement site, insertion angle, and loading direction. Methods Five finite element models were created using micro-computed tomography (microCT) images of the maxilla and mandible. OMIs were placed at one maxillary and two mandibular positions: between the maxillary second premolar and first molar, between the mandibular second premolar and first molar, and between the mandibular first and second molars. The OMIs were inserted at angles of 45° and 90° to the buccal surface of the cortical bone. A bite force of 25 kg was applied to the 10 occlusal contact points of the second premolar, first molar, and second molar. The loading directions were 0°, 5°, and 10° to the long axis of the tooth. Results With regard to placement site, the displacement and stress were greatest for the OMI placed between the mandibular first molar and second molar, and smallest for the OMI placed between the maxillary second premolar and first molar. In the mandibular molar region, the angled OMI showed slightly less displacement than the OMI placed at 90°. The maximum Von Mises stress increased with the inclination of the loading direction. Conclusions These results suggest that placement of OMIs between the second premolar and first molar at 45° to the cortical bone reduces the effect of bite force on OMIs. PMID:24228236

  11. Reasons for mini-implants failure: choosing installation site should be valued!

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2014-01-01

    Mini-implant loss is often associated with physical and mechanical aspects that result from choosing an inappropriate placement site. It is worth highlighting that: a) Interdental alveolar bone crests are flexible and deformable. For this reason, they may not offer the ideal absolute anchorage. The more cervical the structures, the more delicate they are, thus offering less physical support for mini-implant placement; b) Alveolar bone crests of triangular shape are more deformable, whereas those of rectangular shape are more flexible; c) The bases of the alveolar processes of the maxilla and the mandible are not flexible, for this reason, they are more likely to receive mini-implants; d) The more cervical a mini-implant is placed, the higher the risk of loss; the more apical a mini-implant is placed, the better its prognosis will be; e) 3D evaluations play a major role in planning the use of mini-implants. Based on the aforementioned considerations, the hypotheses about mini-implant loss are as follows: 1) Deflection of maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes when mini-implants are more cervically placed; 2) Mini-implants placed too near the periodontal ligament, with normal intra-alveolar tooth movement; 3) Low bone density, low thickness and low alveolar bone volume; 4) Low alveolar cortical bone thickness; 5) Excessive pressure inducing trabecular bone microfracture; 6) Sites of higher anatomical weakness in the mandible and the maxilla; 7) Thicker gingival tissue not considered when choosing the mini-implant. PMID:24945511

  12. Developing a New Dental Implant Design and Comparing its Biomechanical Features with Four Designs

    PubMed Central

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Birang, Reza; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Talebi, Hassan; Zare, Reza Jabar

    2010-01-01

    Background: As various implant geometries present different biomechanical behaviors, the purpose of this work was to study stress distribution around tapered and cylindrical threaded implant geometries using three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Methods: Seven implant models were constructed using Computer Assisted Designing system. After digitized models of mandibular section, the crowns were created. They were combined with implant models, which were previously imported into CATIA software. The combined solid model was transferred to ABAQOUS to create a finite element meshed model which was later analyzed regarding the highest maximum and minimum principal stresses of bone. Results: For all models, the highest stresses of cortical bone were located at the crestal cortical bone around the implant. Threaded implants, triangular thread form and taper body form showed a higher peak of tensile and compressive stress than non-threaded implants, square thread form and straight body form, respectively. A taper implant with triangular threads, which is doubled in the cervical portion of the body, had a significantly lower peak of tensile and compressive stress in the cortical bone than straight/taper triangular or square threaded implant forms. Conclusion: For the investigation of bone implant interfacial stress, the non-bonded state should be studied too. Confirmative clinical and biological studies are required in order to benefit from the results of this study. PMID:22013460

  13. The implant neck: smooth or provided with retention elements. A biomechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Hansson, S

    1999-10-01

    A combined three-dimensional and axisymmetric finite element analysis was made of the effect upon the peak interfacial shear stress of providing an axially loaded mandibular dental implant with retention elements all the way up to the crest of the implant as opposed to a smooth neck. The effect of increased wall thickness of the implant and of using bi-cortical fixation as opposed to uni-cortical fixation was also studied. Retention elements at the implant neck were found to bring about a major decrease in the peak interfacial shear stress. Increased wall thickness and bi-cortical fixation also resulted in decreased peak interfacial shear stress but this effect was minor. The interpretation of this was that all these three measures increase the capacity of the implant to carry axial loads. Thus from a biomechanical viewpoint it appears to be advantageous to provide the neck of screw-shaped implants with retention elements, for example a rough surface of suitable micro-architecture and/or a micro-thread. It is furthermore suggested that retention elements at the implant neck will counteract marginal bone resorption in accordance with Wolff's law. This paper is a revision of: Hansson, S. (1997) Some steps to improve the capacity of dental implants to resist axial loads. In: Hansson, S., ed. Towards an optimized dental implant and implant bridge design: A biomechanical approach. Thesis. Göteborg: Chalmers University of Technology.

  14. Osseointegrated dental implants in growing children: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mankani, Nivedita; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Patil, Brijesh A; Nagaraj, E; Madalli, Poornima

    2014-10-01

    Edentulism is usually associated with the aging patient. However, total or partial tooth loss also affects young individuals, mainly as a result of trauma, decay, anodontia, or congenital and acquired jaw defects involving the alveolar processes. For elderly patients, the use of oral implants has become an accepted treatment modality for edentulism, and most of today's knowledge regarding implants is based on such practice. There has been hesitation to perform implant therapy for growing children; hence, few children to date have been provided with implant-supported construction. Consequently, little is known about the outcome of the osseointegration procedure in young patients, and until now, only a limited number of case presentations have been reported. This article reviews the current literature to discuss the use of dental implants in growing patients and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Wileys Blackwell Synergy, PubMed, Google, Embase, Medknow publications, and Springer for references published from 1963 to 2011. It is recommended to wait for the completion of dental and skeletal growth, except for severe cases of ectodermal dysplasia.

  15. The impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible: a before–after study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, A; Brunton, P; Goodwin, M; Horner, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible, using a “before–after” study design. Methods: Eight dental practitioners, who regularly place dental implants in independent dental practice in the North West of England, were presented with realistic simulations of four edentulous cases. The practitioners were asked to assess case difficulty, select implants and then drill osteotomies in preparation for dental implants in the lower canine regions to support a complete overdenture. In the “before” part of the study, a panoramic and a trans-symphyseal view were available. In the “after” part of the study, a CBCT image was added. Perception of case difficulty, implant selection and the incidence of perforations or “near miss perforations” of the lingual cortical plate were recorded. Two cases were regarded as “regular” and two as “challenging”. Results: In challenging cases, the availability of CBCT led practitioners to select narrower implants and to assess cases as more difficult. In the challenging cases only, there were fewer perforations of the lingual cortical plate after the availability of CBCT, but this difference was not statistically significant. There were no perforations in the regular cases either before or after the availability of CBCT. Conclusions: Perception of case difficulty and implant selection are of importance only if they change the outcome for the patient. This study provided weak evidence that CBCT is helpful in avoiding perforations in challenging cases. The availability of CBCT had no impact in regular cases. PMID:25472617

  16. Impact of fixed implant supported prostheses in edentulous patients: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina S; Saka, Constanza H; Rada, Gabriel; Valenzuela, Daniela D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Edentulism is a debilitating and irreversible condition described as the ‘final marker of disease burden for oral health’. Therapy with dental implants is being used on a large scale to replace missing teeth and to rehabilitate edentulous patients with overdentures and implant supported fixed dentures as a method of solving the problem of instability and lack of retention associated with conventional removable prostheses. Fixed implant supported prostheses are an alternative for implant rehabilitation treatment that allow patients to have new fixed teeth. They can be indicated in partial or total edentulous patients, and they can replace single teeth, or teeth and supporting tissues (hybrid prosthesis). They overcome the limitations of conventional dentures, increasing stability and retention, providing functional and psychological advantages for the patients. Methods and analysis We will electronically search for randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of fixed implant supported prostheses in edentulous patients in the following databases: Pubmed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We will also try to obtain literature screening references of included studies, searching for trial protocols in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, reviewing International Team for Implantology conference proceedings and searching for non-published studies through Open Gray. Two researchers will independently undertake selection of studies, data extraction and assessment of the quality of the included studies. Data synthesis and subgroup analyses will be performed using special Review Manager software. Data will be combined in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. Results The results will be presented as risk ratios for dichotomous data, and as mean difference or standardised mean difference for continuous data. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is considered necessary. The results

  17. Examination of the relationship between mandibular position and body posture.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Kiwamu; Mehta, Noshir R; Abdallah, Emad F; Forgione, Albert G; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Takao; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing mandibular position on body posture and reciprocally, body posture on mandibular position. Forty-five (45) asymptomatic subjects (24 males and 21 females, ages 21-53 years, mean age 30.7 years) were included in this study and randomly assigned to one of two groups, based on the table of random numbers. The only difference between group I and group II was the sequence of the testing. The MatScan (Tekscan, Inc., South Boston, MA) system was used to measure the result of changes in body posture (center of foot pressure: COP) while subjects maintained the following 5 mandibular positions: (1) rest position, (2) centric occlusion, (3) clinically midlined jaw position with the labial frena aligned, (4) a placebo wax appliance, worn around the labial surfaces of the teeth and (5) right eccentric mandibular position. The T-Scan II (Tekscan, Inc., South Boston, MA) system was used to analyze occlusal force distribution in two postural positions, with and without a heel lift under the right foot. Total trajectory length of COP in centric occlusion was shorter than in the rest position (p < 0.05). COP area in right eccentric mandibular position was larger than in centric occlusion (p < 0.05). When subjects used a heel lift under the right foot, occlusal forces shifted to the right side compared to no heel lift (p < 0.01). Based on these findings, it was concluded that changing mandibular position affected body posture. Conversely, changing body posture affected mandibular position.

  18. Classifications of mandibular canal branching: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mauricio Augusto Aquino; Lagravere-Vich, Manuel Oscar; Amaral, Tânia Mara Pimenta; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Guimaraes; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To gather existing radiographic classifications of mandibular canals branching, considering the criteria on which these were based. METHODS: The search for studies on mandibular canals based on imaging exams included literature reviews, epidemiological studies of prevalence, descriptive studies, or case reports. An electronic search in the MEDLINE (OvidSP), PubMed, EMBASE (OvidSP), Web of Science (Thompson Reuters), and Scopus (Elsevier) databases was performed, as well as a manual evaluation of the references of the selected articles. Combinations of key words were placed in each database. No restrictions were imposed regarding the year of publication or language. References collected in duplicate were removed by the authors. A table was drawn up, containing the included studies and respective interest data. RESULTS: Six classifications of mandibular canals branching were selected for the present literature review. Four were based on two-dimensional radiographic exams, and two were performed based on three-dimensional tomographic exams. Three-dimensional classifications were determined based on the analysis found in the least number of exams, comparatively to two-dimensional studies. The prevalence of mandibular canal branching varied from 0% to 38.75% in the works based on two-dimensional exams, while those found in three-dimensional exams ranged from 15.6% to 65%. The studies were mostly referred to branches that began in the mandibular ramus. Just one classification considered the branches that began in the mandibular body region. CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional exams appear to be the best method to view mandibular canal branching. Further studies are warranted to determine its true prevalence and questions concerning to associations. PMID:26753068

  19. Mandibular nerve paresthesia caused by endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gallas-Torreira, M Mercedes; Reboiras-López, M Dolores; García-García, Abel; Gándara-Rey, José

    2003-01-01

    The paresthesias of the inferior dental nerve consists of a complication that can occur after performing various dental procedures such as cystectomies, extraction of impacted teeth, apicoectomies, endodontic treatments, local anesthetic deposition, preprosthetic or implantologic surgery. The possible mechanisms of nervous lesions are mechanical, chemical and thermal. Mechanical injury includes compression, stretching, partial or total resection and laceration. The lesion can cause a discontinuity to the nerve with Wallerian degeneration of the distal and integrated fibers of the covering (axonotmesis) or can cause the total sectioning of the nerve (neurotmesis). Chemical trauma can be due to certain toxic components of the endodontic filling materials (paraformaldehyde, corticoids or eugenol) and irrigating solutions (sodium hypochlorite) or local anesthetics. Thermal injury is a consequence of bone overheating during the execution of surgical techniques. We present a clinical case of paresthesia of the inferior dental nerve after the introduction of a gutta-percha point in the mandibular canal during the performance of a root canal therapy of the inferior first molar. The etiology and the treatment of this endodontic complication are described. PMID:12937392

  20. On the reversibility of mandibular symphyseal fusion.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremiah E; Lack, Justin B; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    Experimental and comparative studies suggest that a major determinant of increased ossification of the mandibular symphysis is elevated masticatory stress related to a mechanically challenging diet. However, the morphology of this joint tracks variation in dietary properties in only some mammalian clades. Extant anthropoid primates are a notable exception: synostosis is ubiquitous in this speciose group, despite its great age and diverse array of feeding adaptations. One possible explanation for this pattern is that, once synostosis evolves, reversion to a lesser degree of fusion is unlikely or even constrained. If correct, this has important implications for functional and phylogenetic analyses of the mammalian feeding apparatus. To test this hypothesis, we generated a molecular tree for 76 vespertilionoid and noctilionoid chiropterans using Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and examined character evolution using parsimony and likelihood ancestral-state reconstructions along with the binary state speciation and extinction (BiSSE) model. Results indicate that reversals have occurred within Vespertilionoidea. In contrast, noctilionoids exhibit an anthropoid-like pattern, which suggests that more detailed comparisons of the functional and developmental bases for fusion in these bat clades may provide insight into why fusion is maintained in some lineages but not in others. Potential functional and developmental explanations for the lack of reversal are discussed. PMID:22946814

  1. Asymmetry of normal mandibular condylar shape.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Sigurtà, D

    1997-01-01

    Morphological studies of the facial skeleton in human beings are usually made from radiographs (frontal and lateral projections and orthopantomographs). The conventional linear and angular measurements provide quantitative information only about size, and fail to define the shape and form of the skeletal features and their variations. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of the shape and its variations. The outlines of the mandibular condyles in the orthopantomographs of 20 men and 20 women (mean age 29 years) were traced and digitized. All subjects had a good dentition, no temporomandibular joint problems, and were referred to a dental surgery for periodontal problems. A Fourier analysis of the outlines was performed. Fourier coefficients and reconstructed outlines were compared to analyze the condylar symmetry of shape on an intra- and intersubject basis. A significant condylar asymmetry for shape as distinct from size was found on an intrasubject basis, i.e. the left and right condyles of a single individual had a different shape with a large interindividual variability. Conversely, the mean condyle shape of the male and female groups was symmetric.

  2. Correction of deep overbite and gummy smile by using a mini-implant with a segmented wire in a growing Class II Division 2 patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyewon; Lee, Shin-Jae

    2006-11-01

    A boy, aged 10.5 years, with a Class II molar relationship and a very deep overbite, complaining of a gummy smile and anterior crowding, was treated nonextraction with a mini-implant and Twin-block and edgewise fixed appliances. Severely extruded and retroclined maxillary incisors were intruded and proclined with a nickel-titanium closed-coil spring anchored to a mini-implant and segmented wires; this resolved the gummy smile and deep overbite efficiently without extruding the maxillary molars or opening the mandible. The mandibular incisors were proclined without direct orthodontic force during intrusion of the maxillary incisors; this helped the nonextraction treatment of mandibular incisor crowding. The Twin-block appliance with high-pull headgear promoted mandibular growth, restrained maxillary growth, and changed the canine and molar relationship from Class II to Class I. The patient's overbite and overjet were overtreated, and, 1 year postretention, the patient maintained a good overbite and overjet.

  3. Private practice results of dental implants. Part I: survival and evaluation of risk factors--Part II: surgical and prosthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Stefanos G; Sotiriadou, Stella; Voliotis, Stamatis; Challas, Anastasios

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study is to present the clinical data from the use of implants that were placed and restored in four independent private dental offices. In part I, the survival rate was calculated and the failure causes were associated with some potential risk factors. In part II, the surgical and prosthetic complications were also recorded and associated both with failures and clinical factors. During 1990-2002 (mean observation 4.6 years), 1692 dental implants were placed and restored in 405 patients in 4 private clinics following the same treatment protocol. The prosthetic restorations included fixed partial dentures, single crowns, and overdentures. The results were statistically analyzed and survival rate probability curves were calculated according to Kaplan-Meier analysis. Part I: Seventy-four implants (4.4%) in a total of 1692 implants failed. The mean of time elapsed before removal of the failed implants was 40 months. The failure rate was higher in the maxilla in patients with metabolic diseases, in D4 bone quality, in smokers, and in patients with insufficient oral hygiene. Part II: Surgical complications happened to 65 implants (3.8%). Prosthetic complications appeared in 152 implants (9%). The overall survival rate (95.6%) in a period of 1 to 12 years is comparable to other studies. The early failures represented a high percentage of failures. Peri-implantitis was the main cause of late failures. The results of this study indicate that the use of implants in private clinics is a safe and predictable method for the treatment of partially or completely edentulous patients, if the proper clinical protocol is followed. The need of a severe recall program must also be emphasized.

  4. Relationship between mandibular condyle and angle fractures and the presence of mandibular third molars

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Deuk-Hyun; Moon, Seong-Yong; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We retrospectively evaluated the impact of mandibular third molars on the occurrence of angle and condyle fractures. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective investigation using patient records and radiographs. The sample set consisted of 440 patients with mandibular fractures. Eruption space, depth and angulation of the third molar were measured. Results Of the 144 angle fracture patients, 130 patients had third molars and 14 patients did not. The ratio of angle fractures when a third molar was present (1.26 : 1) was greater than when no third molar was present (0.19 : 1; odds ratio, 6.58; P<0.001). Of the 141 condyle fractures patients, the third molar was present in 84 patients and absent in 57 patients. The ratio of condyle fractures when a third molar was present (0.56 : 1) was lower than when no third molar was present (1.90 : 1; odds ratio, 0.30; P<0.001). Conclusion The increased ratio of angle fractures with third molars and the ratio of condyle fractures without a third molar were statistically significant. The occurrence of angle and condyle fractures was more affected by the continuity of the cortical bone at the angle than by the depth of a third molar. These results demonstrate that a third molar can be a determining factor in angle and condyle fractures. PMID:25741462

  5. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: Resection and reconstruction using vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus.

    PubMed

    González-Otero, Sergio; Navarro-Cuéllar, Carlos; Escrig-de Teigeiro, Margarita; Fernández-Alba-Luengo, Javier; Navarro-Vila, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Osteochondroma is one of the most common benign bone tumours, although not in the craniofacial region. More than half of these appear in the coronoid process. It can appear on the mandibular condyle, especially in its medial half, and mainly affects women aged around forty years. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with pain of several months' duration in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and no other symptoms. Panoramic radiography showed an enlarged condyle with no subchondral cysts. Computed tomography showed a bony proliferation with benign signs and a scintigraphy revealed an increased uptake in the condyle. Due to the painful clinical symptoms, a surgical procedure using preauricular and retromandibular approaches was performed to excise the condyle. The resulting defect, which was 9 mm high, was reconstructed by means of a vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus and two miniplates for osteosynthesis. Almost two years later, the patient is symptom-free and has a normal opening with no malocclusion or deviation in the opening pattern. We present and discuss different reconstruction options after condylectomy.

  6. The effect of mandibular buccal tilting on the accuracy of posterior mandibular spiral tomographic images: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Maleki, Vida

    2011-01-01

    Background: Accurate measurement of the height and buccolingual thickness of available bone has a significant role in dental implantology. The shadow of ramus on the mandibular second molar region disturbs the sharpness of conventional tomographic images. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transferring the shadow of ramus from the center of the focal plane, by changing the position of mandible, on the sharpness of the posterior mandibular region. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we used 10 dry human mandibles. Three metal balls were mounted on the midline and mandibular second molar regions bilaterally. Standard panoramic and tomographic images were taken. Then, the mandible was tilted buccaly for 8° – compensating the normal lingual inclination of the mandibular ridge and teeth on this region – and tomographic images were taken again. The height and thickness of bone were measured on the images and then compared with the real amounts measured directly on mandibles. Also, the sharpness of mandibular canals was compared between the two tomographic methods. Findings were analyzed with repeated measured ANOVA test (P<0.05). Results: The height of mandibular bone, on the images of the tilted tomography technique was more accurate compared to standard (P<0.001), but standard tomography had more accuracy in estimating the buccolingual thickness at the half-height point. Regarding the sharpness of mandibular canals, we found no significant differences between two tomographic methods. Conclusion: Buccal tilting is recommended when measuring the bone height is more important, but routine standard tomography is preferred when the thickness is requested. PMID:23372586

  7. Guided bone regeneration in distal mandibular atrophy by means of a preformed titanium foil: a case series.

    PubMed

    Andreasi Bassi, M; Andrisani, C; Lopez, M A; Gaudio, R M; Lombardo, L; Lauritano, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case series was to evaluate the clinical outcome of preformed titanium foil (PTF) to perform guided bone regeneration (GBR) in posterior mandibular atrophies. Thirteen patients (4 male; 9 female; mean age 58.85±10.16 years), with class II division C atrophy, according to Misch, were selected to perform GBR by means of PTF, using a moldable allograft paste as graft material. The devices, made of a 0.2mm thick pure titanium foil, were pre-shaped using stereolithographic models obtained from CT-scan of the patients’ recipient sites. In the second stage, performed at 6.35±2.15 months, 23 cylindrical two-piece implants were placed and the devices removed. At four months, the implants were exposed and submitted to progressive prosthetic load for a span of 4 months. The cases were finalized by means of metal-ceramic cementable restorations. The post finalization follow-up was at 12 months. Survival rate (i.e. SVR) was 100% since no fixtures were lost. At the one-year follow up, the clinical appearance of the soft tissues was optimal and no pathological signs on probing were recorded. The success rate (i.e. SCR) was 82.6% and the average peri-implant bone reabsorption was 0.99±0.59 mm. The results suggest good potentialities of this method for bone volume augmentation in distal mandibular atrophies, allowing to maximize the outcome and simplifying the surgical phase. PMID:27469550

  8. [Treatment of mandibular condylar hyperplasia in developmental age. Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Silvestri, A; Incisivo, V; Mariani, G

    2000-10-01

    A case of hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle in a growing-up subject, observed at the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery of the University of Rome "La Sapienza", is described. Hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is a facial asymmetry due to the unilateral overdevelopment of the mandibular bone. In this study the authors underline how bone scintigraphy, 3D tomography and electrognatographic analysis, associated with standard radiography and cephalometry, are important methods of diagnosis in order to make an early diagnosis of hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle and differential diagnosis with other pathologies. In particular, bone scintigraphy is a useful screening procedure to detect if the pathology is in an active phase or not. The 3D tomography is used in pre-surgery to evaluate precisely morphological and structural alterations of the craniofacial bones on a tridimentional base. Finally, the electrognatographic test records the mandibular activity both in physiological and pathological conditions. All these instrumental techniques allow to make a diagnosis and lead to a possible therapeutical approach. PMID:11268938

  9. Position of the mandibular foramen in adult male Tanzania mandibles.

    PubMed

    Russa, Afadhali D; Fabian, Flora M

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia is common in various dental operations. Anatomical variations of the location of the inferior alveolar nerve as it enters the mandibular foramen have been implicated as a main cause of these anesthesia failures. The aim of this work was to determine the location of the mandibular foramen in relation to the occlusal plane at the level of mandibular first molar and second premolar--often used as landmarks during the blocking procedure--and to different landmarks on the ramus of the mandible. The study was performed using mandibles from adult black male Tanzanians aged 30-45 years. Measurements were accomplished using two-digit electronic Vernier calipers. The distances were determined from the center of the mandibular foramen to the different reference points. The mandibular foramen was above the occlusal plane at the M1 and PM2 reference points in all the mandibles studied. It was also located about 20 mm and 12 mm from the anterior and posterior borders of the ramus respectively. There was no significant difference between the left and right side in any of the measurements. These results indicate that during anesthetic or other clinical procedures, the clinician can precisely determine the position of neurovascular bundle of the inferior alveolar nerve above the occlusal plane. PMID:26749676

  10. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals. PMID:24878346

  11. Distraction osteogenesis for correction of post ankylosis mandibular deformities

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmed; Fareed, Wamiq Musheer; Tandon, Parul; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Temporomandibular joint ankylosis, a debilitating disease mainly affecting children, is characterized by progressive restriction of mouth opening and maxilla-mandibular developmental deformities. Craniofacial distraction osteogenesis has been developed as a standard surgical strategy for rectification of craniofacial deformities. The purpose of this study was to assess mono-planar distraction devices for the correction of various mandibular asymmetries in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis who developed restricted mouth opening and mandibular retrognathia. All patients were treated using one-stage distraction osteogenesis followed by temporalis fascia interpositional arthroplasty under general anesthesia. A significant increase in mandibular ramus and base length was observed. Although an increase in anterior lower facial height was observed, it was not significant statistically. A decrease in posterior lower facial height and corpus was observed. Oblique distraction with angular osteotomy allowed lengthening of both the ramus and corpus, yielding satisfactory results and hence eliminating the need of secondary surgery. In conclusion, univector internal distractors are effective for correction of multi-planar mandibular deficiencies by optimizing its placement through meticulous planning. PMID:26243521

  12. Expression of Superficial Zone Protein in Mandibular Condyle Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, S; Schmid, T; Tanne, Y; Kamiya, T; Honda, K; Ohno-Nakahara, M; Swentko, N; Desai, T A; Tanne, K; Knudson, CB; Knudson, W

    2011-01-01

    Objective Superficial zone protein (SZP) has been shown to function in the boundary lubrication of articular cartilages of the extremities. However, the expression of SZP has not been clarified in mandibular cartilage which is a tissue that includes a thick fibrous layer on the surface. This study was conducted to clarify the distribution of SZP on the mandibular condyle and the regulatory effects of humoral factors on the expression in both explants and fibroblasts derived from mandibular condyle. Methods The distribution of SZP was determined in bovine mandibular condyle cartilage, and the effects of IL-1β and TGF-β on SZP expression were examined in condyle explants and, fibroblasts derived from the fibrous zone of condyle cartilage. Results SZP was highly distributed in the superficial zone of intact condyle cartilage. The SZP expression was up-regulated by TGF-β in both explants and cultured fibroblasts, whereas the expression was slightly down-regulated by IL-1β. A significant increase in accumulation of SZP protein was also observed in the culture medium of the fibroblasts treated with TGF-β. Conclusions These results suggest that SZP plays an important role in boundary lubrication of mandible condylar cartilage, is synthesized locally within the condyle itself and, exhibits differential regulation by cell mediators relevant to mandibular condyle repairing and pathologies. PMID:16563813

  13. Sex determination by mandibular ramus: A digital orthopantomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Samatha, K; Byahatti, Sujata Mohan; Ammanagi, Renuka Anand; Tantradi, Praveena; Sarang, Chandan Kaur; Shivpuje, Prachi

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: (1) To determine the usefulness of mandibular ramus as an aid in sex determination. (2) To evaluate Anteroposterior | superioinferior angle of mandibular condyle. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using orthopantomographs of 60 males and 60 females, which were taken using Kodak 8000C Digital Panoramic and Cephalometric System (73 kVp, 12 mA, 13.9 s). The age group ranged between 18 – 45 years. Mandibular ramus measurements were carried out using Master View 3.0 software. The measurements of the mandibular ramus will be subjected to Discriminant function analysis. Results: Maximum ramus breadth, Minimum ramus breadth, Condylar height, Projective height of ramus Coronoid height were calculated for both the sexes differently with the formula & analyzed with Discriminant function analysis using Fischer exact test. The P value was statistically significant with the P value < 0.05 for the following parameters Max. ramus breadth, Condylar height and Projective height of ramus. Conclusion: Mandibular ramus measurements can be a useful tool for gender determination. PMID:27555726

  14. Radiographic evaluation of mandibular ramus for gender estimation: Retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Damera, Ajit; Mohanalakhsmi, Jonnala; Yellarthi, Pavan Kumar; Rezwana, Begum Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gender estimation is a very important part of a study in the field of anthropology and forensic sciences. In the skeleton, gender estimation is the first step of the identification process as subsequent methods for age and stature estimation are sex-dependent. Skeletal components such as the pelvis and skull are investigated for gender estimation and the mandible is a practical element to analyze sexual dimorphism in fragmented bones. The aim of the present study is to measure, compare, and evaluate various measurements of the mandibular ramus, observed in digital orthopantomographs and also to assess the usefulness of the mandibular ramus as an aid in gender estimation. Materials and Methods: A radiographic retrospective study was conducted using 80 digital orthopantomographs to measure, compare, and evaluate the measurements of the mandibular ramus such as maximum ramus breadth, maximum ramus height, and coronoid heightusing Planmeca ProMax® digital machine to assess the usefulness of mandibular measurements in gender estimation. Results: Descriptive statistics of various measurements and associated univariate F ratios for both the sexes were determined. Four variables were significant predictor in classifying a given sample (P < 0.001). The F-statistic values indicated that measurements expressing the greatest sexual dimorphism were noticed in the maximum ramus height. Conclusion: Mandibular ramus can be considered as a valuable tool in gender estimation and the most reliable measurements were obtained of linear objects in the horizontal plane by digital panoramic imaging. PMID:27555722

  15. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  16. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Holly D; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-06-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  17. Clinical application of autogenous mandibular bone grafts. Analysis of 166 cases.

    PubMed

    Hong, M; Chen, Z H; Sun, H; Bu, R F; Chen, M J; Xie, G C; Wang, Y M; Wang, X S

    1989-10-01

    Of the 166 patients receiving autogenous mandibular bone grafts during 1972-1987, 55 were used for repair of mandibular bone defect, 67 for correction of maxillofacial malformation and 44 for reconstruction of temporo-mandibular joint. Follow-up showed that 155 patients had satisfactory results after operation.

  18. Three Cases of Elongated Mandibular Coronoid Process with Different Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Ilguy, Mehmet; Kursoglu, Pinar; Ilguy, Dilhan

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal elongation of the mandibular coronoid process is rare and its etiology is not yet elucidated. The aim of this report is to demonstrate and discuss the relationship between elongated mandibular coronoid process and limitation of mouth opening with cone beam computed tomography. Although the clinical characteristic of elongation of the coronoid process is mandibular limitation, in this report, one case had problem with mouth opening. Axial scans revealed that the distance between the coronoid process and the inner face of the frontal part of the zygomatic bone may cause limitation in mouth opening. In conclusion, instead of the length, the distance between the coronoid process and the inner face of the frontal part of the zygomatic bone may be the actual reason for limitation of mouth opening. This may prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:24693298

  19. Osteochondroma of mandibular condyle: A clinic-radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B.; Gupta, Swati

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondroma (OC) of temporo mandibular joint is a rare, slow growing, benign tumor that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporo mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, limited mouth opening and malocclusion. Pain is rarely associated with this tumor. OC is composed of cartilaginous and osseous tissues. Radiographically, there is unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic outgrowth of the tumor from the condylar head. We present a rare case of osteochondroma of right mandibular condyle in a 45-year-old male who reported with painless swelling over TMJ area and progressive limited mouth opening. Panoramic radiograph and computed tomography (CT) was performed for better evaluation of the pathological condition. This paper describes the clinico-radiographic features and differential diagnosis of OC. PMID:24082753

  20. Cementoblastoma Relating to Right Mandibular Second Primary Molar

    PubMed Central

    Manepalli, Swapna; Mohapatra, Abinash

    2016-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a benign lesion of the odontogenic ectomesenchymal origin. It rarely occurs in primary dentition. This report describes a case of a cementoblastoma relating to the right mandibular second primary molar in a 7-year-old girl. Her panoramic radiograph revealed a well-defined radiopaque lesion with a radiolucent border extending from the distal surface of the mandibular right first primary molar to the distal surface of mandibular second primary molar. The tumor was attached to the mesial root of primary second molar and was excised along with the teeth involved and sent for histopathological evaluation, which showed irregular trabeculae of mineralized tissue interspersed with fibrovascular connective tissue, trabeculae of mineralized tissue with prominent reversal lines, and peripheral rimming of the mineralized tissue with blast cells. On a six-month follow-up, there has been no recurrence of the lesion. PMID:27738532

  1. Mandibular prognathism caused by acromegaly – a surgical orthodontic case

    PubMed Central

    Gosau, Martin; Vogel, Corinna; Moralis, Antonios; Proff, Peter; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A 22-year-old man presented for orthodontic surgery because of mandibular prognathism. Clinical symptoms suggested acromegaly, and diagnosis was verified by an endocrinologist as well as by radiograph. Bilateral mandibular prognathism often represents the first and most striking physical characteristic of acromegaly; usually, it is also the main reason why patients seek help from orthodontists or maxillo-facial surgeons. This case report recapitulates the clinical and histopathological findings in pituitary growth hormone (GH) adenomas and emphasises their importance in surgical orthodontic planning. Mandibular prognatism, macroglossia and abnormal growth of hands and feet represent strong indicators for the diagnosis of acromegaly. This disease and its complications not only affect the entire body but increase mortality if the pituitary gland tumour remains untreated. PMID:19660127

  2. Mandibular prognathism caused by acromegaly - a surgical orthodontic case.

    PubMed

    Gosau, Martin; Vogel, Corinna; Moralis, Antonios; Proff, Peter; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A 22-year-old man presented for orthodontic surgery because of mandibular prognathism. Clinical symptoms suggested acromegaly, and diagnosis was verified by an endocrinologist as well as by radiograph. Bilateral mandibular prognathism often represents the first and most striking physical characteristic of acromegaly; usually, it is also the main reason why patients seek help from orthodontists or maxillo-facial surgeons. This case report recapitulates the clinical and histopathological findings in pituitary growth hormone (GH) adenomas and emphasises their importance in surgical orthodontic planning. Mandibular prognatism, macroglossia and abnormal growth of hands and feet represent strong indicators for the diagnosis of acromegaly. This disease and its complications not only affect the entire body but increase mortality if the pituitary gland tumour remains untreated.

  3. Microbiology of the pericoronal pouch in mandibular third molar pericoronitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, W K; Theilade, E; Comfort, M B; Lim, P L

    1993-10-01

    The microorganisms associated with mandibular third molar pericoronitis were investigated using direct microscopy and anaerobic culture method. The pericoronal pouch was sampled with paper points in A) 8 patients without mandibular third molar pericoronitis and B) 6 patients with mandibular third molar pericoronitis. Under the microscope, the microflora was found to be a complex mixture comprising gram-positive and gram-negative cocci, rods and filaments (including fusiform and curved rods), motile rods and spirochetes. Significantly higher proportions of motile, gram-negative rods were found in group B than in group A. The predominant cultivable microflora of 9 samples: A (4) and B (5) comprised several species of facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria, namely Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Eubacterium, Propionibacterium, Veillonella, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Bacteriodes, Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Staphylococcus, Stomatococcus, Lactobacillus, Neisseria, Capnocytophaga, Haemophilus, Selenomonas and Centipeda species. The microflora in pericoronitis appeared similar to that of diseased periodontal pockets.

  4. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Rathore, Monika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentigerous Cyst/developmental cyst of benign odontogenic origin are ones that surround the crown of impacted, embedded, unerupted or developing teeth. Dentigerous cyst is second most common cyst of the oral cavity after radicular cyst. They are usually solitary in occurrence and mostly associated with the mandibular third molars. Dentigerous cysts involving impacted second premolars are rarely reported in the literatures. We present a rare case of dentigerous cyst in a 12-year-old female patient associated with an impacted mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tripathi AM, Rathore M. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1): 54-57. PMID:25206240

  5. Neonatal mandibular distraction in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brevi, Bruno Carlo; Leporati, Massimiliano; Sesenna, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze a case of mandibular distraction in a case of Treacher Collins syndrome. Mandibular distraction is an adequate surgical treatment of patients with Pierre Robin sequence and represents an alternative to tracheostomy. In severe hypoplastic cases or when three-dimensional vector control or gonial angle control is necessary, extraoral bidirectional or multidirectional devices have an advantage over intraoral devices. The anchorage obtained with transfixing Kirschner wires fixed in the mandibular distal segment and symphysis is crucial in neonates for the stability of the devices. Moreover, with the use of a second pin for each bone segment, the extraoral devices allow to modify the vector orientation and consequently the shape of the newly formed mandible.

  6. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor extraction case with invisalign.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  7. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    PubMed Central

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding. PMID:25024852

  8. [Differential radiodiagnosis of odontogenic mandibular osteomyelitis accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Solonskaia, N S; Zorina, I S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of radiation examination in 43 patients with clinical manifestations of mandibular osteomyelitis. In 13 of them, the disease was accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy. The radiation semiotics of the changes occurring in the mandibular bone and its adjacent soft tissues in different phases of osteomyelitis is described. Comparative analysis of orthopantomograms and the images obtained by multislice spiral computed tomography has revealed the advantage of the latter in identifying insignificant changes in bone tissue and damages to the mandibular canal. Ultrasound study is of more informative value in detecting soft tissue changes in this area. High-technology radiodiagnostic techniques play a leading role in the differentiation of odontogenic and non-odontogenic trigeminal neuropathies.

  9. A retrospective study of six patients with mandibular metastatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAI, ZHEN; ZHU, CHAO; WANG, LIZHEN; ZHU, LING; ZHANG, ZHIYUAN; ZHU, HANGUANG; WANG, YAN'AN

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular metastatic carcinoma is a rare lesion that accounts for <1% of all oral malignancies. To provide greater experience in this field, the present study was conducted in which 6 cases of mandibular metastatic carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The origin of the lesions was the prostate in 2 cases, the lungs in 2 cases, the breast in 1 case and the thyroid gland in 1 case. The clinical and computed tomography features, surgical management and follow-up outcomes were investigated. The study indicated that surgeons should include the suspicion of metastasis in the differential diagnosis for mandibular tumor, particularly in patients who have a history of malignancy. A poor prognosis was associated with the examined patients. To extend the survival time as long as possible, a treatment strategy using multiple therapies, including segmental mandibulectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is recommended. PMID:27284368

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve. PMID:25600702

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve.

  12. The influence of masseter activity on rat mandibular growth.

    PubMed

    Yonemitsu, Ikuo; Muramoto, Takeshi; Soma, Kunimichi

    2007-05-01

    Many studies have shown that mandibular and condylar growth is affected by compressive forces on mandibular bone and the condyle. It has been reported that chondroblastic differentiation and proliferation in chondrocytes play important roles in condylar growth. However, the influence of reduced compressive force on chondroblastic proliferation and mandibular bone formation is not fully understood. Thirty-six 3-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. In the experimental group, the masseter muscles were bilaterally resected to evaluate the influence of masticatory force on mandibular and condylar bone morphology. Six weeks after the operation, while the rats were in the pubertal growth stage, lateral X-rays were taken to analyze the skeletal pattern of the mandible. The form of the condyle and the thickness of the chondroblastic layers were evaluated by toluidine blue staining. Chondroblastic proliferation was identified by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1r) immunostaining and bone resorption of the condyle was assessed by measuring tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Lateral X-rays of the mandible showed that rats in the experimental group tended to have large mandibular plane angles. The chondroblastic layer in the condyles of the experimental group rats was thinner than in the control group. The expression of IGF-1r immunopositive cells in the experimental group was significantly lower than in the control chondrocytes, and the number of TRAP-positive cells was significantly higher in the condylar bone of the experimental group. We conclude that masseter muscle activity is closely related to mandibular morphology during growth.

  13. Incidence of mandibular fractures in black sea region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şener, İsmail; Şenel, Erman; Özkan, Nilüfer; Yilmaz, Nergiz

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to review the incidence of mandibular fractures in the Black Sea Region of Turkey and to present our treatment protocol. Material and Methods Data were collected regarding age, sex, etiology, time distribution, site of the fracture and the associated injuries and evaluated. These patients were treated at Ondokuz Mayıs University Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between 2003 and 2010. Data were collected from patient files in the archive and were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 software. Results A total of 82 patients with 133 mandibular fractures were included in this study. After the follow up period of the patients, the results were achieved from 58 (70.7%) males and 24 (29.3%) females, whose ages ranged from 5 to 72 years and the mean age was 29. Fractures were most seen in 2008 and the busiest month was August. Falls (40.2%) were the major causes of mandibular fractures followed by traffic accidents and violence. The mandibular anatomical sites of higher fracture incidence were: condyle (34.6%), body and symphysis. The number of the fractures and injuries which were seen in other places such as zygomatic arch, alveolar process, tongue, upper and lower lips, orbita, arms was 14. 53 (64.6%) patients were treated by closed reduction, whereas 13 (15.8%) patients were treated by open reduction. Conclusions We concluded that our results were widely similar with the studies in developing countries. Socio-economic factors, cultures, geographic conditions and education could affect the etiology of the mandibular fractures and cause different results between the studies conducted in different countries. Key words:Mandibular fractures, etiology, trauma, treatment, complication. PMID:26330940

  14. The impact of a modified cutting flute implant design on osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Tovar, N; Marin, C; Teixeira, H S; Anchieta, R B; Silveira, L M; Janal, M N; Shibli, J A; Coelho, P G

    2014-07-01

    Information concerning the effects of the implant cutting flute design on initial stability and its influence on osseointegration in vivo is limited. This study evaluated the early effects of implants with a specific cutting flute design placed in the sheep mandible. Forty-eight dental implants with two different macro-geometries (24 with a specific cutting flute design - Blossom group; 24 with a self-tapping design - DT group) were inserted into the mandibular bodies of six sheep; the maximum insertion torque was recorded. Samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis after 3 and 6 weeks. The mean insertion torque was lower for Blossom implants (P<0.001). No differences in histomorphometric results were observed between the groups. At 3 weeks, P=0.58 for bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and P=0.52 for bone area fraction occupied (BAFO); at 6 weeks, P=0.55 for BIC and P=0.45 for BAFO. While no histomorphometric differences were observed, ground sections showed different healing patterns between the implants, with better peri-implant bone organization around those with the specific cutting flute design (Blossom group). Implants with the modified cutting flute design had a significantly reduced insertion torque compared to the DT implants with a traditional cutting thread, and resulted in a different healing pattern. PMID:24583140

  15. The impact of a modified cutting flute implant design on osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Tovar, N; Marin, C; Teixeira, H S; Anchieta, R B; Silveira, L M; Janal, M N; Shibli, J A; Coelho, P G

    2014-07-01

    Information concerning the effects of the implant cutting flute design on initial stability and its influence on osseointegration in vivo is limited. This study evaluated the early effects of implants with a specific cutting flute design placed in the sheep mandible. Forty-eight dental implants with two different macro-geometries (24 with a specific cutting flute design - Blossom group; 24 with a self-tapping design - DT group) were inserted into the mandibular bodies of six sheep; the maximum insertion torque was recorded. Samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis after 3 and 6 weeks. The mean insertion torque was lower for Blossom implants (P<0.001). No differences in histomorphometric results were observed between the groups. At 3 weeks, P=0.58 for bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and P=0.52 for bone area fraction occupied (BAFO); at 6 weeks, P=0.55 for BIC and P=0.45 for BAFO. While no histomorphometric differences were observed, ground sections showed different healing patterns between the implants, with better peri-implant bone organization around those with the specific cutting flute design (Blossom group). Implants with the modified cutting flute design had a significantly reduced insertion torque compared to the DT implants with a traditional cutting thread, and resulted in a different healing pattern.

  16. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions: differentiation based on CT attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Özgür, Anıl; Kara, Engin; Arpacı, Rabia; Arpacı, Taner; Esen, Kaan; Kara, Taylan; Duce, Meltem Nass; Apaydın, Feramuz Demir

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular lesions are classified as odontogenic and nonodontogenic based on the cell of origin. Odontogenic lesions are frequently encountered at head and neck imaging. However, several nonodontogenic pathologies may also involve mandible and present further diagnostic dilemma. Awareness of the imaging features of nonodontogenic lesions is crucial in order to guide clinicians in proper patient management. Computed tomography (CT) may provide key information to narrow diagnostic considerations. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions may have lytic, sclerotic, ground-glass, or mixed lytic and sclerotic appearances on CT. In this article, our aim is to present various nonodontogenic lesions of the mandible by categorizing them according to their attenuations on CT. PMID:25297390

  17. Osteochondroma of Bilateral Mandibular Condyle with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Vijaya; Rawat, Jitesh; Kulkarni, Ameya; Pajnigara, Nilufer; Dhok, Avinash

    2016-08-01

    Osteochondroma (OC) is a common slow growing tumour of bone. This lesion is frequently seen in the axial skeleton and is relatively uncommon in oral and maxillofacial region. In facial bones, it usually affects the mandibular condyle followed by coronoid process. Very few cases of condylar osteocondroma have been reported in the literature. The aim of this article was to present an atypical case of osteochondroma of bilateral mandibular condyle in an asymptomatic patient and facilitate making an exact diagnosis of it. To the best of our knowledge this is the 2(nd) case of this type reported in literature. PMID:27656529

  18. Evaluation of aural manifestations in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sobhy, O A; Koutb, A R; Abdel-Baki, F A; Ali, T M; El Raffa, I Z; Khater, A H

    2004-08-01

    Thirty patients with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction were selected to investigate the changes in otoacoustic emissions before and after conservative treatment of their temporo-mandibular joints. Pure tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) as well as a tinnitus questionnaire were administered to all patients before and after therapy. Therapy was conservative in the form of counselling, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and occlusal splints. Results indicated insignificant changes in the TEOAEs, whereas there were significant increases in distortion product levels at most of the frequency bands. These results were paralleled to subjective improvement of tinnitus.

  19. Osteochondroma of Bilateral Mandibular Condyle with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Vijaya; Kulkarni, Ameya; Pajnigara, Nilufer; Dhok, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondroma (OC) is a common slow growing tumour of bone. This lesion is frequently seen in the axial skeleton and is relatively uncommon in oral and maxillofacial region. In facial bones, it usually affects the mandibular condyle followed by coronoid process. Very few cases of condylar osteocondroma have been reported in the literature. The aim of this article was to present an atypical case of osteochondroma of bilateral mandibular condyle in an asymptomatic patient and facilitate making an exact diagnosis of it. To the best of our knowledge this is the 2nd case of this type reported in literature. PMID:27656529

  20. A new look at mandibular growth--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Kerr, W J

    1992-04-01

    Cephalometric radiographs of 42 growth study subjects (21 males, 21 females) were the basis of an investigation into the longitudinal growth of the mandible from 5 to 20 years using a digitizer program capable of generating curved outlines through groups of four points. In this presentation mean plots for all subjects at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years of age, variously superimposed, confirmed the previous theories of Björk and Skieller (1983) with regard to mandibular rotation and provide a visual representation of the processes of mandibular growth.

  1. Temporospatial cell interactions regulating mandibular and maxillary arch patterning.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Tucker, A S; Sharpe, P T

    2000-01-01

    The cellular origin of the instructive information for hard tissue patterning of the jaws has been the subject of a long-standing controversy. Are the cranial neural crest cells prepatterned or does the epithelium pattern a developmentally uncommitted population of ectomesenchymal cells? In order to understand more about how orofacial patterning is controlled we have investigated the temporal signalling interactions and responses between epithelium and mesenchymal cells in the mandibular and maxillary primordia. We show that within the mandibular arch, homeobox genes that are expressed in different proximodistal spatial domains corresponding to presumptive molar and incisor ectomesenchymal cells are induced by signals from the oral epithelium. In mouse, prior to E10, all ectomesenchyme cells in the mandibular arch are equally responsive to epithelial signals such as Fgf8, indicating that there is no pre-specification of these cells into different populations and suggesting that patterning of the hard tissues of the mandible is instructed by the epithelium. By E10.5, ectomesenchymal cell gene expression domains are still dependent on epithelial signals but have become fixed and ectopic expression cannot be induced. At E11 expression becomes independent of epithelial signals such that removal of the epithelium does not affect spatial ectomesenchymal expression. Significantly, however, the response of ectomesenchyme cells to epithelial regulatory signals was found to be different in the mandibular and maxillary primordium. Thus, whereas both mandibular and maxillary arch epithelia could induce Dlx2 and Dlx5 expression in the mandible and Dlx2 expression in the maxilla, neither could induce Dlx5 expression in the maxilla. Reciprocal cell transplantations between mandibular and maxillary arch ectomesenchymal cells revealed intrinsic differences between these populations of cranial neural crest-derived cells. Research in odontogenesis has shown that the oral epithelium

  2. Widening a narrow posterior mandibular alveolus following extirpation of a large cyst: a case treated with a titanium mesh-plate type distractor.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Tomonao; Iida, Seiji; Senoo, Hitomi; Hori, Kazuhiro; Namikawa, Mari; Okura, Masaya; Ono, Takahiro

    2008-11-01

    Vertical alveolar augmentation by distraction osteogenesis has become a standard pretreatment of dental implants due to the main benefit of lack of donor site complications, and many reports have shown its benefit with various types of alveolar distractors. However, autogenous bone transplantation and/or guided bone regeneration techniques are still the standard treatment for correcting a narrow alveolar ridge because of few commercially available distractors for alveolar widening. In this article, we treated a case by a mesh-plate type of alveolar widening distractor for a narrow posterior mandibular alveolar ridge after extirpation of a large jaw cyst.

  3. Biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Chae; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Park, Young-Chel; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gain basic information regarding the biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews and their potential clinical applications. Methods Sixteen plasma ion-implanted and 16 sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) miniscrews were bilaterally inserted in the mandibles of 4 beagles (2 miniscrews of each type per quadrant). Then, 250 - 300 gm of force from Ni-Ti coil springs was applied for 2 different periods: 12 weeks on one side and 3 weeks contralaterally. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and mandibular specimens including the miniscrews were collected. The insertion torque and mobility were compared between the groups. The bone-implant contact and bone volume ratio were calculated within 800 µm of the miniscrews and compared between the loading periods. The number of osteoblasts was also quantified. The measurements were expressed as percentages and analyzed by independent t-tests (p < 0.05). Results No significant differences in any of the analyzed parameters were noted between the groups. Conclusions The preliminary findings indicate that plasma ion-implanted miniscrews have similar biologic characteristics to SLA miniscrews in terms of insertion torque, mobility, bone-implant contact rate, and bone volume rate. PMID:23814706

  4. The prevalence of mandibular incisive nerve canal and to evaluate its average location and dimension in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, A. S.; Rijesh, K.; Sharma, Aruna; Prakash, R.; Kumar, Arun; Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of the mandibular incisive canal, evaluate its location and dimensions using cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) in Indian population. Materials and Methods: CBCT scan images of 120 subjects were analyzed for the presence of the mandibular incisive canal, its location, size, and its length. The distance between the incisive canal and the buccal and lingual plate of the alveolar bone, and the distance from the canal to the inferior border of the mandible were also measured to position the canal in the mandible. Results: About 71.66% of the CBCT scans of Indian subjects examined showed the presence of the Incisive canal, of which 48.33% exhibited canals bilaterally and 23.33% showed unilateral canals. 28.33% of the subjects CBCT scans did not exhibit the presence of incisive nerve canal. The average length of the incisive canal was 10.173 mm. The average diameter of the Incisive canal in the CBCT scans was 2.578 mm. The distance from the Inferior border of the mandible to (a) the origin of the Incisive canal was 9.425 mm and (b) to the apex of the Incisive canal was 9.095 mm. The distance from the buccal cortex of the mandible to (a) the origin of the incisive canal was 1.48 mm and (b) to the apex of the incisive canal was 4.476 mm. The distance from the lingual cortex of the mandible to (a) the origin of the incisive canal was 4.464 mm and (b) to the apex of the incisive canal was 5.561 mm. Conclusion: The presence, location, and dimensions of the mandibular incisive canal are an additional required data that needs to be elicited before planning an inter-foraminal placement of implants. PMID:26538925

  5. Error analysis of a CAD/CAM method for unidirectional mandibular distraction osteogenesis in the treatment of hemifacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Biao; Zhao, Zeliang; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Steve G F; Wang, Xudong

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the errors in a computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM) method of unidirectional mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Six patients with hemifacial microsomia were selected, and studied on computed tomographic (CT) scans taken at 3 time intervals: preoperatively, at the end of the latent period, and at the end of consolidation. The plan for mandibular distraction osteogeneisis was designed using CT-based 3-dimensional visible software. The osteotomy line and site of the drill were transferred to a rapid prototyping surgical guide. The osteotomy of the mandible and implantation of the distraction device were completed under guidance. The accuracy of the transferred surgical plan was confirmed by fusion of images after the latency period. The 3-dimensional superimposition of the preoperative simulation, and the postoperative actual models at the end of consolidation, showed that the mean (SD) error between the actual and the predicted height of the ramus was 0.6 (0.6) mm. The error between the actual and predicted intercondylar distance was 8.1 (2.1) mm. There was a significant difference in intercondylar distance between the simulated and actual groups (p=0.00024). The 3-dimensional CT-based planning system described in this paper was transferred precisely from the virtual plan to the real-time operation. The planning system also gave a precise prediction of the height of the ramus after mandibular distraction osteogenesis. However, because of the pull of the lateral pterygoid muscle and pseudarthrosis, the intercondylar distance decreased compared with the predicted value. These influencing factors should be considered when the planning system is refined.

  6. Mandibular corpus bone strain in goats and alpacas: implications for understanding the biomechanics of mandibular form in selenodont artiodactyls.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wall, Christine E; Hylander, William L

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to clarify the functional and biomechanical relationship between jaw morphology and in vivo masticatory loading in selenodont artiodactyls. We compare in vivo strains from the mandibular corpus of goats and alpacas to predicted strain patterns derived from biomechanical models for mandibular corpus loading during mastication. Peak shear strains in both species average 600-700 microepsilon on the working side and approximately 450 microepsilon on the balancing side. Maximum principal tension in goats and alpacas is directed at approximately 30 degrees dorsocaudally relative to the long axis of the corpus on the working side and approximately perpendicular to the long axis on the balancing side. Strain patterns in both species indicate primarily torsion of the working-side corpus about the long axis and parasagittal bending and/or lateral transverse bending of the balancing-side corpus. Interpretation of the strain patterns is consistent with comparative biomechanical analyses of jaw morphology suggesting that in goats, the balancing-side mandibular corpus is parasagittally bent whereas in alpacas it experiences lateral transverse bending. However, in light of higher working-side corpus strains, biomechanical explanations of mandibular form also need to consider that torsion influences relative corpus size and shape. Furthermore, the complex combination of loads that occur along the selenodont artiodactyl mandibular corpus during the power stroke has two implications. First, added clarification of these loading patterns requires in vivo approaches for elucidating biomechanical links between mandibular corpus morphology and masticatory loading. Second, morphometric approaches may be limited in their ability to accurately infer masticatory loading regimes of selenodont artiodactyl jaws.

  7. Functional results of dental restoration with osseointegrated implants after mandible reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gürlek, A; Miller, M J; Jacob, R F; Lively, J A; Schusterman, M A

    1998-03-01

    We reviewed the cases of 20 cancer patients (mean age 47.4 years) in whom osseointegrated implants were used for dental restoration after mandibular reconstruction between January of 1988 and December of 1994. Seventy-one implants were placed into bone flaps (n = 60) or native mandible (n = 11), an average of 3.55 per patient (range, 2 to 5). Successful integration occurred in 91.5 percent (65 of 71); there were five early failures and one late failure, with no significant difference between the number lost in microvascular flaps (5 of 60) and native mandible (1 of 11) (as determined by Fisher's exact test). Functional evaluation included assessments of diet, speech, and cosmesis. Based on our review, we concluded that (1) implants enhance dental restoration in selected patients, and (2) microvascular bone flaps, including the fibula and iliac crest, are well suited for dental implant restoration.

  8. Adjusting dento-alveolar morphology with orthodontic mini-implants (miniscrews). A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Bratu, Cristina Dana; Pop, R V; Pop, Silvia-Izabella; Bratu, Em A

    2011-01-01

    Mini-implants are increasingly popular for creating skeletal anchorage in clinical orthodontics. The aim of this article is to present and discuss the clinical uses, benefits and drawbacks of the miniscrew implants used to reorder and adjust the dento-alveolar morphology of the overerupted maxillary molars. The loss of the lower premolars and molars very often leads to overeruption of the opposing maxillary teeth, combined with insufficient space for prosthetic restorations. The available treatment options are either a significant reduction of the maxillary teeth, often associated with endodontic treatment, or a complex orthodontic treatment. In the previous years, different cases of orthodontic intrusion with mini-implants were described. In this report, the authors describe a case of a young patient who needed a maxillary molar intrusion in order to get sufficient prosthetic space for an implant supported fixed restoration in the third quadrant. This treatment type preserved maximum tooth structures and allowed a successful mandibular restoration. PMID:22119837

  9. Rehabilitation with implant-retained removable dentures and its effects on perioral aesthetics: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lupi, Saturnino Marco; Cislaghi, Matteo; Rizzo, Silvana; Rodriguez y Baena, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    Background The onset of perioral wrinkles often prompts patients to request treatment. This aesthetic deterioration linked to aging may be associated with tooth and alveolar bone loss in fully edentulous patients. Purpose To evaluate perioral wrinkles before and after maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures in fully edentulous patients. Methods In this prospective cohort, single-center, blinded study, patients requiring maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures were enrolled. The patients were photographed in the same position before and after oral rehabilitation. Wrinkles were evaluated in the photographs by blinded observers using validated rating scales. The following parameters were analyzed: upper and lower radial lip lines, marionette lines, upper and lower lip fullness, nasolabial folds, corner of the mouth lines, and the labiomental crease. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test for paired data, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results Upper and lower implant-retained dentures were applied in 31 patients (15 males; mean ± standard deviation age 62.13±8.69 years, range 47–77 years). The oral rehabilitation procedures significantly improved (P<0.05) the upper and lower radial lip lines, marionette lines, upper and lower lip fullness, the nasolabial folds, and the corner of the mouth lines. Conclusion Maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures in fully edentulous patients improves perioral aesthetics. Patients requiring oral rehabilitation and desiring perioral aesthetic improvement could benefit from treatment with this type of prosthesis. PMID:27757052

  10. [The influences of anterior disc displacement on oral mandibular function and morphology and their biological mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Xia, Wendi; Fu, Kiayuan

    2016-03-01

    Anterior disc displacement is a common subtype seen in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. It may cause mandibular movement disorders, such as clicking of joint, intermittent closed lock, limitation of mouth opening, etc. These disorders may affect the life qualities of patients. Anterior disc displacement may also cause mandibular malformations, especially among adolescents, which may affect the growth of condyle, therefore may have a correlation with mandibular retrusion or mandibular deviation when grown up. This paper going to review the influences of anterior disc displacement on oral mandibular function and morphology and their biological mechanisms. PMID:26980658

  11. [The influences of anterior disc displacement on oral mandibular function and morphology and their biological mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Xia, Wendi; Fu, Kiayuan

    2016-03-01

    Anterior disc displacement is a common subtype seen in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. It may cause mandibular movement disorders, such as clicking of joint, intermittent closed lock, limitation of mouth opening, etc. These disorders may affect the life qualities of patients. Anterior disc displacement may also cause mandibular malformations, especially among adolescents, which may affect the growth of condyle, therefore may have a correlation with mandibular retrusion or mandibular deviation when grown up. This paper going to review the influences of anterior disc displacement on oral mandibular function and morphology and their biological mechanisms.

  12. Corrosion of phosphate-enriched titanium oxide surface dental implants (TiUnite) under in vitro inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Seta, Francesca; Mickalonis, John; Brown, Yolanda; Lewis, Jill B; Wataha, John C

    2010-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants use is increasing in patients with systemic conditions that compromise wound healing. Manufacturers recently have redesigned implants to ensure more reliable and faster osseointegration. One design strategy has been to create a porous phosphate-enriched titanium oxide (TiUnite) surface to increase surface area and enhance interactions with bone. In the current study, the corrosion properties of TiUnite implants were studied in cultures of monocytic cells and solutions simulating inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. Furthermore, to investigate whether placement into bone causes enough mechanical damage to alter implant corrosion properties, the enhanced surface implants as well as machined titanium implants were placed into human cadaver mandibular bone, the bone removed, and the corrosion properties measured. Implant corrosion behavior was characterized by open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance, and electrical impedance spectroscopy. In selected samples, THP1 cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide prior to implant exposure to simulate an inflammatory environment. No significant differences in corrosion potentials were measured between the TiUnite implants and the machined titanium implants in previous studies. TiUnite implants exhibited lower corrosion rates in all simulated conditions than observed in PBS, and EIS measurements revealed two time constants which shifted with protein-containing electrolytes. In addition, the TiUnite implants displayed a significantly lower corrosion rate than the machined titanium implants after placement into bone. The current study suggests that the corrosion risk of the enhanced oxide implant is lower than its machined surface titanium implant counterpart under simulated conditions of inflammation, elevated dextrose concentrations, and after implantation into bone.

  13. Analyzing dental occlusion for implants: Tekscan's TScan III.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun K

    2007-09-01

    Though no single, specific occlusal pattern has been developed that is ideal for oral implantology, research suggests some general criteria for deciding on a particular occlusal pattern that will help reduce cuspal interferences and lessen horizontal or lateral forces on the fixtures. Anticipated occlusal and chewing forces need to be taken under consideration for any implant-supported prosthesis. In addition, opposing dentition, as well as potential parafunctional mandibular movements, should be noted. Tekscan's T-Scan Occlusal Analysis System can help clinicians meet the needs of their patients for reliable measurements of occlusal biting forces. The T-Scan III System is Tekscan's most recent attempt to help dental clinicians obtain consistent and useful occlusal data for the placement, analysis, and repair of dental implants. PMID:17944069

  14. Orthopedic correction of growing hyperdivergent, retrognathic patients with miniscrew implants.

    PubMed

    Buschang, Peter H; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P Emile

    2011-03-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do address them require long-term patient compliance. This article introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIs) and growth to treat retrognathic, hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (aged 13.2 ± 1.1 years) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ± 0.3 years). Each patient had 2 MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a rapid palatal expander, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Before treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z score = -1.0), facial convexity (Z score = 0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z score = 1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced by a mean of 2.4 mm, the sella-nasion-basion (SNB) angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased by 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individual's growth potential. PMID:21236539

  15. Orthopedic Correction of Growing Hyperdivergent, Retrognathic, Patients with Miniscrew Implants

    PubMed Central

    Buschang, Peter H.; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P. Emile

    2010-01-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do require long-term patient compliance. This paper introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIa) and growth to treat retrognathic hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (13.2 ±1.1 years of age) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ±0.3 years). Each patient had two MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a RPE, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Prior to treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z-score=−1.0), facial convexity (Z-score=0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z-score=1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced an average of 2.4 mm, the SNB angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individuals’ growth potential. PMID:21236539

  16. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  17. Clinical evaluation of osseointegrated implants in Tokyo Dental College Hospital (third report): long-term observation of functioning survival rate of fixtures.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yuko; Arataki, Tomohiko; Nomura, Takao; Suzuki, Hiroki; Atsuta, Syunichi; Hotta, Hiromi; Shimamura, Ichiro; Adachi, Yasushi; Kishi, Masataka

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this report was to review 365 cases of Brånemark Implant Bridge including 1,444 fixtures in patients of Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital. The term of implantation was divided into several phases; less than 1 year, from 1 year to 3 years, from 3 years to 5 years, from 5 years to 7 years, from 7 years to 10 years, more than 10 years, and the survival rate was calculated for each phase. The removal rate of fixture after connecting the superstructure was 13% in maxillary cases and 2% in mandibular cases. The functioning survival rate in maxillary cases slightly decreased from 91% in less than 1 year to 87% after more than 10 years; however, the functioning survival rate in mandibular cases was about 99% in all periods. The removal rate of fixtures per patient was 23% in maxillary cases and 6% in mandibular ones. The average removal number of fixtures was 1.8 in maxillary cases and 1.2 in mandibular ones. The removal of the fixture occurred most frequently at less than 1 year in maxillary cases, but there was no tendency for a pattern of removal of fixture in mandibular cases.

  18. Experimental xenoimplantation of antlerogenic cells into mandibular bone lesions in rabbits: two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cegielski, Marek; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Kuryszko, Jan; Izykowska, Ilona; Zatoński, Maciej; Bochnia, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Different types of cells require activation, and take part in annual, dynamic growth of deer antlers. Stem cells play the most important role in this process. This report shows the results of a two-year long observation of xenogenic implant of antlerogenic stem cells (cell line MIC-1). The cells were derived from growing antler of a deer (Cervus elaphus), seeded onto Spongostan and placed in postoperative lesions of mandibular bones of 15 experimental rabbits. The healing process observed in the implantation sites in all rabbits was normal, and no local inflammatory response was ever observed. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations were performed after 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 months, and confirmed the participation of xenogenic cells in the regeneration processes, as well as a lack of rejection of the implants. The deficiencies in the bones were replaced by newly formed, thick fibrous bone tissue that underwent mineralization and was later remodelled into lamellar bone. The results of the experiment with rabbits allow us to believe that antlerogenic cells could be used in reconstruction of bone tissues in other species as well.

  19. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  20. An algorithm for the treatment of noncondylar mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Edward

    2014-05-01

    An algorithm for the treatment of noncondylar mandibular fractures is presented based on outcomes from studies that have been performed during the past 30 years. It is designed to assist clinicians in formulating a treatment plan that can be expected to provide the patient with a predictable outcome.