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Sample records for maneuver increases oxygenation

  1. Maneuvering PMHTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yanhua; Willett, Peter K.

    2001-11-01

    The Probabilistic Multiple Hypothesis Tracker (PMHT) has previously been augmented and modified to deal with target maneuver. Unfortunately, although the resulting procedure tracks maneuvering targets reasonably well, estimation of the maneuver process (i.e. the hidden Markov Model (HMM)) is not particularly reactive. In this paper, the PMHT is further investigated and several PMHT variants for maneuvering targets are discussed these include the ideas from Logothetis et al. and from Pulford and La Scala; the incorporation of the Interacting Multiple Mode (IMM) formalism to the PMHT; the extension of the "turbo" PMHT. We finally compare these EM-based tracking schemes and provide the simulation results on the second benchmark problem from Blair et al.

  2. Valsalva maneuver in phlebologic practice.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Stefano; Moro, Leo; Minotti, Girolamo C; Incalzi, Raffaele A; De Maeseneer, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Forced expiration against an airway obstruction was originally described as a method for inflating the Eustachian tubes and is accredited to Antonio Maria Valsalva (1666-1723). The Valsalva maneuver is commonly applied for different diagnostic purposes. Its use for phlebologic diagnosis is the object this review. Venous reflux is the most frequent pathophysiologic mechanism in chronic venous disease. Reflux is easily visualized by duplex ultrasound when properly elicited, in standing position. A simple way to elicit reflux is the so-called "compression-release maneuver": by emptying the muscle reservoir, it determines a centrifugal gradient, dependent on hydrostatic pressure, creating an aspiration system from the superficial to the deep system. The same results are obtained with dynamics tests activating calf muscles. The Valsalva maneuver elicits reflux by a different mechanism, increasing the downstream pressure and, thus, highlighting any connection between the source of reflux and the refluxing vessel. The Valsalva maneuver is typically used to investigate the saphenofemoral junction. When the maneuver is performed correctly, it is very useful to analyse several conditions and different hemodynamic behaviours of the valvular system at the saphenofemoral junction. Negative Valsalva maneuver always indicates valvular competence at the saphenofemoral junction. Reverse flow lasting during the whole strain (positive Valsalva maneuver) indicates incompetence or absence of proximal valves. Coupling Valsalva maneuver to compression-release maneuver, with the sample volume in different saphenofemoral junction sections, may reveal different hemodynamic situations at the saphenofemoral junction, which can be analysed in detail.

  3. Pneumomediastinum following the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Agia, G A; Hurst, D J

    1979-11-01

    The Heimlich maneuver appears to be a widely accepted technique advocated as a means of clearing an obstructed airway. Reports of complications have been few. We report a case of pneumomediastinum that occurred following the generation of increased pulmonary pressures during performance of the Heimlich maneuver.

  4. Oxygen intrusion into anoxic fjords leads to increased methylmercury availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiteberg Braaten, Hans Fredrik; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2013-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) appears in the oxic surface waters of the oceans at low levels (sub ng/L). Because inorganic Hg can be methylated into the toxic and bioaccumulative specie methylmercury (MeHg) levels can be high at the top of the marine food chain. Even though marine sea food is considered the main risk driver for MeHg exposure to people most research up to date has focused on Hg methylation processes in freshwater systems. This study identifies the mechanisms driving formation of MeHg during oxygen depletion in fjords, and shows how MeHg is made available in the surface water during oxygen intrusion. Studies of the biogeochemical structure in the water column of the Norwegian fjord Hunnbunn were performed in 2009, 2011 and 2012. In autumn of 2011 mixing flushing events were observed and lead to both positive and negative effects on the ecosystem state in the fjord. The oxygenated water intrusions lead to a decrease of the deep layer concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia and phosphate. On the other hand the intrusion also raised the H2S boundary from 8 m to a shallower depth of just 4 m. Following the intrusion was also observed an increase at shallower depths of nutrients combined with a decrease of pH. Before flushing events were observed concentrations of total Hg (TotHg) increased from 1.3 - 1.7 ng/L in the surface layer of the fjord to concentrations ranging from 5.2 ng/L to 6.4 ng/L in the anoxic zone. MeHg increased regularly from 0.04 ng/L in the surface water to a maximum concentration of 5.2 ng/L in the deeper layers. This corresponds to an amount of TotHg present as MeHg ranging from 2.1 % to 99 %. The higher concentrations of MeHg in the deeper layer corresponds to an area where no oxygen is present and concentrations of H2S exceeds 500 µM, suggesting a production of MeHg in the anoxic area as a result of sulphate reducing bacteria activity. After flushing the concentrations of TotHg showed a similar pattern ranging from 0.6 ng/L in the

  5. Sustained high-altitude hypoxia increases cerebral oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary M.; Krizay, Erin; Guo, Jia; Shin, David D.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition occurring within hours of rapid exposure to high altitude. Despite its frequent occurrence, the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie the condition remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in AMS. The purpose of this study was to test 1) if CMRO2 changes in response to hypoxia, and 2) if there is a difference in how individuals adapt to oxygen metabolic changes that may determine who develops AMS and who does not. Twenty-six normal human subjects were recruited into two groups based on Lake Louise AMS score (LLS): those with no AMS (LLS ≤ 2), and those with unambiguous AMS (LLS ≥ 5). [Subjects with intermediate scores (LLS 3–4) were not included.] CMRO2 was calculated from cerebral blood flow and arterial-venous difference in O2 content. Cerebral blood flow was measured using arterial spin labeling MRI; venous O2 saturation was calculated from the MRI of transverse relaxation in the superior sagittal sinus. Arterial O2 saturation was measured via pulse oximeter. Measurements were made during normoxia and after 2-day high-altitude exposure at 3,800 m. In all subjects, CMRO2 increased with sustained high-altitude hypoxia [1.54 (0.37) to 1.82 (0.49) μmol·g−1·min−1, n = 26, P = 0.045]. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between AMS and no-AMS groups. End-tidal Pco2 was significantly reduced during hypoxia. Low arterial Pco2 is known to increase neural excitability, and we hypothesize that the low arterial Pco2 resulting from ventilatory acclimatization causes the observed increase in CMRO2. PMID:23019310

  6. Effects of bronchomotor tone and gas density on time dependence of forced expiratory vital capacity maneuver.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E; Milic-Emili, J; Marazzini, L

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown that in normal subjects and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients the maximal expiratory flows and FEV1 are significantly higher if the FVC maneuver is preceded by a rapid inspiration without an end-inspiratory pause (maneuver 1) compared with a slow inspiration with an end-inspiratory pause of approximately 5 s (maneuver 2). This time dependency of FVC was attributed primarily to loss of lung recoil (stress relaxation) during breath-holding at TLC, in association with time constant inequality within the lungs, and changes in bronchomotor tone. To examine the role of bronchomotor tone on time dependency of FVC, 11 COPD and 10 asthmatic patients performed FVC maneuvers 1 and 2 before and after administration of a bronchodilator drug (salbutamol). In addition, using the same approach, the effects of changing airway resistance per se were assessed in another group of 10 COPD patients and 10 normal subjects, while breathing air and after equilibration with 80% helium in oxygen. Main findings were: peak expiratory flow (PEF), FEV1, and maximal midexpiratory flow rate (MMF) were significantly larger with maneuver 1 than 2; after salbutamol administration and during helium-oxygen breathing, all indices increased significantly with both maneuvers but the relative differences between maneuvers 1 and 2 were unchanged. We conclude that time dependency of maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves, as indexed by PEF, FEV1, and MMF, is largely independent of bronchomotor tone and gas density, and probably reflects mainly stress relaxation of the respiratory tissues. The relevance of time dependency of FVC maneuver in the assessment of bronchodilator response and density dependence is discussed.

  7. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  8. Compression sleeves increase tissue oxygen saturation but not running performance.

    PubMed

    Ménétrier, A; Mourot, L; Bouhaddi, M; Regnard, J; Tordi, N

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of calf compression sleeves on running performance and on calf tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) at rest before exercise and during recovery period. 14 moderately trained athletes completed 2 identical sessions of treadmill running with and without calf compression sleeves in randomized order. Each session comprised: 15 min at rest, 30 min at 60% maximal aerobic velocity determined beforehand, 15 min of passive recovery, a running time to exhaustion at 100% maximal aerobic velocity, and 30 min of passive recovery. Calf StO2 was determined by near infra-red spectroscopy and running performance by the time to exhaustion. Compression sleeves increased significantly StO2 at rest before exercise (+ 6.4±1.9%) and during recovery from exercise (+ 7.4±1.7% and + 10.7±1.8% at 20th and 30th min of the last recovery period, respectively). No difference was observed between the times to exhaustion performed with and without compression sleeves (269.4±18.4 s and 263.3±19.8 s, respectively). Within the framework of this study, the compression sleeves do not improve running performance in tlim. However the StO2 results argue for further interest of this garment during effort recovery.

  9. Soldier-relevant body borne loads increase knee joint contact force during a run-to-stop maneuver.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, John W; Hancock, Clifford L; O'Donovan, Meghan P; Brown, Tyler N

    2016-12-08

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of load carriage on human performance, specifically during a run-to-stop (RTS) task. Using OpenSim analysis tools, knee joint contact force, grounds reaction force, leg stiffness and lower extremity joint angles and moments were determined for nine male military personnel performing a RTS under three load configurations (light, ~6kg, medium, ~20kg, and heavy, ~40kg). Subject-based means for each biomechanical variable were submitted to repeated measures ANOVA to test the effects of load. During the RTS, body borne load significantly increased peak knee joint contact force by 1.2 BW (p<0.001) and peak vertical (p<0.001) and anterior-posterior (p=0.002) ground reaction forces by 0.6 BW and 0.3 BW, respectively. Body borne load also had a significant effect on hip (p=0.026) posture with the medium load and knee (p=0.046) posture with the heavy load. With the heavy load, participants exhibited a substantial, albeit non-significant increase in leg stiffness (p=0.073 and d=0.615). Increases in joint contact force exhibited during the RTS were primarily due to greater GRFs that impact the soldier with each incremental addition of body borne load. The stiff leg, extended knee and large braking force the soldiers exhibited with the heavy load suggests their injury risk may be greatest with that specific load configuration. Further work is needed to determine if the biomechanical profile exhibited with the heavy load configuration translates to unsafe shear forces at the knee joint and consequently, a higher likelihood of injury.

  10. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  11. A Novel Method for Satellite Maneuver Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabarekh, C.; Kent-Bryant, J.; Keselman, G.; Mitidis, A.

    2016-09-01

    A space operations tradecraft consisting of detect-track-characterize-catalog is insufficient for maintaining Space Situational Awareness (SSA) as space becomes increasingly congested and contested. In this paper, we apply analytical methodology from the Geospatial-Intelligence (GEOINT) community to a key challenge in SSA: predicting where and when a satellite may maneuver in the future. We developed a machine learning approach to probabilistically characterize Patterns of Life (PoL) for geosynchronous (GEO) satellites. PoL are repeatable, predictable behaviors that an object exhibits within a context and is driven by spatio-temporal, relational, environmental and physical constraints. An example of PoL are station-keeping maneuvers in GEO which become generally predictable as the satellite re-positions itself to account for orbital perturbations. In an earlier publication, we demonstrated the ability to probabilistically predict maneuvers of the Galaxy 15 (NORAD ID: 28884) satellite with high confidence eight days in advance of the actual maneuver. Additionally, we were able to detect deviations from expected PoL within hours of the predicted maneuver [6]. This was done with a custom unsupervised machine learning algorithm, the Interval Similarity Model (ISM), which learns repeating intervals of maneuver patterns from unlabeled historical observations and then predicts future maneuvers. In this paper, we introduce a supervised machine learning algorithm that works in conjunction with the ISM to produce a probabilistic distribution of when future maneuvers will occur. The supervised approach uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) to process the orbit state whereas the ISM processes the temporal intervals between maneuvers and the physics-based characteristics of the maneuvers. This multiple model approach capitalizes on the mathematical strengths of each respective algorithm while incorporating multiple features and inputs. Initial findings indicate that the combined

  12. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  13. Cathodo- and photoluminescence increase in amorphous hafnium oxide under annealing in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. V. Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2015-04-15

    Cathodo- and photoluminescence of amorphous nonstoichiometric films of hafnium oxide are studied with the aim to verify the hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the luminescence. To produce oxygen vacancies, hafnium oxide was enriched in surplus metal during synthesis. To reduce the oxygen concentration, the film was annealed in oxygen. A qualitative control of the oxygen concentration was carried out by the refractive index. In the initial, almost stoichiometric films we observed a 2.7-eV band in cathodoluminescence. Annealing in oxygen results in a considerable increase in its intensity, as well as in the appearance of new bands at 1.87, 2.14, 3.40, and 3.6 eV. The observed emission bands are supposed to be due to single oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies in hafnium oxide. The luminescence increase under annealing in an oxygen atmosphere may be a result of the emission quenching effect.

  14. Optimal Propellant Maneuver Flight Demonstrations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Sagar; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Longacre, Kenneth; Nguyen, Louis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, first ever flight demonstrations of Optimal Propellant Maneuver (OPM), a method of propulsive rotational state transition for spacecraft controlled using thrusters, is presented for the International Space Station (ISS). On August 1, 2012, two ISS reorientations of about 180deg each were performed using OPMs. These maneuvers were in preparation for the same-day launch and rendezvous of a Progress vehicle, also a first for ISS visiting vehicles. The first maneuver used 9.7 kg of propellant, whereas the second used 10.2 kg. Identical maneuvers performed without using OPMs would have used approximately 151.1kg and 150.9kg respectively. The OPM method is to use a pre-planned attitude command trajectory to accomplish a rotational state transition. The trajectory is designed to take advantage of the complete nonlinear system dynamics. The trajectory choice directly influences the cost of the maneuver, in this case, propellant. For example, while an eigenaxis maneuver is kinematically the shortest path between two orientations, following that path requires overcoming the nonlinear system dynamics, thereby increasing the cost of the maneuver. The eigenaxis path is used for ISS maneuvers using thrusters. By considering a longer angular path, the path dependence of the system dynamics can be exploited to reduce the cost. The benefits of OPM for the ISS include not only reduced lifetime propellant use, but also reduced loads, erosion, and contamination from thrusters due to fewer firings. Another advantage of the OPM is that it does not require ISS flight software modifications since it is a set of commands tailored to the specific attitude control architecture. The OPM takes advantage of the existing ISS control system architecture for propulsive rotation called USTO control mode1. USTO was originally developed to provide ISS Orbiter stack attitude control capability for a contingency tile-repair scenario, where the Orbiter is maneuvered using its robotic

  15. Surface energy increase of oxygen-plasma-treated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, M.O.H.; Voorwald, H.J.C.; Mota, R.P

    2003-03-15

    Prosthetic composite is a widely used biomaterial that satisfies the criteria for application as an organic implant without adverse reactions. Polyethylene therephthalate (PET) fiber-reinforced composites have been used because of the excellent cell adhesion, biodegradability and biocompatibility. The chemical inertness and low surface energy of PET in general are associated with inadequate bonds for polymer reinforcements. It is recognized that the high strength of composites, which results from the interaction between the constituents, is directly related to the interfacial condition or to the interphase. A radio frequency plasma reactor using oxygen was used to treat PET fibers for 5, 20, 30 and 100 s. The treatment conditions were 13.56 MHz, 50 W, 40 Pa and 3.33x10{sup -7} m{sup 3}/s. A Rame-Hart goniometer was used to measure the contact angle and surface energy variation of fibers treated for different times. The experimental results showed contact angle values from 47 deg. to 13 deg. and surface energies from 6.4x10{sup -6} to 8.3x10{sup -6} J for the range of 5 to 100 s, respectively. These results were confirmed by the average ultimate tensile strength of the PET fiber/ polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrix composite tested in tensile mode and by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Maneuvering in a Seaway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    forces are found from body-exact computations. The body-exact computations are all done in the time domain. Either a fourth-order Runge - Kutta scheme... method code that is computationally fast and can be used to predict ship maneuvering in a seaway. Technical Approach We are developing a blended... method to predict nonlinear ship motions while maneuvering in a seaway. The blended method uses the nonlinear Euler equations of motion and integrates

  17. Remote operation of an orbital maneuvering vehicle in simulated docking maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.

    1990-01-01

    Simulated docking maneuvers were performed to assess the effect of initial velocity on docking failure rate, mission duration, and delta v (fuel consumption). Subjects performed simulated docking maneuvers of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station. The effect of the removal of the range and rate displays (simulating a ranging instrumentation failure) was also examined. Naive subjects were capable of achieving a high success rate in performing simulated docking maneuvers without extensive training. Failure rate was a function of individual differences; there was no treatment effect on failure rate. The amount of time subjects reserved for final approach increased with starting velocity. Piloting of docking maneuvers was not significantly affected in any way by the removal of range and rate displays. Radial impulse was significant both by subject and by treatment. NASA's 0.1 percent rule, dictating an approach rate no greater than 0.1 percent of the range, is seen to be overly conservative for nominal docking missions.

  18. DE-1 Comet Halley imaging maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, D. R.; Marr, G. C.; Stone, J. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Supplemental attitude control and support techniques were developed to maneuver the NASA Dynamics Explorer-1 (DE-1) spacecraft spin axis to allow extended imaging of Comet Halley with the DE-1 spin-scan auroral imager. The application of these techniques to the extension of the DE-1 mission is discussed as well as the performance attained and potential applications. The maneuver increased the duration of Comet Halley observation by about two months.

  19. Increase in transmittance of unbacked aluminum filters exposed to RF or dc discharges in oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Steele, G. N.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the effect of discharges in oxygen on the oxide thickness and transmittance of aluminum filters. The studies were performed by exposing the filters to RF discharges and dc glow discharges in oxygen. In all experiments except one in which an aluminum ring was used as the cathode an increase in the transmittance of the filters is noted. It is thus demonstrated that the transmittance of aluminum filters increases on exposure to electrical discharges in oxygen, although it is not certain whether this phenomenon is caused by atomic oxygen.

  20. Increased Vascular Resistance with Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    vascular resistance. Swine resuscitated with otofHb exhibited the rapid onset of marked systemic hypertension . The blood pressure rose within seconds...virtual absence of red blood cells (3), hemoglobin solutions have produced hypertension irn animals or have not supported an increase in cardiac output...with blood volume expansion. Half of all the humans administered hemoglobin in published trials demonstrated hypertension (4), and a recent human

  1. Cerebral hemodynamics during graded Valsalva maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Blake G.; Cotter, James D.; Mejuto, Gaizka; Mündel, Toby; Lucas, Samuel J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Valsalva maneuver (VM) produces large and abrupt changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) that challenge cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. We examined the effect of VM intensity on middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and cortical oxygenation responses during (phases I–III) and following (phase IV) a VM. Healthy participants (n = 20 mean ± SD: 27 ± 7 years) completed 30 and 90% of their maximal VM mouth pressure for 10 s (order randomized) whilst standing. Beat-to-beat MCAv, cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) and MAP across the different phases of the VM are reported as the difference from standing baseline. There were significant interaction (phase * intensity) effects for MCAv, total oxygenation index (TOI) and MAP (all P < 0.01). MCAv decreased during phases II and III (P < 0.01), with the greatest decrease during phase III (−5 ± 8 and −19 ± 15 cm·s−1 for 30 and 90% VM, respectively). This pattern was also evident in TOI (phase III: −1 ± 1 and −5 ± 4%, both P < 0.05). Phase IV increased MCAv (22 ± 15 and 34 ± 23 cm·s−1), MAP (15 ± 14 and 24 ± 17 mm Hg) and TOI (5 ± 6 and 7 ± 5%) relative to baseline (all P < 0.05). Cerebral autoregulation, indexed, as the %MCAv/%MAP ratio, showed a phase effect only (P < 0.001), with the least regulation during phase IV (2.4 ± 3.0 and 3.2 ± 2.9). These data illustrate that an intense VM profoundly affects cerebral hemodynamics, with a reactive hyperemia occurring during phase IV following modest ischemia during phases II and III. PMID:25309449

  2. Maneuvering strategies using CMGs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, H. S.; Vadali, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers control strategies for maneuvering spacecraft using Single-Gimbal Control Momentum Gyros (CMGs). A pyramid configuration using four gyros is utilized. Preferred initial gimbal angles for maximum utilization of CMG momentum are obtained for some known torque commands. Feedback control laws are derived from the stability point of view by using the Liapunov's Second Theorem. The gyro rates are obtained by the pseudo-inverse technique. The effect of gimbal rate bounds on controllability are studied for an example maneuver. Singularity avoidance is based on limiting the gyro rates depending on a singularity index.

  3. Oxygen delivery for ambulatory patients. How the Micro-Trach increases mobility.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1988-11-01

    Transtracheal oxygen delivery with the Micro-Trach is state-of-the-art treatment for patients requiring long-term oxygen therapy. The Micro-Trach diminishes dyspnea because it bypasses the anatomic dead space in the respiratory tract. It eliminates the waste of oxygen that escapes from the nose and mouth when a nasal cannula is used. Therefore, a small oxygen container lasts longer, increasing the patient's mobility. The patient's appetite improves because oxygen is not diverted during deglutition, and the senses of smell and taste are restored. Rehabilitation is enhanced through increased mobility and improved nutrition. Transtracheal instillation of saline solution cleanses the respiratory tract and stimulates coughing, opening occluded air passages. There are fewer lung infections and hospitalizations for infective exacerbations of disease. Prescribed saline solution, mucolytics, and antibiotics can also be instilled through the Micro-Trach to treat cystic fibrosis. This use and others are still being explored.

  4. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in association with an attempted Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Roehm, E F; Twiest, M W; Williams, R C

    1983-03-04

    We report herein a case of an incorrectly applied Heimlich maneuver--to the best of our knowledge, the first reported fatal complication associated with a Heimlich maneuver, acute thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and the distal aorta. While the Heimlich maneuver is effective for the relief of foreign body-induced upper airway obstruction, increased efforts should be directed toward instructing the public in correctly recognizing and optimally treating airway obstruction.

  5. Kidney hypoxia, attributable to increased oxygen consumption, induces nephropathy independently of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. To date, it has been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia, per se, for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg per day per kg bodyweight by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion, and histological findings were determined and compared with vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, or markers of oxidative stress but increased kidney oxygen consumption, and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen, and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia, per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease.

  6. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily; deGroh, Kim; Banks, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment, spacecraft surfaces can be altered during atomic oxygen exposure through oxidation and erosion. There can be terrestrial benefits of such interactions, such as the modification of hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of polymers due to chemical modification and texturing. Such modification of the surface may be useful for biomedical applications. For example, atomic oxygen texturing may increase the hydrophilicity of polymers, such as chlorotrifluoroethylene (Aclar), thus allowing increased adhesion and spreading of cells on textured Petri dishes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after atomic oxygen exposure or changes with exposure, the contact angles between the polymer and a water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) plasma asher. Atomic oxygen plasma treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Significant decreases in the water contact angle occurred with atomic oxygen exposure. Fluorinated polymers were found to be less sensitive to changes in hydrophilicity for equivalent atomic oxygen exposures, and two of the fluorinated polymers became more hydrophobic. The majority of change in water contact angle of the non-fluorinated polymers was found to occur with very low fluence exposures, indicating potential cell culturing benefit with short treatment time.

  7. Increased metallothionein content in rat liver induced by x irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, N.; Aono, K.; Utsumi, K.

    1983-08-01

    X irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension are known to induce lipid peroxidation. The effects of these stresses on hepatic content of metallothionein, which may be involved in the regulation of zinc and copper metabolism, have been studied. The amount of metallothionein in rat liver was increased 11-fold by a high dose of X irradiation (1000 R). Increased metallothionein content (about 15 times) was also observed in liver of rats exposed to high oxygen tension for 3 days.

  8. Liquid films on shake flask walls explain increasing maximum oxygen transfer capacities with elevating viscosity.

    PubMed

    Giese, Heiner; Azizan, Amizon; Kümmel, Anne; Liao, Anping; Peter, Cyril P; Fonseca, João A; Hermann, Robert; Duarte, Tiago M; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    In biotechnological screening and production, oxygen supply is a crucial parameter. Even though oxygen transfer is well documented for viscous cultivations in stirred tanks, little is known about the gas/liquid oxygen transfer in shake flask cultures that become increasingly viscous during cultivation. Especially the oxygen transfer into the liquid film, adhering on the shake flask wall, has not yet been described for such cultivations. In this study, the oxygen transfer of chemical and microbial model experiments was measured and the suitability of the widely applied film theory of Higbie was studied. With numerical simulations of Fick's law of diffusion, it was demonstrated that Higbie's film theory does not apply for cultivations which occur at viscosities up to 10 mPa s. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the maximum oxygen transfer capacity OTRmax increases in shake flasks when viscosity is increased from 1 to 10 mPa s, leading to an improved oxygen supply for microorganisms. Additionally, the OTRmax does not significantly undermatch the OTRmax at waterlike viscosities, even at elevated viscosities of up to 80 mPa s. In this range, a shake flask is a somehow self-regulating system with respect to oxygen supply. This is in contrary to stirred tanks, where the oxygen supply is steadily reduced to only 5% at 80 mPa s. Since, the liquid film formation at shake flask walls inherently promotes the oxygen supply at moderate and at elevated viscosities, these results have significant implications for scale-up.

  9. Direct lateral maneuvers in hawkmoths

    PubMed Central

    Greeter, Jeremy S. M.; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used videography to investigate direct lateral maneuvers, i.e. ‘sideslips’, of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. M. sexta sideslip by rolling their entire body and wings to reorient their net force vector. During sideslip they increase net aerodynamic force by flapping with greater amplitude, (in both wing elevation and sweep), allowing them to continue to support body weight while rolled. To execute the roll maneuver we observed in sideslips, they use an asymmetric wing stroke; increasing the pitch of the roll-contralateral wing pair, while decreasing that of the roll-ipsilateral pair. They also increase the wing sweep amplitude of, and decrease the elevation amplitude of, the contralateral wing pair relative to the ipsilateral pair. The roll maneuver unfolds in a stairstep manner, with orientation changing more during downstroke than upstroke. This is due to smaller upstroke wing pitch angle asymmetries as well as increased upstroke flapping counter-torque from left-right differences in global reference frame wing velocity about the moth's roll axis. Rolls are also opposed by stabilizing aerodynamic moments from lateral motion, such that rightward roll velocity will be opposed by rightward motion. Computational modeling using blade-element approaches confirm the plausibility of a causal linkage between the previously mentioned wing kinematics and roll/sideslip. Model results also predict high degrees of axial and lateral damping. On the time scale of whole and half wing strokes, left-right wing pair asymmetries directly relate to the first, but not second, derivative of roll. Collectively, these results strongly support a roll-based sideslip with a high degree of roll damping in M. sexta. PMID:26740573

  10. Breathing Maneuvers as a Vasoactive Stimulus for Detecting Inducible Myocardial Ischemia – An Experimental Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kady; Guensch, Dominik P; Shie, Nancy; Lebel, Julie; Friedrich, Matthias G

    2016-01-01

    Background Breathing maneuvers can elicit a similar vascular response as vasodilatory agents like adenosine; yet, their potential diagnostic utility in the presence of coronary artery stenosis is unknown. The objective of the study is to investigate if breathing maneuvers can non-invasively detect inducible ischemia in an experimental animal model when the myocardium is imaged with oxygenation-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance (OS-CMR). Methods and Findings In 11 anesthetised swine with experimentally induced significant stenosis (fractional flow reserve <0.75) of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and 9 control animals, OS-CMR at 3T was performed during two different breathing maneuvers, a long breath-hold; and a combined maneuver of 60s of hyperventilation followed by a long breath-hold. The resulting change of myocardial oxygenation was compared to the invasive measurements of coronary blood flow, blood gases, and oxygen extraction. In control animals, all breathing maneuvers could significantly alter coronary blood flow as hyperventilation decreased coronary blood flow by 34±23%. A long breath-hold alone led to an increase of 97±88%, while the increase was 346±327% (p<0.001), when the long breath-hold was performed after hyperventilation. In stenosis animals, the coronary blood flow response was attenuated after both hyperventilation and the following breath-hold. This was matched by the observed oxygenation response as breath-holds following hyperventilation consistently yielded a significant difference in the signal of the MRI images between the perfusion territory of the stenosis LAD and remote myocardium. There was no difference between the coronary territories during the other breathing maneuvers or in the control group at any point. Conclusion In an experimental animal model, the response to a combined breathing maneuver of hyperventilation with subsequent breath-holding is blunted in myocardium subject to significant coronary

  11. Recruitment Maneuver in Elderly Patients with Different Peripheral Chemoreflex Sensitivity during Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a recruitment maneuver on respiratory biomechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics in patients suffering from chronic heart failure with different peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity. The study was conducted in 115 elderly patients which underwent major abdominal surgery under general/epidural surgery. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity (PCS) was evaluated with breath-holding duration (BHD) during breath-holding test. All patients were divided into two groups: group H had a high PCS (BHD = 38 seconds or less, n = 49); Group M had a middle PCS (BHD more than 38 seconds, n = 66). Recruitment maneuver improved oxygenation and respiratory biomechanics in all cases. However, cardiac output decreased by an average of 18%–31% in group H compared to 18%–28% in group M. SVR either remained unchanged or decreased by up to 14% of the initial value in group H, while, in group M, it had a tendency to increase, which was 24% of the initial value. So, recruitment maneuver is an effective method to improve oxygenation and biomechanical properties of the respiratory system but in patients with increased peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity it associates with the risk of hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:28070507

  12. Recruitment Maneuver in Elderly Patients with Different Peripheral Chemoreflex Sensitivity during Major Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a recruitment maneuver on respiratory biomechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics in patients suffering from chronic heart failure with different peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity. The study was conducted in 115 elderly patients which underwent major abdominal surgery under general/epidural surgery. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity (PCS) was evaluated with breath-holding duration (BHD) during breath-holding test. All patients were divided into two groups: group H had a high PCS (BHD = 38 seconds or less, n = 49); Group M had a middle PCS (BHD more than 38 seconds, n = 66). Recruitment maneuver improved oxygenation and respiratory biomechanics in all cases. However, cardiac output decreased by an average of 18%-31% in group H compared to 18%-28% in group M. SVR either remained unchanged or decreased by up to 14% of the initial value in group H, while, in group M, it had a tendency to increase, which was 24% of the initial value. So, recruitment maneuver is an effective method to improve oxygenation and biomechanical properties of the respiratory system but in patients with increased peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity it associates with the risk of hemodynamic disturbances.

  13. Nonlinear Maneuver Autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Badgett, M. E.; Walker, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Trajectory-control laws based on singular-perturbation theory and nonlinear dynamical modeling. Nonlinear maneuver autopilot commands flight-test trajectories of F-15 airplane. Underlying theory of controller enables separation of variables processed in fast and slow control loops, reducing amount of computation required.

  14. Militarized Maneuver Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    threat to MMTs perception of prestige, honor, respect and glory. 79 Recommendations Deterring MMT requires an approach of breadth and depth . Breadth......tactic posing a direct threat to the perception of security in the United States. Militarized Maneuver Terrorists MMTs are multiple (more than two

  15. Increased blood oxygen affinity during digestion in the snake Python molurus.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Johannes; Wang, Tobias

    2002-11-01

    Many snakes exhibit large increases in metabolic rate during digestion that place extensive demands on efficient oxygen transport. In the present study, we describe blood oxygen affinity following three weeks of fasting and 48 h after feeding in the Burmese python (Python molurus). We also report simultaneous measurements of arterial blood gases and haematological parameters. Arterial blood was obtained from chronically implanted catheters, and blood oxygen-dissociation curves were constructed from oxygen content measurements at known oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) values at 2% and 5% CO(2). Arterial pH remained constant at approximately 7.6 after feeding, but digestion was associated with an approximately 6 mmol l(-1) increase in [HCO(3)(-)], while CO(2) partial pressure (P(CO(2))) increased from 2.21+/-0.13 kPa in fasted animals to 2.89+/-0.17 kPa at 48 h after feeding. Blood oxygen affinity in vivo was predicted on the basis of pH in vivo and the blood oxygen-dissociation curves obtained in vitro. The blood oxygen affinity in vivo increased during digestion, with P(50) values decreasing from 4.58+/-0.11 kPa to 3.53+/-0.24 kPa. This increase was associated with a significant decrease in the red blood cell [NTP]/[Hb(4)] ratio (relationship between the concentrations of organic phosphates and total haemoglobin) and a significant decrease in mean cellular haemoglobin content, which is indicative of swelling of the red blood cells. Our data for blood oxygen affinity and arterial oxygen levels, together with previously published values of oxygen uptake and blood flows, allow for a quantitative evaluation of oxygen transport during digestion. This analysis shows that a large part of the increased metabolism during digestion is supported by an increased venous extraction, while arterial P(O(2)) (Pa(O(2))) and haemoglobin saturation do not vary with digestive status. Thus, we predict that venous P(O(2)) (Pv(O(2))) is reduced from a fasting value of 5.2 kPa to 1.6 k

  16. Close approach maneuvers around an oblate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, G. M. C.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of the close approach maneuvers in astronautics, and several missions used this technique in the last decades. In the present work, those close approach maneuvers are revisited, but now considering that the spacecraft passes around an oblate planet. This fact changes the distribution of mass of the planet, increasing the mass in the region of the equator, so increasing the gravitational forces in the equatorial plane. Since the present study is limited to planar trajectories, there is an increase in the variation of energy given by the maneuver. The planet Jupiter is used as the body for the close approach, but the value of J2 is varied in a large range to simulate situations of other celestial bodies that have larger oblateness, but the same mass ratio. This is particularly true in recent discovered exoplanets, and this first study can help the study of the dynamics around those bodies.

  17. Low oxygen level increases proliferation and metabolic changes in bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuki, Shogo; Hara, Tomotaka; Munakata, Yasuhisa; Shirasuna, Koumei; Kuwayama, Takehito; Iwata, Hisataka

    2016-12-05

    The present study addresses molecular backgrounds underlying low oxygen induced metabolic changes and 1.2-fold change in bovine granulosa cell (GCs) proliferation. RNA-seq revealed that low oxygen (5%) upregulated genes associated with HIF-1 and glycolysis and downregulated genes associated with mitochondrial respiration than that in high oxygen level (21%). Low oxygen level induced high glycolytic activity and low mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Low oxygen level enhanced GC proliferation with high expression levels of HIF-1, VEGF, AKT, mTOR, and S6RP, whereas addition of anti-VEGF antibody decreased cellular proliferation with low phosphorylated AKT and mTOR expression levels. Low oxygen level reduced SIRT1, whereas activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol increased mitochondrial replication and decreased cellular proliferation with reduction of phosphorylated mTOR. These results suggest that low oxygen level stimulates the HIF1-VEGF-AKT-mTOR pathway and up-regulates glycolysis, which contributes to GC proliferation, and downregulation of SIRT1 contributes to hypoxia-associated reduction of mitochondria and cellular proliferation.

  18. Increase in pulmonary blood flow at birth: role of oxygen and lung aeration.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; te Pas, Arjan B; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-03-01

    Lung aeration stimulates the increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, but the spatial relationships between PBF and lung aeration and the role of increased oxygenation remain unclear. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography, we have investigated the separate roles of lung aeration and increased oxygenation in PBF changes at birth using near-term (30 days of gestation) rabbit kits (n = 18). Rabbits were imaged before ventilation, then the right lung was ventilated with 100% nitrogen (N2), air or 100% O2 (oxygen), before all kits were switched to ventilation in air, followed by ventilation of both lungs using air. Unilateral ventilation of the right lung with 100% N2 significantly increased heart rate (from 69.4 ± 4.9 to 93.0 ± 15.0 bpm), the diameters of both left and right pulmonary axial arteries, number of visible vessels in both left and right lungs, relative PBF index in both pulmonary arteries, and reduced bolus transit time for both left and right axial arteries (from 1.34 ± 0.39 and 1.81 ± 0.43 s to 0.52 ± 0.17 and 0.89 ± 0.21 s in the left and right axial arteries, respectively). Similar changes were observed with 100% oxygen, but increases in visible vessel number and vessel diameter of the axial arteries were greater in the ventilated right lung during unilateral ventilation. These findings confirm that PBF increase at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration and that the increase in PBF to unventilated regions is unrelated to oxygenation, although oxygen can potentiate this increase.

  19. Increasing dissolved-oxygen disrupts iron homeostasis in production cultures of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baez, Antonino; Shiloach, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The damaging effect of high oxygen concentration on growth of Escherichia coli is well established. Over-oxygenation increases the intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing the destruction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster of dehydratases and limiting the biosynthesis of both branched-chain amino acids and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A key enzyme that reduces the damaging effect of superoxide is superoxide dismutase (SOD). Its transcriptional regulation is controlled by global transcription regulators that respond to changes in oxygen and iron concentrations and pH. Production of biological compounds from E. coli is currently achieved using cultures grown to high cell densities which require oxygen-enriched air supply. It is, therefore, important to study the effect of over-oxygenation on E. coli metabolism and the bacterial protecting mechanism. The effect of over-oxygenation on the superoxide dismutase regulation system was evaluated in cultures grown in a bioreactor by increasing the oxygen concentration from 30 to 300 % air saturation. Following the change in the dissolved oxygen (DO), the expression of sodC, the periplasmic CuZn-containing SOD, and sodA, the cytosolic Mn-containing SOD, was higher in all the tested strains, while the expression of the sodB, the cytosolic Fe-containing SOD, was lower. The down-regulation of the sodB was found to be related to the activation of the small RNA RyhB. It was revealed that iron homeostasis, in particular ferric iron, was involved in the RyhB activation and in sodB regulation but not in sodA. Supplementation of amino acids to the culture medium reduced the intracellular ROS accumulation and reduced the activation of both SodA and SodC following the increase in the oxygen concentration. The study provides evidence that at conditions of over-oxygenation, sodA and sodC are strongly regulated by the amount of ROS, in particular superoxide; and sodB is regulated by iron availability through the

  20. Physiological intestinal oxygen modulates the Caco-2 cell model and increases sensitivity to the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tara; Armstrong, Jane A; Criddle, David N; Wright, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell model is widely used as a model of colon cancer and small intestinal epithelium but, like most cell models, is cultured in atmospheric oxygen conditions (∼21%). This does not reflect the physiological oxygen range found in the colon. In this study, we investigated the effect of adapting the Caco-2 cell line to routine culturing in a physiological oxygen (5%) environment. Under these conditions, cells maintain a number of key characteristics of the Caco-2 model, such as increased formation of tight junctions and alkaline phosphatase expression over the differentiation period and maintenance of barrier function. However, these cells exhibit differential oxidative metabolism, proliferate less and become larger during differentiation. In addition, these cells were more sensitive to cannabidiol-induced antiproliferative actions through changes in cellular energetics: from a drop of oxygen consumption rate and loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity in cells treated under atmospheric conditions to an increase in reactive oxygen species in intact mitochondria in cells treated under low-oxygen conditions. Inclusion of an additional physiological parameter, sodium butyrate, into the medium revealed a cannabidiol-induced proliferative response at low doses. These effects could impact on its development as an anticancer therapeutic, but overall, the data supports the principle that culturing cells in microenvironments that more closely mimic the in vivo conditions is important for drug screening and mechanism of action studies.

  1. Maximal oxygen consumption increases with temperature in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) through increased heart rate and arteriovenous extraction

    PubMed Central

    Claësson, Débora; Wang, Tobias; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Global warming results in increasing water temperature, which may represent a threat to aquatic ectotherms. The rising temperature affects ecology through physiology, by exerting a direct limiting effect on the individual. The mechanism controlling individual thermal tolerance is still elusive, but some evidence shows that the heart plays a central role, and that insufficient transport of oxygen to the respiring tissues may determine the thermal tolerance of animals. In this study, the influence of the heart in thermal limitation was investigated by measurements of aerobic scope in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) together with measurements of cardiac output during rest and activity. Aerobic capacity was not limited by an acutely increased temperature in the European eel. Oxygen demand was met by an increase in heart rate and arteriovenous extraction. These findings suggest that thermal tolerance during exposure to acute temperature changes is not defined by oxygen transport capacity in the eel, and other mechanisms may play a central role in limiting thermal tolerance in these fish. PMID:27766150

  2. Maximal oxygen consumption increases with temperature in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) through increased heart rate and arteriovenous extraction.

    PubMed

    Claësson, Débora; Wang, Tobias; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Global warming results in increasing water temperature, which may represent a threat to aquatic ectotherms. The rising temperature affects ecology through physiology, by exerting a direct limiting effect on the individual. The mechanism controlling individual thermal tolerance is still elusive, but some evidence shows that the heart plays a central role, and that insufficient transport of oxygen to the respiring tissues may determine the thermal tolerance of animals. In this study, the influence of the heart in thermal limitation was investigated by measurements of aerobic scope in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) together with measurements of cardiac output during rest and activity. Aerobic capacity was not limited by an acutely increased temperature in the European eel. Oxygen demand was met by an increase in heart rate and arteriovenous extraction. These findings suggest that thermal tolerance during exposure to acute temperature changes is not defined by oxygen transport capacity in the eel, and other mechanisms may play a central role in limiting thermal tolerance in these fish.

  3. Reducing Formation-Keeping Maneuver Costs for Formation Flying Satellites in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Several techniques are used to synthesize the formation-keeping control law for a three-satellite formation in low-earth orbit. The objective is to minimize maneuver cost and position tracking error. Initial reductions are found for a one-satellite case by tuning the state-weighting matrix within the linear-quadratic-Gaussian framework. Further savings come from adjusting the maneuver interval. Scenarios examined include cases with and without process noise. These results are then applied to a three-satellite formation. For both the one-satellite and three-satellite cases, increasing the maneuver interval yields a decrease in maneuver cost and an increase in position tracking error. A maneuver interval of 8-10 minutes provides a good trade-off between maneuver cost and position tracking error. An analysis of the closed-loop poles with respect to varying maneuver intervals explains the effectiveness of the chosen maneuver interval.

  4. Spontaneous calcium waves in Bergman glia increase with age and hypoxia and may reduce tissue oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Claus; Brazhe, Alexey; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Glial calcium (Ca(2+)) waves constitute a means to spread signals between glial cells and to neighboring neurons and blood vessels. These waves occur spontaneously in Bergmann glia (BG) of the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo. Here, we tested three hypotheses: (1) aging and reduced blood oxygen saturation alters wave activity; (2) glial Ca(2+) waves change cerebral oxygen metabolism; and (3) neuronal and glial wave activity is correlated. We used two-photon microscopy in the cerebellar cortexes of adult (8- to 15-week-old) and aging (48- to 80-week-old) ketamine-anesthetized mice after bolus loading with OGB-1/AM and SR101. We report that the occurrence of spontaneous waves is 20 times more frequent in the cerebellar cortex of aging as compared with adult mice, which correlated with a reduction in resting brain oxygen tension. In adult mice, spontaneous glial wave activity increased on reducing resting brain oxygen tension, and ATP-evoked glial waves reduced the tissue O(2) tension. Finally, although spontaneous Purkinje cell (PC) activity was not associated with increased glia wave activity, spontaneous glial waves did affect intracellular Ca(2+) activity in PCs. The increased wave activity during aging, as well as low resting brain oxygen tension, suggests a relationship between glial waves, brain energy homeostasis, and pathology.

  5. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengnan; Matsubara, Jesse H.; Gordon, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects’ ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral “lane-change” maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects’ ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost. PMID:26167931

  6. Air Combat Maneuvering Performance Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    several major purposes. First, it would provide improved feedback to Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) students concerning their progress through the flight...materials and syllabi. Consistent patterns of weakness in the students would serve as an indicator of a need for adjustment and improvement in the program...adversary maneuvers. BFM students learn to perceive the aspect angle, angle-off, and closure rate of the opposing aircraft. They learn the proper maneuver

  7. Ruptured jejunum following Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Razaboni, R M; Brathwaite, C E; Dwyer, W A

    1986-01-01

    The Heimlich maneuver, over time, has proved to be a useful resuscitative procedure in the management of cases with airway occlusion secondary to foreign body. Medical treatments, however, can have side effects, and this maneuver is no exception. A previously unreported complication is presented, that of jejunal rupture. The proper application of the maneuver minimizes the number of side effects; however, since they do occur, it is suggested that all persons subject to this maneuver be subsequently evaluated by a physician as soon after the incident as is practicable.

  8. Impaired Tissue Oxygenation in Metabolic Syndrome Requires Increased Microvascular Perfusion Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mason McClatchey, P; Wu, Fan; Olfert, I Mark; Ellis, Christopher G; Goldman, Daniel; Reusch, Jane E B; Frisbee, Jefferson C

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) in obese Zucker rats (OZR) is associated with impaired skeletal muscle performance and blunted hyperemia. Studies suggest that reduced O2 diffusion capacity is required to explain compromised muscle performance and that heterogeneous microvascular perfusion distribution is critical. We modeled tissue oxygenation during muscle contraction in control and OZR skeletal muscle using physiologically realistic relationships. Using a network model of Krogh cylinders with increasing perfusion asymmetry and increased plasma skimming, we predict increased perfusion heterogeneity and decreased muscle oxygenation in OZR, with partial recovery following therapy. Notably, increasing O2 delivery had less impact on VO2 than equivalent decreases in O2 delivery, providing a mechanism for previous empirical work associating perfusion heterogeneity and impaired O2 extraction. We demonstrate that increased skeletal muscle perfusion asymmetry is a defining characteristic of MS and must be considered to effectively model and understand blood-tissue O2 exchange in this model of human disease.

  9. Automobile maneuvering device

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, R.

    1987-08-18

    An automobile maneuvering device is described which consists of: a chassis comprising transport wheels for permitting movement of the device along the ground, a drive wheel operably rotatably connected to the chassis, and means for rotating the drive wheel, clamp means operably connected to the chassis and spaced from and opposed to the drive wheel, the chassis including means to move the clamp means to engage one portion of an automobile tire with the drive wheel engaged at another portion of the automobile tire, and means to actuate the rotating means, so that with rotation of the drive wheel the automobile tire is rotated and the automobile and device moved along the ground.

  10. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  11. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  12. Dynamic Tow Maneuver Orbital Launch Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutan, Elbert L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An orbital launch system and its method of operation use a maneuver to improve the launch condition of a booster rocket and payload. A towed launch aircraft, to which the booster rocket is mounted, is towed to a predetermined elevation and airspeed. The towed launch aircraft begins the maneuver by increasing its lift, thereby increasing the flight path angle, which increases the tension on the towline connecting the towed launch aircraft to a towing aircraft. The increased tension accelerates the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket, while decreasing the speed (and thus the kinetic energy) of the towing aircraft, while increasing kinetic energy of the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket by transferring energy from the towing aircraft. The potential energy of the towed launch aircraft and booster rocket is also increased, due to the increased lift. The booster rocket is released and ignited, completing the launch.

  13. Improved Intratumoral Oxygenation Through Vascular Normalization Increases Glioma Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mackenzie C.; Hamner, J. Blair; Williams, Regan F.; Rosati, Shannon F.; Sims, Thomas L.; Ng, Catherine Y.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Calabrese, Christopher; Wu Jianrong; Nathwani, Amit C.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation, an important component of glioma therapy, is critically dependent on tumor oxygenation. However, gliomas are notable for areas of necrosis and hypoxia, which foster radioresistance. We hypothesized that pharmacologic manipulation of the typically dysfunctional tumor vasculature would improve intratumoral oxygenation and, thus, the antiglioma efficacy of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87 xenografts were treated with either continuous interferon-beta (IFN-beta) or bevacizumab, alone, or combined with cranial irradiation (RT). Tumor growth was assessed by quantitative bioluminescence imaging; the tumor vasculature using immunohistochemical staining, and tumor oxygenation using hypoxyprobe staining. Results: Both IFN-beta and bevaziumab profoundly affected the tumor vasculature, albeit with different cellular phenotypes. IFN-beta caused a doubling in the percentage of area of perivascular cell staining, and bevacizumab caused a rapid decrease in the percentage of area of endothelial cell staining. However, both agents increased intratumoral oxygenation, although with bevacizumab, the effect was transient, being lost by 5 days. Administration of IFN-beta or bevacizumab before RT was significantly more effective than any of the three modalities as monotherapy or when RT was administered concomitantly with IFN-beta or bevacizumab or 5 days after bevacizumab. Conclusion: Bevacizumab and continuous delivery of IFN-beta each induced significant changes in glioma vascular physiology, improving intratumoral oxygenation and enhancing the antitumor activity of ionizing radiation. Additional investigation into the use and timing of these and other agents that modify the vascular phenotype, combined with RT, is warranted to optimize cytotoxic activity.

  14. Identification of a Small Molecule that Increases Hemoglobin Oxygen Affinity and Reduces SS Erythrocyte Sickling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the oxygen affinity of human hemoglobin may reduce sickling of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell disease. We screened 38 700 compounds using small molecule microarrays and identified 427 molecules that bind to hemoglobin. We developed a high-throughput assay for evaluating the ability of the 427 small molecules to modulate the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. We identified a novel allosteric effector of hemoglobin, di(5-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)disulfide (TD-1). TD-1 induced a greater increase in oxygen affinity of human hemoglobin in solution and in red blood cells than did 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), or diformamidine disulfide. The three-dimensional structure of hemoglobin complexed with TD-1 revealed that monomeric units of TD-1 bound covalently to β-Cys93 and β-Cys112, as well as noncovalently to the central water cavity of the hemoglobin tetramer. The binding of TD-1 to hemoglobin stabilized the relaxed state (R3-state) of hemoglobin. TD-1 increased the oxygen affinity of sickle hemoglobin and inhibited in vitro hypoxia-induced sickling of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell disease without causing hemolysis. Our study indicates that TD-1 represents a novel lead molecule for the treatment of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:25061917

  15. Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Camelia E; Larkin, Oliver J; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E D; Hill, Richard J A

    2011-03-06

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  16. Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Camelia E.; Larkin, Oliver J.; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R.; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E. D.; Hill, Richard J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena. PMID:20667843

  17. Heimlich trauma: a violent maneuver.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D A

    2001-03-01

    The Heimlich maneuver is a life-saving technique for dislodging foreign material from the respiratory tract. This report illustrates intraabdominal injuries, including a large mesenteric laceration, mesenteric contusions, and intraperitoneal hemorrhage, that occurred in a recipient of a vigorously applied Heimlich maneuver. The potential for confusing such injuries with homicidally inflicted injuries is emphasized.

  18. The Essence of Operational Maneuver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    instead of tactical maneuver, to win campaigns. The 1962 version of FM 100-5 defines maneuver as the dynamic element of battle by which forces...lug JACKSON tdh all TMIL x UBHEIT MHEapD 4.NSOW J"cao inteVle VAIUY- 18 (3:229)k Union forces were unable to concentrato because of the Massanutten

  19. Increasing oxygenation and radiation sensitivity following photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in the RIF-1 tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Demidenko, Eugene; Wilmot, Carmen M.; Chen, Bin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2003-06-01

    The combination of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) wiht radiaiton therapy from an orthovoltage device has been examiend in the radiation induced fibrosarcoma tumor model. PDT with verteporfin using a 3 hour delay between injection and the time of optical irradiation has been shown to cause a significant rise in overlal tumor oxygenation. It was huypothesized that this mechanism arises from the reduced oxygen consumption from cells where the PDT has targeted the mitochondria and shut down cellular respiration. Tumor blood flow was measured and found to be still be patent immediately following therapy. This increasing oxygenation was thought to provide an opportunity to increase the radiation sensitivity of the tumor immediately following PDT. When this type of treatment was combined with radiation therapy, a delay in the tumor regrowth time demonstrated that the combined effect was greater than additive. Further study of this phenomenon will provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the effect and possibly provide a viable pre-treatment for radiation therapy of tumore that increases the therapeutic ratio. This effect could be used to either increase the radiaton dose without increasing the side effects or decrease the dose needed for the same effect on the tumor.

  20. The role of oxygen-increased respirator in humans ascending to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is common for people who live in low altitude areas ascending to the high altitude. Many instruments have been developed to treat mild cases of AMS. However, long-lasting and portable anti-hypoxia equipment for individual is not yet available. Methods Oxygen-increased respirator (OIR) has been designed to reduce the risk of acute mountain sickness in acute exposure to low air pressure. It can increase the density of oxygen by increasing total atmospheric pressure in a mask. Male subjects were screened, and eighty-eight were qualified to perform the experiments. The subjects were divided into 5 groups and were involved in some of the tests at 4 different altitudes (Group 1, 2: 3700 m; Group 3,4,5: 4000 m, 4700 m, 5380 m) with and without OIR. These tests include heart rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), blood lactate (BLA) and PWC (physical work capacity) -170. Results The results showed that higher SpO2, lower heart rate (except during exercise) and better recovery of heart rate were observed from all the subjects ’with OIR’ compared with ’without OIR’ (P<0.05). Moreover, compared with ’without OIR’, subjects ’with OIR’ in Group 1 had lower concentrations of MDA and BLA, and a higher concentration of SOD (P<0.05), while subjects ’with OIR’ in Group 2 showed better physical capacity (measured by the PWC-170) (P<0.05). The additional experiment conducted in a hypobaric chamber (simulating 4,000 m) showed that the partial pressure of oxygen in blood and arterial oxygen saturation were higher ’with OIR’ than ’without OIR’ (P<0.05). Conclusions We suggested that OIR may play a useful role in protecting people ascending to high altitude before acclimatization. PMID:22898206

  1. Elevated Cytosolic Na+ Increases Mitochondrial Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Failing Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Liu, Ting; Knopp, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Ong, Mei Fang; Böhm, Michael; O'Rourke, Brian; Maack, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Background —Oxidative stress is causally linked to the progression of heart failure, and mitochondria are critical sources of reactive oxygen species in failing myocardium. We previously observed that in heart failure, elevated cytosolic Na+ ([Na+]i) reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) by accelerating Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Because the regeneration of antioxidative enzymes requires NADPH, which is indirectly regenerated by the Krebs cycle, and Krebs cycle dehydrogenases are activated by [Ca2+]m, we speculated that in failing myocytes, elevated [Na+]i promotes oxidative stress. Methods and Results —We used a patch-clamp–based approach to simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and, alternatively, mitochondrial H2O2 together with NAD(P)H in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Cells were depolarized in a voltage-clamp mode (3 Hz), and a transition of workload was induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. During this transition, NAD(P)H initially oxidized but recovered when [Ca2+]m increased. The transient oxidation of NAD(P)H was closely associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 formation. This reactive oxygen species formation was potentiated when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was blocked (by Ru360) or Ca2+ efflux was accelerated (by elevation of [Na+]i). In failing myocytes, H2O2 formation was increased, which was prevented by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Conclusions —Besides matching energy supply and demand, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake critically regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In heart failure, elevated [Na+]i promotes reactive oxygen species formation by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. This novel mechanism, by which defects in ion homeostasis induce oxidative stress, represents a potential drug target to reduce reactive oxygen species production in the failing heart. PMID:20351235

  2. Effect of increased oxygen tension on flicker-induced vasodilatation in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    In the retina, blood flow and neural activity are tightly coupled. Stimulation of the retina with flickering light is accompanied by an increase in blood flow. The current study seeks to investigate whether an increase in oxygen tension modulates flicker (FL)-induced vasodilatation in the human retina. A total of 52 healthy volunteers were included. Via a breathing mask, 100% oxygen (O(2)) was administered in one, a mixture of 8% carbon dioxide and 92% oxygen (C/O) in a second cohort. Retinal vessel diameters were measured with a Vessel Analyzer and FL responses were assessed before and during the breathing periods. At baseline, FL stimulation increased retinal vessel diameters by +3.7±2.3% in arteries and by +5.1±3.7% in veins. Breathing of C/O led to a decrease in arterial (-9.0±6.9%) and venous (-11.3±5.9%) vessel calibers. Flicker response was increased to 5.7±2.5% in arteries and to 8.6±4.1% in veins. Breathing of pure O2 induced a vasoconstriction of vessel diameters by -14.0±5.3% in arteries and -18.4±7.0% in veins and increased FL responses in arteries (+6.2±2.8%) and veins (+7.2±3.1%). Systemic hyperoxia increases FL-induced retinal vasodilatation in the retina. The mechanism by which oxygen modulates the hyperemic response to FL stimulation remains to be elucidated.

  3. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  4. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  5. Increased Oxygen Recovery from Sabatier Systems Using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology and Metal Hydride Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Miller, Lee A.; Dahl, Roger W.; Hadley, Neal M.; Wambolt, Spencer R.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is based on the Sabatier reaction where less than 50% of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic CO2. The reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. This is further exacerbated when Sabatier methane (CH4) is vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover hydrogen has the potential to dramatically increase oxygen recovery and thus drastically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. Due to the highly unstable nature of acetylene, a separation system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of a full-scale Third Generation PPA is reported and investigations into metal hydride hydrogen separation technology is discussed.

  6. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  7. Supplemental oxygen attenuates the increase in wound bacterial growth during simulated aeromedical evacuation in goats

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Ryan E.; Sonnier, Dennis I.; Makley, Amy T.; Campion, Eric M.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bailey, Stephanie R.; Dorlac, Warren C.; Lentsch, Alex B.; Pritts, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth in soft tissue and open fractures is a known risk factor for tissue loss and complications in contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Current care for battlefield casualties with soft tissue and musculoskeletal wounds includes tactical and strategic aeromedical evacuation (AE). This exposes patients to a hypobaric, hypoxic environment. In the present study, we sought to determine whether exposure to AE alters bacterial growth in contaminated complex musculoskeletal wounds and whether supplemental oxygen had any effect on wound infections during simulated AE. Methods A caprine model of a contaminated complex musculoskeletal wound was employed. Complex musculoskeletal wounds were created and inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Goats were divided into three experimental groups: ground control, simulated aeromedical evacuation (AE), and simulated AE with supplemental oxygen (AE+O2). Simulated AE was induced in a hypobaric chamber pressurized to 8800 feet for 7 hours. Bacterial luminescence was measured using a photon counting camera at three timepoints: preflight (20 hours post surgery), postflight (7 hours from preflight and 27 hours post-surgery), and necropsy (24 hours from preflight and 44 hours post surgery). Results There was a significant increase in bacterial growth in the AE group compared to the ground control group measured postflight and at necropsy. Simulated AE induced hypoxia with oxygen saturation less than 93%. Supplemental oxygen corrected the hypoxia and significantly reduced bacterial growth in wounds at necropsy. Conclusions Hypoxia induced during simulated AE enhances bacterial growth in complex musculoskeletal wounds which can be prevented with the application of supplemental oxygen to the host. PMID:22743376

  8. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  9. Blood oxygen affinity increases during digestion in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Rafael P; Fuga, Adriana; Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A; Carvalho, José E; Andrade, Denis V

    2015-08-01

    Digesting snakes experience massive increases in metabolism that can last for many days and are accompanied by adjustments in the oxygen transport cascade. Accordingly, we examined the oxygen-binding properties of the blood in the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) during fasting and 24 and 48h after the snakes have ingested a rodent meal corresponding to 15% (±2%) of its own body mass. In general, oxygen-hemoglobin (Hb-O2) affinity was significantly increased 24h post-feeding, and then returned toward fasting values within 48h post-feeding. Content of organic phosphates ([NTP] and [NTP]/[Hb]), hemoglobin cooperativity (Hill's n), and Bohr Effect (ΔlogP50/ΔpH) were not affected by feeding. The postprandial increase in Hb-O2 affinity in the South American rattlesnake can be almost entirely ascribed by the moderate alkaline tide that follows meal ingestion. In general, digesting snakes were able to regulate blood metabolites at quite constant levels (e.g., plasma osmolality, lactate, glucose, and total protein levels). The level of circulating lipids, however, was considerably increased, which may be related to their mobilization, since lipids are known to be incorporated by the enterocytes after snakes have fed. In conclusion, our results indicate that the exceptional metabolic increment exhibited by C. d. terrificus during meal digestion is entirely supported by the aerobic pathways and that among the attending cardiorespiratory adjustments, pulmonary Hb-O2 loading is likely improved due to the increment in blood O2 affinity.

  10. Increase of brain tumor oxygenation during cervical spinal cord stimulation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Robaina, Francisco; Morera, Jesús; Ruiz-Egea, Eugenio; Pérez, Juan L; Macías, David; Caramés, Miguel A; Catalá, Luis; Hernández, M Antonia; Günderoth, Martina

    2002-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors have been shown to decrease O2 and blood flow resulting in hypoxia and low perfusion that in turn reduce radiation sensitivity and access by chemotherapeutic agents. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a procedure that has been used quite successfully in the treatment of pain and ischemic syndromes. In the present study the authors applied the method and, with polarographic probes inserted in the tumor sites, measured the changes in tissue oxygenation and hypoxia in two separate tumor areas in three patients with high-grade astrocytomas. The results of the SCS indicated that overall tumor oxygenation increased by 90% (from 13.2+/-9.4 mm Hg to 25.1+/-9.6 mm Hg; p = 0.013); the percentage of moderately hypoxic values (< 10 mm Hg) decreased by 55% (from 48.6+/-20.1% to 22+/-13.3%; p = 0.026); and the percentage of considerably hypoxic values (< 5 mm Hg) decreased by 45% (from 28+/-20.3% to 15.5+/-15%; p = 0.018). In this report the authors describe a potential novel application of SCS, and the preliminary results suggest that tumor tissue oxygenation and hypoxia are significantly improved as a result. If these findings are confirmed, the method may be applicable as an adjuvant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens.

  11. Heimlich maneuver on infant (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly in children less than 3 years old and in senior citizens, but can occur at any age. The Heimlich maneuver has been valuable in saving lives and can be administered by anyone who has learned the technique.

  12. Heimlich maneuver on adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly in children less than 3 years old and in senior citizens, but can occur at any age. The Heimlich maneuver has been valuable in saving lives and can be administered by anyone who has learned the technique.

  13. Turns and maneuvers during swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Amneet; Mosberg, Noah; Bale, Rahul; Patankar, Neelesh

    2011-11-01

    In this work we use fully resolved fluid dynamics computations based on an immersed body approach to study fish turns and maneuvers. We present a numerical method to control the trajectory of fish during turns and maneuvers. Fish tracking a prey is presented as an example case. Numerical simulations are carried out on spatially adaptive grid for speed and accuracy. The effect of deformation kinematics and Reynolds number (Re), on the turn radius of an undulatory swimmer, is studied. Power spent during turning at different turn radii and Re is also reported. These results can be used to quantify the cost of various maneuvers and to identify efficient maneuvers to attain the same objective, e.g., reaching a target location during prey tracking. NSF support is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. ARTEMIS Maneuvers into Lunar Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation visualizes the maneuvers required to move the ARTEMIS spacecraft from their kidney-shaped paths on each side of the moon to orbiting the moon. It took one and a half years, over 90 o...

  15. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or “backflip.” With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  16. STS-133: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 1:15 p.m. EST Saturday, space shuttle Discovery began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Steve Lindsey at the helm, Discovery rotated 360 degrees backward t...

  17. Orbital-Maneuver-Sequence Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    optimization computer program and applied it to the generation of optimal cog-brbital attack4ianeuver sequences * and to the generation of optimal evasions...maneuver-sequence- optimization computer programs can be improved by a general restructuring and streamlining and the addition of various features. It is...believed that with further development and systematic testing the programs have potential for real-time generation of optimal maneuver sequences in an

  18. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  19. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, G.A.; Bertuzzi, R.; De-Oliveira, F.R.; Pires, F.O.; Lima-Silva, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure. PMID:27783812

  20. Increased strength and decreased flexibility are related to reduced oxygen cost of walking

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John P.; Bryan, David R.; Zuckerman, Paul A.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Byrne, Nuala M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose was determine effects resistance training/weight loss induced changes in muscular strength and flexibility have on net walking oxygen uptake (netVO2). Sixty-seven premenopausal women lost 12 kg. Before weight loss subjects were assigned to diet (WL) or diet/3 days per week resistance training (WLRT). Resting energy expenditure, oxygen uptake while walking at 4.84 km h−1 on the flat and up 2.5% grade, isometric knee extension strength, and flexibility of the knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured. Strength increased in WLRT (+36 N) but not in WL (−24 N). NetVO2 decreased significantly while flat walking (7.3%) and 2.5% grade walking (5.7%) in WLRT, but not in WL. Delta strength was negatively while delta knee extensor and plantar flexor flexibility were positively related to delta netVO2. Decreases in walking and grade netVO2 were independently and positively related to increased knee extension strength and decreased knee extensor and plantar flexor flexibility. PMID:18758805

  1. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, G A; Bertuzzi, R; De-Oliveira, F R; Pires, F O; Lima-Silva, A E

    2016-10-24

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure.

  2. Automated maneuver planning using a fuzzy logic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, D.; Sperling, R.; Folta, D.; Richon, K.; Defazio, R.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft orbital control requires intensive interaction between the analyst and the system used to model the spacecraft trajectory. For orbits with right mission constraints and a large number of maneuvers, this interaction is difficult or expensive to accomplish in a timely manner. Some automation of maneuver planning can reduce these difficulties for maneuver-intensive missions. One approach to this automation is to use fuzzy logic in the control mechanism. Such a prototype system currently under development is discussed. The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) is one of several missions that could benefit from automated maneuver planning. TRMM is scheduled for launch in August 1997. The spacecraft is to be maintained in a 350-km circular orbit throughout the 3-year lifetime of the mission, with very small variations in this orbit allowed. Since solar maximum will occur as early as 1999, the solar activity during the TRMM mission will be increasing. The increasing solar activity will result in orbital maneuvers being performed as often as every other day. The results of automated maneuver planning for the TRMM mission will be presented to demonstrate the prototype of the fuzzy logic tool.

  3. Early Increase of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pea Seedling Roots Under Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy; Syvash, Alexander; Klymchuk, Dmytro

    Early increase of intensity of peroxidation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells take place under various impacts. The ROS can act as second messengers in mechanism of cell responses (Mittler et al 2006; Jadko et al 2007). Early stages of ROS content (chemiluminescence, ChL) in pea root cells under 3, 5, 10 and 15g during centrifugation have been investigated. After 30 min of centrifugation, especially under 10 and 15g, the intensity of ChL increased and was higher on 40-50% comparing to controls. Than the ChL slowly decreased and reached the controls in 1 hour. The changes of the ChL depend on both the dose and the duration of centrifugation. The role of ROS in mechanism of cell response to hypergravity is discussed.

  4. [Utility of recruitment maneuvers (pro)].

    PubMed

    Suárez Sipmann, F

    2009-04-01

    In recent years lung recruitment maneuvers (RM) have awakened an increasing interest due to their potential beneficial effects in lung protection so that they have been progressively introduced into clinical practice. Many clinical and experimental studies have described the physiological benefits obtained after lung re-expansion although these benefits are not uniform, partly because of the wide heterogeneity of the RMs applied and lack of criteria defining their goal. Therefore, to date it has been difficult to establish the role of recruitment in the ventilatory management of ARDS patients. However, the information obtained from recent studies has improved our understanding regarding the mechanisms governing lung recruitment, interpretation of its response and its side effects and this has strongly contributed to its improved practical application. Lung recruitment must be applied in a protocolized and individualized way, establishing the pressure necessary to obtain the reasonably possible maximum lung re-expansion in each patient. Post RM PEEP adjustment is an essential aspect which, if ignored, renders RM useless and possibly without indication. Taking these essential aspects into account we are getting closer to, as the author believes, finally demonstrating the benefit of RM in lung protection and ARDS patients' outcome.

  5. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase plasma glucose via reactive oxygen species-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Wang, Changlin; Ma, Xiao; He, Hongjuan; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2015-10-01

    There have been few reports about the possible toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles on the endocrine system. We explored the endocrine effects of oral administration to mice of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 64 and 320 mg kg(-1) body weight per day to control, low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively, 7 days per week for 14 weeks). TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and their physiological distribution was investigated by inductively coupled plasma. Biochemical analyzes included plasma glucose, insulin, heart blood triglycerides (TG), free fatty acid (FFA), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related markers (total SOD, GSH and MDA). Phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, JNK1, and p38 MAPK were analyzed by western blotting. Increased titanium levels were found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, kidney and pancreas. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose significantly increased whereas there was no difference in plasma insulin secretion. Increased ROS levels were found in serum and the liver, as evidenced by reduced total SOD activity and GSH level and increased MDA content. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles induced insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver, shown by increased phosphorylation of IRS1 (Ser307) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). The pathway by which TiO2 nanoparticles increase ROS-induced IR were included in the inflammatory response and phosphokinase, as shown by increased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased phosphorylation of JNK1 and p38 MAPK in liver. These results show that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles increases ROS, resulting in IR and increasing plasma glucose in mice.

  7. The rice Mybleu transcription factor increases tolerance to oxygen deprivation in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Monica; Vannini, Candida; Espen, Luca; Bracale, Marcella; Genga, Annamaria; Marsoni, Milena; Iriti, Marcello; Bonazza, Veronica; Romagnoli, Francesco; Baldoni, Elena; Coraggio, Immacolata; Locatelli, Franca

    2007-09-01

    Mybleu is a natural incomplete transcription factor of rice (Oryza sativa), consisting of a partial Myb repeat followed by a short leucine zipper. We previously showed its localization to the apical region of rice roots and coleoptiles. Specifically, in coleoptiles, Mybleu is expressed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, whereas in roots, it is expressed only under aerobic conditions. Mybleu is able to dimerize with canonical leucine zippers and to activate transcription selectively. To investigate Mybleu function in vivo, we transformed Arabidopsis thaliana and evaluated several morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters. In agreement with a hypothesized role of Mybleu in cell elongation in the differentiation zone, we found that the constitutive expression of this transcription factor in Arabidopsis induced elongation in the primary roots and in the internodal region of the floral stem; we also observed a modification of the root apex morphology in transformed lines. Based on the high expression of Mybleu in anaerobic rice coleoptiles, we studied the role of this transcription factor in transgenic plants grown under low-oxygen conditions. We found that overexpression of this transcription factor increased tolerance to oxygen deficit. In transgenic plants, this effect may depend both on the maintenance of a higher metabolism during stress and on the higher expression levels of certain genes involved in the anaerobic response.

  8. Increased levels of peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in copper-tolerant pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, J.M.; Gomez, M.; Yanez, J.; Del Rio, L.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effect in vivo of high nutrient levels of copper (240 micromolar) on the activity of different metalloenzymes containing Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn, distributed in chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria, was studied in leaves of two varieties of Pisum sativum L. plants with different sensitivity to copper. The metalloenzymes studied were: cytochrome c oxidase, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase I (Cu,Zn-SOD I), for mitochondria; catalase and Mn-SOD, for peroxisomes; and isozyme Cu,Zn-SOD II for chloroplasts. The activity of mitochondrial SOD isozymes (Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD I) was very similar in Cu-tolerant and Cu-sensitive plants, whereas cytochrome c oxidase was lower in Cu-sensitive plants. Chloroplastid Cu,Zn-SOD activity was the same in the two plant varieties. In contrast, the peroxisomal Mn-SOD activity was considerably higher in Cu-tolerant than in Cu-sensitive plants, and the activity of catalase was also increased in peroxisomes of Cu-tolerant plants. The higher activities of these peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in Cu-tolerant plants suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates (O/sub 2//sup -/, OH) in the mechanism of Cu lethality, and also imply a function for peroxisomal Mn-SOD in the molecular mechanisms of plant tolerance to Cu in Pisum sativum L.

  9. Increased oxygen radical-dependent inactivation of metabolic enzymes by liver microsomes after chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, E.; Cederbaum, A.I. )

    1988-10-01

    Enzymatic and nonenzymatic mixed-function oxidase systems have been shown to generate an oxidant that catalyzes the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and other metabolic enzymes. Recent studies have shown that microsomes isolated from rats chronically fed ethanol generate reactive oxygen intermediates at elevated rates compared with controls. Microsomes from rats fed ethanol were found to be more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes added to the incubation system. The enzymes studied were alcohol dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase. The inactivation process by both types of microsomal preparations was sensitive to catalase and glutathione plus glutathione peroxidase, but was not affected by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Iron was required for the inactivation of added enzymes; microsomes from the rats fed ethanol remained more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes in the absence or presence of several ferric complexes. The inactivation of enzymes was enhanced by the addition of menadione or paraquat to the microsomes, and rates of inactivation were higher with the microsomes from the ethanol-fed rats. The enhanced generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and increased inactivation of enzymes by microsomes may contribute toward the hepatotoxic effects associated with ethanol consumption.

  10. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  11. Software for Autonomous Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, John; Folta, Dave; Hawkins, Al; Dell, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The AutoCon computer programs facilitate and accelerate the planning and execution of orbital control maneuvers of spacecraft while analyzing and resolving mission constraints. AutoCon-F is executed aboard spacecraft, enabling the spacecraft to plan and execute maneuvers autonomously; AutoCon-G is designed for use on the ground. The AutoCon programs utilize advanced techniques of artificial intelligence, including those of fuzzy logic and natural-language scripting, to resolve multiple conflicting constraints and automatically plan maneuvers. These programs can be used to satisfy requirements for missions that involve orbits around the Earth, the Moon, or any planet, and are especially useful for missions in which there are requirements for frequent maneuvers and for resolution of complex conflicting constraints. During operations, the software targets new trajectories, places and sizes maneuvers, and controls spacecraft burns. AutoCon-G provides a userfriendly graphical interface, and can be used effectively by an analyst with minimal training. AutoCon-F reduces latency and supports multiple-spacecraft and formation-flying missions. The AutoCon architecture supports distributive processing, which can be critical for formation- control missions. AutoCon is completely object-oriented and can easily be enhanced by adding new objects and events. AutoCon-F was flight demonstrated onboard GSFC's EO-1 spacecraft flying in formation with Landsat-7.

  12. The Valsalva maneuver: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Porth, C J; Bamrah, V S; Tristani, F E; Smith, J J

    1984-09-01

    The previous discussion has focused on the mechanisms, both respiratory and circulatory, that occur during the Valsalva maneuver. The increase in intrathoracic pressure that occurs during the Valsalva maneuver incites a sequence of rapid changes in preload and afterload stress. During the strain, venous return to the heart is decreased and peripheral venous pressures become increased. Within the next few beats, systolic and pulse pressures begin to fall while mean arterial pressure remains near (or is elevated above) control levels owing to the transmission of airway pressure. Thus it would appear that the benefits to cardiac contractility derived from a decrease in systolic and pulse pressure are counterbalanced by an increase in mean arterial pressure. Increases in total peripheral resistance that begin after about 7 seconds of strain produce further increases in afterload. Recruitment of autonomically mediated increases in heart rate and cardiac contractility assists the heart to maintain its cardiac output in the presence of diminished venous return. With the increased venous return that accompanies termination of Valsalva strain, there is an increase in diastolic filling and stroke volume output by means of the Frank-Starling mechanism. Heart rate and total peripheral resistance continue to be increased during the immediate poststrain period, and the ejection of an increased stroke volume into a constricted arterial system produces a rapid and marked increase in arterial pressure--the phase IV overshoot with its subsequent slowing of heart rate.

  13. Operational Experiences in Planning and Reconstructing Aqua Inclination Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, David; Reilly, Jacqueline; Schiff, Conrad

    2004-01-01

    As the lead satellite in NASA's growing Earth Observing System (EOS) PM constellation, it is increasingly critical that Aqua maintain its various orbit requirements. The two of interest for this paper are maintaining an orbit inclination that provides for a consistent mean local time and a semi-major Axis (SMA) that allows for ground track repeatability. Maneuvers to adjust the orbit inclination involve several flight dynamics constraints and complexities which make planning such maneuvers challenging. In particular, coupling between the orbital and attitude degrees of freedom lead to changes in SMA when changes in inclination are effected. A long term mission mean local time trend analysis was performed in order to determine the size and placement of the required inclination maneuvers. Following this analysis, detailed modeling of each burn and its Various segments was performed to determine its effects on the immediate orbit state. Data gathered from an inclination slew test of the spacecraft and first inclination maneuver uncovered discrepancies in the modeling method that were investigated and resolved. The new modeling techniques were applied and validated during the second spacecraft inclination maneuver. These improvements should position Aqua to successfully complete a series of inclination maneuvers in the fall of 2004. The following paper presents the events and results related

  14. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  15. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  16. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  17. Exendin-4 increases oxygen consumption and thermogenic gene expression in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Choung, Jin-Seung; Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) has many anti-diabetic actions and also increases energy expenditure in vivo As skeletal muscle is a major organ controlling energy metabolism, we investigated whether GLP1 can affect energy metabolism in muscle. We found that treatment of differentiated C2C12 cells with exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP1 receptor agonist, reduced oleate:palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and triglyceride content compared with cells without Ex-4 treatment. When we examined the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), not only the basal OCR but also the OCR induced by oleate:palmitate addition was significantly increased in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and this was inhibited by exendin-9, a GLP1 receptor antagonist. The expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), β3-adrenergic receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor a (PPARa) and farnesoid X receptor mRNA was significantly upregulated in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and the upregulation of these mRNA was abolished by treatment with adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine) or PKA inhibitor (H-89). As well, intramuscular injection of Ex-4 into diet-induced obese mice significantly increased the expression of UCP1, PPARa and p-AMPK in muscle. We suggest that exposure to GLP1 increases energy expenditure in muscle through the upregulation of fat oxidation and thermogenic gene expression, which may contribute to reducing obesity and insulin resistance.

  18. Normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass increases cerebral tissue oxygenation during combined valve surgery: a single-centre, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Lenkin, Andrey I.; Zaharov, Viktor I.; Lenkin, Pavel I.; Smetkin, Alexey A.; Bjertnaes, Lars J.; Kirov, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES In cardiac surgery, the choice of temperature regimen during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains a subject of debate. Hypothermia reduces tissue metabolic demands, but may impair the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow and contribute to neurological morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different temperature regimens during CPB on the systemic oxygen transport and the cerebral oxygenation during surgical correction of acquired heart diseases. METHODS In a prospective study, we randomized 40 adult patients with combined valvular disorders requiring surgical correction of two or more valves into two groups: (i) a normothermic (NMTH) group (n = 20), in which the body core temperature was maintained at 36.6°C during CPB and (ii) a hypothermic (HPTH) group (n = 20), in which the body was cooled to a core temperature of 32°C maintained throughout the period of CPB. The systemic oxygen transport and the cerebral oxygen saturation (SctO2) were assessed by means of a PiCCO2 haemodynamic monitor and a cerebral oximeter, respectively. All the patients received standard perioperative monitoring. We assessed haemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters, the duration of mechanical ventilation and the length of the ICU and the hospital stays. RESULTS During CPB, central venous oxygen saturation was significantly higher in the HPTH group but SctO2 was increased in the NMTH group (P < 0.05). Cardiac index, systemic oxygen delivery and consumption increased postoperatively in both groups. However, oxygen delivery and consumption were significantly higher in the NMTH group (P < 0.05). The duration of respiratory support and the length of ICU and hospital stays did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS During combined valve surgery, normothermic CPB provides lower central venous oxygen saturation, but increases cerebral tissue oxygenation when compared with the hypothermic regimen. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT01685554. PMID:23407696

  19. ET-1 increases reactive oxygen species following hypoxia and high salt diet in the mouse glomerulus

    PubMed Central

    Heimlich, J. Brett; Speed, Joshua S.; Bloom, Christopher J.; O'Connor, Paul M.; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Pollock, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The current study was designed to determine whether ET-1 derived from endothelial cells contributes to oxidative stress in the glomerulus of mice subjected to a high salt diet and/or hypoxia. Methods C57BL6/J control mice or vascular endothelial cell ET-1 knockout (VEET KO) mice were subjected to three-hour exposure to hypoxia (8% O2) and or 2 weeks of high salt diet (4% NaCl) prior to metabolic cage assessment of renal function and isolation of glomeruli for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results In control mice, hypoxia significantly increased urinary protein excretion during the initial 24 hrs, but only in animals on a high salt diet. Hypoxia increased glomerular ET-1 mRNA expression in control, but not in vascular endothelial cell ET-1 knockout (VEET KO) mice. Under normoxic conditions, mice on a high salt diet had approximately 150% higher glomerular ET-1 mRNA expression compared to a normal salt diet (p<0.05). High salt diet administration significantly increased glomerular ROS production in flox control, but not in glomeruli isolated from VEET KO mice. In C57BL6/J mice, the ETA receptor selective antagonist, ABT-627, significantly attenuated the increase in glomerular ROS production produced by high salt diet. In addition, chronic infusion of C57BL6/J mice with a sub-pressor dose of ET-1 (osmotic pumps) significantly increased levels of glomerular ROS that were prevented by ETA antagonist treatment. Conclusion These data suggest that both hypoxia and a high salt diet increases glomerular ROS production via endothelial derived ET-1-ETA receptor activation and provide a potential mechanism for ET-1 induced nephropathy. PMID:25219340

  20. Ultraendurance exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria from human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shabalina, Irina G.; Mattsson, C. Mikael; Bakkman, Linda; Fernström, Maria; Rozhdestvenskaya, Zinaida; Enqvist, Jonas K.; Nedergaard, Jan; Ekblom, Björn; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced oxidative stress is important for the muscular adaptation to training but may also cause muscle damage. We hypothesized that prolonged exercise would increase mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured in vitro and that this correlates with oxidative damage. Eight male athletes (24–32 yr) performed ultraendurance exercise (kayaking/running/cycling) with an average work intensity of 55% V̇o2peak for 24 h. Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis before exercise, immediately after exercise, and after 28 h of recovery. The production of H2O2 was measured fluorometrically in isolated mitochondria with the Amplex red and peroxidase system. Succinate-supported mitochondrial H2O2 production was significantly increased after exercise (73% higher, P = 0.025) but restored to the initial level at recovery. Plasma level of free fatty acids (FFA) increased fourfold and exceeded 1.2 mmol/l during the last 6 h of exercise. Plasma FFA at the end of exercise was significantly correlated to mitochondrial ROS production (r = 0.74, P < 0.05). Mitochondrial content of 4-hydroxy-nonenal-adducts (a marker of oxidative damage) was increased only after recovery and was not correlated with mitochondrial ROS production. Total thiol group level and glutathione peroxidase activity were elevated after recovery. In conclusion, ultraendurance exercise increases ROS production in isolated mitochondria, but this is reversed after 28 h recovery. Mitochondrial ROS production was not correlated with oxidative damage of mitochondrial proteins, which was increased at recovery but not immediately after exercise. PMID:20110545

  1. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  2. Increased reactive oxygen species production during reductive stress: The roles of mitochondrial glutathione and thioredoxin reductases.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Both extremes of redox balance are known to cause cardiac injury, with mounting evidence revealing that the injury induced by both oxidative and reductive stress is oxidative in nature. During reductive stress, when electron acceptors are expected to be mostly reduced, some redox proteins can donate electrons to O2 instead, which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the high level of reducing equivalents also concomitantly enhances ROS scavenging systems involving redox couples such as NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG. Here our objective was to explore how reductive stress paradoxically increases net mitochondrial ROS production despite the concomitant enhancement of ROS scavenging systems. Using recombinant enzymes and isolated permeabilized cardiac mitochondria, we show that two normally antioxidant matrix NADPH reductases, glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase, generate H2O2 by leaking electrons from their reduced flavoprotein to O2 when electron flow is impaired by inhibitors or because of limited availability of their natural electron acceptors, GSSG and oxidized thioredoxin. The spillover of H2O2 under these conditions depends on H2O2 reduction by peroxiredoxin activity, which may regulate redox signaling in response to endogenous or exogenous factors. These findings may explain how ROS production during reductive stress overwhelms ROS scavenging capability, generating the net mitochondrial ROS spillover causing oxidative injury. These enzymes could potentially be targeted to increase cancer cell death or modulate H2O2-induced redox signaling to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion damage.

  3. Maneuvering technology for advanced fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, Scott H.; Byers, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    The need for increased maneuverability has its genesis from the first aerial combat engagement when two adversaries entangled themselves in a deadly aerial dance trying to gain the advantage over the other. It has only been in the past two decades that technologies have been investigated to increase aircraft control at maneuver attitudes that are typically dominated by highly separated flows. These separated flow regions are aggravated by advanced fighter aircraft shapes required to defeat an electronic enemy. This paper discusses passive and active devices that can be used to enhance the maneuverability of advanced fighter aircraft through vortex flow control, boundary layer control, and innovative flow manipulation.

  4. Increase in tracheal investment with beetle size supports hypothesis of oxygen limitation on insect gigantism.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Klok, C Jaco; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Quinlan, Michael C; Harrison, Jon F

    2007-08-07

    Recent studies have suggested that Paleozoic hyperoxia enabled animal gigantism, and the subsequent hypoxia drove a reduction in animal size. This evolutionary hypothesis depends on the argument that gas exchange in many invertebrates and skin-breathing vertebrates becomes compromised at large sizes because of distance effects on diffusion. In contrast to vertebrates, which use respiratory and circulatory systems in series, gas exchange in insects is almost exclusively determined by the tracheal system, providing a particularly suitable model to investigate possible limitations of oxygen delivery on size. In this study, we used synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to visualize the tracheal system and quantify its dimensions in four species of darkling beetles varying in mass by 3 orders of magnitude. We document that, in striking contrast to the pattern observed in vertebrates, larger insects devote a greater fraction of their body to the respiratory system, as tracheal volume scaled with mass1.29. The trend is greatest in the legs; the cross-sectional area of the trachea penetrating the leg orifice scaled with mass1.02, whereas the cross-sectional area of the leg orifice scaled with mass0.77. These trends suggest the space available for tracheae within the leg may ultimately limit the maximum size of extant beetles. Because the size of the tracheal system can be reduced when oxygen supply is increased, hyperoxia, as occurred during late Carboniferous and early Permian, may have facilitated the evolution of giant insects by allowing limbs to reach larger sizes before the tracheal system became limited by spatial constraints.

  5. Increase in tracheal investment with beetle size supports hypothesis of oxygen limitation on insect gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Klok, C. Jaco; Socha, John J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Quinlan, Michael C.; Harrison, Jon F.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Paleozoic hyperoxia enabled animal gigantism, and the subsequent hypoxia drove a reduction in animal size. This evolutionary hypothesis depends on the argument that gas exchange in many invertebrates and skin-breathing vertebrates becomes compromised at large sizes because of distance effects on diffusion. In contrast to vertebrates, which use respiratory and circulatory systems in series, gas exchange in insects is almost exclusively determined by the tracheal system, providing a particularly suitable model to investigate possible limitations of oxygen delivery on size. In this study, we used synchrotron x-ray phase–contrast imaging to visualize the tracheal system and quantify its dimensions in four species of darkling beetles varying in mass by 3 orders of magnitude. We document that, in striking contrast to the pattern observed in vertebrates, larger insects devote a greater fraction of their body to the respiratory system, as tracheal volume scaled with mass1.29. The trend is greatest in the legs; the cross-sectional area of the trachea penetrating the leg orifice scaled with mass1.02, whereas the cross-sectional area of the leg orifice scaled with mass0.77. These trends suggest the space available for tracheae within the leg may ultimately limit the maximum size of extant beetles. Because the size of the tracheal system can be reduced when oxygen supply is increased, hyperoxia, as occurred during late Carboniferous and early Permian, may have facilitated the evolution of giant insects by allowing limbs to reach larger sizes before the tracheal system became limited by spatial constraints. PMID:17666530

  6. Increased subaerial volcanism and the rise of atmospheric oxygen 2.5 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Kump, Lee R; Barley, Mark E

    2007-08-30

    The hypothesis that the establishment of a permanently oxygenated atmosphere at the Archaean-Proterozoic transition (approximately 2.5 billion years ago) occurred when oxygen-producing cyanobacteria evolved is contradicted by biomarker evidence for their presence in rocks 200 million years older. To sustain vanishingly low oxygen levels despite near-modern rates of oxygen production from approximately 2.7-2.5 billion years ago thus requires that oxygen sinks must have been much larger than they are now. Here we propose that the rise of atmospheric oxygen occurred because the predominant sink for oxygen in the Archaean era-enhanced submarine volcanism-was abruptly and permanently diminished during the Archaean-Proterozoic transition. Observations are consistent with the corollary that subaerial volcanism only became widespread after a major tectonic episode of continental stabilization at the beginning of the Proterozoic. Submarine volcanoes are more reducing than subaerial volcanoes, so a shift from predominantly submarine to a mix of subaerial and submarine volcanism more similar to that observed today would have reduced the overall sink for oxygen and led to the rise of atmospheric oxygen.

  7. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  8. Increase in maximal oxygen uptake following 2-week walk training with blood flow occlusion in athletes.

    PubMed

    Park, Saejong; Kim, Jong Kyung; Choi, Hyun Min; Kim, Hyun Gook; Beekley, Matthew D; Nho, Hosung

    2010-07-01

    Walk training with blood flow occlusion (OCC-walk) leads to muscle hypertrophy; however, cardiorespiratory endurance in response to OCC-walk is unknown. Ischemia enhances the adaptation to endurance training such as increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂(max)) and muscle glycogen content. Thus, we investigated the effects of an OCC-walk on cardiorespiratory endurance, anaerobic power, and muscle strength in elite athletes. College basketball players participated in walk training with (n = 7) and without (n = 5) blood flow occlusion. Five sets of a 3-min walk (4-6 km/h at 5% grade) and a 1-min rest between the walks were performed twice a day, 6 days a week for 2 weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures (groups x time) was utilized (P < 0.05). Interactions were found in VO₂(max) (P = 0.011) and maximal minute ventilation (VE(max); P = 0.019). VO₂(max) (11.6%) and VE(max) (10.6%) were increased following the OCC-walk. For the cardiovascular adaptations of the OCC-walk, hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) at rest and during OCC-walk were compared between the first and the last OCC-walk sessions. Although no change in hemodynamics was found at rest, during the last OCC-walk session SV was increased in all five sets (21.4%) and HR was decreased in the third (12.3%) and fifth (15.0%) sets. With anaerobic power an interaction was found in anaerobic capacity (P = 0.038) but not in peak power. Anaerobic capacity (2.5%) was increased following the OCC-walk. No interaction was found in muscle strength. In conclusion, the 2-week OCC-walk significantly increases VO₂(max) and VE(max) in athletes. The OCC-walk training might be used in the rehabilitation for athletes who intend to maintain or improve endurance.

  9. Using the Two-Burn Escape Maneuver for Fast Transfers in the Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Richardson, Georgia A.

    2010-01-01

    The two-burn maneuver to escape the gravitational pull of a central body is described. The maneuver, originally suggested by Hermann Oberth, improves efficiency considerably for a wide range of missions of interest in space exploration and scientific investigation. A clear delineation of when the maneuver is more effective is given, as are methods to extract the most advantage when using the maneuver. Some examples are given of how this maneuver can enable exploration of the outer solar system, near interstellar space, and crewed missions to Mars and beyond. The maneuver has the potential to halve the required infrastructure associated with a crewed mission to Mars and achieve increased solar escape velocities with existing spacecraft technologies.

  10. Survivability Options for Maneuver and Transport Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    it is simply the next logical step in mechanized warfare and an ex- tension of ground operational maneuver as it has been conducted in the past. By...Survivability Options for Maneuver and Transport Aircraft bility and operational challenges.6 The research presented in this document, conducted as analytic...operational maneuver conducted mostly on the ground. We will then present the results of the analysis of operational maneuver by air, using the ASB

  11. Mitigating an increase of specific power consumption in a cryogenic air separation unit at reduced oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Rohit; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    Specific power consumed in a Linde double column air separation unit (ASU) increases as the quantity of oxygen produced at a given purity is decreased due to the changes of system requirement or market demand. As the plant operates in part load condition, the specific power consumption (SPC) increases as the total power consumption remains the same. In order to mitigate the increase of SPC at lower oxygen production, the operating pressure of high pressure column (HPC) can be lowered by extending the low pressure column (LPC) by a few trays and adding a second reboiler. As the duty of second reboiler in LPC is increased, the recovery of oxygen decreases with a lowering of the HPC pressure. This results in mitigation of the increase of SPC of the plant. A Medium pressure ASU with dual reboiler that produces pressurised gaseous and liquid products of oxygen and nitrogen is simulated in Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a commercial process simulator to determine SPC at varying oxygen production. The effects of reduced pressure of air feed into the cold box on the size of heat exchangers (HX) are analysed. Operation strategy to obtain various oxygen production rates at varying demand is also proposed.

  12. Cold stress increases reactive oxygen species formation via TRPA1 activation in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Cui, Haiyang; Ma, Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for lung damage during inhalation of cold air. However, the mechanism of the ROS production induced by cold stress in the lung is still unclear. In this work, we measured the changes of ROS and the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 to 5 °C) exposure of A549 cell resulted in an increase of ROS and [Ca(2+)]c, which was completely attenuated by removing Ca(2+) from medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of ROS and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Moreover, HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, significantly inhibited the enhanced ROS and [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TRPA1 activation played an important role in the enhanced production of ROS induced by cold stress in A549 cell.

  13. Hyberbaric oxygen increases atresia in normal & steroid induced PCO rat ovaries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on the morphology of estradiol valerate (EV) induced polycystic ovary (PCO) to find a new treatment modality for improvement of PCO. Methods The rats were divided into four groups. Group1, control; group 2, PCO group; group 3, PCO with HBOT group and group 4, normal ovary with HBOT. PCO was induced by a single intramuscular injection of 4 mg EV in adult cycling rats. Other rats with normal ovaries had oil injection as placebo. HBOT was applied to third and fourth groups for six weeks. Histopathologic evaluation of ovaries of all groups were performed & compared. Results Six weeks of HBOT was resulted in increase in follicular atresia, decrease in the number of primary, secondary, tertiary follicles and decrease in the number of fresh corpus luteum in normal rat ovary. HBOT on polycystic rat ovary, resulted in significant increase in atretic follicles which were already present. Conclusions HBOT of six weeks itself, changed ovarian morphology in favor of atresia both in PCO group and control group. This result of aggravated follicular atresia after HBOT on EV induced PCO may be due to long-term exposure in our protocol which with this state seems to be inapplicable in the improvement of PCO morphology. PMID:22309835

  14. Fish oil increases mitochondrial phospholipid unsaturation, upregulating reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in rat colonocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Mee Young; Chapkin, Robert S.; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C.; Turner, Nancy D.; Henderson, Cara E.; Sanders, Lisa M.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Murphy, Mary E.; Spinka, Christine M.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that a combination of fish oil (high in n-3 fatty acids) with the butyrate-producing fiber pectin, upregulates apoptosis in colon cells exposed to the carcinogen azoxymethane, protecting against colon tumor development. We now hypothesize that n-3 fatty acids prime the colonocytes such that butyrate can initiate apoptosis. To test this, 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with diets differing in the fatty acid composition (corn oil, fish oil or a purified fatty acid ethyl ester diet). Intact colon crypts were exposed ex vivo to butyrate, and analyzed for reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), translocation of cytochrome C to the cytosol, and caspase-3 activity (early events in apoptosis). The fatty acid composition of the three major mitochondrial phospholipids was also determined, and an unsaturation index calculated. The unsaturation index in cardiolipin was correlated with ROS levels (R = 0.99; P = 0.02). When colon crypts from fish oil and FAEE-fed rats were exposed to butyrate, MMP decreased (P = 0.041); and translocation of cytochrome C to the cytosol (P = 0.037) and caspase-3 activation increased (P = 0.032). The data suggest that fish oil may prime the colonocytes for butyrate-induced apoptosis by enhancing the unsaturation of mitochondrial phospholipids, especially cardiolipin, resulting in an increase in ROS and initiating apoptotic cascade.

  15. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Oxidative Stress in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Somaiya; Moin, Shagufta; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Zafar, Atif; Fatima, Naureen

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Highly reactive oxygen free radicals are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, RA patients were sub-grouped depending upon the presence or absence of rheumatoid factor, disease activity score and disease duration. RA Patients (120) and healthy controls (53) were evaluated for the oxidant—antioxidant status by monitoring ROS production, biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. The level of various enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants was also monitored. Correlation analysis was also performed for analysing the association between ROS and various other parameters. Methods Intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation (MDA level), protein oxidation (carbonyl level and thiol level) and DNA damage were detected in the blood of RA patients. Antioxidant status was evaluated by FRAP assay, DPPH reduction assay and enzymatic (SOD, catalase, GST, GR) and non-enzymatic (vitamin C and GSH) antioxidants. Results RA patients showed a higher ROS production, increased lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. A significant decline in the ferric reducing ability, DPPH radical quenching ability and the levels of antioxidants has also been observed. Significant correlation has been found between ROS and various other parameters studied. Conclusion RA patients showed a marked increase in ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, DNA damage and decrease in the activity of antioxidant defence system leading to oxidative stress which may contribute to tissue damage and hence to the chronicity of the disease. PMID:27043143

  16. A blood-oxygenation-dependent increase in blood viscosity due to a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toru; Nagayama, Yuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    2004-07-21

    As the magnetic field of widely used MR scanners is one of the strongest magnetic fields to which people are exposed, the biological influence of the static magnetic field of MR scanners is of great concern. One magnetic interaction in biological subjects is the magnetic torque on the magnetic moment induced by biomagnetic substances. The red blood cell is a major biomagnetic substance, and the blood flow may be influenced by the magnetic field. However, the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. To examine the mechanisms of the magnetic influence on blood viscosity, we measured the time for blood to fall through a glass capillary inside and outside a 1.5 T MR scanner. Our in vitro results showed that the blood viscosity significantly increased in a 1.5 T MR scanner, and also clarified the mechanism of the interaction between red blood cells and the external magnetic field. Notably, the blood viscosity increased depending on blood oxygenation and the shear rate of the blood flow. Thus, our findings suggest that even a 1.5 T magnetic field may modulate blood flow.

  17. Large Angle Satellite Attitude Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E.; Junkins, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two methods are proposed for performing large angle reorientation maneuvers. The first method is based upon Euler's rotation theorem; an arbitrary reorientation is ideally accomplished by rotating the spacecraft about a line which is fixed in both the body and in space. This scheme has been found to be best suited for the case in which the initial and desired attitude states have small angular velocities. The second scheme is more general in that a general class of transition trajectories is introduced which, in principle, allows transfer between arbitrary orientation and angular velocity states. The method generates transition maneuvers in which the uncontrolled (free) initial and final states are matched in orientation and angular velocity. The forced transition trajectory is obtained by using a weighted average of the unforced forward integration of the initial state and the unforced backward integration of the desired state. The current effort is centered around practical validation of this second class of maneuvers. Of particular concern is enforcement of given control system constraints and methods for suboptimization by proper selection of maneuver initiation and termination times. Analogous reorientation strategies which force smooth transition in angular momentum and/or rotational energy are under consideration.

  18. Operational Maneuver: Function or Fiction?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the premise that this would never happen, so why plan for it. That is just the point. Operational art planning should not leave any stone unturned . The... unturned during operational art planning and execution. The maneuver apex theory can be applied to the Air Force operating environment, however, operational

  19. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  20. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  1. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  2. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  3. Maneuver Detection and Estimation with Optical Tracklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K.

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed for detecting and estimating maneuvers using optical (angles-only) tracklets. After the correlator recognizes that a Resident Space Object (RSO) has maneuvered and no longer matches its pre-maneuver trajectory, observations for that RSO will be classified as Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs). Using an algorithm to indicate when known RSOs have gone missing, an initial estimate for a maneuver can be obtained by processing the pool of UCTs with an algorithm called Two Angle Pairs Initial Orbit with Conjunction Analysis (TAPIOCA). TAPIOCA computes hypothesized orbits on the admissible region for two angles-only observations and back-propagates the orbits to look for conjunctions with the last known trajectories for the missing RSOs. If a conjunction is found with a small miss distance and velocity difference, it is used as an estimate for a maneuver. Once an initial estimate for the maneuver is obtained from TAPIOCA, a batch least-squares process is outlined which can refine that maneuver estimate and provide predictions for the trajectory and covariance after the maneuver such that the correlator will correctly identify that object for subsequent tracklets. As more tracklets become available after the maneuver, it is continually refined in the least-squares estimator. The maneuver estimates include start time and thrust. Maneuver detection results are shown for both simulated and real geostationary objects. Using Raven observations of Galaxy 15, the method was able to find five maneuvers over four weeks which were verified against precise WAAS ephemeris.

  4. 33 CFR 84.23 - Maneuvering light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maneuvering light. 84.23 Section... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.23 Maneuvering light. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 84.03(f), the maneuvering light described in Rule 34(b) shall be...

  5. Increase in reactive oxygen species and activation of Akt signaling pathway in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata P; Araújo, Alex S R; Janner, Daiane; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M; Partata, Wania A

    2008-12-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of peripheral or central nervous system injury. Its pathophysiology involves mainly a central sensitization mechanism that may be correlated to many molecules acting in regions involved in pain processing, such as the spinal cord. It has been demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signaling molecules, such as the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt, are involved in neuropathic pain mechanisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to provide evidence of this relationship. Sciatic nerve transection (SNT) was used to induce neuropathic pain in rats. Western blot analysis of Akt and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-Michael adducts, and measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the lumbosacral spinal cord were performed. The main findings were found seven days after SNT, when there was an increase in HNE-Michael adducts formation, total and p-Akt expression, and H(2)O(2) concentration. However, one and 15 days after SNT, H(2)O(2) concentration was raised in both sham (animals that were submitted to surgery without nerve injury) and SNT groups, showing the high sensibility of this ROS to nociceptive afferent stimuli, not only to neuropathic pain. p-Akt also increased in sham and SNT groups one day post injury, but at 3 and 7 days the increase occurred exclusively in SNT animals. Thus, there is crosstalk between intracellular signaling pathways and ROS, and these molecules can act as protective agents in acute pain situations or play a role in the development of chronic pain states.

  6. Repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment increases insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Wei, Yi-ting; Fan, Shuang-bo; Wang, Liang; Zhou, Xiao-ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This study aims to investigate whether the peripheral insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetes patients suffering from intracerebral hemorrhage can be increased after HBOT. Methods Fifty-two type 2 diabetes participants were recruited after being diagnosed with intracerebral hemorrhage in our hospital. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (80 mU m−2 min−1) at baseline and 10 and 30 days after HBOT sessions. Serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were measured in fasting serum at baseline and after HBOT sessions. In addition, early (∼10 days after onset) and late (1 month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. Results In response to HBOT, the glucose infusion rate was increased by 37.8%±5.76% at 1 month after onset compared with baseline. Reduced serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were observed after HBOT. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group were improved compared with baseline (P<0.001). In the control group, there was significant difference only in the late outcome (P<0.05). In the assessment of efficacy, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when comparing changes in NIHSS scores at 10 days and 1 month after onset (P<0.05). Conclusion Peripheral insulin sensitivity was increased following HBOT in type 2 diabetes patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. The HBOT used in this study may be effective for diabetes patients with acute stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:28228657

  7. Optimal Autonomous Spacecraft Resiliency Maneuvers Using Metaheuristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-15

    be defined. Results indicate that the inspection requires an increase of only five percent of the propellant needed to transfer from low Earth orbit to...initial position vector, km R⊕ radius of the earth , km S Solution space encompassing all n design variables tk expected kth time of entry into exclusion...the k th maneuver, rad ω⊕ rotation rate of the earth , rad xviii Symbol Definition Ωm,c right ascension of the ascending node of the target, chaser orbit

  8. Mitohormesis: Promoting Health and Lifespan by Increased Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)

    PubMed Central

    Ristow, Michael; Schmeisser, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS), consisting of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and multiple others, do not only cause oxidative stress, but rather may function as signaling molecules that promote health by preventing or delaying a number of chronic diseases, and ultimately extend lifespan. While high levels of ROS are generally accepted to cause cellular damage and to promote aging, low levels of these may rather improve systemic defense mechanisms by inducing an adaptive response. This concept has been named mitochondrial hormesis or mitohormesis. We here evaluate and summarize more than 500 publications from current literature regarding such ROS-mediated low-dose signaling events, including calorie restriction, hypoxia, temperature stress, and physical activity, as well as signaling events downstream of insulin/IGF-1 receptors, AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK), target-of-rapamycin (TOR), and lastly sirtuins to culminate in control of proteostasis, unfolded protein response (UPR), stem cell maintenance and stress resistance. Additionally, consequences of interfering with such ROS signals by pharmacological or natural compounds are being discussed, concluding that particularly antioxidants are useless or even harmful. PMID:24910588

  9. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Three

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Arrieta, Juan; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Valerino, Powtawche N.; Wong, Mau C.

    2013-01-01

    The Solstice Mission is the final extension of the Cassini spacecraft s tour of Saturn and its moons. To accommodate an end-of-mission in 2017, the maneuver decision process has been refined. For example, the Cassini Project now prioritizes saving propellant over minimizing maneuver cycles. This paper highlights 30 maneuvers planned from June 2012 through July 2013, targeted to nine Titan flybys and the final Rhea encounter in the mission. Of these maneuvers, 90% were performed to maintain the prescribed trajectory and preserve downstream delta V. Recent operational changes to maneuver executions based on execution-error modeling and analysis are also discussed.

  10. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Three

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Arrieta, Juan; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Valerino, Powtawche N.; Wong, Mau C.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft is now in its second Saturn tour extension, the Solstice Mission. By emphasizing propellant preservation over minimizing maneuver cycles, the Cassini Project is meeting the challenge of mission completion in 2017. Since June 2012, 18 of 21 maneuvers were performed to closely maintain the prescribed trajectory, saving downstream propellant. These and other maneuvers during the third year of the Solstice Mission (June 2012 to August 2013) are highlighted in this paper: 31 planned maneuvers targeted to 11 Titan flybys and the last planned Rhea encounter. An assessment of the updated maneuver execution-error models will also be presented.

  11. The allelochemical L-DOPA increases melanin production and reduces reactive oxygen species in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Soares, Anderson Ricardo; de Lourdes Lucio Ferrarese, Maria; de Cássia Siqueira-Soares, Rita; Marchiosi, Rogério; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2011-08-01

    The non-protein amino acid, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), is the main allelochemical released from the roots of velvetbean and affects seed germination and root growth of several plant species. In the work presented here, we evaluated, in soybean roots, the effects of L-DOPA on the following: polyphenol oxidase (PPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities; superoxide anion (O·-2), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and melanin contents; and lipid peroxidation. To this end, 3-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland's solution (pH 6.0), with or without 0.1 to 1.0 mM L-DOPA in a growth chamber (at 25°C, with a light/dark photoperiod of 12/12 hr and a photon flux density of 280 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for 24 hr. The results showed that L-DOPA increased the PPO activity and, further, the melanin content. The activities of SOD and POD increased, but CAT activity decreased after the chemical exposure. The contents of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as O·-2 and H(2)O(2), and the levels of lipid peroxidation significantly decreased under all concentrations of L-DOPA tested. These results suggest that L-DOPA was absorbed by the soybean roots and metabolized to melanin. It was concluded that the reduction in the O·-2 and H(2)O(2) contents and lipid peroxidation in soybean roots was due to the enhanced SOD and POD activities and thus a possible antioxidant role of L-DOPA.

  12. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M; Fledderus, Joost O; Braam, Branko; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2015-03-15

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated reactive oxygen species production contributes to oleic acid (OA)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells, due to eNOS uncoupling. We measured reactive oxygen species production and eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in the presence of OA bound to bovine serum albumin, using the CM-H2DCFDA assay and the L-arginine/citrulline conversion assay, respectively. OA induced a concentration-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). OA had little effect on eNOS activity when stimulated by a calcium-ionophore, but decreased both basal and insulin-induced eNOS activity, which was restored by TTFA. Pretreatment of bEnd.3 cells with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) prevented OA-induced reactive oxygen species production and restored inhibition of eNOS activity by OA. Elevation of OA levels leads to both impairment in receptor-mediated stimulation of eNOS and to production of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and hence endothelial dysfunction.

  13. The Effect of Increased Temperatures and Ultraviolet Radiation on Dissolved Oxygen in Ecosystems Primarily Comprised of "Euglena"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased levels of UV radiation and temperatures from global warming have a significant impact on dissolved oxygen (DO) output from the alga, "Euglena," which affects other organisms in the ecosystem. The original hypothesis stated that if temperature was increased along with exposure time to…

  14. EPOXI Trajectory and Maneuver Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Min-Kun J.; Bhaskaran, Shyamkumar; Chesley, Steven R.; Halsell, C. Allen; Helfrich, Clifford E.; Jefferson, David C.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Rush, Brian P.; Wang, Tseng-Chan M.; Yen, Chen-wan L.

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI mission is a NASA Discovery Mission of Opportunity combining two separate investigations: Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) and Deep Impact eXtended Investigation (DIXI). Both investigations reused the DI instruments and spacecraft that successfully flew by the comet Tempel-1 (4 July 2005). For EPOCh, the goal was to find exoplanets with the high resolution imager, while for DIXI it was to fly by the comet Hartley 2 (4 Nov 2010). This paper documents the navigation experience of the earlier ma-neuver analyses critical for the EPOXI mission including statistical ?V analyses and other useful analyses in designing maneuvers. It also recounts the trajectory design leading up to the final reference trajectory to Hartley 2.

  15. Manned maneuvering unit latching mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The astronaut/Manned Maneuvering Unit interface, which presented a challenging set of requirements for a latching mechanism, is described. A spring loaded cam segment with variable ratio pulley release actuator was developed to meet the requirements. To preclude jamming of the mechanism, special precautions were taken such as spring loaded bearing points and careful selection of materials to resist cold welding. The mechanism successfully passed a number of tests which partially simulated orbital conditions.

  16. Respiratory compliance but not gas exchange correlates with changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver: an experimental study in pigs with saline lavage lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Henzler, Dietrich; Pelosi, Paolo; Dembinski, Rolf; Ullmann, Annette; Mahnken, Andreas H; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Atelectasis is a common finding in acute lung injury, leading to increased shunt and hypoxemia. Current treatment strategies aim to recruit alveoli for gas exchange. Improvement in oxygenation is commonly used to detect recruitment, although the assumption that gas exchange parameters adequately represent the mechanical process of alveolar opening has not been proven so far. The aim of this study was to investigate whether commonly used measures of lung mechanics better detect lung tissue collapse and changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver as compared to measures of gas exchange Methods In eight anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs, acute lung injury was induced by saline lavage and a recruitment maneuver was performed by inflating the lungs three times with a pressure of 45 cmH2O for 40 s with a constant positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O. The association of gas exchange and lung mechanics parameters with the amount and the changes in aerated and nonaerated lung volumes induced by this specific recruitment maneuver was investigated by multi slice CT scan analysis of the whole lung. Results Nonaerated lung correlated with shunt fraction (r = 0.68) and respiratory system compliance (r = 0.59). The arterial partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) and the respiratory system compliance correlated with poorly aerated lung volume (r = 0.57 and 0.72, respectively). The recruitment maneuver caused a decrease in nonaerated lung volume, an increase in normally and poorly aerated lung, but no change in the distribution of a tidal breath to differently aerated lung volumes. The fractional changes in PaO2, arterial partial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and venous admixture after the recruitment maneuver did not correlate with the changes in lung volumes. Alveolar recruitment correlated only with changes in the plateau pressure (r = 0.89), respiratory system compliance (r = 0.82) and parameters obtained from the pressure-volume curve

  17. An Independent and Coordinated Criterion for Kinematic Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Hagen, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a mathematical definition of an aircraft-separation criterion for kinematic-based horizontal maneuvers. It has been formally proved that kinematic maneu- vers that satisfy the new criterion are independent and coordinated for repulsiveness, i.e., the distance at closest point of approach increases whether one or both aircraft maneuver according to the criterion. The proposed criterion is currently used in NASA's Airborne Coordinated Resolution and Detection (ACCoRD) set of tools for the design and analysis of separation assurance systems.

  18. Active Control of Solar Array Dynamics During Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brant A.; Woo, Nelson; Kraft, Thomas G.; Blandino, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent NASA mission plans require spacecraft to undergo potentially significant maneuvers (or dynamic loading events) with large solar arrays deployed. Therefore there is an increased need to understand and possibly control the nonlinear dynamics in the spacecraft system during such maneuvers. The development of a nonlinear controller is described. The utility of using a nonlinear controller to reduce forces and motion in a solar array wing during a loading event is demonstrated. The result is dramatic reductions in system forces and motion during a 10 second loading event. A motion curve derived from the simulation with the closed loop controller is used to obtain similar benefits with a simpler motion control approach.

  19. Infusion of ATP increases leg oxygen delivery but not oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Christensen, Peter M; Mortensen, Stefan P; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined whether an increase in leg blood flow and oxygen delivery at the onset of intense exercise would speed the rate of rise in leg oxygen uptake. Nine healthy men (25 ± 1 years old, mean ± SEM) performed one-leg knee-extensor exercise (62 ± 3 W, 86 ± 3% of incremental test peak power) for 4 min during a control setting (CON) and with infusion of ATP into the femoral artery in order to increase blood flow before and during exercise. In the presence of ATP, femoral arterial blood flow and O2 delivery were higher (P < 0.001) at the onset of exercise and throughout exercise (femoral arterial blood flow after 10 s, 5.1 ± 0.5 versus 2.7 ± 0.3 l min(-1); after 45 s, 6.0 ± 0.5 versus 4.1 ± 0.4 l min(-1); after 90 s, 6.6 ± 0.6 versus 4.5 ± 0.4 l min(-1); and after 240 s, 7.0 ± 0.6 versus 5.1 ± 0.3 l min(-1) in ATP and CON conditions, respectively). Leg oxygen uptake was not different in ATP and CON conditions during the first 20 s of exercise but was lower (P < 0.05) in the ATP compared with CON conditions after 30 s and until the end of exercise (30 s, 436 ± 42 versus 549 ± 45 ml min(-1); and 240 s, 705 ± 31 versus 814 ± 59 ml min(-1) in ATP and CON, respectively). Lactate release was lower after 60, 120 and 180 s of exercise with ATP infusion. These results suggest that O2 delivery is not limiting the rise in skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise.

  20. Enhanced performance for the manned maneuvering unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Paul E.

    We have all seen the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) on television, in the newspaper, magazines and any number of other places. It is probably one of the most widely recognized articles ever put into orbit. This paper briefly describes the MMU. The description includes an overview of the controls and physical features and a discussion of the propulsion and electrical systems. Operational experience to date is briefly covered. The MMU was first used on STS 41-B for the first untethered space walk on February 7, 1984. Next usage was for the Solar Max mission on STS 41-C, followed by the retrieval of the Westar and Palapa communication satellites on mission STS 51-A in November, 1984. One of the "lessons learned" during these space operations was the need for enhanced performance by the MMU, and leads into a discussion of how that increased performance capability will be provided. Current work on a Propellant Tank Kit (PTK), which will provide enhanced performance, is shown. The PTK will provide sufficient propellant storage capability such that the MMU with PTK will have twice the previous delta velocity capability; i.e., double the MMU's maneuvering ability. Results of development testing in the NASA/JSC Weightless Environment Test Facility are included. Current status of PTK development is presented. This paper ends with a brief discussion of proposed space operations using the enhanced MMU performance in erecting space structures from the Space Shuttle, assembling and maintaining Space Station, rescue-transfer of astronauts and other space operations.

  1. 3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2

  2. Acute Supramaximal Exercise Increases the Brain Oxygenation in Relation to Cognitive Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bediz, Cem Seref; Oniz, Adile; Guducu, Cagdas; Ural Demirci, Enise; Ogut, Hilmi; Gunay, Erkan; Cetinkaya, Caner; Ozgoren, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Single bout of exercise can improve the performance on cognitive tasks. However, cognitive responses may be controversial due to different type, intensity, and duration of exercise. In addition, the mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on brain is still unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of supramaximal exercise on cognitive tasks by means of brain oxygenation monitoring. The brain oxygenation of Prefrontal cortex (PFC) was measured on 35 healthy male volunteers via functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system. Subjects performed 2-Back test before and after the supramaximal exercise wingate anerobic test (WAnT) lasting 30-s on cycle ergometer. The PFC oxygenation change evaluation revealed that PFC oxygenation rise during post-exercise 2-Back task was considerably higher than those in pre-exercise 2-Back task. In order to describe the relationship between oxygenation change and exercise performance, subjects were divided into two groups as high performers (HP) and low performers (LP) according to their peak power values (PP) obtained from the supramaximal test. The oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) values were compared between pre- and post-exercise conditions within subjects and also between subjects according to peak power. When performers were compared, in the HP group, the oxy-Hb values in post-exercise 2-Back test were significantly higher than those in pre-exercise 2-Back test. HP had significantly higher post-exercise oxy-Hb change (Δ) than those of LP. In addition, PP of the total group were significantly correlated with Δoxy-Hb.The key findings of the present study revealed that acute supramaximal exercise has an impact on the brain oxygenation during a cognitive task. Also, the higher the anerobic PP describes the larger the oxy-Hb response in post-exercise cognitive task. The current study also demonstrated a significant correlation between peak power (exercise load) and post-exercise hemodynamic responses (oxy-, deoxy- and

  3. LANDSAT-5 orbit adjust maneuver report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassett, P. J.; Johnson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The orbit adjust maneuvers performed to raise the LANDSAT 5 spacecraft to mission altitude, synchronize it with the required groundtrack, and properly phase the spacecraft with LANDSAT-4 to provide an 8 day full Earth coverage cycle are described. Maneuver planning and evaluation procedures, data and analysis results for all maneuvers performed to date, the frozen orbit concept, and the phasing requirement between LANDSAT-4 and LANDSAT-5 are also examined.

  4. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Horizontal Stabilizing and Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and...

  5. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Horizontal Stabilizing and Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and...

  6. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Horizontal Stabilizing and Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and...

  7. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Horizontal Stabilizing and Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and...

  8. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Horizontal Stabilizing and Balancing Surfaces § 23.423 Maneuvering loads. Each horizontal surface and its supporting structure, and...

  9. Increased Retinal Oxygen Metabolism Precedes Microvascular Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Wang, Shoujian; Soetikno, Brian; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Siyu; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate inner retinal oxygen metabolic rate (IRMRO2) during early stages of type 1 diabetes in a transgenic mouse model. Methods In current study, we involved seven diabetic mice (Akita/+, TSP1−/−) and seven control mice (TSP1−/−), and applied visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) to image functional parameters including retinal blood flow rate, oxygen saturation (sO2) and the IRMRO2 value longitudinally from 5 weeks of age to 13 weeks of age. After imaging at 13 weeks of age, we analyzed the imaging results, and examined histology of mouse retina. Results Between diabetic mice and the control group, we observed significant differences in venous sO2 from 9 weeks of age (P = 0.006), and significant increment in IRMRO2 from 11 weeks of age (P = 0.001) in diabetic mice compared with control group. We did not find significant differences in retinal blood flow rate as well as arterial sO2 during imaging between diabetic and control mice. Histologic examination of diabetic and control mice at 13 weeks of age also revealed no anatomical retinal alternations. Conclusions In diabetic retinopathy, complications in retinal oxygen metabolism may occur before changes of retinal anatomical structure.

  10. Time frequency analysis of sound from a maneuvering rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, James H.; Tinney, Charles E.; Greenwood, Eric; Watts, Michael E.

    2014-10-01

    The acoustic signatures produced by a full-scale, Bell 430 helicopter during steady-level-flight and transient roll-right maneuvers are analyzed by way of time-frequency analysis. The roll-right maneuvers comprise both a medium and a fast roll rate. Data are acquired using a single ground based microphone that are analyzed by way of the Morlet wavelet transform to extract the spectral properties and sound pressure levels as functions of time. The findings show that during maneuvering operations of the helicopter, both the overall sound pressure level and the blade-vortex interaction sound pressure level are greatest when the roll rate of the vehicle is at its maximum. The reduced inflow in the region of the rotor disk where blade-vortex interaction noise originates is determined to be the cause of the increase in noise. A local decrease in inflow reduces the miss distance of the tip vortex and thereby increases the BVI noise signature. Blade loading and advance ratios are also investigated as possible mechanisms for increased sound production, but are shown to be fairly constant throughout the maneuvers.

  11. Aircraft maneuver envelope warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivens, Courtland C. (Inventor); Rosado, Joel M. (Inventor); Lee, Burnett (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A maneuver envelope warning system for an aircraft having operating limits, operating condition sensors and an indicator driver. The indicator driver has a plurality of visual indicators. The indicator driver determines a relationship between sensed operating conditions and the operating limits; such as, a ratio therebetween. The indicator driver illuminates a number of the indicators in proportion to the determined relationship. The position of the indicators illuminated represents to a pilot in an easily ascertainable manner whether the operational conditions are approaching operational limits of the aircraft, and the degree to which operational conditions lie within or exceed operational limits.

  12. Orbital maneuvers and space rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-12-01

    Several possibilities of launching a space vehicle from the orbital station are considered and compared. Orbital maneuvers discussed in the paper can be useful in designing a trajectory for a specific space mission. The relative motion of orbiting bodies is investigated on examples of spacecraft rendezvous with the space station that stays in a circular orbit around the Earth. An elementary approach is illustrated by an accompanying simulation computer program and supported by a mathematical treatment based on fundamental laws of physics and conservation laws. Material is appropriate for engineers and other personnel involved in space exploration, undergraduate and graduate students studying classical physics and orbital mechanics.

  13. Cassini-Huygens maneuver automation for navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy; Attiyah, Amy; Buffington, Brent; Hahn, Yungsun; Pojman, Joan; Stavert, Bob; Strange, Nathan; Stumpf, Paul; Wagner, Sean; Wolff, Peter; Wong, Mau

    2006-01-01

    Many times during the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, propulsive maneuvers must be spaced so closely together that there isn't enough time or workforce to execute the maneuver-related software manually, one subsystem at a time. Automation is required. Automating the maneuver design process has involved close cooperation between teams. We present the contribution from the Navigation system. In scope, this includes trajectory propagation and search, generation of ephemerides, general tasks such as email notification and file transfer, and presentation materials. The software has been used to help understand maneuver optimization results, Huygens probe delivery statistics, and Saturn ring-plane crossing geometry. The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS), developed for the Cassini-Huygens program enables frequent maneuvers by handling mundane tasks such as creation of deliverable files, file delivery, generation and transmission of email announcements, generation of presentation material and other supporting documentation. By hand, these tasks took up hours, if not days, of work for each maneuver. Automated, these tasks may be completed in under an hour. During the cruise trajectory the spacing of maneuvers was such that development of a maneuver design could span about a month, involving several other processes in addition to that described, above. Often, about the last five days of this process covered the generation of a final design using an updated orbit-determination estimate. To support the tour trajectory, the orbit determination data cut-off of five days before the maneuver needed to be reduced to approximately one day and the whole maneuver development process needed to be reduced to less than a week..

  14. Normative data on phases of the Valsalva maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denq, J. C.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    The phases of the Valsalva maneuver have well-known pathophysiology, and are used in the evaluation of adrenergic function. Because scant normative data is available, we have evaluated normative data for the Valsalva maneuver in control subjects. The patient, supine, performed the Valsalva maneuver maintaining an expiratory pressure of 40 mm Hg for 15 seconds. We reviewed 188 Valsalva maneuver recordings of normal control subjects, and recordings were excluded if two reproducible recordings were not obtained, or if expiratory pressure was <30 mm Hg or < 10 seconds. One hundred and three recordings were acceptable for analysis; 47 female and 56 male subjects, age in years (mean +/- SD) was 52.2+/-17.3 and 44.8+/-17.3, respectively. The association of expiratory pressure with age (P < 0.001) and gender ( P < 0.001) was complex, expressed as a parabola in both men and women, but resulted in phases I and III that were not significantly different. An increase in age resulted in a progressively more negative phase II_E (P < 0.05) and attenuation of phase II_L (P < 0.01). An increase in supine blood pressure resulted in a significantly more negative phase II_E (P < 0.001) and a lower phase IV. Phase IV is unaffected by age and gender.

  15. The acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen is not accompanied by an increase in markers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shulin; Shirachi, Donald Y.; Quock, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) causes an antinociceptive response in mice. However, breathing oxygen (O2) at an elevated pressure can potentially cause oxygen toxicity. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of HBO2 antinociception and the toxicity profile of HBO2. Main methods Male NIH Swiss mice were assessed for acute antinociceptive responsiveness under room air or 100% O2 at 1.0 or 3.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. For the oxygen toxicity test, mice were exposed to 3.5 ATA oxygen for 11 min, 60 min, 60 min daily for 2 days (120 min) or 60 min daily for 4 days (240 min), then assessed by analyzing the levels of two oxidative stress markers, MDA (malondialdehyde) and protein carbonyl in brain, spinal cord and lung. Key Findings Only the combination of 100% O2 and 3.5 ATA caused significant antinociception. The antinociceptive effect of 100% O2 was pressure-dependent up to 3.5 ATA. In the oxygen toxicity test, mice exposed to HBO2 for different time intervals had levels of brain, spinal cord and lung MDA and protein carbonyl that were comparable to that of control animals exposed to room air. Significance Treatment with 100% O2 evokes a pressure-dependent antinociceptive effect. Since there was no significant increase in levels of the oxidative stress markers in the tested tissues, it is concluded HBO2 at 3.5 ATA produces antinociception in the absence of oxidative stress in mice. PMID:24418003

  16. Optimal Electrodynamic Tether Phasing Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitzer, Matthew S.; Hall, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the minimum-time orbit phasing maneuver problem for a constant-current electrodynamic tether (EDT). The EDT is assumed to be a point mass and the electromagnetic forces acting on the tether are always perpendicular to the local magnetic field. After deriving and non-dimensionalizing the equations of motion, the only input parameters become current and the phase angle. Solution examples, including initial Lagrange costates, time of flight, thrust plots, and thrust angle profiles, are given for a wide range of current magnitudes and phase angles. The two-dimensional cases presented use a non-tilted magnetic dipole model, and the solutions are compared to existing literature. We are able to compare similar trajectories for a constant thrust phasing maneuver and we find that the time of flight is longer for the constant thrust case with similar initial thrust values and phase angles. Full three-dimensional solutions, which use a titled magnetic dipole model, are also analyzed for orbits with small inclinations.

  17. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  18. Nonenzymatic glycation of transferrin: decrease of iron-binding capacity and increase of oxygen radical production.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Kawakami, N; Ohara, A

    1995-03-01

    The total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and iron contents of diabetic rat serum, as well as the iron-binding capacity of glycated transferrin and oxygen radical production by the glycated proteins were examined. The TIBC and iron content of diabetic rat sera were found to be much lower than those of control rat sera. Incubation of human serum with glucose in vitro resulted in a significant fall of its unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) with time. When apotransferrin was incubated with glucose, its UIBC significantly decreased. The iron content of holotransferrin was markedly reduced by incubation with bathophenanthroline sulphonic acid (BPSA) in the presence of glucose, although the content was not altered by incubation with BPSA alone. The generation of superoxide radical (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) by the glycated holotransferrin was much greater than that by glycated apotransferrin. Glycated holotransferrin showed significantly accelerated hydroxyl radical production by the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system, while intact holotransferrin did not. Treatment of holotransferrin with glucose caused the fragmentation of the protein, while the same treatment of apotransferrin did not. These results suggest that iron ions in the glycated transferrin molecule are bound loosely to the protein and are redox-active and the glycated holotransferrin produces oxygen radicals including O2- and OH. efficiently, and that the glycated transferrin does not function as an iron-binding protein.

  19. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  20. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  1. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  2. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  3. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  4. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of...

  5. 14 CFR 23.441 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maneuvering loads. 23.441 Section 23.441... Maneuvering loads. (a) At speeds up to V A, the vertical surfaces must be designed to withstand the following conditions. In computing the loads, the yawing velocity may be assumed to be zero: (1) With the airplane...

  6. [Internal carotid artery dissection after Heimlich maneuver].

    PubMed

    Rakotoharinandrasana, H; Petit, E; Dumas, P; Vandermarcq, P; Gil, R; Neau, J-Ph

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of cervical artery dissection following a Heimlich maneuver. Cervical artery dissections are at the present time well known and are sometimes associated with trivial traumas. However, to our knowledge, this complication of such maneuver was never reported in the literature. Pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Method for Studying Helicopter Longitudinal Maneuver Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Kenneth B

    1954-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of helicopter maneuver stability is made and the results are compared with experimental results for both a single and a tandem rotor helicopter. Techniques are described for measuring in flight the significant stability derivatives for use with the theory to aid in design studies of means for achieving marginal maneuver stability for a prototype helicopter.

  8. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  9. Maneuver Classification for Aircraft Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data provide a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In the domain of fault detection in aircraft, identifying all possible faulty and proper operating modes is clearly impossible. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. To develop such a system, we use flight data collected under a controlled test environment, subject to many sources of variability. We explain where our classifier fits into the envisioned fault detection system as well as experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  10. Classification of Aircraft Maneuvers for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Tumer, Kagan; Huff, Edward M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated fault detection is an increasingly important problem in aircraft maintenance and operation. Standard methods of fault detection assume the availability of either data produced during all possible faulty operation modes or a clearly-defined means to determine whether the data is a reasonable match to known examples of proper operation. In our domain of fault detection in aircraft, the first assumption is unreasonable and the second is difficult to determine. We envision a system for online fault detection in aircraft, one part of which is a classifier that predicts the maneuver being performed by the aircraft as a function of vibration data and other available data. We explain where this subsystem fits into our envisioned fault detection system as well its experiments showing the promise of this classification subsystem.

  11. Marine Corps Maneuver Squad Leader Mastery Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-17

    Thinking; Character, Initiative, and Command Presence; Train , Mentor, and Develop Marines; Job Knowledge; Administration; Self‐Development; Communication...making skills by increasing the specificity of the desired  measurement.    Requirement    The U.S. Marine Corps  (USMC)  Training  and Education Command...of Task 3‐7 of the Commandant’s Planning Guidance  2010  to  improve  training   and  experience  levels  for  maneuver  unit  squad  leaders  in

  12. Increased stability toward oxygen reduction products for lithium-air batteries with oligoether-functionalized silane electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Lu, J.; Assary, R. S.; Du, P.; Wang, H-H.; Sun, Y-K.; Qin, Y.; Lau, K. C.; Greeley, J.; Redfern, P. C.; Iddir, H.; Curtiss, L. A.; Amine, K.

    2011-01-01

    The successful development of Li-air batteries would significantly increase the possibility of extending the range of electric vehicles. There is much evidence that typical organic carbonate based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries form lithium carbonates from reaction with oxygen reduction products during discharge in lithium-air cells so more stable electrolytes need to be found. This combined experimental and computational study of an electrolyte based on a tri(ethylene glycol)-substituted trimethylsilane (1NM3) provides evidence that the ethers are more stable toward oxygen reduction discharge species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FTIR experiments show that only lithium oxides and no carbonates are formed when 1NM3 electrolyte is used. In contrast XPS shows that propylene carbonate (PC) in the same cell configuration decomposes to form lithium carbonates during discharge. Density functional calculations of probable decomposition reaction pathways involving solvated oxygen reduction species confirm that oligoether substituted silanes, as well as other ethers, are more stable to the oxygen reduction products than propylene carbonate. These results indicate that the choice of electrolyte plays a key role in the performance of Li-air batteries.

  13. Increased Stability Toward Oxygen Reduction Products for Lithium-Air Batteries with Oligoether-Functionalized Silane Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Lu, Jun; Assary, Rajeev S.; Du, Peng; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Sun, Yang-Kook; Qin, Yan; Lau, Kah Chun; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Redfern, Paul C.; Iddir, Hakim; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2011-12-29

    The successful development of Li-air batteries would significantly increase the possibility of extending the range of electric vehicles. There is much evidence that typical organic carbonate based electrolytes used in lithium ion batteries form lithium carbonates from reaction with oxygen reduction products during discharge in lithium-air cells so more stable electrolytes need to be found. This combined experimental and computational study of an electrolyte based on a tri(ethylene glycol)-substituted trimethylsilane (1NM3) provides evidence that the ethers are more stable toward oxygen reduction discharge species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FTIR experiments show that only lithium oxides and no carbonates are formed when 1NM3 electrolyte is used. In contrast XPS shows that propylene carbonate (PC) in the same cell configuration decomposes to form lithium carbonates during discharge. Density functional calculations of probable decomposition reaction pathways involving solvated oxygen reduction species confirm that oligoether substituted silanes, as well as other ethers, are more stable to the oxygen reduction products than propylene carbonate. These results indicate that the choice of electrolyte plays a key role in the performance of Li-air batteries.

  14. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  15. Tactical Maneuvering Using Immunized Sequence Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John; KrishnaKumar, K.; Shung, Felix

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a tactical maneuvering system that uses an artificial immune system based approach for selecting maneuver sequences. This approach combines the problem solving abilities of genetic algorithms with the memory retention characteristics of an immune system. Of significant importance here is the fact that the tactical maneuvering system can make time-critical decisions to accomplish near-term objectives within a dynamic environment. These objectives can be received from a human operator, autonomous executive, or various flight planning specialists. Simulation tests were performed using a high performance military aircraft model. Results demonstrate the potential of using immunized sequence selection in order to accomplish tactical maneuvering objectives ranging from flying to a location while avoiding unforeseen obstacles, to performing relative positioning in support of air combat maneuvering.

  16. Increased oxygen load in the prefrontal cortex from mouth breathing: a vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Sayaka; Oka, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Kayoko; Kato, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who habitually breathe through the mouth are more likely than nasal breathers to have sleep disorders and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. We hypothesized that brain hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might be different for mouth and nasal breathing. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex during mouth breathing and nasal breathing in healthy adults (n=9) using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. The angle k, calculated from changes in oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin and indicating the degree of oxygen exchange, was significantly higher during mouth breathing (P<0.05), indicating an increased oxygen load. Mouth breathing also caused a significant increase in deoxyhemoglobin, but oxyhemoglobin did not increase. This difference in oxygen load in the brain arising from different breathing routes can be evaluated quantitatively using vector-based near-infrared spectroscopy. Phase responses could help to provide an earlier and more reliable diagnosis of a patient’s habitual breathing route than a patient interview. PMID:24169579

  17. Energy Index For Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Drew, Douglas A. (Inventor); Ainsworth, Robert J. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Tomothy P. (Inventor); Bloch, Laurent (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing, separately or in combination, kinetic energy and potential energy and/or their time derivatives, measured or estimated or computed, for an aircraft in approach phase or in takeoff phase, to determine if the aircraft is or will be put in an anomalous configuration in order to join a stable approach path or takeoff path. A 3 reference value of kinetic energy andor potential energy (or time derivatives thereof) is provided, and a comparison index .for the estimated energy and reference energy is computed and compared with a normal range of index values for a corresponding aircraft maneuver. If the computed energy index lies outside the normal index range, this phase of the aircraft is identified as anomalous, non-normal or potentially unstable.

  18. Atmospheric maneuvering during Martian entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Yang, Lily

    A comparative-advantages study is made of two different Martian atmospheric entry maneuvers, on the basis of calculation results for the case of a vehicle with a maximum L/D ratio of 2.3. Entries from a highly elliptical Martian orbit at 5 km/sec are more difficult than those from a lower altitude and speed orbit at 3.5 km/sec, due to their more stringent guidance requirements. Efforts to reduce the deceleration for the higher speed entry by lift-modulation achieved a 40-percent reduction, but at the cost of a 50-percent decrease in lateral range. The lower-speed entry's gliding trajectory is noted to encounter a far more benign atmospheric environment.

  19. Multi-Maneuver Clohessy-Wiltshire Targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannemiller, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital rendezvous involves execution of a sequence of maneuvers by a chaser vehicle to bring the chaser to a desired state relative to a target vehicle while meeting intermediate and final relative constraints. Intermediate and final relative constraints are necessary to meet a multitude of requirements such as to control approach direction, ensure relative position is adequate for operation of space-to-space communication systems and relative sensors, provide fail-safe trajectory features, and provide contingency hold points. The effect of maneuvers on constraints is often coupled, so the maneuvers must be solved for as a set. For example, maneuvers that affect orbital energy change both the chaser's height and downrange position relative to the target vehicle. Rendezvous designers use experience and rules-of-thumb to design a sequence of maneuvers and constraints. A non-iterative method is presented for targeting a rendezvous scenario that includes a sequence of maneuvers and relative constraints. This method is referred to as Multi-Maneuver Clohessy-Wiltshire Targeting (MM_CW_TGT). When a single maneuver is targeted to a single relative position, the classic CW targeting solution is obtained. The MM_CW_TGT method involves manipulation of the CW state transition matrix to form a linear system. As a starting point for forming the algorithm, the effects of a series of impulsive maneuvers on the state are derived. Simple and moderately complex examples are used to demonstrate the pattern of the resulting linear system. The general form of the pattern results in an algorithm for formation of the linear system. The resulting linear system relates the effect of maneuver components and initial conditions on relative constraints specified by the rendezvous designer. Solution of the linear system includes the straight-forward inverse of a square matrix. Inversion of the square matrix is assured if the designer poses a controllable scenario - a scenario where the the

  20. Cerebrovascular effects of the thigh cuff maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, N. P.; Robinson, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypotension can be induced by sudden release of inflated thigh cuffs (THC), but its effects on the cerebral circulation have not been fully described. In nine healthy subjects [aged 59 (9) yr], bilateral cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was recorded in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), noninvasive arterial blood pressure (BP) in the finger, and end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) with nasal capnography. Three THC maneuvers were performed in each subject with cuff inflation 20 mmHg above systolic BP for 3 min before release. Beat-to-beat values were extracted for mean CBFV, BP, ETCO2, critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP), and heart rate (HR). Time-varying estimates of the autoregulation index [ARI(t)] were also obtained using an autoregressive-moving average model. Coherent averages synchronized by the instant of cuff release showed significant drops in mean BP, CBFV, and RAP with rapid return of CBFV to baseline. HR, ETCO2, and ARI(t) were transiently increased, but CrCP remained relatively constant. Mean values of ARI(t) for the 30 s following cuff release were not significantly different from the classical ARI [right MCA 5.9 (1.1) vs. 5.1 (1.6); left MCA 5.5 (1.4) vs. 4.9 (1.7)]. HR was strongly correlated with the ARI(t) peak after THC release (in 17/22 and 21/24 recordings), and ETCO2 was correlated with the subsequent drop in ARI(t) (19/22 and 20/24 recordings). These results suggest a complex cerebral autoregulatory response to the THC maneuver, dominated by myogenic mechanisms and influenced by concurrent changes in ETCO2 and possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system and baroreflex. PMID:25659488

  1. Advancing the Oxygen Generation Assembly Design to Increase Reliability and Reduce Costs for a Future Long Duration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Kevin C.; Ghariani, Ahmed E.; Van Keuren,

    2015-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) has been reliably producing breathing oxygen for the crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for over eight years. Lessons learned from operating the ISS OGA have led to proposing incremental improvements to advance the baseline design for use in a future long duration mission. These improvements are intended to reduce system weight, crew maintenance time and resupply mass from Earth while increasing reliability. The proposed improvements include replacing the cell stack membrane material, deleting the nitrogen purge equipment, replacing the hydrogen sensors, deleting the wastewater interface, replacing the hydrogen dome and redesigning the cell stack power supply. The development work to date will be discussed and forward work will be outlined. Additionally, a redesigned system architecture will be proposed.

  2. Methane Post-Processor Development to Increase Oxygen Recovery beyond State-of-the-Art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan; Miller, Lee; Greenwood, Zach; Iannantuono, Michelle; Jones, Kenny

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology, based on the Sabatier reaction, is theoretically capable of 50% recovery of oxygen from metabolic CO2. This recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of the methane byproduct from the Sabatier reactor results in hydrogen recycle and a subsequent increase in oxygen recovery. For this purpose, a Methane Post-Processor Assembly containing three sub-systems has been developed and tested. The assembly includes a Methane Purification Assembly (MePA) to remove residual CO2 and water vapor from the Sabatier product stream, a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to partially pyrolyze methane into hydrogen and acetylene, and an Acetylene Separation Assembly (ASepA) to purify the hydrogen product for recycle. The results of partially integrated testing of the sub-systems are reported.

  3. Methane Post-Processor Development to Increase Oxygen Recovery beyond State-of-the-Art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Miller, Lee A.; Alvarez, Giraldo; Iannantuono, Michelle; Jones, Kenny

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology, based on the Sabatier reaction, is theoretically capable of 50% recovery of oxygen from metabolic CO2. This recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of the methane byproduct from the Sabatier reactor results in hydrogen recycle and a subsequent increase in oxygen recovery. For this purpose, a Methane Post-Processor Assembly containing three sub-systems has been developed and tested. The assembly includes a Methane Purification Assembly (MePA) to remove residual CO2 and water vapor from the Sabatier product stream, a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to partially pyrolyze methane into hydrogen and acetylene, and an Acetylene Separation Assembly (ASepA) to purify the hydrogen product for recycle. The results of partially integrated testing of the sub-systems are reported

  4. X-31 in flight, Herbst maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at the Rockwell International Palmdale, California, facility and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on October 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is an aircraft with a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack--with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, or both. Three thrust-vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the X-31 aircraft exhaust nozzle directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31 aircraft were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust

  5. Development and flight test of an experimental maneuver autopilot for a highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Jones, Frank P.; Roncoli, Ralph B.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the development of an experimental flight test maneuver autopilot (FTMAP) for a highly maneuverable aircraft. The essence of this technique is the application of an autopilot to provide precise control during required flight test maneuvers. This newly developed flight test technique is being applied at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. The FTMAP is designed to increase the quantity and quality of data obtained in test flight. The technique was developed and demonstrated on the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle. This report describes the HiMAT vehicle systems, maneuver requirements, FTMAP development process, and flight results.

  6. Development of a flight test maneuver autopilot for a highly maneuverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Jones, F. P.; Roncoli, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper details the development of a flight test maneuver autopilot for a highly maneuverable aircraft. This newly developed flight test technique is being applied at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of the NASA Ames Research Center. The flight test maneuver autopilot (FTMAP) is designed to increase the quantity and quality of the data obtained in flight test. The vehicle with which it is being used is the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) vehicle. This paper describes the HiMAT vehicle systems, maneuver requirements, FTMAP development process, and flight results.

  7. Laser Remote Maneuver of Space Debris at the Space Environment Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, M.

    2016-09-01

    Active satellites have the ability to maneuver to avoid collision with other space objects. Unfortunately the majority of objects in space are debris objects that do not have the ability to maneuver. In the future the population of debris objects will grow and the probability of collision will increase. This paper will provide details on plans to use a ground based laser with uplink adaptive optics compensation to apply photon pressure to debris objects and maneuver them out of harm's way. This work is ongoing at the Space Environment Research Centre at Mt. Stromlo Australia with collaborative efforts from Lockheed Martin, Electro-Optics Systems Inc. and the Australian National University.

  8. Laser remote maneuver of space debris at the Space Environment Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    Active satellites have the ability to maneuver to avoid collision with other space objects. Unfortunately the majority of objects in space are debris objects that do not have the ability to maneuver. In the future the population of debris objects will grow and the probability of collision will increase. This paper will provide details on plans to use a ground based laser with uplink adaptive optics compensation to apply photon pressure to debris objects and maneuver them out of harm's way. This work is ongoing at the Space Environment Research Centre at Mt. Stromlo Australia with collaborative efforts from Lockheed Martin, Electro-Optics Systems Inc. and the Australian National University.

  9. Traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shaun C; Chute, Dennis J; Desai, Bharati C; Koloski, Eugene R

    2008-11-01

    Although the Heimlich maneuver is considered the best intervention for relieving acute upper airway obstruction, several complications have been reported in the literature. These complications can occur as a result of an increase in abdominal pressure leading to a variety of well-documented visceral injuries, including the great vessels. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis after the Heimlich maneuver is a rare but recognized event; however, to date no case of traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta has been described. We report the first known case, to our knowledge, of a traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta after a forcefully applied Heimlich maneuver.

  10. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  11. Dawn Maneuver Design Performance at Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcher, D. W.; Abrahamson, M.; Ardito, A.; Han, D.; Haw, R. J.; Kennedy, B. M.; Mastrodemos, N.; Nandi, S.; Park, R. S.; Rush, B. P.; Smith, B. A.; Smith, J. C.; Vaughan, A. T.; Whiffen, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Dawn spacecraft orbited the asteroid Vesta from July 16, 2011 to September 5, 2012, successfully accomplishing the four planned science orbits and two planned rotational characterization orbits. The lowest-altitude science orbit lasted four months, with 20 planned orbit maintenance maneuvers. Navigation results from Vesta demonstrate that the navigation plan was sufficient to achieve orbit delivery accuracy requirements. This paper compares the flown Dawn trajectory against the planned trajectory and expected maneuver dispersions. Understanding the effectiveness of the Vesta maneuver design plan is a key component of planning for operations at Ceres, the next destination for the Dawn mission.

  12. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Valerino, Powtawche N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its four-year Prime Mission to study Saturn's system in July 2004. Two tour extensions followed: a two-year Equinox Mission beginning in July 2008 and a seven-year Solstice Mission starting in September 2010. This paper highlights Cassini maneuver activities from June 2010 through June 2011, covering the transition from the Equinox to Solstice Mission. This interval included 38 scheduled maneuvers, nine targeted Titan flybys, three targeted Enceladus flybys, and one close Rhea flyby. In addition, beyond the demanding nominal navigation schedule, numerous unforeseen challenges further complicated maneuver operations. These challenges will be discussed in detail.

  13. Development Of Maneuvering Autopilot For Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Walker, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes recent efforts to develop automatic control system operating under supervision of pilot and making airplane follow prescribed trajectories during flight tests. Report represents additional progress on this project. Gives background information on technology of control of test-flight trajectories; presents mathematical models of airframe, engine and command-augmentation system; focuses on mathematical modeling of maneuvers; addresses design of autopilots for maneuvers; discusses numerical simulation and evaluation of results of simulation of eight maneuvers under control of simulated autopilot; and presents summary and discussion of future work.

  14. Gastric rupture after the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Bintz, M; Cogbill, T H

    1996-01-01

    Since 1975, the Heimlich maneuver has been widely applied to relieve upper airway obstruction caused by aspirated material. Life-threatening complications have been documented following this simple procedure. We report two cases of gastric rupture after use of the Heimlich maneuver. Both patients experienced pulmonary and abdominal symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed in each case by the demonstration of free intraperitoneal air on an upright chest roentgenogram. Full-thickness gastric rupture along the lesser curvature of the stomach was repaired in both patients; one patient died. Abdominal pain or persistent abdominal distention despite nasogastric suction after the Heimlich maneuver should prompt evaluation for possible gastric rupture.

  15. X-31 in flight - Mongoose Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at the Rockwell International facility, Palmdale, California, and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on October 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is an aircraft with a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, pilot or both. Three thrust-vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the exhaust nozzle of the X-31 aircraft directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31 aircraft were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls

  16. Comparison of internal jugular vein dilation between Valsalva maneuver and proximal internal jugular vein compression

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Hyeonjoo; Kang, Bora; Kim, Giwoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Valsalva maneuver is recognized as an effective method to dilate the internal jugular vein (IJV). However, this maneuver cannot be performed in many cases, such as children and unconscious patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of proximal IJV compression, which can easily be performed, regardless of patient cooperation. Methods Healthy adult volunteers were recruited from tertiary hospital employees. Basic anatomic and physiologic data were collected. The subjects lay down as if they were undergoing IJV catheter insertion, in the supine position with their necks turned 30 degrees to the left. The main outcome was the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the distal IJV as measured by ultrasound in four stages. The first stage was sham without any maneuver. The second was Valsalva maneuver, the third was digital IJV compression, and the fourth was digital compression accompanied by simultaneous Valsalva maneuver. Results A total of 41 volunteers were enrolled. Twenty-six (63.41%) were male with an average age of 28.15±2.85 years. Mean height was 170.74±8.66 cm and mean neck circumference was 35.28±3.87 cm. The mean CSA-IJV was 1.06±0.36 cm2 without any maneuver. It increased to 1.34±0.45 cm2 with Valsalva maneuver (P<0.001), to 1.26±0.41 cm2 with digital compression (P<0.001), and to 1.41±0.47 cm2 with the two maneuvers combined (P=0.01). Conclusion Digital proximal IJV compression effectively dilates the distal IJV. When performed simultaneously with the Valsalva maneuver, the effect was enhanced. PMID:28168225

  17. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  18. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  19. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  20. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  1. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  2. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  3. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  4. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  5. Combined increases in mitochondrial cooperation and oxygen photoreduction compensate for deficiency in cyclic electron flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dang, Kieu-Van; Plet, Julie; Tolleter, Dimitri; Jokel, Martina; Cuiné, Stéphan; Carrier, Patrick; Auroy, Pascaline; Richaud, Pierre; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Peltier, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    During oxygenic photosynthesis, metabolic reactions of CO2 fixation require more ATP than is supplied by the linear electron flow operating from photosystem II to photosystem I (PSI). Different mechanisms, such as cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI, have been proposed to participate in reequilibrating the ATP/NADPH balance. To determine the contribution of CEF to microalgal biomass productivity, here, we studied photosynthesis and growth performances of a knockout Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (pgrl1) deficient in PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION LIKE1 (PGRL1)-mediated CEF. Steady state biomass productivity of the pgrl1 mutant, measured in photobioreactors operated as turbidostats, was similar to its wild-type progenitor under a wide range of illumination and CO2 concentrations. Several changes were observed in pgrl1, including higher sensitivity of photosynthesis to mitochondrial inhibitors, increased light-dependent O2 uptake, and increased amounts of flavodiiron (FLV) proteins. We conclude that a combination of mitochondrial cooperation and oxygen photoreduction downstream of PSI (Mehler reactions) supplies extra ATP for photosynthesis in the pgrl1 mutant, resulting in normal biomass productivity under steady state conditions. The lower biomass productivity observed in the pgrl1 mutant in fluctuating light is attributed to an inability of compensation mechanisms to respond to a rapid increase in ATP demand.

  6. A Fuel-Efficient Conflict Resolution Maneuver for Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowe, Aisha Ruth; Santiago, Confesor

    2012-01-01

    Automated separation assurance algorithms are envisioned to play an integral role in accommodating the forecasted increase in demand of the National Airspace System. Developing a robust, reliable, air traffic management system involves safely increasing efficiency and throughput while considering the potential impact on users. This experiment seeks to evaluate the benefit of augmenting a conflict detection and resolution algorithm to consider a fuel efficient, Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver, when resolving a given conflict based on either minimum fuel burn or minimum delay. A total of twelve conditions were tested in a fast-time simulation conducted in three airspace regions with mixed aircraft types and light weather. Results show that inclusion of this maneuver has no appreciable effect on the ability of the algorithm to safely detect and resolve conflicts. The results further suggest that enabling the Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver significantly increases the cumulative fuel burn savings when choosing resolution based on minimum fuel burn while marginally increasing the average delay per resolution.

  7. Oxygen exposure increases resistance of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to killing by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wildschut, Janine D; Caffrey, Sean M; Voordouw, Johanna K; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2012-02-01

    Inactivation of PerR by oxidative stress and a corresponding increase in expression of the perR regulon genes is part of the oxidative stress defense in a variety of anaerobic bacteria. Diluted anaerobic, nearly sulfide-free cultures of mutant and wild-type Desulfovibrio vulgaris (10(5)-10(6) colony-forming units/ml) were treated with 0 to 2,500 μM H(2)O(2) for only 5 min to prevent readjustment of gene expression. Survivors were then scored by plating. The wild type and perR mutant had 50% survival at 58 and 269 μM H(2)O(2), respectively, indicating the latter to be 4.6-fold more resistant to killing by H(2)O(2) under these conditions. Significantly increased resistance of the wild type (38-fold; 50% killing at 2188 μM H(2)O(2)) was observed if cells were pretreated with full air for 30 min, conditions that did not affect cell viability. The resistance of the perR mutant increased less (4.6-fold; 50% killing at 1230 μM H(2)O(2)), when similarly pretreated. Interestingly, no increased resistance of either was achieved by exposure with 10.6 μM H(2)O(2) for 30 min, the highest concentration that could be used without killing the cells. Hence, in environments with low D. vulgaris biomass only the presence of external O(2) effectively activates the perR regulon. As a result, mutant strains lacking one of the perR regulon genes ahpC, dvu0772, rbr1 or rbr2 displayed decreased resistance to H(2)O(2) stress only following pretreatment with air.

  8. Heimlich maneuver on an adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly in children less than 3 years old and in senior citizens, but can occur at any age. The Heimlich maneuver has been valuable in saving lives and can be administered by anyone who has learned the technique.

  9. Heimlich maneuver on conscious child (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly in children less than 3 years old and in senior citizens, but can occur at any age. The Heimlich maneuver has been valuable in saving lives and can be administered by anyone who has learned the technique.

  10. Tracking a maneuvering target in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Andrew P.; Blanchard, Jeffrey A.; Grabbe, Michael T.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents an Extended Kalman Filter for tracking a maneuvering target, where the kinematics of a typical target aircraft maneuver have been incorporated into the filter state equations. Such a formulation allows the target's motion to be accurately determined through estimation of heading and lateral acceleration. This is an improvement over the the typical approach of modeling target motion with acceleration terms represented by random processes, such as that used in the Singer model. In the following pages, a three-dimensional target maneuver model is formulated in conjunction with the kinematic equations of a sensor tracking a target in spherical coordinates. Three degree-of-freedom simulation results of the proposed filter, simplified for planar target maneuvers, are compared to a filter modeling target motion with the Singer model.

  11. The mountains that triggered the Late Neoproterozoic increase in oxygen: The Second Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Squire, Richard J.

    2010-08-01

    The consensus view is that the O 2 concentration of the Archean atmosphere was very low and that it rose to its present level of 21% in a series of steps, two of which dwarf the others in importance. The first, known as the Great Oxidation Event, occurred at ˜2.4 Ga. It involved an increase in the relative abundance of O 2, which has been estimated at three orders of magnitude, and it is important because it led to the first surface weathering. The second, although less important in relative terms, involved the addition of 9 × 10 17 kg of O 2 to the atmosphere, at least ten times as much as that required to produce the Great Oxidation Event. Its importance lies in the fact that it correlates with the rise of animals in the Ediacaran and Early Cambrian periods. Although it is widely accepted that an increase in atmospheric O 2 facilitated the appearance of animals at ˜575 Ma, followed by the Cambrian Explosion ˜50 Myr later, the cause of this increase remains controversial. We show that the surge in the O 2 level near the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary correlates with major episodes of continent-continent collision associated with Gondwana's amalgamation, including convergence between East and West Gondwana, which produced the 8000-km-long Transgondwanan Supermountains. The eroded roots of these mountains include the oldest lawsonite-bearing blueschists and eclogites, and ultra high-pressure metamorphic rocks. The sudden appearance of these low-thermal gradient, high-pressure metamorphic rocks implies that the Gondwanan orogenic zones were cooler and stronger than those associated with the assembly of earlier supercontinents and therefore capable of supporting higher mountains. There is a log-linear relationship between relief and erosion rate, and a linear relationship between sedimentation rate and organic C burial. Taken together these two relationships imply a log-linear relationship between relief and C sequestration. We suggest that the Gondwanan

  12. Cassini-Huygens Maneuver Experience: Second Year of Saturn Tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Gist, Emily M.; Goodson, Troy D.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper documents the maneuver experience during the second year of the Cassini-Huygens mission at Saturn. Since Saturn arrival in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has made many flybys of Titan and Saturn's icy satellites. From August 2005 to June 2006, there were 39 planned maneuvers designed to target Cassini to aimpoints near Titan, Hyperion, Dione, and Rhea. Highlights of this paper include maneuver designs and strategies, maneuver performance, maneuver cancellation rationales, and a new maneuver execution-error model based on maneuvers executed to date.

  13. A Method for Governing Spacecraft Evasive Maneuvering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    countermeasures fail to prevent detection of the spacecraft, or fail to deceive, confuse, or destroy the attacker. To maneuver effectively , the...cept is concluded to be imminent, the spacecraft must be able to plan and carry-out effective evasive maneuvers based on information which is timely...hostile force deployments, and support the command and control of mil- itary operations. In fact, an effective and survivable satellite network is

  14. Helicopter stability during aggressive maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Ranjith

    The dissertation investigates helicopter trim and stability during level bank-angle and diving bank-angle turns. The level turn is moderate in that sufficient power is available to maintain level maneuver, and the diving turn is severe where the power deficit is overcome by the kinetic energy of descent. The investigation basically represents design conditions where the peak loading goes well beyond the steady thrust limit and the rotor experiences appreciable stall. The major objectives are: (1) to assess the sensitivity of the trim and stability predictions to the approximations in modeling stall, (2) to correlate the trim predictions with the UH-60A flight test data, and (3) to demonstrate the feasibility of routinely using the exact fast-Floquet periodic eigenvector method for mode identification in the stability analysis. The UH-60A modeling and analysis are performed using the comprehensive code RCAS (Army's Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System). The trim and damping predictions are based on quasisteady stall, ONERA-Edlin (Equations Differentielles Lineaires) and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall models. From the correlation with the test data, the strengths and weaknesses of the trim predictions are presented.

  15. [Utility of recruitment maneuvers (con)].

    PubMed

    Ochagavia, A; Blanch, L; Lopez-Aguilar, J

    2009-04-01

    A reduction in both total lung volume and in lung parenchyma useful for gas exchange has been observed in ARDS patients. Applying an appropriate ventilatory pattern that includes PEEP can open up collapsed areas of the lung to aeration, thus ensuring a more homogeneous distribution of air in the lung. However, the heterogeneous patterns observed in patients with ARDS vary widely in their response to ventilation with PEEP. Recruitment maneuvers (RM) have been proposed as an adjuvant treatment to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue in ARDS. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether RM are useful when patients are ventilated with high PEEP or when they have fibrosis, stiff chest wall, or hypovolemia, among other conditions. Likewise, decisions about RM must take into account not only their short- and long-term efficacy and reversibility, but also possible adverse effects derived from the high pressures reached during RM, including barotrauma, hemodynamic alterations, reduced systolic volume and aortic flow, and difficulties in venous return, as well as the possibility of bacterial translocation to the bloodstream or other organs. This article review the effects of RM as adjuvant treatment to mechanical ventilation in ARDS patients and discuss its efficacy and potential benefits as well as the different interactions that RM can have with the diverse conditions that can be associated to ARDS.

  16. Optimization of satellite constellation reconfiguration maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Leonid; Guelman, Moshe; Mishne, David

    2014-06-01

    Constellation satellites are required to perform orbital transfer maneuvers. Orbital transfer maneuvers, as opposed to orbital correction maneuvers, are seldom performed but require a substantial amount of propellant for each maneuver. The maneuvers are performed in order to obtain the desired constellation configuration that satisfies the coverage requirements. In most cases, the single-satellite position is immaterial; rather the relative position between constellation multiple-satellites is to be controlled. This work deals with the solution to the coupled optimization problem of multiple-satellite orbital transfer. The studied problem involves a coupled formulation of the terminal conditions of the satellites. The solution was achieved using functional optimization techniques by a combined algorithm. The combined algorithm is based on the First Order Gradient and Neighboring-Extremals Algorithms. An orbital transfer optimization tool was developed. This software has the ability to consider multiple satellites with coupled terminal conditions. A solution to the multiple-satellite orbital transfer optimization problem is presented. A comparison of this solution to the uncoupled case is presented in order to review the benefits of using this approach. It is concluded that the coupled transfer maneuver solution approach is more computationally efficient and more accurate. Numerical solutions for a number of representative cases are presented.

  17. Gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tung, P H; Law, S; Chu, K M; Law, W L; Wong, J

    2001-01-01

    Choking is a common emergency problem. The Heimlich maneuver is unquestionably effective in relieving airway obstruction. Serious and life-threatening complications may arise, however, if the maneuver is applied incorrectly. Two cases of gastric rupture after Heimlich maneuver are reported. Lay public, paramedics and the medical professionals should be educated with the correct technique of Heimlich maneuver and its potential complications. All patients receiving Heimlich maneuver should be examined by an experienced physician.

  18. Increase of reactive oxygen species by desferrioxamine during experimental Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Amanda Fortes; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; Arantes, Jerusa Marilda; Silva, Maisa; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is common in inflammatory processes associated with many diseases including Chagas' disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a murine model, biomarkers of oxidative stress together with components of the antioxidant system in order to provide an overview of the mechanism of action of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). The study population comprised 48 male Swiss mice, half of which were treated daily by intraperitoneal injection of DFO over a 35-day period, while half were administered sterile water in a similar manner. On the 14th day of the experiment, 12 DFO-treated mice and an equal number of untreated mice were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Serum concentrations of nitric oxide and superoxide dismutase and hepatic levels of total glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyl, were determined on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post-infection. The results obtained revealed that DFO enhances antioxidant activity in the host but also increases oxidative stress, indicating that the mode of action of the drug involves a positive contribution to the host together with an effect that is not beneficial to the parasite. PMID:20663295

  19. Conjunction challenges of low-thrust geosynchronous debris removal maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-06-01

    The conjunction challenges of low-thrust engines for continuous thrust re-orbiting of geosynchronous (GEO) objects to super-synchronous disposal orbits are investigated, with applications to end-of-life mitigation and active debris removal (ADR) technologies. In particular, the low maneuverability of low-thrust systems renders collision avoidance a challenging task. This study investigates the number of conjunction events a low-thrust system could encounter with the current GEO debris population during a typical re-orbit to 300 km above the GEO ring. Sensitivities to thrust level and initial longitude and inclination are evaluated, and the impact of delaying the start time for a re-orbiting maneuver is assessed. Results demonstrate that the mean number of conjunctions increases hyperbolically as thrust level decreases, but timing the start of the maneuver appropriately can reduce the average conjunction rate when lower thrust levels are applied.

  20. A Computer Simulation of the System-Wide Effects of Parallel-Offset Route Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauderdale, Todd A.; Santiago, Confesor; Pankok, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Most aircraft managed by air-traffic controllers in the National Airspace System are capable of flying parallel-offset routes. This paper presents the results of two related studies on the effects of increased use of offset routes as a conflict resolution maneuver. The first study analyzes offset routes in the context of all standard resolution types which air-traffic controllers currently use. This study shows that by utilizing parallel-offset route maneuvers, significant system-wide savings in delay due to conflict resolution of up to 30% are possible. It also shows that most offset resolutions replace horizontal-vectoring resolutions. The second study builds on the results of the first and directly compares offset resolutions and standard horizontal-vectoring maneuvers to determine that in-trail conflicts are often more efficiently resolved by offset maneuvers.

  1. Gymnosperms have increased capacity for electron leakage to oxygen (Mehler and PTOX reactions) in photosynthesis compared with angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Shirao, Masayoshi; Kuroki, Shu; Kaneko, Kaoru; Kinjo, Yuriko; Tsuyama, Michito; Förster, Britta; Takahashi, Shunichi; Badger, Murray R

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in photosynthesis by participating in a number of O2-consuming reactions. O2 inhibits CO2 fixation by stimulating photorespiration, thus reducing plant production. O2 interacts with photosynthetic electron transport in the chloroplasts' thylakoids in two main ways: by accepting electrons from PSI (Mehler reaction); and by accepting electrons from reduced plastoquinone (PQ) mediated by the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX). In this study, we show, using 101 plant species, that there is a difference in the potential for photosynthetic electron flow to O2 between angiosperms and gymnosperms. We found, from measurements of Chl fluorescence and leaf absorbance at 830 nm, (i) that electron outflow from PSII, as determined by decay kinetics of Chl fluorescence after application of a saturating light pulse, is more rapid in gymnosperms than in angiosperms; (ii) that the reaction center Chl of PSI (P700) is rapidly and highly oxidized in gymnosperms during induction of photosynthesis; and (iii) that these differences are dependent on oxygen. Finally, rates of O2 uptake measured by mass spectrometry in the absence of photorespiration were significantly promoted by illumination in dark-adapted leaves of gymnosperms, but not in those of angiosperms. The light-stimulated O2 uptake was around 10% of the maximum O2 evolution in gymnosperms and 1% in angiosperms. These results suggest that gymnosperms have increased capacity for electron leakage to oxygen in photosynthesis compared with angiosperms. The involvement of the Mehler reaction and PTOX in the electron flow to O2 is discussed.

  2. Acute short-term hyperoxia followed by mild hypoxia does not increase EPO production: resolving the "normobaric oxygen paradox".

    PubMed

    Debevec, Tadej; Keramidas, Michail E; Norman, Barbara; Gustafsson, Thomas; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2012-03-01

    Recent findings suggest that besides renal tissue hypoxia, relative decrements in tissue oxygenation, using a transition of the breathing mixture from hyperoxic to normoxic, can also stimulate erythropoietin (EPO) production. To further clarify the importance of the relative change in tissue oxygenation on plasma EPO concentration [EPO], we investigated the effect of a consecutive hyperoxic and hypoxic breathing intervention. Eighteen healthy male subjects were assigned to either IHH (N = 10) or CON (N = 8) group. The IHH group breathed pure oxygen (F(i)O(2) ~ 1.0) for 1 h, followed by a 1-h period of breathing a hypoxic gas mixture (F(i)O(2) ~ 0.15). The CON group breathed a normoxic gas mixture (F(i)O(2) ~ 0.21) for the same duration (2 h). Blood samples were taken just before, after 60 min, and immediately after the 2-h exposure period. Thereafter, samples were taken at 3, 5, 8, 24, 32, and 48 h after the exposure. During the breathing interventions, subjects remained in supine position. There were significant increases in absolute [EPO] within groups at 8 and 32 h in the CON and at 32 h only in the IHH group. No significant differences in absolute [EPO] were observed between groups following the intervention. Relative (∆[EPO]) levels were significantly lower in the IHH than in the CON group, 5 and 8 h following exposure. The tested protocol of consecutive hyperoxic-hypoxic gas mixture breathing did not induce [EPO] synthesis stimulation. Moreover, the transient attenuation in ∆[EPO] in the IHH group was most likely due to a hyperoxic suppression. Hence, our findings provide further evidence against the "normobaric O(2) paradox" theory.

  3. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  4. X-31 in flight - Post Stall Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at the Rockwell International facility, Palmdale, California, and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on October 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is an aircraft with a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, pilot or both. Three thrust vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the exhaust nozzle of the X-31 aircraft directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31 aircraft were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls

  5. Improved Maneuver Reconstructions for the GRAIL Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, Mason; You, Tung-Han; Antreasian, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Maneuver reconstructions for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) A and B lunar orbiters were improved through updates to the orbit determination filter and dynamic models. Consistent reconstructions of the 27 GRAIL A and B maneuvers from the Trans-Lunar Cruise phase in the fall of 2011 through the Transition to Science Formation phase in February 2012 were performed. Standard methods of orbit determination were applied incorporating the latest dynamic models and filter strategies developed by the GRAIL Navigation and Science Teams, including a high resolution, 420 x 420 degree and order lunar spherical harmonic gravity field model. For Trans-Lunar Cruise for GRAIL-A (TLC-A), all maneuvers executed with delta V errors below 5.50 +/- 0.50 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.25 degrees. GRAIL-A lunar orbit maneuvers had delta V errors below 30.0 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.51 degrees. For TLC-B, all maneuvers executed with delta V errors below 8.60 +/- 1.41 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.300 degrees. GRAIL-B maneuvers in lunar orbit executed with maximum delta V errors of 25.0 mm/s and pointing error of 0.43 degrees. These maneuver reconstructions will enable the GRAIL Navigation Team to better characterize the main engine performance of each spacecraft. This will help the Navigation Team to navigate low (greater than 8 km) altitude orbits during the extended mission phase in the fall of 2012.

  6. Prior endurance exercise prevents postprandial lipaemia-induced increases in reactive oxygen species in circulating CD31+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Nathan T; Landers, Rian Q; Thakkar, Sunny R; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Brown, Michael D; Prior, Steven J; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We hypothesized that prior exercise would prevent postprandial lipaemia (PPL)-induced increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in three distinct circulating angiogenic cell (CAC) subpopulations. CD34+, CD31+/CD14−/CD34−, and CD31+/CD14+/CD34− CACs were isolated from blood samples obtained from 10 healthy men before and 4 h after ingesting a high fat meal with or without ∼50 min of prior endurance exercise. Significant PPL-induced increases in ROS production in both sets of CD31+ cells were abolished by prior exercise. Experimental ex vivo inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity and mitochondrial ROS production indicated that mitochondria were the primary source of PPL-induced oxidative stress. The attenuated increases in ROS with prior exercise were associated with increased antioxidant gene expression in CD31+/CD14−/CD34− cells and reduced intracellular lipid uptake in CD31+/CD14+/CD34− cells. These findings were associated with systemic cardiovascular benefits of exercise, as serum triglyceride, oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and plasma endothelial microparticle concentrations were lower in the prior exercise trial than the control trial. In conclusion, prior exercise completely prevents PPL-induced increases in ROS in CD31+/CD14−/CD34− and CD31+/CD14+/CD34− cells. The mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise on CAC function appear to vary among specific CAC types. PMID:21930598

  7. Cassini's Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) Process: How to Successfully Command 200 Navigation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Genevie Velarde; Mohr, David; Kirby, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    To keep Cassini on its complex trajectory, more than 200 orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) have been planned from July 2004 to July 2010. With only a few days between many of these OTMs, the operations process of planning and executing the necessary commands had to be automated. The resulting Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) process minimizes the workforce required for, and maximizes the efficiency of, the maneuver design and uplink activities. The MAS process is a well-organized and logically constructed interface between Cassini's Navigation (NAV), Spacecraft Operations (SCO), and Ground Software teams. Upon delivery of an orbit determination (OD) from NAV, the MAS process can generate a maneuver design and all related uplink and verification products within 30 minutes. To date, all 112 OTMs executed by the Cassini spacecraft have been successful. MAS was even used to successfully design and execute a maneuver while the spacecraft was in safe mode.

  8. A flight test maneuver autopilot for a highly manueverable aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roncoli, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    A flight test maneuver autopilot (FTMAP) is currently being flown to increase the quality and quantity of the data obtained in the flight testing of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV). The FTMAP resides in a ground-based digital computer and was designed to perform certain prescribed maneuvers precisely, while maintaining critical flight parameters within close tolerances. The FTMAP operates as a non-flight-critical outer loop controller and augments the vehicle primary flight control system. The inputs to the FTMAP consist of telemetry-downlinked aircraft sensor data. During FTMAP operation, the FTMAP computer replaces normal pilot inputs to the aircraft stick and throttle positions. The FTMAP maneuvers include straight-and-level flight, level accelerations and decelerations, pushover pullups, and windup turns. The pushover pullups can be executed holding throttle or Mach number fixed. The windup turns can be commanded by either normal acceleration or angle of attack. The operational procedures, control mode configuration, and initial simulation results are discussed.

  9. Using the Heimlich maneuver to save near-drowning victims.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J; Patrick, E A

    1988-08-01

    Flooding of the lungs occurs routinely in drowning victims. The cause of death in 90% of them is hypoxemia caused by water in the lungs. Mouth-to-mouth ventilation is ineffective until the water is removed. The Heimlich maneuver expels aspirated water, vomitus, debris, and other foreign matter. In treating near-drowning victims, place the victim in the supine position with head turned to the side and perform the Heimlich maneuver to evacuate water from the lungs, unless you know water is not in the respiratory tract. The Heimlich maneuver is a form of artificial respiration. It elevates the diaphragm, increasing intrathoracic pressure and compressing the lungs, and should be performed intermittently until all water is expelled. It is an especially useful technique because fear of contagion sometimes deters rescuers from using mouth-to-mouth ventilation . Further treatment has not been necessary in most instances. If the victim does not recover after water ceases to flow from the mouth, ventilation techniques, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and other measures as indicated should be used.

  10. Comparable Cerebral Oxygenation Patterns in Younger and Older Adults during Dual-Task Walking with Increasing Load

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Sarah A.; Dupuy, Olivier; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Bherer, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The neuroimaging literature on dual-task gait clearly demonstrates increased prefrontal cortex (PFC) involvement when performing a cognitive task while walking. However, findings from direct comparisons of the cerebral oxygenation patterns of younger (YA) and older (OA) adults during dual-task walking are mixed and it is unclear how YA and OA respond to increasing cognitive load (difficulty) while walking. This functional near infra-red (fNIRS) study examined cerebral oxygenation of YA and OA during self-paced dual-task treadmill walking at two different levels of cognitive load (auditory n-back). Changes in accuracy (%) as well as oxygenated (HbO) and deoxygenated (HbR) hemoglobin were examined. For the HbO and HbR measures, eight regions of interest (ROIs) were assessed: the anterior and posterior dorsolateral and ventrolateral PFC (aDLPFC, pDLPFC, aVLPFC, pVLPFC) in each hemisphere. Nineteen YA (M = 21.83 years) and 14 OA (M = 66.85 years) walked at a self-selected pace while performing auditory 1-back and 2-back tasks. Walking alone (single motor: SM) and performing the cognitive tasks alone (single cognitive: SC) were compared to dual-task walking (DT = SM + SC). In the behavioural data, participants were more accurate in the lowest level of load (1-back) compared to the highest (2-back; p < 0.001). YA were more accurate than OA overall (p = 0.009), and particularly in the 2-back task (p = 0.048). In the fNIRS data, both younger and older adults had task effects (SM < DT) in specific ROIs for ΔHbO (three YA, one OA) and ΔHbR (seven YA, eight OA). After controlling for walk speed differences, direct comparisons between YA and OA did not reveal significant age differences, but did reveal a difficulty effect in HbO in the left aDLPFC (p = 0.028) and significant task effects (SM < DT) in HbR for six of the eight ROIs. Findings suggest that YA and OA respond similarly to manipulations of cognitive load when walking on a treadmill at a self-selected pace. PMID

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Donors Increase the Responsiveness of Dorsal Horn Neurons and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Inhyung; Chun, Sang Woo; Kim, Hee Kee

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers have analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through spinal mechanisms in the rat. The studies suggest that superoxide in spinal cord is one of important mediators of persistent pain. To test the hypothesis that increase of superoxide-derived intermediates leads to central sensitization and pain, the effects of an intrathecal injection of chemical ROS donors releasing either OH∙, OCl−, or H2O2 were examined on pain behaviors. Following treatment with t-BOOH (OH∙ donor), dorsal horn neuron responses to mechanical stimuli in normal rats and the changes of neuronal excitability were explored on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch clamping recordings. Intrathecal administration of t-BOOH or NaOCl (OCl− donor), but not H2O2, significantly decreased mechanical thresholds of hind paws. The responses of wide dynamic range neurons to mechanical stimuli increased after a local application of t-BOOH. The t-BOOH increased the frequency and the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, depolarized membrane potential in SG neurons, and increased the frequency of action potentials evoked by depolarizing current pulses. These results suggest that elevated ROS, especially OH∙, in the spinal cord sensitized dorsal horn neurons and produced hyperalgesia in normal rats. PMID:26457204

  12. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  13. Acrolein-Induced Increases in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Are Coupled with Decreased Blood Oxygen Levels During Exposure in Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Recent studies link exposure to air pollution with reduced blood oxygen saturation suggesting that hypoxia is a potential me...

  14. Increased level of reactive oxygen species persuades postovulatory aging-mediated spontaneous egg activation in rat eggs cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Karuppanan V; Chaube, Shail K

    2016-05-01

    The present study was aimed to find out whether increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) particularity hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could persuade postovulatory aging-mediated abortive spontaneous egg activation (SEA) in rat eggs cultured in vitro. For this purpose, ROS and H2O2 levels, mitochondria distribution and its membrane potential, p286-CaMK-II, Emi2, Thr-161 phophorylated cyclin-dependent protein kinase1 (Cdk1) as well as cyclin B1 levels, in vitro effects of 3-tert-butyl-4 hydroxy anisole (BHA), pentoxifylline and dibutyryl-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (db-cAMP) were analyzed during postovulatory aging-induced abortive SEA in vitro. Data of the present study suggest that postovulatory aging increased H2O2 levels, disturbed mitochondrial distribution pattern and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in eggs. There was an significant increase of p286-CaMK-II level, while Emi2 level reduced significantly during egg aging in vitro. The reduced Emi2 level was associated with decreased Thr-161 phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (Cdk1) as well as cyclin B1 level in aged eggs that underwent abortive SEA. Further, supplementation of pentoxifylline, db-cAMP, and BHA protected postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that postovulatory aging increased H2O2 levels, reduced MMP, and increased p286-CaMK-II. The increased p286-CaMK-II was associated with reduced Emi2 level and maturation-promoting factor levels during postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA. Drugs that elevate cAMP directly or indirectly and BHA protected postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA possibly by reducing ROS level in rat eggs cultured in vitro.

  15. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability.

  16. Immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1) promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression in macrophages through reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingke; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chengcai; Han, Chaofeng; Meng, Jun; Liu, Xingguang; Xu, Sheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Xueyin; Cao, Xuetao

    2013-06-07

    Sepsis-associated immunosuppression (SAIS) is regarded as one of main causes for the death of septic patients at the late stage because of the decreased innate immunity with a more opportunistic infection. LPS-tolerized macrophages, which are re-challenged by LPS after prior exposure to LPS, are regarded as the common model of hypo-responsiveness for SAIS. However, the molecular mechanisms of endotoxin tolerance and SAIS remain to be fully elucidated. In addition, negative regulation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered innate inflammatory response needs further investigation. Here we show that expression of immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1) was highly up-regulated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of septic patients and in LPS-tolerized mouse macrophages. IRG1 significantly suppressed TLR-triggered production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-β in LPS-tolerized macrophages, with the elevated expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and A20. Moreover, ROS enhanced A20 expression by increasing the H3K4me3 modification of histone on the A20 promoter domain, and supplement of the ROS abrogated the IRG1 knockdown function in breaking endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression. Our results demonstrate that inducible IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression through ROS, indicating a new molecular mechanism regulating hypoinflammation of sepsis and endotoxin tolerance.

  17. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  18. Maneuvering and control of flexible space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, Leonard; Lim, Seungchul

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a flexible space robot capable of maneuvering payloads. The robot is assumed to consist of two hinge-connected flexible arms and a rigid end-effector holding a payload; the robot is mounted on a rigid platform floating in space. The equations of motion are nonlinear and of high order. Based on the assumption that the maneuvering motions are one order of magnitude larger than the elastic vibrations, a perturbation approach permits design of controls for the two types of motion separately. The rigid-body maneuvering is carried out open loop, but the elastic motions are controlled closed loop, by means of discrete-time linear quadratic regulator theory with prescribed degree of stability. A numerical example demonstrates the approach. In the example, the controls derived by the perturbation approach are applied to the original nonlinear system and errors are found to be relatively small.

  19. Dawn Statistical Maneuver Design for Vesta Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcher, Daniel W.; Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    In July of 2011 the Dawn spacecraft is scheduled to begin orbital operations at Vesta, a large main-belt asteroid. Dawn is a NASA Discovery mission that uses solar-electric low-thrust ion propulsion for both interplanetary cruise and orbital operations. Navigating between the Dawn project's four targeted science orbits at Vesta requires a plan that accounts for uncertainties not only in thrust execution, orbit determination, and other spacecraft forces, but also large uncertainties in characteristics of Vesta - such as the asteroid's gravity field and pole orientation. Accommodating these uncertainties requires strategic use of low-thrust maneuvers reserved for statistical trajectory corrections. This paper describes the placement and evaluation of low-thrust statistical maneuvers during two key phases of the Vesta mission along with a discussion of the tools, constraints, and methods used to plan those maneuvers.

  20. An oxygenated metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene increases hepatic β-oxidation of fatty acids in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Westman, Ola; Larsson, Maria; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Hollert, Henner; Engwall, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are well-known carcinogens to humans and ecotoxicological effects have been shown in several studies. However, PAHs can also be oxidized into more water soluble-oxygenated metabolites (Oxy-PAHs). The first purpose of the present project was to (1) assess the effects of a mixture containing three parent PAHs: anthracene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene versus a mixture of their oxygenated metabolites, namely: anthracene-9,10-dione, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one on the hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation in chicken embryos (Gallus gallus domesticus) exposed in ovo. The second and also main purpose of the project was to (2) assess the effects of the parent PAHs versus their oxy-PAHs analogues when injected individually, followed by (3) additional testing of the individual oxy-PAHs. The hepatic β-oxidation was measured using a tritium release assay with [9,10-(3)H]-palmitic acid (16:0) as substrate. The result from the first part (1) showed reduced hepatic β-oxidation after exposure in ovo to a mixture of three PAHs, however, increased after exposure to the mixture of three oxy-PAHs compared to control. The result from the second part (2) and also the follow-up experiment (3) showed that 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one was the causative oxy-PAH. The implication of this finding on the risk assessment of PAH metabolite exposure in avian wildlife remains to be determined. To the best of our knowledge, no similar studies have been reported.

  1. Improvement of the Redox Balance Increases l-Valine Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum under Oxygen Deprivation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Suda, Masako; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Production of l-valine under oxygen deprivation conditions by Corynebacterium glutamicum lacking the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA and overexpressing the l-valine biosynthesis genes ilvBNCDE was repressed. This was attributed to imbalanced cofactor production and consumption in the overall l-valine synthesis pathway: two moles of NADH was generated and two moles of NADPH was consumed per mole of l-valine produced from one mole of glucose. In order to solve this cofactor imbalance, the coenzyme requirement for l-valine synthesis was converted from NADPH to NADH via modification of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase encoded by ilvC and introduction of Lysinibacillus sphaericus leucine dehydrogenase in place of endogenous transaminase B, encoded by ilvE. The intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio significantly decreased, and glucose consumption and l-valine production drastically improved. Moreover, l-valine yield increased and succinate formation decreased concomitantly with the decreased intracellular redox state. These observations suggest that the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio, i.e., reoxidation of NADH, is the primary rate-limiting factor for l-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions. The l-valine productivity and yield were even better and by-products derived from pyruvate further decreased as a result of a feedback resistance-inducing mutation in the acetohydroxy acid synthase encoded by ilvBN. The resultant strain produced 1,470 mM l-valine after 24 h with a yield of 0.63 mol mol of glucose−1, and the l-valine productivity reached 1,940 mM after 48 h. PMID:22138982

  2. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (fH), heart mass (Mh) and body mass (Mb) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean fH and VO2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while fH was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while fH was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean fH and VO2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO2 from measurements of fH is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (COi) derived from the product of fH and Mh. However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow.

  3. Cassini Solstice Mission Maneuver Experience: Year Two

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Juan; Ballard, Christopher G.; Hahn, Yungsun

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft was launched in October 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its moons; it entered orbit around Saturn in July 2004 for a nominal four-year Prime Mission, later augmented by two extensions: the Equinox Mission, from July 2008 through September 2010, and the Solstice Mission, from October 2010 through September 2017. This paper provides an overview of the maneuver activities from August 2011 through June 2012 which include the design of 38 Orbit Trim Maneuvers--OTM-288 through OTM-326-- for attaining 14 natural satellite encounters: seven with Titan, six with Enceladus, and one with Dione.

  4. Mars Science Laboratory Cruise Propulsion Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Raymond S.; Mizukami, Masahi; Barber, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" is NASA's most recent mission to Mars, launched in November 2011, and landed in August 2012. It is a subcompact car-sized nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. Entry, descent and landing used a unique "skycrane" concept. This report describes the propulsive maneuvering operations during cruise from Earth to Mars, to control attitudes and to target the vehicle for entry. The propulsion subsystem, mission operations, and flight performance are discussed. All trajectory control maneuvers were well within accuracy requirements, and all turns and spin corrections were nominal.

  5. The Heimlich maneuver: breaking down the complications.

    PubMed

    Chillag, Shawn; Krieg, Jake; Bhargava, Ranjana

    2010-02-01

    The very young and the very old are vulnerable to choking, and there are over 4000 choking-related deaths annually in the United States. Complications from the Heimlich maneuver (HM), as reported in infrequent case reports, predominantly relate to the elderly. It is doubtful that the denominator, numerator, appropriateness, expertise, and problems of maneuvers applied to choking victims will ever be known. This case report and literature review suggests that the treatment for acute elderly choking victims should be applied carefully and that esophageal food impaction, which should be rapidly distinguishable from choking, can have serious complications with application of the HM.

  6. Age-related increase of reactive oxygen generation in the brains of mammals and birds: is reactive oxygen a signaling molecule to determine the aging process and life span?

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toru; Unno, Keiko; Tahara, Shoichi; Kaneko, Takao

    2010-07-01

    Since Harman proposed the "free-radical theory of aging", oxidative stress has been postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. The accumulation of oxidative stress-induced oxidatively modified macromolecules, including protein, DNA and lipid, were found in tissues during the aging process; however, it is not necessarily clear which factor is more critical, an increase in endogenous reactive oxygen and/or a decrease in anti-oxidative defense, to the age-related increase in oxidative damage. To clarify the increasing production of reactive oxygen with age, we examined reactive oxygen-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) signals in ex vivo brain slices prepared from different-aged animal brains during hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment using a novel photonic imaging method. The CL signal was intensified during reoxygenation. The signals in SAMP10 (short-life strain) and SAMR1 (control) brain slices increased with aging. The slope of the increase of CL intensity with age in P10 was steeper than in R1. Age-dependent increase of CL intensity was also observed in C57BL/6 mice, Wistar rats and pigeons; however, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the brain did not change with age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen production itself increased with aging. The rate of age-related increases of CL intensity was inversely related to the maximum lifespan of animals. We speculate that reactive oxygen might be a signaling molecule and its levels in tissue might determine the aging process and lifespan. Decelerating age-related increases of reactive oxygen production are expected to be a potent strategy for anti-aging interventions.

  7. GGsTOP increases migration of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro via reactive oxygen species pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YING; WANG, XIANG; LI, YING; MU, SEN; ZHOU, SHUANG; LIU, YI; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    GGsTOP is a novel and selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a cell-surface enzyme that has a key role in glutathione homeostasis and the maintenance of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are essential for wound healing. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of GGT by GGsTOP in human periodontal ligament cells (hPLCs). The present study assessed GGT expression in mouse periodontal ligament tissues, GGT activity in hPLCs, and the potential physiological effect of GGsTOP on hPLC migration. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that GGT was widely expressed in mouse periodontal ligament tissue. Treatment with GGsTOP was associated with greater proliferation and migration of hPLCs, and higher levels of cellular ROS compared with untreated hPLCs. However, the increase in intracellular ROS was attenuated in hPLCs co-cultured with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. The higher ROS levels associated with GGsTOP treatment were in parallel with increases in the levels of type I collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin, which was inhibited in hPLCs co-cultured with NAC. Thus, GGsTOP may promote hPLC migration and participate in the maintenance of the periodontal ligament apparatus via the ROS pathway. PMID:27035100

  8. GGsTOP increases migration of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro via reactive oxygen species pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ying; Mu, Sen; Zhou, Shuang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    GGsTOP is a novel and selective inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), a cell-surface enzyme that has a key role in glutathione homeostasis and the maintenance of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are essential for wound healing. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of GGT by GGsTOP in human periodontal ligament cells (hPLCs). The present study assessed GGT expression in mouse periodontal ligament tissues, GGT activity in hPLCs, and the potential physiological effect of GGsTOP on hPLC migration. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that GGT was widely expressed in mouse periodontal ligament tissue. Treatment with GGsTOP was associated with greater proliferation and migration of hPLCs, and higher levels of cellular ROS compared with untreated hPLCs. However, the increase in intracellular ROS was attenuated in hPLCs co‑cultured with the anti‑oxidant N‑acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. The higher ROS levels associated with GGsTOP treatment were in parallel with increases in the levels of type I collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin, which was inhibited in hPLCs co‑cultured with NAC. Thus, GGsTOP may promote hPLC migration and participate in the maintenance of the periodontal ligament apparatus via the ROS pathway.

  9. Sex as a response to oxidative stress: a twofold increase in cellular reactive oxygen species activates sex genes.

    PubMed

    Nedelcu, Aurora M; Marcu, Oana; Michod, Richard E

    2004-08-07

    Organisms are constantly subjected to factors that can alter the cellular redox balance and result in the formation of a series of highly reactive molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). As ROS can be damaging to biological structures, cells evolved a series of mechanisms (e.g. cell-cycle arrest, programmed cell death) to respond to high levels of ROS (i.e. oxidative stress). Recently, we presented evidence that in a facultatively sexual lineage--the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri--sex is an additional response to increased levels of stress, and probably ROS and DNA damage. Here we show that, in V. carteri, (i) sex is triggered by an approximately twofold increase in the level of cellular ROS (induced either by the natural sex-inducing stress, namely heat, or by blocking the mitochondrial electron transport chain with antimycin A), and (ii) ROS are responsible for the activation of sex genes. As most types of stress result in the overproduction of ROS, we believe that our findings will prove to extend to other facultatively sexual lineages, which could be indicative of the ancestral role of sex as an adaptive response to stress and ROS-induced DNA damage.

  10. New insights into the source of decadal increase in chemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved organic carbon in Dianchi Lake.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Yang, Feng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Shengrui

    2017-03-29

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) can be used an alternative index of water quality instead of chemical oxygen demand (COD) to reflect the organic pollution in water. The monitoring data of water quality in a long-term (1990-2013) from Dianchi Lake confirmed the increase trend of COD concentration in the lake since 2007. The similarities and differences in the DOC components between the lake and its sources and the contribution from allochthonous and autochthonous DOC to the total DOC in this lake were determined to elucidate the reason of COD increase based on C/N atomic ratios, stable isotope abundance of carbon and nitrogen, UV-visible spectroscopy, three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. The terrigenous organic matter showed humic-like fluorescence, and the autochthonous organic matter showed tryptophan-like components. Agricultural runoff (9.5%), leaf litter (7.5%) and urban runoff (13.2%) were the main sources of DOC in the lake. Sewage tail was a major source of organic materials, 3DEEM for the indicates that sewage tail DOC composition did not change markedly over the biodegradation period, indicating that sewage tail contains a high load of DOC that is resistant to further biodegradation and subsequently accumulates in the lake. The change of land use in the catchment and the increase of sewage tail load into the lake are the key factors for the increase in COD concentration in Dianchi Lake. Thus, the lake should be protected by controlling the pollution from the urban nonpoint sources and refractory composition in point sources.

  11. Electromagnetic noise inhibits radiofrequency radiation-induced DNA damage and reactive oxygen species increase in human lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Wang, KaiJun; Ni, Shuang; Ye, PanPan; Yu, YiBo; Ye, Juan; Sun, LiXia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate whether superposing of electromagnetic noise could block or attenuate DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase of cultured human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) induced by acute exposure to 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field (RF) of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). Methods An sXc-1800 RF exposure system was used to produce a GSM signal at 1.8 GHz (217 Hz amplitude-modulated) with the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 W/kg. After 2 h of intermittent exposure, the ROS level was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DNA damage to HLECs was examined by alkaline comet assay and the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation assay. Results After exposure to 1.8 GHz RF for 2 h, HLECs exhibited significant intracellular ROS increase in the 2, 3, and 4 W/kg groups. RF radiation at the SAR of 3 W/kg and 4 W/kg could induce significant DNA damage, examined by alkaline comet assay, which was used to detect mainly single strand breaks (SSBs), while no statistical difference in double strand breaks (DSBs), evaluated by γH2AX foci, was found between RF exposure (SAR: 3 and 4 W/kg) and sham exposure groups. When RF was superposed with 2 μT electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS increase and DNA damage. Conclusions DNA damage induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field for 2 h, which was mainly SSBs, may be associated with the increased ROS production. Electromagnetic noise could block RF-induced ROS formation and DNA damage. PMID:18509546

  12. VIEW OF MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 AND CHANOINE WICKETS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 AND CHANOINE WICKETS FROM DAM GATE STRUCTURE. MANEUVER BOAT No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Peoria Lock and Dam, 1071 Wesley Road, Creve Coeur, Tazewell County, IL

  13. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift coefficients, the airplane is assumed to be subjected to symmetrical maneuvers resulting in the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift coefficients, the airplane is assumed to be subjected to symmetrical maneuvers resulting in the...

  15. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift coefficients, the airplane is assumed to be subjected to symmetrical maneuvers resulting in the...

  16. Informing Spacecraft Maneuver Decisions to Reduce Probability of Collision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Patterson Air Force Base , Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. The views expressed...Scenario Set Up ..........................................................................................................35 Changes based on Maneuver...Magnitude ....................................................................37 Changes based on Maneuver Time

  17. Comparative analysis between the alveolar recruitment maneuver and breath stacking technique in patients with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Elias Ferreira; Tavolaro, Kelly Cristiani; Kumpel, Claudia; Oliveira, Fernanda Augusta; Sousa, Juciaria Ferreira; de Carvalho, Graciele Vieira; de Castro, Antonio Adolfo Mattos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of the alveolar recruitment maneuver and the breath stacking technique with respect to lung mechanics and gas exchange in patients with acute lung injury. Methods Thirty patients were distributed into two groups: Group 1 - breath stacking; and Group 2 - alveolar recruitment maneuver. After undergoing conventional physical therapy, all patients received both treatments with an interval of 1 day between them. In the first group, the breath stacking technique was used initially, and subsequently, the alveolar recruitment maneuver was applied. Group 2 patients were initially subjected to alveolar recruitment, followed by the breath stacking technique. Measurements of lung compliance and airway resistance were evaluated before and after the use of both techniques. Gas analyses were collected before and after the techniques were used to evaluate oxygenation and gas exchange. Results Both groups had a significant increase in static compliance after breath stacking (p=0.021) and alveolar recruitment (p=0.03), but with no significant differences between the groups (p=0.95). The dynamic compliance did not increase for the breath stacking (p=0.22) and alveolar recruitment (p=0.074) groups, with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.11). The airway resistance did not decrease for either groups, i.e., breath stacking (p=0.91) and alveolar recruitment (p=0.82), with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.39). The partial pressure of oxygen increased significantly after breath stacking (p=0.013) and alveolar recruitment (p=0.04), but there was no significant difference between the groups (p=0.073). The alveolar-arterial O2 difference decreased for both groups after the breath stacking (p=0.025) and alveolar recruitment (p=0.03) interventions, and there was no significant difference between the groups (p=0.81). Conclusion Our data suggest that the breath stacking and alveolar recruitment techniques are effective in

  18. Aging increases the susceptivity of MSCs to reactive oxygen species and impairs their therapeutic potency for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Guo, Yingfei; Zhai, Hongxia; Yin, Yaxin; Zhang, Jinjin; Chen, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Li, Na; Liu, Runmei; Xia, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) transplantation has been considered a promising therapy. Recently, it was reported that the therapeutic effectiveness of MSCs is dependent on the age of the donor, yet the underlying mechanism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study was designed to investigate whether this impaired therapeutic potency is caused by an increased susceptivity of MSCs from old donors to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The MSCs were isolated from the subcutaneous inguinal region of young (8-10 weeks) and old (18 months) Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. By exposing these MSCs to H2O2, we found that the adhesion of MSCs from old donors was damaged more severely. Specifically, decreased expression of integrin and reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase Src and FAK were observed. Furthemore, H2O2 triggered an increased apoptosis of MSCs from old donors. To study the viability and therapeutic potency of MSCs from young and old donors in vivo, these MSCs were transplanted into acute MI model rats. We observed a more rapidly decreased survival rate of the old MSCs in the infarct region, which may be caused by their increased susceptivity to the micro-environmental ROS, as transplantation of the old MSCs with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, protected them. The low viability of engrafted old MSCs consequently impaired their therapeutic effectiveness, judging by the histology and function of heart. Our study may help to understand the mechanism of MSCs-host interaction during MI, as well as shed light on the design of therapeutic strategy in clinic.

  19. Developmental exposure to ethanol increases the neuronal vulnerability to oxygen-glucose deprivation in cerebellar granule cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, Diana; Spataru, Ana; Ceanga, Mihai; Zagrean, Leon; Schöneberg, Torsten; Toescu, Emil C; Zagrean, Ana-Maria

    2015-07-21

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with microencephaly, cognitive and behavioral deficits, and growth retardation. Some of the mechanisms of ethanol-induced injury, such as high level oxidative stress and overexpression of pro-apoptotic genes, can increase the sensitivity of fetal neurons towards hypoxic/ischemic stress associated with normal labor. Thus, alcohol-induced sequelae may be the cumulative result of direct ethanol toxicity and increased neuronal vulnerability towards metabolic stressors, including hypoxia. We examined the effects of ethanol exposure on the fetal cerebellar granular neurons' susceptibility to hypoxic/hypoglycemic damage. A chronic ethanol exposure covered the entire prenatal period and 5 days postpartum through breastfeeding, a time interval partially extending into the third-trimester equivalent in humans. After a binge-like alcohol exposure at postnatal day 5, glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons were cultured and grown for 7 days in vitro, then exposed to a 3-h oxygen-glucose deprivation to mimic a hypoxic/ischemic condition. Cellular viability was monitored by dynamic recording of propidium iodide fluorescence over 20 h reoxygenation. We explored differentially expressed genes on microarray data from a mouse embryonic ethanol-exposure model and validated these by real-time PCR on the present model. In the ethanol-treated cerebellar granule neurons we find an increased expression of genes related to apoptosis (Mapk8 and Bax), but also of genes previously described as neuroprotective (Dhcr24 and Bdnf), which might suggest an actively maintained viability. Our data suggest that neurons exposed to ethanol during development are more vulnerable to in vitro hypoxia/hypoglycemia and have higher intrinsic death susceptibility than unexposed neurons.

  20. 32 CFR 644.137 - Maneuver agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the exercise objectives and the force elements which participate. The Corps participates in the...), and United States Army Forces, Readiness Command (USCINCARRED) on acquisition of maneuver rights for... camp sites, field hospital sites and supply dumps), and buildings needed for warehouses, ordnance...

  1. Dynamical instability of the aerogravity assist maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInner, Colin R.

    1994-09-01

    Fundamental dynamical equations are used to form a single expression for vertical acceleration. It is shown that the AGA (aerogravity assist) maneuver is dynamically unstable with respect to altitude errors. However, this instability can be controlled using feedback linearization. The existence of instability further emphasizes the need for robust guidance during the atmospheric pass.

  2. Towboat Maneuvering Simulator. Volume III. Theoretical Description.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    overshoot or :igzag maneuver;I - 1,2,3 .. . 6FL F- _’ Flan"ing rudder deflection rate a _ __ Steering rudder deflection rate Ship propulsion ratlol " elh...used with the equations are for the ship propulsion point (n - 1.0). The equations are written in terms of the complete barge flotillia towboat

  3. A New Maneuver for Escape Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation put forth a new maneuver for escape trajectories and specifically sought to find an analytical approximation for medium thrust trajectories. In most low thrust derivations the idea is that escape velocity is best achieved by accelerating along the velocity vector. The reason for this is that change in specific orbital energy is a function of velocity and acceleration. However, Levin (1952) suggested that while this is a locally optimal solution it might not be a globally optimal one. Turning acceleration inward would drop periapse giving a higher velocity later in the trajectory. Acceleration at that point would be dotted against a higher magnitude V giving a greater rate of change of mechanical energy. The author then hypothesized that decelerating from the initial orbit and then accelerating at periapse would not lead to a gain in greater specific orbital energy--however, the hypothesis was incorrect. After considerable derivation it was determined that this new maneuver outperforms a direct burn when the overall DeltaV budget exceeds the initial orbital velocity (the author has termed this the Heinlein maneuver). The author provides a physical explanation for this maneuver and presents optimization analyses.

  4. 14 CFR 23.441 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from VA to VD/MD. When computing the tail loads— (1) The airplane must be yawed to the largest... Maneuvering loads. (a) At speeds up to V A, the vertical surfaces must be designed to withstand the following conditions. In computing the loads, the yawing velocity may be assumed to be zero: (1) With the airplane...

  5. Perforated stomach following the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M; Bardole, J; Dlesk, A

    1987-03-01

    The use of infradiaphragmatic abdominal pressure for relief of airway obstruction caused by food was first described by Henry Heimlich in 1974. Since that time, several complications have been reported. We report a case of gastric perforation occurring in a choking victim following the application of the Heimlich maneuver.

  6. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navagh, John

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  7. Maneuver Estimation Model for Geostationary Orbit Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    MODEL FOR GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT DETERMINATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Graduate...FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GA/ENY/06-J01 MANEUVER ESTIMATION MODEL FOR GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT DETERMINATION...used to model the relative motion of a geostationary satellite about its intended location and a nonlinear least squares algorithm was developed to

  8. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  9. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 25.337... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift... maneuvering load factors prescribed in this section. Pitching velocities appropriate to the corresponding...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  11. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 25.337... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift... maneuvering load factors prescribed in this section. Pitching velocities appropriate to the corresponding...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  13. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  14. Insulin reverses D-glucose-increased nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    González, Marcelo; Rojas, Susana; Avila, Pía; Cabrera, Lissette; Villalobos, Roberto; Palma, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio; Peña, Eduardo; Gallardo, Victoria; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tone is controlled by the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway, and NO bioavailability is strongly affected by hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. Insulin leads to high expression and activity of human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1), NO synthesis and vasodilation; thus, a protective role of insulin on high D-glucose-alterations in endothelial function is likely. Vascular reactivity to U46619 (thromboxane A2 mimetic) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was measured in KCl preconstricted human umbilical vein rings (wire myography) incubated in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (25 mmol/L) D-glucose. hCAT-1, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), 42 and 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk), protein kinase B/Akt (Akt) expression and activity were determined by western blotting and qRT-PCR, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) level was determined by HPLC, and L-arginine transport (0-1000 μmol/L) was measured in response to 5-25 mmol/L D-glucose (0-36 hours) in passage 2 human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Assays were in the absence or presence of insulin and/or apocynin (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase [NADPH oxidase] inhibitor), tempol or Mn(III)TMPyP (SOD mimetics). High D-glucose increased hCAT-1 expression and activity, which was biphasic (peaks: 6 and 24 hours of incubation). High D-glucose-increased maximal transport velocity was blocked by insulin and correlated with lower hCAT-1 expression and SLC7A1 gene promoter activity. High D-glucose-increased transport parallels higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anion (O2•-) generation, and increased U46619-contraction and reduced CGRP-dilation of vein rings. Insulin and apocynin attenuate ROS and O2•- generation, and restored vascular reactivity to U46619 and CGRP. Insulin, but not apocynin or tempol reversed high D-glucose-increased NO synthesis; however, tempol and Mn(III)TMPyP reversed the high D-glucose-reduced BH4 level. Insulin and

  15. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  16. 3-Methyl pyruvate enhances radiosensitivity through increasing mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Yasui, Hironobu; Nagane, Masaki; Yamamori, Tohru; Inanami, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Considerable interest has recently been focused on the special characteristics of cancer metabolism, and several drugs designed to modulate cancer metabolism have been tested as potential anticancer agents. To date, however, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the combined effects of anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. In this study, to evaluate the role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the radiation-induced cell death of tumor cells, we have examined the effect of 3-methyl pyruvate (MP). MP is a membrane-permeable pyruvate derivative that is capable of activating mitochondrial energy metabolism in human lung carcinoma A549 cells and murine squamous carcinoma SCCVII cells. Pretreatment with MP significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death in both cell lines, and also led to increases in the mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular adenosine triphosphate content, and mitochondria-derived ROS production following the exposure of the cells to X-rays. In A549 cells, MP-induced radiosensitization was completely abolished by vitamin C. In contrast, it was partially abolished in SCCVII cells. These results therefore suggest that the treatment of the cells with MP induced radiosensitization via the production of excess mitochondria-derived ROS in tumor cells.

  17. Adventitious roots of wheat seedlings that emerge in oxygen-deficient conditions have increased root diameters with highly developed lysigenous aerenchyma.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takaki; Abe, Fumitaka; Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Oyanagi, Atsushi; Nakazono, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Exposing roots of plants to hypoxic conditions is known to greatly improve their anoxic stress tolerance. We previously showed that pre-treatment of wheat seedlings with an ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC), enhanced their tolerance of oxygen-deficient conditions. Although ACC-pretreated seminal roots of wheat seedlings grown under oxygen-deficient conditions avoided root tip death, they elongated very little. In the present study, we assessed the effects of ethylene on the responses of adventitious roots of wheat seedlings to oxygen-deficient conditions. Lysigenous aerenchyma formation in the adventitious roots of wheat seedlings pretreated with ACC appeared to reduce tip death under oxygen-deficient conditions, but the adventitious roots, like the seminal roots, hardly elongated. We also found that adventitious roots that emerge in oxygen-deficient conditions continued to elongate even under such conditions. The adventitious roots emerged in oxygen-deficient conditions were found to have thicker root diameters than those emerged in aerated conditions. These results suggest that the adventitious roots with thicker root diameters can better cope with oxygen-deficient conditions. Measurements of the area of the lysigenous aerenchyma confirmed that the increased root diameters have a greater amount of air space generated by lysigenous aerenchyma formation.

  18. Effect of Conflict Resolution Maneuver Execution Delay on Losses of Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines uncertainty in the maneuver execution delay for data linked conflict resolution maneuvers. This uncertainty could cause the previously cleared primary conflict to reoccur or a secondary conflict to appear. Results show that the likelihood of a primary conflict reoccurring during a horizontal conflict resolution maneuver increases with larger initial turn-out angles and with shorter times until loss of separation. There is also a significant increase in the probability of a primary conflict reoccurring when the time until loss falls under three minutes. Increasing horizontal separation by an additional 1.5 nmi lowers the risk, but does not completely eliminate it. Secondary conflicts were shown to have a small probability of occurring in all tested configurations.

  19. X-31 in flight - Post Stall Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at Rockwell International's Palmdale, Calif., facility and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on Oct. 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft's body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, pilot or both. Three thrust vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the X-31's exhaust nozzle directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31s were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplyied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high

  20. Increased reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorders patients with JAK2 (V617F) mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Csillag-Grange, Marie-José; Boussetta, Tarek; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Fay, Michèle; Cassinat, Bruno; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel

    2013-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are associated with increased risk of thrombosis and vascular complications. The pathogenesis of these complications is not completely known. Reactive oxygen species produced by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase could have a role in this process. The aim of this study was to evaluate reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils of myeloproliferative disorder patients. Patients with or without the JAK2 V617F mutation were characterized. Reactive oxygen species production was assessed by chemiluminescence, and phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox was analyzed by Western blots. In a comparison of controls and myeloproliferative disorder patients without the JAK2 V617F mutation, reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils from patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation was dramatically increased in non-stimulated and in stimulated conditions. This increase was associated with increased phosphorylation of the p47phox on Ser345 and of the uspstream kinase ERK1/2. In neutrophils from healthy donors, JAK2 can be activated by GM-CSF. GM-CSF-induced p47phox phosphorylation and priming of reactive oxygen species production are inhibited by the selective JAK2 inhibitors AG490 and lestaurtinib (CEP-701), supporting a role for JAK2 in the upregulation of NADPH oxidase activation. These findings show an increase in reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorder patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation, and demonstrate that JAK2 is involved in GM-CSF-induced NADPH oxidase hyperactivation. As neutrophil hyperactivation could be implicated in the thrombophilic status of patients with myeloproliferative disorders, aberrant activation of JAK2 V617F, leading to excessive neutrophil reactive oxygen species production might play a role in this setting. PMID:23975181

  1. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  2. Complications as a result of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven L; Kim, Stephen S; Shekherdimian, Shant; Ledbetter, Daniel J

    2009-03-01

    The Heimlich maneuver is a well-described emergency procedure for management of foreign body airway obstructions. Although rare, complications of the Heimlich maneuver do exist. The purpose of this report is to review the known complications of this procedure. All reported complications published in English on Medline and PubMed were reviewed. Additionally, we present a rare case of acute pancreatitis with associated pseudocyst formation after the administration of the Heimlich maneuver on a healthy 3-year-old boy. Although life saving, the Heimlich maneuver may be associated with significant complications; thus, symptomatic patients after this maneuver should be thoroughly evaluated with appropriate laboratory and radiographic studies.

  3. (n-3) Long chain PUFA dose-dependently increase oxygen utilization efficiency and inhibit arrhythmias after saturated fat feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Salvatore; McLennan, Peter L

    2007-11-01

    Fish oil (FO) modifies cardiac membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition to confer increased efficiency of oxygen utilization and antiarrhythmic effects. We tested the capacity of low-dose increments of FO, rich in (n-3) PUFA, to reverse the detrimental pro-arrhythmic and inefficient oxygen usage effects of dietary saturated fat (SAT) [including high ratio of (n-6) PUFA:(n-3) PUFA] during ischemia and reperfusion. Wistar rats were fed an SAT-enriched diet (15.3% fat, including 12% SAT, added by weight) for 6 wk and were then divided into 4 groups (n = 10/group) fed that diet or a 12% fat diet containing 3, 6, or 12% FO in place of SAT for 6 wk. Paced (300/min), erythrocyte-perfused isolated working hearts were subjected to low coronary flow ischemia (15 min) and were then reperfused. At normoxic baseline, external work capacity increased marginally at 6 and 12% FO; however, marked dose-related reductions in oxygen consumption were evident due to FO-dependent reduction in oxygen-energy utilization efficiency and associated reductions in coronary flow and oxygen extraction. Postischemic recovery resulted in lower oxygen consumption, greater oxygen-energy utilization efficiency, reduced coronary release of creatine kinase, and reduced incidence of arrhythmias in all FO groups compared with the SAT group. FO at a dose as low as 3% of total fat dietary supplement effectively reversed the high oxygen requirements and pro-arrhythmic effects of a SAT-rich diet even with continued consumption of SAT (9%) in this ex vivo animal model.

  4. Estimating maneuvers for precise relative orbit determination using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende-Alba, Gerardo; Montenbruck, Oliver; Ardaens, Jean-Sébastien; Wermuth, Martin; Hugentobler, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Precise relative orbit determination is an essential element for the generation of science products from distributed instrumentation of formation flying satellites in low Earth orbit. According to the mission profile, the required formation is typically maintained and/or controlled by executing maneuvers. In order to generate consistent and precise orbit products, a strategy for maneuver handling is mandatory in order to avoid discontinuities or precision degradation before, after and during maneuver execution. Precise orbit determination offers the possibility of maneuver estimation in an adjustment of single-satellite trajectories using GPS measurements. However, a consistent formulation of a precise relative orbit determination scheme requires the implementation of a maneuver estimation strategy which can be used, in addition, to improve the precision of maneuver estimates by drawing upon the use of differential GPS measurements. The present study introduces a method for precise relative orbit determination based on a reduced-dynamic batch processing of differential GPS pseudorange and carrier phase measurements, which includes maneuver estimation as part of the relative orbit adjustment. The proposed method has been validated using flight data from space missions with different rates of maneuvering activity, including the GRACE, TanDEM-X and PRISMA missions. The results show the feasibility of obtaining precise relative orbits without degradation in the vicinity of maneuvers as well as improved maneuver estimates that can be used for better maneuver planning in flight dynamics operations.

  5. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  6. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  7. The optimization of incident angles of low-energy oxygen ion beams for increasing sputtering rate on silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, N.; Takahashi, M.; Tomita, M.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine an appropriate incident angle of low-energy (350-eV) oxygen ion beam for achieving the highest sputtering rate without degradation of depth resolution in SIMS analysis, a delta-doped sample was analyzed with incident angles from 0° to 60° without oxygen bleeding. As a result, 45° incidence was found to be the best analytical condition, and it was confirmed that surface roughness did not occur on the sputtered surface at 100-nm depth by using AFM. By applying the optimized incident angle, sputtering rate becomes more than twice as high as that of the normal incident condition.

  8. Review of Tracktable for Satellite Maneuver Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Acquesta, Erin C.S.; Valicka, Christopher G.; Hinga, Mark B.; Ehn, Carollan Beret

    2016-10-01

    As a tool developed to translate geospatial data into geometrical descriptors, Tracktable offers a highly efficient means to detect anomalous flight and maritime behavior. Following the success of using geometrical descriptors for detecting anomalous trajectory behavior, the question of whether Tracktable could be used to detect satellite maneuvers arose. In answering this question, this re- port will introduce a brief description of how Tracktable has been used in the past, along with an introduction to the fundamental properties of astrodynamics for satellite trajectories. This will then allow us to compare the two problem spaces, addressing how easily the methods used by Tracktable will translate to orbital mechanics. Based on these results, we will then be able to out- line the current limitations as well as possible path forward for using Tracktable to detect satellite maneuvers.

  9. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith A.; Quaid, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) was designed at Motorola's Strategic Electronics Division in Chandler, Arizona, to be a key subsystem aboard NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The unmanned OMV, which was under development at TRW's Federal Systems Division in Redondo Beach, California, was designed to supplement the Shuttle's satellite delivery, retrieval, and maneuvering activities. The RRS was to be used to locate and then provide the OMV with vectoring information to the target satellite (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum fuel consumption approach and rendezvous. The OMV development program was halted by NASA in 1990 just as parts were being ordered for the RRS engineering model. The paper presented describes the RRS design and then discusses new technologies, either under development or planned for development at Motorola, that can be applied to radar or alternative sensor solutions for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture problem.

  10. Identifying tacit strategies in aircraft maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles M.; Heidorn, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Two machine-learning methods are presently used to characterize the avoidance strategies used by skilled pilots in simulated aircraft encounters, and a general framework for the characterization of the strategic components of skilled behavior via qualitative representation of situations and responses is presented. Descriptions of pilot maneuvers that were 'conceptually equivalent' were ascertained by a concept-learning algorithm in conjunction with a classifier system that employed a generic algorithm; satisficing and 'buggy' strategies were thereby revealed.

  11. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle - A new capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcilesi, Charles J.; Holliman, Charles T.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a reusable remotely-controlled spacecraft for support of orbiting platforms through such functions as satellite delivery, satellite retrieval, satellite reboost, controlled satellite deorbit, satellite inspection, and subsatellite missions. The OMV will be a critical component of the Space Station program's operational scenario; it will be able to operate either from the Space Shuttle Orbiter or the Space Station, and can also be space-based. The maiden flight of the first OMV is projected for 1993.

  12. Variable structure control of spacecraft reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, H.; Dwyer, T. A. W., III

    1986-01-01

    A Variable Structure Control (VSC) approach is presented for multi-axial spacecraft reorientation maneuvers. A nonlinear sliding surface is proposed which results in an asymptotically stable, ideal linear sliding motion of Cayley-Rodriques attitude parameters. By imposing a desired equivalent dynamics on the attitude parameters, the approach is devoid of optimal control considerations. The single axis case provides a design scheme for the multiple axes design problem. Illustrative examples are presented.

  13. Effects of exposure time during flight maneuvers on passenger subjective comfort rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were investigated of length of exposure time to a flight maneuver environment on subjective passenger evaluation of ride comfort. Four statistical analysis tests were performed on ride comfort ratings obtained during one two-hour test flight wherein eleven test subjects were exposed to two identical programmed sequences of twenty four flight segments which covered a wide range of maneuver conditions. The results of the analysis indicate that, for over ninety five percent of the segments, there is no significant change in the test subjects comfort ratings of identical segments spaced one hour apart. These results are in contrast to those found in previous studies involving a vibration environment, rather than flight maneuver environment, where increased exposure-time was found to cause a degradation of ride comfort ratings.

  14. Trial maneuver generation and selection in the Paladin tactical decision generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Alan R.; Mcmanus, John W.; Goodrich, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    To date, increased levels of maneuverability and controllability in aircraft have been postulated as tactically advantageous, but little research has studied maneuvers or tactics that make use of these capabilities. In order to help fill this void, a real-time tactical decision generation system for air combat engagements, Paladin, has been developed. Paladin models an air combat engagement as a series of discrete decisions. A detailed description of Paladin's decision making process is presented. This includes the sources of data used, methods of generating reasonable maneuvers for the Paladin aircraft, and selection criteria for choosing the 'best' maneuver. Simulation results are presented that show Paladin to be relatively insensitive to errors introduced into the decision process by estimation of future positional and geometric data.

  15. Hemoglobin Rouen (alpha-140 (HC2) Tyr-->His): alteration of the alpha-chain C-terminal region and moderate increase in oxygen affinity.

    PubMed

    Wajcman, H; Kister, J; Marden, M; Lahary, A; Monconduit, M; Galacteros, F

    1992-10-13

    Hb Rouen (alpha 140(HC2) Tyr-->His) is a moderately high oxygen-affinity variant that was found in coincidence with polycythemia vera in a French patient. This hemoglobin provides an example of an alteration of the C-terminus of the alpha-chain, a region involved in the mechanisms of allosteric regulation. The increase in oxygen-affinity and decrease in cooperativity of this variant is much smaller than that resulting from the same substitution in the beta-chain. This model provides additional evidence for the inequivalence between the alpha- and beta-subunits.

  16. [Cardiovascular consequences of aerobic maneuvers].

    PubMed

    Trivelloni, Pierandrea; Berrettini, Umberto

    2010-10-01

    Gravitational (G) stress during aerobatics flights, both military and civilian, can suddenly incapacitate pilots in agile and supermaneuverable aircrafts. High +Gz stress, up to +9Gz, has two different physiological consequences: the first is the drop in head-level blood pressure that is proportional to the G load; the other, slightly delayed, is the blood pooling in the lower part of the body and the abdomen. This blood shift results in a decreased return of venous blood to the heart, decreased cardiac output, and decreased blood pressure, leading to a likely loss of consciousness. The natural countermeasure against the effects of high G stress is the baroreceptor reflex. The human physiological tolerance to the gravito-inertial forces developed in flight operations can be increased by physiological and technological means.

  17. An Approach for Hydrogen Recycling in a Closed-loop Life Support Architecture to Increase Oxygen Recovery Beyond State-of-the-Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee; Greenwood, Zachary; Alvarez, Giraldo

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art atmosphere revitalization life support technology on the International Space Station is theoretically capable of recovering 50% of the oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide via the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). When coupled with a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA), oxygen recovery increases dramatically, thus drastically reducing the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane to predominantly form hydrogen and acetylene. Because of the unstable nature of acetylene, a down-stream separation system is required to remove acetylene from the hydrogen stream before it is recycled to the CRA. A new closed-loop architecture that includes a PPA and downstream Hydrogen Purification Assembly (HyPA) is proposed and discussed. Additionally, initial results of separation material testing are reported.

  18. Baroreceptor output during normal and obstructed breathing and Mueller maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Robotham, J L; Anand, A

    1981-05-01

    Cardiovascular control during asthma and other forms of obstructed breathing has not been extensively investigated. Previous studies in dogs have shown that obstructed breathing or an inspiratory effort against a blocked airway (Mueller maneuver) provoke large oscillations in blood pressure. During the inspiratory phase transmural systolic pressure relative to atmosphere drops initially, but transmural systolic pressure relative to intrathoracic pressure can remain unchanged or even increase. Because the carotid baroreceptors are located in the extrathoracic circulation, whereas the aortic baroreceptors are located in the intrathoracic circulation, and each responds to local transmural arterial pressure, simultaneous baroreceptor output from these two areas was measured in the anesthetized cat during normal and obstructed breathing and during Mueller maneuvers. Both whole-nerve and single-fiber preparations showed a significantly decreased output from the carotid baroreceptors during obstructed inspiratory efforts, whereas aortic baroreceptor output decreased significantly less or not at all. Transmural systolic pressure decreased significantly less in the aorta than in the carotid regions. Further, the aortic baroreceptors were more sensitive to changes in pulse pressure than were the carotid baroreceptors. These results suggest a mechanism for stabilizing the cardiac responses to precipitous falls in blood pressure that occur in obstructed breathing.

  19. Drivers’ Visual Search Patterns during Overtaking Maneuvers on Freeway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhui; Dai, Jing; Pei, Yulong; Li, Penghui; Yan, Ying; Chen, Xinqiang

    2016-01-01

    Drivers gather traffic information primarily by means of their vision. Especially during complicated maneuvers, such as overtaking, they need to perceive a variety of characteristics including the lateral and longitudinal distances with other vehicles, the speed of others vehicles, lane occupancy, and so on, to avoid crashes. The primary object of this study is to examine the appropriate visual search patterns during overtaking maneuvers on freeways. We designed a series of driving simulating experiments in which the type and speed of the leading vehicle were considered as two influential factors. One hundred and forty participants took part in the study. The participants overtook the leading vehicles just like they would usually do so, and their eye movements were collected by use of the Eye Tracker. The results show that participants’ gaze durations and saccade durations followed normal distribution patterns and that saccade angles followed a log-normal distribution pattern. It was observed that the type of leading vehicle significantly impacted the drivers’ gaze duration and gaze frequency. As the speed of a leading vehicle increased, subjects’ saccade durations became longer and saccade angles became larger. In addition, the initial and destination lanes were found to be key areas with the highest visual allocating proportion, accounting for more than 65% of total visual allocation. Subjects tended to more frequently shift their viewpoints between the initial lane and destination lane in order to search for crucial traffic information. However, they seldom directly shifted their viewpoints between the two wing mirrors. PMID:27869764

  20. Venous return curves obtained from graded series of valsalva maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The effects were studied of a graded series of valsalva-like maneuvers on the venous return, which was measured transcutaneously in the jugular vein of an anesthetized dog, with the animal serving as its own control. At each of five different levels of central venous pressure, the airway pressure which just stopped venous return during each series of maneuvers was determined. It was found that this end-point airway pressure is not a good estimator of the animal's resting central venous pressure prior to the simulated valsalva maneuver. It was further found that the measured change in right atrial pressure during a valsalva maneuver is less than the change in airway pressure during the same maneuver, instead of being equal, as had been expected. Relative venous return curves were constructed from the data obtained during the graded series of valsalva maneuvers.

  1. Slew maneuvers of Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Yogendra P.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on the dynamics and control of slew maneuvers of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) test facility. The report documents the basic dynamical equation derivations for an arbitrary large angle slew maneuver as well as the basic decentralized slew maneuver control algorithm. The set of dynamical equations incorporate rigid body slew maneuver and three dimensional vibrations of the complete assembly comprising the rigid shuttle, the flexible beam, and the reflector with an offset mass. The analysis also includes kinematic nonlinearities of the entire assembly during the maneuver and the dynamics of the interactions between the rigid shuttle and the flexible appendage. The equations are simplified and evaluated numerically to include the first ten flexible modes to yield a model for designing control systems to perform slew maneuvers. The control problem incorporates the nonlinear dynamical equations and is expressed in terms of a two point boundary value problem.

  2. Fugitive dust emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers on military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Off-road vehicle training can contribute to air quality degradation because of increased wind erosion as a result of soil disruption during high wind events. However, limited information exists regarding the impacts of off-road vehicle maneuvering on wind erosion potential of soils. This study was c...

  3. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Moura, Álvaro Vieira; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Reá-Neto, Álvaro; Oliveira, Mirella Cristine; da Silva Júnior, Walderi Monteiro; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Herminia Scola, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax), along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients. PMID:24141836

  4. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  5. Photoelectron spectra of small LaOn- clusters: decreasing electron affinity upon increasing the number of oxygen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingeler, R.; Lüttgens, G.; Pontius, N.; Rochow, R.; Bechthold, P. S.; Neeb, M.; Eberhardt, W.

    We present mass selected photoelectron spectra of small lanthanum oxide cluster anions LaOn- (n=1-5) which have been generated in a laser vaporization cluster source. The electron affinity of the lanthanum oxide clusters drops continuously with the number of chemisorbed oxygen atoms as revealed from the anion photoelectron spectra. The decreasing electron affinity behaves contrary to several other metal oxide clusters. The geometry of some of the measured clusters are discussed in comparsion with configuration interaction and density functional calculations using a Gaussian94 program package.

  6. Breath-stacking increases the depth and duration of chest expansion by incentive spirometry.

    PubMed

    Baker, W L; Lamb, V J; Marini, J J

    1990-02-01

    Although the objective of incentive spirometry is to achieve and hold high lung volumes, many patients with pain or weakness are unable to sustain the effort needed to perform effective exercises. We questioned whether using a one-way valve to prevent exhalation would allow rest between inspiratory efforts and cause volume to cumulate during successive tidal efforts, improving both the depth and duration of the inspiratory maneuver. We studied 26 cooperative but naive patients recovering from surgery, trauma, or critical illness whose pain or weakness impaired ability to achieve and sustain deep inspiration. All subjects breathed via mouthpiece from a spirometer prefilled with 100% oxygen. Three different maneuvers were performed in random order by all subjects: (1) standard inspiratory capacity without valve or inspiratory hold, (2) inspiratory capacity (IC) with breathholding aided by a one-way valve, and (3) uncoached breath-stacking, during which successive tidal breaths were cumulated by one-way valving. A fourth maneuver was added in the last 13 subjects studied: an initial coached IC effort with subsequent valved stacking of tidal efforts. When compared with IC, "breath stacking" (valved) maneuvers increased inspired volume by an average of 15 to 20% (p less than 0.05). More importantly, there was a severalfold increase in the time over which high lung volume was sustained (p less than 0.001). Our results indicate that one-way valving helps to achieve and sustain deep inspiration, even in uncoached patients.

  7. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities in the inertia matrix. Then a feeback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  8. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities within the inertia matrix. Then a feedback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  9. Coordination Logic for Repulsive Resolution Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Dutle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for determining the direction an aircraft should maneuver in the event of a potential conflict with another aircraft. The algorithm is implicitly coordinated, meaning that with perfectly reliable computations and information, it will in- dependently provide directional information that is guaranteed to be coordinated without any additional information exchange or direct communication. The logic is inspired by the logic of TCAS II, the airborne system designed to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions between aircraft. TCAS II provides pilots with only vertical resolution advice, while the proposed algorithm, using a similar logic, provides implicitly coordinated vertical and horizontal directional advice.

  10. Orbital plane change maneuver with aerocruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The synergistic plane change problem connected with orbital transfer employing aeroassist technology, is addressed. The mission involves transfer from high earth orbit to low earth orbit with plane change being performed within the atmosphere. The complete mission consists of a deorbit phase, atmospheric phase, and finally reorbit phase. The atmospheric maneuver is composed of an entry mode, a cruise mode, and finally an exit mode. During the cruise mode, constant altitude and velocity are maintained by means of bank angle control with constant thrust or thrust control with constant bank angle. Comparisons between these two control strategies bring out some interesting features.

  11. Light-triggered liposomal cargo delivery platform incorporating photosensitizers and gold nanoparticles for enhanced singlet oxygen generation and increased cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kautzka, Zofia; Clement, Sandhya; Goldys, Ewa M; Deng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We developed light-triggered liposomes incorporating 3–5 nm hydrophobic gold nanoparticles and Rose Bengal (RB), a well-known photosensitizer used for photodynamic therapy. Singlet oxygen generated by these liposomes with 532 nm light illumination was characterized for varying the molar ratio of lipids and gold nanoparticles while keeping the amount of RB constant. Gold nanoparticles were found to enhance the singlet oxygen generation rate, with a maximum enhancement factor of 1.75 obtained for the molar ratio of hydrogenated soy l-α-phosphatidylcholine:1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(hexanoylamine):gold of 57:5:17 compared with liposomes loaded with RB alone. The experimental results could be explained by the local electric field enhancement caused by gold nanoparticles. We further assessed cellular cytotoxicity of gold-loaded liposomes by encapsulating an antitumor drug, doxorubicin (Dox); such Dox-loaded liposomes were applied to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) and exposed to light. Gold-loaded liposomes containing RB and Dox where Dox release was triggered by light were found to exhibit higher cytotoxicity compared with the liposomes loaded with RB and Dox alone. Our results indicate that gold-loaded liposomes incorporating photosensitizers may serve as improved agents in photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:28203076

  12. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: Systemic and microvascular oxygen saturation is linearly correlated and hypoxia leads to increased spatial heterogeneity of microvascular saturation.

    PubMed

    Awan, Z A; Häggblad, E; Wester, T; Kvernebo, M S; Halvorsen, P S; Kvernebo, K

    2011-05-01

    The microvascular oxygen saturation (SmvO(2)) in the skin and tongue (sublingual mucosa) in pigs (n=6) was characterised using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The correlation between arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and SmvO(2) as well as the spatial heterogeneity of SmvO(2) was examined during hypoxia. DRS uses shallow-penetrating visible light to assess microvascular oxygen saturation (SmvO(2)) in superficial tissue. Hypoxia was induced by gradual reduction in ventilation or reduction of the inspiratory oxygen fraction. The spatial heterogeneity of SmvO(2) was expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated SmvO(2) measurements. Baseline SmvO(2) before interventions was 20.2% (10.3%-38.1%, median with range) in groin skin, 32.9% (13.0%-49.3%) in the ear and 42.2% (32.1%-51.5%) in the tongue. SmvO(2) in the groin was significantly lower than venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) (p<0.05) and SmvO(2) in the tongue (p=0.03). There was a significant linear correlation between SaO(2) and SmvO(2) in all measuring sites for both interventions (p<0.05). Similarly there was a significant correlation between CV of repeated SmvO(2) measurements and SmvO(2) in all measuring sites for both interventions (p<0.01). The results from baseline measurements indicate a surprisingly high oxygen extraction in the measurement volume of DRS, especially in the groin skin. A reduction of SmvO(2) with decreasing SaO(2) was found and additionally the results suggest that spatial heterogeneity of microvascular oxygen saturation increases during hypoxia. Microvascular disturbances have been demonstrated in both local vascular diseases and systemic conditions such as shock and sepsis, an assessment of microvascular oxygen saturation using DRS may be useful in the monitoring of the microcirculation in such patients. This study is a part of an ongoing characterization of the DRS technique.

  13. Knee biomechanics during a jump-cut maneuver: Effects of gender & ACL surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Daniel L.; Fadale, Paul D.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Shalvoy, Robert M.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic and knee kinematic measurements from male and female ACL-intact (ACLINT) and ACL-reconstructed (ACLREC) subjects during a jump-cut maneuver using biplanar videoradiography. Methods Twenty subjects were recruited; 10 ACLINT (5 males, 5 females) and 10 ACLREC (4 males, 6 females; five years post surgery). Each subject performed a jump-cut maneuver by landing on a single leg and performing a 45° side-step cut. Ground reaction force was measured by a force plate and expressed relative to body weight. Six-degree-of-freedom knee kinematics were determined from a biplanar videoradiography system and an optical motion capture system. Results ACLINT female subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p<0.001) compared to ACLINT male subjects. ACLINT subjects landed with a larger peak vertical GRF (p≤0.036) compared to ACLREC subjects. Regardless of ACL reconstruction status, female subjects underwent less knee flexion angle excursion (p=0.002) and had an increased average rate of anterior tibial translation (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.037) after contact compared to male subjects. Furthermore, ACLREC subjects had a lower rate of anterior tibial translation compared to ACLINT subjects (0.05±0.01%/millisecond; p=0.035). Finally, no striking differences were observed in other knee motion parameters. Conclusion Women permit a smaller amount of knee flexion angle excursion during a jump-cut maneuver, resulting in a larger peak vertical GRF and increased rate of anterior tibial translation. Notably, ACLREC subjects also perform the jump cut maneuver with lower GRF than ACLINT subjects five years post surgery. This study proposes a causal sequence whereby increased landing stiffness (larger peak vertical GRF combined with less knee flexion angle excursion) leads to an increased rate of anterior tibial translation while performing a jump-cut maneuver. PMID:23190595

  14. Conflict Resolution Performance in an Experimental Study of En Route Free Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Hitt, James M., II

    2005-01-01

    NASA has developed a far-term air traffic management concept, termed Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). One component of DAG-TM, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows properly trained flight crews of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for separation from other autonomous aircraft and from Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) aircraft. Ground-based air traffic controllers continue to separate IFR traffic and issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To examine En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a joint human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted in summer 2004 at the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. Test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve traffic conflicts and adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by subject controllers. The experimental airspace integrated both autonomous and IFR aircraft at varying traffic densities. This paper presents a subset of the En Route Free Maneuvering experimental results, focusing on airborne and ground-based conflict resolution, and the effects of increased traffic levels on the ability of pilots and air traffic controllers to perform this task. The results show that, in general, increases in autonomous traffic do not significantly impact conflict resolution performance. In addition, pilot acceptability of autonomous operations remains high throughout the range of traffic densities studied. Together with previously reported findings, these results continue to support the feasibility of the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM.

  15. Gender differences in hip adduction motion and torque during a single-leg agility maneuver.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Wanstrath, Kim; Scheper, Melia

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in hip motion and kinetics during a single leg bidirectional deceleration maneuver. The rationale for the development of this maneuver was to test dynamic hip control during the deceleration of three different types of single-leg landings. The hypothesis was that female athletes would display increased hip adduction angles and moments during the maneuver compared to male athletes. Thirty-six collegiate soccer players (19 female, 17 male) volunteered to participate. Subjects were instructed to start the maneuver balancing on one foot, to hop through an agility-speed ladder on the same leg "up two boxes, back one, and then up one and hold it." Hip kinematics and kinetics during all three landings were examined. Females demonstrated significantly greater hip adduction angles at initial contact during all three landings and greater maximal hip adduction during landings 1 and 2 compared to male athletes. Females also exhibited significantly increased external hip adduction moments during landing 1, however, no differences were found between genders during landings 2 and 3.

  16. Ambulatory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with subclavian venoarterial cannulation to increase mobility and recovery in a patient awaiting cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Samuel; MacHannaford, Juan C.; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.; Felius, Joost; Rafael, Aldo E.; Malyala, Rajasekhar S.

    2017-01-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can provide temporary cardiopulmonary support for patients in hemodynamic extremis or refractory heart failure until more durable therapies—such as cardiac transplantation or a left ventricular assist device—can be safely implemented. Conventional ECMO cannulation strategies commonly employ the femoral artery and vein, constraining the patients to the supine position for the duration of ECMO support. We have recently adopted a modified cannulation approach to promote patient mobility, rehabilitation, and faster recovery and to mitigate complications associated with femoral arterial cannulation, such as limb ischemia and compartment syndrome. This technique involves cannulation of the subclavian artery and vein. The current case report details our recent experience with this approach in a critically ill patient awaiting cardiac transplantation.

  17. Large angle slew maneuvers with autonomous sun vector avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Colin R.

    1994-07-01

    The paper presents a methodology developed which allows large angle slew maneuvers to be achieved with autonomous avoidance of the sun vector or other undesired orientations. It has been demonstrated that the local potential shape may be manipulated to guide the satellite attitude during the slew. This guidance allows a globally stable, point to point constrained maneuver using analytic guidance commands.

  18. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-05-27

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system's performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions.

  19. Instantaneous Observability of Tightly Coupled SINS/GPS during Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Junxiang; Yu, Fei; Lan, Haiyu; Dong, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    The tightly coupled strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS)/global position system (GPS) has been widely used. The system observability determines whether the system state can be estimated by a filter efficiently or not. In this paper, the observability analysis of a two-channel and a three-channel tightly coupled SINS/GPS are performed, respectively, during arbitrary translational maneuvers and angle maneuvers, where the translational maneuver and angle maneuver are modeled. A novel instantaneous observability matrix (IOM) based on a reconstructed psi-angle model is proposed to make the theoretical analysis simpler, which starts from the observability definition directly. Based on the IOM, a series of theoretical analysis are performed. Analysis results show that almost all kinds of translational maneuver and angle maneuver can make a three-channel system instantaneously observable, but there is no one translational maneuver or angle maneuver can make a two-channel system instantaneously observable. The system’s performance is investigated when the system is not instantaneously observable. A series of simulation studies based on EKF are performed to confirm the analytic conclusions. PMID:27240369

  20. Increased blood glycohemoglobin A1c levels lead to overestimation of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-enzymatic glycation increases hemoglobin-oxygen affinity and reduces oxygen delivery to tissues by altering the structure and function of hemoglobin. Objectives We investigated whether an elevated blood concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) could induce falsely high pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (SpO2) in type 2 diabetic patients during mechanical ventilation or oxygen therapy. Methods Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) were determined with simultaneous monitoring of SpO2 in 261 type 2 diabetic patients during ventilation or oxygen inhalation. Results Blood concentration of HbA1c was >7% in 114 patients and ≤ 7% in 147 patients. Both SaO2 (96.2 ± 2.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 95.7-96.7% vs. 95.1 ± 2.8%, 95% CI 94.7-95.6%) and SpO2 (98.0 ± 2.6%, 95% CI 97.6-98.5% vs. 95.3 ± 2.8%, 95% CI 94.9-95.8%) were significantly higher in patients with HbA1c >7% than in those with HbA1c ≤ 7% (Data are mean ± SD, all p < 0.01), but PO2 did not significantly differ between the two groups. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a significant bias between SpO2 and SaO2 (1.83 ±0.55%, 95% CI 1.73% -1.94%) and limits of agreement (0.76% and 2.92%) in patients with HbA1c >7%. The differences between SpO2 and SaO2 correlated closely with blood HbA1c levels (Pearson’s r = 0.307, p < 0.01). Conclusions Elevated blood HbA1c levels lead to an overestimation of SaO2 by SpO2, suggesting that arterial blood gas analysis may be needed for type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control during the treatment of hypoxemia. PMID:22985301

  1. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Evasion Maneuvers for Parallel Approach Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winder, Lee F.; Kuchar, James K.; Waller, Marvin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Current plans for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways call for an automated pilot alerting system to ensure separation of aircraft in the case of a "blunder," or unexpected deviation from the a normal approach path. Resolution advisories by this system would require the pilot of an endangered aircraft to perform a trained evasion maneuver. The potential performance of two evasion maneuvers, referred to as the "turn-climb" and "climb-only," was estimated using an experimental NASA alerting logic (AILS) and a computer simulation of relative trajectory scenarios between two aircraft. One aircraft was equipped with the NASA alerting system, and maneuvered accordingly. Observation of the rates of different types of alerting failure allowed judgement of evasion maneuver performance. System Operating Characteristic (SOC) curves were used to assess the benefit of alerting with each maneuver.

  3. Linearity of electrical impedance tomography during maximum effort breathing and forced expiration maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Chuong; Leonhardt, Steffen; Zhang, Tony; Lüken, Markus; Misgeld, Berno; Vollmer, Thomas; Tenbrock, Klaus; Lehmann, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) provides global and regional information about ventilation by means of relative changes in electrical impedance measured with electrodes placed around the thorax. In combination with lung function tests, e.g. spirometry and body plethysmography, regional information about lung ventilation can be achieved. Impedance changes strictly correlate with lung volume during tidal breathing and mechanical ventilation. Initial studies presumed a correlation also during forced expiration maneuvers. To quantify the validity of this correlation in extreme lung volume changes during forced breathing, a measurement system was set up and applied on seven lung-healthy volunteers. Simultaneous measurements of changes in lung volume using EIT imaging and pneumotachography were obtained with different breathing patterns. Data was divided into a synchronizing phase (spontaneous breathing) and a test phase (maximum effort breathing and forced maneuvers). The EIT impedance changes correlate strictly with spirometric data during slow breathing with increasing and maximum effort ([Formula: see text]) and during forced expiration maneuvers ([Formula: see text]). Strong correlations in spirometric volume parameters [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]/FVC ([Formula: see text]), and flow parameters PEF, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) were observed. According to the linearity during forced expiration maneuvers, EIT can be used during pulmonary function testing in combination with spirometry for visualisation of regional lung ventilation.

  4. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  5. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, Howard G. . E-mail: shertzhg@ucmail.uc.edu; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2006-12-15

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels.

  6. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Shertzer, Howard G.; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner-membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly-synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox-cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels. PMID:17109908

  7. Increased Expression of Versican in the Inflammatory Response to UVB- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Skin Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunisada, Makoto; Yogianti, Flandiana; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Ono, Ryusuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Nishigori, Chikako

    2011-01-01

    Excessive exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for developing skin cancer. UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause accumulation of DNA damage products such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) in the skin. We have previously shown that mice lacking the repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (Ogg1 knockout mice) are highly susceptible to skin cancer after long-term UVB exposure. To investigate the genes involved, we performed gene profiling of Ogg1 knockout mouse skin after UVB exposure. Among the up-regulated genes in UVB-treated Ogg1 knockout mice, inflammatory response pathway-related genes were most affected. The Vcan gene, which encodes the large extracellular matrix proteoglycan versican, was continuously up-regulated in UVB-treated Ogg1 knockout mice, suggesting that versican is a mediator of skin cancer development. We examined the expression pattern of versican in skin tumors from wild-type mice and UVB-treated Ogg1 knockout mice, and also analyzed 157 sun-related human skin tumors. Versican was strongly expressed in malignant skin tumors in both mice and humans, and especially in Ogg1 knockout mice. Additionally, infiltrating neutrophils strongly colocalized with versican in UVB-treated Ogg1 knockout mouse skin. These data demonstrate that inflammatory responses, particularly neutrophil infiltration and versican up-regulation, are closely involved in UVB/ROS-induced skin tumorigenesis. PMID:22001346

  8. Non-Oxygenated Sesquiterpenes in the Essential Oil of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. Increase during the Day in the Dry Season

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Portella, Roberto de Oliveira; Bufalo, Jennifer; Marques, Márcia Ortiz Mayo; Facanali, Roselaine; Frei, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of seasonal and diurnal events on the chemical profile of the essential oil obtained from the leaves of Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. This study was performed in a Brazilian savanna named Cerrado. We identified the best harvesting period for obtaining the highest amount of compounds used for commercial and industrial purposes. The chemical profile of the essential oils was evaluated by GC-FID and GC-MS, and the results were assessed through multivariate analyses. The data showed that the time of day and seasonal variations affect the quality of the essential oil obtained. Leaves harvested at the end of the day (5:00 pm) in the dry season resulted in richer essential oils with higher amounts of non-oxygenated sesquiterpenes. To the best of our knowledge, environmental conditions induce metabolic responses in the leaves of C. langsdorffii, which changes the patterns of sesquiterpene production. Therefore, these factors need to be considered to obtain better concentrations of bioactive compounds for pharmacological studies. PMID:26886431

  9. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma cells by increasing reactive oxygen species and activating MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Festa, Michela; Capasso, Anna; D'Acunto, Cosimo W; Masullo, Milena; Rossi, Adriano G; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-12-27

    The effect of the biologically active prenylated chalcone and potential anticancer agent xanthohumol (1) has been investigated on apoptosis of the T98G human malignant glioblastoma cell line. Compound 1 decreased the viability of T98G cells by induction of apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis induced by 1 was associated with activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage and was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway, as exemplified by mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Xanthohumol induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), an effect that was reduced by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Intracellular ROS production appeared essential for the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and induction of apoptosis after exposure to 1. Oxidative stress due to treatment with 1 was associated with MAPK activation, as determined by ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 was attenuated using NAC to inhibit ROS production. After treatment with 1, ROS provided a specific environment that resulted in MAPK-induced cell death, with this effect reduced by the ERK1/2 specific inhibitor PD98059 and partially inhibited by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These findings suggest that xanthohumol (1) is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  10. Gestational hypoxia increases reactive oxygen species and inhibits steroid hormone-mediated upregulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel function in uterine arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ronghui; Huang, Xiaohui; Hu, Xiang-Qun; Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-08-01

    Gestational hypoxia inhibits steroid hormone-induced upregulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa) channel activities in uterine arteries. We tested the hypothesis that increased reactive oxygen species play an important role in hypoxia-mediated inhibition of KCa channel activities. Uterine arteries were isolated from nonpregnant (nonpregnant uterine artery) and near-term (≈142-145 day) pregnant (pregnant uterine artery) sheep maintained at either sea level or high altitude (3820 m, Pao2: 60 mm Hg) for 110 days. In pregnant uterine arteries, hypoxia significantly decreased large conductance channel opener NS1619- and small conductance channel opener NS309-induced relaxations, which were partially restored by reactive oxygen species inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC significantly increased large conductance KCa but not small conductance KCa current densities in uterine arterial smooth muscle cells in pregnant animals acclimatized to high altitude. The NAC-sensitive component of small conductance KCa-induced relaxations was diminished in endothelium-denuded arteries. In nonpregnant uterine arteries, NS1619- and NS309-induced relaxations were diminished compared with those in pregnant uterine arteries. Treatment of nonpregnant uterine arteries with 17β-estradiol and progesterone for 48 hours increased small conductance KCa type 3 protein abundance and NS1619- and NS309-induced relaxations, which were inhibited by hypoxia. This hypoxia-mediated inhibition was reversed by NAC. Consistently, steroid hormone treatment had no significant effects on large conductance KCa current density in nonpregnant uterine arteries of hypoxic animals in the absence of NAC but significantly increased it in the presence of NAC. These results suggest an important role of hypoxia-mediated reactive oxygen species in negatively regulating steroid hormone-mediated upregulation of KCa channel activity and adaptation of uterine vascular reactivity in pregnancy, which may contribute to the

  11. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  12. The wire anchor loop traction (WALT) maneuver.

    PubMed

    Effendi, Khaled; Sacho, Raphael Hillel; Belzile, François; Marotta, Thomas R

    2015-01-23

    Crossing the neck of large complex intracranial aneurysms for the purposes of stent deployment can be challenging using standard over the wire techniques. We describe a novel yet simple technique for straightening out the loop formed within a large intracranial aneurysm, which is often required in order to cross the aneurysm neck into the distal branch. Both the microcatheter and microwire are initially introduced into the distal vasculature, followed by withdrawal of the microwire to a point parallel to the distal exiting branch. The microcatheter and microwire are then gently withdrawn and a series of maneuvers to gradually reduce the loop is performed, obviating the need for distal purchase in the form of a stent, balloon, or coil, which have previously been described to maintain distal purchase.

  13. The wire anchor loop traction (WALT) maneuver.

    PubMed

    Effendi, Khaled; Sacho, Raphael Hillel; Belzile, François; Marotta, Thomas R

    2016-02-01

    Crossing the neck of large complex intracranial aneurysms for the purposes of stent deployment can be challenging using standard over the wire techniques. We describe a novel yet simple technique for straightening out the loop formed within a large intracranial aneurysm, which is often required in order to cross the aneurysm neck into the distal branch. Both the microcatheter and microwire are initially introduced into the distal vasculature, followed by withdrawal of the microwire to a point parallel to the distal exiting branch. The microcatheter and microwire are then gently withdrawn and a series of maneuvers to gradually reduce the loop is performed, obviating the need for distal purchase in the form of a stent, balloon, or coil, which have previously been described to maintain distal purchase.

  14. Analysis of ship maneuvering data from simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, V.; Kleppe, G.; Christensen, K.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze complex manuevering histories of ships obtained from training sessions on bridge simulators. Advanced ships are used in fields like offshore oil exploration: dive support vessels, supply vessels, anchor handling vessels, tugs, cable layers, and multi-purpose vessels. Due to high demands from the operations carried out, these ships need to have very high maneuverability. This is achieved through a propulsion system with several thrusters, water jets, and rudders in addition to standard propellers. For some operations, like subsea maintenance, it is crucial that the ship accurately keeps a fixed position. Therefore, bridge systems usually incorporate equipment for Dynamic Positioning (DP). DP is a method to keep ships and semi submersible rigs in a fixed position using the propulsion systems instead of anchors. It may also be used for sailing a vessel from one position to another along a predefined route. Like an autopilot on an airplane, DP may operate without human involvement. The method relies on accurate determination of position from external reference systems like GPS, as well as a continuously adjusted mathematical model of the ship and external forces from wind, waves and currents. In a specific simulator exercise for offshore crews, a ship is to be taken up to an installation consisting of three nearby oil platforms connected by bridges (Frigg field, North Sea), where a subsea inspection is to be carried out. Due to the many degrees of freedom during maneuvering, including partly or full use of DP, the chosen routes vary significantly. In this poster we report preliminary results on representations of the complex maneuvering histories; representations that allow comparison between crew groups, and, possibly, sorting of the different strategic choices behind.

  15. Hemodynamic responses during and after multiple sets of stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Tainah P.; Farinatti, Paulo T.V.; Rubini, Ercole C.; Silva, Elirez B.; Monteiro, Walace D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the acute hemodynamic responses to multiple sets of passive stretching exercises performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. METHODS: Fifteen healthy men aged 21 to 29 years with poor flexibility performed stretching protocols comprising 10 sets of maximal passive unilateral hip flexion, sustained for 30 seconds with equal intervals between sets. Protocols without and with the Valsalva maneuver were applied in a random counterbalanced order, separated by 48-hour intervals. Hemodynamic responses were measured by photoplethysmography pre-exercise, during the stretching sets, and post-exercise. RESULTS: The effects of stretching sets on systolic and diastolic blood pressure were cumulative until the fourth set in protocols performed with and without the Valsalva maneuver. The heart rate and rate pressure product increased in both protocols, but no additive effect was observed due to the number of sets. Hemodynamic responses were always higher when stretching was performed with the Valsalva maneuver, causing an additional elevation in the rate pressure product. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sets of unilateral hip flexion stretching significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product values. A cumulative effect of the number of sets occurred only for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, at least in the initial sets of the stretching protocols. The performance of the Valsalva maneuver intensified all hemodynamic responses, which resulted in significant increases in cardiac work during stretching exercises. PMID:26039949

  16. Effects of epinephrine and lactate on the increase in oxygen consumption of non-exercising skeletal muscle after aerobic exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Motohide; Katsumura, Toshihito; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Osada, Takuya; Sako, Takayuki; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Kime, Ryotaro; Shimomitsu, Teruichi

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure O2 consumption of nonexercising skeletal muscles (VO2nonex) at rest and after aerobic exercise and to investigate the stimulant factors of O2 consumption. In experiment 1, we measured the resting metabolic rate of the finger flexor muscles in seven healthy males by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during a 15 min arterial occlusion. In experiment 2, the VO2nonex of the finger flexor muscles was measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy at rest, immediate postexercise, and 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min following a cycling exercise at a workload corresponding to 50% of peak pulmonary O2 uptake for 20 min. We also monitored deep tissue temperature in the VO2nonex measurement area and determined catecholamines and lactate concentrations in the blood at rest and immediate postexercise. VO2nonex at rest was 1.1 +/- 0.1 (mu) M O2/s (mean +/- standard error) and VO2nonex after exercise increased 59.6 +/- 7.2% (p < 0.001) from the resting values. There were significant correlations between the increase in VO2nonex and the increase in epinephrine concentration (p < 0.01), and between the increase in VO2nonex and the increase in lactate concentration (p < 0.05). These results suggest that epinephrine and lactate concentrations are important VO2nonex stimulant factors.

  17. Dynamics of spacecraft control laboratory experiment (SCOLE) slew maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakad, Y. P.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first of two reports on the dynamics and control of slewing maneuvers of the NASA Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE). In this report, the dynamics of slewing maneuvers of SCOLE are developed in terms of an arbitrary maneuver about any given axis. The set of dynamical equations incorporate rigid-body slew maneuver and three-dimensional vibrations of the complete assembly comprising the rigid shuttle, the flexible beam, and the reflector with an offset mass. The analysis also includes kinematic nonlinearities of the entire assembly during the maneuver and the dynamics of the interaction between the rigid shuttle and the flexible appendage. The final set of dynamical equations obtained for slewing maneuvers is highly nonlinear and coupled in terms of the flexible modes and the rigid-body modes. The equations are further simplified and evaluated numerically to include the first ten flexible modes and the SCOLE data to yield a model for designing control systems to perform slew maneuvers.

  18. Insulin increases surface expression of TRPC6 channels in podocytes: role of NADPH oxidases and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Anderson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Insulin receptors in podocytes are essential for normal kidney function. Here, we show that insulin evokes a rapid increase in the surface expression of canonical transient receptor potential-6 channel (TRPC6) channels in cultured podocytes, but caused a decrease in surface expression of TRPC5. These effects are accompanied by a marked increase in outwardly rectifying cationic currents that can be blocked by 10 μM SKF96365 or 100 μM La3+. Application of oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) also increased SKF96365- and La3+-sensitive cationic currents in podocytes. Importantly, current responses to a combination of OAG and insulin were the same amplitude as those evoked by either agent applied alone. This occlusion effect suggests that OAG and insulin are targeting the same population of channels. In addition, shRNA knockdown of TRPC6 markedly reduced cationic currents stimulated by insulin. The effects of insulin on TRPC6 were mimicked by treating podocytes with H2O2. Insulin treatment rapidly increased the generation of H2O2 in podocytes, and it increased the surface expression of the NADPH oxidase NOX4 in cultured podocytes. Basal and insulin-stimulated surface expression of TRPC6 were reduced by pretreatment with diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases and other flavin-dependent enzymes, by siRNA knockdown of NOX4, and by manganese (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin chloride, a membrane-permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase. These observations suggest that insulin increases generation of ROS in part through activation of NADPH oxidases, and that this step contributes to modulation of podocyte TRPC6 channels. PMID:22031853

  19. Plasma reactive oxygen metabolites and non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity are not affected by an acute increase of metabolic rate in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Beamonte-Barrientos, Rene; Verhulst, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the sources of variation in oxidative stress level is a challenging issue due to the implications of oxidative stress for late age diseases, longevity and life-history trade-offs. Reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress are mostly a by-product of energy metabolism and it is therefore often assumed that oxidative stress is proportional to energy consumption. In mammals, an increased metabolic rate induced by cold exposure generally increases oxidative stress. However, compared to mammals, birds generate fewer free radicals per ATP produced and hence it is not obvious that, in birds, a cold-induced increase of metabolic rate increase oxidative stress. We tested whether cold-induced increase in metabolic rate increased oxidative stress in zebra finches by exposing individuals to cold and warm overnight temperatures. We registered metabolic rate and plasma levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants and reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), a measure of oxidative damage. Metabolic rate was on average 88 % higher in cold compared to warm temperature, with females being stronger affected than males. However, temperature had no effect on plasma antioxidants or our measure of oxidative damage. Middle-age birds had higher levels of plasma antioxidants than younger and older birds, but age was unrelated to ROMs. Birds showed repeatability of plasma ROMs across temperatures but not of non-enzymatic antioxidants. In contrast to similar studies in mammals, our results do not show evidence of increased oxidative stress in plasma after an acute cold-induced increase of metabolic rate but research in more bird species is needed to assess the generality of this pattern.

  20. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew E; Schaff, Cody W; Horne, Alexandra J; Lessner, Faith H; Lessner, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens.

  1. Maneuver Design for the Juno Mission: Inner Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlak, Thomas A.; Frauenholz, Raymond B.; Bordi, John J.; Kangas, Julie A.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    2014-01-01

    The Juno spacecraft launched in August 2011 and, following a successful Earth flyby in October 2013, is on course for a nominal orbit insertion at Jupiter in July 2016. This paper examines the design and execution of deterministic and statistical trajectory correction maneuvers during the first approximately 27 months of post-launch operations that defined the "Inner Cruise" phase of the Juno mission. Topics of emphasis include the two deep space maneuvers, Earth flyby altitude biasing strategy, and the sequence of trajectory correction maneuvers executed in the weeks prior to the successful Earth gravity assist.

  2. Modeling of ship maneuvering motion using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weilin; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, Neural Networks (NNs) are used in the modeling of ship maneuvering motion. A nonlinear response model and a linear hydrodynamic model of ship maneuvering motion are also investigated. The maneuverability indices and linear non-dimensional hydrodynamic derivatives in the models are identified by using two-layer feed forward NNs. The stability of parametric estimation is confirmed. Then, the ship maneuvering motion is predicted based on the obtained models. A comparison between the predicted results and the model test results demonstrates the validity of the proposed modeling method.

  3. Cassini-Huygens Maneuver Experience: Ending the Prime Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy D.; Ballard, Christopher G.; Gist, Emily M.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Wagner, Sean V.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft was launched in 1997 on a mission to observe Saturn and its many moons. After a seven-year cruise, it entered a Saturnian orbit for a four-year, prime mission. This paper highlights significant maneuver activities performed during the last year of the prime mission. Specifically, results of 42 recent maneuvers are presented. Many maneuvers have been skipped, saving fuel and flight team effort. The system has performed more accurately than the pre-launch expectations and requirements. This is in large part why the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has been navigated with tremendous success during the prime mission.

  4. Optimal large-angle maneuvers with vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. D.; Chun, H. M.; Junkins, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Some methods and applications which determine optimal maneuver controls are overviewed. The main aspects of optimal control theory are summarized and the essential ideas involved in a class of methods ('continuation' or 'homotopy' methods) which are useful in solving the resulting two-point boundary value problems are discussed. Several low dimensioned, nonlinear maneuvers of multiple rigid-body configurations using optimal momentum transfer are discussed. Several linear and nonlinear flexible-body maneuvers are then presented and include distributed controls, vibration suppression/arrest, and computational issues. Finally, the key problem areas in which future research appears most urgent are identified.

  5. Cassini - Huygens maneuver experience : cruise and arrival at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy; Buffington, Brent; Hahn, Yungsun; Strange, Nathan; Wagner, Sean; Wong, Mau

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan was launched in 1997. It is an international effort to study the Saturnian system. Cassini-Huygens' interplanetary cruise delivered the spacecraft to Saturn in 2004. It also made use of many propulsive maneuvers, both statistical and deterministic. Maneuver-related analysis and performance for latter half of cruise is reported. The system has performed more accurately than the pre-launch expectations and requirements. Additionally, some maneuvers have already been skipped, saving propellant and flight team effort. Analysis of historical execution error data is presented.

  6. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes

  7. Traumatic rupture of the stomach after Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, A C; Lange, J F

    1990-01-01

    Fatal complications following the performance of the Heimlich maneuver have been reported. A 76-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with signs of respiratory distress, abdominal pain and distension one day after airway obstruction and subsequent resuscitation. Despite successful immediate laparotomy and repair of a ruptured stomach, she later succumbed to the sequelae of aspiration of gastric contents and dehiscence of the gastric tear. This is the 4th case of stomach rupture and the 7th reported fatal complication following the Heimlich maneuver. It is recommended that persons who undergo the Heimlich maneuver be examined and observed by a physician, as soon as possible, to rule out complications.

  8. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  9. Combined Increases in Mitochondrial Cooperation and Oxygen Photoreduction Compensate for Deficiency in Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Kieu-Van; Plet, Julie; Tolleter, Dimitri; Jokel, Martina; Cuiné, Stéphan; Carrier, Patrick; Auroy, Pascaline; Richaud, Pierre; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Peltier, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    During oxygenic photosynthesis, metabolic reactions of CO2 fixation require more ATP than is supplied by the linear electron flow operating from photosystem II to photosystem I (PSI). Different mechanisms, such as cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI, have been proposed to participate in reequilibrating the ATP/NADPH balance. To determine the contribution of CEF to microalgal biomass productivity, here, we studied photosynthesis and growth performances of a knockout Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (pgrl1) deficient in PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION LIKE1 (PGRL1)–mediated CEF. Steady state biomass productivity of the pgrl1 mutant, measured in photobioreactors operated as turbidostats, was similar to its wild-type progenitor under a wide range of illumination and CO2 concentrations. Several changes were observed in pgrl1, including higher sensitivity of photosynthesis to mitochondrial inhibitors, increased light-dependent O2 uptake, and increased amounts of flavodiiron (FLV) proteins. We conclude that a combination of mitochondrial cooperation and oxygen photoreduction downstream of PSI (Mehler reactions) supplies extra ATP for photosynthesis in the pgrl1 mutant, resulting in normal biomass productivity under steady state conditions. The lower biomass productivity observed in the pgrl1 mutant in fluctuating light is attributed to an inability of compensation mechanisms to respond to a rapid increase in ATP demand. PMID:24989042

  10. Increased vascular thromboxane generation impairs dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of obese Zucker rats with reduced oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; James, Milinda E; Frisbee, Jefferson C

    2008-10-01

    This study determined if altered vascular prostacyclin (PGI(2)) and/or thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) production with reduced Po(2) contributes to impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles of obese Zucker rats (OZRs) versus lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Mechanical responses were assessed in isolated gracilis muscle arterioles following reductions in Po(2) under control conditions and following pharmacological interventions inhibiting arachidonic acid metabolism and nitric oxide synthase and alleviating elevated vascular oxidant stress. The production of arachidonic acid metabolites was assessed using pooled arteries from OZRs and LZRs in response to reduced Po(2). Hypoxic dilation, endothelium-dependent in both strains, was attenuated in OZRs versus LZRs. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no significant impact on hypoxic dilation in either strain. Cyclooxygenase inhibition dramatically reduced hypoxic dilation in LZRs and abolished responses in OZRs. Treatment of arterioles from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase improved hypoxic dilation, and this improvement was entirely cyclooxygenase dependent. Vascular PGI(2) production with reduced Po(2) was similar between strains, although TxA(2) production was increased in OZRs, a difference that was attenuated by treatment of vessels from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase. Both blockade of PGH(2)/TxA(2) receptors and inhibition of thromboxane synthase increased hypoxic dilation in OZR arterioles. These results suggest that a contributing mechanism underlying impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of OZRs may be an increased vascular production of TxA(2), which competes against the vasodilator influences of PGI(2). These results also suggest that the elevated vascular oxidant stress inherent in metabolic syndrome may contribute to the increased vascular TxA(2) production and may blunt vascular sensitivity to PGI(2).

  11. Taxifolin and Fucoidin Abolish the Irradiation-Induced Increase in the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Arutyunyan, T V; Korystova, A F; Kublik, L N; Levitman, M Kh; Shaposhnikova, V V; Korystov, Yu N

    2016-03-01

    We studied changes in ROS content in the aorta of Wistar rats at early terms after irradiation in doses equal to single fraction used in tumor radiotherapy and the effects of taxifolin and fucoidin, blockers of leukocyte adhesion to endothelium, on ROS content. Male rats were exposed to X-rays (200 kW) in doses of 1-7.5 Gy. ROS production in aorta segments was measured in 1-48 h after irradiation by dichlorodihydrofluorescein oxidation. The content of ROS in the aorta of rats exposed to radiation in doses of 1-2.5 Gy increased in 1-24 h after irradiation, the peak ROS content was found in 2 h after irradiation. Taxifolin (100 μg/kg dihydroquercetin once a day with drinking water) and fucoidin (10 mg/kg, i.v.) abolished ROS accumulation. The content of ROS in rat aorta increased in 1-24 h after irradiation in doses used for tumor radiotherapy and this increase can be determined by leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium.

  12. Copper-binding tripeptide motif increases potency of the antimicrobial peptide Anoplin via Reactive Oxygen Species generation.

    PubMed

    Libardo, M Daben J; Nagella, Sai; Lugo, Andrea; Pierce, Scott; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2015-01-02

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that act through diverse mechanisms, this characteristic makes them suitable starting points for development of novel classes of antibiotics. We have previously reported the increase in activity of AMPs upon addition of the Amino Terminal Copper and Nickel (ATCUN) Binding Unit. Herein we synthesized the membrane active peptide, Anoplin and two ATCUN-Anoplin derivatives and show that the increase in activity is indeed due to the ROS formation by the Cu(II)-ATCUN complex. We found that the ATCUN-Anoplin peptides were up to four times more potent compared to Anoplin alone against standard test bacteria. We studied membrane disruption, and cellular localization and found that addition of the ATCUN motif did not lead to a difference in these properties. When helical content was calculated, we observed that ATCUN-Anoplin had a lower helical composition. We found that ATCUN-Anoplin are able to oxidatively damage lipids in the bacterial membrane and that their activity trails the rate at which ROS is formed by the Cu(II)-ATCUN complexes alone. This study shows that addition of a metal binding tripeptide motif is a simple strategy to increase potency of AMPs by conferring a secondary action.

  13. Snake venom causes apoptosis by increasing the reactive oxygen species in colorectal and breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Al-Shahrani, Mohammad Hamed; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom possesses various kinds of proteins and neurotoxic polypeptides, which can negatively interfere with the neurotransmitter signaling cascade. This phenomenon occurs mainly due to the blocking of ion channels in the body system. Envenomation prevents or severely interrupts nerve impulses from being transmitted, inhibition of adenosine triphosphate synthesis, and proper functioning of the cardiac muscles. However, some beneficial properties of venoms have also been reported. The aim of this study was to examine the snake venom as an anticancer agent due to its inhibitory effects on cancer progression such as cell motility, cell invasion, and colony formation. In this study, the effect of venoms on phenotypic changes and the change on molecular level in colorectal and breast cancer cell lines were examined. A reduction of 60%–90% in cell motility, colony formation, and cell invasion was observed when these cell lines were treated with different concentrations of snake venom. In addition, the increase in oxidative stress that results in an increase in the number of apoptotic cancer cells was significantly higher in the venom-treated cell lines. Further analysis showed that there was a decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and signaling proteins, strongly suggesting a promising role for snake venom against breast and colorectal cancer cell progression. In conclusion, the snake venoms used in this study showed significant anticancer properties against colorectal and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:27799796

  14. Influence of the Valsalva maneuver on cardiac hemodynamics and right to left shunt in patients with patent foramen ovale

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Enfa; Zhang, Yafei; Kang, Chunmiao; Niu, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Lei; Liu, Baomin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the Valsalva maneuver (VM) on cardiac hemodynamics in patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO). Sixty-five patients who were highly suspected to have PFO were included. The changes in E, A, E/A ratio of mitral valve blood flow, E, A, E/A ratio of tricuspid valve blood flow, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, area and right atrial area during the resting state and the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver were observed by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Version18.0. Compared to the resting state, mitral valve diastolic velocity E and A peaks at the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver significantly decreased (P < 0.05), left ventricular end diastolic volume(LVEDV) and area(LVEDA) decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while E/A ratio of mitral valve, tricuspid valve systolic velocity E and A peaks and E/A ratio remained unchanged (P > 0.05). PFO hemodynamic changes mainly occurred in the left ventricle when the Valsalva maneuver was performed. The Valsalva maneuver increased pressure in the chest, then pulmonary venous return was impeded, which resulted in left ventricular limited filling, and E and A peaks decreased. The pressure of the left ventricle and atrium was lower than that of the right side, which resulted in right-to-left shunt (RLS) through PFO. PMID:28266661

  15. Influence of the Valsalva maneuver on cardiac hemodynamics and right to left shunt in patients with patent foramen ovale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enfa; Zhang, Yafei; Kang, Chunmiao; Niu, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Lei; Liu, Baomin

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the Valsalva maneuver (VM) on cardiac hemodynamics in patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO). Sixty-five patients who were highly suspected to have PFO were included. The changes in E, A, E/A ratio of mitral valve blood flow, E, A, E/A ratio of tricuspid valve blood flow, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, area and right atrial area during the resting state and the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver were observed by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Version18.0. Compared to the resting state, mitral valve diastolic velocity E and A peaks at the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver significantly decreased (P < 0.05), left ventricular end diastolic volume(LVEDV) and area(LVEDA) decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while E/A ratio of mitral valve, tricuspid valve systolic velocity E and A peaks and E/A ratio remained unchanged (P > 0.05). PFO hemodynamic changes mainly occurred in the left ventricle when the Valsalva maneuver was performed. The Valsalva maneuver increased pressure in the chest, then pulmonary venous return was impeded, which resulted in left ventricular limited filling, and E and A peaks decreased. The pressure of the left ventricle and atrium was lower than that of the right side, which resulted in right-to-left shunt (RLS) through PFO.

  16. An analysis of the effect of aeroassist maneuvers on orbital transfer vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gregory O.; Suit, William T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes a Langley Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) research project (Summer 1986) dealing with the topic of the effectiveness of aeroassist maneuvers to accomplish a change in the orbital inclination of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). This task was subject to OTV design constraints, chief of which were the axial acceleration and the aerodynamic heating rate limits of the OTV. The use of vehicle thrust to replace lost kinetic energy and, thereby, to increase the maximum possible change in orbital inclination was investigated. A relation between time in the hover orbit and payload to LEO was established. The amount of plane change possible during this type of maneuver was checked for several runs and a possible thrusting procedure to increase the plane change and still get to LEO was suggested. Finally, the sensitivity of various target parameters to controllable independent variables was established, trades between the amount of control allowed, and payload to LEO suggested.

  17. Hb San Cataldo [β144(HC1)Lys→Thr; HBB: C.434A > C]: A New Hemoglobin Variant with Increased Affinity for Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Margherita; Passarello, Cristina; Cassarà, Filippo; Leto, Filippo; Cannata, Monica; Crivello, Anna; Di Salvo, Veronica; Maggio, Aurelio; Giambona, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    A 59-year-old Italian woman came to our center for revaluation of a previous diagnosis of polycythemia vera. The patient presented with a lifelong history of polycythemia, no increase in white blood cells (WBCs) and platelets, and a negative bone marrow biopsy. Analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) fractions showed an abnormal fast moving Hb component. We aimed to determine if this variant was the cause of polycythemia in this patient. A complete blood count (CBC) was performed by an automated cell counter and Hb fractions were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Standard stability tests and oxygen affinity evaluation were also performed. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes using the phenol chloroform method and the entire β-globin gene was analyzed by direct sequencing. At the hematological level, no anemia or hemolysis was observed but an abnormal Hb fraction was detected using cation exchange HPLC. Molecular analysis of the β-globin gene showed heterozygosity for an AAG > ACG substitution at codon 144, resulting in a Lys→Thr amino acid replacement. We demonstrated that this is a new Hb variant with increased oxygen affinity. Its altered physiology is caused by the reduction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) effects, due to an amino acid substitution in the central pocket near the C-terminal of the β chain. We called this new variant Hb San Cataldo for the native city of proband.

  18. Alteration of the α1β2/α2β1 subunit interface contributes to the increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity of high-altitude deer mice

    PubMed Central

    Inoguchi, Noriko; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Storz, Jay F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) that are native to high altitudes in the Rocky Mountains have evolved hemoglobins with an increased oxygen-binding affinity relative to those of lowland conspecifics. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolved increase in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity, the crystal structure of the highland hemoglobin variant was solved and compared with the previously reported structure for the lowland variant. Results Highland hemoglobin yielded at least two crystal types, in which the longest axes were 507 and 230 Å. Using the smaller unit cell crystal, the structure was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two tetrameric hemoglobin molecules. Conclusions The analyses revealed that αPro50 in the highland hemoglobin variant promoted a stable interaction between αHis45 and heme that was not seen in the αHis50 lowland variant. The αPro50 mutation also altered the nature of atomic contacts at the α1β2/α2β1 intersubunit interfaces. These results demonstrate how affinity-altering changes in intersubunit interactions can be produced by mutations at structurally remote sites. PMID:28362841

  19. Cardiovascular effects of the valsalva maneuver during static arm exercise in elite power lifting athletes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Gasior, Zbigniew; Jastrzebski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether a blood pressure increase during static exercises might affect the left ventricular function and whether a possible pressure overload might decrease cardio-respiratory adaptation to aerobic exercise in power lifting athletes. Nine resistance-trained athletes and ten age-matched untrained men participated in high intensity isometric exercise performed during the Valsalva maneuver and in an incremental arm cranking test. All subjects underwent echocardiographic evaluation. The combine effect of exercise and increased intrathoracic pressure due to the Valsalva maneuver was a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in the athletes compared with controls. Echocardiography demonstrated significant differences in left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass index; both being higher in the athletes than in controls. The intraventricular septum diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness were significantly greater and the myocardial performance index was lower in the athletes compared with controls, indicating a better left ventricular function in the athletes. A cumulative effect of mechanical compression of peripheral blood vessels by contracting muscles and intrathoracic pressure increase during the Valsalva maneuver did not compromise myocardial contractility and cardiorespiratory adaptation to incremental arm exercise in power lifting athletes.

  20. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates accumulate at the onset of intense exercise in man but are not essential for the increase in muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gibala, Martin J; Howarth, Krista R; Krustrup, Peter

    2006-09-01

    It was proposed that a contraction-induced increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates (TCAI) is obligatory for the increase in muscle oxygen uptake at the start of exercise. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in muscle TCAI during the initial seconds of intense exercise and used dichloroacetate (DCA) in an attempt to alter the level of TCAI. Five men performed strenuous leg kicking exercise (64+/-8 W) under noninfused control (CON) and DCA-supplemented conditions; biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and after 5, 15, and 180 s of exercise. In CON, the total concentration of three measured TCAI (SigmaTCAI: citrate, malate, and fumarate) increased (p<0.05) by 71% during the first 15 s of exercise. The SigmaTCAI was lower (p<0.05) in DCA than in CON at rest [0.18+/-0.02 vs 0.64+/-0.09 mmol kg(-1) dry weight (d.w.)], after 5 s (0.30+/-0.07 vs 0.85+/-0.14 mmol kg(-1) d.w.), and 15 s of exercise (0.60+/-0.07 vs 1.09+/-0.16 mmol kg(-1) d.w.), but not different after 3 min (3.12+/-0.53 vs 3.23+/-0.55 mmol kg(-1) d.w.). Despite differences in the level of muscle TCAI, muscle phosphocreatine degradation was similar in DCA and CON during the first 15 s of exercise (17.5+/-3.3 vs 25.6+/-4.1 mmol kg(-1) d.w.). Taken together with our previous observation that DCA does not alter muscle oxygen uptake during the initial phase of intense leg kicking exercise (Bangsbo et al. Am J Physiol 282:R273-R280, 2002), the present data suggest that muscle TCAI accumulate during the initial seconds of exercise; however, this increase is not essential for the contraction-induced increase in mitochondrial respiration.

  1. Khz (fusion product of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species, activation of caspase 3, and increased intracellular Ca²⁺.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Zoo Haye; Huang, Ren Bin; Chae, Young Lye; Wang, Ren Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Khz (a fusion mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) is isolated from ganoderic acid and P. umbellatus and it exerts antiproliferative effects against malignant cells. However, no previous study has reported the inhibitory effects of Khz on the growth of human colon cancer cells. In the present study, we found that Khz suppressed cell division and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Khz cytotoxicity was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Khz reduced cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential levels and it also induced disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and increased calcium concentration and reactive oxygen species generation. Khz increased caspase 3, PARP, caspase 7, and caspase 9 levels, but reduced Bcl-2 protein levels. Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of HCT116 cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle increased in response to Khz treatment.

  2. Halo Orbit Mission Correction Maneuvers Using Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M.; Serban, R.; Petzold, L.; Koon, W.; Ross, S.; Marsden, J.; Wilson, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the required trajectory correction maneuvers (TCM) for a halo orbit space mission to compensate for the launch velocity errors introduced by inaccuracies of the launch vehicle.

  3. Impulse generated during unsteady maneuvering of swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    The relationship between the maneuvering kinematics of a Giant Danio (Danio aequipinnatus) and the resulting vortical wake is investigated for a rapid, 'C'-start maneuver using fully time-resolved (500 Hz) particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV illuminates the two distinct vortices formed during the turn. The fish body rotation is facilitated by the initial, or "maneuvering" vortex formation, and the final fish velocity is augmented by the strength of the second, "propulsive" vortex. Results confirm that the axisymmetric vortex ring model is reasonable to use in calculating the hydrodynamic impulse acting on the fish. The total linear momentum change of the fish from its initial swimming trajectory to its final swimming trajectory is balanced by the vector sum of the impulses of both vortex rings. The timing of vortex formation is uniquely synchronized with the fish motion, and the choreography of the maneuver is addressed in the context of the resulting hydrodynamic forces.

  4. 33 CFR 157.445 - Maneuvering performance capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this section. (c) If a tankship is one of a class of vessels with identical propulsion, steering, hydrodynamic, and other relevant design characteristics, maneuvering performance test results for any...

  5. 33 CFR 157.445 - Maneuvering performance capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this section. (c) If a tankship is one of a class of vessels with identical propulsion, steering, hydrodynamic, and other relevant design characteristics, maneuvering performance test results for any...

  6. 33 CFR 157.445 - Maneuvering performance capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this section. (c) If a tankship is one of a class of vessels with identical propulsion, steering, hydrodynamic, and other relevant design characteristics, maneuvering performance test results for any...

  7. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  8. Vorticity Control in Fish-like Propulsion and Maneuvering.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, M S; Techet, A H; Zhu, Q; Beal, D N; Hover, F S; Yue, D K P

    2002-11-01

    Vorticity control is employed by marine animals to enhance performance in maneuvering and propulsion. Studies on fish-like robots and experimental apparatus modelling rigid and flexible fins provide some of the basic mechanisms employed for controlling vorticity.

  9. Investigation of Dynamic Flight Maneuvers With an Iced Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed analysis of two of the dynamic maneuvers, the pushover and elevator doublet, from the NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program are discussed. For this series of flight tests, artificial ice shapes were attached to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer of the NASA Lewis Research Center icing aircraft, a DHC-6 Twin Otter. The purpose of these tests was to learn more about ice-contaminated tailplane stall (ICTS), the known cause of 16 accidents resulting in 139 fatalities. The pushover has been employed by the FAA, JAA and Transport Canada for tailplane icing certification. This research analyzes the pushover and reports on the maneuver performance degradation due to ice shape severity and flap deflection. A repeatability analysis suggests tolerances for meeting the required targets of the maneuver. A second maneuver, the elevator doublet, is also studied.

  10. Deterministic optimal maneuver strategy for multi-target missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal strategy for making impulsive correction to a multi-target trajectory by a single maneuver. The concept of an optimal maneuver time is introduced. The choice of suitable weighting functions is explored to enable one to properly translate the subjective desire of mission success into an objective cost function whose minimization yields the optimal strategy. It is shown that a number of strategies previously formulated are derivable from one general expression. A number of other interesting properties of the optimal strategy are described. Numerical results are presented for a typical two-target mission. It is shown that the strategy formulated is optimal. For some perturbations, there exists an optimal maneuver time different from the time of initiation of the perturbation. That is, the physical properties of the trajectory can be exploited to select the optimal time of making a corrective maneuver.

  11. Catha edulis Extract Induces H9c2 Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Activation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Syam, Suvitha; Al-Zubairi, Adel S.; Al-Sanousi, Rashad; Oraiby, Magbool Essa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen shrub or small tree, traditionally used by various peoples of the Arabian Peninsula and Africa as an integral component of the socioeconomic traditions. It is believed that the psychostimulant nature and toxic nature of khat is primarily due to the presence of cathinone and cathine respectively. Studies have shown that khat chewing is closely associated with cardiac complications, especially myocardial infarction. Hence in this study, we exposed cathine-rich khat extract in a cardiomyoblast H9c2 (2-1) cell line to check the cell death mechanism. Materials and Methods: Extraction of Catha edulis leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with LC-MS-MS. The anti-proliferative activity was assayed using MTT and apoptosis detection by acridine orange/propidium iodide assay. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein and caspase-3/7 expression were analyzed. The level of reactive oxygen species generation was also evaluated. Results: The khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 hours treatment. We have observed significant early apoptosis events by intervened acridine orange within the fragmented DNA with bright green fluorescence upon treatment. The Bcl-2 expression in the treatment with IC50 concentration of khat extract for 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation significantly decreased with increase in bax level. The increased activation of caspase-3/7 was significantly observed upon treatment together with significant increase of ROS was detected at 24 and 48 hours treatment. Conclusion: Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanisms by which Catha edulis leaves mediate cell death in cardiomyocytes. SUMMARY Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen psychotropic shrub or small treeExtraction of khat leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometryThe khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 h treatment in

  12. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  13. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  14. Flight Simulator: Field of View Utilized in Performing Tactical Maneuvers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    were taken in the Simulator for Air-to-Air Combat (SAAC) and the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). During the air-to-ground data collection...ground maneuvers were performed In the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). The data collected provided an estimate of the FOV dimensions that a...tactical maneuvers were conducted in the AFHIRL ASPT located at Williams AFB. The ASPT had a fully instrumnted F-16 cockpit. The g-cueing was available

  15. Orbit Estimation of Non-Cooperative Maneuvering Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    uses numerical integration of orbit dynamics with 21 × 21 spherical harmonic expansion of the Geopotential, atmospheric drag, lunar gravity, and solar ... ORBIT ESTIMATION OF NON-COOPERATIVE MANEUVERING SPACECRAFT DISSERTATION Gary M. Goff, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-DS-15-J-051 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-DS-15-J-051 ORBIT ESTIMATION OF NON-COOPERATIVE MANEUVERING SPACECRAFT DISSERTATION Presented to

  16. USE OF THE SDO POINTING CONTROLLERS FOR INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION MANEUVERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vess, Melissa F.; Starin, Scott R.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    During the science phase of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the three science instruments require periodic instrument calibration maneuvers with a frequency of up to once per month. The command sequences for these maneuvers vary in length from a handful of steps to over 200 steps, and individual steps vary in size from 5 arcsec per step to 22.5 degrees per step. Early in the calibration maneuver development, it was determined that the original attitude sensor complement could not meet the knowledge requirements for the instrument calibration maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. Because the mission must be single fault tolerant, an attitude determination trade study was undertaken to determine the impact of adding an additional attitude sensor versus developing alternative, potentially complex, methods of performing the maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. To limit the impact to the science data capture budget, these instrument calibration maneuvers must be performed as quickly as possible while maintaining the tight pointing and knowledge required to obtain valid data during the calibration. To this end, the decision was made to adapt a linear pointing controller by adjusting gains and adding an attitude limiter so that it would be able to slew quickly and still achieve steady pointing once on target. During the analysis of this controller, questions arose about the stability of the controller during slewing maneuvers due to the combination of the integral gain, attitude limit, and actuator saturation. Analysis was performed and a method for disabling the integral action while slewing was incorporated to ensure stability. A high fidelity simulation is used to simulate the various instrument calibration maneuvers.

  17. Nonlinear maneuver autopilot for the F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Badgett, M. E.; Walker, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the development of flight test trajectory control laws based on singular perturbation methodology and nonlinear dynamic modeling. The control design methodology is applied to a detailed nonlinear six degree-of-freedom simulation of the F-15 and results for a level accelerations, pushover/pullup maneuver, zoom and pushover maneuver, excess thrust windup turn, constant thrust windup turn, and a constant dynamic pressure/constant load factor trajectory are presented.

  18. Space Object Maneuver Detection Algorithms Using TLE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittelkau, M.

    2016-09-01

    An important aspect of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is detection of deliberate and accidental orbit changes of space objects. Although space surveillance systems detect orbit maneuvers within their tracking algorithms, maneuver data are not readily disseminated for general use. However, two-line element (TLE) data is available and can be used to detect maneuvers of space objects. This work is an attempt to improve upon existing TLE-based maneuver detection algorithms. Three adaptive maneuver detection algorithms are developed and evaluated: The first is a fading-memory Kalman filter, which is equivalent to the sliding-window least-squares polynomial fit, but computationally more efficient and adaptive to the noise in the TLE data. The second algorithm is based on a sample cumulative distribution function (CDF) computed from a histogram of the magnitude-squared |V|2 of change-in-velocity vectors (V), which is computed from the TLE data. A maneuver detection threshold is computed from the median estimated from the CDF, or from the CDF and a specified probability of false alarm. The third algorithm is a median filter. The median filter is the simplest of a class of nonlinear filters called order statistics filters, which is within the theory of robust statistics. The output of the median filter is practically insensitive to outliers, or large maneuvers. The median of the |V|2 data is proportional to the variance of the V, so the variance is estimated from the output of the median filter. A maneuver is detected when the input data exceeds a constant times the estimated variance.

  19. Improvements to the adaptive maneuvering logic program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program simulates close-in, one-on-one air-to-air combat between two fighter aircraft. Three important improvements are described. First, the previously available versions of AML were examined for their suitability as a baseline program. The selected program was then revised to eliminate some programming bugs which were uncovered over the years. A listing of this baseline program is included. Second, the equations governing the motion of the aircraft were completely revised. This resulted in a model with substantially higher fidelity than the original equations of motion provided. It also completely eliminated the over-the-top problem, which occurred in the older versions when the AML-driven aircraft attempted a vertical or near vertical loop. Third, the requirements for a versatile generic, yet realistic, aircraft model were studied and implemented in the program. The report contains detailed tables which make the generic aircraft to be either a modern, high performance aircraft, an older high performance aircraft, or a previous generation jet fighter.

  20. An Immunized Aircraft Maneuver Selection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project, as stated in the original proposal, was to develop an immunized aircraft maneuver selection (IAMS) system. The IAMS system was to be composed of computational and informational building blocks that resemble structures in natural immune systems. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a software package that could be flight tested on aircraft models. This report describes the work performed in the first year of what was to have been a two year project. This report also describes efforts that would have been made in the final year to have completed the project, had it been continued for the final year. After introductory material is provided in Section 2, the end-of-year-one status of the effort is discussed in Section 3. The remainder of the report provides an accounting of first year efforts. Section 4 provides background information on natural immune systems while Section 5 describes a generic ar&itecture developed for use in the IAMS. Section 6 describes the application of the architecture to a system identification problem. Finally, Section 7 describes steps necessary for completing the project.

  1. Augmentation of maneuver performance by spanwise blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized wind tunnel model was tested to investigate new component concepts utilizing spanwise blowing to provide improved maneuver characteristics for advanced fighter aircraft. Primary emphasis was placed on high angle of attack performance, stability, and control at subsonic speeds. Spanwise blowing on a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing resulted in leading edge vortex enhancement with subsequent large vortex-induced lift increments and drag polar improvements at the higher angles of attack. Small deflections of a leading edge flap delayed these lift and drag benefits to higher angles of attack. In addition, blowing was more effective at higher Mach numbers. Spanwise blowing in conjunction with a deflected trailing edge flap resulted in lift and drag benefits that exceeded the summation of the effects of each high lift device acting alone. Asymmetric blowing was an effective lateral control device at the higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing on the wing reduced horizontal tail loading and improved the lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-horizontal tail-vertical tail configuration.

  2. Computation of flow around maneuvering submerged bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, T. R.; Briley, W. R.; Levy, R.

    1988-10-01

    Generalized primary/secondary flow equations and a spatial-marching solution algorithm have been used to develop a procedure to compute the three-dimensional viscous flow around a submerged body in maneuver. The primary/secondary flow equations are an approximation to the Navier-Stokes equations for flows in which a primary flow direction can be identified. Important elements of the approximation are a locally specified primary flow direction and a decomposition of the secondary velocity field to identify a small velocity vector for approximations. No approximations are introduced for pressure in this approach. The primary/secondary flow equations are a well-posed initial-value problem in a spatial coordinate nominally aligned with the primary flow direction and are solved by a sequentially decoupled implicit algorithm. The procedure provides an order to two orders-of-magnitude run time advantage over solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for the flow past an unappended submarine hull in drift at a Reynolds number of 16 million and incidence of 20 degrees. These results are consistent with experimental observations and provide a means to compute the complex three-dimensional viscous flow field economically.

  3. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  4. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) remote servicing kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1988-01-01

    With the design and development of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) progressing toward an early 1990 initial operating capability (IOC), a new era in remote space operations will evolve. The logical progression to OMV front end kits would make available in situ satellite servicing, repair, and consummables resupply to the satellite community. Several conceptual design study efforts are defining representative kits (propellant tanks, debris recovery, module servicers); additional focus must also be placed on an efficient combination module servicer and consummables resupply kit. A remote servicer kit of this type would be designed to perform many of the early maintenance/resupply tasks in both nominal and high inclination orbits. The kit would have the capability to exchange Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), exchange propellant tanks, and/or connect fluid transfer umbilicals. Necessary transportation system functions/support could be provided by interfaces with the OMV, Shuttle (STS), or Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV). Specific remote servicer kit designs, as well as ground and flight demonstrations of servicer technology are necessary to prepare for the potential overwhelming need. Ground test plans should adhere to the component/system/breadboard test philosophy to assure maximum capability of one-g testing. The flight demonstration(s) would most likely be a short duration, Shuttle-bay experiment to validate servicer components requiring a micro-g environment.

  5. Miss distance geometry estimation for maneuvering bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlin, Baruch E.

    1994-02-01

    The end game of air-to-air missiles is characterized by high velocities (Mach 2 and higher), high accelerations (30 g and higher) and small miss distances (less than 20 m.) Event analysis of this phase requires knowledge of the intercept geometry: minimum-distance time, miss-distance vector, velocities, angles, range and range rate. Separate trajectory estimation for each object is usually unsuitable for this purpose owing to systematic errors. A technique is described for miss-distance geometry estimation which is based on reference trajectory data and on missile-target image offsets photodigitized from high-speed cameras (over 300 fps.) The method includes calculation of the line-of-sight to the reference trajectory and the transformation angles to the required point, estimation of the required trajectory by three-dimensional triangulation, identification of the minimum-distance point, and calculation of the miss-distance parameters. The method is robust and not sensitive to bias errors in the reference trajectory or camera positions. It requires accurate data synchronization. Suitable setups within 15-km ranges give end-game geometry of violently maneuvering bodies with 0.1-0.3 m accuracy.

  6. Hypothesis: increase of the ratio singlet oxygen plus superoxide radical to hydrogen peroxide changes stress defense response to programmed leaf death

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases under different stresses and, by destroying cellular components, may cause cell death. In addition, ROS are part of the complex network of transduction signals that induce defense reactions against stress or, alternatively, trigger programmed cell death, and key questions are the levels of each ROS that, respectively determine defense and death responses of the cell. The answer to those questions is difficult because there are several patterns of cell death that frequently appear mixed and are hardly distinguishable. Moreover, although considerable progresses have been achieved in the determination of the levels of specific ROS, critical questions remain on the ROS level in specific cell compartments. By considering chloroplasts as the main source of ROS in photosynthetic tissues at light, a comparison of the levels in stress and senescence of the chloroplastic activities involved in the generation and scavenging of ROS suggests plausible differences in the levels of specific ROS between stress defense and death. In effect, the three activities of the chlororespiratory chain increase similarly in stress defense response. However, in senescence, superoxide dismutase (SOD), that converts superoxide anion radical (O2∙−) to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2,) decreases, while the thylakoid Ndh complex, that favors the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) and O2∙−, and peroxidase (PX), that consumes H2O2, increase. The obvious inference is that, in respect to defense response, the ratio (1O2 plus O2∙−)/H2O2 is increased in the senescence previous to cell death. We hypothesize that the different ROS ratios, probably through changes in the jasmonic acid/H2O2 ratio, could determine the activation of the defense network or the death network response of the cell. PMID:24324479

  7. Maneuver Design and Calibration for the Genesis Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kenneth E.; Hong, Philip E.; Zietz, Richard P.; Han, Don

    2000-01-01

    Genesis is the fifth mission selected as part of NASA's Discovery Program. The objective of Genesis is to collect solar wind samples for a period of approximately two years while in a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun L I point. At the end of this period, the samples are to be returned to a specific recovery point on the Earth for subsequent analysis. This goal has never been attempted before and presents a formidable challenge in terms of mission design and operations, particularly planning and execution of propulsive maneuvers. To achieve a level of cost-effectiveness consistent with a Discovery-class mission, the Genesis spacecraft design was adapted to the maximum extent possible from designs used on earlier missions, such as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Stardust, another sample collection mission. The spacecraft design for Genesis is shown. Spin stabilization was chosen for attitude control, in lieu of three-axis stabilization, with neither reaction wheels nor accelerometers included. This precludes closed-loop control of propulsive maneuvers and implies that any attitude changes, including spin changes and precessions, will behave like translational propulsive maneuvers and affect the spacecraft trajectory. Moreover, to minimize contamination risk to the samples collected, all thrusters were placed on the side opposite the sample collection canister. The orientation and characteristics of thrusters are indicated. For large maneuvers (>2.5 m/s), two 5 lbf thrusters will be used for delta v, with precession to the burn attitude, followed by spin-up from 1.6 to 10 rpm before the burn and spin down to 1.6 rpm afterwards, then precession back to the original spin attitude. For small maneuvers (<2.5 m/s), no spin change is needed and four 0.2 lbf thrusters are used for Av. Single or double 360 deg. precession changes are required whenever the desired delta v falls inside the two-way turn circle (about 0.4 m/s) based on the mass properties, spin rate and lever arm

  8. Maintaining Aura's Orbit Requirements Under New Maneuver Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Megan; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation consists of five member missions (GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura), each of which maintain a frozen, sun-synchronous orbit with a 16-day repeating ground track that follows the Worldwide Reference System-2 (WRS-2). Under nominal science operations for Aura, the propulsion system is oriented such that the resultant thrust vector is aligned 13.493 degrees away from the velocity vector along the yaw axis. When performing orbit maintenance maneuvers, the spacecraft performs a yaw slew to align the thrust vector in the appropriate direction. A new Drag Make Up (DMU) maneuver operations scheme has been implemented for Aura alleviating the need for the 13.493 degree yaw slew. The focus of this investigation is to assess the impact that no-slew DMU maneuver operations will have on Auras Mean Local Time (MLT) which drives the required along track separation between Aura and the constellation members, as well as Auras frozen orbit properties, eccentricity and argument of perigee. Seven maneuver strategies were analyzed to determine the best operational approach. A mirror pole strategy, with maneuvers alternating at the North and South poles, was implemented operationally to minimize impact to the MLT. Additional analysis determined that the mirror pole strategy could be further modified to include frozen orbit maneuvers and thus maintain both MLT and the frozen orbit properties under no-slew operations

  9. Optimal diving maneuver strategy considering guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianwen; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Bao, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    An optimal maneuver strategy considering terminal guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle in dive phase is investigated in this paper. First, it derives the complete three-dimensional nonlinear coupled motion equation without any approximations based on diving relative motion relationship directly, and converts it into linear decoupled state space equation with the same relative degree by feedback linearization. Second, the diving guidance law is designed based on the decoupled equation to meet the terminal impact point and falling angle constraints. In order to further improve the interception capability, it constructs maneuver control model through adding maneuver control item to the guidance law. Then, an integrated performance index consisting of maximum line-of-sight angle rate and minimum energy consumption is designed, and optimal control is employed to obtain optimal maneuver strategy when the encounter time is determined and undetermined, respectively. Furthermore, the performance index and suboptimal strategy are reconstructed to deal with the control capability constraint and the serous influence on terminal guidance accuracy caused by maneuvering flight. Finally, the approach is tested using the Common Aero Vehicle-H model. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can achieve high precision guidance and effective maneuver at the same time, and the indices are also optimized.

  10. Space Maneuver Vehicle Orbital Mission Planner: Development of Application and Analysis of On-Demand Maneuvering Ability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    unknown situations that arise. In an Airman magazine article, Air Force Chief of Staff General Michael E. Ryan said that "almost all of the Air Force...Sir Isaac Newton first developed the 2BP in 1686 in his oft-cited work. PhilosophiE Naturalis Principia Mathematica , or Principia as it is usually...noncoplanar, and fixed Av maneuvers. These maneuvers offer the ability to change various orbital ele- ments. In general , forces applied within the orbital

  11. Recovery of halo orbit missions in case of contingent station-keeping maneuver delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirobokov, Maksim; Trofimov, Sergey; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates a recovery strategy for halo orbit missions in case of contingent station-keeping maneuver delay. It is assumed that (1) the delay is temporal, and the spacecraft control becomes available after the delay, (2) the thruster is not producing thrust during the delay. The idea behind the recovery strategy is to deliver the spacecraft into the "cheapest-to-get" halo orbit rather than into the reference one. This approach reduces the transfer costs and saves fuel that can be used for future station-keeping maneuvers, thereby increasing the mission lifetime. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the savings and their scattering for each delay time. Families of halo orbits around the Sun-Earth L1 /L2 points and the Earth-Moon L1 /L2 points are considered.

  12. Purging using the Heimlich maneuver among children and adolescents with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Boachie, Ahmed; Kusi Appiah, Edigna; Jubin, Michelle; Jasper, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This case report describes five independent cases of children and adolescents assessed for eating disorders who disclosed using the Heimlich maneuver as a purging technique. The maneuver is meant to be used only in life or death situations, likely once or less in any person's lifetime. A child or adolescent with an eating disorder may be using it to self-induce vomiting on a daily basis, increasing the risk of complications, including potential damage to major organs of the body. Asking patients who purge to elaborate on the methods with which they purge can provide clinicians with fuller information, improving their ability to select appropriate medical tests and interventions. Thorough investigations of physical complaints during the patient assessment may be warranted, including examining patients for possible rib fractures, hemorrhages, perforations of the hollow viscous, and other forms of blunt abdominal traumas.

  13. A Study of Airplane Maneuvers with Special Reference to Angular Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J E

    1923-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics for the purpose of increasing our knowledge on the behavior of the airplane during various maneuvers and to obtain values of the maximum angular velocities and accelerations in flight. The method consisted in flying a JN4H airplane through various maneuvers while records were being taken of the control position, the air speed, the angular velocity and the acceleration along the Z axis. The results showed that the maximum angular velocity about the X axis of radians per second in a barrel roll. The maximum angular acceleration about the X axis of -2.10 radians per (second) to the 2nd power occurred in a spin, while the maximum about the Y axis was 1.40 radians per (second) to the 2nd power when pulling suddenly out of a dive. These results have direct application to the design of airplane parts, such as propeller shaft and instruments.

  14. Reactive oxygen species production induced by ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases because of a dysfunctional mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gallardo, Rocio V; Briones, Luis S; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L; Gutiérrez, Sergio; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Campos-García, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol accumulation during fermentation contributes to the toxic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, impairing its viability and fermentative capabilities. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis is encoded by the ISC genes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is associated with iron release from Fe-S-containing enzymes. We evaluated ethanol toxicity, ROS generation, antioxidant response and mitochondrial integrity in S. cerevisiae ISC mutants. These mutants showed an impaired tolerance to ethanol. ROS generation increased substantially when ethanol accumulated at toxic concentrations under the fermentation process. At the cellular and mitochondrial levels, ROS were increased in yeast treated with ethanol and increased to a higher level in the ssq1∆, isa1∆, iba57∆ and grx5∆ mutants - hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were the main molecules detected. Additionally, ethanol treatment decreased GSH/GSSG ratio and increased catalase activity in the ISC mutants. Examination of cytochrome c integrity indicated that mitochondrial apoptosis was triggered following ethanol treatment. The findings indicate that the mechanism of ethanol toxicity occurs via ROS generation dependent on ISC assembly system functionality. In addition, mutations in the ISC genes in S. cerevisiae contribute to the increase in ROS concentration at the mitochondrial and cellular level, leading to depletion of the antioxidant responses and finally to mitochondrial apoptosis.

  15. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-04-15

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres.

  16. A new alpha-globin variant with increased oxygen affinity in a Swiss family: Hb Frauenfeld [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe, TCC>TTC (alpha 2)].

    PubMed

    Hochuli, Michel; Zurbriggen, Karin; Schmid, Marlis; Speer, Oliver; Rochat, Philippe; Frauchiger, Beat; Kleinert, Peter; Schmugge, Markus; Troxler, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A new alpha-globin mutation [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe] was found in a 55-year-old male proband with an erythrocytosis known since his youth. Cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed an additional peak eluting slightly before Hb A indicating the presence of a variant. The peak area of the variant was approximately one-third that of Hb A suggesting an alpha-globin variant. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the mutation at the protein level. The variant is also detectable with isoelectric focusing and reversed phase HPLC. DNA analysis revealed a heterozygous sequence mutation at codon 138 of the alpha2 gene. A C>T transition at the second nucleotide of the codon indicated a Ser-->Phe exchange. The variant showed increased oxygen affinity and was named Hb Frauenfeld.

  17. Novel ternary vanadium-betaine-peroxido species suppresses H-ras and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression by increasing reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Petanidis, Savvas; Kioseoglou, Efrosini; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2013-07-28

    Vanadium is known for its antitumorigenicity. Poised to investigate the impact of well-defined forms of vanadium on processes and specific biomolecules (oncogenes-proteins) involved in cancer cell physiology, a novel ternary V(V)-peroxido-betaine compound was employed in experiments targeting cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, H-ras signaling, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression in human breast cancer epithelial and lung adenocarcinoma cells. The results reveal that vanadium imparts a significant decrease in cancer cell viability, reducing H-ras and MMP-2 expression by increasing ROS-mediated apoptosis, distinctly emphasizing the nature, structure and properties of ternary ligands on vanadium anti-tumor activity and its future potential as a metallodrug.

  18. Taurocholate-induced nitric oxide signaling and the ensuing production of reactive oxygen species lead to an increase in epithelial permeability in cultivated mouse gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Harri; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Paimela, Hannu; Mentula, Panu; Kemppainen, Esko; Kivilaakso, Eero

    2008-12-01

    We have here elucidated whether ulcerogenic agents affect the production of NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ulcerogenic agents dose dependently induced NO and ROS production in mouse gastric epithelial cells. Taurocholate (TC, 5 mM) exposure did not affect cell viability, but it increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, NO production, ROS production, and epithelial permeability. Epithelial permeability was inhibited with NOS inhibitors or antioxidants. Oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and ethanol was not inhibited with NOS inhibitors. ASA induced ROS production even at low concentrations (1 mM), which did not affect cell viability. Ethanol-induced ROS production was linked to cell viability, suggesting direct oxidative stress caused by ethanol. Taurocholate-induced NO signaling and the ensuing production of ROS might contribute to initiation of defensive or adaptive cellular mechanisms. ASA-induced ROS signaling might have similar effects, whereas ethanol induced direct oxidative stress, having an influence on cell viability.

  19. Oral glucose before venepuncture relieves neonates of pain, but stress is still evidenced by increase in oxygen consumption, energy expenditure, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karl; Ketteler, Jörg; Hellwig, Magdalena; Laurenz, Maren; Versmold, Hans

    2004-04-01

    Oral glucose was recommended as pain therapy during venepuncture in neonates. It is unclear whether this intervention reduces excess oxygen consumption (o(2)), energy loss, or cardiovascular destabilization associated with venepuncture, and whether <2 mL glucose solution is effective. We tested the hypothesis that oral glucose solution attenuates the increases in neonatal oxygen consumption, energy expenditure (EE), and heart rate associated with venepuncture for two different volumes of glucose solution (2 and 0.4 mL). In this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, 58 neonates (gestational age, 31-42 wk; postnatal age, 1-7 d) were randomized to 2 mL glucose 30%, 0.4 mL glucose 30%, or 2 mL water by mouth before venepuncture. The videotaped behavioral pain reactions were scored with the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Cry duration, o(2), EE (indirect calorimetry), and heart rate were measured. The 2 mL glucose solution reduced pain score and crying after venepuncture compared with controls [median pain score, 5.5 (interquartile range, 4-9) versus 11 (7-12), p = 0.01; median duration of first cry, 0 s (0-43 s) versus 13 s (2-47 s), p < 0.05, respectively]. The 0.4 mL glucose solution had no effect. The 2 mL glucose solution did not attenuate the o(2) increase during venepuncture (1.5 +/- 0.2 mL/kg min (water) versus 1.7 +/- 0.5 (0.4 mL glucose) versus 1.1 +/- 0.2 (2 mL glucose) (mean +/- SEM) nor EE nor heart rate. We conclude that oral administration of 2 mL glucose 30% before venepuncture reduced pain expression and crying, but did not prevent the rise in o(2), EE, or heart rate. Alternative therapies against the stress of nonpainful handling during venepuncture should be explored.

  20. An Overview of Suomi NPP VIIRS Calibration Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Barnes, Robert A.; Patt, Frederick S.; Sun, Junqiang; Chiang, Kwofu

    2012-01-01

    The first Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was successfully launched on-board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft on October 28, 2011. Suomi NPP VIIRS observations are made in 22 spectral bands, from the visible (VIS) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR), and are used to produce 22 Environmental Data Records (EDRs) with a broad range of scientific applications. The quality of these VIIRS EDRs strongly depends on the quality of its calibrated and geo-located Sensor Date Records (SDRs). Built with a strong heritage to the NASA's EOS MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the VIIRS is calibrated on-orbit using a similar set of on-board calibrators (OBC), including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody (BB) for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). On-orbit maneuvers of the SNPP spacecraft provide additional calibration and characterization data from the VIIRS instrument which cannot be obtained pre-launch and are required to produce the highest quality SDRs. These include multi-orbit yaw maneuvers for the characterization of SD and SDSM screen transmission, quasi-monthly roll maneuvers to acquire lunar observations to track sensor degradation in the visible through shortwave infrared, and a driven pitch-over maneuver to acquire multiple scans of deep space to determine TEB response versus scan angle (RVS). This paper pro-vides an overview of these three SNPP calibration maneuvers. Discussions are focused on their potential calibration and science benefits, pre-launch planning activities, and on-orbit scheduling and implementation strategies. Results from calibration maneuvers performed during the Intensive Calibration and Validation (ICV) period for the VIIRS sensor are illustrated. Also presented in this paper are lessons learned regarding the implementation of calibration spacecraft maneuvers on follow

  1. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  2. The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Wang, Chia-To; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2016-06-14

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common complaints encountered in clinics and is strongly correlated with advanced age or, possibly, degeneration. Redistribution exercises are the most effective approaches to treat BPPV, and canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) cure most BPPV cases. However, the mechanisms through which the treatment modulates systemic molecules in BPPV patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that the miR-34a and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) genes correlated with the treatment effects of CRP in BPPV subjects. We found that miR-34a expression was largely inhibited and SIRT1 expression was significantly reversed after BPPV maneuver treatment. We also confirmed that the PPAR-γ, PGC-1 and FoxO gene expressions were decreased immediately after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for BPPV, and were largely increased after a complete cure of BPPV. Moreover, we observed that after a complete recovery of BPPV, the ROS concentrations, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression levels were attenuated. We conclude that BPPV treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status.

  3. The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Wang, Chia-To; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common complaints encountered in clinics and is strongly correlated with advanced age or, possibly, degeneration. Redistribution exercises are the most effective approaches to treat BPPV, and canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) cure most BPPV cases. However, the mechanisms through which the treatment modulates systemic molecules in BPPV patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that the miR-34a and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) genes correlated with the treatment effects of CRP in BPPV subjects. We found that miR-34a expression was largely inhibited and SIRT1 expression was significantly reversed after BPPV maneuver treatment. We also confirmed that the PPAR-γ, PGC-1 and FoxO gene expressions were decreased immediately after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for BPPV, and were largely increased after a complete cure of BPPV. Moreover, we observed that after a complete recovery of BPPV, the ROS concentrations, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression levels were attenuated. We conclude that BPPV treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status. PMID:27203679

  4. MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO project will further develop a multi-functional small satellite technology for low-power attitude control, or orientation, of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept initially developed in 2013, is a thermal valving system which utilizes capillary forces in a microchannel to offset internal pressures in a bulk fluid. The local vapor pressure is increased by resistive film heating until it exceeds meniscus strength in a nozzle which induces vacuum boiling and provides a stagnation pressure equal to vapor pressure at that point which is used for propulsion. Interplanetary CubeSats can utilize FEMTA for high slew rate attitude corrections in addition to desaturating reaction wheels. The FEMTA in cooling mode can be used for thermal control during high-power communication events, which are likely to accompany the attitude correction. Current small satellite propulsion options are limited to orbit correction whereas picosatellites are lacking attitude control thrusters. The available attitude control systems are either quickly saturated reaction wheels or movable high drag surfaces with long response times.

  5. Left Ventricular Transmural Gradient in Mitochondrial Respiration Is Associated with Increased Sub-Endocardium Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Productions

    PubMed Central

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Hoang Minh, Tam; Charles, Anne-Laure; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Zoll, Joffrey; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricle (LV) transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration has been recently reported. However, to date, the physiological mechanisms involved in the lower endocardium mitochondrial respiration chain capacity still remain to be determined. Since, nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression in the heart has spatial heterogeneity and might impair mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential association between LV transmural NO and mitochondrial function gradient. Methods: Maximal oxidative capacity (VMax) and relative contributions of the respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VSucc) and IV (VTMPD), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase activity), coupling, NO (electron paramagnetic resonance), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining) were determined in rat sub-endocardium (Endo) and sub-epicardium (Epi). Further, the effect of a direct NO donor (MAHMA NONOate) on maximal mitochondrial respiratory rates (Vmax) was determined. Results: Mitochondrial respiratory chain activities were reduced in the Endo compared with the Epi (−16.92%; P = 0.04 for Vmax and –18.73%; P = 0.02, for Vsucc, respectively). NO production was two-fold higher in the Endo compared with the Epi (P = 0.002) and interestingly, increasing NO concentration reduced Vmax. Mitochondrial H2O2 and LV ROS productions were significantly increased in Endo compared to Epi, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial coupling being similar in the two layers. Conclusions: LV mitochondrial respiration transmural gradient is likely related to NO and possibly ROS increased production in the sub-endocardium. PMID:27582709

  6. Reducing Pointing Errors During Cassini Reaction Control System Orbit Trim Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of altering a gain parameter in the Cassini reaction control system (RCS) delta-V controller on the maneuver execution errors during orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) is explored. Cassini consists of two reaction control thruster branches (A & B) each with eight thrusters. Currently, the B-branch is operational while the A-branch serves as a back-up. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. During an OTM, the Z-thrusters fire to maintain the X and Y-axes pointing within an attitude control dead-zone (-10 to 10 milliradians). The errors do not remain at zero due to pointing error sources such as spacecraft center of mass offset from the geometric center of the Z-facing thrusters, and variability in the thruster forces due to the thruster hardware differences. The delta-V reaction control system (RCS) controller ensures that the attitude error remains within this dead-zone. Gain parameters within the RCS delta-V controller affect the maneuver execution errors. Different parameter values are used to explore effect on these errors. It is found that pointing error decreases and magnitude error increases rapidly for gain parameters 10 times greater than the current parameter values used in the flight software.

  7. Pursuit-evasion games with information uncertainties for elusive orbital maneuver and space object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Dan; Jia, Bin; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops and evaluates a pursuit-evasion (PE) game approach for elusive orbital maneuver and space object tracking. Unlike the PE games in the literature, where the assumption is that either both players have perfect knowledge of the opponents' positions or use primitive sensing models, the proposed PE approach solves the realistic space situation awareness (SSA) problem with imperfect information, where the evaders will exploit the pursuers' sensing and tracking models to confuse their opponents by maneuvering their orbits to increase the uncertainties, which the pursuers perform orbital maneuvers to minimize. In the game setup, each game player P (pursuer) and E (evader) has its own motion equations with a small continuous low-thrust. The magnitude of the low thrust is fixed and the direction can be controlled by the associated game player. The entropic uncertainty is used to generate the cost functions of game players. The Nash or mixed Nash equilibrium is composed of the directional controls of low-thrusts. Numerical simulations are emulated to demonstrate the performance. Simplified perturbations models (SGP4/SDP4) are exploited to calculate the ground truth of the satellite states (position and speed).

  8. Exploring precrash maneuvers using classification trees and random forests.

    PubMed

    Harb, Rami; Yan, Xuedong; Radwan, Essam; Su, Xiaogang

    2009-01-01

    Taking evasive actions vis-à-vis critical traffic situations impending to motor vehicle crashes endows drivers an opportunity to avoid the crash occurrence or at least diminish its severity. This study explores the drivers, vehicles, and environments' characteristics associated with crash avoidance maneuvers (i.e., evasive actions or no evasive actions). Rear-end collisions, head-on collisions, and angle collisions are analyzed separately using decision trees and the significance of the variables on the binary response variable (evasive actions or no evasive actions) is determined. Moreover, the random forests method is employed to rank the importance of the drivers/vehicles/environments characteristics on crash avoidance maneuvers. According to the exploratory analyses' results, drivers' visibility obstruction, drivers' physical impairment, drivers' distraction are associated with crash avoidance maneuvers in all three types of accidents. Moreover, speed limit is associated with rear-end collisions' avoidance maneuvers and vehicle type is correlated with head-on collisions and angle collisions' avoidance maneuvers. It is recommended that future research investigates further the explored trends (e.g., physically impaired drivers, visibility obstruction) using driving simulators which may help in legislative initiatives and in-vehicle technology recommendations.

  9. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  10. Synergistic catalytic properties of bifunctional nanoalloy catalysts in rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ning; Ng, Mei Shan; Shan, Shiyao; Wu, Jinfang; Zhao, Wei; Yin, Jun; Fang, Weiqing; Luo, Jin; Petkov, Valeri; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of factors influencing the performance of catalysts in the air cathode of a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery, including overpotentials for oxygen reduction/evolution and discharge capacity, is essential for exploration of its ultimate application. This report describes new findings of an investigation of PdCu nanoalloys as cathode catalysts. Alloying Pd with oxophilic base metals such as Cu leads to reduction of the overpotentials and increase of the discharge capacity. The nanoalloy structures depend on the bimetallic composition, with an atomic ratio near 50:50 featuring mixed bcc and fcc structures. The discharge potential exhibits a maximum while the charge potential display a minimum in the range of 20-50% Cu, closer to 25% Cu, both of which correspond to a maximum reduction of the discharge-charge overpotentials. The discharge capacity displays a gradual increase with Cu%. This type of catalytic synergy is believed to be associated with a combination of ensemble and ligand effects. In particular, the activation of oxygen on Pd sites and oxygen oxophilicity at the alloyed Cu sites in the catalyst may have played an important role in effectively activating oxygen and maneuvering surface superoxide/peroxide species. These findings have implications for the design of multifunctional cathode catalysts in rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries.

  11. Increased reactive oxygen species production down-regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha pathway in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Agatha; Alegret, Marta; Sanchez, Rosa M; Adzet, Tomas; Laguna, Juan C; Carrera, Manuel Vazquez

    2002-03-22

    Generation of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases involving intracellular lipid accumulation. To explore the mechanisms leading to these pathologies we tested the effects of etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which contains a fatty acid-derived structure, in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Etomoxir treatment for 24 h resulted in a down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) mRNA expression, achieving an 87% reduction at 80 microm etomoxir. The mRNA levels of most of the PPARalpha target genes studied were reduced at 100 microm etomoxir. By using several inhibitors of de novo ceramide synthesis and C(2)-ceramide we showed that they were not involved in the effects of etomoxir. Interestingly, the addition of triacsin C, a potent inhibitor of acyl-CoA synthetase, to etomoxir-treated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells did not prevent the down-regulation in PPARalpha mRNA levels, suggesting that the active form of the drug, etomoxir-CoA, was not involved. Given that saturated fatty acids may generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), we determined whether the addition of etomoxir resulted in ROS generation. Etomoxir increased ROS production and the activity of the well known redox transcription factor NF-kappaB. In the presence of the pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity, etomoxir did not down-regulate PPARalpha mRNA in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. These results indicate that ROS generation and NF-kappaB activation are responsible for the down-regulation of PPARalpha and may provide a new mechanism by which intracellular lipid accumulation occurs in skeletal muscle cells.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  13. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  14. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  15. Effect of increased cardiac output on liver blood flow, oxygen exchange and metabolic rate during longterm endotoxin-induced shock in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Šantak, Borislav; Radermacher, Peter; Adler, Jens; Iber, Thomas; Rieger, Karen M; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Georgieff, Michael; Träger, Karl

    1998-01-01

    We investigated hepatic blood flow, O2 exchange and metabolism in porcine endotoxic shock (Control, n=8; Endotoxin, n=10) with administration of hydroxyethylstarch to maintain arterial pressure (MAP)>60 mmHg. Before and 12, 18 and 24 h after starting continuous i.v. endotoxin we measured portal venous and hepatic arterial blood flow, intracapillary haemoglobin O2 saturation (Hb-O2%) of the liver surface and arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate, pyruvate, glyercol and alanine concentrations. Glucose production rate was derived from the plasma isotope enrichment during infusion of [6,6-2H2]-glucose. Despite a sustained 50% increase in cardiac output endotoxin caused a progressive, significant fall in MAP. Liver blood flow significantly increased, but endotoxin affected neither hepatic O2 delivery and uptake nor mean intracapillary Hb-O2% and Hb-O2% frequency distributions. Endotoxin nearly doubled endogenous glucose production rate while hepatic lactate, alanine and glycerol uptake rates progressively decreased significantly. The lactate uptake rate even became negative (P<0.05 vs Control). Endotoxin caused portal and hepatic venous pH to fall significantly concomitant with significantly increased arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate/pyruvate ratios. During endotoxic shock increased cardiac output achieved by colloid infusion maintained elevated liver blood flow and thereby macro- and microcirculatory O2 supply. Glucose production rate nearly doubled with complete dissociation of hepatic uptake of glucogenic precursors and glucose release. Despite well-preserved capillary oxygenation increased lactate/pyruvate ratios reflecting impaired cytosolic redox state suggested deranged liver energy balance, possibly due to the O2 requirements of gluconeogenesis. PMID:9756385

  16. Insights on the antitumor effects of kahweol on human breast cancer: Decreased survival and increased production of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Kahweol inhibits growth and attachment-independent proliferation of tumor cells. • Kahweol induces apoptosis in MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells. • Kahweol-induced apoptosis involves caspase activation and cytochrome c release. • Kahweol does not protect against hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. • Kahweol increases hydrogen peroxide production by human breast cancer cells. - Abstract: The present study aims to identify the modulatory effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene present in coffee beans, on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Kahweol inhibits tumor cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induces apoptosis in several kinds of human tumor cells. In the estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB231 human breast cancer, the mentioned effects are accompanied by caspases 3/7 and 9 activation and cytochrome c release. On the other hand, kahweol increases the production of reactive oxygen species and their cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells but not in normal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that kahweol is an antitumor compound with inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth and survival, especially against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases reactive oxygen species by inducing spermine oxidase in human lung epithelial cells: a potential mechanism for inflammation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Naveen; Casero, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the development of many human epithelial cancers, including those of the stomach, lung, colon, and prostate. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent pleiotropic, proinflammatory cytokine produced by many cells in response to injury and inflammation. Here, we show that TNF-alpha exposure results in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with a concomitant increase in the production of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, a marker for oxidative DNA damage, in human lung bronchial epithelial cells. The source of the ROS in TNF-alpha-treated cells was determined by both pharmacologic and small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategies to be spermine oxidase (SMO/PAOh1). SMO/PAOh1 oxidizes spermine into spermidine, 3-aminopropanal, and H(2)O(2). Inhibition of TNF-alpha-induced SMO/PAOh1 activity with MDL 72,527 or with a targeted siRNA prevented ROS production and oxidative DNA damage. Further, similar induction in SMO/PAOh1 is observed with treatment of another inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6. The data are consistent with a model that directly links inflammation and DNA damage through the production of H(2)O(2) by SMO/PAOh1. Further, these results suggest a common mechanism by which inflammation from multiple sources can lead to the mutagenic changes necessary for the development and progression of epithelial cancers.

  18. Upregulation of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 in hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 via increase in reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parag; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Hegel, Cornelia; Bader, Lucius; Rose, Frank; Fink, Ludger; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Seeger, Werner; Hänze, Jörg

    2004-05-15

    Hypoxia sensing and related signaling events, including activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), represent key features in cell physiology and lung function. Using cultured A549 cells, we investigated the role of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 (Nox1), suggested to be a subunit of a low-output NAD(P)H oxidase complex, in hypoxia signaling. Nox1 expression was detected on both the mRNA and protein levels. Upregulation of Nox1 mRNA and protein occurred during hypoxia, accompanied by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. A549 cells, which were transfected with a Nox1 expression vector, revealed an increase in ROS generation accompanied by activation of HIF-1-dependent target gene expression (heme oxygenase 1 mRNA, hypoxia-responsive-element reporter gene activity). In A549 cells stably overexpressing Nox1, accumulation of HIF-1alpha in normoxia and an additional increase in hypoxia were noted. Interference with ROS metabolism by the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and catalase inhibited HIF-1 induction. This suggests that H2O2 links Nox1 and HIF-1 activation. We conclude that hypoxic upregulation of Nox1 and subsequently augmented ROS generation may activate HIF-1-dependent pathways.

  19. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  20. Co-occurring increases of calcium and organellar reactive oxygen species determine differential activation of antioxidant and defense enzymes in Ulva compressa (Chlorophyta) exposed to copper excess.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alberto; Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; Dennett, Geraldine; Mellado, Macarena; Morales, Bernardo; Correa, Juan A; Moenne, Alejandra

    2010-10-01

    In order to analyse copper-induced calcium release and (reactive oxygen species) ROS accumulation and their role in antioxidant and defense enzymes activation, the marine alga Ulva compressa was exposed to 10 µM copper for 7 d. The level of calcium, extracellular hydrogen peroxide (eHP), intracellular hydrogen peroxide (iHP) and superoxide anions (SA) as well as the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (AP), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were determined. Calcium release showed a triphasic pattern with peaks at 2, 3 and 12 h. The second peak was coincident with increases in eHP and iHP and the third peak with the second increase of iHP. A delayed wave of SA occurred after day 3 and was not accompanied by calcium release. The accumulation of iHP and SA was mainly inhibited by organellar electron transport chains inhibitors (OETCI), whereas calcium release was inhibited by ryanodine. AP activation ceased almost completely after the use of OETCI. On the other hand, GR and GST activities were partially inhibited, whereas defense enzymes were not inhibited. In contrast, PAL and LOX were inhibited by ryanodine, whereas AP was not inhibited. Thus, copper stress induces calcium release and organellar ROS accumulation that determine the differential activation of antioxidant and defense enzymes.

  1. Oxygen-glucose deprivation increases firing of unipolar brush cells and enhances spontaneous EPSCs in Purkinje cells in the vestibulo-cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Yukihiro; Shino, Masato; Nikkuni, Osamu; Yoshida, Yukari; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are excitatory interneurons in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex, which are predominantly distributed in the vestibulo-cerebellar region. The unique firing properties and synaptic connections of UBCs may underlie lobular heterogeneity of excitability in the granular layer and the susceptibility to ischemia-induced excitotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on the firing properties of UBCs and granule cells and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) of Purkinje cells using whole-cell recordings. Short-term OGD induced increases in spontaneous firing of UBCs by causing membrane depolarization via the activation of NMDA receptors. UBC firing indirectly affected Purkinje cells by altering parallel fiber inputs of a subset granule cells, resulting in a marked increase in sEPSCs in Purkinje cells in vestibulo-cerebellar lobules IX-X, but not in lobules IV-VI, which have fewer UBCs. Similarly, the frequency and amplitude of sEPSCs in Purkinje cells were significantly greater in lobules IX-X than in IV-VI, even in control conditions. These results reveal that UBCs play key roles in regulating local excitability in the granular layer, resulting in lobular heterogeneity in the susceptibility to ischemic insult in the cerebellum.

  2. Attitude-Control Algorithm for Minimizing Maneuver Execution Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet

    2008-01-01

    A G-RAC attitude-control algorithm is used to minimize maneuver execution error in a spacecraft with a flexible appendage when said spacecraft must induce translational momentum by firing (in open loop) large thrusters along a desired direction for a given period of time. The controller is dynamic with two integrators and requires measurement of only the angular position and velocity of the spacecraft. The global stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed without having access to the states describing the dynamics of the appendage and with severe saturation in the available torque. Spacecraft apply open-loop thruster firings to induce a desired translational momentum with an extended appendage. This control algorithm will assist this maneuver by stabilizing the attitude dynamics around a desired orientation, and consequently minimize the maneuver execution errors.

  3. A Maneuvering Flight Noise Model for Helicopter Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Rau, Robert; May, Benjamin; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A new model for estimating the noise radiation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. The model applies the Quasi-Static Acoustic Mapping (Q-SAM) method to a database of acoustic spheres generated using the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique. A method is developed to generate a realistic flight trajectory from a limited set of waypoints and is used to calculate the quasi-static operating condition and corresponding acoustic sphere for the vehicle throughout the maneuver. By using a previously computed database of acoustic spheres, the acoustic impact of proposed helicopter operations can be rapidly predicted for use in mission-planning. The resulting FRAME-QS model is applied to near-horizon noise measurements collected for the Bell 430 helicopter undergoing transient pitch up and roll maneuvers, with good agreement between the measured data and the FRAME-QS model.

  4. Impulse generated during unsteady maneuvering of swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2007-11-01

    The relationship between the maneuvering kinematics of a Giant Danio ( Danio aequipinnatus) and the resulting vortical wake is investigated for a rapid, ‘C’-start maneuver using fully time-resolved (500 Hz) particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV illuminates the two distinct vortices formed during the turn. The fish body rotation is facilitated by the initial, or “maneuvering” vortex formation, and the final fish velocity is augmented by the strength of the second, “propulsive” vortex. Results confirm that the axisymmetric vortex ring model is reasonable to use in calculating the hydrodynamic impulse acting on the fish. The total linear momentum change of the fish from its initial swimming trajectory to its final swimming trajectory is balanced by the vector sum of the impulses of both vortex rings. The timing of vortex formation is uniquely synchronized with the fish motion, and the choreography of the maneuver is addressed in the context of the resulting hydrodynamic forces.

  5. On spacecraft maneuvers control subject to propellant engine modes.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H

    2015-09-01

    The paper attempts to address a new control approach to spacecraft maneuvers based upon the modes of propellant engine. A realization of control strategy is now presented in engine on mode (high thrusts as well as further low thrusts), which is related to small angle maneuvers and engine off mode (specified low thrusts), which is also related to large angle maneuvers. There is currently a coarse-fine tuning in engine on mode. It is shown that the process of handling the angular velocities are finalized via rate feedback system in engine modes, where the angular rotations are controlled through quaternion based control (QBCL)strategy in engine off mode and these ones are also controlled through an optimum PID (OPIDH) strategy in engine on mode.

  6. Operational Challenges In TDRS Post-Maneuver Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, Jason; Myers, Jessica; Ward, Douglas; Lamb, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) is responsible for daily and post maneuver orbit determination for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The most stringent requirement for this orbit determination is 75 meters total position accuracy (3-sigma) predicted over one day for Terra's onboard navigation system. To maintain an accurate solution onboard Terra, a solution is generated and provided by the FDF Four hours after a TDRS maneuver. A number of factors present challenges to this support, such as maneuver prediction uncertainty and potentially unreliable tracking from User satellities. Reliable support is provided by comparing an extended Kalman Filter (estimated using ODTK) against a Batch Least Squares system (estimated using GTDS).

  7. New therapeutic maneuver for anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Hain, Timothy C; Gualtieri, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the clinical features of anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) and a new therapeutic maneuver for its management. Our study was a retrospective review of cases from an ambulatory tertiary referral center. Thirteen patients afflicted with positional paroxysmal vertigo exhibiting brief positional down-beating nystagmus in positional tests (Dix-Hallpike and head-hanging position) were treated with a maneuver comprised of the following movements: Sequential head positioning beginning supine with head hanging 30 degrees dependent with respect to the body, then supine with head inclined 30 degrees forward, and ending sitting with head 30 degrees forward. All cases showed excellent therapeutic response to our repositioning procedure, i.e. relief of vertigo and elimination of nystagmus. The maneuver described is an option for AC-BPPV treatment.

  8. Acute aortic thrombosis following incorrect application of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Mack, Lloyd; Forbes, Thomas L; Harris, Kenneth A

    2002-01-01

    The Heimlich maneuver has been widely accepted as a safe and effective method of relieving life-threatening foreign-body upper airway obstruction. When applied incorrectly, however, it may result in direct trauma to the intraabdominal viscera. Only two cases of major aortic complications have been reported. Both have involved thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. We report two further instances of aortic thrombotic complications due to the incorrect application of the Heimlich maneuver. The first case resulted in thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the second case the abdominal thrusts caused dislodgement of thrombus from an atherosclerotic nonaneurysmal aorta, which resulted in thromboembolic occlusion of both lower extremities. In both cases, as with the two previously reported instances, massive reperfusion injury resulted, which eventually proved fatal. When applied incorrectly, the Heimlich maneuver may result in direct trauma to the abdominalaorta and is an unusual cause of acute aortic thrombosis.

  9. How to Maneuver Around in Eccentricity Vector Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2010-01-01

    The GRAIL mission to the Moon will be the first time that two separate robotic orbiters will be placed into formation in orbit around a body other than Earth. The need to design an efficient series of maneuvers to shape the orbits and phasing of the two orbiters after arrival presents a significant challenge to mission designers. This paper presents a simple geometric method for relating in-plane impulsive maneuvers to changes in the eccentricity vector, which determines the shape and orientation of an orbit in the orbit plane. Examples then show how such maneuvers can accommodate desired changes to other orbital elements such as period, incination, and longitude of the ascending node.

  10. Effects of abdominal stabilization maneuvers on the control of spine motion and stability against sudden trunk perturbations.

    PubMed

    Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Elvira, José L L; Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2007-10-01

    Much discussion exists about which is the most effective technique to improve spine stability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of abdominal bracing and abdominal hollowing maneuvers to control spine motion and stability against rapid perturbations. Eleven healthy males were posteriorly loaded in different experimental conditions: resting with no knowledge of the perturbation timing; performing each of the stabilization maneuvers at 10%, 15% and 20% of internal oblique maximum voluntary contraction with no knowledge of the perturbation timing; and naturally coactivating the trunk muscles when perturbation timing was known. An EMG biofeedback system was used to control the pattern and intensity of abdominal coactivation. The muscular preactivation of seven trunk muscles (bilaterally registered), the applied force, and the torso muscular and kinematic responses to loading were measured; and the spine stability and compression were modeled. The hollowing maneuver was not effective for reducing the kinematic response to sudden perturbation. On the contrary, the bracing maneuver fostered torso cocontraction, reduced lumbar displacement, and increased trunk stability, but at the cost of increasing spinal compression. When the timing of the perturbation was known, the participants were able to stabilize the trunk while imposing smaller spine compressive loads.

  11. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer C; Crecelius, Anne R; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-07-15

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise, but increased FBF (199 ± 13 vs. 248 ± 16 ml/min and 343 ± 24 vs. 403 ± 33 ml/min; P < 0.05) and V̇o2 (26 ± 2 vs. 34 ± 3 ml/min and 43 ± 4 vs. 50 ± 5 ml/min; P < 0.05) at both 15 and 25% MVC, respectively. The increased FBF was due to elevations in forearm vascular conductance (FVC). In protocol 2 (n = 10; 63 ± 2 yr), following AA, FBF was similarly elevated during 15% MVC (∼ 20%); however, vasoconstriction to reflex increases in sympathetic activity during -40 mmHg lower-body negative pressure at rest (ΔFVC: -16 ± 3 vs. -16 ± 2%) or during 15% MVC (ΔFVC: -12 ± 2 vs. -11 ± 4%) was unchanged. Our collective results indicate that acute oral ingestion of AA improves muscle blood flow and V̇o2 during exercise in older adults via local vasodilation.

  12. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    PubMed

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  13. A prescription for the Epley maneuver: www.youtube.com?

    PubMed Central

    Burke, James F.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Fife, Terry D.; Baloh, Robert W.; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Video-sharing Web sites are being used for information about common conditions including dizziness. The Epley maneuver (EM) is a simple and effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the posterior canal. However, the maneuver is underused in routine care. In this study, we aimed to describe and analyze the available information about the EM on youtube.com. Methods: A YouTube search was performed on August 31, 2011, for videos that demonstrated the entire EM. Detailed data were abstracted from each video and corresponding Web site. Videos were rated on the accuracy of the maneuver by 2 authors, with differences resolved by adjudication. Comments posted by viewers were assessed for themes regarding video use. Results: Of the 3,319 videos identified, 33 demonstrated the EM. The total number of hits for all videos was 2,755,607. The video with the most hits (802,471) was produced by the American Academy of Neurology. Five of the videos accounted for 85% of all the hits. The maneuver demonstration was rated as accurate in 64% (21) of the videos. Themes derived from the 424 posted comments included patients self-treating with the maneuver after reviewing the videos, and providers using the videos as a prescribed treatment or for educational purposes. Conclusion: Accurate video demonstration of the Epley maneuver is available and widely viewed on YouTube. Video-sharing media may be an important way to disseminate effective interventions such as the EM. The impact of video Web sites on outcomes and costs of care is not known and warrants future study. PMID:22826542

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). He is wearing a pressure suit for this run of the M509 experiment, but other ASMU tests are done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  15. Electric propulsion for constellation deployment and spacecraft maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Vondra, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the near-term (1990s) advantages of electric propulsion for two SDI missions: (1) the launch of a constellation of spacecraft, and (2) continual spacecraft defensive maneuvering. Ammonia arcjet and Xe-ion electric propulsion systems are compared to advanced chemical propulsion for each of these missions. The number of launch vehicles required for constellation deployment can be reduced by up to a factor of 2 when electric propulsion upper stages are used in place of advanced upper stages. Electric propulsion can provide significant benefits when used for continuous defensive maneuvering by enabling a large reduction in the initial spacecraft mass.

  16. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Snider, Royce; Greenwood, Eric; Baden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A cooperative flight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July, 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 data points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive data base of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone configurations with up to 31 microphones in each configuration were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included DGPS, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test.

  17. Traumatic rupture of the stomach secondary to Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Dupre, M W; Silva, E; Brotman, S

    1993-11-01

    The case of a 93-year-old man who received a Heimlich maneuver while choking is reported. After the procedure, the patient presented with abdominal pain and ultimately was found to have developed a gastric rupture. He was hospitalized for 66 days. Review of the literature showed that only four gastric perforations related to the Heimlich maneuver have been documented. Other complications have occurred. It is reasonable to perform the procedure as an alternative to asphyxiation, but emergency physicians must be aware of the fact that life-threatening complications may ensue.

  18. Persistent Mitochondrial Hyperpolarization, Increased Reactive Oxygen Intermediate Production, and Cytoplasmic Alkalinization Characterize Altered IL-10 Signaling in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus1

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Peter; Niland, Brian; Gonchoroff, Nick; Pullmann, Rudolf; Phillips, Paul E.; Perl, Andras

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal death signaling in lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been associated with elevation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) and increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). The resultant ATP depletion sensitizes T cells for necrosis that may significantly contribute to inflammation in patients with SLE. In the present study, the role of mitochondrial signal processing in T cell activation was investigated. CD3/CD28 costimulation of PBL elicited transient mitochondrial hyperpolarization and intracellular pH (pHi) elevation, followed by increased ROI production. Baseline Δψm, ROI production, and pHi were elevated, while T cell activation-induced changes were blunted in 15 patients with SLE in comparison with 10 healthy donors and 10 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Similar to CD3/CD28 costimulation, treatment of control PBL with IL-3, IL-10, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ led to transient Δψm elevation. IL-10 had diametrically opposing effects on mitochondrial signaling in lupus and control donors. Unlike healthy or rheumatoid arthritis PBL, cells of lupus patients were resistant to IL-10-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization. By contrast, IL-10 enhanced ROI production and cell death in lupus PBL without affecting ROI levels and survival of control PBL. Ab-mediated IL-10 blockade or stimulation with antagonistic lymphokine IL-12 normalized baseline and CD3/CD28-induced changes in ROI production and pHi with no impact on Δψm of lupus PBL. The results suggest that mitochondrial hyperpolarization, increased ROI production, and cytoplasmic alkalinization play crucial roles in altered IL-10 responsiveness in SLE. PMID:12097418

  19. No increase of the blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal with higher field strength: implications for brain activation studies.

    PubMed

    Seehafer, Jörg U; Kalthoff, Daniel; Farr, Tracy D; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2010-04-14

    Experimental data up to 7.0 T show that the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) increases with higher magnetic field strength. Although several studies at 11.7 T report higher BOLD signal compared with studies at 7.0 T, no direct comparison at these two field strengths has been performed under the exact same conditions. It therefore remains unclear whether the expected increase of BOLD effect with field strength will still continue to hold for fields >7.0 T. To examine this issue, we compared the BOLD activation signal at 7.0 and 11.7 T with the two common sequences, spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) echo planar imaging (EPI). We chose the physiologically well controlled rat model of electrical forepaw stimulation under medetomidine sedation. While a linear to superlinear increase in activation with field strengths up to 7.0 T was reported in the literature, we observed no significant activation difference between 7.0 and 11.7 T with either SE or GE. Discussing the results in light of the four-component model of the BOLD signal, we showed that at high field only two extravascular contributions remain relevant, while both intravascular components vanish. Constancy of the BOLD effect is discussed due to motional narrowing, i.e., susceptibility gradients become so strong that phase variance of diffusing spins decreases and therefore the BOLD signal also decreases. This finding will be of high significance for the planning of future human and animal fMRI studies at high fields and their quantitative analysis.

  20. Study of a very low cost air combat maneuvering trainer aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. C.; Bowles, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    A very low cost aircraft for performing Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) training was studied using the BD-5J sport plane as a point of departure. The installation of a larger engine and increased fuel capacity were required to meet the performance and mission objectives. Reduced wing area increased the simulation of the ACM engagement, and a comparison with current tactical aircraft is presented. Other factors affecting the training transfer are considered analytically, but a flight evaluation is recommended to determine the concept utility.

  1. Acute thrombosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm subsequent to Heimlich maneuver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, R L; Green, R M

    1985-07-01

    We report a case of acute thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to a correctly applied and successful Heimlich maneuver. Although the Heimlich maneuver is generally safe and effective, this possible catastrophic consequence needs to be recognized.

  2. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  3. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K+ loss, decreased Na+ accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na+ and K+ homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  4. Grafting of Cucumis sativus onto Cucurbita ficifolia leads to improved plant growth, increased light utilization and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species in chilled plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanhong; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Lifeng; Ding, Xiaotao; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan

    2009-09-01

    The effects of chilling at 14 and 7 degrees C on plant growth, CO(2) assimilation, light allocation, photosynthetic electron flux and antioxidant metabolism were examined in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinyan No. 4, CS) plants with figleaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia Bouché, CF) and cucumber as rootstocks, respectively. Growth inhibition by chilling at 7 degrees C was characterized by irreversible inhibition of CO(2) assimilation in grafted plants with cucumber as rootstock and scion (CS/CS) but this effect was significantly alleviated by grafting onto CF roots (CS/CF). Chilled CS/CF plants exhibited a higher photosynthetic activity and lower proportion of energy dissipation than chilled CS/CS plants. Chilling resulted in a greater decrease in the electron flux in photosystem (PS) II (J (PSII)) than the rate of energy dissipation either via light-dependent (J (NPQ)) or via constitutive thermal dissipation and fluorescence (J (f,D)) in CS/CS plants. In parallel with the reduction in J (PSII), electron flux to oxygenation (J (o)) and carboxylation by Rubisco (J (c)) all decreased significantly whilst alternative electron flux in PS II (J (a)) increased, especially in CS/CS plants. Moreover, CS/CF plants exhibited higher activity of antioxidant enzymes, lower antioxidant content and less membrane peroxidation relative to CS/CS plants after chilling.

  5. Metformin Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species, Enhances Osteogenic Properties of Adipose-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro, and Increases Bone Density In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Henry, Brandon Michael; Wroński, Sebastian; Tarasiuk, Jacek; Maredziak, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Due to its pleiotropic effects, the commonly used drug metformin has gained renewed interest among medical researchers. While metformin is mainly used for the treatment of diabetes, recent studies suggest that it may have further application in anticancer and antiaging therapies. In this study, we investigated the proliferative potential, accumulation of oxidative stress factors, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of mouse adipose-derived stem cells (MuASCs) isolated from mice treated with metformin for 8 weeks. Moreover, we investigated the influence of metformin supplementation on mice bone density and bone element composition. The ASCs isolated from mice who were treated with metformin for 8 weeks showed highest proliferative potential, generated a robust net of cytoskeletal projections, had reduced expression of markers associated with cellular senescence, and decreased amount of reactive oxygen species in comparison to control group. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cells possessed greatest osteogenic differentiation potential, while their adipogenic differentiation ability was reduced. We also demonstrated that metformin supplementation increases bone density in vivo. Our result stands as a valuable source of data regarding the in vivo influence of metformin on ASCs and bone density and supports a role for metformin in regenerative medicine. PMID:27195075

  6. Antitumor effect of manumycin on colorectal cancer cells by increasing the reactive oxygen species production and blocking PI3K-AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Jiang, Hua; Xie, Li; Hu, Jing; Li, Li; Yang, Mi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Baorui; Qian, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Manumycin is a natural, well-tolerated microbial metabolite and is regarded as a farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Some data suggest that manumycin inhibits proliferation of diverse cancer cells through various pathways. However, the antitumor effect of manumycin on colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of manumycin on CRC in vitro and in vivo. The results of cell viability assay revealed that the proliferation of the CRC cells was significantly inhibited by manumycin. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by manumycin was also found in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, treatment of the CRC cells with manumycin resulted in increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Subsequently, manumycin also decreased the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and AKT, as well as the expression of caspase-9 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in a time-dependent manner. In addition, we found that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) attenuated the effect of manumycin on the PI3K-AKT pathway, and wortmannin reduced the effect of manumycin on caspase-9 and PARP expression. More importantly, the anticancer effect of manumycin was also observed in established tumor xenografts. Taken together, these findings supported the potential application of manumycin against colorectal carcinoma. PMID:27307747

  7. Silver nanoparticles from Dendropanax morbifera Léveille inhibit cell migration, induce apoptosis, and increase generation of reactive oxygen species in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castro Aceituno, Verónica; Ahn, Sungeun; Simu, Shakina Yesmin; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-12-01

    Green synthesized silver nanoparticles have significant potential in the pharmaceutical field because of their biological functions such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Novel silver nanoparticles synthesized from Dendropanax morbifera Léveille leaves (D-AgNPs) exhibit antimicrobial activity and reduce the viability of cancer cells without affecting the viability of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of D-AgNPs by measuring the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and toxicity against A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of D-AgNPs on cell migration, induction of apoptosis, and modification of gene and/or protein expression of cancer-related markers was determined using A549 cells. D-AgNPs exhibited cytotoxicity in A549 and HepG2 cell at different concentrations and enhanced the production of ROS in both cell lines. An increase in cell apoptosis and a reduction in cell migration in A549 cells were also observed after D-AgNP treatment. Furthermore, the effect of D-AgNPs in A549 cells was shown to be related to modification of the EGFR/p38 MAPK pathway. Our data provide the first evidence supporting the potential of D-AgNPs as a possible anticancer agent, particularly for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  8. Metformin Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species, Enhances Osteogenic Properties of Adipose-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro, and Increases Bone Density In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Henry, Brandon Michael; Wroński, Sebastian; Tarasiuk, Jacek; Maredziak, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Due to its pleiotropic effects, the commonly used drug metformin has gained renewed interest among medical researchers. While metformin is mainly used for the treatment of diabetes, recent studies suggest that it may have further application in anticancer and antiaging therapies. In this study, we investigated the proliferative potential, accumulation of oxidative stress factors, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of mouse adipose-derived stem cells (MuASCs) isolated from mice treated with metformin for 8 weeks. Moreover, we investigated the influence of metformin supplementation on mice bone density and bone element composition. The ASCs isolated from mice who were treated with metformin for 8 weeks showed highest proliferative potential, generated a robust net of cytoskeletal projections, had reduced expression of markers associated with cellular senescence, and decreased amount of reactive oxygen species in comparison to control group. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cells possessed greatest osteogenic differentiation potential, while their adipogenic differentiation ability was reduced. We also demonstrated that metformin supplementation increases bone density in vivo. Our result stands as a valuable source of data regarding the in vivo influence of metformin on ASCs and bone density and supports a role for metformin in regenerative medicine.

  9. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  10. NG as a novel nitric oxide donor induces apoptosis by increasing reactive oxygen species and inhibiting mitochondrial function in MGC803 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Li, Tingting; Tan, Jiani; Fu, Junjie; Guo, Qianqian; Ji, Hui; Zhang, Yihua

    2014-11-01

    NG, O(2)-(2,4-dinitro-5-{[2-(12-en-28-β-D-galactopyranosyl-oleanolate-3-yl)-oxy-2-oxoethyl] amino} phenyl) 1-(N-hydroxyethylmethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, was identified in our laboratory as a novel nitric oxide-releasing prodrug with antitumor effects. A previous study showed that NG inhibited cell growth, and induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. In this study, the inhibitory effects of NG on the viability of MGC803 cells were examined using methylthiazolyl tetrazolium biomide (MTT) assay, neutral red assay and trypan blue exclusion test. The results showed that NG had strong cytotoxicity to induce apoptosis, which was characterized by a significant externalization of phosphatidylserine, nuclear morphological changes and enhanced Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) from mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9/3 were also detected, indicating that NG may induce apoptosis through a mitochondrial-mediated pathway. NG induced mitochondrial dysfunction in MGC803 cells by altering membrane potential (△Ψm), the inhibition of complexes I, II and IV consequently decreasing ATP level. Furthermore, the treatment of MGC803 cells with NG caused a marked rise in oxidative stress as characterized by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) production and a reduction in glutathione hormone (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. In addition, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH synthesis precursor, was partially protective against the NG-induced ROS generation and cell apoptosis. In contrast, pretreatment of MGC803 cells with L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO), a GSH synthesis inhibitor, increased the ROS levels, and aggravated cell apoptosis by NG. These results suggest that NG-induced apoptosis in MGC803 cells is mediated, at least in part, by the increase in ROS production, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Effect of gamma radiation on resting B lymphocytes. I. Oxygen-dependent damage to the plasma membrane results in increased permeability and cell enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwell, J.D.; Schwartz, R.H.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1986-05-15

    Although the susceptibility of resting B lymphocytes to radiation-induced interphase death is well known, the mechanism by which this occurs is not understood. In this report, we use three measures of plasma membrane integrity (increase in cell volume, uptake of trypan blue, and release of /sup 51/Cr) to assess the effect of radiation on the resting B cell plasma membrane. The delivery of 500 to 1000 rad caused the majority of resting B cells to enlarge slightly, whereas 3000 rad caused virtually all of the cells to approximately double in size within 3 to 4 hr. Measurement of the release of /sup 51/Cr from resting B cells revealed a similar relationship between the dose of radiation and the loss of radioactive label. Trypan blue exclusion was also found to diminish as a function of radiation dose. An analysis of a variety of lymphoid cells suggested that sensitivity to the membrane damaging effects of gamma radiation was in the order of resting B cells greater than resting T cells greater than a long-term L3T4+ T cell clone greater than a B cell lymphoma. LPS-induced B cell blasts treated with 3000 rad were equivalent to 1000 rad-treated resting B cells. The effects of the gamma radiation could be ameliorated by excluding oxygen at the time of irradiation, or by adding the free radical scavenging agent cysteamine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that gamma radiation results in damage to the plasma membrane of resting lymphocytes via the generation of highly reactive free radical species. This damage is reflected in a rapid increase in plasma membrane permeability and swelling of the cells, and may play a major role in causing interphase death.

  12. Long-term low-level laser therapy promotes an increase in maximal oxygen uptake and exercise performance in a dose-dependent manner in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Perini, Júlia Luiza; Hentschke, Vítor Scotta; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) represents a new intervention modality that has been explored to enhance exercise performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of LLLT (GaAIAs-850 nm) at different doses on VO2max and on exercise performance in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: "placebo" rats (P-LLLT, n = 10), rats at a dose of 0.315 J per treatment point of LLLT (8.7 J/cm(2)-LLLT, n = 10), and rats at a dose of 2.205 J per treatment point of LLLT (61.2 J/cm(2)-LLLT, n = 10). The LLLT was applied bilaterally at the biceps femoris, gluteus, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, iliopsoas, and adductor longus muscles. One spot in each muscle belly was applied, with a sum of 12 spots in each rat, once a day, for 10 days. All animals performed the maximal exercise test (ET) at a metabolic treadmill for rats, with simultaneous gas analysis. The distance covered was measured during ET, before and after the conclusion of the LLLT protocol. The data were compared by a repeated measures two-way ANOVA followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests (p < .05). The 61.2 J/cm(2)-LLLT group increased VO2basal (~40 %), VO2max (~24 %), VCO2max (~17 %), and distance covered (~34 %) after LLLT application on the skeletal muscle. No significant results were found comparing before and after conditions for the studied variables considering P-LLLT and 8.7 J/cm(2)-LLLT groups. The LLLT promoted in a dose-dependent manner an increase in oxygen consumption uptake and a performance increment of male Wistar rats.

  13. Effects of repeated Valsalva maneuver straining on cardiac and vasoconstrictive baroreflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Ratliff, Duane A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Ludwig, David A.; Muniz, Gary W.; Benedetti, Erik; Chavarria, Jose; Koreen, Susan; Nguyen, Claude; Wang, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that repeated respiratory straining maneuvers (repeated SM) designed to elevate arterial BPs (arterial baroreceptor loading) would acutely increase baroreflex responses. METHODS: We tested this hypothesis by measuring cardiac baroreflex responses to carotid baroreceptor stimulation (neck pressures), and changes in heart rate and diastolic BP after reductions in BP induced by a 15-s Valsalva maneuver in 10 female and 10 male subjects at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after performing repeated SM. Baroreflex responses were also measured in each subject at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h at the same time on a separate day without repeated SM (control) in a randomized, counter-balanced cross-over experimental design. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in carotid-cardiac and peripheral vascular baroreflex responses measured across time following repeated SM compared with the control condition. Integrated cardiac baroreflex response (deltaHR/ deltaSBP) measured during performance of a Valsalva maneuver was increased by approximately 50% to 1.1 +/- 0.2 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 1 h and 1.0 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 3 h following repeated SM compared with the control condition (0.7 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at both 1 and 3 h, respectively). However, integrated cardiac baroreflex response after repeated SM returned to control levels at 6 and 24 h after training. These responses did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that arterial baroreceptor loading induced by repeated SM increased aortic, but not carotid, cardiac baroreflex responses for as long as 3 h after repeated SM. We conclude that repeated SM increases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness which may provide patients, astronauts, and high-performance aircraft pilots with protection from development of orthostatic hypotension.

  14. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) required by this section need not be lighted. Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1567 Flight maneuver placard. (a) For normal category airplanes,...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1567 Flight maneuver placard. (a) For normal category airplanes, there..., including spins, approved.” (b) For utility category airplanes, there must be— (1) A placard in clear...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) required by this section need not be lighted. Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1567 Flight maneuver placard. (a) For normal category airplanes,...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1567 - Flight maneuver placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1567 Flight maneuver placard. (a) For normal category airplanes, there..., including spins, approved.” (b) For utility category airplanes, there must be— (1) A placard in clear...

  18. Detail view of a starboard Orbiter Maneuvering and Reaction Control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of a starboard Orbiter Maneuvering and Reaction Control Systems pod, removed from the orbiter and in it's carrier/transport vehicle at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. 47 CFR 25.282 - Orbit raising maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Technical Operations § 25.282 Orbit raising maneuvers. A space station authorized to operate in the... the space station is authorized to operate once it reaches its assigned geostationary orbital location; (b) In the event that any unacceptable interference does occur, the space station licensee...

  20. 47 CFR 25.282 - Orbit raising maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Technical Operations § 25.282 Orbit raising maneuvers. A space station authorized to operate in the... the space station is authorized to operate once it reaches its assigned geostationary orbital location; (b) In the event that any unacceptable interference does occur, the space station licensee...

  1. 47 CFR 25.282 - Orbit raising maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Technical Operations § 25.282 Orbit raising maneuvers. A space station authorized to operate in the... the space station is authorized to operate once it reaches its assigned geostationary orbital location; (b) In the event that any unacceptable interference does occur, the space station licensee...

  2. 47 CFR 25.282 - Orbit raising maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Technical Operations § 25.282 Orbit raising maneuvers. A space station authorized to operate in the... the space station is authorized to operate once it reaches its assigned geostationary orbital location; (b) In the event that any unacceptable interference does occur, the space station licensee...

  3. Orbit Maneuver for Responsive Coverage Using Electric Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    NASA to support the Geospace Electrodynamics Connections (GEC) Mission. The GEC mission was designed to maneuver a constellation of probes to a...thrust Propulsion," Proc Inst Mech Engrs, vol. 214, pp. 313-321, September 2000. [17] Michael A. Mesarch, "Orbit Optimization for the Geospace

  4. 33 CFR 157.445 - Maneuvering performance capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tankship undergoes a major conversion or alteration affecting the control systems, control surfaces, propulsion system, or other areas which may be expected to alter maneuvering performance, the tankship owner... this section. (c) If a tankship is one of a class of vessels with identical propulsion,...

  5. Performance of Driver-Vehicle in Aborted Lane Change Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    1995-01-01

    A 'lane change crash' is defined as a family of collisions that occurred when a driver attempts to change lane and strikes or is struck by a vehicle in the adjacent lane. One type of maneuver that is commonly used to avert a lane change crash involved aborting the intended lane change, and returning the vehicle to the original lane of the subject vehicle.

  6. Vibration suppression of fixed-time jib crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A jib crane consists of a pendulum-like end line attached to a rotatable jib. Within this general category of cranes there exist devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length and variable jib length. These cranes are commonly used for construction and transportation applications. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using jib cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. The resulting maneuvers are therefore performed slowly, contributing to high construction and transportation costs. The crane considered here consists of a spherical pendulum attached to a rigid jib. The other end of the jib is attached to a direct drive motor for generating rotational motion. A general approach is presented for determining the open-loop trajectories for the jib rotation for accomplishing fixed-time, point-to-point, residual oscillation free, symmetric maneuvers. These residual oscillation free trajectories purposely excite the pendulum modes in such a way that at the end of the maneuver the oscillatory degrees of freedom are quiescent. Simulation results are presented with experimental verification.

  7. LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. 1, AND DAM. NOTE LOWER LOCK GATE IN FOREGROUND. LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  8. An exploratory investigation of the STOL landing maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    The parameters influencing the STOL landing are identified and their effect on the ease and quality of the flare maneuver is discussed. Data from actual landings, supported by pilot commentary and pilot opinion rating, are analyzed. Hypotheses concerning the prediction of STOL handling qualities in the flare are proposed, and suggestions for future research are presented.

  9. 47 CFR 25.282 - Orbit raising maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interference from any lawfully operating satellite network or radio communication system. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Orbit raising maneuvers. 25.282 Section 25.282 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE...

  10. Variable-structure control of spacecraft attitude maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, Thomas A. W., III; Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt

    1988-01-01

    A variable-structure control approach is presented for multiaxial spacecraft attitude maneuvers. Nonlinear sliding surfaces are proposed that result in asymptotically stable, ideal linear decoupled sliding motions of Cayley-Rodrigues attitude parameters, as well as of angular velocities. The resulting control laws are interpreted as more easily implemented and more robust versions of those previously obtained by feedback linearization.

  11. EOS Terra Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update presentation will discuss brief history of Terra EOM work; lifetime fuel estimates; baseline vs. proposed plan origin; resultant exit orbit; baseline vs. proposed exit plan; long term orbit altitude; revised lifetime proposal and fallback options.

  12. Heimlich's maneuver-assisted bronchoscopic removal of airway foreign body.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Sohan Lal; Bansal, Shivendu; Khare, Arvind; Jain, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies (FBs) by children can lead to serious illness and sometimes even death. Bronchoscopic removal of the FB is necessary to prevent from any catastrophic event. Sometimes bronchoscopic removal is not possible due to the larger size of the FB, sharp FB, or long duration FB. Tracheostomy is normally used for the removal of such FBs. The aim of this case report is to highlight the use of Heimlich maneuver for the removal of such FBs before opting invasive procedures. In the present case, a 5-year-old child was presented with history of FB aspiration 5 h back. After multiple failed bronchoscopic attempts to remove the FB it was decided to use Heimlich maneuver in the supine position. A single attempt of Heimlich maneuver expelled the FB into the oral cavity, which was removed by Magill's forceps. On repeated bronchoscope check, there was no remnant of FB. Child's further course of stay in hospital was uneventful. In conclusion, Heimlich maneuver may be useful in patient with failed bronchoscope removal of airway FBs before proceeding for tracheotomy or other invasive procedures.

  13. Heimlich's maneuver-assisted bronchoscopic removal of airway foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sohan Lal; Bansal, Shivendu; Khare, Arvind; Jain, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration of foreign bodies (FBs) by children can lead to serious illness and sometimes even death. Bronchoscopic removal of the FB is necessary to prevent from any catastrophic event. Sometimes bronchoscopic removal is not possible due to the larger size of the FB, sharp FB, or long duration FB. Tracheostomy is normally used for the removal of such FBs. The aim of this case report is to highlight the use of Heimlich maneuver for the removal of such FBs before opting invasive procedures. In the present case, a 5-year-old child was presented with history of FB aspiration 5 h back. After multiple failed bronchoscopic attempts to remove the FB it was decided to use Heimlich maneuver in the supine position. A single attempt of Heimlich maneuver expelled the FB into the oral cavity, which was removed by Magill's forceps. On repeated bronchoscope check, there was no remnant of FB. Child's further course of stay in hospital was uneventful. In conclusion, Heimlich maneuver may be useful in patient with failed bronchoscope removal of airway FBs before proceeding for tracheotomy or other invasive procedures. PMID:25885389

  14. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis following the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Ayerdi, Juan; Gupta, Sushil K; Sampson, Lawrence N; Deshmukh, Narayan

    2002-04-01

    Complications from the Heimlich maneuver are relatively infrequent. Two fatal cases of abdominal aortic thrombosis have been reported following this technique. We report on the first patient that suffered an acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta and survived. Prompt recognition of this complication provides the only hope of survival from this rare and catastrophic complication.

  15. Ruptured aortic valve cusp: a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J H; Menapace, F J; Howell, R R

    1983-07-01

    A case of traumatic rupture of the aortic valve as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver is presented. Conformation was made by comparative echocardiographic studies available from three months before and immediately following the incident. The patient refused surgical intervention and died one month later with severe congestive heart failure despite vigorous medical therapy.

  16. 14 CFR 27.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resultant limit maneuvering loads. 27.339 Section 27.339 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads §...

  17. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337 Section 27.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads §...

  18. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia does not result in increased postoperative respiratory morbidity but decreases surgical site infection. An observational clinical study.

    PubMed

    von Bormann, Benno; Suksompong, Sirilak; Weiler, Jürgen; Zander, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pure oxygen ventilation during anaesthesia is debatable, as it may lead to development of atelectasis. Rationale of the study was to demonstrate the harmlessness of ventilation with pure oxygen. Methods. This is a single-centre, one-department observational trial. Prospectively collected routine-data of 76,784 patients undergoing general, gynaecological, orthopaedic, and vascular surgery during 1995-2009 were retrospectively analysed. Postoperative hypoxia, unplanned ICU-admission, surgical site infection (SSI), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and hospital mortality were continuously recorded. During 1996 the anaesthetic ventilation for all patients was changed from 30% oxygen plus 70% nitrous oxide to 100% oxygen in low-flow mode. Therefore, in order to minimize the potential of confounding due to a variety of treatments being used, we directly compared years 1995 (30% oxygen) and 1997 (100%), whereas the period 1998 to 2009 is simply described. Results. Comparing 1995 to 1997 pure oxygen ventilation led to a decreased incidence of postoperative hypoxic events (4.3 to 3.0%; p < 0.0001) and hospital mortality (2.1 to 1.6%; p = 0.088) as well as SSI (8.0 to 5.0%; p < 0.0001) and PONV (21.6 to 17.5%; p < 0.0001). There was no effect on unplanned ICU-admission (1.1 to 0.9; p = 0.18). Conclusions. The observed effects may be partly due to pure oxygen ventilation, abandonment of nitrous oxide, and application of low-flow anesthesia. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia is harmless, as long as certain standards are adhered to. It makes anaesthesia simpler and safer and may reduce clinical morbidity, such as postoperative hypoxia and surgical site infection.

  19. 47 CFR 80.1183 - Remote control for maneuvering or navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote control for maneuvering or navigation... Communications § 80.1183 Remote control for maneuvering or navigation. (a) An on-board station may be used for remote control of maneuvering or navigation control systems aboard the same ship or, where that ship...

  20. 47 CFR 80.1183 - Remote control for maneuvering or navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control for maneuvering or navigation... Communications § 80.1183 Remote control for maneuvering or navigation. (a) An on-board station may be used for remote control of maneuvering or navigation control systems aboard the same ship or, where that ship...

  1. 47 CFR 80.1183 - Remote control for maneuvering or navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control for maneuvering or navigation... Communications § 80.1183 Remote control for maneuvering or navigation. (a) An on-board station may be used for remote control of maneuvering or navigation control systems aboard the same ship or, where that ship...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1183 - Remote control for maneuvering or navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control for maneuvering or navigation... Communications § 80.1183 Remote control for maneuvering or navigation. (a) An on-board station may be used for remote control of maneuvering or navigation control systems aboard the same ship or, where that ship...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1183 - Remote control for maneuvering or navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remote control for maneuvering or navigation... Communications § 80.1183 Remote control for maneuvering or navigation. (a) An on-board station may be used for remote control of maneuvering or navigation control systems aboard the same ship or, where that ship...

  4. Caudal fin shape modulation and control during acceleration, braking and backing maneuvers in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Flammang, B E; Lauder, G V

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary patterns of intrinsic caudal musculature in ray-finned fishes show that fine control of the dorsal lobe of the tail evolved first, followed by the ability to control the ventral lobe. This progression of increasing differentiation of musculature suggests specialization of caudal muscle roles. Fine control of fin elements is probably responsible for the range of fin conformations observed during different maneuvering behaviors. Here, we examine the kinematics of the caudal fin and the motor activity of the intrinsic caudal musculature during kick-and-glide, braking and backing maneuvers, and compare these data with our previous work on the function of the caudal fin during steady swimming. Kick-and-glide maneuvers consisted of large-amplitude, rapid lateral excursion of the tail fin, followed by forward movement of the fish with the caudal fin rays adducted to reduce surface area and with the tail held in line with the body. Just before the kick, the flexors dorsalis and ventralis, hypochordal longitudinalis, infracarinalis and supracarinalis showed strong activity. During braking, the dorsal and ventral lobes of the tail moved in opposite directions, forming an ;S'-shape, accompanied by strong activity in the interradialis muscles. During backing up, the ventral lobe initiated a dorsally directed wave along the distal edge of the caudal fin. The relative timing of the intrinsic caudal muscles varied between maneuvers, and their activation was independent of the activity of the red muscle of the axial myomeres in the caudal region. There was no coupling of muscle activity duration and electromyographic burst intensity in the intrinsic caudal muscles during maneuvers, as was observed in previous work on steady swimming. Principal-component analysis produced four components that cumulatively explained 73.6% of the variance and segregated kick-and-glide, braking and backing maneuvers from each other and from steady swimming. The activity patterns of the

  5. Reduced levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and apoptotic status are not correlated with increases in cryotolerance of bovine embryos produced in vitro in the presence of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Frigoni, Nathália A S; Leão, Beatriz C S; Nogueira, Ériklis; Accorsi, Mônica F; Mingoti, Gisele Z

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intracellular (cysteine and β-mercaptoethanol) and extracellular (catalase) antioxidant supplementation at different times during in vitro production (IVM and/or in vitro culture (IVC)) on bovine embryo development, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, apoptosis and re-expansion rates after a vitrification-thawing process were examined. Blastocyst frequencies were not affected by either antioxidant supplementation (40.5%-56.4%) or the timing of supplementation (41.7%-55.4%) compared with control (48.7%; P>0.05). Similarly, antioxidants and the moment of supplementation did not affect (P>0.05) the total number of blastomeres (86.2-90.5 and 84.4-90.5, respectively) compared with control (85.7). However, the percentage of apoptotic cells was reduced (P<0.05) in groups supplemented during IVM (1.7%), IVC (2.0%) or both (1.8%) compared with control (4.3%). Intracellular ROS levels measured in Day 7 blastocysts were reduced (P<0.05) in all groups (0.60-0.78), with the exception of the group supplemented with β-mercaptoethanol during IVC (0.88), which did not differ (P>0.05) from that in the control group (1.00). Re-expansion rates were not affected (P>0.05) by the treatments (50.0%-93.0%). In conclusion, antioxidant supplementation during IVM and/or IVC reduces intracellular ROS and the rate of apoptosis; however, supplementation does not increase embryonic development and survival after vitrification.

  6. Institution of Veno-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Does Not Lead to Increased Wall Stress in Patients with Impaired Myocardial Function.

    PubMed

    Koth, Andrew M; Axelrod, David M; Reddy, Sushma; Roth, Stephen J; Tacy, Theresa A; Punn, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    The effect of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) on wall stress in patients with cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, or other cardiac conditions is unknown. We set out to determine the circumferential and meridional wall stress (WS) in patients with systemic left ventricles before and during VA ECMO. We established a cohort of patients with impaired myocardial function who underwent VA ECMO therapy from January 2000 to November 2013. Demographic and clinical data were collected and inotropic score calculated. Measurements were taken on echocardiograms prior to the initiation of VA ECMO and while on full-flow VA ECMO, in order to derive wall stress (circumferential and meridional), VCFc, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. A post hoc sub-analysis was conducted, separating those with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and those with impaired systemic output. Thirty-three patients met inclusion criteria. The patients' median age was 0.06 years (range 0-18.7). Eleven (33%) patients constituted the organ failure group (Gr2), while the remaining 22 (66%) patients survived to discharge (Gr1). WS and all other echocardiographic measures were not different when comparing patients before and during VA ECMO. Ejection and shortening fraction, WS, and VCFc were not statistically different comparing the survival and organ failure groups. The patients' position on the VCFc-WS curve did not change after the initiation of VA ECMO. Those with PH had decreased WS as well as increased EF after ECMO initiation, while those with impaired systemic output showed no difference in those parameters with initiation of ECMO. The external workload on the myocardium as indicated by WS is unchanged by the institution of VA ECMO support. Furthermore, echocardiographic measures of cardiac function do not reflect the changes in ventricular performance inherent to VA ECMO support. These findings are informative for the interpretation of echocardiograms in the setting of VA ECMO

  7. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin increases reactive oxygen species production in human endothelial cells via induction of cytochrome P4501A1

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, P.G.; Walker, M.K.

    2010-05-15

    Studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that subchronic 2,3,7,8,-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure of adult mice results in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and reduced nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in cardiovascular organs of TCDD-exposed mice and this increase contributed to the reduced NO-mediated vasodilation. Since cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) can contribute to some TCDD-induced toxicity, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells by the induction of CYP1A1. A concentration-response to 24 h TCDD exposure (10 pM-10 nM) was performed in confluent primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Oxidant-sensitive fluorescent probes dihydroethidium (DHE) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), were used to measure superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical, respectively. NO was also measured using the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA). These assessments were conducted in HAECs transfected with siRNA targeting the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), CYP1A1, or CYP1B1. TCDD concentration-dependently increased CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Moreover, 1 nM TCDD maximally increased DHE (Cont = 1.0 +- 0.3; TCDD = 5.1 +- 1.0; p = 0.002) and DCFH-DA (Cont = 1.0 +- 0.2; TCDD = 4.1 +- 0.5; p = 0.002) fluorescence and maximally decreased DAF-2DA fluorescence (Cont = 1.0 +- 0.4; TCDD = 0.68 +- 0.1). siRNA targeting AhR and CYP1A1 significantly decreased TCDD-induced DHE (siAhR: Cont = 1.0 +- 0.1; TCDD = 1.3 +- 0.2; p = 0.093) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.0 +- 0.1; TCDD = 1.1 +- 0.1; p = 0.454) and DCFH-DA (siAhR: Cont = 1.0 +- 0.2; TCDD = 1.3 +- 0.3; p = 0.370) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.0 +- 0.1; TCDD = 1.3 +- 0.2; p = 0.114) fluorescence and increased DAF-2DA fluorescence (siAhR: Cont = 1.00 +- 0.03; TCDD = 0.97 +- 0.03; p = 0.481) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.00 +- 0.03; TCDD = 0.92 +- 0

  8. Development and Flight Test of an Experimental Maneuver Autopilot for a Highly Maneuverable Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Ames Research turns, and the rocking-horse maneuver. Center. The FrTAP is designed to increase the quantity and quality of This report discusses the...This angle acceleration command variables. The of attack is held for a predetermined design goal vas to control the rate of condition-hold time A&a...the windup closed-loop flight system (fig. 8). turn to the design condition of 8 g at When the FTMAP is engaged, the normal Mach 0.90 and 7600-m

  9. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low Epsilon stability test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance and heat transfer characteristics of a doublet element type injector for the space shuttle orbiter maneuvering engine thrust chamber were investigated. Ths stability characteristics were evaluated over a range of chamber pressures and mixture ratios. The specific objectives of the test were: (1) to determine whether stability has been influenced by injection of boundary layer coolant across the cavity entrance, (2) if the injector is stable, to determine the minimum cavity area required to maintain stability, and (3) if the injector is unstable, to determine the effects of entrance geometry and increased area on stability.

  10. Factors controlling oxygen utilization.

    PubMed

    Biaglow, John; Dewhirst, Mark; Leeper, Dennis; Burd, Randy; Tuttle, Steve

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically, that oxygen diffusion distance is related to the metabolic rate of tumors (QO2) as well as the oxygen tension. The difference in QO2 rate between tumors can vary by as much as 80-fold. Inhibition of oxygen utilization by glucose or chemical inhibitors can improve the diffusion distance. Combining respiratory inhibitors with increased availability of oxygen will further improve the oxygen diffusion distance for all tumors. A simple means for inhibiting oxygen consumption is the use of glucose (the Crabtree effect). The inhibition of tumor oxygen utilization by glucose occurs in R323OAc mammary carcinoma and 9L glioma cells. However, stimulation of oxygen consumption is observed with glucose in the Q7 hepatoma cell line. MIBG, a known inhibitor of oxygen utilization, blocks oxygen consumption in 9L, but is weakly inhibitory with the Q7. Q7 tumor cells demonstrate an anomalous behavior of glucose and MIBG on oxygen consumption. Our results clearly demonstrate the necessity for comparing effects of different agents on different tumor cells. Generalizations cannot be made with respect to the choice of inhibitor for in vivo use. Our work shows that oxygen consumption also can be inhibited with malonate and chlorosuccinate. These substrates may be effective in vivo, where glucose is low and glutamine is the major substrate. Our results indicate that information about individual tumor substrate-linked metabolic controls may be necessary before attempting to inhibit oxygen utilization in vivo for therapeutic benefit.

  11. Maneuver Performance Assessment of the Cassini Spacecraft Through Execution-Error Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has executed nearly 300 maneuvers since 1997, providing ample data for execution-error model updates. With maneuvers through 2017, opportunities remain to improve on the models and remove biases identified in maneuver executions. This manuscript focuses on how execution-error models can be used to judge maneuver performance, while providing a means for detecting performance degradation. Additionally, this paper describes Cassini's execution-error model updates in August 2012. An assessment of Cassini's maneuver performance through OTM-368 on January 5, 2014 is also presented.

  12. Cassini Maneuver Experience for the Fourth Year of the Solstice Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaquero, Mar; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul; Valerino, Powtawche; Wagner, Sean; Wong, Mau

    2014-01-01

    After sixteen years of successful mission operations and invaluable scientific discoveries, the Cassini orbiter continues to tour Saturn on the most complex gravity-assist trajectory ever flown. To ensure that the end-of-mission target of September 2017 is achieved, propellant preservation is highly prioritized over maneuver cycle minimization. Thus, the maneuver decision process, which includes determining whether a maneuver is performed or canceled, designing a targeting strategy and selecting the engine for execution, is being continuously re-evaluated. This paper summarizes the maneuver experience throughout the fourth year of the Solstice Mission highlighting 27 maneuvers targeted to nine Titan flybys.

  13. Development of a flight test maneuver autopilot for an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alag, G. S.; Duke, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    An autopilot can be used to provide precise control to meet the demanding requirements of flight research maneuvers with high-performance aircraft. This paper presents the development of control laws for a flight test maneuver autopilot for an F-15 aircraft. A linear quadratic regulator approach is used to develop the control laws within the context of flight test maneuver requirements by treating the maneuver as a finite time tracking problem with regulation of state rates. Results are presented to show the effectiveness of the controller in insuring acceptable aircraft performance during a maneuver.

  14. Spacecraft attitude maneuver using two single-gimbal control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa; Satoh, Mitsunori

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, arbitrary rest-to-rest attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using two single-gimbal control moment gyros (2SGCMGs) are considered. Although single-gimbal control moment gyros are configured in the same manner as the traditional pyramid-array CMG, only two CMGs are assumed to be available. Attitude maneuver problems are similar to problems involving two reaction wheels (RWs) from the viewpoint of the number of actuators. In other words, the problem treated herein is a kind of underactuated problem. Although 2SGCMGs can generate torques around all axes, they cannot generate torques around each axis independently. Therefore, control methods designed for a satellite using two reaction wheels cannot be applied to three-axis attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using 2SGCMGs. In this paper, for simplicity, maneuvers around the x- and z-axes are first considered, and then a maneuver around the y-axis due to the corning effect resulting from the maneuver around the x- and z-axes is considered. Since maneuvers around each axis are established by the proposed method, arbitrary attitude maneuvers can be achieved using 2SGCMGs. In addition, the maneuvering angles around the z- and x-axes, which are required in order to maneuver around the y-axis, are analytically determined, and the total time required for maneuvering around the y-axis is then analyzed numerically.

  15. Residual dizziness after successful repositioning maneuvers for idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Teggi, Roberto; Giordano, Leone; Bondi, Stefano; Fabiano, Beatrice; Bussi, Mario

    2011-04-01

    Even after successful repositioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), some patients report dizziness lasting for a certain period afterwards. We studied the prevalence and clinical factors associated with residual dizziness in a sample of elderly patients. Sixty outpatients over 65 years of age, affected by idiopathic BPPV were recruited; the exclusion criterion was a history of previous episodes of vertigo, including positional. The patients were asked to describe their self-perceived anxiety for vertigo on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and successively treated with appropriate maneuvers till resolution of nystagmus. Data concerning the demographic and clinical features of BPPV were collected. Patients were followed until complete resolution of subjective dizziness and imbalance without positional nystagmus. Data about residual dizziness were collected from the second day from resolution of BPPV. Clinical and demographic factors related to residual dizziness were analyzed. Twenty-two subjects (37%) reported residual dizziness. In these subjects, the mean duration of residual dizziness was 13.4 ± 7.5 days. No association was observed between residual dizziness and gender, involved canal and the number of repositioning maneuvers before resolution. On the other hand, age older than 72 years, symptom duration greater than 9 days and VAS scale for anxiety greater than 10/100 were associated with an increased risk of residual dizziness. The odds ratio were respectively 6.5 (age-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%), 6.5 (duration of vertigo-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%) and 15.5 (anxiety levels-residual dizziness, Confidence Interval 95%). Longer symptom duration before diagnosis was associated with higher anxiety levels. The results underline the necessity for an early and correct diagnosis of BPPV, especially in the elderly.

  16. The Low Mandible Maneuver and Its Resonential Implications for Elite Singers.

    PubMed

    Nair, Angelika; Nair, Garyth; Reishofer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Many elite singers appear to frequently drop the posterior mandible while singing to optimize resonance production. This study investigated the physiology of the Low Mandible Maneuver (LMM) through the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), and spectrographic analysis. The study of elite singers has been hampered by the paucity of internal imagery. We have attempted to address this problem by using portable US equipment that we could transport to the homes, studios, or dressing rooms of such ranking singers. With the US and acoustic data gathered in fairly brief sessions, we were able to ascertain the resonance gains garnered from the technique's use. The study featured two phases: I--MRI study of the maneuver and its physiological effect on surrounding structures (in collaboration of the Medical University of Graz, Austria) and II--US investigation that studied tongue shape during the maneuver. The LMM has significant ramifications for resonance production by enabling a concomitantly lowered larynx and increased resonance space in the pharyngeal and oral cavities. Measurements of the LMM ranged between 0.7 and 3.1 cm and showed a boost in the first harmonics as well as an enhancement in the singers formant. Its use also has a rather significant effect on the tongue shapes required for all sung phonemes. The advantage of using US for this study was the ability to produce real-time videos of the singer in action and then, through the use of stop action, precisely study both individual phoneme production and phoneme-to-phoneme transitions during the LMM.

  17. A synthetic environment for visualization and planning of orbital maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Grunwald, Arthur J.

    An interactive proximity operations planning system, which allows on-site planning of fuel-efficient, multi-burn maneuvers in a potential multi-space-craft environment has been developed and tested. This display system most directly assists planning by providing visual feedback in a synthetic virtual space that aids visualization of trajectories and their constraints. Its most significant features include (1) an 'inverse dynamics' algorithm that removes control nonlinearities facing the operator and (2) a stack-oriented action-editor that reduces the order of control and creates, through a 'geometric spreadsheet,' the illusion of an inertially stable environment. This synthetic environment provides the user with control of relevant static and dynamic properties of way-points during small orbital changes allowing independent solutions to otherwise coupled problems of orbital maneuvering.

  18. A synthetic environment for visualization and planning of orbital maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Grunwald, Arthur J.

    1991-01-01

    An interactive proximity operations planning system, which allows on-site planning of fuel-efficient, multi-burn maneuvers in a potential multi-space-craft environment has been developed and tested. This display system most directly assists planning by providing visual feedback in a synthetic virtual space that aids visualization of trajectories and their constraints. Its most significant features include (1) an 'inverse dynamics' algorithm that removes control nonlinearities facing the operator and (2) a stack-oriented action-editor that reduces the order of control and creates, through a 'geometric spreadsheet,' the illusion of an inertially stable environment. This synthetic environment provides the user with control of relevant static and dynamic properties of way-points during small orbital changes allowing independent solutions to otherwise coupled problems of orbital maneuvering.

  19. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  20. Time efficient spacecraft maneuver using constrained torque distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xibin; Yue, Chengfei; Liu, Ming; Wu, Baolin

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the time efficient maneuver of rigid satellites with inertia uncertainty and bounded external disturbance. A redundant cluster of four reaction wheels is used to control the spacecraft. To make full use of the controllability and avoid frequent unload for reaction wheels, a maximum output torque and maximum angular momentum constrained torque distribution method is developed. Based on this distribution approach, the maximum allowable acceleration and velocity of the satellite are optimized during the maneuvering. A novel braking curve is designed on the basis of the optimization strategy of the control torque distribution. A quaternion-based sliding mode control law is proposed to render the state to track the braking curve strictly. The designed controller provides smooth control torque, time efficiency and high control precision. Finally, practical numerical examples are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the developed torque distribution strategy and control methodology.