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Sample records for manganese ii induces

  1. Manganese ions induce H2O2 generation at the ubiquinone binding site of mitochondrial complex II.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Erik; Zwicker, Klaus; Dröse, Stefan

    2015-08-15

    Manganese-induced toxicity has been recently associated with an increased ROS generation from mitochondrial complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). To achieve a deeper mechanistic understanding how divalent manganese ions (Mn(2+)) could stimulate mitochondrial ROS production we performed investigations with bovine heart submitochondrial particles (SMP). In succinate fueled SMP, the Mn(2+) induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was blocked by the specific complex II ubiquinone binding site (IIQ) inhibitor atpenin A5 while a further downstream block at complex III increased the rate markedly. This suggests that site IIQ was the source of the reactive oxygen species. Moreover, Mn(2+) ions also accelerated the rate of superoxide dismutation, explaining the general increase in the measured rates of H2O2 production and an attenuation of direct superoxide detection.

  2. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci.

  3. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Manganese (II) Complex against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcerations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M.; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M.Jamil; El-Ferjani, Rashd M.; Adam, Hoyam; Alkotaini, Bassam; Batran, Rami Al; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a crucial element for health. In this study, the gastroprotective efficacy of Mn (II) complex (MDLA) against acidified ethanol (HCl/Ethanol)-induced gastric ulceration in rats was evaluated. The animals were distributed into 5 groups. Groups 1 and 2 received carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), group 3 was pretreated with omeprazole, and groups 4 and 5 were given 10 and 20 mg/kg of MDLA, respectively. After one hour, CMC and HCl/Ethanol were given to groups 2–5 whilst the animals in group 1 were ingested with CMC. After sacrifice, gastric lesions were evaluated by wall mucus, gross appearance, histology, antioxidant enzymes and immunohistochemistry. Group 2 displayed severe gastric damage with a significant reduction in wall mucus. Conversely, gastric lesions were reduced in groups 3–5 by 85.72%, 56.51% and 65.93%, respectively. The rats in groups 3–5 showed up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with down-regulation of Bcl-2-associated protein x (Bax). Pretreatment with omeprazole or MDLA led to an increase in the uptake of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain in the glandular part of the gastric tissue, raised levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. These results suggested the gastroprotective action of Mn (II) complex. PMID:27229938

  4. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Manganese (II) Complex against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcerations in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M Jamil; El-Ferjani, Rashd M; Adam, Hoyam; Alkotaini, Bassam; Batran, Rami Al; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a crucial element for health. In this study, the gastroprotective efficacy of Mn (II) complex (MDLA) against acidified ethanol (HCl/Ethanol)-induced gastric ulceration in rats was evaluated. The animals were distributed into 5 groups. Groups 1 and 2 received carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), group 3 was pretreated with omeprazole, and groups 4 and 5 were given 10 and 20 mg/kg of MDLA, respectively. After one hour, CMC and HCl/Ethanol were given to groups 2-5 whilst the animals in group 1 were ingested with CMC. After sacrifice, gastric lesions were evaluated by wall mucus, gross appearance, histology, antioxidant enzymes and immunohistochemistry. Group 2 displayed severe gastric damage with a significant reduction in wall mucus. Conversely, gastric lesions were reduced in groups 3-5 by 85.72%, 56.51% and 65.93%, respectively. The rats in groups 3-5 showed up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with down-regulation of Bcl-2-associated protein x (Bax). Pretreatment with omeprazole or MDLA led to an increase in the uptake of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain in the glandular part of the gastric tissue, raised levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. These results suggested the gastroprotective action of Mn (II) complex.

  5. The molecular biogeochemistry of manganese(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Geszvain, Kati; Butterfield, Cristina; Davis, Richard E; Madison, Andrew S; Lee, Sung-Woo; Parker, Dorothy L; Soldatova, Alexandra; Spiro, Thomas G; Luther, George W; Tebo, Bradley M

    2012-12-01

    Micro-organisms capable of oxidizing the redox-active transition metal manganese play an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of manganese. In the present mini-review, we focus specifically on Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The mechanisms by which bacteria oxidize Mn(II) include a two-electron oxidation reaction catalysed by a novel multicopper oxidase that produces Mn(IV) oxides as the primary product. Bacteria also produce organic ligands, such as siderophores, that bind to and stabilize Mn(III). The realization that this stabilized Mn(III) is present in many environments and can affect the redox cycles of other elements such as sulfur has made it clear that manganese and the bacteria that oxidize it profoundly affect the Earth's biogeochemistry. PMID:23176462

  6. Mechanism of site-specific DNA damage induced by methylhydrazines in the presence of copper(II) or manganese(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanishi, Shosuke; Yamamoto, Koji )

    1991-03-26

    DNA damage induced by methylhydrazines in the presence of metal ions was investigated by a DNA sequencing technique. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine plus Mn(III) caused DNA cleavage at every nucleotide without marked site specificity. ESR-spin-trapping experiments showed that the hydroxyl free radical ({center dot}OH) is generated during the Mn(III)-catalyzed autoxidation of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. DNA damage and {center dot}OH generation were inhibited by {center dot}OH scavengers and superoxide dismutase, but not by catalase. The results suggest that 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus Mn(III) generates {center dot}OH, not via H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and that {center dot}OH causes DNA damage. In the presence of Cu(II), DNA cleavage was caused by the three methylhydrazines frequently at thymine residues, especially of the GTC sequence. Catalase and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelating agent, inhibited DNA damage while catalase did not inhibit the {center dot}CH{sub 3} generation. The order of DNA damage was correlated with the order of ratio of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production to O{sub 2} consumption observed during Cu(II)-catalyzed autooxidation of methylhydrazines. These results suggest that the Cu(I)-peroxide complex rather than the {center dot}CH{sub 3} plays a more important role in methylhydrazine plus Cu(II)-induced DNA damage.

  7. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking manganese by mouth in combination with calcium, zinc, and copper seems to help reduce spinal bone ... Vitrum osteomag) containing manganese, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, zinc, copper, and boron for one year seems to ...

  8. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of trace manganese (II) with dahlia violet in nonionic microemulsion medium.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qin; Yan, Liangguo; Chang, Guohua; Ou, Qingyu

    2003-02-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of trace amount of manganese (II) in nonionic microemulsion medium. The method is based on the catalytic effect of manganese (II) on the oxidation of dahlia violet by potassium periodate with nitrilotriacetic acid as an activitor in the presence of nonionic microemulsion. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.0004-0.0056 mug ml(-1) of manganese (II) at 580 nm. The detection limit achieved is 3.75x10(-5) mug ml(-1). Manganese (II) in foodstuff samples was determined with satisfactory results. PMID:18968906

  9. Genetic factors and manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Parmalee, Nancy; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), is a trace metal required for normal physiological processes in humans. Mn levels are tightly regulated, as high levels of Mn result in accumulation in the brain and cause a neurological disease known as manganism. Manganism shares many similarities with Parkinson’s disease (PD), both at the physiological level and the cellular level. Exposure to high Mn-containing environments increases the risk of developing manganism. Mn is absorbed primarily through the intestine and then released in the blood. Excessive Mn is secreted in the bile and excreted in feces. Mn enters and exits cells through a number of non-specific importers localized on the cell membrane. Mutations in one of the Mn exporters, SLC30A10 (solute carrier family 30, member 10), result in Mn induced toxicity with liver impairments and neurological dysfunction. Four PD genes have been identified in connection to regulation of Mn toxicity, shedding new light on potential links between manganism and PD. PMID:25136353

  10. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5-5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  11. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  12. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm. PMID:26567571

  14. Manganese Deficiency in Plants: The Impact on Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-07-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability. PMID:27150384

  15. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  16. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. Tuning the redox properties of manganese(II) and its implications to the electrochemistry of manganese and iron superoxide dismutases.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Martin; Gätjens, Jessica; Tabares, Leandro C; Thuéry, Pierre; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Un, Sun

    2008-04-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide to dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The active metal sites of iron and manganese superoxide dismutases are structurally indistinguishable from each other. Despite the structural homology, these enzymes exhibit a high degree of metal selective activity suggesting subtle redox tuning of the active site. The redox tuning model, however, up to now has been challenged by the existence of so-called cambialistic SODs that function with either metal ion. We have prepared and investigated two sets of manganese complexes in which groups of varying electron-withdrawing character, as measured by their Hammett constants sigma Para, have been introduced into the ligands. We observed that the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential for the series based on 4'-X-terpyridine ligands together with the corresponding values for the iron-substituted 4'-X-terpyridine complexes changed linearly with sigma Para. The redox potential of the iron and manganese complexes could be varied by as much as 600 mV by the 4'-substitution with the manganese complexes being slightly more sensitive to the substitution than iron. The difference was such that in the case where the 4'-substituent was a pyrrolidine group both the manganese and the iron complex were thermodynamically competent to catalytically disproportionate superoxide, making this particular ligand "cambialistic". Taking our data and those available from the literature together, it was found that in addition to the electron-withdrawing capacity of the 4'-substituents the overall charge of the Mn(II) complexes plays a major role in tuning the redox potential, about 600 mV per charge unit. The ion selectivity in Mn and FeSODs and the occurrence of cambialistic SODs are discussed in view of these results. We conclude that the more distant electrostatic contributions may be the source of metal specific enzymatic activity. PMID:18271528

  18. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  19. Manganese(II)-catalyzed and clay-minerals-mediated reduction of chromium(VI) by citrate.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Binoy; Naidu, Ravi; Krishnamurti, Gummuluru S R; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2013-01-01

    Unlike lower valent iron (Fe), the potential role of lower valent manganese (Mn) in the reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in soil is poorly documented. In this study, we report that citrate along with Mn(II) and clay minerals (montmorillonite and kaolinite) reduce Cr(VI) both in aqueous phase and in the presence of dissolved organic carbon (SDOC) extracted from a forest soil. The reduction was favorable at acidic pH (up to pH 5) and followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The citrate (10 mM) + Mn(II) (182.02 μM) + clay minerals (3% w/v) system in SDOC accounted for complete reduction of Cr(VI) (192.32 μM) in about 72 h at pH 4.9. In this system, citrate was the reductant, Mn(II) was a catalyst, and the clay minerals acted as an accelerator for both the reductant and catalyst. The clay minerals also serve as a sink for Cr(III). This study reveals the underlying mechanism of the Mn(II)-induced reduction of Cr(VI) by organic ligand in the presence of clay minerals under certain environmental conditions.

  20. Electrochemical Behavior and Voltammetric Determination of a Manganese(II) Complex at a Carbon Paste Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Karastogianni, Sophia; Girousi, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the electrochemical behavior using cyclic voltammetry and detection of [Mn2+(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2 (triethanolamine)] with adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of a manganese(II) complex [Mn2+(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2(triethanolamine)] (A) was investigated using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry in an acetate buffer of pH 4.6 at a carbon paste electrode. Further, an oxidation–reduction mechanism was proposed. Meanwhile, an adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetric method was developed for the determination of manganese(II) complex. PMID:26819548

  1. Manganese-induced Neurotoxicity: From C. elegans to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Peres, Tanara V.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is one of the most abundant metals on the earth. It is required for normal cellular activities, but overexposure leads to toxicity. Neurons are more susceptible to Mn-induced toxicity than other cells, and accumulation of Mn in the brain results in Manganism that presents with Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms. In the last decade, a number of Mn transporters have been identified, which improves our understanding of Mn transport in and out of cells. However, the mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity is only partially uncovered, with further research needed to explore the whole picture of Mn-induced toxicity. In this review, we will address recent progress in Mn-induced neurotoxicity from C. elegans to humans, and explore future directions that will help understand the mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. PMID:25893090

  2. Cobalt(II) Oxidation by the Marine Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus sp. Strain SG-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Tebo, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical cycling of cobalt (Co) has often been considered to be controlled by the scavenging and oxidation of Co(II) on the surface of manganese [Mn(III,IV)] oxides or manganates. Because Mn(II) oxidation in the environment is often catalyzed by bacteria, we have investigated the ability of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to bind and oxidize Co(II) in the absence of Mn(II) to determine whether some Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria also oxidize Co(II) independently of Mn oxidation. We used the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, which produces mature spores that oxidize Mn(II), apparently due to a protein in their spore coats (R.A. Rosson and K. H. Nealson, J. Bacteriol. 151:1027-1034, 1982; J. P. M. de Vrind et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 52:1096-1100, 1986). A method to measure Co(II) oxidation using radioactive 57Co as a tracer and treatments with nonradioactive (cold) Co(II) and ascorbate to discriminate bound Co from oxidized Co was developed. SG-1 spores were found to oxidize Co(II) over a wide range of pH, temperature, and Co(II) concentration. Leucoberbelin blue, a reagent that reacts with Mn(III,IV) oxides forming a blue color, was found to also react with Co(III) oxides and was used to verify the presence of oxidized Co in the absence of added Mn(II). Co(II) oxidation occurred optimally around pH 8 and between 55 and 65°C. SG-1 spores oxidized Co(II) at all Co(II) concentrations tested from the trace levels found in seawater to 100 mM. Co(II) oxidation was found to follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An Eadie-Hofstee plot of the data suggests that SG-1 spores have two oxidation systems, a high-affinity-low-rate system (Km, 3.3 × 10-8 M; Vmax, 1.7 × 10-15 M · spore-1 · h-1) and a low-affinity-high-rate system (Km, 5.2 × 10-6 M; Vmax, 8.9 × 10-15 M · spore-1 · h-1). SG-1 spores did not oxidize Co(II) in the absence of oxygen, also indicating that oxidation was not due to abiological Co(II) oxidation on the surface of preformed Mn(III,IV) oxides. These

  3. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment.

  4. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment. PMID:27341149

  5. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  6. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  7. Substituted benzeneseleninic acids as bidentate ligands. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candrini, Giovanni; Malavasi, Wanda; Preti, Carlo; Tosi, Giuseppe; Zannini, Paolo

    The para- and meta-substituted seleninato anion, XC 6H 4SeO -2, forms complexes with manganese(II) and iron(II) of the type [M(XC 6H 4SeO 2) 2(H 2O) 2], which have been shown to contain the bidentate ligand in seleninato- O, O' derivatives, the water molecules being coordinated to the metals. From the electronic absorption spectra and from the magnetic susceptibility data we have proposed for all the complexes a distorted octahedral D4 h symmetry. The structure of the anhydrous para- and meta-substituted benzeneseleninato complexes of manganese(II) and iron(II) have been investigated by means of electrical conductance measurements, spectral (electronic and i.r.) studies and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The anhydrous complexes are always of the seleninato- O, O' type with the ligands tetrahedrally coordinated to the central atom. The wavelengths of the principal absorption peaks have been accounted for quantitatively in terms of the crystal field theory for manganese(II) derivatives. The nephelauxetic parameters are all indicative of an appreciable metal-ligand covalency.

  8. Molecular mechanism of manganese exposure-induced dopaminergic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, K; Ghosh, D; Chapman, G D; Gunasekar, P G

    2008-07-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential mineral that is found in varying amounts in aerosols or dust. Exposure to atmospheric Mn at high concentration is a risk factor in humans that can manifest as neuronal degeneration resembling Parkinson's disease (PD). Since the underlying mechanism of Mn and dopamine (DA) interaction-induced cell death remains unclear, here, we showed that Mn exposure alone to mesencephalic cells for 24h induced minimal apoptotic cell death. However, cells pre-exposed to DA for 2h accelerated Mn-induced apoptosis. The vulnerability of Mn-induced apoptotic cell death to DA was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and Apoptag TUNEL staining (terminaldeoxynucleotidyl transferase DNA labeling). This was further confirmed by the cell viability assay to support our hypothesis that DA at the cellular level interacts with Mn and causes cells to be more susceptible. Pretreatment with nitric oxide blocker (7-nitroindazole, 7-NI), vitamin E or NF-kappaB inhibitor (SN50) significantly protected the cells from Mn and DA interaction-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that Mn in the presence of DA markedly induced induction of NOS (iNOS) expression. Pretreatment with 7-NI, SN50 or vitamin E significantly attenuated increased iNOS expression indicating that iNOS expression is regulated by ROS and the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Further, the generation of ROS as an early event in Mn and DA interaction is not controlled by NF-kappaB as SN50 pretreatment did not prevent ROS. These findings suggest that NF-kappaB induction and the activation of nitric oxide synthase through ROS represent a proximate mechanism for Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and chemical properties of 1-((E)-2-pyridinylmethylidene)semicarbazone manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbelini, Ellery Regina; Martin, Maria da Graça M. B.; Back, Davi Fernando; Evans, David John; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Ronny Rocha; Lang, Ernesto Schulz; Nunes, Fábio Souza

    2012-01-01

    Manganese(II) perchlorate and iron(II) chloride react with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone (HCSpy) in boiling ethanol to produce [Mn II(HSCpy) 2](ClO 4) 2·C 2H 5OH and [Fe IICl(HSCpy)]Cl. The distorted octahedral manganese complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group P(-1). The ligand HSCpy is tridentate and is coordinated through two nitrogen and one oxygen atoms. Comparison of the bond distances with analogous transition metal complexes that have the same geometry revealed longer bonds for the manganese derivative, an outcome that correlates well with the radius of the metal ions. The iron(II) ion is tetracoordinated to one semicarbazone and one chloride. Mass spectrometry, conductivity measurements, Mössbauer, UV-VIS, FTIR and elemental analysis were all in accordance with the proposed composition and the plausible geometry of [FeCl(HSCpy)]Cl. Mass spectrometry unequivocally detected the presence of the [FeCl(HSCpy)] + ion with a m/ z of 254.97 and intensity of 2 × 10 5.

  10. Metalloantibiotic Mn(II)-bacitracin complex mimicking manganese superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Piacham, Theeraphon; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Yainoy, Sakda; Ye Lei; Buelow, Leif; Prachayasittikul, Virapong . E-mail: mtvpr@mucc.mahidol.ac.th

    2006-03-24

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of various metallobacitracin complexes were evaluated using the riboflavin-methionine-nitro blue tetrazolium assay. The radical scavenging activity of various metallobacitracin complexes was shown to be higher than those of the negative controls, e.g., free transition metal ions and metal-free bacitracin. The SOD activity of the complex was found to be in the order of Mn(II) > Cu(II) > Co(II) > Ni(II). Furthermore, the effect of bacitracin and their complexation to metals on various microorganisms was assessed by antibiotic susceptibility testing. Moreover, molecular modeling and quantum chemical calculation of the metallobacitracin complex was performed to evaluate the correlation of electrostatic charge of transition metal ions on the SOD activity.

  11. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  12. Nano-sized manganese-calcium cluster in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, M M; Ghobadi, M Z; Haghighi, B; Eaton-Rye, J J; Tomo, T; Shen, J-R; Allakhverdiev, S I

    2014-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, algae, and plants are the manufacturers that release O2 via water oxidation during photosynthesis. Since fossil resources are running out, researchers are now actively trying to use the natural catalytic center of water oxidation found in the photosystem II (PS II) reaction center of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms to synthesize a biomimetic supercatalyst for water oxidation. Success in this area of research will transcend the current bottleneck for the development of energy-conversion schemes based on sunlight. In this review, we go over the structure and function of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) found in Nature by focusing on the recent advances made by the international research community dedicated to achieve the goal of artificial water splitting based on the WOC of PS II. PMID:24910206

  13. 2D Resistivity and Induced Polarization Measurement for Manganese Ore Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srigutomo, Wahyu; Trimadona; Pratomo, Prihandhanu M.

    2016-08-01

    2D Resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) survey was conducted to delineate the presence of minerals containing manganese in form of manganese ore. The resistivity method concerns with resistivity (ohm.m) of rocks which indicates the electrical properties in terms of ability to resist the flow of electrical current. The presence of manganese in rocks generally lowers the resistivity. The Induced Polarization (IP) method deals with chargeability (in msec) which indicates the strength of polarization effects experienced by ions in the vicinity of metallic grains in rock. The presence of manganese in rocks increases the chargeability of the rock when measured using IP method. The low resistivity zones (< 5 ohm.m) are situated in the western part, central part, and eastern part of the investigated area. These zones may strongly correlate to the presence of manganese ore. However, these low resistivity zones may have been influenced by the presence of clay or weathered soil. In this case, the high chargeability zones will help in confirming the prospective zones caused by manganese ore. The thicknesses of the manganese ore layer vary from about 5 to 20 m based on the cross-sections. Based on the results, we estimated the geometry of the associated manganese prospective zones for resistivity (< 5 ohm.m) and chargeability (>10 msec).

  14. Manganese-enhanced MRI of rat brain based on slow cerebral delivery of manganese(II) with silica-encapsulated Mn x Fe(1-x) O nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Lu, Fang; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Mo, Kuan-Chi; Hung, Yann; Guo, Zhi-Xuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Ming-Huang; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Chen; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report a monodisperse bifunctional nanoparticle system, MIO@SiO2 -RITC, as an MRI contrast agent [core, manganese iron oxide (MIO); shell, amorphous silica conjugated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC)]. It was prepared by thermal decomposition and modified microemulsion methods. The nanoparticles with varying iron to manganese ratios displayed different saturated magnetizations and relaxivities. In vivo MRI of rats injected intravenously with MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles exhibited enhancement of the T1 contrast in brain tissue, in particular a time-delayed enhancement in the hippocampus, pituitary gland, striatum and cerebellum. This is attributable to the gradual degradation of MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles in the liver, resulting in the slow release of manganese(II) [Mn(II)] into the blood pool and, subsequently, accumulation in the brain tissue. Thus, T1-weighted contrast enhancement was clearly detected in the anatomic structure of the brain as time progressed. In addition, T2*-weighted images of the liver showed a gradual darkening effect. Here, we demonstrate the concept of the slow release of Mn(II) for neuroimaging. This new nanoparticle-based manganese contrast agent allows one simple intravenous injection (rather than multiple infusions) of Mn(II) precursor, and results in delineation of the detailed anatomic neuroarchitecture in MRI; hence, this provides the advantage of the long-term study of neural function. PMID:23526743

  15. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  16. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 hours following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 µM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F2-IsoPs and PGE2 in adult mouse brain 24 hours following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19607852

  17. Two coordination polymers of manganese(II) isophthalate and their preparation, structures, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jinxi; Wang Jingjing; Ohba, Masaaki

    2012-01-15

    Two manganese coordination polymers, [Mn{sub 2}(ip){sub 2}(dmf)]{center_dot}dmf (1) and [Mn{sub 4}(ip){sub 4}(dmf){sub 6}]{center_dot}2dmf (2) (ip=isophthalate; dmf=N,N-dimethylformamide), have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray crystal structural data reveal that compound 1 crystallizes in triclinic space group P-1, a=9.716(3) A, b=12.193(3) A, c=12.576(3) A, {alpha}=62.19(2) Degree-Sign , {beta}=66.423(17) Degree-Sign , {gamma}=72.72(2) Degree-Sign , Z=2, while compound 2 crystallizes in monoclinic space group Cc, a=19.80(3) A, b=20.20(2) A, c=18.01(3) A, {beta}=108.40(4) Degree-Sign , Z=4. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities of compounds 1 and 2 exhibit overall weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Mn(II) ions. - Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional porous and two-dimensional layered manganese isophthalates have been prepared. Magnetic susceptibility measurements exhibit overall weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the Mn(II) ions in both compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two manganese isophthalates have been prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 1 adopts a three-dimensional porous structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 2 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of both compounds are investigated.

  18. Structure and nature of manganese(II) imidazole complexes in frozen aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Un, Sun

    2013-04-01

    A common feature of a large majority of the manganese metalloenzymes, as well as many synthetic biomimetic complexes, is the bonding between the manganese ion and imidazoles. This interaction was studied by examining the nature and structure of manganese(II) imidazole complexes in frozen aqueous solutions using 285 GHz high magnet-field continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-HFEPR) and 95 GHz pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and pulsed electron-double resonance detected nuclear magnetic resonance (PELDOR-NMR). The (55)Mn hyperfine coupling and isotropic g values of Mn(II) in frozen imidazole solutions continuously decreased with increasing imidazole concentration. ENDOR and PELDOR-NMR measurements demonstrated that the structural basis for this behavior arose from the imidazole concentration-dependent distribution of three six-coordinate and two four-coordinate species: [Mn(H2O)6](2+), [Mn(imidazole)(H2O)5](2+), [Mn(imidazole)2(H2O)4](2+), [Mn(imidazole)3(H2O)](2+), and [Mn(imidazole)4](2+). The hyperfine and g values of manganese proteins were also fully consistent with this imidazole effect. Density functional theory methods were used to calculate the structures, spin and charge densities, and hyperfine couplings of a number of different manganese imidazole complexes. The use of density functional theory with large exact-exchange admixture calculations gave isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine couplings that were semiquantitative and of predictive value. The results show that the covalency of the Mn-N bonds play an important role in determining not only magnetic spin parameters but also the structure of the metal binding site. The relationship between the isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine value and the number of imidazole ligands provides a quick and easy test for determining whether a protein binds an Mn(II) ion using histidine residues and, if so, how many are involved. Application of this method shows that as much as 40% of the Mn(II) ions in

  19. Amorphous Manganese-Calcium Oxides as a Possible Evolutionary Origin for the CaMn4 Cluster in Photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-06-01

    In this paper a few calcium-manganese oxides and calcium-manganese minerals are studied as catalysts for water oxidation. The natural mineral marokite is also studied as a catalyst for water oxidation for the first time. Marokite is made up of edge-sharing Mn3+ in a distorted octahedral environment and eight-coordinate Ca2+ centered polyhedral layers. The structure is similar to recent models of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. Thus, the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II does not have an unusual structure and could be synthesized hydrothermally. Also in this paper, oxygen evolution is studied with marokite (CaMn2O4), pyrolusite (MnO2) and compared with hollandite (Ba0.2Ca0.15K0.3Mn6.9Al0.2Si0.3O16), hausmannite (Mn3O4), Mn2O3.H2O, CaMn3O6.H2O, CaMn4O8.H2O, CaMn2O4.H2O and synthetic marokite (CaMn2O4). I propose that the origin of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II resulted from absorption of calcium and manganese ions that were precipitated together in the archean oceans by protocyanobacteria because of changing pH from ~5 to ~8-10. As reported in this paper, amorphous calcium-manganese oxides with different ratios of manganese and calcium are effective catalysts for water oxidation. The bond types and lengths of the calcium and manganese ions in the calcium-manganese oxides are directly comparable to those in the OEC. This primitive structure of these amorphous calcium-manganese compounds could be changed and modified by environmental groups (amino acids) to form the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II.

  20. Oxidant Selection for the Treatment of Manganese (II), Iron (II), and Arsenic (III) in Groundwaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) arsenic standard and the manganese and iron secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) in water (10µg/L, 50µg/L, and 300µg/L, respectively), many Midwestern water utilities must add a strong...

  1. Synthesis of dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex and interaction with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingquan; Yuan, Juan; Zeng, Jinhua; He, Xiangzhu; Li, Daguang

    2012-11-01

    Dihydromyricetin has many physiological functions and its metal complex could have better effects. DNA is very important in biological body, but little attention has been devoted to the relationship between dihydromyricetin-metal complex and the DNA. In this paper, dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex has been prepared and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG-DTA Analysis). The interaction of dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex with DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectra, fluorescence measurements and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA with binding constant Kb = 5.64 × 104 M and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites with Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksq = 1.16.

  2. Spectroscopic evaluation of manganese(II) complexes derived from semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2005-09-01

    Manganese(II) complexes having the general composition Mn(L) 2X 2 [where L = isopropyl methyl ketone semicarbazone (LLA), isopropyl methyl ketone thiosemicarbazone (LLB), 4-aminoacetophenone semicarbazone (LLC) and 4-aminoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (LLD) and X = Cl -, 1/2SO 42-] have been synthesized. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic moment susceptibility, EI-mass, 1H NMR, IR, EPR and electronic spectral studies. All the complexes show magnetic moments corresponding to five unpaired electrons. The possible geometries of the complexes were assigned on the basis of EPR, electronic and infrared spectral studies.

  3. Synthesis, structural analysis, and magnetic properties of ethylmalonate-manganese(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Déniz, Mariadel; Pasán, Jorge; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Fabelo, Oscar; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Yuste, Consuelo; Julve, Miguel; Cano, Joan; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2011-11-01

    Five manganese(II) complexes of formulas [Mn(2)(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)(2)(L)](n) (1-4) and {[Mn(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)][Mn(H(2)O)(4)]}(n) (5) with H(2)Etmal = ethylmalonic acid (1-5) and L = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpa) (1), 4,4'-azobispyridine (azpy) (2), 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) (3), and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe) (4) were synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their thermal behavior and variable-temperature magnetic properties were also investigated. The structure of the compounds 1-4 consists of corrugated layers of aquamanganese(II) units with intralayer carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridges in the anti-syn (equatorial-equatorial) coordination mode which are linked through bis-monodentate bpa (1), azpy (2), 4,4'-bpy (3), and bpe (4) ligands to build up a three-dimensional (3D) framework. The structure of compound 5 is made up by zigzag chains of manganese(II) ions with a regular alternation of [Mn(H(2)O)(4)](2+) and chiral (either Δ or λ enantiomeric forms) [Mn(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)](2-) units within each chain. In contrast to the bidentate/bis-monodentate coordination mode of the Etmal ligand in 1-4, it adopts the bidentate/monodentate coordination mode in 5 with the bridging carboxylate-ethylmalonate also exhibiting the anti-syn conformation but connecting one equatorial and an axial position from adjacent metal centers. The manganese-manganese separation through the carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridge in 1-5 vary in the range 5.3167(4)-5.5336(7) Å. These values are much shorter than those across the extended bis-monodentate N-donors in 1-4 with longest/shortest values of 11.682(3) (3)/13.9745(9) Å (4). Compounds 1-5 exhibit an overall antiferromagnetic behavior, where the exchange pathway is provided by the carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridge. Monte Carlo simulations based on the classical spin approach (1-5) were used to successfully reproduce the magnetic data of 1-5.

  4. Axial Mn-CCN Bonds of Cyano Manganese(II) Porphyrin Complexes: Flexible and Weak?

    PubMed

    He, Mingrui; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-06-20

    Three five-coordinate high-spin (cyano)manganese(II) complexes, utilized tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), tetratolylporphyrin (TTP), and tetramesitylporphyrin (TMP) as ligands, are prepared and studied by single-crystal X-ray, FT-IR, UV-vis, and EPR spectroscopies. The crystal structure studies revealed noteworthy structural features including unexpectedly wide tilting angles of the axial Mn-CCN bonds, which is contrasted to the isoelectronic Fe(III)-CCN bonds. Solid-state EPR measurements (90 K) and simulations are applied to obtain the ZFS parameters (D, E, and E/D (λ)), which are compared to Mn(II) porphyrin analogues of hemes to understand the ligand field of the cyanide. The solution EPR studies gave new insights into the chemical equilibrium of four- and five-coordinate species, which has been monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of silico-manganese nanohybrid for Cu(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiufeng; Wang, Liting; An, Zehuan; Ye, Hong; Feng, Xudong

    2016-05-01

    A novel silico-manganese nanohybrid adsorbent (SMNA) was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and zeta potential measurement. The adsorption of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution on the SMNA was investigated with variations in contact time, pH and initial Cu(II) concentration. The results showed that hydrothermal method would generate nanowire/nanorod incomplete crystallite (δ-MnO2) adsorbent. The adsorption of Cu(II) onto SMNA increased sharply within 25 min and reached equilibrium gradually. The maximum adsorption capacities of SMNA for Cu(II) were ∼40-88 mg g-1, which was lower than δ-MnO2 (92.42 mg g-1) but had a lower pH dependency. As compared with δ-MnO2, higher adsorption capacities of SMNA (7.5-15 wt% of silica doping amount) for Cu(II) could be observed when pH of the aqueous solution was low (<4). The pseudo-second-order model was the best choice to describe the adsorption behavior of Cu(II) onto SMNA, suggesting that the removal of Cu(II) by the as-prepared adsorbents was dominated by migration of Cu(II). The possibility of Cu(II) recovery was also investigated and it revealed that SMNA was a promising recyclable adsorbent for removal of heavy metal ions in water and wastewater treatment.

  6. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  7. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24685431

  8. Two-dimensional HYSCORE spectroscopy of superoxidized manganese catalase: a model for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Coates, Christopher S; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Whittaker, Mei M; Whittaker, James W; Lakshmi, K V

    2015-04-16

    The solar water-splitting protein complex, photosystem II (PSII), catalyzes one of the most energetically demanding reactions in Nature by using light energy to drive a catalyst capable of oxidizing water. The water oxidation reaction takes place at the tetra-nuclear manganese calcium-oxo (Mn4Ca-oxo) cluster at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. Previous studies have determined the magnetic interactions between the paramagnetic Mn4Ca-oxo cluster and its environment in the S2 state of the OEC. The assignments for the electron-nuclear magnetic interactions that were observed in these studies were facilitated by the use of synthetic dimanganese di-μ-oxo complexes. However, there is an immense need to understand the effects of the protein environment on the coordination geometry of the Mn4Ca-oxo cluster in the OEC of PSII. In the present study, we use a proteinaceous model system to examine the protein ligands that are coordinated to the dimanganese catalytic center of manganese catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum. We utilize two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (2D HYSCORE) spectroscopy to detect the weak magnetic interactions of the paramagnetic dinuclear manganese catalytic center of superoxidized manganese catalase with the nitrogen and proton atoms of the surrounding protein environment. We obtain a complete set of hyperfine interaction parameters for the protons of a water molecule that is directly coordinated to the dinuclear manganese center. We also obtain a complete set of hyperfine and quadrupolar interaction parameters for two histidine ligands as well as a coordinated azide ligand, in azide-treated superoxidized manganese catalase. On the basis of the values of the hyperfine interaction parameters of the dimanganese model, manganese catalase, and those of the S2 state of the OEC of PSII, for the first time, we discuss the impact of a proteinaceous environment on the coordination geometry of multinuclear manganese clusters

  9. Two-dimensional HYSCORE spectroscopy of superoxidized manganese catalase: a model for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Coates, Christopher S; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Whittaker, Mei M; Whittaker, James W; Lakshmi, K V

    2015-04-16

    The solar water-splitting protein complex, photosystem II (PSII), catalyzes one of the most energetically demanding reactions in Nature by using light energy to drive a catalyst capable of oxidizing water. The water oxidation reaction takes place at the tetra-nuclear manganese calcium-oxo (Mn4Ca-oxo) cluster at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. Previous studies have determined the magnetic interactions between the paramagnetic Mn4Ca-oxo cluster and its environment in the S2 state of the OEC. The assignments for the electron-nuclear magnetic interactions that were observed in these studies were facilitated by the use of synthetic dimanganese di-μ-oxo complexes. However, there is an immense need to understand the effects of the protein environment on the coordination geometry of the Mn4Ca-oxo cluster in the OEC of PSII. In the present study, we use a proteinaceous model system to examine the protein ligands that are coordinated to the dimanganese catalytic center of manganese catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum. We utilize two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (2D HYSCORE) spectroscopy to detect the weak magnetic interactions of the paramagnetic dinuclear manganese catalytic center of superoxidized manganese catalase with the nitrogen and proton atoms of the surrounding protein environment. We obtain a complete set of hyperfine interaction parameters for the protons of a water molecule that is directly coordinated to the dinuclear manganese center. We also obtain a complete set of hyperfine and quadrupolar interaction parameters for two histidine ligands as well as a coordinated azide ligand, in azide-treated superoxidized manganese catalase. On the basis of the values of the hyperfine interaction parameters of the dimanganese model, manganese catalase, and those of the S2 state of the OEC of PSII, for the first time, we discuss the impact of a proteinaceous environment on the coordination geometry of multinuclear manganese clusters.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese II. Hepatic Processing after Ingestion and Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Dorman, David C.; Nong, Andy; Covington, Tammie R.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current concerns regarding inhalation exposure to Mn, a component from oxidation of the gasoline antiknock agent MMT, have stimulated interest in developing kinetic tools for describing the inhalation and combined inhalation/oral route kinetics of Mn. Here we integrate kinetic approaches for (i) bulk tissue Mn kinetics and (ii) hepato-intestinal control of oral-route Mn uptake into a integrated model structure connecting systemic and oral Mn. Linkages were developed between the hepato-intestinal and systemic tissues in order to evaluate differences in hepatic processing of orally absorbed Mn and systemic Mn. The integrated, unified model described the uptake, net absorption and elimination of ingested manganese and the elimination kinetics of iv administered (systemic) manganese by treating Mn arriving at the liver from systemic versus portal blood differently. Hepatic extraction of orally absorbed Mn in rats predicted through simulation of the oral uptake data was 19 %, 54 % and 78 % at dietary exposures of 1.5 ppm, 11.2 ppm and 100 ppm, respectively. In contrast, hepatic extraction of systemic Mn predicted through simulation of elimination kinetics iv tracer Mn was much less, 0.004%, 0.005%, or 0.009% at dietary levels of 2, 10 and 100 ppm, respectively. These differences in hepatic processing of blood Mn derived from different dose-routes need to be accounted for in more complete PK models for Mn that are intended to support human health risk assessments.

  11. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  12. Subchronic Inhalation of Soluble Manganese Induces Expression of Hypoxia-associated Angiogenic Genes in Adult Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Bredow, Sebastian; Falgout, Melanie M.; March, Thomas H.; Yingling, Christin M.; Malkoski, Stephen P.; Aden, James; Bedrick, Edward J.; Lewis, Johnnye L.; Divine, Kevin K.

    2007-01-01

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE) these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m3 for 5 days at 6h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease. PMID:17467022

  13. Nutrient input influences fungal community composition and size and can stimulate manganese (II) oxidation in caves.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Sarah K; Zorn, Bryan T; Santelli, Cara M; Roble, Leigh A; Carmichael, Mary J; Bräuer, Suzanna L

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the fungal role in biogeochemical cycling in oligotrophic ecosystems. This study compared fungal communities and assessed the role of exogenous carbon on microbial community structure and function in two southern Appalachian caves: an anthropogenically impacted cave and a near-pristine cave. Due to carbon input from shallow soils, the anthropogenically impacted cave had an order of magnitude greater fungal and bacterial quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) gene copy numbers, had significantly greater community diversity, and was dominated by ascomycotal phylotypes common in early phase, labile organic matter decomposition. Fungal assemblages in the near-pristine cave samples were dominated by Basidiomycota typically found in deeper soils (and/or in late phase, recalcitrant organic matter decomposition), suggesting more oligotrophic conditions. In situ carbon and manganese (II) [Mn(II)] addition over 10 weeks resulted in growth of fungal mycelia followed by increased Mn(II) oxidation. A before/after comparison of the fungal communities indicated that this enrichment increased the quantity of fungal and bacterial cells, yet decreased overall fungal diversity. Anthropogenic carbon sources can therefore dramatically influence the diversity and quantity of fungi, impact microbial community function, and stimulate Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in a cascade of changes that can strongly influence nutrient and trace element biogeochemical cycles in karst aquifers.

  14. Nutrient input influences fungal community composition and size and can stimulate manganese (II) oxidation in caves.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Sarah K; Zorn, Bryan T; Santelli, Cara M; Roble, Leigh A; Carmichael, Mary J; Bräuer, Suzanna L

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the fungal role in biogeochemical cycling in oligotrophic ecosystems. This study compared fungal communities and assessed the role of exogenous carbon on microbial community structure and function in two southern Appalachian caves: an anthropogenically impacted cave and a near-pristine cave. Due to carbon input from shallow soils, the anthropogenically impacted cave had an order of magnitude greater fungal and bacterial quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) gene copy numbers, had significantly greater community diversity, and was dominated by ascomycotal phylotypes common in early phase, labile organic matter decomposition. Fungal assemblages in the near-pristine cave samples were dominated by Basidiomycota typically found in deeper soils (and/or in late phase, recalcitrant organic matter decomposition), suggesting more oligotrophic conditions. In situ carbon and manganese (II) [Mn(II)] addition over 10 weeks resulted in growth of fungal mycelia followed by increased Mn(II) oxidation. A before/after comparison of the fungal communities indicated that this enrichment increased the quantity of fungal and bacterial cells, yet decreased overall fungal diversity. Anthropogenic carbon sources can therefore dramatically influence the diversity and quantity of fungi, impact microbial community function, and stimulate Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in a cascade of changes that can strongly influence nutrient and trace element biogeochemical cycles in karst aquifers. PMID:25865809

  15. Spectroscopic techniques and cyclic voltammetry with synthesis: Manganese(II) coordination stability and its ligand field parameters effect on macrocyclic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Chandra, Sulekh

    2007-05-01

    Manganese(II) macrocyclic complexes are prepared with different macrocyclic ligands, containing cyclic skeleton bearing organic components which have different chromospheres like N, O and S donor atoms and stereochemistry. Thus, six macrocyclic ligands, were prepared and their capacity to retain the manganese(II) ion in solid as well as in aqueous solution was determined and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, 1H NMR, IR, electronic spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. The electronic spectrum of this system showed a dependence that may be consistent with the formation of stable complexes and coordination behaviour of the ions. ESR spectra of all the complexes are recorded in solid as well as solution, which show the oxidation state of the manganese(II). Spin Hamiltonian manganese(II), which can be defined as the magnetic field vector (ℋ): ℋ=gβHS+DSz2-{35}/{12}+E[Sz2-Sy2]+ASI+ 1/6 a Sx4+Sy4+Sz4-{707}/{16}+ 1/180 F{35Sz2-475}/{2Sz2+3255/10} Significant distortion of the manganese(II) ion in observed geometry is evident from the angle subtended by the different membered chelate rings and the angles spanned by trans donor atoms octahedral geometry. Cyclic voltammetric studies indicate that complexes with all ligands undergoes one electron oxidation from manganese(II) to manganese(III) followed by a further oxidation to manganese(IV) at a significantly more positive potential.

  16. Spectroscopic, Thermal, Electrochemical, and Antimicrobial Studies of Mononuclear Manganese(II) Ditolyldithiophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Ruchi; Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    New complexes of manganese(II) corresponding to [{(ArO)2PS2}2Mn] and [{(ArO)2PS2}2Mn.nL] (Ar = o-, m-, p-CH3C6H4 and p-Cl-m-CH3C6H3; n = 1, L = N2C12H8, N2C10H8; n = 2, L = NC5H5, P(C6H5)3) have been synthesized and characterized by microelemental analyses (C, H, and N), magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance, thermogravimetric, cyclic voltammetry, and spectral analyses including ESI mass spectrometry, IR, and UV-visible. The presence of a four-and-six coordinated Mn atoms has been established in the complexes and adducts, respectively. Antimicrobial screening of the complexes against gram negative bacteria E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa and fungus S. rolfsii has shown potential bioactivity. PMID:23983670

  17. Immobilization of high concentrations of soluble Mn(II) from electrolytic manganese solid waste using inorganic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Du, Bing; Hou, Deyin; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jun; Dan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Electrolytic manganese solid waste (EMSW) is a by-product of electrolytic manganese production and generally contains a high concentration of soluble Mn(II) (2000-3000 mg/L). Millions of tons of EMSW are stored in China, and the environmental pollution caused by manganese in this waste product is concerning. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid to the immobilization of manganese from industrial solid waste because manganese is absent from toxicological identification standards, and there is a lack of relevant quality standards in China. The objectives of this study were to immobilize soluble Mn(II) using chemical reagents, to analyze the immobilization mechanism, and to identify the most economical reagents. We investigated the immobilization degrees of soluble Mn(II) achieved by the reagents quicklime (CaO), carbonates (NaHCO₃ and Na₂CO₃), phosphates (Na₃PO₄, Na₂HPO₄, NH₄H₂PO₄, and Ca₁₀(PO₄)₆(OH)₂), and caustic magnesia (MgO) both individually and in combination. Our results showed that the use of 9% CaO+ 5% NaHCO₃, 9% CaO+ 5% Na₃PO₄, 10% MgO alone, or with 1-5% NaHCO₃ or 1-5% Na₂CO₃ can reduce the amount of Mn(II) leached to 100 mg/kg when the eluate pH was in the range of 6-9. The most economical reagent treatments were determined using K-means cluster analysis. Analysis of the immobilization mechanism showed that CaO + NaHCO₃ may be favorable for immobilizing soluble Mn(II) as precipitation and oxidation products because the addition of NaHCO₃ releases OH(-) and buffers the system. PMID:25728200

  18. Immobilization of high concentrations of soluble Mn(II) from electrolytic manganese solid waste using inorganic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Du, Bing; Hou, Deyin; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo; Wang, Jun; Dan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Electrolytic manganese solid waste (EMSW) is a by-product of electrolytic manganese production and generally contains a high concentration of soluble Mn(II) (2000-3000 mg/L). Millions of tons of EMSW are stored in China, and the environmental pollution caused by manganese in this waste product is concerning. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid to the immobilization of manganese from industrial solid waste because manganese is absent from toxicological identification standards, and there is a lack of relevant quality standards in China. The objectives of this study were to immobilize soluble Mn(II) using chemical reagents, to analyze the immobilization mechanism, and to identify the most economical reagents. We investigated the immobilization degrees of soluble Mn(II) achieved by the reagents quicklime (CaO), carbonates (NaHCO₃ and Na₂CO₃), phosphates (Na₃PO₄, Na₂HPO₄, NH₄H₂PO₄, and Ca₁₀(PO₄)₆(OH)₂), and caustic magnesia (MgO) both individually and in combination. Our results showed that the use of 9% CaO+ 5% NaHCO₃, 9% CaO+ 5% Na₃PO₄, 10% MgO alone, or with 1-5% NaHCO₃ or 1-5% Na₂CO₃ can reduce the amount of Mn(II) leached to 100 mg/kg when the eluate pH was in the range of 6-9. The most economical reagent treatments were determined using K-means cluster analysis. Analysis of the immobilization mechanism showed that CaO + NaHCO₃ may be favorable for immobilizing soluble Mn(II) as precipitation and oxidation products because the addition of NaHCO₃ releases OH(-) and buffers the system.

  19. Sub-chronic inhalation of high concentrations of manganese sulfate induces lower airway pathology in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, David C; Struve, Melanie F; Gross, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brian A; Howroyd, Paul C

    2005-01-01

    Background Neurotoxicity and pulmonary dysfunction are well-recognized problems associated with prolonged human exposure to high concentrations of airborne manganese. Surprisingly, histological characterization of pulmonary responses induced by manganese remains incomplete. The primary objective of this study was to characterize histologic changes in the monkey respiratory tract following manganese inhalation. Methods Subchronic (6 hr/day, 5 days/week) inhalation exposure of young male rhesus monkeys to manganese sulfate was performed. One cohort of monkeys (n = 4–6 animals/exposure concentration) was exposed to air or manganese sulfate at 0.06, 0.3, or 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days. Another eight monkeys were exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days and held for 45 or 90 days before evaluation. A second cohort (n = 4 monkeys per time point) was exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 and evaluated after 15 or 33 exposure days. Evaluations included measurement of lung manganese concentrations and evaluation of respiratory histologic changes. Tissue manganese concentrations were compared for the exposure and control groups by tests for homogeneity of variance, analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison. Histopathological findings were evaluated using a Pearson's Chi-Square test. Results Animals exposed to manganese sulfate at ≥0.3 mg Mn/m3 for 65 days had increased lung manganese concentrations. Exposure to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for ≥15 exposure days resulted in increased lung manganese concentrations, mild subacute bronchiolitis, alveolar duct inflammation, and proliferation of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Bronchiolitis and alveolar duct inflammatory changes were absent 45 days post-exposure, suggesting that these lesions are reversible upon cessation of subchronic high-dose manganese exposure. Conclusion High-dose subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation is associated with increased

  20. Inhibition of Calpain Prevents Manganese-Induced Cell Injury and Alpha-Synuclein Oligomerization in Organotypic Brain Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Liu, Wei; Deng, Yu; Yang, Tian-Yao; Feng, Shu; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to manganese has been known to promote alpha-synuclein oligomerization and enhance cellular toxicity. However, the exact mechanism of Mn-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization is unclear. To explore whether alpha-synuclein oligomerization was associated with the cleavage of alpha-synuclein by calpain, we made a rat brain slice model of manganism and pretreated slices with calpain inhibitor II, a cell-permeable peptide that restricts the activity of calpain. After slices were treated with 400 μM Mn for 24 h, there were significant increases in the percentage of apoptotic cells, lactate dehydrogenase release, intracellular [Ca2+]i, calpain activity, and the mRNA and protein expression of calpain 1 and alpha-synuclein. Moreover, the number of C- and N-terminal fragments of alpha-synuclein and the amount of alpha-synuclein oligomerization also increased. These results also showed that calpain inhibitor II pretreatment could reduce Mn-induced nerve cell injury and alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in the number of C- and N-terminal fragments of alpha-synuclein in calpain inhibitor II-pretreated slices. These findings revealed that Mn induced the cleavage of alpha-synuclein protein via overactivation of calpain and subsequent alpha-synuclein oligomerization in cultured slices. Moreover, the cleavage of alpha-synuclein by calpain 1 is an important signaling event in Mn-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. PMID:25756858

  1. Purification and Characterization of the Manganese(II) Oxidizing Protein from Erythrobacter sp. SD-21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakama, K. R.; Lien, A.; Johnson, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The manganese(II) oxidizing protein (Mop) found in the alpha-proteobacterium Erythrobacter sp. SD-21 catalyzes the formation of insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides from soluble Mn(II). These Mn(III/IV) oxides formed are one of the strongest naturally occurring oxides, next to oxygen, and can be used to adsorb and oxidize toxic chemicals from the surrounding environment. Because of the beneficial use in the treatment of contaminated sources, the mechanism and biochemical properties of this novel enzyme are being studied. Due to low expression levels in the native host strain, purification of Mop has been problematic. To overcome this problem the gene encoding Mop, mopA, was cloned from the native host into a C-terminal histidine tag vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions have been applied in attempts to purify an active Mop. Western blots have confirmed that the protein is being expressed and is at the expected size of 250 kDa. Preliminary characterization on crude extract containing Mop has shown a Km and vmax value of 2453 uM and 0.025 uM min-1, respectively. Heme and pyrroloquinoline quinone can stimulate Mn(II) oxidizing activity, but hydrogen peroxide does not affect activity, despite the sequence similarity to animal heme peroxidase proteins. Research has been shown that calcium is essential for Mop activity. Purifying an active Mn(II) oxidizing protein will allow for a better understanding behind the enigmatic process of Mn(II) oxidation.

  2. A Bis-Manganese(II)-DOTA Complex for Pulsed Dipolar Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Demay-Drouhard, Paul; Ching, H Y Vincent; Akhmetzyanov, Dmitry; Guillot, Régis; Tabares, Leandro C; Bertrand, Hélène C; Policar, Clotilde

    2016-07-01

    High-spin gadolinium(III) and manganese(II) complexes have emerged as alternatives to standard nitroxide radical spin labels for measuring nanometric distances by using pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR or DEER) at high fields/frequencies. For certain complexes, particularly those with relatively small zero-field splitting (ZFS) and short distances between the two metal centers, the pseudosecular term of the dipolar coupling Hamiltonian is non-negligible. However, in general, the contribution from this term during conventional data analysis is masked by the flexibility of the molecule of interest and/or the long tethers connecting them to the spin labels. The efficient synthesis of a model system consisting of two [Mn(dota)](2-) (MnDOTA; DOTA(4-) =1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate) directly connected to the ends of a central rodlike oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE) spacer is reported. The rigidity of the OPE is confirmed by Q-band PELDOR measurements on a bis-nitroxide analogue. The Mn(II) -Mn(II) distance distribution profile determined by W-band PELDOR is in reasonable agreement with one simulated by using a simple rotamer analysis. The small degree of flexibility arising from the linking MnDOTA arm appears to outweigh the contribution from the pseudosecular term at this interspin distance. This study illustrates the potential of MnDOTA-based spin labels for measuring fairly short nanometer distances, and also presents an interesting candidate for in-depth studies of pulsed dipolar spectroscopy methods on Mn(II) -Mn(II) systems. PMID:27017296

  3. Quantum entanglement in manganese(II) hexakisimidazole nitrate: on electronic structure imaging - A polarized neutron diffraction and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Warren A.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum entanglement has been visualized for the first time, in view of the spin density distribution and electronic structure for manganese in manganese(II)hexakisimidazole nitrate. Using polarized neutron diffraction and density functional theory modelling we have found for the complex, which crystallizes in the R3¯ spacegroup, a = b = 12.4898(3) Å, c = 14.5526(4) Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 120°, Z = 3, that spatially antisymmetric and spatially symmetric shaped regions of negative spin density, in the spin density map for manganese, are a result of quantum entanglement of the high spin d5 configuration due to dative imidazole- manganese π- donation and σ-bonding interactions respectively. We have found leakage of the entangled states for manganese observed as regions of positive spin density with spherical (3.758(2) μB) and non-spherical (1.242(3) μB) contributions. Our results, which are supportive of Einstein's theory of general relativity, provide evidence for the existence of a black hole spin density distribution at the origin of an electronic structure and also address the paradoxical views of entanglement and quantum mechanics. We have also found the complex, which is an insulator, to be suitable for spintronic studies.

  4. Tumor-targeting novel manganese complex induces ROS-mediated apoptotic and autophagic cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JIA; GUO, WENJIE; LI, JING; LI, XIANG; GENG, JI; CHEN, QIUYUN; GAO, JING

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antitumor activity of the novel manganese (II) compound, Adpa-Mn {[(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] (Adpa=bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid)}, and its possible mechanisms of action were investigated. In vitro, the growth inhibitory effects of Adpa-Mn (with IC50 values lower than 15 μM) on tumor cell lines were examined by MTT assay. We found that this compound was more selective against cancer cells than the popular chemotherapeutic reagent, cisplatin. We then found that Adpa-Mn achieved its selectivity against cancer cells through the transferrin (Tf)-transferrin receptor (TfR) system, which is highly expressed in tumor cells. Furthermore, Adpa-Mn induced both apoptosis and autophagy, as indicated by chromatin condensation, the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), Annexin V/prop-idium iodide staining, an enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine (MDC), as well as the elevated expression of the autophagy-related protein, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). In addition, Adpa-Mn induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its anticancer effects were significantly reduced following pre-treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, indicating that ROS triggered cell death. In vivo, the induction of apoptosis and autophagy in tumor tissue was confirmed following treatment with Adpa-Mn, which contributed to its significant antitumor activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-A cell) xenografts at 10 mg/kg. Taken together, these data suggest the possible use of Adpa-Mn as a novel anticancer drug. PMID:25604962

  5. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amount of manganese(II) in water and food samples.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ayman A

    2014-10-15

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract manganese(II) from aqueous solution was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of manganese(II) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarin) in the presence of borate buffer at pH 8.5 and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by spectrophotometry at 528nm. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection (LOD), linear range, preconcentration and improvement factors) were obtained. The proposed CPE method showed linear calibration within the range 5.0-200ngmL(-1) of manganese(II) and the limit of detection of the method was 0.8ngmL(-1) with an preconcentration factor of ∼50 when 25mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.5mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and relative error were found to be 1.35% and 1.42%, respectively (CMn(II)=150ngmL(-1), n=6) for pure standard solutions. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. The method was applied to the determination of manganese(II) in water and food samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 95.87-102.5%.

  6. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amount of manganese(II) in water and food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Ayman A.

    2014-10-01

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract manganese(II) from aqueous solution was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of manganese(II) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarin) in the presence of borate buffer at pH 8.5 and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by spectrophotometry at 528 nm. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection (LOD), linear range, preconcentration and improvement factors) were obtained. The proposed CPE method showed linear calibration within the range 5.0-200 ng mL-1 of manganese(II) and the limit of detection of the method was 0.8 ng mL-1 with an preconcentration factor of ∼50 when 25 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.5 mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and relative error were found to be 1.35% and 1.42%, respectively (CMn(II) = 150 ng mL-1, n = 6) for pure standard solutions. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. The method was applied to the determination of manganese(II) in water and food samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 95.87-102.5%.

  7. Pathogenesis of Mortalin in Manganese-induced Parkinsonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Travis J.

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary micronutrient for which excessive exposure has long been known to be neurotoxic. Historically, short-term, high-intensity exposure in occupational settings was recognized to cause acute-onset parkinsonism (PS) termed manganism. Although modern day exposures are typically several orders of magnitude lower than those necessary to cause manganism, chronic, low-level exposures are not uncommon among a number of occupations and communities. Recent epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between Mn exposure and risk of PS, and in this regard Mn remains a public health concern. The work described here was designed to provide insight toward questions which remain with respect to Mn exposure and its toxic effect on the brain, and includes studies utilizing Mn exposed human populations and in vitro model systems to address these objectives. Blood plasma samples obtained from a cohort of welders, whose work is recognized as generating appreciable amounts of airborne Mn, and post-mortem brain tissue of Mn mine workers were both found to have discernable alterations related to the mitochondrial chaperone protein mortalin. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that reduced astroglial expression of mortalin confers neuronal susceptibility to toxicity elicited by low levels of Mn, possibly via mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress mediated by alpha-synuclein. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that Mn exposures experienced by modern day populations are sufficient to cause biological alterations in humans that are potentially neurotoxic.

  8. Simulation, planning, and optimization of redox processes involving the catalytic disproportionation of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ by manganese(II) complexes with glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Batyr, D.G.; Isak, V.G.; Kil'mininov, S.V.; Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.

    1987-11-01

    The applicability of the use of a method for the simulation, planning, and optimization of chemical processes has been demonstrated in the example case of the manganese(II)-glycine-hydrogen peroxide redox system. Theoretical calculations based on experimental data have made it possible to present a mechanism for the catalase-mediated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of coordination compounds of manganese(II) with glycine.

  9. Mn(II) removal from groundwater with manganese oxide-coated filter media.

    PubMed

    Piispanen, Jutta K; Sallanko, Jarmo T

    2010-11-01

    Removing soluble manganese from groundwater requires a strong chemical oxidant, such as ozone or potassium permanganate, or raising the pH to alkaline value (over pH 9). Biological or adsorption processes can also be applied. Filter media naturally or industrially coated with manganese oxide are effective in adsorptive manganese removal. In this work, a layer of commercial manganese oxide coated medium was added to the top of an experimental sand/anthracite filter column to improve manganese removal. The coated layer was ca 28 cm thick (20% of the total filter depth) and the sand layer was 110 cm thick. The coated layer enhanced the manganese removal markedly. Manganese removal increased by over 91%, and < 0.02 mg/L of manganese remained in the treated water. Also iron removal was enhanced. Filters with added coated layer recovered faster than reference filter from filter backwashes. Sodium hypochlorite feed, which was tested in regeneration of the filter medium, had a slight negative effect on the filter performance.

  10. Local structure of the metal-organic perovskite dimethylammonium manganese(ii) formate.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Helen D; Dove, Martin T; Keen, David A; Phillips, Anthony E

    2016-03-14

    We report total neutron scattering measurements on the metal-organic perovskite analogue dimethylammonium manganese(ii) formate, (CD3)2ND2[Mn(DCO2)3]. Reverse Monte Carlo modelling shows that, in both the disordered high-temperature and ordered low-temperature phases, the ammonium moiety forms substantially shorter hydrogen bonds (N...O = 2.4 Å and 2.6 Å) than are visible in the average crystal structures. These bonds result from a pincer-like motion of two adjacent formate ions about the dimethylammonium ion in such a way that the framework can adjust independently to the positions of nearest-neighbour dimethylammonium ions. At low temperatures the shortest hydrogen bond is less favourable, apparently because it involves a greater distortion of the framework. Furthermore, in the high-temperature phase, in addition to the three disordered nitrogen positions expected from the average crystal structure, there appear to be also smaller probability maxima between these positions, corresponding to orientations in which the dimethylammonium is hydrogen-bonded to the two oxygen atoms of a single formate ion. The spontaneous strain across the phase transition reveals a contraction of the framework about the dimethylammonium cation, continuing as the material is cooled below the transition temperature. These results provide direct evidence of the local atomic structure of the guest-framework hydrogen bonding, and in particular the distortions of the framework responsible for the phase transition in this system. PMID:26763144

  11. 24-epibrassinolide mitigates the adverse effects of manganese induced toxicity through improved antioxidant system and photosynthetic attributes in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Fariduddin, Qazi; Ahmed, Mumtaz; Mir, Bilal A; Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Tanveer A

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish relationship between manganese-induced toxicity and antioxidant system response in Brassica juncea plants and also to investigate whether brassinosteroids activate antioxidant system to confer tolerance to the plants affected with manganese induced oxidative stress. Brassica juncea plants were administered with 3, 6, or 9 mM manganese at 10-day stage for 3 days. At 31-day stage, the seedlings were sprayed with deionized water (control) or 10(-8) M of 24-epibrassinolide, and plants were harvested at 45-day stage to assess growth, leaf gas-exchange traits, and biochemical parameters. The manganese treatments diminished growth along with photosynthetic attributes and carbonic anhydrase activity in the concentration-dependent manner, whereas it enhanced lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, accumulation of H2O2 as well as proline, and various antioxidant enzymes in the leaves of Brassica juncea which were more pronounced at higher concentrations of manganese. However, the follow-up application of 24-epibrassinolide to the manganese stressed plants improved growth, water relations, and photosynthesis and further enhanced the various antioxidant enzymes viz. catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase and content of proline. The elevated level of antioxidant enzymes as well as proline could have conferred tolerance to the manganese-stressed plants resulting in improved growth and photosynthetic attributes.

  12. [Effect of manganese (II), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions on the growth and production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M; Sklenárová, H; Solich, P

    2005-01-01

    The plant cell reacts to an increased concentration of metals in the environment by various mechanisms. They include an increase in the formation of heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, phytochelatins, amino acids (cysteine, histidine), organic acids (citric, malic), or secondary metabolites. The latter mechanism is being investigated for its possible use in explant cultures for the stimulation of secondary metabolism, which is the source of substances of pharmaceutical importance. The study tested manganese (II) (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mM in the medium), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 200, and 500 microM in the medium) as potential elicitors of coumarin production. At the same time, toxicity of these metals for the culture was examined by evaluating their effect on growth (characterized by fresh and dry weight of biomass at the end of a two-week cultivation). Cultures were cultivated in the dark and in the light. It has been found that the growth of cultures is not influenced by manganese in concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 mM, then it slightly decreases, at a concentration of 50 mM it is lower by 20 % when cultivated in the dark and by 30 % when cultivated in the light in comparison with the control. Cobalt in concentrations of 0 to 50 microM does not significantly influence the growth of the culture, higher concentrations decrease the biomass yields, more markedly when cultivated in the light (at 500 microM Co by 60 %, in the dark only by 30 % in comparison with the controls). Nickel in concentrations of 0.1 to 200 microM does not influence growth, and in a concentration of 500 microM decreases it by approximately 30 % in comparison with the control both in the light and dark. Production of coumarins was not stimulated by any metal in comparison with the control cultures, only the removal of manganese from the medium in the culture cultivated in the dark increased production by about 15 % versus the

  13. New manganese(II) and nickel(II) coordination compounds with N,O-polydentate ligands obtained from pyridoxal and tripodal units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebani, Patrícia Regina; Fontana, Liniquer Andre; Campos, Patrick Teixeira; Rosso, Eduardo F.; Piquini, Paulo C.; Iglesias, Bernardo Almeida; Back, Davi Fernando

    2016-09-01

    We have reported the synthesis involving the condensation of pyridoxal with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine obtained a tripodal ligand, as well as its subsequent complexation with the manganese(II) and nickel(II) ions. The structural analysis revealed, in the case of complex 1, the formation of a monomeric complex with Mn(II) species. In the complex 2, with Ni(II) metal ion, we describe the probable mechanism for the formation of hemiacetal in these complexes. Only the complex 1 catalyze the dismutation of superoxide efficiently with IC50 equal to 3.38 μM, evaluated through the nitro blue tetrazolium photoreduction inhibition superoxide dismutase assay, in aqueous solution of pH 7.8. Density functional theory calculations are done to characterize and compare the molecular frontier orbitals of the Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes.

  14. Antioxidants and NOS inhibitors selectively targets manganese-induced cell volume via Na-K-Cl cotransporter-1 in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alahmari, Khalid A; Prabhakaran, Harini; Prabhakaran, Krishnan; Chandramoorthy, Harish C; Ramugounder, Ramakrishnan

    2015-06-12

    Manganese has shown to be involved in astrocyte swelling. Several factors such as transporters, exchangers and ion channels are attributed to astrocyte swelling as a result in the deregulation of cell volume. Products of oxidation and nitration have been implied to be involved in the pathophysiology of swelling; however, the direct link and mechanism of manganese induced astrocyte swelling has not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we used rat primary astrocyte cultures to investigate the activation of Na-K-Cl cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) a downstream mechanism for free radical induced astrocyte swelling as a result of manganese toxicity. Our results showed manganese, oxidants and NO donors as potent inducer of oxidation and nitration of NKCC1. Our results further confirmed that manganese (50 μM) increased the total protein, phosphorylation and activity of NKCC1 as well as cell volume (p < 0.05 vs. control). NKCC1 inhibitor (bumetanide), NKCC1-siRNA, antioxidants; DMTU, MnTBAP, tempol, catalase and Vit-E, NOS inhibitor; L-NAME, peroxinitrite scavenger; uric acid all significantly reversed the effects of NKCC1 activation (p < 0.05). From the current investigation we infer that manganese or oxidants and NO induced activation, oxidation/nitration of NKCC1 play an important role in the astrocyte swelling.

  15. Facile metalation of silicon and germanium analogues of thiocarboxylic acids with a manganese(II) hydride precursor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglai; Xiong, Yun; Driess, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of the first manganese(II)-containing heavier thiocarboxylate analogues, [L(Dip)Si(=S)OMnL(Dep)] (4; L(Dip)=CH[C(Me)N(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3))](2), L(Dep)=CH[C(Me)N(2,6-Et(2)C(6)H(3))](2)) and [L(Dip)Ge(=S)OMnL(Dep)] (5) are described. They are accessible through reaction of the silicon and germanium analogues of the respective thiocarboxylic acids [L(Dip)E(=S)OH] (E=Si, Ge) with the β-diketiminato (nacnac) manganese(II) hydride precursor [(L(Dep)Mn)(2)(μ-H)(2)] (3) in high yield. The first Mn nacnac hydride 3 has been prepared by the reaction of manganese bromide [(L(Dep)Mn)(2)(μ-Br)(2)] (2) with KBEt(3)H. Compounds 4 and 5 represent the first transition-metal heavier thiocarboxylates with the Si=S and Ge=S functionalities. All new compounds are paramagnetic and were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, MS (EI), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Due to the N→E (E=Si, Ge) and E=S→Mn donor-acceptor interaction as well as the carboxylate-like π-electron delocalization within the E(S)O moieties, the E=S double bonds in these compounds are resonance stabilized.

  16. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini.

  17. Distribution of manganese species in an oxidative dimerization reaction of a bis-terpyridine mononuclear manganese (II) complex and their heterogeneous water oxidation activities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Sato, Taisei; Yamazaki, Hirosato; Yagi, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous water oxidation catalyses were studied as a synthetic model of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis using mica adsorbing various manganese species. Distribution of manganese species formed in the oxidative dimerization reaction of [Mn(II)(terpy)2](2+) (terpy=2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) (1') with various oxidants in water was revealed. 1' was stoichiometrically oxidized to form di-μ-oxo dinuclear manganese complex, [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(III)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](3+) (1) by KMnO4 as an oxidant. When Oxone and Ce(IV) oxidants were used, the further oxidation of 1 to [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(IV)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](4+) (2) was observed after the oxidative dimerization reaction of 1'. The mica adsorbates with various composition of 1', 1 and 2 were prepared by adding mica suspension to the various oxidant-treated solutions followed by filtration. The heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis by the mica adsorbates was examined using a Ce(IV) oxidant. The observed catalytic activity of the mica adsorbates corresponded to a content of 1 (1ads) adsorbed on mica for KMnO4- and Oxone-treated systems, indicating that 1' (1'ads) and 2 (2ads) adsorbed on mica do not work for the catalysis. The kinetic analysis suggested that 1ads works for the catalysis through cooperation with adjacent 1ads or 2ads, meaning that 2ads assists the cooperative catalysis by 1ads though 2ads is not able to work for the catalysis alone. For the Ce(IV)-treated system, O2 evolution was hardly observed although the sufficient amount of 1ads was contained in the mica adsorbates. This was explained by the impeded penetration of Ce(IV) ions (as an oxidant for water oxidation) into mica by Ce(3+) cations (generated in oxidative dimerization of 1') co-adsorbed with 1ads.

  18. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Millaleo, R; Reyes-Díaz, M; Alberdi, M; Ivanov, A G; Krol, M; Hüner, N P A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50-1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as F(v)/F(m), although the characteristic peak temperature of the S(2/3)Q(B) (-) charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33 kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700(+)) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700(+) re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed.

  19. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50–1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as Fv/Fm, although the characteristic peak temperature of the S2/3QB – charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700+) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700+ re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed. PMID:23183256

  20. Complex of manganese (II) with curcumin: Spectroscopic characterization, DFT study, model-based analysis and antiradical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgannezhad, Lena; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati

    2016-04-01

    The complex formation between curcumin (Cur) and Manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate (MnCl2.4H2O) was studied by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data suggest that Cur can chelate Manganese cations. A simple multi-wavelength model-based method was used to define stability constant for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components were extracted using this method. Density functional theory (DFT) was also used to view insight into complexation mechanism. Antioxidant activity of Cur and Cur-Mn(II) complex was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Bond dissociation energy (BDE), the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of Cur and the complex also were calculated at PW91/TZ2P level of theory using ADF 2009.01 package. The experimental results show that Cur has a higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than Cur-Mn(II). This observation is theoretically justified by means of lower BDE and higher HOMO and LUMO energy values of Cur ligand as compared with those of Cur-Mn(II) complex.

  1. Manganese(II,III) Oxyborate, Mn 2OBO 3: A Distorted Homometallic Warwickite—Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Band Calculations, and Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrestam, R.; Kritikos, M.; Sjödin, A.

    1995-02-01

    The manganese(II,III) oxyborate with the composition Mn2OBO3 has been synthesized by high-temperature techniques. X-ray studies show that crystals of the specimen, grown with borax as flux, are monoclinic, with space group P21/n, = 9.2866(7), b = 9.5333(10), c = 3.2438(3) Å, and β = 90.757(7)°. A model of the crystal structure has been refined with the 2064 most significant (l ≥ 5 · σ1) X-ray reflections with sin(θ)/λ ≤ 1.08 Å-1 to R = 0.40. The structure of Mn2OBO3 can be considered to be a distorted modification of the orthorhombic warwickite structure. The distortions, apparently caused by Jahn-Teller effects induced by the Mn3+ ions, remove the mirror symmetry of the parent undistorted warwickite. As a consequence, the space group symmetry is lowered from Pnam to one of its subgroups, P21/n. The structural results as well as the measured magnetic susceptibilities indicate high-spin manganese ions. The magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature region 110-300 K follow the Curie-Weiss law. The Weiss constant of -132(1) K indicates an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The bond distances and calculated bond valence sums indicate that the trivalent manganese ions are located in the two inner columns of the four-octahedra-wide walls. This metal charge distribution is supported by extended Hückel band calculations on some homometallic warwickites. The difference in metal coordination around one of the borate oxygen atoms is reflected by a significant deviation of the borate group geometry from the ideal trigonal symmetry.

  2. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: Putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1. Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1.Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25128239

  4. Removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from wastewater by using triethylenetetramine functionalized grafted cellulose acetate-manganese dioxide composite.

    PubMed

    Yakout, Amr A; El-Sokkary, Ramadan H; Shreadah, Mohamed A; Abdel Hamid, Omnia G

    2016-09-01

    In this manuscript, we have studied the removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by using triethylenetetramine functionalized cellulose acetate grafted with the copolymer-manganese dioxide composite. The novel sorbent cellulose was extracted from the mangrove trees (Avicennia marina) and it was then acetylated and grafted with acrylamide. The sorbent composite was designed to interact simultaneously with higher metal loading by complexation-adsorption process. FT-IR, SEM, EDAX and TGA techniques were employed to characterize the cellulose modified composite. Sorption equilibria were established after 30min and their data were described by Langmuir and Freundlich models. The functionalized hybrid cellulose composite showed maximum adsorption capacity 82.06 and 196.84mgg(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. The studied metal ions were successfully recovered from real wastewater samples of different matrices.

  5. Structure and magnetic behavior of a new two-dimensional antiferromagnetic manganese(II)-{mu}-1,3-azido system

    SciTech Connect

    Escuer, A.; Vicente, R.; Mautner, F.A.

    1995-11-08

    In this work we present the synthesis, X-ray crystal structure determination, and magnetic behavior of the two-dimensional compound [Mn(4acpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n}, (4acpy = 4-acetylpyridine) in which the coordination mode of the azido ligand is end-to-end. The susceptibility measurements for [Mn(4acpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n} are indicative of a moderate antiferromagnetic coupling. EPR and susceptibility data are indicative of magnetic ordering below 28 K. It is relevant to note that these magnetic measurements are the first ones for the manganese-azido(end-to-end) system. From the point of view of the design of new magnetic systems, the bridging azido ligand shows two key properties: it is a good superexchange pathway (ferromagnetic systems for the end-on coordination and antiferromagnetic for end-to-end coordination) and it frequently leads to nontrivial systems with nuclearity greater than 2. At the present, magnetic studies on the manganese-azido-bridged systems have been performed only for the dinuclear compound ({mu}-1,1-N{sub 3})[Mn(terpy)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, which shows ferromagnetic coupling (J/k = + 3.5 K), following the general trends found for analogous Cu(II) and Ni(II) 1,1-azido systems. The structure of the title compound shows that each manganese atom is octahedrally coordinated to four azido ligands and two molecules of 4-acetylpyridine in trans arrangement. Antiferromagnetic interactions were evident from susceptibility data.

  6. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Allancer DC; Ramalho, Laylla S; Souza, Álvaro PS; Mendes, Elizabeth P; Colugnati, Diego B; Zufelato, Nícholas; Sousa, Marcelo H; Bakuzis, Andris F; Castro, Carlos H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for various biomedical applications. Importantly, manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles have useful magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and potential for hyperthermia treatment, but their effects in the cardiovascular system are poorly reported. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular effects of three different types of manganese ferrite-based magnetic nanoparticles: citrate-coated (CiMNPs); tripolyphosphate-coated (PhMNPs); and bare magnetic nanoparticles (BaMNPs). The samples were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The direct effects of the MNPs on cardiac contractility were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. The CiMNPs, but not PhMNPs and BaMNPs, induced a transient decrease in the left ventricular end-systolic pressure. The PhMNPs and BaMNPs, but not CiMNPs, induced an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, which resulted in a decrease in a left ventricular end developed pressure. Indeed, PhMNPs and BaMNPs also caused a decrease in the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dt) and maximal rate of left ventricular pressure decline (−dP/dt). The three MNPs studied induced an increase in the perfusion pressure of isolated hearts. BaMNPs, but not PhMNPs or CiMNPs, induced a slight vasorelaxant effect in the isolated aortic rings. None of the MNPs were able to change heart rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25031535

  7. Fluorophotometric determination of histone with 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone-manganese(II) complex and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Kanako; Hoshino, Mitsuru; Kadobayashi, Hiroko; Moriyama, Kenzo; Asano, Mamiko; Yamaguchi, Takako; Fujita, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    A simple fluorophotometric method for the determination of histone has been developed. This method involves a fluorescence quenching reaction that results in the formation of a complex of manganese(II), 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone (TFCPF), and histone in a non-ionic surfactant micellar medium. The calibration curve was found to be linear in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 µg/mL. The binding parameters (n, number of binding sites; K, binding constant) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), change in Gibbs free energy; ΔH(0), change in enthalpy; ΔS(0), change in entropy) were investigated spectrophotometrically for the elucidation of the reaction mechanism. The resulting binding parameters (n=4.08 and K=3.16×10(4) m(-1) at 25°C) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG=-25.83 kJ/mol, ΔH=-9.83 kJ/mol, and ΔS=53.68 J/(mol K)) suggest that the colored complex in this reaction system is an ion-association complex between manganese(II)-TFCPF and histone.

  8. Catalytic oxidation of manganese(II) by multicopper oxidase CueO and characterization of the biogenic Mn oxide.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmei; Deng, Lin; Huang, Liangbo; Guo, Shujin; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2014-06-01

    Manganese(II) contamination is naturally occurring in many groundwater and surface water sources. Moreover, industrial wastewater is also responsible for much of the Mn(II) contamination. Nowadays, Mn(II) contamination has become a serious environmental problem in some regions of the world. To explore a biological approach for removing excessive amounts of aqueous Mn(II) from water, we found a new biocatalyst multicopper oxidase CueO, which was firstly proved to catalyze the oxidation of Mn(II) both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequently, we established a CueO-mediated catalysis system to prepare biogenic Mn oxide (BioMnOx), which was confirmed to be γ-Mn3O4 by X-ray diffraction. This newly prepared BioMnOx consisted of 53.6% Mn(II), 18.4% Mn(III) and 28.0% Mn(IV) characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It exhibited distinct polyhedral structure with nanoparticles of 150-350 nm diameters observed by transmission electron microscopy. Importantly, CueO could remove 35.7% of Mn(II) after a seven-day reaction, and on the other hand, the cueO-overexpressing Escherichia coli strain (ECueO) could also oxidize 58.1% dissolved Mn(II), and simultaneously remove 97.7% Mn(II). Based on these results, we suggest that ECueO strain and CueO enzyme have potential applications on Mn(II) decontamination in water treatment.

  9. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s Disease: Shared and Distinguishable Features

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, Gunnar F.; Paoliello, Monica M.B.; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element necessary for physiological processes that support development, growth and neuronal function. Secondary to elevated exposure or decreased excretion, Mn accumulates in the basal ganglia region of the brain and may cause a parkinsonian-like syndrome, referred to as manganism. The present review discusses the advances made in understanding the essentiality and neurotoxicity of Mn. We review occupational Mn-induced parkinsonism and the dynamic modes of Mn transport in biological systems, as well as the detection and pharmacokinetic modeling of Mn trafficking. In addition, we review some of the shared similarities, pathologic and clinical distinctions between Mn-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease. Where possible, we review the influence of Mn toxicity on dopamine, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamate neurotransmitter levels and function. We conclude with a survey of the preventive and treatment strategies for manganism and idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). PMID:26154659

  10. Preparation of polyacrylnitrile (PAN)/ Manganese oxide based activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) for adsorption of Cadmium (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, N.; Yusof, N.; Jaafar, J.; Ismail, AF; Che Othman, F. E.; Hasbullah, H.; Salleh, W. N. W.; Misdan, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) from precursor polyacrylnitrile (PAN) and manganese oxide (MnO2) were prepared via electrospinning process. The electrospun PAN/MnO2-based ACNFs were characterised in term of its morphological structure and specific surface area using SEM and BET analysis respectively. The comparative adsorption study of cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solution between the neat ACNFs, composite ACNFs and commercial granular activated carbon was also conducted. SEM analysis illustrated that composite ACNFs have more compact fibers with presence of MnO2 beads with smaller fiber diameter of 437.2 nm as compared to the neat ACNFs which is 575.5 nm. BET analysis elucidated specific surface area of ACNFs/MnO2 to be 67 m2/g. Under adsorption study, it was found out that Cd (II) removal by ACNFs/MnO2 was the highest (97%) followed by neat ACNFs (96%) and GAC (74%).

  11. Extremely low-frequency magnetic field induces manganese accumulation in brain, kidney and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Mustafa Salih; Güven, Kemal; Akpolat, Veysi; Akdağ, Mehmet Zulkuf; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Gül-Güven, Reyhan; Çelik, M Yusuf; Erdoğan, Sait

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) on accumulation of manganese (Mn) in the kidney, liver and brain of rats. A total of 40 rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Four control groups received 0, 3.75, 15 and 60 mg Mn per kg body weight orally every 2 days for 45 days, respectively. The remaining four groups received same concentrations of Mn and were also exposed to ELF-MF (1.5 mT; 50 Hz) for 4 h for 5 days a week during 45 days. Following the last exposure, kidney, liver and brain were taken from all rats and they were analyzed for Mn accumulation levels using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. In result of the current study, we observed that Mn levels in brain, kidney and liver were higher in Mn groups than in control groups. Mn levels in brain, kidney and liver were also higher in Mn plus ELF-MF groups than in Mn groups. In conclusion, result of the current study showed that the ELF-MF induced manganese accumulation in kidney, liver and brain of rats.

  12. Degradation of the solid electrolyte interphase induced by the deposition of manganese ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hosop; Park, Jonghyun; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The deposition of manganese ions dissolved from the cathode onto the interface between the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and graphite causes severe capacity fading in manganese oxide-based cells. The evolution of the SEI layer containing these Mn compounds and the corresponding instability of the layer are thoroughly investigated by artificially introducing soluble Mn ions into a 1 mol L-1 LiPF6 electrolyte solution. Deposition of dissolved Mn ions induces an oxygen-rich SEI layer that results from increased electrolyte decomposition, accelerating SEI growth. The spatial distribution of Mn shows that dissolved Mn ions diffuse through the porous layer and are deposited mostly at the inorganic layer/graphite interface. The Mn compound deposited on the anode, identified as MnF2, originates from a metathesis reaction between LiF and dissolved Mn ion. It is confirmed that ion-exchange reaction occurs in the inorganic layer, converting SEI species to Mn compounds. Some of the Mn is observed inside the graphite; this may cause surface structural disordering in the graphite, limiting lithium-ion intercalation. The continuous reaction that occurs at the inorganic layer/graphite interfacial regions and the modification of the original SEI layer in the presence of Mn ions are critically related to capacity fade and impedance rise currently plaguing Li-ion cells.

  13. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Pan, Haixia; Xu, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen

    2016-03-01

    Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N2 adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g(-1) adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na3MnPO4CO3. Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation.

  14. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Pan, Haixia; Xu, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen

    2016-03-01

    Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N2 adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g(-1) adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na3MnPO4CO3. Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation. PMID:26606462

  15. Proton Matrix ENDOR Studies on Ca2+-depleted and Sr2+-substituted Manganese Cluster in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Shen, Jian-Ren; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-20

    Proton matrix ENDOR spectra were measured for Ca(2+)-depleted and Sr(2+)-substituted photosystem II (PSII) membrane samples from spinach and core complexes from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the S2 state. The ENDOR spectra obtained were similar for untreated PSII from T. vulcanus and spinach, as well as for Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII, indicating that the proton arrangements around the manganese cluster in cyanobacterial and higher plant PSII and Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII are similar in the S2 state, in agreement with the similarity of the crystal structure of both Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII in the S1 state. Nevertheless, slightly different hyperfine separations were found between Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII because of modifications of the water protons ligating to the Sr(2+) ion. Importantly, Ca(2+) depletion caused the loss of ENDOR signals with a 1.36-MHz separation because of the loss of the water proton W4 connecting Ca(2+) and YZ directly. With respect to the crystal structure and the functions of Ca(2+) in oxygen evolution, it was concluded that the roles of Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) involve the maintenance of the hydrogen bond network near the Ca(2+) site and electron transfer pathway to the manganese cluster.

  16. Manganese-induced Parkinsonism among ephedrone users and drug policy in Poland.

    PubMed

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Kołodziejczyk, Iwona; Gajda, Tomasz; Majkowska-Zwolińska, Beata; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    A recent government's prohibition policy in Poland was partially successful with a reduction of the synthetic drugs market and a decrease in drug-related poisoning mortality rates. However, a new threatening trend is observed. There are a growing number of individuals in Poland and other European countries using legal pharmaceuticals containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine to produce stimulants. This case report describes a history of a male patient with polysubstance dependence who administered self-designed ephedrone derived from Sudafed using potassium permanganate. He revealed significant clinical symptoms of manganese-induced parkinsonism. No effective treatment could be recommended. Awareness of this severe neurological and social consequences should lead to prevention efforts including educational programs and initiatives reducing availability of the legal medications containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. More research is needed to enhance our knowledge about manganism and potential treatment regimens.

  17. Structure-Triggered High Quantum Yield Luminescence and Switchable Dielectric Properties in Manganese(II) Based Hybrid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xia; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Tang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Heng-Yun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Two new manganese(II) based organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, C11H21Cl3MnN2 (1) and C11H22Cl4MnN2 (2), with prominent photoluminescence and dielectric properties were synthesized by solvent modulation. Compound 1 with novel trigonal bipyramidal geometry exhibits bright red luminescence with a lifetime of 2.47 ms and high quantum yield of 35.8 %. Compound 2 with tetrahedral geometry displays intense long-lived (1.54 ms) green light emission with higher quantum yield of 92.3 %, accompanied by reversible solid-state phase transition at 170 K and a distinct switchable dielectric property. The better performance of 2 results from the structure, including a discrete organic cation moiety and inorganic metal anion framework, which gives the cations large freedom of motion.

  18. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism Is Not Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease: Environmental and Genetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Guilarte, Tomás R.; Gonzales, Kalynda K.

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities caused by chronic manganese (Mn) intoxication clinically resemble but are not identical to those in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. In fact, the most successful parkinsonian drug treatment, the dopamine precursor levodopa, is ineffective in alleviating Mn-induced motor symptoms, implying that parkinsonism in Mn-exposed individuals may not be linked to midbrain dopaminergic neuron cell loss. Over the last decade, supporting evidence from human and nonhuman primates has emerged that Mn-induced parkinsonism partially results from damage to basal ganglia nuclei of the striatal “direct pathway” (ie, the caudate/putamen, internal globus pallidus, and substantia nigra pars reticulata) and a marked inhibition of striatal dopamine release in the absence of nigrostriatal dopamine terminal degeneration. Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed similar findings in a particular group of young drug users intravenously injecting the Mn-containing psychostimulant ephedron and in individuals with inherited mutations of the Mn transporter gene SLC30A10. This review will provide a detailed discussion about the aforementioned studies, followed by a comparison with their rodent analogs and idiopathic parkinsonism. Together, these findings in combination with a limited knowledge about the underlying neuropathology of Mn-induced parkinsonism strongly support the need for a more complete understanding of the neurotoxic effects of Mn on basal ganglia function to uncover the appropriate cellular and molecular therapeutic targets for this disorder. PMID:26220508

  19. Manganese-induced effects on cerebral trace element and nitric oxide of Hyline cocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zuo, Nan; Guan, Huanan; Han, Chunran; Xu, Shi Wen

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to Manganese (Mn) is a common phenomenon due to its environmental pervasiveness. To investigate the Mn-induced toxicity on cerebral trace element levels and crucial nitric oxide parameters on brain of birds, 50-day-old male Hyline cocks were fed either a commercial diet or a Mn-supplemented diet containing 600, 900, 1,800 mg kg(-1). After being treated with Mn for 30, 60, and 90 days, the following were determined: the changes in contents of copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), selenium (Se) in brain; inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide (iNOS-NO) system activity in brain; and histopathology and ultrastructure changes of cerebral cortex. The results showed that Mn was accumulated in brain and the content of Cu and Fe increased. However, the levels of Zn and Se decreased and the Ca content presented no obvious regularity. Exposure to Mn significantly elevated the content of NO and the expression of iNOS mRNA. Activity of total NO synthase (T NOS) and iNOS appeared with an increased tendency. These findings suggested that Mn exposure resulted in the imbalance of cerebral trace elements and influenced iNOS in the molecular level, which are possible underlying nervous system injury mechanisms induced by Mn exposure. PMID:23813426

  20. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  1. Interaction of manganese(II) complex with apotransferrin and the apotransferrin enhanced anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Xu, Xiao-Lei; Li, Zan; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Apotransferrin could bind a number of metal ions besides Fe, which makes it an attractive delivery vehicle for metal-based medicines. In order to evaluate whether anticancer Mn(II) complex of [(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] Adpa = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid) (AdpaMn) could be transported by apotransferrin, we investigated its interaction with human apotransferrin by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). The association dynamics show that AdpaMn could bind to apotransferrin spontaneously in Hepes buffer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy show that the conjugation of AdpaMn and apotransferrin by hydrophobic interactions induces the change of the microenvironment and conformation of apotransferrin. The reversible binding and release of AdpaMn was studied with fluorescence titration method. The AdpaMn complex can be released from the AdpaMn-apotransferrin entity in weak acid environments. MTT assay in vitro confirms that apotransferrin can enhance the inhibition rate of AdpaMn on the proliferation of HepG-2 cells, so we deduce that AdpaMn could be transported by apotransferrin in vivo.

  2. Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II) in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Tarigh, Ghazale; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II). The properties of MMWCNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). This adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE) in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. MMWCNT, carrying target metals, was easily separated from the aqueous solutions with the help of an external magnet; so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After extraction and collection of MMWCNT, the adsorbed analytes were eluted and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different sorption/desorption parameters. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits and enhancement factors of the proposed method for Pb and Mn were 1.0 and 0.6 µg L(-1), 390 and 697 respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of Pb(II) and Mn (II) contents in lipstick, rice samples and accuracy was evaluated analyzing a certified reference material Seronorm(™) Urine LOT NO2525. PMID:24054657

  3. Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II) in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Tarigh, Ghazale; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II). The properties of MMWCNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). This adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE) in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. MMWCNT, carrying target metals, was easily separated from the aqueous solutions with the help of an external magnet; so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After extraction and collection of MMWCNT, the adsorbed analytes were eluted and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different sorption/desorption parameters. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits and enhancement factors of the proposed method for Pb and Mn were 1.0 and 0.6 µg L(-1), 390 and 697 respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of Pb(II) and Mn (II) contents in lipstick, rice samples and accuracy was evaluated analyzing a certified reference material Seronorm(™) Urine LOT NO2525.

  4. Electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol using modified glassy carbon electrode by MWCNT in combination with unsymmetrical manganese (II) Schiff base complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohebbi, Sajjad Eslami, Saadat

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • High electocatalytic efficiency and stability of modified hybrid electrode GC/MWCNTs/MnSaloph. • Direct reflection of catalytic activity of manganese complexes on electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-ME. • Decreasing overpotential and increasing catalytic peak current toward oxidation of 2-ME. • Deposition of range of novel substituted N{sub 2}O{sub 2} Saloph complexes of manganese(II) on GCE/MWCNT. • Enhancement of electrocatalytic oxidation activity upon electron donating substitutions on the Saloph. - Abstract: The performance of modified hybrid glassy carbon electrode with composite of carbon nanotubes and manganese complexes for the electrocatalytic oxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol is developed. GC electrode was modified using MWCNT and new N{sub 2}O{sub 2} unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base complexes of manganese namely Manganese Saloph complexes 1-5, with general formula Mn[(5-x-4-y-Sal)(5-x′-4-y′-Sal) Ph], where x, x′ = H, Br, NO{sub 2} and y, y′ = H, MeO. Direct immobilization of CNT on the surface of GCE is performed by abrasive immobilization, and then modified by manganese(II) complexes via direct deposition method. These novel modified electrodes clearly demonstrate the necessity of modifying bare carbon electrodes to endow them with the desired behavior and were identified by HRTEM. Also complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, MS, UV–vis and IR spectroscopy. Modified hybrid GC/MWCNT/MnSaloph electrode exhibits strong and stable electrocatalytic activity towards the electrooxidation of 2-mercaptoethanol molecules in comparison with bare glassy carbon electrode with advantages of very low over potential and high catalytic current. Such ability promotes the thiol’s electron transfer reaction. Also, electron withdrawing substituent on the Saloph was enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation activity.

  5. Chemical probes for water-oxidation: synthetic manganese complexes in photoactivation of water splitting complex and as exogenous electron donors to photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Bernát, G; Padhye, S; Barta, C; Kovács, L; Demeter, S

    2001-01-01

    Photoactivation of the water splitting enzyme was performed with 13 different synthetic manganese complexes and characterized by oxygen evolution yield, thermoluminescence and chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics. The efficiency of different compounds in photoactivation correlated with the rate of linear electron transport in the presence of these compounds. The organic ligands, associated with the manganese ions, do not prevent the photoactivation of the water splitting complex (WOC). Photoactivation with different manganese complexes depended on the number of the Mn-ions in the complex, their valence state and the nature of their donor atoms. The most efficient restorations were achieved by using tetrameric complexes having a dimer+dimer structure, complexes containing Mn(II) ions, and having 4-6 oxygen and 0-2 nitrogen atoms as donor atoms. Further, the effectiveness of photoactivation depended largely on the structure of the complexes. Our data support the notion that WOC in intact thylakoids requires the cooperation and well determined arrangement of all four manganese ions, and argue against the hypothesis that two manganese ions are sufficient for water splitting. Photoactivation by some complexes led to anomalous flash-oxygen patterns, which are explained by a modified/perturbed water splitting complex.

  6. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin-transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa-Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa-Mn time and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa-Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases-9, -7 and -3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa-Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa-Mn-induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa-Mn-treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa-Mn-induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa-Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa-Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti-glioma therapeutic option. PMID:27432745

  7. Enzymatic Manganese(II) Oxidation by a Marine α-Proteobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Chris A.; Co, Edgie-Mark; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    A yellow-pigmented marine bacterium, designated strain SD-21, was isolated from surface sediments of San Diego Bay, San Diego, Calif., based on its ability to oxidize soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(III, IV) oxides. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that this organism was most closely related to members of the genus Erythrobacter, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria within the α-4 subgroup of the Proteobacteria (α-4 Proteobacteria). SD-21, however, has a number of distinguishing phenotypic features relative to Erythrobacter species, including the ability to oxidize Mn(II). During the logarithmic phase of growth, this organism produces Mn(II)-oxidizing factors of ≈250 and 150 kDa that are heat labile and inhibited by both azide and o-phenanthroline, suggesting the involvement of a metalloenzyme. Although the expression of the Mn(II) oxidase was not dependent on the presence of Mn(II), higher overall growth yields were reached in cultures incubated with Mn(II) in the culture medium. In addition, the rate of Mn(II) oxidation appeared to be slower in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of Mn(II) oxidation within the α-4 Proteobacteria as well as the first Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins identified in a marine gram-negative bacterium. PMID:11526000

  8. Regulation of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis by a manganese porphyrin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hyup; Lee, You Mie; Park, Jeen-Woo . E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr

    2005-08-26

    Ionizing radiation induces the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important causative role in apoptotic cell death. Therefore, compounds that scavenge reactive oxygen species may confer regulatory effects on apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics have been shown to be protective against cell injury caused by reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of the manganese (III) tetrakis(N-methyl-2-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), a cell-permeable SOD mimetic, on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis. Upon exposure to 2 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation, there was a distinct difference between the control cells and the cells pre-treated with 5 {mu}M MnTMPyP for 2 h with regard to apoptotic parameters, cellular redox status, mitochondria function, and oxidative damage to cells. MnTMPyP effectively suppressed morphological evidence of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation in U937 cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The [GSSG]/[GSH + GSSG] ratio and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species were higher and the [NADPH]/[NADP{sup +} + NADPH] ratio was lower in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. The ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial damage reflected by the altered mitochondrial permeability transition, the increase in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and the reduction of ATP production were significantly higher in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. MnTMPyP pre-treated cells showed significant inhibition of apoptotic features such as activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and p53, and down-regulation of Bcl-2 compared to control cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation. This study indicates that MnTMPyP may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation presumably through scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

  9. Determining the Role of Multicopper Oxidases in Manganese(II) Oxidation by Marine Bacillus Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. J.; Tebo, B. M.

    2005-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the environmental cycling of Mn by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) and forming insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides. These biogenic Mn oxides are renowned for their strong sorptive and oxidative properties, which control the speciation and availability of many metals and organic compounds. A wide variety of bacteria are known to catalyze the oxidation of Mn(II); one of the most frequently isolated types are Bacillus species that oxidize Mn(II) only as metabolically dormant spores. We are using genetic and biochemical methods to study the molecular mechanisms of this process in these organisms. mnxG, a gene related to the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes, is required for Mn(II) oxidation in the model organism, Bacillus sp. strain SG-1. Mn(II)-oxidizing activity can be detected in crude protein extracts of the exosporium and as a discrete band in SDS-PAGE gels, however previous attempts to purify or identify this Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme have failed. A direct link between the Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme and the MCO gene suspected to encode it has never been made. We used genetic and biochemical methods to investigate the role of the MCO in the mechanism of Mn(II) oxidation. Comparative analysis of the mnx operon from several diverse Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus spores revealed that mnxG is the most highly conserved gene in the operon, and that copper binding sites are highly conserved. As with Mn(II) oxidases from other organisms, heterologous expression of the Bacillus mnxG in E. coli did not yield an active Mn(II) oxidase. Purifying sufficient quantities of the native Mn(II) oxidase from Bacillus species for biochemical characterization has proven difficult because the enzyme does not appear to be abundant, and it is highly insoluble. We were able to partially purify the Mn(II) oxidase, and to analyze the active band by in-gel trypsin digestion followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS/MS spectra provided a conclusive match to mnx

  10. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Manganese (II) Sulfate Monohydrate (CAS No. 10034-96-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies).

    PubMed

    1993-12-01

    not mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97, TA98, TA100, TA1535, or TA1537, with or without exogenous metabolic activation (S9), and did not induce sex-linked recessive lethal mutations in germ cells of male Drosophila melanogaster. Tests for induction of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells treated without S9 were positive; with S9, only the sister chromatid exchange test with manganese (11) sulfate monohydrate was positive. CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of these 2-year feed studies, there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of manganese (II) sulfate monohydrate in male or female F344/N rats receiving 1,500, 5,000, or 15,000 ppm. There was equivocal evidence of carcinogenic activity of manganese (II) sulfate monohydrate in male and female B6C3F1 mice, based on the marginally increased incidences of thyroid gland follicular cell adenoma and the significantly increased incidences of follicular cell hyperplasia. The ingestion of diets containing manganese (II) sulfate monohydrate was associated with an increased severity of nephropathy in male rats, focal squamous hyperplasia of the forestomach in male and female mice, and ulcers and inflammation of the forestomach in male mice. These studies were not designed to assess any neurotoxicity that might have been expected with chronic exposure to sufficiently high doses of manganese. Synonyms: Manganese sulfate; manganous sulfate; sulfuric acid. manganese2+ salt (1:1), monohydrate

  11. Characterization of the interaction between manganese and tyrosine Z in acetate-inhibited photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Szalai, V A; Kühne, H; Lakshmi, K V; Brudvig, G W

    1998-09-29

    When acetate-inhibited photosystem II (PSII) membranes are illuminated at temperatures above 250 K and quickly cooled to 77 K, a 240 G-wide electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal is observed at 10 K. This EPR signal arises from a reciprocal interaction between the spin 1/2 ground state of the S2 state of the Mn4 cluster, for which a multiline EPR signal with shifted 55Mn hyperfine peaks is observed, and the oxidized tyrosine residue, YZ*, for which a broadened YZ* EPR spectrum is observed. The S2YZ* EPR signal in acetate-inhibited PSII is the first in which characteristic spectral features from both paramagnets can be observed. The observation of distinct EPR signals from each of the paramagnets together with the lack of a half-field EPR transition indicates that the exchange and dipolar couplings are weak. Below 20 K, the S2YZ* EPR signal in acetate-inhibited PSII is in the static limit. Above 20 K, the line width narrows dramatically as the broad low-temperature S2YZ* EPR signal is converted to a narrow YZ* EPR signal at room temperature. The line width narrowing is interpreted to be due to averaging of the exchange and dipolar interactions between YZ* and the S2 state of the Mn4 cluster by rapid spin-lattice relaxation of the Mn4 cluster as the temperature is increased. Decay of the S2YZ* intermediate at 200 K shows that the g = 4.1 form of the S2 state is formed and that a noninteracting S2-state multiline EPR signal is not observed as an intermediate in the decay. This result shows that a change in the redox state of YZ induces a spin-state change in the Mn4 cluster in acetate-inhibited PSII. The interconversion between spin states of the Mn4 cluster in acetate-inhibited PSII supports the idea that YZ oxidation or YZ* reduction is communicated to the Mn4 cluster through a direct hydrogen-bonding pathway, possibly involving a ligand bound to the Mn4 cluster.

  12. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, W.

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S{sub 2} state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2} state with the g{approx}4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S{sub 2}-g4 state) was compared with that in the S{sub 2} state with multiline signal (S{sub 2}-MLS state) and the S{sub 1} state. The S{sub 2}-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S{sub 1} state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S{sub 1} to the S{sub 2}-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2}-g4 state is different from that in the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. In the S{sub 2}-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 {angstrom} and 2.85 {angstrom}. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S{sub 1} or S{sub 2}-MLS states. The third shell of the S{sub 2}-g4 state at about 3.3 {angstrom} also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 2} transition.

  13. Deregulation of Mitochondria-Shaping Proteins Opa-1 and Drp-1 in Manganese-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Agustina; Gorojod, Roxana M.; Beauquis, Juan; Muñoz, Manuel J.; Saravia, Flavia; Kotler, Mónica L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo fusion and fission processes. These events are regulated by mitochondria-shaping proteins. Changes in the expression and/or localization of these proteins lead to a mitochondrial dynamics impairment and may promote apoptosis. Increasing evidence correlates the mitochondrial dynamics disruption with the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we focused on this topic in Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism, a disorder associated with Mn accumulation preferentially in the basal ganglia where mitochondria from astrocytes represent an early target. Using MitoTracker Red staining we observed increased mitochondrial network fission in Mn-exposed rat astrocytoma C6 cells. Moreover, Mn induced a marked decrease in fusion protein Opa-1 levels as well as a dramatic increase in the expression of fission protein Drp-1. Additionally, Mn provoked a significant release of high MW Opa-1 isoforms from the mitochondria to the cytosol as well as an increased Drp-1 translocation to the mitochondria. Both Mdivi-1, a pharmacological Drp-1 inhibitor, and rat Drp-1 siRNA reduced the number of apoptotic nuclei, preserved the mitochondrial network integrity and prevented cell death. CsA, an MPTP opening inhibitor, prevented mitochondrial Δψm disruption, Opa-1 processing and Drp-1 translocation to the mitochondria therefore protecting Mn-exposed cells from mitochondrial disruption and apoptosis. The histological analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining of brain sections of Mn-injected rats in the striatum showed a decrease in cellular mass paralleled with an increase in the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. Opa-1 and Drp-1 expression levels were also changed by Mn-treatment. Our results demonstrate for the first time that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics is implicated in both in vitro and in vivo Mn toxicity. In addition we show that the imbalance in fusion/fission equilibrium might be involved in Mn-induced apoptosis. This knowledge may

  14. Multiple phytoestrogens inhibit cell growth and confer cytoprotection by inducing manganese superoxide dismutase expression.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. As data on phytoestrogens continues to accumulate, it is clear that there is significant overlap in the cellular effects elicited by these various compounds. Here, we show that one mechanism by which a number of phytoestrogens achieve their growth inhibitory and cytoprotective effects is via induction of the mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Eight phytoestrogens, including resveratrol, coumestrol, kaempferol, genistein, daidzein, apigenin, isoliquirtigenin and glycitin, were tested for their ability to induce MnSOD expression in mouse C2C12 and primary myoblasts. Five of these, resveratrol, coumestrol, kaempferol, genistein and daidzein, significantly increased MnSOD expression, slowed proliferative growth and enhanced stress resistance (hydrogen peroxide LD50) . When siRNA was used to prevent the MnSOD induction by genistein, coumestrol or daidzein, none of these compounds exerted any effect on proliferative growth, and only the effect of coumestrol on stress resistance persisted. The estrogen antagonist ICI182780 prevented the increased MnSOD expression and also the changes in cell growth and stress resistance, indicating that these effects are mediated by estrogen receptors (ER). The absence of effects of resveratrol or coumestrol, but not genistein, in ERβ-null cells further indicated that this ER in particular is important in mediating these effects. Thus, an ER-mediated induction of MnSOD expression appears to underlie the growth inhibitory and cytoprotective activities of multiple phytoestrogens.

  15. Effects of oxidative stress on apoptosis in manganese-induced testicular toxicity in cocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-fei; Zhang, Li-ming; Guan, Hua-nan; Zhang, Zi-wei; Xu, Shi-wen

    2013-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a trace element known to be essential for maintaining the proper function and regulation of many biochemical and cellular reactions. However, little is known about the reproductive toxicity of Mn in birds. To investigate the toxicity of Mn on male reproduction in birds, 50-day-old cocks were fed either a commercial diet or a Mn-supplemented diet containing 600, 900, and 1800 mg/kg MnCl₂. After being treated with Mn for 30, 60, and 90 d, the following were determined: Mn content; histological and ultrastructural changes in the testes, apoptosis; the malondialdehyde (MDA) level; the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD); the inhibition ability of hydroxyl radicals (OH); the levels of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and protein carbonyl in the testes; the DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC); and the activity of the ATP enzyme. Exposure to Mn significantly lowered the activity of SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the inhibition ability of OH. Mn exposure also increased the levels of MDA, NO, NOS, DPC, and protein carbonyl; the number of apoptotic cells; and the Mn content and caused obvious histopathological changes in the testes. These findings suggested that Mn exposure resulted in the oxidative damage of cock testicular tissue by altering radical formation, ATP enzyme systems, apoptosis, and DNA damage, which are possible underlying reproductive toxicity mechanisms induced by Mn exposure.

  16. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  17. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  18. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation. PMID:25967658

  19. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles’ Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A.; Katsnelson, Boris A.; Privalova, Larisa I.; Sutunkova, Marina P.; Gurvich, Vladimir B.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Shishkina, Ekaterina V.; Valamina, Irene E.; Makeyev, Oleg H.; Panov, Vladimir G.; Varaksin, Anatoly N.; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V.; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a “bio-protective complex” (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn3O4-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn3O4-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn3O4-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  20. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles' Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors.

    PubMed

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Valamina, Irene E; Makeyev, Oleg H; Panov, Vladimir G; Varaksin, Anatoly N; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn₃O₄ nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7±8.2 and 18.4±5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a "bio-protective complex" (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn₃O₄-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn₃O₄-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn₃O₄-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  1. Enzymatic Manganese(II) Oxidation by Metabolically Dormant Spores of Diverse Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Chris A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial spores are renowned for their longevity, ubiquity, and resistance to environmental insults, but virtually nothing is known regarding whether these metabolically dormant structures impact their surrounding chemical environments. In the present study, a number of spore-forming bacteria that produce dormant spores which enzymatically oxidize soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(IV) oxides were isolated from coastal marine sediments. The highly charged and reactive surfaces of biogenic metal oxides dramatically influence the oxidation and sorption of both trace metals and organics in the environment. Prior to this study, the only known Mn(II)-oxidizing sporeformer was the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, an extensively studied bacterium in which Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be catalyzed by a multicopper oxidase, MnxG. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and mnxG sequences obtained from 15 different Mn(II)-oxidizing sporeformers (including SG-1) revealed extensive diversity within the genus Bacillus, with organisms falling into several distinct clusters and lineages. In addition, active Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins of various sizes, as observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels, were recovered from the outer layers of purified dormant spores of the isolates. These are the first active Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes identified in spores or gram-positive bacteria. Although extremely resistant to denaturation, the activities of these enzymes were inhibited by azide and o-phenanthroline, consistent with the involvement of multicopper oxidases. Overall, these studies suggest that the commonly held view that bacterial spores are merely inactive structures in the environment should be revised. PMID:11823231

  2. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition.

  3. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition. PMID:27534374

  4. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  5. Binding stoichiometry and affinity of the manganese-stabilizing protein affects redox reactions on the oxidizing side of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Roose, Johnna L; Yocum, Charles F; Popelkova, Hana

    2011-07-12

    It has been reported previously that the two subunits of PsbO, the photosystem II (PSII) manganese stabilizing protein, have unique functions in relation to the Mn, Ca(2+), and Cl(-) cofactors in eukaryotic PSII [Popelkova; (2008) Biochemistry 47, 12593]. The experiments reported here utilize a set of N-terminal truncation mutants of PsbO, which exhibit altered subunit binding to PSII, to further characterize its role in establishing efficient O(2) evolution activity. The effects of PsbO binding stoichiometry, affinity, and specificity on Q(A)(-) reoxidation kinetics after a single turnover flash, S-state transitions, and O(2) release time have been examined. The data presented here show that weak rebinding of a single PsbO subunit to PsbO-depleted PSII repairs many of the defects in PSII resulting from the removal of the protein, but many of these are not sustainable, as indicated by low steady-state activities of the reconstituted samples [Popelkova; (2003) Biochemistry 42 , 6193]. High affinity binding of PsbO to PSII is required to produce more stable and efficient cycling of the water oxidation reaction. Reconstitution of the second PsbO subunit is needed to further optimize redox reactions on the PSII oxidizing side. Native PsbO and recombinant wild-type PsbO from spinach facilitate PSII redox reactions in a very similar manner, and nonspecific binding of PsbO to PSII has no significance in these reactions.

  6. Honeycomb-like S = 5/2 Spin-Lattices in Manganese(II) Vanadates.

    PubMed

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McGuire, Michael A; McMillen, Colin D; Willett, Daniel; Chumanov, George; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-09-19

    New complex manganese vanadate materials were synthesized as high-quality single crystals in multi-millimeter lengths using a high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal method. One compound, Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4, was grown from Mn2O3 and V2O5 in 3 M CsOH at 580 °C and 1.5 kbar. Changing the mineralizer to 1 M CsOH/3MCsCl leads to the formation of another product, Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Both compounds were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4: C2/m, Z = 2, a = 9.6568(9) Å, b = 9.5627(9) Å, c = 5.4139(6) Å, β = 98.529(8)°; Mn6O(VO4)2(OH): P21/m, Z = 2, a = 8.9363(12) Å, b = 6.4678(8) Å, c = 10.4478(13) Å, β = 99.798(3)°), revealing interesting low-dimensional transition-metal features. Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 possesses complex honeycomb-type Mn-O layers, built from edge-sharing [MnO6] octahedra in the bc plane, with bridging vanadate groups connecting these layers along the a-axis. Mn6O(VO4)2(OH) presents a more complicated structure with both octahedral [MnO6] and trigonal bipyramidal [MnO5] units. A different pattern of planar honeycomb sheets are formed by edge-shared [MnO6] octahedra, and these sublattices are connected through edge-shared dimers of [MnO5] trigonal bipyramids to form corrugated sheets. Vanadate groups again condense the sheets into a three-dimensional framework. Infrared and Raman spectroscopies indicated the presence of OH groups and displayed characteristic Raman scattering due to vanadate groups. Temperature-dependent magnetic studies indicated Curie-Weiss behavior above 100 K with significant anti-ferromagnetic coupling for both compounds, with further complex magnetic behavior at lower temperatures. The data indicate canted anti-ferromagnetic order below 57 K in Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 and below 45 K in Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Members of another class of compounds, K2M3(VO4)2(OH)2 (M = Mn, Co), also containing a honeycomb-type sublattice, were also synthesized to allow a comparison of the structural features across all three

  7. Surfactant-controlled composition and crystal structure of manganese(II) sulfide nanocrystals prepared by solvothermal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Capetti, Elena; Ferretti, Anna M; Dal Santo, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary We investigated how the outcome of the solvothermal synthesis of manganese(II) sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) is affected by the type and amount of long chain surfactant present in the reaction mixture. Prompted by a previous observation that a larger than stoichiometric amount of sulfur is required [Puglisi, A.; Mondini, S.; Cenedese, S.; Ferretti, A. M.; Santo, N.; Ponti A. Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 2804–2813], we carried out a wide set of reactions using Mn(II) carboxylates and Mn2(CO)10 as precursors with varying amounts of sulfur and carboxylic acid. MnS NCs were obtained provided that the S/Mn ratio was larger than the L/Mn ratio, otherwise MnO NCs were produced. Since MnS can crystallize in three distinct phases (rock salt α-MnS, zincblende β-MnS, and wurtzite γ-MnS), we also investigated whether the surfactant affected the NC polymorphism. We found that MnS polymorphism can be controlled by appropriate selection of the surfactant. γ-MnS nanocrystals formed when a 1:2 mixture of long chain carboxylic acid and amine was used, irrespective of the presence of carboxylic acid as a free surfactant or ligand in the metal precursor. When we used a single surfactant (carboxylic acid, alcohol, thiol, amine), α-MnS nanocrystals were obtained. The peculiar role of the amine seems to be related to its basicity. The nanocrystals were characterized by TEM and electron diffraction; ATR-FTIR spectroscopy provided information about the surfactants adsorbed on the NCs. PMID:26734522

  8. Analysis of in situ manganese(II) oxidation in the Columbia River and offshore plume: linking Aurantimonas and the associated microbial community to an active biogeochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C R; Davis, R E; Bandolin, N S; Baptista, A M; Tebo, B M

    2011-06-01

    The Columbia River is a major source of dissolved nutrients and trace metals for the west coast of North America. A large proportion of these nutrients are sourced from the Columbia River Estuary, where coastal and terrestrial waters mix and resuspend particulate matter within the water column. As estuarine water is discharged off the coast, it transports the particulate matter, dissolved nutrients and microorganisms forming nutrient-rich and metabolically dynamic plumes. In this study, bacterial manganese oxidation within the plume and estuary was investigated during spring and neap tides. The microbial community proteome was fractionated and assayed for Mn oxidation activity. Proteins from the outer membrane and the loosely bound outer membrane fractions were separated using size exclusion chromatography and Mn(II)-oxidizing eluates were analysed with tandem mass spectrometry to identify potential Mn oxidase protein targets. Multi-copper oxidase (MCO) and haem-peroxidase enzymes were identified in active fractions. T-RFLP profiles and cluster analysis indicates that organisms and bacterial communities capable of oxidizing Mn(II) can be sourced from the Columbia River estuary and nearshore coastal ocean. These organisms are producing up to 10 fM MnO₂ cell⁻¹ day⁻¹. Evidence for the presence of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterial isolates from the genera Aurantimonas, Rhodobacter, Bacillus and Shewanella was found in T-RFLP profiles. Specific Q-PCR probes were designed to target potential homologues of the Aurantimonas manganese oxidizing peroxidase (Mop). By comparing total Mop homologues, Aurantimonas SSU rRNA and total bacterial SSU rRNA gene copies, it appears that Aurantimonas can only account for ~1.7% of the peroxidase genes quantified. Under the broad assumption that at least some of the peroxidase homologues quantified are involved in manganese oxidation, it is possible that other organisms oxidize manganese via peroxidases. PMID:21418498

  9. Crystal structure of hexa-kis-(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)manganese(II) diiodide.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Mathias; Schroffenegger, Martina; Weil, Matthias; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-07-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [Mn(C2H6OS)6]I2, consists of one Mn(II) ion, six O-bound dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ligands and two I(-) counter-anions. The isolated complex cations have an octa-hedral configuration and are grouped in hexa-gonally arranged rows extending parallel to [100]. The two I(-) anions are located between the rows and are linked to the cations through two weak C-H⋯I inter-actions. PMID:27555928

  10. Hyperfine structure constants for singly ionized manganese (Mn II) using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley-Smith, Keeley; Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    We expand on the comprehensive study of hyperfine structure (HFS) in Mn II conducted by Holt et al. (1999) by verifying hyperfine magnetic dipole constants (A) for 20 levels previously measured by Holt et al. (1999) and deriving A constants for 47 previously unstudied levels. The HFS patterns were measured in archival spectra from Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at Imperial College London and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Analysis of the FT spectra was carried out in XGREMLIN. Our A constant for the ground level has a lower uncertainty by a factor of 6 than that of Blackwell-Whitehead et al.

  11. Crystal structure of hexa­kis­(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)manganese(II) diiodide

    PubMed Central

    Glatz, Mathias; Schroffenegger, Martina; Weil, Matthias; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [Mn(C2H6OS)6]I2, consists of one MnII ion, six O-bound dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ligands and two I− counter-anions. The isolated complex cations have an octa­hedral configuration and are grouped in hexa­gonally arranged rows extending parallel to [100]. The two I− anions are located between the rows and are linked to the cations through two weak C—H⋯I inter­actions. PMID:27555928

  12. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of manganese (II) complex of picolinate: A combined experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    A novel manganese (II) complex with picolinic acid (pyridine 2-carboxylic acid, Hpic), namely, [Mn(pic)2(H2O)2] was prepared and its crystal structure was fully characterized by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Picolinate (pic) ligands were coordinated to the central manganese(II) ion as bidentate N,O-donors through the nitrogen atoms of pyridine rings and the oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups forming five-membered chelate rings. The spectroscopic characterization of Mn(II) complex was performed by the applications of FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis and EPR techniques. In order to support these studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out by using B3LYP level. IR and Raman spectra were simulated at B3LYP level, and obtained results indicated that DFT calculations generally give compatible results to the experimental ones. The electronic structure of the Mn(II) complex was predicted using time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model (PCM). Molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength were investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Nonlinear optical properties of Mn(II) complex were investigated by the determining of molecular polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) parameters.

  13. Manganese bioconcentration in aquatic insects: Mn oxide coatings, molting loss, and Mn(II) thiol scavenging.

    PubMed

    Dittman, Elizabeth K; Buchwalter, David B

    2010-12-01

    Streams below mountaintop removal-valley fill coal mining operations often have elevated Mn concentrations, but it remains unclear if Mn plays a role in biodiversity reduction. We examined various aspects of aqueous Mn interactions with aquatic insects exposed to environmentally relevant Mn concentrations, revealing complex behavior. First, Mn accumulation rates varied widely among 9 species. A significant percentage of total Mn accrued (mean 74%, range 24-95%) was associated with the cuticle, predominantly in the form of Mn-oxides, and to a lesser degree Mn(II). Mn II is also absorbed into tissues, possibly through calcium transporters. Increased ambient calcium concentrations decreased both adsorbed and absorbed Mn accumulation from solution. Though species showed similar Mn efflux rate constants (0.032-0.072 d(-1)), the primary mode of Mn loss was through molting. Both adsorbed and absorbed Mn is lost during the molt. Subcellular compartmentalization studies revealed an overwhelming tendency for internalized Mn to associate with the heat stable cytosolic protein fraction. After short dissolved Mn exposures, intracellular glutathione and cysteine levels were markedly reduced relative to controls. These findings suggest that Mn exposure results in transient physiological stress in aquatic insects which is likely relieved, in part, during the molting process.

  14. Therapeutic efficacy of silymarin from milk thistle in reducing manganese-induced hepatic damage and apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Y; Garoui, Em; Boudawara, T; Zeghal, N

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism involved in manganese (Mn) toxicity. Using natural antioxidants against metal-induced hepatotoxicity is a modern approach. The present study investigated the beneficial role of silymarin, a natural flavonoid, in Mn-induced hepatotoxicity focusing on histopathology and biochemical approaches. Male Wistar rats were exposed orally to manganese chloride (20 mg/mL) for 30 days followed by intraperitoneal cotreatment with silymarin (100 mg/kg). Exposure to Mn resulted in a significant elevation of the plasma marker enzyme activities and bilirubin level related to liver dysfunction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and hepatic oxidative stress indices. This metal reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase and nonenzymatic antioxidant levels such as reduced glutathione, total sulfhydryl groups and vitamin C. In addition, it caused hepatic hemorrhage, cellular degeneration and necrosis of hepatocytes as indicated by liver histopathology and DNA fragmentation studies. Coadministration of silymarin alleviated Mn oxidative damage effects by inhibiting ROS generation. Histological studies also supported the beneficial role of silymarin against Mn-induced hepatic damages. Combining all, results suggested that silymarin could protect hepatic tissues against Mn-induced oxidative stress probably through its antioxidant activity. Therefore, its supplementation could provide a new approach for the reduction in hepatic complication due to Mn poisoning.

  15. The role of chemical speciation, chemical fractionation and calcium disruption in manganese-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Hernández, R B; Nishita, M I; Espósito, B P; Scholz, S; Michalke, B

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient that can be toxic in excess concentrations, especially during early development stages. The mechanisms of Mn toxicity is still unclear, and little information is available regarding the role of Mn speciation and fractionation in toxicology. We aimed to investigate the toxic effects of several chemical forms of Mn in embryos of Danio rerio exposed during different development stages, between 2 and 122h post fertilization. We found a stage-specific increase of lethality associated with hatching and removal of the chorion. Mn(II), ([Mn(H2O)6](2+)) appeared to be the most toxic species to embryos exposed for 48h, and Mn(II) citrate was most toxic to embryos exposed for 72 and/or 120h. Manganese toxicity was associated with calcium disruption, manganese speciation and metal fractionation, including bioaccumulation in tissue, granule fractions, organelles and denaturated proteins.

  16. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael D.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M.; Dorman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers. PMID:22645610

  17. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malkova, Natalia V.; Gallagher, Joseph J.; Yu, Collin Z.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn2+) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  18. Investigation of the Delayed Fracture Phenomenon in Deep-Drawn Austenitic Manganese-Based Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tol, R. T.; Zhao, L.; Bracke, L.; Kömmelt, P.; Sietsma, J.

    2013-10-01

    The phenomenon of delayed fracture in three austenitic manganese-based Twinning-Induced Plasticity steels is investigated by means of video observation and magnetic measurements. Delayed fracture is observed in the direction perpendicular to the rolling direction, in coincidence with the highest α'-martensite fraction in a deep-drawn cup. The formation of a small fraction of α'-martensite, irrespective of the chemical composition examined, is indicative of the formation of crack initiation sites. We propose an intermittent crack propagation concept and model for the phenomenon of delayed fracture.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Carolyn A; Purvine, Samuel O; Zink, Erika M; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment. PMID:27434633

  20. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment. PMID:27434633

  1. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats correlates with nucleus accumbens activity on manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Desai, Kirtan; Kohler, Robert J; Eapen, Ajay T; Lisieski, Michael J; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bosse, Kelly E; Conti, Alana C; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of substance abuse research has been to link drug-induced behavioral outcomes with the activity of specific brain regions to understand the neurobiology of addiction behaviors and to search for drug-able targets. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cocaine produces locomotor (behavioral) sensitization that correlates with increased calcium channel-mediated neuroactivity in brain regions linked with drug addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAC), anterior striatum (AST) and hippocampus, as measured using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Rats were treated with cocaine for 5 days, followed by a 2-day drug-free period. The following day, locomotor sensitization was quantified as a metric of cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in the presence of manganese. Immediately following behavioral testing, rats were examined for changes in calcium channel-mediated neuronal activity in the NAC, AST, hippocampus and temporalis muscle, which was associated with behavioral sensitization using MEMRI. Cocaine significantly increased locomotor activity and produced behavioral sensitization compared with saline treatment of control rats. A significant increase in MEMRI signal intensity was determined in the NAC, but not AST or hippocampus, of cocaine-treated rats compared with saline-treated control rats. Cocaine did not increase signal intensity in the temporalis muscle. Notably, in support of our hypothesis, behavior was significantly and positively correlated with MEMRI signal intensity in the NAC. As neuronal uptake of manganese is regulated by calcium channels, these results indicate that MEMRI is a powerful research tool to study neuronal activity in freely behaving animals and to guide new calcium channel-based therapies for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence.

  2. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System.

    PubMed

    Sujith, P P; Mourya, B S; Krishnamurthi, S; Meena, R M; Loka Bharathi, P A

    2014-01-01

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral deposition. We also hypothesized that, the Mn-oxidizing microbes may respond reversibly to pulses of fresh organic carbon introduced into the water column by mobilizing the Mn in Mn-oxides. To test these two hypotheses, we enumerated the number of Mn-oxidizers and -reducers and carried out studies on the mobilization of Mn by microbial communities associated with basalt. In medium containing 100 μM Mn(2+), 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) were recovered with undetectable number of reducers on Mn-oxide amended medium, suggesting that the community was more oxidative. Experiments were then conducted with basalt fragments at 4±2 °C in the presence 'G(+)' and absence 'G(-)' of glucose (0.1%). Controls included set-ups, some of which were poisoned with 15 mM azide and the others of which were heat-killed. The mobilization of Mn in the presence of glucose was 1.76 μg g(-1) d(-1) and in the absence, it was 0.17 μg g(-1) d(-1) after 150 d. Mn mobilization with and without added glucose was 13 and 4 times greater than the corresponding azide treated controls. However, rates in 'G(+)' were 16 times and 'G(-)' 24 times more than the respective heat killed controls. The corresponding total counts in the presence of added glucose increased from 1.63×10(6) to 6.71×10(7) cells g(-1) and from 1.41×10(7) to 3.52×10(7) cells g(-1) in its absence. Thus, the addition of glucose as a proxy for organic carbon changed the community's response from Mn(II)-oxidizing to Mn(IV)-reducing activity. The results confirm the participation of Mn oxidizing bacteria in the mobilization of Mn. Identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed taxonomic affiliations to Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium and

  3. Magnetic field-induced phase transformation and variant reorientation in nickel-manganese-gallium and nickel-manganese-cobalt-indium magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Haluk Ersin

    The purpose of this work is to reveal the governing mechanisms responsible for the magnetic field-induced (i) martensite reorientation in Ni 2MnGa single crystals, (ii) stress-assisted phase transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals and (iii) phase transformation in NiMnCoIn alloys. The ultimate goal of utilizing these mechanisms is to increase the actuation stress levels in magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Extensive experimental work on magneto-thermo-mechanical (MTM) characterization of these materials enabled us to (i) better understand the ways to increase the actuation stress and strain and decrease the required magnetic field for actuation in MSMAs, (ii) determine the effects of main MTM parameters on reversible magnetic field induced phase transformation, such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE), Zeeman energy (ZE), stress hysteresis, thermal hysteresis, critical stress for the stress induced phase transformation and crystal orientation, (iii) find out the feasibility of employing polycrystal MSMAs, and (iv) formulate a thermodynamical framework to capture the energetics of magnetic field-induced phase transformations in MSMAs. Magnetic shape memory properties of Ni2MnGa single crystals were characterized by monitoring magnetic field-induced strain (MFIS) as a function of compressive stress and stress-induced strain as a function of magnetic field. It is revealed that the selection of the operating temperature with respect to martensite start and Curie temperatures is critical in optimizing actuator performance. The actuation stress of 5 MPa and work output of 157 kJm-3 are obtained by the field-induced variant reorientation in NiMnGa alloys. Reversible and one-way stress-assisted field-induced phase transformations are observed in Ni2MnGa single crystals under low field magnitudes (<0.7T) and resulted in at least an order of magnitude higher actuation stress levels. It is very promising to provide higher work output levels and operating

  4. Manganese Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Charles H.; Pasi, Aurelio

    1975-01-01

    We have reported two cases of chronic manganese poisoning. Case 1 followed exposure to manganese fumes in cutting and burning manganese steel. Case 2 resulted from exposure to dusts of manganese dioxide, an ingredient used in glazing of ceramics. There were initial difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis. Prominent clinical features were severe and persistent chronic depressive psychosis (Case 1), transient acute brain syndrome (Case 2) and the presence of various extrapyramidal symptoms in both cases. Manganese intoxication has not previously been reported as occurring in California. With increasing use of the metal, the disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurologic and psychiatric disease. Our observations were made in the period 1964 through 1968. Recently the prognosis of victims of manganese poisoning has been improved dramatically by the introduction of levodopa as a therapeutic agent. PMID:1179714

  5. Synthesis, molecular and crystal structure of bis(triethanolamine)manganese(II) saccharinate: a seven-coordinate manganese complex with tri- and tetradentate triethanolamine ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Yildiray; Andac, Omer; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Harrison, William T. A.

    2002-06-01

    The synthesis, molecular and crystal structure of bis(triethanolamine)Mn(II) saccharinate, [Mn(tea) 2](sac) 2 are reported. The configuration of the tea ligands results in an unusual example of coordination number seven for the Mn(II) ion. The two triethanolamine (tea) ligands coordinate to the Mn(II) ion forming a monocapped trigonal prism geometry, in which one of the tea ligands behaves as a tridentate ligand, while the other one acts as a tetradentate donor. The free and coordinated hydroxyl hydrogens of the tea ligands are involved in hydrogen bonding with the amine nitrogen, carbonyl and sulfonyl oxygens of the neighbouring sac ions to form a three-dimensional infinite network. A weak π-π interaction between the phenyl rings of the sac ions also occurs.

  6. Determination of double bond location in fatty acids by manganese adduction and electron induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Håkansson, Kristina

    2010-08-15

    Double bond locations in fatty acids can be determined from characteristic charge-remote fragmentation patterns of alkali metal-adducted fatty acids following high energy collision activated dissociation (CAD). With low energy CAD, several chemical derivatization methods, including ozonization, epoxidation, and hydroxylation, have been used to generate characteristic fragments. However, high energy CAD is not universally available and involves a high degree of scattering, causing product ion loss. Further, derivatization reactions involve side reactions and sample loss. Here, we analyzed metal-adducted fatty acids to investigate the utility of electron induced dissociation (EID) for determining double bond location. EID has been proposed to involve both electronic excitation, similar to high energy CAD, and vibrational excitation. Various metals (Li, Zn, Co, Ni, Mg, Ca, Fe, and Mn) were investigated to fix one charge at the carboxylate end of fatty acids to promote charge-remote fragmentation. EID of Mn(II)-adducted fatty acids allowed determination of all double bond locations of arachidonic acid, linolenic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid. For Mn(II)-adducted fatty acids, reduced characteristic charge-remote product ion abundances at the double bond positions are indicative of double bond locations. However, other metal adducts did not generally provide characteristic product ion abundances at all double bond locations.

  7. The effect of induced anoxia and reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of organic carbon, phosphate, iron, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Annelie C; Arias-Esquivel, Victor A

    2009-11-15

    Eutrophication causes seasonally anoxic bottom waters in coastal environments, but we lack information on effects of onset of anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of redox-sensitive minerals and associated organic carbon (OC). As the first study, we determined the effect of inducing anoxia and subsequently restoring oxic conditions in mesocosms with surface sediment and water from a coastal environment. These concentration changes were compared with those in an oxygenated control. We determined water column concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), iron, manganese, and phosphate. Benthic fluxes of DOC, POC, and iron increased at the onset of anoxia in oxygen-depleted treatments. DOC and iron concentrations increased concomitantly towards maxima, which may have indicated reductive dissolution of FeOOH and release of associated OC. The subsequent concomitant concentration decreases may have been the result of coprecipitation of OC with iron-containing minerals. In contrast, the phosphate-concentration increase occurred several days after the onset of anoxia and the manganese concentration was not affected by the onset of anoxia. Restoring oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in DOC, POC, and phosphate concentrations, which may indicate coprecipitation of OC with phosphate-containing minerals. The high DOC fluxes at the onset of anoxia indicate that redox oscillations may be important in OC degradation. Further, our results indicate a close coupling between OC cycling and dissolution/precipitation of iron-containing minerals in intermittently anoxic sediments.

  8. Elimination of Manganese(II,III) Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 by a Double Knockout of Two Putative Multicopper Oxidase Genes

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese(II) oxidation impacts the redox cycling of Mn, other elements, and compounds in the environment; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms of and enzymes responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. In several Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms, the identified Mn(II) oxidase belongs to either the multicopper oxidase (MCO) or the heme peroxidase family of proteins. However, the identity of the oxidase in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 has long remained unknown. To identify the P. putida GB-1 oxidase, we searched its genome and found several homologues of known or suspected Mn(II) oxidase-encoding genes (mnxG, mofA, moxA, and mopA). To narrow this list, we assumed that the Mn(II) oxidase gene would be conserved among Mn(II)-oxidizing pseudomonads but not in nonoxidizers and performed a genome comparison to 11 Pseudomonas species. We further assumed that the oxidase gene would be regulated by MnxR, a transcription factor required for Mn(II) oxidation. Two loci met all these criteria: PputGB1_2447, which encodes an MCO homologous to MnxG, and PputGB1_2665, which encodes an MCO with very low homology to MofA. In-frame deletions of each locus resulted in strains that retained some ability to oxidize Mn(II) or Mn(III); loss of oxidation was attained only upon deletion of both genes. These results suggest that PputGB1_2447 and PputGB1_2665 encode two MCOs that are independently capable of oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III). The purpose of this redundancy is unclear; however, differences in oxidation phenotype for the single mutants suggest specialization in function for the two enzymes. PMID:23124227

  9. A study of iron and manganese transformations at the O 2/S(-II) transition layer in a eutrophic lake (Lake Bret, Switzerland): A multimethod approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vitre, R. R.; Buffle, J.; Perret, D.; Baudat, R.

    1988-06-01

    The usefulness of an analytical scheme based on the simultaneous use of various analytical methods (differential pulse polarography, colorimetry, atomic absorption, and filtration) for the study of Fe and Mn species at a mid-water O 2/H 2S redox transition layer has been investigated. The relative abundance of particulate, colloidal and electroactive species as well as their redox state has been determined, across the interfacial zone. The relevance of polarographic results in unmodified anoxic lake water was tested by performing measurements both directly in the field and the laboratory after sample storage. Significant differences in the signals of Fe(II) and S(-II) species have been observed. The concentration of manganese oxyhydroxide (MnO x was measured using three different analytical techniques and the results suggest that natural lacustrine MnO x contains a reactive and a less reactive fraction. Use of the multimethod approach, has enabled us to demonstrate a spatially well resolved chemical make-up of the water strata at the transition layer and peaked profiles for dissolved Mn(II) and particulate and colloidal Fe(III) and Mn(IV) species. The most probable reactions between O 2, Mn(II)/Mn(IV), Fe(II)/Fe(III) and S(-II) are discussed on the basis of these results.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, P.; Shobana, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Mitu, L.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2015-05-01

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L1-3](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R = sbnd CH3, sbnd C(CH3)3 or sbnd Br) with 2,2‧-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn2+ complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62 B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92 B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E1pc = -0.73 to -0.76 V, E2pc = -1.30 to -1.36 V), and anodic (E1pa = 1.02-1.11 V, E2pa = 1.32-1.79 V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1 > 2 > 3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  11. Follow-up of patients affected by manganese-induced Parkinsonism after treatment with CaNa2EDTA.

    PubMed

    Herrero Hernandez, Elena; Discalzi, Gianluigi; Valentini, Consuelo; Venturi, Fabrizio; Chiò, Adriano; Carmellino, Caterina; Rossi, Luigi; Sacchetti, Anna; Pira, Enrico

    2006-05-01

    In the period of 1998-2004, seven workers affected by manganese-induced Parkinsonism were diagnosed, studied and treated with CaNa2EDTA at our Occupational Health Ward. Biological markers, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and clinical examinations, were used to assess the disease trend. Those workers still employed were immediately removed from exposure. Our results seem to confirm that very good clinical, biological and neuroradiological results can be obtained by timely removal from exposure and chelating treatment, and that amelioration can persist in time. Manganism is, however, a severe condition that can also progress independent of further exposure. Therefore, chelating treatment can be a great aid in overt manganism, but particular attention must be paid to primary prevention, as this disease should now be totally preventable and definitely merits eradication. PMID:16271769

  12. Manganese and iron oxidation by fungi isolated from building stone.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, M A; Gomez-Alarcon, G

    1994-01-01

    Acid and nonacid generating fungal strains isolated from weathered sandstone, limestone, and granite of Spanish cathedrals were assayed for their ability to oxidize iron and manganese. In general, the concentration of the different cations present in the mineral salt media directly affected Mn(IV) oxide formation, although in some cases, the addition of glucose and nitrate to the culture media was necessary. Mn(II) oxidation in acidogenic strains was greater in a medium containing the highest concentrations of glucose, nitrate, and manganese. High concentrations of Fe(II), glucose, and mineral salts were optimal for iron oxidation. Mn(IV) precipitated as oxides or hydroxides adhered to the mycelium. Most of the Fe(III) remained in solution by chelation with organic acids excreted by acidogenic strains. Other metabolites acted as Fe(III) chelators in nonacidogenic strains, although Fe(III) deposits around the mycelium were also detected. Both iron and manganese oxidation were shown to involve extracellular, hydrosoluble enzymes, with maximum specific activities during exponential growth. Strains able to oxidize manganese were also able to oxidize iron. It is concluded that iron and manganese oxidation reported in this work were biologically induced by filamentous fungi mainly by direct (enzymatic) mechanisms.

  13. Protective effects of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) against manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Marreilha dos Santos, A.P.; Lucas, Rui L.; Andrade, Vanda; Mateus, M. Luísa; Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Michael; Batoreu, M. Camila

    2012-02-01

    Chronic, excessive exposure to manganese (Mn) may induce neurotoxicity and cause an irreversible brain disease, referred to as manganism. Efficacious therapies for the treatment of Mn are lacking, mandating the development of new interventions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in attenuating the neurotoxic effects of Mn in an in vivo rat model. Exposure biomarkers, inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, as well as behavioral parameters were evaluated. Co-treatment with Mn plus Ebs or Mn plus PAS caused a significant decrease in blood and brain Mn concentrations (compared to rats treated with Mn alone), concomitant with reduced brain E{sub 2} prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) and enhanced brain glutathione (GSH) levels, decreased serum prolactin (PRL) levels, and increased ambulation and rearing activities. Taken together, these results establish that both PAS and Ebs are efficacious in reducing Mn body burden, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and locomotor activity impairments in a rat model of Mn-induced toxicity. -- Highlights: ► The manuscript is unique in its approach to the neurotoxicity of Mn. ► The manuscript incorporates molecular, cellular and functional (behavioral) analyses. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in restoring Mn behavioral function. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in reducing Mn-induced oxidative stress. ► Both PAS and Ebs led to a decrease in Mn-induced neuro-inflammation.

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of peripheral environment on magnetic properties of tetranuclear manganese skeleton in new representatives of calix[4]arene-containing [MnII2 MnIII2] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoshin, S. M.; Antipin, I. S.; Solov'eva, S. E.; Sanina, N. A.; Korchagin, D. V.; Shilov, G. V.; Mushenok, F. B.; Utenyshev, A. N.; Bozhenko, K. V.

    2015-02-01

    A new representative of calix[4]arene-containing tetranuclear manganese complexes of [Mn2IIIMn2II] type with 2,2‧-dipyridyl bidentate ligand coordinated in the equatorial plane of the complex (II) has been obtained. The complex is crystallized in monoclinic space group P21/c (a = 14.9402(7) Å, b = 32.816(1) Å, c = 21.595(1) Å, β = 106.888(4)). Its magnetic properties have been studied by the method of SQUID magnetometry. The substitution of a peripheral ligand was shown to influence substantially on the structure of the central fragment of the metal complex, and, hence, on the magnetic properties. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed for this complex and for the similar calix[4]arene-containing manganese complex with pyridine ligand (I). The influence of peripheral environment on the magnetic properties of tetranuclear manganese skeleton was elucidated for both complexes.

  15. The role of dopamine in manganese-induced oxidative injury in rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seth, K; Agrawal, A K; Date, I; Seth, P K

    2002-03-01

    Reactive dopamine (DA) metabolites have been implicated in both Parkinson's disease and manganese (Mn) neurotoxicity. Rat PC12 and genetically modified PC12 (PC12M) cells capable of producing higher DA content, on exposure to MnCl2 (10(-6) M) for 72 hours, exhibited a significant decrease in glutathione content. Activity of antioxidant enzyme catalase was also inhibited following 24- and 72-hour MnCl2 exposure. MnCl2 caused a concentration-dependent (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) loss in mitochondrial activity after 24 and 72 hours and an impaired DNA synthesis after 72 hours with changes being more marked in PC12M cells. The results indicate that the free-radical-mediated toxicity of Mn at cellular level involves down-regulation of antioxidants in normal and DA-rich PC12 cells. PC12M cells appeared to be more sensitive than PC12 cells. PMID:12102543

  16. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  17. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Mononuclear Manganese(III)-Porphyrin Complex.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Álvarez, Alejandro; Vallejo, Julia; Pardo, Emilio; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Krzystek, J; Armentano, Donatella; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cano, Joan

    2015-11-23

    We report on a novel manganese(III)-porphyrin complex with the formula [Mn(III) (TPP)(3,5-Me2 pyNO)2 ]ClO4 ⋅CH3 CN (2; 3,5-Me2 pyNO=3,5-dimethylpyridine N-oxide, H2 TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin), in which the Mn(III) ion is six-coordinate with two monodentate 3,5-Me2 pyNO molecules and a tetradentate TPP ligand to build a tetragonally elongated octahedral geometry. The environment in 2 is responsible for the large and negative axial zero-field splitting (D=-3.8 cm(-1) ), low rhombicity (E/|D|=0.04) of the high-spin Mn(III) ion, and, ultimately, for the observation of slow magnetic-relaxation effects (Ea =15.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G) in this rare example of a manganese-based single-ion magnet (SIM). Structural, magnetic, and electronic characterizations were carried out by means of single-crystal diffraction studies, variable-temperature direct- and alternating-current measurements and high-frequency and -field EPR spectroscopic analysis followed by quantum-chemical calculations. Slow magnetic-relaxation effects were also observed in the already known analogous compound [Mn(III) (TPP)Cl] (1; Ea =10.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G). The results obtained for 1 and 2 are compared and discussed herein.

  19. Manganese oxidation by modified reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, L; LoBrutto, R; Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2003-09-23

    The transfer of an electron from exogenous manganese (II) ions to the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, P, of bacterial reaction centers was characterized for a series of mutants that have P/P(+) midpoint potentials ranging from 585 to 765 mV compared to 505 mV for wild type. Light-induced changes in optical and EPR spectra of the mutants were measured to monitor the disappearance of the oxidized dimer upon electron donation by manganese in the presence of bicarbonate. The extent of electron transfer was strongly dependent upon the P/P(+) midpoint potential. The midpoint potential of the Mn(2+)/Mn(3+) couple was calculated to decrease linearly from 751 to 623 mV as the pH was raised from 8 to 10, indicating the involvement of a proton. The electron donation had a second order rate constant of approximately 9 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), determined from the linear increase in rate for Mn(2+) concentrations up to 200 microM. Weak dissociation constants of 100-200 microM were found. Quantitative EPR analysis of the six-line free Mn(2+) signal revealed that up to seven manganese ions were associated with the reaction centers at a 1 mM concentration of manganese. The association and the electron transfer between manganese and the reaction centers could be inhibited by Ca(2+) and Na(+) ions. The ability of reaction centers with high potentials to oxidize manganese suggests that manganese oxidation could have preceded water oxidation in the evolutionary development of photosystem II. PMID:12974637

  20. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese (II) silicate containing frustrated S=5/2 zig–zag ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Brandão, P.; Paixão, L.S.; Reis, M.S.

    2014-03-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese silicate with ideal formula of NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) is reported. This compound is a synthetic analog to the naturally occurring mineral Serandite. The crystal structure comprises MnO{sub 6} octahedra and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The MnO{sub 6} share four edges with neighboring octahedra forming double chains. These chains are connected by silicate chains Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) resulting in an open framework structure with six-member ring channels where sodium ions are located. From the magnetic point of view, the intra-chain exchange between neighboring S=5/2 manganese ions is weak, partly due to the distortion observed in the octahedra, but also due to the frustrated topology of the chain. A successful fitting of the magnetic susceptibility was obtained by considering a double chain numerical model with Monte Carlo derived empirical parameters. -- Graphical abstract: A manganese silicate prepared hydrothermally with formula NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH) possessing the structure of the mineral Serandite contains doubled chains of edge-sharing MnO{sub 6} octahedra. The magnetic susceptibility was measured and shows an antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: • Characterization of a synthetic analog to the mineral Serandite: NaMn{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH). • Fitting of the magnetic susceptibility considering a classical regular chain. • Weak metal–oxygen–metal super-exchange interactions; antiferromagnetic in nature. • Elevated degree of frustration along the chain, without sign of interchain ordering.

  1. Dinuclear manganese(II) complexes of hexaazamacrocycles bearing N-benzoylated pendant separated by aromatic spacers: Antibacterial, DNA interaction, cytotoxic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Arthi, P; Shobana, S; Srinivasan, P; Prabhu, D; Arulvasu, C; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2015-12-01

    Three new homodinuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L(1-3)(ClO4)(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1-3) have been synthesized via cyclocondensation of terephthalaldehyde with three different benzoylated pendants in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate and characterized by spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetric investigation of complexes (1-3) depict two quasi-reversible one electron reduction processes in the cathodic potential region (E(1)pc=-0.73 to-0.83 V, E(2)pc=-1.31 to -1.40 V) and two quasi-reversible one electron oxidation processes in the anodic potential region (E(1)pa=1.03 to 1.10 V, E(2)pa=1.69 to 1.77 V). Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry around the central metal ion. The observed low magnetic moment values (μeff, 5.60-5.68 B.M.) of the complexes indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction between two metal centers, which was also supported by the broad EPR signal. All the compounds were tested for antibacterial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The binding studies of complexes with CT-DNA suggested minor-groove mode of interaction. Molecular docking studies were carried out in order to find the binding affinity of complexes with DNA and protein EGFR Kinase. The complexes are stabilized by additional electrostatic and van der Waals interaction with the DNA, and support minor groove mode of binding. The cleavage activity of complexes on pBR322 plasmid DNA displays efficient activity through a mechanistic pathway involving hydroxyl radicals. The cytotoxicity of complexes 2 and 3 have been tested against human liver adenocarcinoma (HepG2) cell line. Nuclear-chromatin cleavage has also been observed with propidium iodide (PI) staining and alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) techniques.

  2. Ammonia binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II identifies the solvent-exchangeable oxygen bridge (μ-oxo) of the manganese tetramer.

    PubMed

    Pérez Navarro, Montserrat; Ames, William M; Nilsson, Håkan; Lohmiller, Thomas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Nowaczyk, Marc M; Neese, Frank; Boussac, Alain; Messinger, Johannes; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas

    2013-09-24

    The assignment of the two substrate water sites of the tetra-manganese penta-oxygen calcium (Mn4O5Ca) cluster of photosystem II is essential for the elucidation of the mechanism of biological O-O bond formation and the subsequent design of bio-inspired water-splitting catalysts. We recently demonstrated using pulsed EPR spectroscopy that one of the five oxygen bridges (μ-oxo) exchanges unusually rapidly with bulk water and is thus a likely candidate for one of the substrates. Ammonia, a water analog, was previously shown to bind to the Mn4O5Ca cluster, potentially displacing a water/substrate ligand [Britt RD, et al. (1989) J Am Chem Soc 111(10):3522-3532]. Here we show by a combination of EPR and time-resolved membrane inlet mass spectrometry that the binding of ammonia perturbs the exchangeable μ-oxo bridge without drastically altering the binding/exchange kinetics of the two substrates. In combination with broken-symmetry density functional theory, our results show that (i) the exchangable μ-oxo bridge is O5 {using the labeling of the current crystal structure [Umena Y, et al. (2011) Nature 473(7345):55-60]}; (ii) ammonia displaces a water ligand to the outer manganese (MnA4-W1); and (iii) as W1 is trans to O5, ammonia binding elongates the MnA4-O5 bond, leading to the perturbation of the μ-oxo bridge resonance and to a small change in the water exchange rates. These experimental results support O-O bond formation between O5 and possibly an oxyl radical as proposed by Siegbahn and exclude W1 as the second substrate water. PMID:24023065

  3. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Diaqua(1,10-Phenanthroline-N,N′)(Thiosulfato-O,S)Manganese(II). Biological Properties.

    PubMed Central

    Brezeanu, Maria; Badea, Mikaela; Morgant, Georges; Viossat, Bernard; Bouttier, Sylvie; Fourniat, Jacky; Marinescu, Dana

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of diaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-N,N′)(thiosulfato-O,S)manganese(ll) [Mn(phen)(S2O3)(H2O)2] was investigated. Its structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction from 2418 reflections (I > 3 σ(I)) to a final value of R = 0.047 and Rw = 0.054. Crystal data are as follows : space group P21; a = 10.356(3), b = 7.097(3), c = 20.316(2) Å, β = 94.29(2)°, V = 1489.1(8) , Å3, Z = 2. There are two independent title compounds in the asymetric unit. Each manganese atom has a distorted octahedral Mn(SO)N2O2 geometry with the S and O atoms (from two neighbouring thiosulfate ligands) mutually trans, two N atoms from the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand and two water oxygen. The thiosulfate group behaves as a bridging ligand, connecting, through sulfur and oxygen, Mn atoms related by the binary b translation, thus forming infinite chains running parallel to this axis. Infrared and electronic spectra are reported. PMID:18475862

  4. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells’ Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  5. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  6. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription.

  7. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  8. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate ( Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  9. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  10. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. PMID:26762600

  11. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  12. Adipocyte-Specific Deletion of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects From Diet-Induced Obesity Through Increased Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong Hwan; Buffolo, Márcio; Pires, Karla Maria; Pei, Shaobo; Scherer, Philipp E; Boudina, Sihem

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with oxidative stress (OS). The causal role of adipose OS in the pathogenesis of these conditions is unknown. To address this issue, we generated mice with an adipocyte-selective deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). When fed a high-fat diet (HFD), the AdSod2 knockout (KO) mice exhibited less adiposity, reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, and decreased circulating leptin. The resistance to diet-induced adiposity was the result of an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure. Furthermore, palmitate oxidation was elevated in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue of AdSod2 KO mice fed an HFD, and the expression of key fatty acid oxidation genes was increased. To gain mechanistic insight into the increased fat oxidation in HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice, we quantified the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial content in WAT and found that MnSOD deletion increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and induced mitochondrial biogenesis. This effect was preserved in cultured adipocytes from AdSod2 KO mice in vitro. As expected from the enhanced fat oxidation, circulating levels of free fatty acids were reduced in the HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice. Finally, HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice were protected from hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue inflammation, and glucose and insulin intolerance. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MnSOD deletion in adipocytes triggered an adaptive stress response that activated mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27284109

  13. Enhancing Mn(II)-Binding and Manganese Peroxidase Activity in a Designed Cytochrome c Peroxidase through Fine-Tuning Secondary-Sphere Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Mirts, Evan N; Pfister, Thomas D; Gao, Yi-Gui; Mayne, Christopher; Robinson, Howard; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Lu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    Noncovalent second-shell interactions are important in controlling metal-binding affinity and activity in metalloenzymes, but fine-tuning these interactions in designed metalloenzymes has not been fully explored. As a result, most designed metalloenzymes have low metal-binding affinity and activity. Here we identified three mutations in the second coordination shell of an engineered Mn(II)-binding site in cytochrome c peroxidase (called MnCcP.1, containing Glu45, Glu37, and Glu181 ligands) that mimics the native manganese peroxidase (MnP), and explored their effects on both Mn(II)-binding affinity and MnP activity. First, removing a hydrogen bond to Glu45 through Tyr36Phe mutation enhanced Mn(II)-binding affinity, as evidenced by a 2.8-fold decrease in the KM of Mn(II) oxidation. Second, introducing a salt bridge through Lys179Arg mutation improved Glu35 and Glu181 coordination to Mn(II), decreasing KM 2.6-fold. Third, eliminating a steric clash that prevented Glu37 from orienting toward Mn(II) resulted in an 8.6-fold increase in kcat/KM, arising primarily from a 3.6-fold decrease in KM, with a KM value comparable to that of the native enzyme (0.28 mM vs 0.19 mM for Pleurotus eryngii MnP PS3). We further demonstrated that while the effects of Tyr36Phe and Lys179Arg mutations are additive, because involved in secondary-shell interactions to different ligands, other combinations of mutations were antagonistic because they act on different aspects of the Mn(II) coordination at the same residues. Finally, we showed that these MnCcP variants are functional models of MnP that mimic its activity in both Mn(II) oxidation and degradation of a phenolic lignin model compound and kraft lignin. In addition to achieving KM in a designed protein that is similar to the that of native enzyme, our results offer molecular insight into the role of noncovalent interactions around metal-binding sites for improving metal binding and overall activity; such insight can be applied to

  14. A laser ablation ICP-MS based method for multiplexed immunoblot analysis: applications to manganese-dependent protein dynamics of photosystem II in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole Noerregaard; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Jensen, Poul Erik; Thelen, Jay J; Husted, Søren

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) constitutes an essential co-factor in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII). Consequently, Mn deficiency reduces photosynthetic efficiency and leads to changes in PSII composition. In order to study these changes, multiplexed protein assays are advantageous. Here, we developed a multiplexed antibody-based assay and analysed selected PSII subunits in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). A selection of antibodies were labelled with specific lanthanides and immunoreacted with thylakoids exposed to Mn deficiency after western blotting. Subsequently, western blot membranes were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which allowed selective and relative quantitative analysis via the different lanthanides. The method was evaluated against established liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) methods, based on data-dependent acquisition (DDA) and selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Manganese deficiency resulted in a general decrease in PSII protein abundances, an effect that was shown to be reversible upon Mn re-supplementation. Specifically, the extrinsic proteins PsbP and PsbQ showed Mn-dependent changes in abundances. Similar trends in the response to Mn deficiency at the protein level were observed when comparing DDA, SRM and LA-ICP-MS results. A biologically important exception to this trend was the loss of PsbO in the SRM analysis, which highlights the necessity of validating protein changes by more than one technique. The developed method enables a higher number of proteins to be multiplexed in comparison to existing immunoassays. Furthermore, multiplexed protein analysis by LA-ICP-MS provides an analytical platform with high throughput appropriate for screening large collections of plants.

  15. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  16. Effects of mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Dong, Jiao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Zhai, Jing; Ge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSODm) has been synthesized and reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether MnSODm has anti-inflammatory effects on colitis and any underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study was to investigate therapeutic effects and mechanism of MnSODm on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis model in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered MnSODm (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) per day for 7 days after colitis was induced by TNBS. After treated with MnSODm, the colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and colonic weight/length ratios were significantly decreased compared with colitis model group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malonyldialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in colon tissues were also significantly decreased in MnSODm treatment groups. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased and phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (IκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IKKα/β), and nuclear factor-kappa Bp65 (NF-κBp65) as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation actor 88 (MyD88) in the colonic mucosa were significantly inhibited by MnSODm treatment. Thus, MnSODm was protective against colitis via antioxidant activity and by inhibiting inflammatory mediators by down-regulating TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways. These data suggest a potential therapeutic effect of MnSODm in colitis.

  17. Effects of mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Dong, Jiao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Zhai, Jing; Ge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSODm) has been synthesized and reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether MnSODm has anti-inflammatory effects on colitis and any underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study was to investigate therapeutic effects and mechanism of MnSODm on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis model in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered MnSODm (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) per day for 7 days after colitis was induced by TNBS. After treated with MnSODm, the colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and colonic weight/length ratios were significantly decreased compared with colitis model group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malonyldialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in colon tissues were also significantly decreased in MnSODm treatment groups. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased and phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (IκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IKKα/β), and nuclear factor-kappa Bp65 (NF-κBp65) as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation actor 88 (MyD88) in the colonic mucosa were significantly inhibited by MnSODm treatment. Thus, MnSODm was protective against colitis via antioxidant activity and by inhibiting inflammatory mediators by down-regulating TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways. These data suggest a potential therapeutic effect of MnSODm in colitis. PMID:27506642

  18. Bladder function in mice with inducible smooth muscle-specific deletion of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Elrashidy, Rania A; Xiao, Nan; Kavran, Michael; Huang, Yexiang; Tao, Mingfang; Powell, C Thomas; Kim, Edward; Sadeghi, Ghazal; Mohamed, Hoda E; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-08-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is considered a critical component of the antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative damage. We are interested in the role of oxidative stress in bladder detrusor smooth muscle (SM) in different disease states. In this study, we generated an inducible, SM-specific Sod2(-/-) mouse model to investigate the effects of MnSOD depletion on the function of the bladder. We crossbred floxed Sod2 (Sod2(lox/lox)) mice with mice containing heterozygous knock-in of a gene encoding a tamoxifen-activated Cre recombinase in the SM22α promoter locus [SM-CreER(T2)(ki)(Cre/+)]. We obtained Sod2(lox/lox),SM-CreER(T2)(ki)(Cre/+) mice and injected 8-wk-old males with 4-hydroxytamoxifen to induce Cre-mediated excision of the floxed Sod2 allele. Twelve weeks later, SM-specific deletion of Sod2 and depletion of MnSOD were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. SM-specific Sod2(-/-) mice exhibited normal growth with no gross abnormalities. A significant increase in nitrotyrosine concentration was found in bladder SM tissue of SM-specific Sod2(-/-) mice compared with both wild-type mice and Sod2(+/+), SM-CreER(T2)(ki)(Cre/+) mice treated with 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Assessment of 24-h micturition in SM-specific Sod2(-/-) mice revealed significantly higher voiding frequency compared with both wild-type and SM-specific Cre controls. Conscious cystometry revealed significantly shorter intercontraction intervals and lower functional bladder capacity in SM-specific Sod2(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. This novel model can be used for exploring the mechanistic role of oxidative stress in organs rich in SM in different pathological conditions. PMID:25948732

  19. [Clinical cases of occupational chronic manganese intoxication].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T N; Lakhman, O L; Katamanova, E V; Kartapol'tseva, N V; Meshcheriagin, V A; Rusanova, D V; Andreeva, O K

    2009-01-01

    Classic symptoms of manganese intoxication are very rarely seen nowadays. Clinic in Angarsk Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology registered two cases of stage I and II chronic manganese intoxication over 10 years among electric welders. The cases were diagnosed with consideration of long length of exposure to manganese with the ambient air level exceeding the MAC 1.5 times, the disease manifestation at middle age, high manganese level in serum and urine, characteristic neurologic symptoms in association with organic psychopathologic defects and polyneuropathy of limbs.

  20. Binding of manganese(II) to a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme as studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    KISSELEVA, NATALIA; KHVOROVA, ANASTASIA; WESTHOF, ERIC; SCHIEMANN, OLAV

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to study the binding of MnII ions to a tertiary stabilized hammer-head ribozyme (tsHHRz) and to compare it with the binding to the minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz). Continuous wave EPR measurements show that the tsHHRz possesses a single high-affinity MnII binding site with a KD of ≤10 nM at an NaCl concentration of 0.1 M. This dissociation constant is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than the KD determined previously for the single high-affinity MnII site in the mHHRz. In addition, whereas the high-affinity MnII is displaced from the mHHRz upon binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B, it is not from the tsHHRz. Despite these pronounced differences in binding, a comparison between the electron spin echo envelope modulation and hyperfine sublevel correlation spectra of the minimal and tertiary stabilized HHRz demonstrates that the structure of both binding sites is very similar. This suggests that the MnII is located in both ribozymes between the bases A9 and G10.1 of the sheared G · A tandem base pair, as shown previously and in detail for the mHHRz. Thus, the much stronger MnII binding in the tsHHRz is attributed to the interaction between the two external loops, which locks in the RNA fold, trapping the MnII in the tightly bound conformation, whereas the absence of long-range loop–loop interactions in the mHHRz leads to more dynamical and open conformations, decreasing MnII binding. PMID:15611296

  1. MECHANISMS OF MANGANESE-INDUCED RAT PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELL DEATH AND CELL DIFFERENTIATION. (R826248)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytom...

  2. The effects of iron(II) on the kinetics of arsenic oxidation and sorption on manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, As(III) oxidation kinetics by a poorly-crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe(II) was investigated using stirred-flow and batch experiments. Chemically synthetic δ-MnO2 was reacted with four influent solutions, containing the same As(III) concentration but different Fe(II) concentrations, at pH 6. The results show an initial rapid As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2, which is followed by an appreciably slow reaction after 8h. In the presence of Fe(II), As(III) oxidation is inhibited due to the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the formation of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides on the δ-MnO2 surface. However, the sorption of As(III), As(V) and Mn(II) are increased, for the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides provide additional sorption sites. This study suggests that the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) and consequently the precipitation of Fe(III) compounds on the δ-MnO2 surface play an important role in As(III) oxidation and As sequestration. Understanding these processes would be helpful in developing in situ strategies for remediation of As-contaminated waters and soils.

  3. Kinetic and redox properties of MnP II, a major manganese peroxidase isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79.

    PubMed

    Petruccioli, Maurizio; Frasconi, Marco; Quaratino, Daniele; Covino, Stefano; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    A manganese peroxidase (MnP) isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79 was produced in a benchtop stirred-tank reactor and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification scheme involving ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography on concanavalin-A Sepharose, and gel filtration led to a purified MnP, termed "MnP II," with a specific activity of 288 IU mg(-1) protein and a final yield of 22%. The enzyme turned out to be a monomeric protein with molecular mass of 50.5 kDa, pI of 4.07, and an extent of N-glycosylation of about 5.3% of the high-mannose type. The temperature and pH optima for the formation of malonate manganic chelates were 45 degrees C and 5.5, respectively. MnP II proved to be poorly thermostable at 50 and 60 degrees C, with half-lives of 11 min and 105 s, respectively. K (m) values for H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+) were 16 and 124 microM, respectively. Although MnP II was able to oxidize veratryl alcohol and to catalyze the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of several phenols, it cannot be assigned to the versatile peroxidase family. As opposed to versatile peroxidase oxidation, veratryl alcohol oxidation required the simultaneous presence of H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+); in addition, low turnover numbers and K (m) values higher than 300 microM characterized the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of substituted phenols. Kinetic properties and the substrate specificity of the enzyme markedly differed from those reported for MnP isoenzymes produced by the reference strain P. tigrinus 8/18. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time a thorough electrochemical characterization of a MnP from this fungus. PMID:19578878

  4. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  5. Mechanisms of manganese-induced rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell death and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jerome A; Horbinski, Craig; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela; Garrick, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model since they possess much of the biochemical machinery associated with dopaminergic neurons. Mn, like nerve growth factor (NGF), can induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells but Mn-induced cell differentiation is dependent on its interaction with the cell surface integrin receptors and basement membrane proteins, vitronectin or fibronectin. Similar to NGF, Mn-induced neurite outgrowth is dependent on the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinases, ERK1 and 2 (p44/42). Unlike NGF, Mn is also cytotoxic having an IC50 value of approximately 600 microM. Although many apoptotic signals are turned on by Mn, cell death is caused ultimately by disruption of mitochondrial function leading to loss of ATP. RT-PCR and immunoblotting studies suggest that some uptake of Mn into PC12 cells depends on the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). DMT1 exists in two isoforms resulting from alternate splicing of a single gene product with one of the two mRNA species containing an iron response element (IRE) motif downstream from the stop codon. The presence of the IRE provides a binding site for the iron response proteins (IRP1 and 2); binding of either of these proteins could stabilize DMT1 mRNA and would increase expression of the +IRE form of the transporter. Iron and Mn compete for transport into PC12 cells via DMT1, so removal of iron from the culture media enhances Mn toxicity. The two isoforms of DMT1 (+/-IRE) are distributed in different subcellular compartments with the -IRE species selectively present in the nucleus of neuronal and neuronal-like cells. PMID:12224755

  6. Manganese(IV) Oxide Production by Acremonium sp. Strain KR21-2 and Extracellular Mn(II) Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Naoyuki; Tani, Yukinori; Maruo, Kanako; Tsuno, Hiroshi; Sakata, Masahiro; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2006-01-01

    Ascomycetes that can deposit Mn(III, IV) oxides are widespread in aquatic and soil environments, yet the mechanism(s) involved in Mn oxide deposition remains unclear. A Mn(II)-oxidizing ascomycete, Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2, produced a Mn oxide phase with filamentous nanostructures. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy showed that the Mn phase was primarily Mn(IV). We purified to homogeneity a laccase-like enzyme with Mn(II) oxidase activity from cultures of strain KR21-2. The purified enzyme oxidized Mn(II) to yield suspended Mn particles; XANES spectra indicated that Mn(II) had been converted to Mn(IV). The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation was 7.0, and the apparent half-saturation constant was 0.20 mM. The enzyme oxidized ABTS [2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] (pH optimum, 5.5; Km, 1.2 mM) and contained two copper atoms per molecule. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence (residues 3 to 25) was 61% identical with the corresponding sequence of an Acremonium polyphenol oxidase and 57% identical with that of a Myrothecium bilirubin oxidase. These results provide the first evidence that a fungal multicopper oxidase can convert Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxide. The present study reinforces the notion of the contribution of multicopper oxidase to microbially mediated precipitation of Mn oxides and suggests that Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2 is a good model for understanding the oxidation of Mn in diverse ascomycetes. PMID:17021194

  7. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Aschner, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic

  8. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms. II - The mercury-manganese stars 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis and Kappa Cancri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1987-01-01

    Elemental abundance analyses based on the coaddition of at least 10 2.4 A/mm Ila-O Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms have been performed for three mercury-manganese stars, 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis, and Kappa Cancri. These fine analyses show a greater degree of internal consistency than previous studies based on lower signal-to-noise data. Lines as weak as of order 3 mA are employed in these studies, and lines of atomic species not previously identified have been discovered. The status of 53 Tau as an anomalous member of this class is confirmed in that it lacks a Hg II 3984 A line even at the 2 mA level. Further, its surface gravity indicates it is less evolved than Mu Lep and Chi Cnc. Violations of the odd-even effect in the photospheric abundances of all three stars suggest that nonnuclear processes have operated in their atmospheres. Some of the values are substantially changed from their presumably initial solar values.

  9. Evaluation of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-manganese(II) complexes modified by narrow molecular weight distribution of chitosan oligosaccharides as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qi; Dai, Xueqin; Wu, Jingbo

    2011-05-01

    Novel conjugates of narrow molecular weight distribution of chitosan oligosaccharides (CSn; n=6, 8, 11) with manganese-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Mn-DTPA) as potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were synthesized. The structures were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, size exclusion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The characterization results showed that Mn-DTPA was successfully linked to aminated CSn by an amide function. The magnetic properties were characterized by in vitro and T(1)-weighted FLASH image experiments. Relaxivities studies indicated that Mn-DTPA-CSn (n=8, 11) provided higher relaxivity, either in aqueous or bovine serum albumin solution (0.725 mM), than commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA. The stability results showed that Mn-DTPA-CSn in aqueous were stable enough to prevent Mn(II) ions from releasing. The preliminary in vitro and T(1)-weighted FLASH image studies suggested that Mn-DTPA-CSn had the advantage of becoming promising MRI contrast agents.

  10. SOFC Ohmic Resistance Reduction by HCl-Induced Removal of Manganese at the Anode/Electrolyte Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Edwards, Danny J.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Cramer, Carolyn N.

    2010-04-09

    The ohmic resistance of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells having a manganese-based cathode was lowered when operated in synthetic coal gas containing hydrogen chloride. This effect was not observed for cells with cathodes that did not contain manganese. Substantial amounts of Mn were found throughout the grain boundaries of the 8 mole% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) electrolyte. Exposure to HCl partially removed Mn near the anode/electrolyte interface, presumably by volatilization as MnCl2(g). This work suggests that one of the underlying causes of higher than expected electrolyte resistance in anode-supported SOFCs is a lowering of the ionic conductivity of 8YSZ by incorporation of manganese.

  11. CEMS study of strain induced phase transformation in manganese Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanillas, E. D.; Alvarez, E. P.; Hey, A.; Mercader, R. C.

    1991-11-01

    A Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy, (CEMS), study of phase transformations in a Hadfield steel induced by high rate strains is reported. Hadfield steel samples were impact deformed and the ensuing changes in the magnetic properties at the deformed zone and its surroundings have been studied by CEMS. The CEMS results are compared with wear tests and optical microscopy and show a formation of martensite by impact deformation only at the surface. Martensite is not produced by compression or tensile stresses but appears after wear tests in proportions that depend on the load and velocity conditions of test. The understanding of martensite phase formation and its evolution during deformation processes is also addressed.

  12. Synthesis, and characterization of low- and high-spin manganese(II) complexes of polyfunctional adipoyldihydrazone: Effect of coordination of N-donor ligands on stereo-redox chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumatary, Debajani; Lal, Ram Ashray; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-07-01

    Manganese(II) complexes [MnII(npahH2)] (1), [MnII(npahH2)(A)2] and [MnII(npahH2)(NN)] (where A = pyridine, (2); 2-picoline, (3); 3-picoline, (4); 4-picoline, (5) and NN = 2,2‧ bipyridine, (6); 1,10-phenanthroline, (7)) have been synthesized from bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde)adipoyldihydrazone (npahH4) in methanol. The composition of metal complexes has been established by elemental analyses. Complexes (1) and (3) have been characterized by mass spectral data also. Structural assessments of the complexes have been based on data obtained from molar conductance, magnetic moment, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectral studies. Conductivity measurements in DMSO suggest that they are non-electrolyte. Electronic spectral studies suggest a six-coordinate octahedral geometry around the manganese center in complexes (2) to (7) and square-planar geometry in complex (1). IR spectral studies reveal that the dihydrazone coordinates to the metal in keto form with an anti-cis configuration. Magnetic moment, and EPR studies suggest manganese in +2 oxidation state in all complexes with high-spin distorted octahedral stereochemistry in complexes (2-7) while low-spin square-planar stereochemistry is involved with significant metal-metal interactions in the solid state in complex (1). Cyclic voltammetric studies reveal that the metal center cycles among the MnII → MnI → Mn0 in complexes (2) to (7) and among MnII → MnI oxidation states in complex (1).

  13. Inhalation of Talc Induces Infiltration of Macrophages and Upregulation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ilseob; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Yang, Sangyoung; Choi, Min; Seo, Gyun-Baek; Lee, Byung-Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Talc is a mineral that is widely used in cosmetic products, antiseptics, paints, and rubber manufacturing. Although the toxicological effects of talc have been studied extensively, until now no detailed inhalation study of talc focusing on oxidative stress has been done. This repeated 4 weeks whole-body inhalation toxicity study of talc involved Sprague-Dawley rats. Male and female groups of rats were exposed to inhaled talc at 0, 5, 50, and 100 mg/m(3) for 6 hours daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The objective was to identify the 4-week inhalation toxicity of talc and investigate antioxidant activity after exposure to talc. There were no treatment-related symptoms or mortality in rats treated with talc. Glucose (GLU) was decreased significantly in male rats exposed to 50 and 100 mg/m(3) of talc. Histopathological examination revealed infiltration of macrophages on the alveolar walls and spaces near the terminal and respiratory bronchioles. In male and female rats exposed to 100 mg/m(3) talc, expression of superoxide dismutase 2, a typical biological indicator of oxidative damage, was significantly increased. Thus, inhalation of talc induces macrophage aggregations and oxidative damage in the lung.

  14. Inhalation of Talc Induces Infiltration of Macrophages and Upregulation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ilseob; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Yang, Sangyoung; Choi, Min; Seo, Gyun-Baek; Lee, Byung-Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Talc is a mineral that is widely used in cosmetic products, antiseptics, paints, and rubber manufacturing. Although the toxicological effects of talc have been studied extensively, until now no detailed inhalation study of talc focusing on oxidative stress has been done. This repeated 4 weeks whole-body inhalation toxicity study of talc involved Sprague-Dawley rats. Male and female groups of rats were exposed to inhaled talc at 0, 5, 50, and 100 mg/m(3) for 6 hours daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The objective was to identify the 4-week inhalation toxicity of talc and investigate antioxidant activity after exposure to talc. There were no treatment-related symptoms or mortality in rats treated with talc. Glucose (GLU) was decreased significantly in male rats exposed to 50 and 100 mg/m(3) of talc. Histopathological examination revealed infiltration of macrophages on the alveolar walls and spaces near the terminal and respiratory bronchioles. In male and female rats exposed to 100 mg/m(3) talc, expression of superoxide dismutase 2, a typical biological indicator of oxidative damage, was significantly increased. Thus, inhalation of talc induces macrophage aggregations and oxidative damage in the lung. PMID:26482432

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  17. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  18. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss--A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  19. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss--A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms.

  20. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum. PMID:26378923

  1. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  2. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss - A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms. PMID:27078034

  3. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Miao-Qian; Su, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xuan; Liu, Xiong-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xue; Lian, Cheng; Zheng, Qiang-Sun; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)‑induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase‑3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII‑induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII‑induced p‑Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase‑3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII‑induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII‑induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  4. NMR investigation of field-induced magnetic order in barium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Steve

    As early as 1956, Matsubara and Matsuda found an exact correspondence between a lattice gas model and a quantum antiferromagnet model[1]. They paved the way for the language of integer spin boson particles to be used interchangeably with quantum magnetic insulator systems in a general manner. For example, an analogy of density of bosons is found in magnetization, and analogy of chemical potential is found in external field. Just as there exist corresponding parameters between these two seemingly unrelated systems, quantum magnets can also exhibit consequences of Boson particle systems. In particular, spin-ordering transition in quantum magnets can be interpreted as Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) transition in Boson particle framework. Direct observation of BEC in Boson particles has been realized in 4He's superfluid transition and in dilute atomic gas clouds cooled to very low temperatures[2]. In this thesis, we try to realize and analyze BEC transition through field-induced spin-ordering transition in the S = 1 antiferromagnetic dimer system, Ba3Mn2O8. We perform NMR measurements with 135,137Ba nucleus as a local probe. Although S = 1 spin properties of Ba 3Mn2O8 come from electronic spins on Mn atoms, hyperfine coupling between Mn electronic spins and Ba nuclear spins allow us to infer Mn electrons' spin information. Since there are 2 inequivalent Ba sites, Ba(1) and Ba(2), in Ba3Mn2O8, we essentially have two probes that provide a detailed picture of structure and nature of magnetism in this material. There are many antiferromagnetic BEC candidates, but there is a significant advantage of studying Ba3Mn 2O8. Unlike the other popular antiferromagnetic BEC candidates such as TlCuCl3[3] or BaCuSi2O6[4], we find no evidence of lattice deformation in Ba3Mn2O8 . This allows us an unprecedented clean look at magnetic properties. Aside from the aforementioned simple technical advantage, there are new physics that we can learn from Ba3Mn2O 8. The geometric frustration of

  5. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  6. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  7. The manganese stabilizing protein of photosystem II modifies the in vivo deactivation and photoactivation kinetics of the H2O oxidation complex in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Burnap, R L; Qian, M; Pierce, C

    1996-01-23

    Dark deactivation and photoactivation of H2O-splitting activity were examined in a directed mutant (delta psbO) of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 lacking the extrinsic manganese-stabilizing protein of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center complex. Rapid (t1/2 = 10 min) losses of H2O-splitting activity were observed for delta psbO cells kept in the dark, but not for wild-type cells. The loss of H2O-splitting activity by delta psbO cells was suppressed by maintaining the cells under illumination and dark losses were rapidly (t1/2 < 1 min) reversed by light. Photoactivation kinetics of delta psbO and wild-type cells were compared following hydroxylamine extraction of PSII Mn. Photoactivation of delta psbO cells under continuous illumination occurs at an intrinsically faster rate (about 4-fold) than the wild-type. Virtually all of the increase in the rate of photoactivation can be accounted for by a corresponding 4-fold increase in the relative quantum yield of photoactivation as indicated by the yield of photoactivation as a function of flash number. The flash frequency dependence of photoactivation indicates a multi-quantum process in the mutant resembling the wild-type, but with significant increases in yields at all flash frequencies examined. The higher quantum yield of photoactivation in delta psbO cells occurs in the absence of large changes in the kinetics of the rate-limiting dark rearrangement. The results are consistent with increased accessibility (or affinity) and photooxidation of Mn2+ at one or both of the two binding sites involved in the initial stages of the photoactivation mechanism. In the context of previous results, it is proposed that MSP regulates the binding/photooxidation of the second Mn2+ of the photoligation sequence, but not the first.

  8. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  9. Preparation of manganese(II), chromium(III) and ferric(III) oxides nanoparticles in situ metal citraconate complexes frameworks.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S

    2014-12-10

    The new reactions of some divalent and trivalent transition metal ions (Mn(II), Cr(III), and Fe(III)) with citraconic acid has been studied. The obtained results indicate the formation of citraconic acid compounds with molar ratio of metal to citraconic acid of 2:2 or 2:3 with general formulas Mn2(C5H4O4)2 or M2(C5H4O4)3⋅nH2O where n=6 for Cr, and Fe(III). The thermal decomposition of the crystalline solid complexes was investigated. The IR spectra of citraconate suggested that the carboxylic groups are bidentatically bridging and chelating. In the course of decomposition the complexes are dehydrated and then decompose either directly to oxides in only one step or with intermediate formation of oxocarbonates. This proposal dealing the preparation of MnO2, Fe2O3 and Cr2O3 nanoparticles. The crystalline structure of oxide products were checked by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and the morphology of particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:24952090

  10. A new partially deprotonated mixed-valence manganese(II,III) hydroxide-arsenate with electronic conductivity: magnetic properties of high- and room-temperature sarkinite.

    PubMed

    de Pedro, Imanol; Rojo, Jose M; Rius, Jordi; Vallcorba, Oriol; Ruiz de Larramendi, Idoia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Lezama, Luis; Rojo, Teofilo

    2012-05-01

    A new three-dimensional hydroxide-arsenate compound called compound 2 has been synthesized by heating (in air) of the sarkinite phase, Mn(2)(OH)AsO(4) (compound 1), with temperature and time control. The crystal structure of this high-temperature compound has been solved by Patterson-function direct methods. A relevant feature of this new material is that it is actually the first member of the adamite-type family with mixed-valence manganese(II,III) and electronic conductivity. Crystal data: a = 6.7367(5) Å, b = 7.5220(6) Å, c = 9.8117(6) Å, α = 92.410(4)°, β = 109.840(4)°, γ = 115.946(4)°, P1̅. The unit cell content derived from Rietveld refinement is Mn(8)(O(4)H(x))(AsO(4))(4). Its framework, projected along [111], is characterized by rings of eight Mn atoms with the OH(-)/O(2-) inside the rings. These rings form an almost perfect hexagonal arrangement with the AsO(4) groups placed in between. Bond-valence analysis indicates both partial deprotonation (x ≅ 3) and the presence of Mn in two different oxidation states (II and III), which is consistent with the electronic conductivity above 300 °C from electrochemical measurements. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of compound 1 and of its high-temperature form compound 2 show the presence of antiferromagnetic interactions with stronger magnetic coupling for the high-temperature phase. Magnetization measurements of room-temperature compound 1 show a complex magnetic behavior, with a three-dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering and magnetic anomalies at low temperatures, whereas for compound 2, an ordered state is not reached. Magnetostructural correlations indicate that superexchange interactions via oxygen are present in both compounds. The values of the magnetic exchange pathways [Mn-O-Mn] are characteristic of antiferromagnetic couplings. Notwithstanding, the existence of competition between different magnetic interactions through superexchange pathways can cause the complex magnetic

  11. Syntheses, crystal structure, spectroscopic and photoluminescence studies of mononuclear copper(II), manganese(II), cadmium(II), and a 1D polymeric Cu(II) complexes with a pyrimidine derived Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sangita; Konar, Saugata; Jana, Atanu; Das, Kinsuk; Dhara, Anamika; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Kar, Susanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The complexation behaviour of Schiff base ligand 2-((2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol [HL] towards different metal centres is reported by the syntheses and characterization of three mononuclear Cu(II), Mn(II) and Cd(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(H2O)2](NO3)(H2O) (1), [Mn(L)2](CH3OH) (2), [Cd(L)2](CH3OH) (3) and a 1D polymeric Cu(II) complex, [Cu(L)(ClO4)(C2N2O2H)]n(CH3OH) (4) respectively. In the complexes 1-4 the deprotonated uninegative tridentate ligand serves as NNO donor where one pyrimidine ring N, the azomethine N and the salicyl hydroxyl oxygen atoms are coordinatively active. The complex 1 has almost square pyramidal geometry [τ = 0.2081] whereas the metal centres maintain distorted octahedral geometry in the remaining three complexes 2-4. All the complexes are characterized by X-ray crystallography. The Cd(II) complex has considerable fluorescence while the rest of the complexes and the ligand molecule are fluorescent silent.

  12. ADP-Ribose Pyrophosphatase Reaction in Crystalline State Conducted by Consecutive Binding of Two Manganese(II) Ions as Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Furuike, Yoshihiko; Akita, Yuka; Miyahara, Ikuko; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2016-03-29

    Adenosine diphosphate ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase), a member of the Nudix family proteins, catalyzes the metal-induced and concerted general acid-base hydrolysis of ADP ribose (ADPR) into AMP and ribose-5'-phosphate (R5P). The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction of ADPRase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtADPRase) requires divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+), or Mg(2+) as cofactors. Here, we report the reaction pathway observed in the catalytic center of TtADPRase, based on cryo-trapping X-ray crystallography at atomic resolutions around 1.0 Å using Mn(2+) as the reaction trigger, which was soaked into TtADPRase-ADPR binary complex crystals. Integrating 11 structures along the reaction timeline, five reaction states of TtADPRase were assigned, which were ADPRase alone (E), the ADPRase-ADPR binary complex (ES), two ADPRase-ADPR-Mn(2+) reaction intermediates (ESM, ESMM), and the postreaction state (E'). Two Mn(2+) ions were inserted consecutively into the catalytic center of the ES-state and ligated by Glu86 and Glu82, which are highly conserved among the Nudix family, in the ESM- and ESMM-states. The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction was characterized by electrostatic, proximity, and orientation effects, and by preferential binding for the transition state. A new reaction mechanism is proposed, which differs from previous ones suggested from structure analyses with nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues or point-mutated ADPRases.

  13. Focused electron beam induced deposition of pure SIO II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perentes, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Patrik; Munnik, Frans

    2007-02-01

    Focused electron beam induced processing (FEBID) equipments are the "all in one" tools for high resolution investigation, and modification of nano-devices. Focused electron beam induced deposition from a gaseous precursor usually results in a nano-composite sub-structured material, in which the interesting material is embedded in an amorphous carbonaceous matrix. Using the Hydrogen free tetraisocyanatosilane Si(NCO) 4 molecule as Si source, we show how a controlled oxygen flux, simultaneously injected with the precursor vapors, causes contaminants to vanish from the FEB deposits obtained and leads to the deposition of pure SiO II. The chemical composition of the FEBID material could be controlled from SiC IINO 3 to SiO II, the latter containing undetectable foreign element contamination. The [O II] / [TICS] ratio needed to obtain SiO II in our FEB deposition equipment is larger than 300. The evolution of the FEBID material chemical composition is presented as function of the [O II] / [TICS] molecular flux ratios. A hypothetical decomposition pathway of this silane under these conditions is discussed based on the different species formed under electron bombardment of TICS. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated that the deposited oxide is smooth (roughness sub 2nm) and amorphous. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the low concentration of hydroxyl groups. The Hydrogen content of the deposited oxide, measured by elastic recoil detection analysis, is as low as 1 at%. 193nm wavelength AIMS investigations of 125nm thick SiO II pads (obtained with [O II] / [TICS] = 325) showed an undetectable light absorption.

  14. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in vitrified Mn-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C.; Sonavane, M. S.; Yeotikar, R. G.; Shah, M. L.; Gupta, G. P.; Suri, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an atomic emission spectroscopy method, has rapidly grown as one of the best elemental analysis techniques over the past two decades. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in manganese-doped glasses have been carried out using an optimized LIBS system employing a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser as the source of excitation. The glass samples have been prepared using conventional vitrification methods. The laser pulse irradiance on the surface of the glass samples placed in air at atmospheric pressure was about 1.7×109 W/cm2. The spatially integrated plasma emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fiber-based collection system. Homogeneity was checked by recording LIBS spectra from different sites on the sample surface and analyzing the elemental emission intensities for concentration determination. Validation of the observed LIBS results was done by comparison with scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) surface elemental mapping. The analytical performance of the LIBS system has been evaluated through the correlation of the LIBS determined concentrations of Mn with its certified values. The results are found to be in very good agreement with the certified concentrations.

  15. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in vitrified Mn-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C. E-mail: unnikrishnan.vk@manipal.edu; Sonavane, M. S.; Yeotikar, R. G.; Shah, M. L.; Gupta, G. P.; Suri, B. M.

    2014-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an atomic emission spectroscopy method, has rapidly grown as one of the best elemental analysis techniques over the past two decades. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in manganese-doped glasses have been carried out using an optimized LIBS system employing a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser as the source of excitation. The glass samples have been prepared using conventional vitrification methods. The laser pulse irradiance on the surface of the glass samples placed in air at atmospheric pressure was about 1.7×10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatially integrated plasma emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fiber-based collection system. Homogeneity was checked by recording LIBS spectra from different sites on the sample surface and analyzing the elemental emission intensities for concentration determination. Validation of the observed LIBS results was done by comparison with scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) surface elemental mapping. The analytical performance of the LIBS system has been evaluated through the correlation of the LIBS determined concentrations of Mn with its certified values. The results are found to be in very good agreement with the certified concentrations.

  16. Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2015-11-01

    The triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate complex was prepared and its crystal structure was determined by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Its structure was also characterized by the applying of FT-IR, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. The manganese(II) ion was located to center of distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement was carried out on the Mn(II) complex. In order to support experimental results, density functional theory calculations were performed at HSEH1PBE level and LanL2DZ basis set. Obtained results indicated that theoretical results can replace the experimental ones. The relatively active ν(CO) ν(CC) and ν(CN) stretching vibration peaks appeared in IR and Raman spectra of complex 1 which are indicators of charge transfer within complex 1 suggest that complex 1 is a good candidate for nonlinear optical materials. The HOMO and LUMO energies determined that complex 1 is stable and the charge transfer occurs within complex 1.

  17. The S sub 3 state of photosystem II: Differences between the structure of the manganese complex in the S sub 2 and S sub 3 states determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guiles, R.D.; Zimmermann, J.L.; McDermott, A.E.; Yachandra, V.K.; Cole, J.L.; Dexheimer, S.L.; Britt, R.D.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P. ); Wieghardt, K.; Bossek, U. )

    1990-01-16

    O{sub 2}-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach have been cryogenically stabilized in the S{sub 3} state of the oxygen-evolving complex. The cryogenic trapping of the S{sub 3} state was achieved using a double-turnover illumination of dark-adapted PSII preparations maintained at 240 K. A double turnover of PSII was accomplished using the high-potential acceptor, Q{sub 400}, which is the high-spin iron of the iron-quinone acceptor complex. EPR spectroscopy was the principal tool establishing the S-state composition and defining the electron-transfer events associated with a double turnover of PSII. The inflection point energy of the Mn X-ray absorption K-edge of PSII preparations poised in the S{sub 3} state is the same as for those poised in the S{sub 2} state. This is surprising in light of the loss of the multiline EPR signal upon advancing to the S{sub 3} state. This indicates that the oxidative equivalent stored within the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) during this transition resides on another intermediate donor which must be very close to the manganese complex. An analysis of the Mn extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of PSII preparations poised in the S{sub 2} and S{sub 3} states indicates that a small structural rearrangement occurs during this photoinduced transition. A detailed comparison of the Mn EXAFS of these two S states with the EXAFS of four multinuclear {mu}-oxo-bridged manganese compounds indicates that the photosynthetic manganese site most probably consists of a pair of binuclear di-{mu}-oxo-bridged manganese structures.

  18. Toward synthetic models for high oxidation state forms of the photosystem II active site metal cluster: the first tetranuclear manganese cluster containing a [Mn4(mu-O)5]6+ core.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Staples, Richard J; Armstrong, William H

    2002-04-21

    The first tetrameric high valent manganese complex consisting of a MnIV4(mu-O)5 bridged core, [Mn4(mu-O)5(dmb)4(dmbO)2](ClO4)4, [symbol: see text] was isolated via dimanganese (III,IV) and (IV,IV) intermediates in presence of the oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide and was characterized by X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, infrared, UV-visible, 1H NMR, and mass spectroscopy; the structure found differs greatly from a proposal for the putative Mn4O5 aggregate found in Photosystem II.

  19. Sodium para-aminosalicylate protected cultured basal ganglia astrocytes from manganese-induced DNA damages and alteration of amino acid neurotransmitter levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Jun; Luo, Yi-Ni; Li, Yong; Chen, Jing-Wen; Mo, Yu-Huan; Yuan, Zong-Xiang; Ou, Shi-Yan; Ou, Chao-Yan; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Deng, Xiang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Sodium para-aminosalicylate (PAS-Na) was first applied successfully in clinical treatment of two manganism patients with good prognosis. However, the mechanism of how PAS-Na protects against Mn-induced neurotoxicity is still elusive. The current study was conducted to explore the effects of PAS-Na on Mn-induced basal ganglia astrocyte injury, and the involvement of amino acid neurotransmitter in vitro. Basal ganglia astrocytes were exposed to 500 μM manganese chloride (MnCl2) for 24 hr, following by 50, 150, or 450 μM PAS-Na treatment for another 24 hr. MnCl2 significantly decreased viability of astrocytes and induced DNA damages via increasing the percentage of tail DNA and Olive tail moment of DNA. Moreover, Mn interrupted amino acid neurotransmitters by decreasing Gln levels and increasing Glu, Gly levels. In contrast, PAS-Na treatment reversed the aforementioned Mn-induced toxic effects on basal ganglia astrocytes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that excessive Mn exposure may induce toxic effects on basal ganglia astrocytes, while PAS-Na could protect basal ganglia astrocytes from Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27665767

  20. PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy play a protective role in manganese induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Mi, Lan; Wang, Ting; Yuan, Lan; Li, Xue-Hui; Dong, Li-Sha; Zhao, Peng; Fu, Juan-Ling; Yao, Bi-Yun; Zhou, Zong-Can

    2016-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) as an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered to cause manganism. Mitophagy is thought to play a key role in elimination the injured mitochondria. The goal of this paper was to explore whether the PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy is activated and its role in Mn-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. Here, we investigated effects of MnCl2 on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP/ΔΨm) and apoptosis by FACS and examined PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy by western-blotting and the co-localization of mitochondria and acidic lysosomes. Further, we explore the role of mitophagy in Mn-induced apoptosis by inhibition the mitophagy by knockdown Parkin level. Results show that MnCl2 dose-dependently caused ΔΨm decrease, ROS generation and apoptosis of dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Mn could induce mitophagy and PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathway was activated in SH-SY5Y cells. Transient transfection of Parkin siRNA knockdown the expressing level of parkin inhibited Mn-induced mitophagy and aggravated apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Mn may induce PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy, which may exert significant neuro-protective effect against Mn-induced dopaminergic neuronal cells apoptosis.

  1. Brain activation induced by voluntary alcohol and saccharin drinking in rats assessed with manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Mateusz; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Hermann, Derik; Brown, Matthew; Canals, Santiago; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Hyytiä, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The neuroanatomical and neurochemical basis of alcohol reward has been studied extensively, but global alterations of neural activity in reward circuits during chronic alcohol use remain poorly described. Here, we measured brain activity changes produced by long-term voluntary alcohol drinking in the alcohol-preferring AA (Alko alcohol) rats using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). MEMRI is based on the ability of paramagnetic manganese ions to accumulate in excitable neurons and thereby enhance the T1-weighted signal in activated brain areas. Following 6 weeks of voluntary alcohol drinking, AA rats were allowed to drink alcohol for an additional week, during which they were administered manganese chloride (MnCl2 ) with subcutaneous osmotic minipumps before MEMRI. A second group with an identical alcohol drinking history received MnCl2 during the abstinence week following alcohol drinking. For comparing alcohol with a natural reinforcer, MEMRI was also performed in saccharin-drinking rats. A water-drinking group receiving MnCl2 served as a control. We found that alcohol drinking increased brain activity extensively in cortical and subcortical areas, including the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine pathways and their afferents. Remarkably similar activation maps were seen after saccharin ingestion. Particularly in the prelimbic cortex, ventral hippocampus and subthalamic nucleus, activation persisted into early abstinence. These data show that voluntary alcohol recruits an extensive network that includes the ascending dopamine systems and their afferent connections, and that this network is largely shared with saccharin reward. The regions displaying persistent alterations after alcohol drinking could participate in brain networks underlying alcohol seeking and relapse.

  2. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Su; Wu, Hengfang; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  3. Manganese induced changes in growth, chlorophyll content and antioxidants activity in seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Arya, Shashi K; Roy, B K

    2011-11-01

    The effect of manganese (Mn) on broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was studied with regard to growth, Mn accumulation in root and shoot, chlorophyll, proline content and peroxidase activity. Seeds were treated with Mn (10, 20, 40, 80,120,160 microM) and grown hydroponically up to 15 days. Manganese level in both root and shoot increased progressively in response to increasing concentration and it was high in roots (13 fold) overthe shoots (8 fold). The reductions in root (52%) and shoot (62.92%) development were evident for the maximum Mn concentration (160 microM). The chlorophyll amount gradually declined with increasing Mn concentrations and attained its maximum (42%) at 160 microM. By contrast, the guaiacol peroxidase activity was high (71%) along with the accompanying rise in proline content (75%) in shoots of the highest Mn concentration (160 microM). However, there was about 2 fold increase in total glutathione content at 40 microM than the basal level and further declined to 21.65 microg g(-1) fresh wt. at 160 microM Mn. The alterations in overall reflected Mn concentration-dependent changes in the parameters studied. The results suggest thatthe plant Vicia faba L. copes with Mn exposure through enhanced production of antioxidants.

  4. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  5. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  6. Formation of manganese oxides by bacterially generated superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Voelker, B. M.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A. I.; Hansel, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Manganese oxide minerals are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in the environment. The formation of these minerals controls the fate of contaminants, the degradation of recalcitrant carbon, the cycling of nutrients and the activity of anaerobic-based metabolisms. Oxidation of soluble manganese(II) ions to manganese(III/IV) oxides has been primarily attributed to direct enzymatic oxidation by microorganisms. However, the physiological reason for this process remains unknown. Here we assess the ability of a common species of marine bacteria-Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b-to oxidize manganese(II) in the presence of chemical and biological inhibitors. We show that Roseobacter AzwK-3b oxidizes manganese(II) by producing the strong and versatile redox reactant superoxide. The oxidation of manganese(II), and concomitant production of manganese oxides, was inhibited in both the light and dark in the presence of enzymes and metals that scavenge superoxide. Oxidation was also inhibited by various proteases, enzymes that break down bacterial proteins, confirming that the superoxide was bacterially generated. We conclude that bacteria can oxidize manganese(II) indirectly, through the enzymatic generation of extracellular superoxide radicals. We suggest that dark bacterial production of superoxide may be a driving force in metal cycling and mineralization in the environment.

  7. The S3 state of photosystem II: differences between the structure of the manganese complex in the S2 and S3 states determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guiles, R D; Zimmermann, J L; McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Cole, J L; Dexheimer, S L; Britt, R D; Wieghardt, K; Bossek, U; Sauer, K

    1990-01-16

    O2-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach have been cryogenically stabilized in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex. The cryogenic trapping of the S3 state was achieved using a double-turnover illumination of dark-adapted PSII preparations maintained at 240 K. A double turnover of PSII was accomplished using the high-potential acceptor, Q400, which is the high-spin iron of the iron-quinone acceptor complex. EPR spectroscopy was the principal tool establishing the S-state composition and defining the electron-transfer events associated with a double turnover of PSII. The inflection point energy of the Mn X-ray absorption K-edge of PSII preparations poised in the S3 state is the same as for those poised in the S2 state. This is surprising in light of the loss of the multiline EPR signal upon advancing to the S3 state. This indicates that the oxidative equivalent stored within the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) during this transition resides on another intermediate donor which must be very close to the manganese complex. An analysis of the Mn extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of PSII preparations poised in the S2 and S3 states indicates that a small structural rearrangement occurs during this photoinduced transition. A detailed comparison of the Mn EXAFS of these two S states with the EXAFS of four multinuclear mu-oxo-bridged manganese compounds indicates that the photosynthetic manganese site most probably consists of a pair of binuclear di-mu-oxo-bridged manganese structures. However, we cannot rule out, on the basis of the EXAFS analysis alone, a complex containing a mononuclear center and a linear trinuclear complex. The subtle differences observed between the S states are best explained by an increase in the spread of Mn-Mn distances occurring during the S2----S3 state transition. This increased disorder in the manganese distances suggests the presence of two inequivalent di-mu-oxo-bridged binuclear structures in the S3 state.

  8. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, M.; Dočekal, B.; Míšek, I.; Navrátil, J.; Mikuška, P.; Šerý, O.; Večeřa, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, it has been proven that manganese from inhaled particles of manganese compounds can accumulate in the internal organs of laboratory animals. Nevertheless, there were only a few researches dealing with changes in body morphology induced by inhalation of these particles, even though results of some studies indicate existence of such changes. The aim of our research was to assess the effect of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on weight of internal organs. For this purpose a long-term inhalation experiment on laboratory mice was performed, during which the mice were exposed to MnO.Mn2O3 nanoparticles in concentration 2 × 106 particles/cm3 for 17 weeks, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Manganese oxides nanoparticles were synthesized continuously via aerosol route in a hot wall tube flow reactor using thermal decomposition of metal organic precursor manganese(II)acetylacetonate in the flow tube reactor at temperature 750 °C in the presence of 30 vol% of oxygen. It was proven that inhaled nanoparticles can influence the weight of internal organs of mice. Moreover, it was discovered that the resulting change in weight of selected organs is disproportional. The mice from the experimental group had statistically significantly lighter kidneys, liver and spleen and heavier pancreas compared to the mice from the control group.

  9. Effect of manganese on calcification of bone

    PubMed Central

    Tal, E.; Guggenheim, K.

    1965-01-01

    1. Young mice were maintained on a basal diet composed of meat, which is poor in both manganese and calcium. 2. The addition of small amounts (2·5–5·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese improved weight gain and calcification of bone and decreased incorporation of injected radiocalcium into bone. 3. Prolonged treatment with larger amounts (10·0–25·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese depressed growth, induced defective calcification of bone and increased incorporation of radiocalcium into bone. PMID:14333572

  10. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  11. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  12. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  13. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  14. Competing Fe (II)-induced mineralization pathways of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Colleen M; Benner, Shawn G; Fendorf, Scott

    2005-09-15

    Owing to its high surface area and intrinsic reactivity, ferrihydrite serves as a dominant sink for numerous metals and nutrients in surface environments and is a potentially important terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. Introduction of Fe (II), by reductive dissolution of Fe(III) minerals, for example, converts ferrihydrite to Fe phases varying in their retention and reducing capacity. While Fe(II) concentration is the master variable dictating secondary mineralization pathways of ferrihydrite, here we reveal thatthe kinetics of conversion and ultimate mineral assemblage are a function of competing mineralization pathways influenced by pH and stabilizing ligands. Reaction of Fe(II) with ferrihydrite results in the precipitation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and magnetite. The three phases vary in their precipitation extent, rate, and residence time, all of which are primarily a function of Fe(II) concentration and ligand type (Cl, SO4, CO3). While lepidocrocite and goethite precipitate over a large Fe(II) concentration range, magnetite accumulation is only observed at surface loadings greater than 1.0 mmol Fe(II)/g ferrihydrite (in the absence of bicarbonate). Precipitation of magnetite induces the dissolution of lepidocrocite (presence of Cl) or goethite (presence of SO4), allowing for Fe(III)-dependent crystal growth. The rate of magnetite precipitation is a function of the relative proportions of goethite to lepidocrocite; the lower solubility of the former Fe (hydr)oxide slows magnetite precipitation. A one unit pH deviation from 7, however, either impedes (pH 6) or enhances (pH 8) magnetite precipitation. In the absence of magnetite nucleation, lepidocrocite and goethite continue to precipitate at the expense of ferrihydrite with near complete conversion within hours, the relative proportions of the two hydroxides dependent upon the ligand present. Goethite also continues to precipitate at the expense of lepidocrocite in the absence of

  15. The effect of manganese-induced toxicity on the cytokine mRNA expression of chicken spleen lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinxing; Zhu, Yihao; Bai, Rensheng; Li, Shu; Teng, Xiaohua

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is essential for life, but excess Mn exposure is harmful. This study investigated the effect of excess Mn on the cytokines of spleen lymphocytes in chicken. Lymphocytes were incubated with or without MnCl2 (2, 4, 6, and 8×10(-4) mmol/L) for 12, 24, 36, and 48 h, respectively. The mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) -2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12β, and IL-17 and interferon (INF) -γ was examined using RT-PCR. Excess Mn inhibited IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12β, and IL-17 mRNA expression in chicken spleen lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. IFN-γ was inhibited by 8×10(-4) mmol/L Mn for 48 h. This study demonstrates that excess Mn affects cytokine mRNA expression and causes immunosuppression in chicken spleen lymphocytes. The relationships between IL-6 and IL-17 and between IL-2 and IL-12β were strong under immunosuppression caused by excess Mn in lymphocytes.

  16. Endotoxin treatment protects rats against ozone-induced lung edema: with evidence for the role of manganese superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, I.; Massaro, D. )

    1992-03-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent that can cause lung damage and edema. There is evidence that it does so by causing peroxidation of membrane lipids. However, the elevation in lung activity of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, ZnSOD), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) during exposure to ozone suggests that increased production of superoxide could contribute to lung edema caused by ozone. This latter observation, and preliminary evidence that treatment of rats with endotoxin elevates lung activity of MnSOD without elevation of the activity of Cu, ZnSOD, catalase (CAT), or glutathione peroxidase (GP), led to the present study. We treated rats with endotoxin, exposed them to different concentrations of ozone, measured lung wet weight to dry weight ratio, thiobarbituric acid-reactive material (TBAR), and assayed lung tissue for Cu, ZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, and GP activity. Our major findings are, (1) a strongly edemogenic concentration of ozone-lowered MnSOD activity; (2) endotoxin treatment of air-breathing rats did not decrease lipid peroxidation as indicated by the lung concentration of TBAR; (3) induction of increased MnSOD activity in lung by treatment with endotoxin was associated with virtually complete protection against an otherwise edemogenic concentration of ozone, with less lipid peroxidation, and with less loss of weight; and (4) this protection occurred without elevated Cu, ZnSOD, CAT, or GP activity.

  17. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events.

  18. Selective inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 by Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Choo, Hyunah; Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2015-07-01

    We report herein that Zn(II) selectively inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 over PHD2, and does not compete with Fe(II). Independent of the oligomer formation induced by Zn(II), inhibition of the activity of PHD3 by Zn(II) involves Cys42 and Cys52 residues distantly located from the active site. PMID:26051901

  19. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  20. Developmental exposure to manganese chloride induces sustained aberration of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyun; Ohishi, Takumi; Shiraki, Ayako; Morita, Reiko; Akane, Hirotoshi; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    The effect of exogenously administered manganese (Mn) on developmental neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was examined in male mice after maternal exposure to MnCl(2) (0, 32, 160, or 800 ppm as Mn in diet) from gestational day 10 to day 21 after delivery on weaning. Immunohistochemistry was performed to monitor neurogenesis and interneuron subpopulations on postnatal days (PNDs) 21 and 77 (adult stage). Reelin-synthesizing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons increased in the hilus with ≥ 160 ppm on weaning to sustain to PND 77 at 800 ppm. Apoptosis in the neuroblast-producing subgranular zone increased with 800 ppm and TUC4-expressing immature granule cells decreased with 800 ppm on weaning, whereas at the adult stage, immature granule cells increased. On PND 21, transcript levels increased with Reln and its receptor gene Lrp8 and decreased with Dpysl3 coding TUC4 in the dentate gyrus, confirming immunohistochemical results. Double immunohistochemistry revealed a sustained increase of reelin-expressing and NeuN-lacking or weakly positive immature interneurons and NeuN-expressing mature neurons in the hilus through to the adult stage as examined at 800 ppm. Brain Mn concentrations increased at both PNDs 21 and 77 in all MnCl(2)-exposed groups. These results suggest that Mn targets immature granule cells causing apoptosis and neuronal mismigration. Sustained increases in immature reelin-synthesizing GABAergic interneurons may represent continued aberration in neurogenesis and following migration to cause an excessive response for overproduction of immature granule cells through to the adult stage. Sustained high concentration of Mn in the brain may be responsible for these changes.

  1. Manganese uptake and distribution in the brain after methyl bromide-induced lesions in the olfactory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Khristy J; Molina, Ramon M; Donaghey, Thomas; Savaliya, Sandeep; Schwob, James E; Brain, Joseph D

    2011-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient with potential neurotoxic effects. Mn deposited in the nose is apparently transported to the brain through anterograde axonal transport, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. However, the role of the olfactory epithelial cells in Mn transport from the nasal cavity to the blood and brain is not well understood. We utilized the methyl bromide (MeBr) lesion model wherein the olfactory epithelium fully regenerates in a time-dependent and cell type-specific manner over the course of 6-8 weeks postinjury. We instilled (54)MnCl(2) intranasally at different recovery periods to study the role of specific olfactory epithelial cell types in Mn transport. (54)MnCl(2) was instilled at 2, 4, 7, 21, and 56 days post-MeBr treatment. (54)Mn concentrations in the blood were measured over the first 4-h period and in the brain and other tissues at 7 days postinstillation. Age-matched control rats were similarly studied at 2 and 56 days. Blood and tissue (54)Mn levels were reduced initially but returned to control values by day 7 post-MeBr exposure, coinciding with the reestablishment of sustentacular cells. Brain (54)Mn levels also decreased but returned to control levels only by 21 days, the period near the completion of neuronal regeneration/bulbar reinnervation. Our data show that Mn transport to the blood and brain temporally correlated with olfactory epithelial regeneration post-MeBr injury. We conclude that (1) sustentacular cells are necessary for Mn transport to the blood and (2) intact axonal projections are required for Mn transport from the nasal cavity to the olfactory bulb and brain.

  2. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  3. Prevention of kainic acid-induced changes in nitric oxide level and neuronal cell damage in the rat hippocampus by manganese complexes of curcumin and diacetylcurcumin.

    PubMed

    Sumanont, Yaowared; Murakami, Yukihisa; Tohda, Michihisa; Vajragupta, Opa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2006-03-13

    Curcumin is a natural antioxidant isolated from the medicinal plant Curcuma longa Linn. We previously reported that manganese complexes of curcumin (Cp-Mn) and diacetylcurcumin (DiAc-Cp-Mn) exhibited potent superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity in an in vitro assay. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radial playing a multifaceted role in the brain and its excessive production is known to induce neurotoxicity. Here, we examined the in vivo effect of Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn on NO levels enhanced by kainic acid (KA) and L-arginine (L-Arg) in the hippocampi of awake rats using a microdialysis technique. Injection of KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and L-Arg (1000 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the concentration of NO and Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reversed the effects of KA and L-Arg without affecting the basal NO concentration. Following KA-induced seizures, severe neuronal cell damage was observed in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of hippocampal 3 days after KA administration. Pretreatment with Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated KA-induced neuronal cell death in both CA1 and CA3 regions of rat hippocampus compared with vehicle control, and Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn showed more potent neuroprotective effect than their parent compounds, curcumin and diacetylcurcumin. These results suggest that Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn protect against KA-induced neuronal cell death by suppression of KA-induced increase in NO levels probably by their NO scavenging activity and antioxidative activity. Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn have an advantage to be neuroprotective agents in the treatment of acute brain pathologies associated with NO-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage such as epilepsy, stroke and traumatic brain injury. PMID:16266725

  4. Changes in rat urinary porphyrin profiles predict the magnitude of the neurotoxic effects induced by a mixture of lead, arsenic and manganese.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Vanda; Mateus, M Luísa; Batoréu, M Camila; Aschner, Michael; Marreilha dos Santos, A P

    2014-12-01

    The neurotoxic metals lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and manganese (Mn) are ubiquitous contaminants occurring as mixtures in environmental settings. The three metals may interfere with enzymes of the heme bioshyntetic pathway, leading to excessive porphyrin accumulation, which per se may trigger neurotoxicity. Given the multi-mechanisms associated with metal toxicity, we posited that a single biomarker is unlikely to predict neurotoxicity that is induced by a mixture of metals. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of a combination of urinary porphyrins to predict the magnitude of motor activity impairment induced by a mixture of Pb/As/Mn. Five groups of Wistar rats were treated for 8 days with Pb (5mg/kg), As (60 mg/L) or Mn (10mg/kg), and the 3-metal mixture (same doses as the single metals) along with a control group. Motor activity was evaluated after the administration of the last dose and 24-hour (h) urine was also collected after the treatments. Porphyrin profiles were determined both in the urine and brain. Rats treated with the metal-mixture showed a significant decrease in motor parameters compared with controls and the single metal-treated groups. Both brain and urinary porphyrin levels, when combined and analyzed by multiple linear regressions, were predictable of motor activity (p<0.05). The magnitude of change in urinary porphyrin profiles was consistent with the greatest impairments in motor activity as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 96%. Our work strongly suggests that the use of a linear combination of urinary prophyrin levels accurately predicts the magnitude of motor impairments in rats that is induced by a mixture of Pb, As and Mn.

  5. Inconsistency between manganese superoxide dismutase expression and its activity involved in the degeneration of recognition function induced by chronic aluminum overloading in mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, H-M; Yang, J-X; Jiang, Q-S; He, D; Zhou, Q-X

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) superoxide dismutase (SOD) is mainly located in mitochondrial matrix and is responsible for scavenging about 80% free radicals from oxidative and phospharylative process in mitochondria. It was reported that the insufficiency of Mn SOD expression or activity was connected to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we investigated the time course related to the changes of Mn SOD expression and its activity from mouse brain as well as the recognition dysfunction in chronic aluminum (Al) overloading mice. Aluminum gluconate solution (equal to Al 400 mg/kg) was given to mice once a day, 6 days per week for 12 weeks via intragastric gavage. The learning and memory function, malondialdehyde (MDA) level as well as expression and activity of Mn SOD in cortex were determined. It was found that function of passive learning and memory and spatial recognition decreased, MDA level and Mn SOD expression increased during the period of chronic Al loading, but the Mn SOD activity rose from the 4th week and then decreased from the 8th week in cortex in Al overloading mice compared with the control. The results indicated that the inconsistency between Mn SOD expression and its activity might contribute to the development of recognition dysfunction induced by chronic Al overload.

  6. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Jingyuan; Zheng, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of {sup 64}Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB

  7. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Catalytic Manganese Cluster: Organization of the Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, V.K.

    2007-02-09

    The light-induced oxidation of water to O{sub 2} is catalyzed by a four-manganese atom cluster associated with Photosystem II (PS II). This chapter summarizes ongoing investigations of the oxidation state, the structure and the associated cofactors calcium and chloride of the catalytic Mn cluster using X-ray and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese K-edge X-ray spectroscopy, K{beta} X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies have not only determined the oxidation states and structural features, but also changes that occur in oxidation state of the Mn cluster and in its structural organization during the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents leading to O{sub 2} formation. Combining X-ray spectroscopy information with X-ray diffraction studies, and consistent with the available EPR data, we have succeeded in limiting the range of likely structures of the Mn cluster. EXAFS studies at the strontium and calcium K-edges have provided evidence that the catalytic center is a Mn/Ca heteronuclear complex. Based on the X-ray spectroscopy data, models for the structure and a mechanism for O{sub 2} evolution are presented.

  9. Bis(O-n-butyl dithio­carbonato-κ2 S,S′)bis­(pyridine-κN)manganese(II)

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Naveed; Ehsan, Muhammad Ali; Zeller, Matthias; Mazhar, Muhammad; Arifin, Zainudin

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the title manganese complex, [Mn(C5H9OS2)2(C5H5N)2] or [Mn(S2CO-n-Bu)2(C5H5N)2], consists of discrete monomeric entities with Mn2+ ions located on centres of inversion. The metal atom is coordinated by a six-coordinate trans-N2S4 donor set with the pyridyl N atoms located in the apical positions. The observed slight deviations from octa­hedral geometry are caused by the bite angle of the bidentate κ2-S2CO-n-Bu ligands [69.48 (1)°]. The O(CH2)3(CH3) chains of the O-n-butyl dithio­carbonate units are disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.589 (2):0.411 (2). PMID:22090847

  10. Photoproduction of catalase-insensitive peroxides on the donor side of manganese-depleted photosystem II: evidence with a specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, Sergey A; Khorobrykh, Andrei A; Yanykin, Denis V; Ivanov, Boris N; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2011-12-13

    The photoproduction of organic peroxides (ROOH) in photosystem II (PSII) membranes was studied using the fluorescent probe Spy-HP. Two types of peroxide, highly lipophilic ones and relatively hydrophilic ones, were distinguished by the rate of reaction with Spy-HP; the former oxidized Spy-HP to the higher fluorescent form Spy-HPOx within 5 min, while the latter did so very slowly (the reaction was still not completed after 180 min). The level of photoproduction of these peroxides was significantly larger in the alkaline-treated, Mn-depleted PSII membranes than that in the untreated membranes, and it was suppressed by an artificial electron donor (diphenylcarbazide or ferrocyanide) and by the electron transport inhibitor diuron. Postillumination addition of Fe(2+) ions, which degrade peroxides by the Fenton mechanism, abolished the accumulation of Spy-HPOx, but catalase did not change the peroxide level, indicating that the detected species were organic peroxides, excluding H(2)O(2). These results agreed with our previous observation of an electron transport-dependent O(2) consumption on the PSII donor side and indicated that ROOH accumulated via a radical chain reaction that started with the formation of organic radicals on the donor side. Illumination (λ > 600 nm; 1500 μmol of photons m(-2) s(-1)) of the Mn-depleted PSII membranes for 3 min resulted in the formation of nearly 200 molecules of hydrophilic ROOH per reaction center, but only four molecules of highly lipophilic ROOH. The limited formation of the latter was due to the limited supply of its precursor to the reaction, suggesting that it represented structurally fixed peroxides, i.e., either protein peroxides or peroxides of the lipids tightly bound to the core complex. These ROOH forms, likely including several species derived from lipid peroxides, may mediate the donor side-induced photoinhibition of PSII via protein modification.

  11. Comparison of photosynthesis recovery dynamics in floating leaves of Trapa natans after inhibition by manganese or molybdenum: effects on Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Costanza; Ferroni, Lorenzo; Pantaleoni, Laura; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2013-09-01

    The aquatic plant Trapa natans L. is highly resistant to Mn and moderately resistant to Mo, mainly thanks to its ability to sequestrate the metals by chelation in the vacuole. Excess of Mn and Mo causes somewhat aspecific toxicity symptoms in plants, but the main target of their toxicity seems to be the photosynthetic process. In this work, we aimed at understanding how the effect on photosynthesis caused by Mn (130 μM, full recovery) or Mo (50 μM, partial recovery) in T. natans is linked to changes occurring in the photosynthetic apparatus, with emphasis on Photosystem II (PSII), during a 10 day treatment with these metals. The time-course of net photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigment content, amount of PSII and its peripheral antenna LHCII, and room-temperature fluorescence emission ratios F694/F680 and F700/(F685 + F695) showed that the early inhibiting effect of Mo and Mn (one day exposure) was essentially non-specific with respect to the metal, though more marked in Mo- than in Mn-treated plants. During the subsequent recovery phase, Mo still impaired PSII assembly and, consequently, photosynthesis could not reach the control values. Conversely, in Mn-treated plants the amount of PSII was fully re-established, as was photosynthesis, but the metal induced the accumulation of LHCII. The extent of inhibition and the effectiveness of photosynthesis recovery are proposed to reflect the different ability of T. natans to sequestrate safely excess Mn or Mo in vacuoles.

  12. A light-dependent mechanism for massive accumulation of manganese in the photosynthetic bacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Keren, Nir; Kidd, Matthew J; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2002-12-17

    Manganese is an essential micronutrient for many organisms. Because of its unique role in the water oxidizing activity of photosystem II, manganese is required for photosynthetic growth in plants and cyanobacteria. Here we report on the mechanism of manganese uptake in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Cells grown in 9 microM manganese-containing medium accumulate up to 1 x 10(8) manganese atoms/cell, bound to the outer membrane (pool A). This pool could be released by EDTA treatment. Accumulation of manganese in pool A was energized by photosynthetic electron flow. Moreover, collapsing the membrane potential resulted in the immediate release of this manganese pool. The manganese in this pool is mainly Mn(II) in a six-coordinate distorted environment. A distinctly different pool of manganese, pool B ( approximately 1.5 x 10(6) atoms/cell), could not be extracted by EDTA. Transport into pool B was light-independent and could be detected only under limiting manganese concentrations (1 nM). Evidently, manganese uptake in Synechocystis 6803 cells occurs in two steps. First, manganese accumulates in the outer membrane (pool A) in a membrane potential-dependent process. Next, manganese is transported through the inner membrane into pool B. We propose that pool A serves as a store that allows the cells to overcome transient limitations in manganese in the environment. PMID:12475258

  13. Sorption behavior of the Pt(II) complex anion on manganese dioxide (δ-MnO2): a model reaction to elucidate the mechanism by which Pt is concentrated into a marine ferromanganese crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Mamiko Yamashita; Ohashi, Hironori; Yonezu, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Akane; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Koichiro; Ishida, Tamao; Tokunaga, Makoto; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2016-02-01

    It is difficult to directly investigate the chemical state of Pt in marine ferromanganese crusts (a mixture of hydrous iron(III) oxide and manganese dioxide (δ-MnO2)) because it is present at extremely low concentration levels. This paper attempts to elucidate the mechanism by which Pt is concentrated into marine ferromanganese crust from the Earth's continental crust through ocean water. In this investigation, the sorption behavior of the Pt(II) complex ions on the surface of the δ-MnO2 that is a host of Pt was examined as a model reaction. The δ-MnO2 sorbing Pt was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) to determine the chemical state of the Pt. Hydrolytic Pt(II) complex ions were specifically sorbed above pH 6 by the formation of a Mn-O-Pt bond. XPS spectra and XANES spectra for δ-MnO2 sorbing Pt showed that the sorbed Pt(II) was oxidized to Pt(IV) on δ-MnO2. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis showed that the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on δ-MnO2 is almost the same as that of the [Pt(OH)6]2- complex ion used as a standard. Therefore, the mechanism for the concentration of Pt in marine ferromanganese crust may be an oxidative substitution (penetration of Pt(IV) into structure of δ-MnO2) by a reduction-oxidation reaction between Pt(II) in [PtCl4-n(OH)n]2- and Mn(IV) in δ-MnO2 through a Mn-O-Pt bond.

  14. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV). PMID:26039669

  15. Adsorption of antimony(V) onto Mn(II)-enriched surfaces of manganese-oxide and FeMn binary oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiping; Xu, Wei; He, Zan; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Prasai, Tista

    2015-11-01

    Manganese(IV) oxide [Mn(IV)] potentially oxidizes antimony(III) [Sb(III)] to antimony(V) [Sb(V)] and improves Sb removal by FeMn binary oxide (FMBO) through an oxidation-adsorption mechanism. This study focused on the effect of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution by potassium sulfite (K2SO3) on Sb(V) adsorption onto manganese oxide (Mn-oxide) and FMBO. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption (Qmax,Sb(V)) increased from 1.0 to 1.1 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and from 0.4 to 0.6 mmol g(-1) for Mn-oxide after pretreatment with 10 mmol L(-1) K2SO3. The addition of 2.5 mmol L(-1) Mn(2+) also significantly improved Sb(V) adsorption, and the observed Qmax,Sb(V) increased to 1.4 and 1.0 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and Mn-oxide, respectively, with pre-adsorbed Mn(2+). Neither K2SO3 nor Mn(2+) addition had any effect on Sb(V) adsorption onto iron oxide (Fe-oxide). Mn(2+) introduced by either Mn(IV) dissolution or addition tended to form outer-sphere surface complexes with hydroxyl groups on Mn-oxide surfaces (MnOOH). Mn(2+) at 2.5 mmol L(-1) shifted the isoelectric point (pHiep) from 7.5 to 10.2 for FMBO and from 4.8 to 9.2 for Mn-oxide and hence benefited Sb(V) adsorption. The adsorption of Sb(V) onto Mn(2+)-enriched surfaces contributed to the release of Mn(2+), and the X-ray photoelectron spectra also indicated increased binding energy of Mn 2p3/2 after the adsorption of Sb(V) onto K2SO3-pretreated FMBO and Mn-oxide. Sb(V) adsorption involved the formation of inner-sphere complexes and contributed to the release of Mn(2+). In the removal of Sb(III) by Mn-based oxides, the oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) by Mn(IV) oxides had an effect; however, Mn(IV) dissolution and Mn(2+)-enrichment also played an important role.

  16. Manganese-induced regulations in growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in fragrant rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Ashraf, Umair; Tian, Hua; Mo, Zhaowen; Pan, Shenggang; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Duan, Meiyang; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-06-01

    Micro-nutrient application is essential for normal plant growth while a little is known about manganese (Mn)-induced regulations in morpho-physiological attributes, aroma formation and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2-AP) biosynthesis in aromatic rice. Present study aimed to examine the influence of four levels of Mn i.e., Mn1 (100 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn2 (150 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn3 (200 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), and Mn4 (250 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)) on the growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in two fragrant rice cultivars i.e., Meixiangzhan and Nongxiang 18. Pots without Mn application were served as control (Ck). Each pot contained 15 kg of soil. Effects on agronomic characters, quality attributes, 2-AP contents and enzymes involved in 2-AP biosynthesis have been studied in early and late season rice. Results depicted that Mn improved rice growth, yield and related characters, and some quality attributes significantly. It further up-regulated proline, pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) (precursors of 2-AP), soluble proteins and activities of proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), Δ(1) pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid synthetase (P5CS) ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) that led to enhanced 2-AP production in rice grains. Moreover, higher Mn levels resulted in increased grain Mn contents in both rice cultivars. Along with growth and yield improvement, Mn application significantly improved rice aromatic contents. Overall, Nongxiang 18 accumulated more 2-AP contents than Meixiangzhan in both seasons under Mn application. This study further explored the importance of Mn in rice aroma formation and signifies that micro-nutrients can play significant roles in rice aroma synthesis; however, intensive studies at molecular levels are still needed to understand the exact mechanisms of Mn to improve rice aroma formation. PMID:26995311

  17. The role of cord blood BDNF in infant cognitive impairment induced by low-level prenatal manganese exposure: LW birth cohort, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Limei; Wang, Caifeng; Yang, Xin; Gao, Yu; Tian, Ying

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the potential association between low-level prenatal manganese (Mn) exposure and 1-year-old children's neurodevelopment quotient (DQ) by using the Gesell Developmental Inventory (GDI) (motor, adaptive, language, and social domains) and explored the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in Mn-induced cognitive impairments. A total of 377 mothers were recruited from a prospective birth cohort in rural northern China. Cord serum concentrations of Mn and BDNF were measured and children's DQ was evaluated. The median serum Mn concentration was 3.4 μg/L. After adjusting for confounding factors, Mn level was significantly associated with gross motor scores (β = -6.0, 95% CI: -11.8 to -0.2, p < 0.05) and personal-social scores (β = -4.2, 95% CI: -8.4 to 0.1, p < 0.05). BDNF level was positively correlated with personal-social score (β = 0.7, 95% CI: 0-1.4, p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found between Mn and BDNF (r = -0.13, 95% CI: -0.23 to -0.03, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the interaction between cord serum Mn and BDNF was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, elevated low-level prenatal Mn exposure impaired infant's neurodevelopment, and BDNF plays an important role in cognitive impairment, especially in the personal-social ability. PMID:27565312

  18. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane.

  19. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  20. A click fluorophore sensor that can distinguish Cu(II) and Hg(II) via selective anion-induced demetallation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yu Heng; Price, Jason R; Todd, Matthew H; Rutledge, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    A cyclam-based fluorescent sensor featuring a novel triazole pendant arm has been synthesised using click chemistry. The sensor is highly responsive to both Cu(II) and Hg(II) in neutral aqueous solution and displays excellent selectivity in the presence of various competing metal ions in 50-fold excess. The addition of specific anions such as I(-) and S(2)O(3)(2-) causes a complete revival of fluorescence only in the case of Hg(II), providing a simple and effective method for distinguishing solutions containing Cu(II), Hg(II) or a mixture of both ions, even in doped seawater samples. X-ray crystal structures of both the Hg(II) sensor complex and a model Cu(II) complex show that pendant triazole coordination occurs through the central nitrogen atom (N2), providing to the best of our knowledge the first reported examples of this unusual coordination mode in macrocycles. Fluorescence, mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR experiments reveal that the mechanism of anion-induced fluorescence revival involves either displacement of pendant coordination or complete removal of the Hg(II) from the macrocycle, depending on the anion.

  1. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments. PMID:22572639

  2. SREBP-1 Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced TGF-β1 Upregulation and Glomerular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tony N.; Chen, Xing; Li, Renzhong; Gao, Bo; Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Lu, Chao; Yum, Victoria; Dickhout, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is an important mediator of CKD of diverse etiology. A common pathologic feature of CKD is glomerular fibrosis, a central mediator of which is the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β. The mechanisms underlying the induction of TGF-β and matrix by angiotensin II are not completely understood. Recent studies showed that overexpression of the transcription factor SREBP-1 induces glomerular sclerosis and that angiotensin II can activate SREBP-1 in tubular cells. We thus studied whether SREBP-1 is activated by angiotensin II and mediates angiotensin II–induced profibrogenic responses in primary rat mesangial cells. Treatment of cells with angiotensin II induced the upregulation and activation of SREBP-1. Angiotensin II–induced activation of SREBP-1 required signaling through the angiotensin II type I receptor and activation of PI3K/Akt in addition to the chaperone SCAP and protease S1P. Notably, angiotensin II-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified as a key mediator of Akt-SREBP-1 activation, and inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress or SREBP-1 prevented angiotensin II–induced SREBP-1 binding to the TGF-β promoter, TGF-β upregulation, and downstream fibronectin upregulation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress alone, however, did not induce TGF-β upregulation despite activating SREBP-1. Although not required for SREBP-1 activation by angiotensin II, EGF receptor signaling was necessary for activation of the SREBP-1 cotranscription factor Sp1, which provided a required second signal for TGF-β upregulation. In vivo, endoplasmic reticulum stress and SREBP-1-dependent effects were induced in glomeruli of angiotensin II-infused mice, and administration of the SREBP inhibitor fatostatin prevented angiotensin II–induced TGF-β upregulation and matrix accumulation. SREBP-1 and endoplasmic reticulum stress thus provide potential novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of CKD. PMID:25398788

  3. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3

  4. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reaney, S.H. . E-mail: stevereaney@hotmail.com; Smith, D.R.

    2005-06-15

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 {mu}M Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 {mu}M produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 {mu}M), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures ({>=}50 {mu}M) than did Mn(II) (200 {mu}M only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 {mu}M Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity.

  5. Direct Identification of a Bacterial Manganese(II) Oxidase, the Multicopper Oxidase MnxG, from Spores of Several Different Marine Bacillus Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Gregory J.; Torpey, Justin W.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms catalyze the formation of naturally occurring Mn oxides, but little is known about the biochemical mechanisms of this important biogeochemical process. We used tandem mass spectrometry to directly analyze the Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme from marine Bacillus spores, identified as an Mn oxide band with an in-gel activity assay. Nine distinct peptides recovered from the Mn oxide band of two Bacillus species were unique to the multicopper oxidase MnxG, and one peptide was from the small hydrophobic protein MnxF. No other proteins were detected in the Mn oxide band, indicating that MnxG (or a MnxF/G complex) directly catalyzes biogenic Mn oxide formation. The Mn(II) oxidase was partially purified and found to be resistant to many proteases and active even at high concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Comparative analysis of the genes involved in Mn(II) oxidation from three diverse Bacillus species revealed a complement of conserved Cu-binding regions not present in well-characterized multicopper oxidases. Our results provide the first direct identification of a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation and suggest that MnxG catalyzes two sequential one-electron oxidations from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV), a novel type of reaction for a multicopper oxidase. PMID:18165363

  6. Nickel(II)-induced nasal epithelial toxicity and oxidative mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lim, Soo-Sung; Baek, Byoung Joon; An, Je-Min; Nam, Hae-Seon; Woo, Kee-Min; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-03-01

    In probing the underlying mechanisms of nickel(II)-induced cytotoxicity on nasal epithelium, we investigated the effects of nickel(II) acetate on nasal epithelial RPMI-2650 cells. Nickel(II) elicited apoptosis, as signified by pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, increased caspase-3/7 activity, and an increase in annexin V binding, hypodiploid DNA, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio. Nickel(II)-induced G2/M arrest was associated with up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression, decrease in phosphorylation at Thr(161) of Cdc2, and down-regulation of cyclin B1. Associated with these responses, ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization increased in a nickel(II) concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated these changes. p53 reporter gene assay and analyses of p53, Puma, Bax, and Bcl-2 protein levels indicated that NAC inhibited nickel(II)-induced activation of p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our study provides evidences that nickel(II) may induce oxidative damage on nasal epithelium in which antioxidant NAC protects cells against nickel(II)-induced apoptosis through the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage. PMID:26809061

  7. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  8. Apoptosis induced by Na+/H+ antiport inhibition activates the LEI/L-DNase II pathway.

    PubMed

    Altairac, S; Zeggai, S; Perani, P; Courtois, Y; Torriglia, A

    2003-05-01

    L-DNase II is derived from its precursor leucocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI) by post-translational modification. In vitro, the conversion of LEI into L-DNase II can be induced by incubation of LEI at an acidic pH. In this study, we proposed to analyze the effects of intracellular acidification on this transformation. Amiloride derivatives, like hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), are known to provoke a decrease of cytosolic pH by inhibiting the Na(+)/H(+) antiport. In BHK cells, treatment with HMA-induced apoptosis accompanied by an increase in L-DNase II immunoreactivity and L-DNase II enzymatic activity. Overexpression of L-DNase II precursor led to a significant increase of apoptosis in these cells supporting the involvement of L-DNase II in HMA induced apoptosis. As previously shown in other cells, etoposide-induced apoptosis did not activate L-DNase. On the contrary, LEI overexpression significantly increased cell survival in etoposide-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest differential roles of LEI and L-DNase II in response to different types of apoptotic inducers.

  9. [Function and disease in manganese].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized. PMID:27455810

  10. Field effect and magnetically induced capacitive tuning in hole doped lanthanum(1-x) strontium(x) manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Zsolt

    magnetic oxides, superconductors and superlattices has a great impact on the emerging field of oxide electronics. These compounds overcome the scaling limitations of conventional semiconductors; using low operation voltage oxide ferroelectrics lowers energy consumption. This thesis shows that changing fundamental physical properties of complex oxides on the atomic scale is possible by ferroelectric field effect. This technique is proposed as a tool to study thin films, artificially stacked structures and to induce and optimize novel phases and phenomena.

  11. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway.

  12. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway. PMID:26093296

  13. Caveolin-1 prevents sustained angiotensin II-induced resistance artery constriction and obesity-induced high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Feher, Attila; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The type 1 angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT1R) undergoes internalization following stimulation by ANG II. Internalization reduces cell surface AT1Rs, and it is required for AT1R resensitization. In this process AT1R may interact with caveolin-1 (Cav1), the main scaffolding protein of caveolae. We hypothesized that the interaction between Cav1 and AT1R delays AT1R resensitization and thereby prevents sustained ANG II-induced resistance artery (RA) constriction under normal conditions and in experimental obesity. In rat and mouse skeletal muscle RA (diameter: ∼90–120 μm) ANG II-induced constrictions were reduced upon repeated (30-min apart) administrations. Upon disruption of caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or in RA of Cav1 knockout mice, repeated ANG II applications resulted in essentially maintained constrictions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, AT1R interacted with Cav1, and the degree of cell surface interactions was reduced by long-term (15-min), but not short-term (2-min), exposure to ANG II. When Cav1 was silenced, the amount of membrane-associated AT1R was significantly reduced by a short-term ANG II exposure. Moreover, Cav1 knockout mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited augmented and sustained RA constriction to ANG II and had elevated systemic blood pressure, when compared with normal or high-fat fed wild-type mice. Thus, Cav1, through a direct interaction, delays internalization and subsequent resensitization of AT1R. We suggest that this mechanism prevents sustained ANG II-induced RA constriction and elevated systemic blood pressure in diet-induced obesity. PMID:25527780

  14. Probing the topography of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex: PsbO is required for efficient calcium protection of the manganese cluster against dark-inhibition by an artificial reductant.

    PubMed

    Popelkova, Hana; Boswell, Nicholas; Yocum, Charles

    2011-12-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) manganese-stabilizing protein (PsbO) is known to be the essential PSII extrinsic subunit for stabilization and retention of the Mn and Cl(-) cofactors in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of PSII, but its function relative to Ca(2+) is less clear. To obtain a better insight into the relationship, if any, between PsbO and Ca(2+) binding in the OEC, samples with altered PsbO-PSII binding properties were probed for their potential to promote the ability of Ca(2+) to protect the Mn cluster against dark-inhibition by an exogenous artificial reductant, N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine. In the absence of the PsbP and PsbQ extrinsic subunits, Ca(2+) and its surrogates (Sr(2+), Cd(2+)) shield Mn atoms from inhibitory reduction (Kuntzleman et al., Phys Chem Chem Phys 6:4897, 2004). The results presented here show that PsbO exhibits a positive effect on Ca(2+) binding in the OEC by facilitating the ability of the metal to prevent inhibition of activity by the reductant. The data presented here suggest that PsbO may have a role in the formation of the OEC-associated Ca(2+) binding site by promoting the equilibrium between bound and free Ca(2+) that favors the bound metal.

  15. Electrochemical deposition of the new manganese(II) Schiff-base complex on a gold template and its application for dopamine sensing in the presence of interfering biogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gorczyński, Adam; Pakulski, Dawid; Szymańska, Martyna; Kubicki, Maciej; Bułat, Kornela; Łuczak, Teresa; Patroniak, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    Facile and efficient template synthesis of new manganese(II) complex [Mn2(H2L)2](ClO4)2 (1) and its crystal structure are reported. Self-assembly leads to the formation of dinuclear, phenoxo-bridged closed species via exploitation of both binding subunits of the in situ formed new Schiff-base ligand. Gold electrode modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of synthesized complex 1 was applied as a voltammetric sensor for quantitative determination of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic (AA) and uric acids (UA). The linear relationship between the current response of dopamine at the potential of peak maximum and the concentration was found over a wide analyte concentration range (R(2)≥0.993, 1×10(-10)-8.5×10(-4)M) with a very good sensitivity (4.11Acm(-2)M(-1) at dE/dt=0.1Vs(-1)), high detection limit (6.8×10(-9)M) and excellent reproducibility. It has been proven that current peaks of dopamine, ascorbic and uric acids were clearly separated from each other, thus enabling selective detection of these compounds coexisting in a mixture.

  16. Pitavastatin Regulates Ang II Induced Proliferation and Migration via IGFBP-5 in VSMC

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yu Mi; Nam, Ju-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a key mediator of hypertensive, causes structural changes in the arteries (vascular remodeling), which involve alterations in cell growth, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy. Ang II promotes fibrotic factor like IGFBP5, which mediates the profibrotic effects of Ang II in the heart and kidneys, lung and so on. The purpose of this study was to identify the signaling pathway of IGFBP5 on cell proliferation and migration of Ang II-stimulated VSMC. We have been interested in Ang II-induced IGFBP5 and were curious to determine whether a Pitavastatin would ameliorate the effects. Herein, we investigated the question of whether Ang II induced the levels of IGFBP5 protein followed by proliferation and migration in VSMC. Pretreatment with the specific Angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) inhibitor (Losartan), Angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2) inhibitor (PD123319), MAPK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), P38 inhibitor (SB600125) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) resulted in significantly inhibited IGFBP5 production, proliferation, and migration in Ang II-stimulated VSMC. In addition, IGFBP5 knockdown resulted in modulation of Ang II induced proliferation and migration via IGFBP5 induction. In addition, Pitavastatin modulated Ang II induced proliferation and migration in VSMC. Taken together, our results indicated that Ang II induces IGFBP5 through AT1, ERK1/2, P38, and PI3K signaling pathways, which were inhibited by Pitavastatin. These findings may suggest that Pitavastatin has an effect on vascular disease including hypertension. PMID:26557016

  17. Surfactant manganese complexes as models for the oxidation of water

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1984-02-01

    Surfactant manganese complexes have been studied spectroscopically and electrochemically as models for the catalysts involved in the photooxidation of water to produce oxygen. Evidence has been obtained for the participation of the suggested redox cycle Mn/sup II/ to Mn/sup III/ to Mn/sup IV/ and back to Mn/sup II/ with the evolution of oxygen.

  18. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  19. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-07-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe(-/-) mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe(-/-) mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe(-/-) mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe(-/-) mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation.

  20. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  1. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  2. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-01-01

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876179

  3. UV-induced ubiquitination of RNA polymerase II: a novel modification deficient in Cockayne syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Bregman, D B; Halaban, R; van Gool, A J; Henning, K A; Friedberg, E C; Warren, S L

    1996-10-15

    Damage to actively transcribed DNA is preferentially repaired by the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) system. TCR requires RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but the mechanism by which repair enzymes preferentially recognize and repair DNA lesions on Pol II-transcribed genes is incompletely understood. Herein we demonstrate that a fraction of the large subunit of Pol II (Pol II LS) is ubiquitinated after exposing cells to UV-radiation or cisplatin but not several other DNA damaging agents. This novel covalent modification of Pol II LS occurs within 15 min of exposing cells to UV-radiation and persists for about 8-12 hr. Ubiquitinated Pol II LS is also phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS is deficient in fibroblasts from individuals with two forms of Cockayne syndrome (CS-A and CS-B), a rare disorder in which TCR is disrupted. UV-induced ubiquitination of Pol II LS can be restored by introducing cDNA constructs encoding the CSA or CSB genes, respectively, into CS-A or CS-B fibroblasts. These results suggest that ubiquitination of Pol II LS plays a role in the recognition and/or repair of damage to actively transcribed genes. Alternatively, these findings may reflect a role played by the CSA and CSB gene products in transcription. PMID:8876179

  4. Manganese in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  5. Manganese reduction by microbes from oxic regions of the Lake Vanda (Antarctica) water column

    SciTech Connect

    Bratina, B.J.; Stevenson, B.S.; Schmidt, T.M.; Green, W.J.

    1998-10-01

    Depth profiles of metals in Lake Vanda, a permanently ice-covered, stratified Antarctic lake, suggest the importance of particulate manganese oxides in the scavenging, transport, and release of metals. Since manganese oxides can be solubilized by manganese-reducing bacteria, microbially mediated manganese reduction was investigated in Lake Vanda. Microbes concentrated from oxic regions of the water column, encompassing a peak of soluble manganese [Mn(II)], reduced synthetic manganese oxides (MnO{sub 2}) when incubated aerobically, Pure cultures of manganese-reducing bacteria were readily isolated from waters collected near the oxic Mn(II) peak. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, most of the isolated manganese reducers belong to the genus Carnobacterium. Cultures of a phylogenetically representative strain of Carnobacterium reduced synthetic MnO{sub 2} in the presence of sodium azide, as was seen in field assays. Unlike anaerobes that utilize manganese oxides as terminal electron acceptors in respiration, isolates of the genus Carnobacterium reduced Mn(IV) via a diffusible compound under oxic conditions. The release of adsorbed trace metals accompanying the solubilization of manganese oxides may provide populations of Carnobacterium with a source of nutrients in this extremely oligotrophic environment.

  6. "Big IGF-II"-induced hypoglycemia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbois-Trabut, L; Maillot, F; De Widerspach-Thor, A; Lamisse, F; Couet, C

    2004-06-01

    Non-islet cell tumor-related hypoglycemia is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 63 Year-old man admitted for hemiparesia and a capillary blood glucose of 20 mg/dL. The presence of an immature form of IGF-II that can mimic the effect of insulin, namely "big IGF-II", explained this patient's hypoglycaemia. A moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cardia with metastatic extension to the stomach and the liver was demonstrated. Octreotide failed to control the hypoglycaemia, therefore prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day) and enteral feeding prevented new episodes of severe hypoglycaemia. PMID:15223980

  7. Protective effects of diltiazem against vascular endothelial cell injury induced by angiotensin-II and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Li, Minggao; Li, Jing; Meng, Guo; Liu, Xin

    2015-04-01

    To provide pharmacological data for future clinical studies, this study investigated the protective effects of diltiazem on vascular endothelial cell (VEC) injury induced by angiotensin-II (AngII), hypoxia, and a combination of both treatments. The concentration of intracellular free calcium and the mitochondrial membrane potential in VEC were assessed as indicators of cell injury. An in vivo hypoxic animal model was used to test the protective effect of diltiazem on vascular endothelial tissues. Our study showed that AngII and hypoxia decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in VEC, which was significantly inhibited by diltiazem. Diltiazem protected against VEC injury induced by the increased concentration of intracellular free calcium, which was associated with AngII and hypoxia. Diltiazem reduced the apoptosis of rat VEC under a sustained hypoxic condition. In addition, it reduced AngII and endothelin I levels in rat vascular endothelial tissues. Our study confirmed that AngII and hypoxia induced VEC injury by regulating the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular free calcium. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, protected VEC from AngII- and hypoxia-induced injury. PMID:25661249

  8. Polydatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial superoxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yingying; Zhang, Nan; Yao, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Our studies and others recently demonstrate that polydatin, a resveratrol glucoside, has antioxidative and cardioprotective effects. This study aims to investigate the direct effects of polydatin on Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy to explore the potential role of polydatin in cardioprotection. Our results showed that in primary cultured cardiomyocytes, polydatin blocked Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner, which were associated with reduction in the cell surface area and [3H]leucine incorporation, as well as attenuation of the mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor and β-myosin heavy chain. Furthermore, polydatin prevented rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II infusion, as assessed by heart weight-to-body weight ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocyte, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that polydatin attenuated the Ang II-induced increase in the reactive oxygen species levels and NADPH oxidase activity in vivo and in vitro. Polydatin also blocked the Ang II-stimulated increases of Nox4 and Nox2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes and the hearts of Ang II-infused rats. Our results indicate that polydatin has the potential to protect against Ang II-mediated cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production. These observations may shed new light on the understanding of the cardioprotective effect of polydatin. PMID:25488910

  9. Cytogenetic evidence that DNA topoisomerase II is not involved in radiation induced chromsome-type aberrations.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, P; Pepe, G; Ottavianelli, A; Schinoppi, A; Cinelli, S

    2015-11-01

    ICRF-187 (Cardioxane™, Chiron) is a catalytic inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), proposed to act by blocking Topo II-mediated DNA cleavage without stabilizing DNA-Topo II-"cleavable complexes". In this study ICRF-187 was used to evaluate the potential involvement of DNA topoisomerase II in the formation of the radiation-induced chromosome-type aberrations in the G0 phase of the cell cycle in human lymphocytes from three healthy male donors. This is based on many evidences that DNA topoisomerases are involved in DNA recombination, mainly of illegitimate type (non-homologous) both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained clearly indicated that ICRF-187 did not induce per se any chromosomal damage. When challenged with the non-catalytic Topo II poison VP-16 (etoposide), which acts by stabilizing the "cleavable complex" generating "protein concealed" DSB's and thus chromosomal aberrations, it completely abolished the significant induction of chromosome-type aberrations and formation of dicentric chromosomes. This indicates that ICRF-187 acts effectively as catalytic inhibitor of Topo II. On the other hand, when X-ray treatments were challenged with ICRF-187 using experimental conditions as for VP-16 treatments, no modification of the incidence of chromosome-type aberrations and dicentric chromosomes was observed. On this basis, we conclude that Topo II is not involved in the formation of X-ray-induced chromosome-type aberrations and dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes in the G0 phase of the cell cycle. PMID:26520368

  10. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Lipid II Aggregation, Causing Membrane Instability and Vesicle Budding

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Katharina M.; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  11. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  12. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 13.8 μM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC50 5.3 μM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  13. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  14. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC(50) value of 13.8 microM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC(50) 5.3 microM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  15. Thymosin β4 Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Growth by Regulating Wnt/WISP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guleria, Rakeshwar S; Thakur, Suresh; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Pan, Jing; Baker, Kenneth M; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2016-08-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. However, the role of Tβ4 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the cardio-protective effect of Tβ4 in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte growth. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVM) were pretreated with Tβ4 followed by Ang II stimulation. Cell size, hypertrophy marker gene expression and Wnt signaling components, β-catenin, and Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of cell size, hypertrophy marker genes and Wnt-associated gene expression, and protein levels; induced by Ang II in cardiomyocyte. WISP-1 was overexpressed in NRVM and, the effect of Tβ4 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth was evaluated. WISP-1 overexpression promoted cardiomyocytes growth and was reversed by pretreatment with Tβ4. This is the first report which demonstrates that Tβ4 targets Wnt/WISP-1 to protect Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1737-1744, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Lovastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Oi, S; Haneda, T; Osaki, J; Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kawabe, J; Kikuchi, K

    1999-07-01

    Angiotensin II activates p21ras, and mediates cardiac hypertrophic growth through the type 1 angiotensin II receptor in cardiac myocytes. An inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase has been shown to block the post-translational farnesylation of p21ras and inhibit protein synthesis in several cell types. Primary cultures of neonatal cardiac myocytes were used to determine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin inhibit the angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic growth. Angiotensin II (10(-6) M) significantly increased protein-DNA ratio, RNA-DNA ratio, ratios of protein synthesis and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin (10(-6) M) and simvastatin (10(-6) M) partially and significantly inhibited the angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, but a water-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin (10(-6) M) did not. Mevalonate (10(-4) M) overcame the inhibitory effects of lovastatin and simvastatin on angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters. A selective protein kinase C inhibitor, calphostin C (10(-6) M) partially and significantly prevented angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, and treatment with both lovastatin and calphostin C inhibited completely. Angiotensin II increased p21ras activity and membrane association, and lovastatin inhibited them. These studies demonstrate that a lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, may prevent angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, at least in part, through p21ras/MAP kinase pathway, which is linked to mevalonate metabolism.

  17. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  18. TNF Receptor 1 Signaling is Critically Involved in Mediating Angiotensin-II-induced Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R.; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E.; Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34+CD45+ monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1 week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34+CD45+ cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart. PMID:23337087

  19. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  20. Distributions of manganese, iron, and manganese-oxidizing bacteria in Lake Superior sediments of different organic carbon content

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, L.L.; Nealson, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacterial and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrated primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  1. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  2. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  3. Structural specifics of light-induced metastable states in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets.

    PubMed

    Barskaya, I Yu; Veber, S L; Fokin, S V; Tretyakov, E V; Bagryanskaya, E G; Ovcharenko, V I; Fedin, M V

    2015-12-28

    Although light-induced magnetostructural switching in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets Cu(hfac)2L(R) has been known for several years, structural characterization of metastable photoinduced states has not yet been accomplished due to significant technical demands. In this work we apply, for the first time, variable-temperature FTIR spectroscopy with photoexcitation to investigate the structural specifics of light-induced states in the Cu(hfac)2L(R) family represented by (i) Cu(hfac)2L(Me) comprising two-spin copper(II)-nitroxide clusters, and (ii) Cu(hfac)2L(Pr) comprising three-spin nitroxide-copper(II)-nitroxide clusters. The light-induced state of Cu(hfac)2L(Me) manifests the same set of vibrational bands as the corresponding thermally-induced state, implying their similar structures. For the second compound Cu(hfac)2L(Pr), the coordination environment of copper(II) is similar in light- and thermally-induced states, but distinct differences are found for packing of the peripheral n-propyl substituent of nitroxide. Thus, generally the structures of the corresponding thermally- and light-induced states in molecular magnets Cu(hfac)2L(R) might differ, and FTIR spectroscopy provides a useful approach for revealing and elucidating such differences.

  4. A new nano-scale manganese (II) coordination polymer constructed from semicarbazone Schiff base and dicyanamide ligands: Synthesis, crystal structure and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Farzaneh; Simpson, Jim

    2016-03-01

    A new nano-structured Mn(II) coordination polymer [Mn(HL)(dca)(Cl)]n(1), [HL= Pyridine-2-carbaldehyde semicarbazone, dca= dicyanamide] has been synthesized by a sonochemical method and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. Single crystals of compound 1 was synthesized by slow evaporation method and was structurally characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The single crystal structure shows one dimensional zig-zag chains with end-to-end dicyanamide-bridged ligand. A distorted octahedral geometry around the Mn2+centers was achieved by NNO atoms from HL, two nitrogen atoms of dicyanamide and one chlorine atom. Also for more details, the structure of 1, has been optimized by density functional theory (DFT calculations).

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  6. OKT3-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with release of group II secretory phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Roest, R W; Wolbink-Kamp, A M; Wolbink, G J; Weening, J J; Hack, C E; ten Berge, J M

    1996-10-01

    Administration of the murine IgG2a CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 exerts a transient nephrotoxic effect. Increased levels of group II secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-II) might account for this nephrotoxicity as sPLA2-II induces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, vasoactive lipid mediators that influence glomerular haemodynamics and renal function. Furthermore, extracellular phospholipases seem to be involved in proximal tubular cell injury. We studied plasma sPLA2-II levels in relation to circulating creatinine, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein levels in 15 renal allograft recipients receiving rejection treatment with OKT3. As a control group, we studied 15 renal allograft recipients receiving rejection treatment with methylprednisolone. A maximal fourfold increase in sPLA2-II levels was observed 48 h after the first OKT3 administration, preceded by increased tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 levels and accompanied by increased C-reactive protein levels. Creatinine levels reached a maximal increase 72 h after initiation of treatment. During methylprednisolone treatment no increase in any of the studied parameters was observed. Thus, administration of OKT3 induces increased sPLA2-II levels, presumably via generation of cytokines. We hypothesize that sPLA2-II may contribute to the nephrotoxic effect of OKT3 by inducing vasoconstrictive prostaglandins and renal tubular cell injury.

  7. ANG II is required for optimal overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Davis, B. S.; Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    ANG II mediates the hypertrophic response of overloaded cardiac muscle, likely via the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor. To examine the potential role of ANG II in overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy, plantaris and/or soleus muscle overload was produced in female Sprague-Dawley rats (225-250 g) by the bilateral surgical ablation of either the synergistic gastrocnemius muscle (experiment 1) or both the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles (experiment 2). In experiment 1 (n = 10/group), inhibiting endogenous ANG II production by oral administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor during a 28-day overloading protocol attenuated plantaris and soleus muscle hypertrophy by 57 and 96%, respectively (as measured by total muscle protein content). ACE inhibition had no effect on nonoverloaded (sham-operated) muscles. With the use of new animals (experiment 2; n = 8/group), locally perfusing overloaded soleus muscles with exogenous ANG II (via osmotic pump) rescued the lost hypertrophic response in ACE-inhibited animals by 71%. Furthermore, orally administering an AT(1) receptor antagonist instead of an ACE inhibitor produced a 48% attenuation of overload-induced hypertrophy that could not be rescued by ANG II perfusion. Thus ANG II may be necessary for optimal overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy, acting at least in part via an AT(1) receptor-dependent pathway.

  8. Humid heat exposure induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to humid heat stress leads to the initiation of serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases, including heat stroke, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and even death. Increasing evidences have shown that the humid heat stress-induced dysfunction of the cardiovascular system was accompanied with severe cardiomyocyte injury; however, the precise mechanism of heat stress-induced injury of cardiomyocyte remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that humid heat stress promoted oxidative stress through the activation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiomyocytes. To test our hypothesis, we established mouse models of humid heat stress. Using the animal models, we found that Ang II levels in serum were significantly up-regulated and that the Ang II receptor AT1 was increased in cardiomyocytes. The antioxidant ability in plasma and heart tissues which was detected by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay was also decreased with the increased ROS production under humid heat stress, as was the expression of antioxidant genes (SOD2, HO-1, GPx). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan, effectively relieved oxidative stress, blocked Ang II signaling pathway and suppressed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by humid heat stress. In addition, overexpression of antioxidant genes reversed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Overall, these results implied that humid heat stress increased oxidative stress and caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the Ang II signaling pathway. Thus, targeting the Ang II signaling pathway may provide a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases caused by humid heat stress.

  9. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. DNA breakage induced by piceatannol and copper(II): Mechanism and anticancer properties

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHENSHENG; YANG, XIAOZHAN; DONG, SHIWU; LI, XIAOHUI

    2012-01-01

    Piceatannol (3,3′,4,5′-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene; Pice), found in a variety of plant sources including grapes, red wine, peanuts and rhubarb, is known as a metabolite and analog of Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene; Res) and has higher bioactivity than Res. To explore the mechanism of DNA damage induced by Pice in the presence of copper (Cu)(II), gel electrophoresis, UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used. The results of gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the hydroxyl radical played a critical role in DNA cleavage. Spectroscopy confirmed that the mechanism of DNA cleavage induced by Pice-Cu(II) involves the Haber Weiss and Fenton reactions. Pice chelates with Cu(II) as a bidentate ligand, and the Pice-Cu(II) complex undergoes intramolecular electron transfer to form the semiquinone radical anion and Cu(I), which may be reoxidated by O2 to form Cu(II) with hydroxyl radical generation. In brief, the formation of the hydroxyl radical and the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle play a key role in inducing DNA damage. In this process, Pice demonstrated pro-oxidant properties. Oxidative product(s) of Pice, semiquinone, was formed and Cu(I) was reoxidized to Cu(II). The redox cycling of copper generated reactive oxygen species, which induced DNA cleavage, the hallmark of cell apoptosis. The mechanism of DNA breakage induced by Pice-Cu(II) may be a significant pathway through which cancer cells are killed. PMID:22783397

  11. Manganese-induced integrin affinity maturation promotes recruitment of alpha V beta 3 integrin to focal adhesions in endothelial cells: evidence for a role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Src.

    PubMed

    Dormond, Olivier; Ponsonnet, Lionel; Hasmim, Meriem; Foletti, Alessandro; Rüegg, Curzio

    2004-07-01

    Integrin activity is controlled by changes in affinity (i.e. ligand binding) and avidity (i.e. receptor clustering). Little is known, however, about the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity and on the associated signaling pathways. To study the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity, we stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with MnCl(2) to increase integrin affinity and monitored clustering of beta 1 and beta 3 integrins. In unstimulated HUVEC, beta 1 integrins were present in fibrillar adhesions, while alpha V beta 3 was detected in peripheral focal adhesions. Clustered beta 1 and beta 3 integrins expressed high affinity/ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes. MnCl(2)-stimulation promoted focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation at the basal surface of the cells, and strongly enhanced mAb LM609 staining and expression of beta 3 high affinity/LIBS epitopes at focal adhesions. MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering was blocked by a soluble RGD peptide, by wortmannin and LY294002, two pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and by over-expressing a dominant negative PI 3-K mutant protein. Conversely, over-expression of active PI 3-K and pharmacological inhibiton of Src with PP2 and CGP77675, enhanced basal and manganese-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering. Transient increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt, a direct target of PI 3K, occurred upon manganese stimulation. MnCl(2) did not alter beta 1 integrin distribution or beta1 high-affinity/LIBS epitope expression. Based on these results, we conclude that MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 integrin affinity maturation stimulates focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation, and promotes recruitment of high affinity alpha V beta 3 to focal adhesions. Affinity-modulated alpha V beta 3 clustering requires PI3-K signaling and is negatively regulate by Src.

  12. Calcium channel blockade attenuates angiotensin II-induced drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Calcagnetti, D J; Schechter, M D

    1993-01-01

    Lateral ventricular administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) produces potent dipsogenic effects in water-sated rats. ANG II seems to require functional voltage-gated calcium channels on neurons throughout circumventricular brain sites to exert its effects. Although there are at least three types of calcium channels, only L-type calcium channel-blocking drugs have been reported to decrease drinking. (4-(4-Benzofurazanyl)-1-4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-pyridine-dic arb oxylic acid methyl 1-methyl-ethyl ester) [PN 200-110; isradipine (ISR)], a selective L-type calcium channel blocker, has been shown to attenuate significantly the intake of sweetened water in water-sated rats following either peripheral or ICV administration, but ISR does not affect plain-water intake in water-deprived rats. The present experiment was designed to determine whether ISR would attenuate ANG II-induced drinking that is not either motivated by palatability or dependent on deprivation. Rats, each fitted with chronic indwelling ventricular cannulae, were pretreated with ISR (0.3, 3.0, and 30 micrograms/rat; ICV). ANG II (40 ng/rat; ICV) was administered 10 min later and rats were allowed free access to water for 15 min. Injections of ANG II plus saline and ANG II plus the ISR vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) did not attenuate ANG II-induced polydipsia, whereas ANG II+ISR (0.3 and 3.0 micrograms) attenuated ANG II-induced drinking to 62 and 22% of control, respectively. Results with the 30-micrograms dose were not different from the 3.0 dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  14. Class A scavenger receptor deficiency augments angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lingling; Li, Xiaoyu; Fang, Ru; Wang, Zhuoyun; Xu, Yiming; Zhang, Hanwen; Bai, Hui; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xudong; Ben, Jingjing; Xu, Yong; Chen, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that participates in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Here we evaluated the role of SR-A in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive vascular remodeling. Chronic infusion of Ang II leads to an increased systolic blood pressure both in SR-A knockout (SR-A(-/-)) and wild type (SR-A(+/+)) mice with no significant difference between these two groups. SR-A(-/-) hypertensive mice, however, exhibited a marked augmentation of arterial wall thickening and vascular cell proliferation compared with SR-A(+/+) hypertensive mice. M1 macrophage markers were increased whereas M2 macrophage markers were decreased in vascular tissues of SR-A(-/-) mice. Co-culture experiments revealed that more pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α were produced by SR-A(-/-) peritoneal macrophages leading to a stronger proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. In addition, SR-A(-/-) macrophages were more prone to lipopolysaccharide-induced M1 differentiation while resisting interleukin-4-induced M2 differentiation. Importantly, transplantation of SR-A(-/-) bone marrow into SR-A(+/+) mice significantly augmented Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. These results show that SR-A is critical for Ang II-induced vascular remodeling by regulating macrophage polarization. Therefore, SR-A may be a useful therapeutic target for the intervention of hypertensive vascular remodeling. PMID:24875449

  15. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal.

  16. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  17. High-molar-mass hyaluronan behavior during testing its radical scavenging capacity in organic and aqueous media: effects of the presence of manganese(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Rapta, Peter; Valachová, Katarína; Gemeiner, Peter; Soltés, Ladislav

    2009-02-01

    This study compares the radical scavenging capacity of high-molar-mass hyaluronan (HA) using standardized methods applying 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and 2,2'-azinobis[3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonate] (ABTS) radical cations as oxidants. Additionally, spin-trapping technique combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to evaluate the ability of HA to scavenge reactive radicals. The thermal decomposition of K2S2O8 in pure H2O or in a H2O/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixture at 333 K was used as a source of reactive paramagnetic species. We found that HA does not exhibit radical-scavenging activity when DPPH radicals or ABTS(.+) radical cations are used as oxidant, but that HA is an effective radical scavenger at low concentrations, if the oxidation reactions are initiated by the decomposition of K2S2O8. At higher HA concentrations, a more complex behavior and prooxidant HA action was observed. The influence of Mn(II) ions on the reaction mechanisms of radical generation and termination in the K2S2O8/H2O/DMSO system in the presence of HA was studied in detail. PMID:19235158

  18. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  19. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  20. International Strategic Minerals Inventory summary report; manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, Jr., John H.; Sutphin, David M.; Cannon, William F.

    1984-01-01

    Major world resources of manganese, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI). ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of manganese on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  1. ERK1/2 signaling plays an important role in topoisomerase II poison-induced G2/M checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Ryan H; Greer, Patrick M; Cao, Phu T; Cowan, Kenneth H; Yan, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Topo II poisons, which target topoisomerase II (topo II) to generate enzyme mediated DNA damage, have been commonly used for anti-cancer treatment. While clinical evidence demonstrate a capability of topo II poisons in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, accumulating evidence also show that topo II poison treatment frequently results in cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which was associated with subsequent resistance to these treatments. Results in this report indicate that treatment of MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with topo II poisons resulted in an increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and an subsequent induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation using specific inhibitors markedly attenuated the topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest and diminished the topo II poison-induced activation of ATR and Chk1 kinases. Moreover, decreased expression of ATR by specific shRNA diminished topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest but had no effect on topo II poison-induced ERK1/2 activation. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling had little, if any, effect on topo II poison-induced ATM activation. In addition, ATM inhibition by either incubation of cells with ATM specific inhibitor or transfection of cells with ATM specific siRNA did not block topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest. Ultimately, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling greatly enhanced topo II poison-induced apoptosis. These results implicate a critical role for ERK1/2 signaling in the activation of G2/M checkpoint response following topo II poison treatment, which protects cells from topo II poison-induced apoptosis.

  2. Angiotensin II centrally induces frequent detrusor contractility of the bladder by acting on brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Bunya; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Higashi, Youichirou; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Saito, Motoaki; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays an important role in the brain as a neurotransmitter and is involved in psychological stress reactions, for example through activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. We investigated the effects of centrally administered Ang II on the micturition reflex, which is potentially affected by the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, and brain Ang II receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) male rats. Central administration of Ang II (0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 nmol per rat, intracerebroventricularly, icv) but not vehicle rapidly and dose-dependently decreased the urinary bladder intercontraction interval, without altering the bladder detrusor pressure. Central administration of antagonists of Ang II type 1 but not type 2 receptors inhibited the Ang II-induced shortening of intercontraction intervals. Administration of the highest dose of Ang II (0.07 nmol per rat, icv) but not lower doses (0.01 and 0.02 nmol per rat, icv) elevated the plasma concentration of adrenaline. Bilateral adrenalectomy reduced Ang II-induced elevation in adrenaline, but had no effect on the Ang II-induced shortening of the intercontraction interval. These data suggest that central administration of Ang II increases urinary frequency by acting on brain Ang II type 1 receptors, independent of activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. PMID:26908391

  3. Pollutant particles induce arginase II in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse pulmonary effects, including induction and exacerbation of asthma. Recently arginase was shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we hypothesized that PM exposure would induce ar...

  4. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  5. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  8. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  9. Retrieval improvement is induced by water shortage through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Maldonado, Héctor; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) has an evolutionary preserved role in determining adaptative responses to water-shortages. In addition, it has been shown to modulate diverse phases of memory. Still, it is not clear whether ANGII improves or spoils memory. We demonstrated that endogenous angiotensins enhance consolidation of a long-term associative memory in the crab Chasmagnathus and that water shortage improves memory consolidation through brain ANGII actions. Here, we show that weakly trained crabs, when water-deprived, exhibit enhanced retrieval. Subsequently, memory retention is indistinguishable from that of strongly trained crabs. ANGII, but not angiotensin IV, is a necessary and sufficient condition for such enhancing effect. We conclude that ANGII released due to water shortage leads to enhanced memory retrieval. Thus, it seems that ANGII has an evolutionary preserved role as a multifunction coordinator that enables an adaptative response to water-shortage. The facilitation of memory consolidation and retrieval would be among those coordinated functions.

  10. Retrieval improvement is induced by water shortage through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Maldonado, Héctor; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) has an evolutionary preserved role in determining adaptative responses to water-shortages. In addition, it has been shown to modulate diverse phases of memory. Still, it is not clear whether ANGII improves or spoils memory. We demonstrated that endogenous angiotensins enhance consolidation of a long-term associative memory in the crab Chasmagnathus and that water shortage improves memory consolidation through brain ANGII actions. Here, we show that weakly trained crabs, when water-deprived, exhibit enhanced retrieval. Subsequently, memory retention is indistinguishable from that of strongly trained crabs. ANGII, but not angiotensin IV, is a necessary and sufficient condition for such enhancing effect. We conclude that ANGII released due to water shortage leads to enhanced memory retrieval. Thus, it seems that ANGII has an evolutionary preserved role as a multifunction coordinator that enables an adaptative response to water-shortage. The facilitation of memory consolidation and retrieval would be among those coordinated functions. PMID:15721803

  11. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G M; Prieto, Minolfa C; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9-12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 +/- 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). AT(1)R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 +/- 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 +/- 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 +/- 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 +/- 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT(1)R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT(1)R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  12. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G. M.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9–12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 ± 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 ± 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 ± 0.07, P < 0.05). AT1R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 ± 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 ± 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 ± 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 ± 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT1R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT1R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass with bivalirudin in type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Stephanie B; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Crumbley, Arthur J; Uber, Walter E

    2004-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia poses significant challenges. Inadequate pharmacokinetic profiles, monitoring, reversibility, and availability often limit alternative anticoagulation strategies. Bivalirudin, a semisynthetic direct thrombin inhibitor, was recently approved for use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Its unique properties, including a relatively short half-life, an anticoagulation effect that closely correlates with activated clotting time, and an alternate metabolic pathway for elimination, make bivalirudin an attractive agent for cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia. We report our experience using bivalirudin in 2 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

  14. Perturbing the water cavity surrounding the manganese cluster by mutating the residue D1-valine 185 has a strong effect on the water oxidation mechanism of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Bao, Han; Neveu, Curtis L; Burnap, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    The active site of water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) is a Mn4CaO5 cluster that is located in a cavity between the D1 and CP43 protein subunits by which it is coordinated. The remainder of this cavity is filled with water molecules, which serve as a source of substrate and participate in poorly understood hydrogen bond networks that may modulate the function of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. These water molecules interact with the first and second sphere amino acid ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and some water interacts directly with the Mn4CaO5 cluster. Here, the results of mutations to the amino acids that line the walls of several predicted cavities in the immediate vicinity of the Mn4CaO5 cluster were examined in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Of these, mutations of Val185 in the D1 subunit resulted in the most interesting functional alterations. The hydrophobic D1-Val185 occupies a location contacting water molecules that are positioned between the redox active tyrosine (YZ) and the putative proton gate residue, D1-Asp61, and at a position opposite the oxo bridge atom, O5, of the cluster. Mutations of the residue D1-Val185 were produced, with the intention that the substitute residue would extend into the water cavity that includes H2O molecules that interact with the Mn4CaO5 cluster, amino acid ligands of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, YZ and the chloride co-factor of PSII. Three of these mutants, D1-Val185Asn, D1-Val185Thr, and D1-Val185Phe, were able to accumulate significant levels of charge separating PSII and were characterized using polarographic and fluorescent techniques. Of the three substitutions, the phenylalanine substitution was the most severe with a complete inability to evolve oxygen, despite being able to accumulate PSII and to undergo stable charge separation. The threonine substitution had no apparent effect on oxygen evolution other than a 40% reduction in the steady state rate of O2 production compared to the case of wild-type Synechocystis , due to a

  15. The Escherichia coli small protein MntS and exporter MntP optimize the intracellular concentration of manganese.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julia E; Waters, Lauren S; Storz, Gisela; Imlay, James A

    2015-03-01

    Escherichia coli does not routinely import manganese, but it will do so when iron is unavailable, so that manganese can substitute for iron as an enzyme cofactor. When intracellular manganese levels are low, the cell induces the MntH manganese importer plus MntS, a small protein of unknown function; when manganese levels are high, the cell induces the MntP manganese exporter and reduces expression of MntH and MntS. The role of MntS has not been clear. Previous work showed that forced MntS synthesis under manganese-rich conditions caused bacteriostasis. Here we find that when manganese is scarce, MntS helps manganese to activate a variety of enzymes. Its overproduction under manganese-rich conditions caused manganese to accumulate to very high levels inside the cell; simultaneously, iron levels dropped precipitously, apparently because manganese-bound Fur blocked the production of iron importers. Under these conditions, heme synthesis stopped, ultimately depleting cytochrome oxidase activity and causing the failure of aerobic metabolism. Protoporphyrin IX accumulated, indicating that the combination of excess manganese and iron deficiency had stalled ferrochelatase. The same chain of events occurred when mutants lacking MntP, the manganese exporter, were exposed to manganese. Genetic analysis suggested the possibility that MntS exerts this effect by inhibiting MntP. We discuss a model wherein during transitions between low- and high-manganese environments E. coli uses MntP to compensate for MntH overactivity, and MntS to compensate for MntP overactivity.

  16. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Manganese (II) Complexes of Phthalic and Isophthalic Acid: X-Ray Crystal Structures of [Mn(ph)(Phen)2(H2O)]· 4H2O, [Mn(Phen)2(H2O)2]2(Isoph)2(Phen)· 12H2O and {[Mn(Isoph)(bipy)]4· 2.75biby}n(phH2 = Phthalic Acid; isoph = Isophthalic Acid; phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline; bipy = 2,2-Bipyridine)

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Malachy; Leon, Vanessa; Geraghty, Majella; McKee, Vickie; Wikaira, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Manganese(II) acetate reacts with phthalic acid (phH2) to give [Mn(ph)]·0.5H2O (1). Reaction of 1 with 1,10-phenanthroline produces [Mn(ph)(phen)]·2H2O (2) and [Mn(ph)(phen)2(H2O)]·4H2O (3). Reaction of isophthalic acid (isophH2) with manganese(II) acetate results in the formation of [Mn(isoph)]·2H2O (4). The addition of the N,N-donor ligands 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,2'-bipyridine to 4 leads to the formation of [Mn2 (isoph)2(phen)3)]·4H2O (5), [(Mn(phen)2(H2O)2]2(isoph)2(phen)·12H2O (6) and {[Mn(isoph)(bipy)]4·2.75 biby}n (7), respectively. Molecular structures of 3, 6 and 7 were determined crystallographically. In 3 the phthalate ligand is bound to the manganese via just one of its carboxylate groups in a monodentate mode with the remaining coordination sites filled by four phenanthroline nitrogen and one water oxygen atoms. In 6 the isophthalates are uncoordinated with the octahedral manganese center ligated by two phenanthrolines and two waters. In 7 the Isophthalate ligands act as bridges resulting in a polymeric structure. One of the carboxylate groups is chelating a single manganese with the other binding two metal centres in a bridging bidentate mode. The phthalate and isophthalate complexes, the metal free ligands and a number of simple manganes salts were each tested for their ability, to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Only the “metal free” 1,10-phenanthroline and its manganese complexes were found to be active. PMID:18475957

  17. Fumarates improve psoriasis and multiple sclerosis by inducing type II dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghoreschi, Kamran; Brück, Jürgen; Kellerer, Christina; Deng, Caishu; Peng, Haiyan; Rothfuss, Oliver; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Gocke, Anne R.; Respa, Annedore; Glocova, Ivana; Valtcheva, Nadejda; Alexander, Eva; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Rupec, Rudolf A.; Lovett-Racke, Amy E.; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Fumarates improve multiple sclerosis (MS) and psoriasis, two diseases in which both IL-12 and IL-23 promote pathogenic T helper (Th) cell differentiation. However, both diseases show opposing responses to most established therapies. First, we show in humans that fumarate treatment induces IL-4–producing Th2 cells in vivo and generates type II dendritic cells (DCs) that produce IL-10 instead of IL-12 and IL-23. In mice, fumarates also generate type II DCs that induce IL-4–producing Th2 cells in vitro and in vivo and protect mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Type II DCs result from fumarate-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion, followed by increased hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and impaired STAT1 phosphorylation. Induced HO-1 is cleaved, whereupon the N-terminal fragment of HO-1 translocates into the nucleus and interacts with AP-1 and NF-κB sites of the IL-23p19 promoter. This interaction prevents IL-23p19 transcription without affecting IL-12p35, whereas STAT1 inactivation prevents IL-12p35 transcription without affecting IL-23p19. As a consequence, GSH depletion by small molecules such as fumarates induces type II DCs in mice and in humans that ameliorate inflammatory autoimmune diseases. This therapeutic approach improves Th1- and Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and MS by interfering with IL-12 and IL-23 production. PMID:21987655

  18. Castration of male mice prevents the progression of established angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Thatcher, Sean; Wu, Congqing; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Male sex is a non-modifiable risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. Similar to humans, male mice are more susceptible to angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAAs than females. Previous studies demonstrated that castration of males markedly reduced the formation of AngII-induced AAAs. Progression of AAA size is associated with increased risk of aneurysm rupture. In this study, we hypothesized that castration of male mice would reduce the progression of established AngII-induced AAAs. Methods Male apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice were infused with AngII for 1 month to induce AAA formation. Aortic diameters were measured by ultrasound and mice were stratified into 2 groups that were either sham-operated or castrated. AngII infusions were continued for a further 2 months. Ultrasound was used to quantify lumen diameters, and excised aortas were processed for quantification of AAA size, volume, and tissue characteristics. Results Sham-operated mice exhibited progressive dilation of suprarenal aortic lumen diameters during continued AngII infusion. Castration significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters (study endpoint: 1.88 ± 0.05 mm vs 1.63 ± 0.04 mm; P<.05; sham-operated [n = 15] vs castration [n = 17], respectively). However, maximal external AAA diameters were not significantly different between sham-operated and castrated mice. The vascular volume/lumen volume ratio of excised AAAs imaged by ultrasound was significantly increased by castration (sham-operated, 4.8 ± 0.9; castration, 9.5 ± 2.0 %; n = 11/group; P<.05). Moreover, compared to thin walled AAAs of sham-operated mice, aneurysm sections from castrated mice exhibited increased smooth muscle -actin and collagen. Conclusions Removal of endogenous male hormones by castration selectively reduces aortic lumen expansion while not altering the external AAA dimensions. PMID:24439319

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  1. Block the function of nonmuscle myosin II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Chong, Mei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hongkui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is the name given to the multi-subunit protein product of three genes encoding different nonmuscle myosin heavy chains including NM II-A, NM II-B, and NM II-C. Blebbistatin is a small molecule that has been shown to be a relatively specific inhibitor of NM II. Blocking the function of NM II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida at a dose-dependent manner. In situ hybridization analysis with ventricular marker ventricular myosin heavy chain (vmhc) and atrial marker atrial myosin heavy chain (amhc) showed each of the heart contained both distinct atria and ventricle. However, the cardia bifida embryos had highly variable distance between two separate ventricles. We also provided evidence that time window from 12 to 20 h post fertilization (hpf) is necessary and sufficient for cardia bifida formation caused by blebbistatin treatment. Expression of spinster homolog 2 (spns2) was decreased in blebbistatin-treated embryos, suggesting the cardia bifida phenotype caused by NM II inhibition was relevant to precardiac mesoderm migration defects. Through in situ hybridization analysis, we showed that foxa1 was expressed in endoderm of blebbistatin-treated embryos at 24-hpf stage, suggesting the endoderm formation is normal in cardia bifida embryos caused by blebbistatin treatment. In addition, we demonstrated that blebbistatin treatment resulted in morphology alteration of zebrafish cardiomyocytes in vivo and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro.

  2. Block the function of nonmuscle myosin II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Chong, Mei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hongkui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is the name given to the multi-subunit protein product of three genes encoding different nonmuscle myosin heavy chains including NM II-A, NM II-B, and NM II-C. Blebbistatin is a small molecule that has been shown to be a relatively specific inhibitor of NM II. Blocking the function of NM II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida at a dose-dependent manner. In situ hybridization analysis with ventricular marker ventricular myosin heavy chain (vmhc) and atrial marker atrial myosin heavy chain (amhc) showed each of the heart contained both distinct atria and ventricle. However, the cardia bifida embryos had highly variable distance between two separate ventricles. We also provided evidence that time window from 12 to 20 h post fertilization (hpf) is necessary and sufficient for cardia bifida formation caused by blebbistatin treatment. Expression of spinster homolog 2 (spns2) was decreased in blebbistatin-treated embryos, suggesting the cardia bifida phenotype caused by NM II inhibition was relevant to precardiac mesoderm migration defects. Through in situ hybridization analysis, we showed that foxa1 was expressed in endoderm of blebbistatin-treated embryos at 24-hpf stage, suggesting the endoderm formation is normal in cardia bifida embryos caused by blebbistatin treatment. In addition, we demonstrated that blebbistatin treatment resulted in morphology alteration of zebrafish cardiomyocytes in vivo and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:25403653

  3. Circumventricular organs and ANG II-induced salt appetite: blood pressure and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Fitts, D A; Starbuck, E M; Ruhf, A

    2000-12-01

    A lesion of the subfornical organ (SFO) may reduce sodium depletion-induced salt appetite, which is largely dependent on ANG II, and yet ANG II infusions directly into SFO do not provoke salt appetite. Two experiments were designed to address this apparent contradiction. In experiment 1 sustained infusions of ANG II into SFO did not produce a sustained elevation of blood pressure, and neither a reduction of blood pressure alone with minoxidil and captopril nor a reduction of both blood pressure and volume with furosemide and captopril enhanced salt appetite. Infusions of ANG II in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) did evoke salt appetite without raising blood pressure. In experiment 2 knife cuts of the afferent and efferent fibers of the rostroventral pole of the SFO abolished water intake during an infusion of ANG II into the femoral vein but failed to reduce salt appetite during an infusion of ANG II into the OVLT. We conclude that 1) hypertension does not account for the failure of infusions of ANG II in the SFO to generate salt appetite and 2) the OVLT does not depend on its connectivity with the SFO to generate salt appetite during ANG II infusions. PMID:11080096

  4. Manganese-Cycling Microbial Communities Inside Deep-Sea Manganese Nodules.

    PubMed

    Blöthe, Marco; Wegorzewski, Anna; Müller, Cornelia; Simon, Frank; Kuhn, Thomas; Schippers, Axel

    2015-07-01

    Polymetallic nodules (manganese nodules) have been formed on deep sea sediments over millions of years and are currently explored for their economic potential, particularly for cobalt, nickel, copper, and manganese. Here we explored microbial communities inside nodules from the northeastern equatorial Pacific. The nodules have a large connected pore space with a huge inner surface of 120 m(2)/g as analyzed by computer tomography and BET measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron microprobe analysis revealed a complex chemical fine structure. This consisted of layers with highly variable Mn/Fe ratios (<1 to >500) and mainly of turbostratic phyllomanganates such as 7 and 10 Å vernadites alternating with layers of Fe-bearing vernadite (δ-MnO2) epitaxially intergrown with amorphous feroxyhyte (δ-FeOOH). Using molecular 16S rRNA gene techniques (clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and real-time PCR), we show that polymetallic nodules provide a suitable habitat for prokaryotes with an abundant and diverse prokaryotic community dominated by nodule-specific Mn(IV)-reducing and Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. These bacteria were not detected in the nodule-surrounding sediment. The high abundance and dominance of Mn-cycling bacteria in the manganese nodules argue for a biologically driven closed manganese cycle inside the nodules relevant for their formation and potential degradation.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  8. Indole-7-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone as a flexidentate ligand toward ZnII, CdII, PdII and PtII ions: cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing properties of the PtII complex.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abeer A; Khaledi, Hamid; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Karimian, Hamed

    2014-03-14

    A new thiosemicarbazone (LH2) derived from indole-7-carbaldehyde was synthesized and reacted with Zn(II), Cd(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) salts. The reactions with zinc and cadmium salts in 2 : 1 (ligand-metal) molar ratio afforded complexes of the type MX2(LH2)2, (X = Cl, Br or OAc), in which the thiosemicarbazone acts as a neutral S-monodentate ligand. In the presence of potassium hydroxide, the reaction of LH2 with ZnBr2 resulted in deprotonation of the thiosemicarbazone at the hydrazine and indole nitrogens to form Zn(L)(CH3OH). The reaction of LH2 with K2PdCl4 in the presence of triethylamine, afforded Pd(L)(LH2) which contains two thiosemicarbazone ligands: one being dianionic N,N,S-tridentate while the other one is neutral S-monodentate. When PdCl2(PPh3)2 was used as the Pd(II) ion source, Pd(L)(PPh3) was obtained. In a similar manner, the analogous platinum complex, Pt(L)(PPh3), was synthesized. The thiosemicarbazone in the latter two complexes behaves in a dianionic N,N,S-tridentate fashion. The platinum complex was found to have significant cytotoxicity toward four cancer cells lines, namely MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, HT-29, and HCT-116 but not toward the normal liver WRL-68 cell line. The apoptosis-inducing properties of the Pt complex was explored through fluorescence microscopy visualization, DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide flow cytometry.

  9. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  10. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  11. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II on hemodialysis: switch to danaparoid.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, T J; Goetschel, P; Schmugge, M; Leumann, E

    2000-08-01

    We report two pediatric patients with end-stage renal failure who developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II (HIT II) on hemodialysis (HD). Both developed acute respiratory distress and chest pain within 30 min of initiating the 5th HD session. The platelets dropped during HD from 168 to 38x10(9)/l and from 248 to 109x10(9)/l, respectively. Marked clots were observed in the dialyzers. Substitution of heparin with the low molecular weight heparin dalteparin had no effect. Switching from anticoagulation to the heparinoid danaparoid resulted in immediate disappearance of all adverse effects, and further long-term HD was uneventful. HIT II was diagnosed clinically; heparin-induced platelet activation test (HIPA) and serum IgG, IgA, and IgM to heparin-platelet factor 4 complexes (HPF4) were both negative. We conclude that HIT II may occur in children on HD. HIT II is essentially a clinical diagnosis, as HIPA and antibodies to HPF4 are not always positive. Once HIT II is suspected, heparin (and low-molecular-weight heparins) should be stopped immediately. Long-term anticoagulation with danaparoid is a valuable option for patients on HD. PMID:10955913

  12. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  13. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  14. Gramicidin-induced hexagonal H/sub II/ phase formation in erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, H.; Leunissen-Bijvelt, J.; Haest, C.W.M.; de Gier, J.; Kruij, B.

    1987-10-20

    Using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and freeze-fracture electron microscopic (FFEM) techniques, it is shown that gramicidin induces a hexagonal H/sub II/ phase not only in liposomes prepared from total lipids extracted from human erythrocytes but also in isolated human erythrocyte membranes (white ghosts). A 37/sup 0/C, H/sub II/ phase formation is detected at a gramicidin to phospholipid molar ratio exceeding 1:80. The gramicidin-induced H/sub II/ phase exhibits a very small /sup 31/P chemical shift anisotropy indicating decreased head-group order, and it displays a temperature-dependent increase in tube diameter from 60.2 A at 4/sup 0/C to 64.2 A at 37/sup 0/C in ghosts and from 62.8 to 69.4 A at 37/sup 0/C in total lipid extracts, both in the presence of 1 mol of gramicidin/10 mol of phospholipid. /sup 31/P NMR data indicate that the H/sub II/ phase formation by gramicidin is temperature dependent and show the gradual disappearance of the H/sub II/ phase at low temperatures resulting in a bilayer type of /sup 31/P NMR line shape at 4/sup 0/C, whereas SAXS and FFEM data suggest equal amounts of H/sub II/ phases at all temperatures. The induction of the H/sub II/ phase by gramicidin is specific in that N-formylation of the four tryptophan residues of gramicidin completely blocks the hexagonal (H/sub II/) phase inducing ability of the peptide. The striking parallel between hexagonal H/sub II/ phase induction and the enhancement of lysophosphatidylcholine and palmitoylcarnitine transbilayer reorientation by gramicidin as well the lack of effect of the formylated gramicidin strongly suggests the H/sub II/ phase formation and flip enhancement are mechanistically related phenomena. It is suggested that the formation of gramicidin aggregates of specific structure which are intermediates in H/sub II/ phase formation leads to enhancement of transbilayer reorientation of phospholipids.

  15. The SOD mimic MnTM-2-PyP(5+) reduces hyaluronan degradation-induced inflammation in mouse articular chondrocytes stimulated with Fe (II) plus ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; D'Ascola, Angela; Scuruchi, Michele; Nastasi, Giancarlo; Micali, Antonio; Puzzolo, Domenico; Pisani, Antonina; Calatroni, Alberto; Campo, Salvatore

    2013-08-01

    In pathological conditions, oxidative burst generates hyaluronan (HA) fragmentation with a consequent increase in the number of small HA oligosaccharides. These fragments are able to stimulate an inflammatory response in different cell types by activating the CD44 and the toll-like receptors 4 (TLR-4) and 2 (TLR-2). The stimulation of CD44 and TLRs in turn activates the NF-kB which induces the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators that amplify and perpetuate inflammation. We aimed to study the antioxidant effect of the SOD mimic, synthetic manganese porphyrin, Mn(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTM-2-PyP(5+)) on preventing HA degradation in mouse articular chondrocytes stimulated with Fe (II) plus ascorbate. Fe (II) plus ascorbate stimulation induced oxidative burst confirmed by high levels of hydroxyl radical/peroxynitrite production, increased lipid peroxidation and HA degradation. HA fragments highly induced mRNA expression and the related protein production of CD44, TLR-4 and TLR-2, NF-kB activation and significantly up-regulated the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and other pro-inflammatory mediators, i.e. matrix metalloprotease 13 (MMP-13) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Treatment of cells with MnTM-2-PyP(5+)was able to attenuate oxidative burst, HA degradation and NF-kB activation, and markedly decreased mRNA expression of CD44, and TLRs and the related protein synthesis, as well as the levels of up-regulated inflammatory mediators. Adding a specific HA-blocking peptide (PEP-1) to cells significantly reduced all the inflammatory parameters up-regulated by Fe (II) plus ascorbate, and increased MnTM-2-PyP(5+) activity. These findings suggest that HA degradation plays a key role in the initial inflammatory response of cartilage and antioxidants and could be a useful tool to prevent the propagation of this mechanism. PMID:23692848

  16. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma.

  17. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma. PMID:26073245

  18. The role of mAKAPβ in the process of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huixin; Liu, Baoxin; Hou, Lei; The, Erlinda; Li, Gang; Wang, Dongzhi; Jie, Qiqiang; Che, Wenliang; Wei, Yidong

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the central product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and this octapeptide contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. mAKAPβ is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that has the function of binding to the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) and confining the holoenzyme to discrete locations within the cell. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of mAKAPβ in AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the possible mechanisms involved. Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were treated with AngII. Subsequently, the morphology of the cardiomyocytes was observed and the expression of mAKAPβ and cardiomyocyte hypertrophic markers was measured. mAKAPβ‑shRNA was constructed for RNA interference; the expression of mAKAPβ and hypertrophic markers, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate in the AngII‑treated rat cardiomyocytes were detected following RNA interference. Simultaneously, changes in the expression levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK)2 in the cardiomyocytes were assessed. The cell size of the AngII-treated cardiaomyocytes was significantly larger than that of the untreated cardiomyocytes. The expression of hypertrophic markers and p-ERK2, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate were all significantly increased in the AngII‑treated cells. However, the expression of mAKAPβ remained unaltered in this process. RNA interference simultaneously inhibited the protein expression of mAKAPβ and p‑ERK2, and the hypertrophy of the cardiomyocytes induced by AngII was attenuated. These results demonstrate that AngII induces hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes, and mAKAPβ is possibly involved in this process. The effects of mAKAPβ on AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy may be associated with p-ERK2 expression.

  19. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Xiao, Qiong; Peng, XiaoHua; Wang, HaiJing

    2011-12-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  20. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chang, Yi-Chuang; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling; Chen, Chang-Yu

    2012-03-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  1. Improving vagal activity ameliorates cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II: in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ning; Lu, Yi; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yong-hua; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is characterized by overactivity of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and withdrawal of vagal activity. We hypothesized that improving vagal activity could attenuate cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vivo and in vitro. Rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction (AAC) with or without pyridostigmine (PYR) (31 mg/kg/d). After 8 weeks, PYR significantly decreased Ang II level, AT1 protein expression, and collagen deposition in cardiac tissue and improved heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac function, which were abolished by atropine. In vitro, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) with Ang II (10−7 M) increased cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and secretory properties, which were significantly diminished by acetylcholine (ACh, 10−6 M). Subsequently, Ang II significantly increased collagen type I expression as well as metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression and activity. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression and Smad3 phosphorylation presented a similar trend. Notably, the knockdown of the acetylcholine M2 receptor by siRNA could abolish ACh anti-fibrotic action. These data implicated cholinesterase inhibitor can increase vagal activity and reduce local Ang II level, and ACh inhibit Ang II pro-fibrotic effects. Our findings suggested that the parasympathetic nervous system can serve as a promising target for cardiac remodeling treatment. PMID:26596640

  2. Angiotensin II stimulates internalization and degradation of arterial myocyte plasma membrane BK channels to induce vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Leo, M. Dennis; Bulley, Simon; Bannister, John P.; Kuruvilla, Korah P.; Narayanan, Damodaran

    2015-01-01

    Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that modulate arterial contractility. In arterial myocytes, β1 subunits are stored within highly mobile rab11A-positive recycling endosomes. In contrast, BKα subunits are primarily plasma membrane-localized. Trafficking pathways for BKα and whether physiological stimuli that regulate arterial contractility alter BKα localization in arterial myocytes are unclear. Here, using biotinylation, immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer (immunoFRET) microscopy, and RNAi-mediated knockdown, we demonstrate that rab4A-positive early endosomes traffic BKα to the plasma membrane in myocytes of resistance-size cerebral arteries. Angiotensin II (ANG II), a vasoconstrictor, reduced both surface and total BKα, an effect blocked by bisindolylmaleimide-II, concanavalin A, and dynasore, protein kinase C (PKC), internalization, and endocytosis inhibitors, respectively. In contrast, ANG II did not reduce BKα mRNA, and sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor, did not alter surface BKα protein over the same time course. MG132 and bafilomycin A, proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors, respectively, also inhibited the ANG II-induced reduction in surface and total BKα, resulting in intracellular BKα accumulation. ANG II-mediated BK channel degradation reduced BK currents in isolated myocytes and functional responses to iberiotoxin, a BK channel blocker, and NS1619, a BK activator, in pressurized (60 mmHg) cerebral arteries. These data indicate that rab4A-positive early endosomes traffic BKα to the plasma membrane in arterial myocytes. We also show that ANG II stimulates PKC-dependent BKα internalization and degradation. These data describe a unique mechanism by which ANG II inhibits arterial myocyte BK currents, by reducing surface channel number, to induce vasoconstriction. PMID:26179602

  3. Mononuclear and Oligonuclear Manganese Complexes with Organic Multidentate Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuriya, Masahiro

    The crystal structures of manganese complexes with tridentate, tetradentate, pentadentate, hexadentate, and dodecadentate ligands with oxygen and nitrogen donors are described. Reactions of these ligands with manganese salts afforded mononuclear (MnII, MnIII, and MnIV), dinuclear (MnII2, MnIII2, and MnIIMnIII), trinuclear (MnIII3), and tetranuclear (MnII2MnIII2 and MnIII4) complexes. As for MnII complexes, octahedral, trigonal prismatic, capped trigonal prismatic, and square antiprismatic geometries were found depending on the combination of the organic and anionic ligands. In the case of MnIII complexes, the Jahn-Teller distortions due to the high-spin d4 electronic configuration were observed as elongated or compressed octahedral geometries. An octahedral geometry was confirmed for the Mn (IV) complexes.

  4. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Wenjian; Chen, Haiyang; Jiang, Jiandong; Kong, Weijia; Wang, Yiguang

    2010-01-15

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-{alpha}, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  5. Crystal structure and spectroscopic analysis of a new oxalate-bridged Mn(II) compound: catena-poly[guanidinium [[aqua-chlorido-manganese(II)]-μ2-oxalato-κ(4) O (1),O (2):O (1'),O (2')] monohydrate].

    PubMed

    Sehimi, Hiba; Chérif, Ichraf; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2016-05-01

    As part of our studies on the synthesis and the characterization of oxalate-bridged compounds M-ox-M (ox = oxalate dianion and M = transition metal ion), we report the crystal structure of a new oxalate-bridged Mn(II) phase, {(CH6N3)[Mn(C2O4)Cl(H2O)]·H2O} n . In the compound, a succession of Mn(II) ions (situated on inversion centers) adopting a distorted octa-hedral coordination and bridged by oxalate ligands forms parallel zigzag chains running along the c axis. These chains are inter-connected through O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions to form anionic layers parallel to (010). Individual layers are held together via strong hydrogen bonds involving the guanidinium cations (N-H⋯O and N-H⋯Cl) and the disordered non-coordinating water mol-ecule (O-H⋯O and O-H⋯Cl), as well as by guanidinium π-π stacking. The structural data were confirmed by IR and UV-Visible spectroscopic analysis. PMID:27308028

  6. 7-Methylsulfinylheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rose, P; Faulkner, K; Williamson, G; Mithen, R

    2000-11-01

    Watercress is an exceptionally rich dietary source of beta-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). This compound inhibits phase I enzymes, which are responsible for the activation of many carcinogens in animals, and induces phase II enzymes, which are associated with enhanced excretion of carcinogens. In this study, we show that watercress extracts are potent inducers of quinone reductase (QR) in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells, a widely adopted assay for measuring phase II enzyme induction. However, contrary to expectations, this induction was not associated with PEITC (which is rapidly lost to the atmosphere upon tissue disruption due to its volatility) or a naturally occurring PEITC-glutathione conjugate, but with 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates (ITCs). While it was confirmed that PEITC does induce QR (5 microM required for a two-fold induction in QR), 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs were more potent inducers (0.2 microM and 0.5 microM, respectively, required for a two-fold induction in QR). Thus, while watercress contains three times more phenylethyl glucosinolate than methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, ITCs derived from methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates may be more important phase II enzyme inducers than PEITC, having 10 - to 25-fold greater potency. Analysis of urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) following consumption of watercress demonstrated the presence of N:-acetylcysteine conjugates of 7-methylsulfinylheptyl, 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs and PEITC, indicating that these ITCs are taken up by the gut and metabolized in the body. Watercress may have exceptionally good anticarcinogenic potential, as it combines a potent inhibitor of phase I enzymes (PEITC) with at least three inducers of phase II enzymes (PEITC, 7-methylsulfinylheptyl ITC and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITC). The study also demonstrates the application of LC-MS for the detection of complex glucosinolate-derived metabolites in

  7. Method for dehydrating manganese dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, N.; Fuksa, R.

    1987-05-05

    A method is described for preparing a water-free lithium-manganese dioxide battery comprising: assembling the battery comprising lithium anode, a cathode comprising carbon and manganese dioxide, and a cell container; adding to the cell container a fluid containing a dehydrating agent which reacts with water bound to the manganese dioxide to form a reaction product that is extractable from the manganese dioxide; removing the fluid from the cell container; hermetically sealing and connecting the container to a vacuum source; establishing a vacuum within the compartment to pull off any remaining amount of the fluid and any volatile reaction product from the manganese dioxide; releasing the vacuum; and adding anhydrous electrolyte and hermetically sealing the cell.

  8. Degradation of humic acids by manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Clitocybula dusenii.

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    The depolymerization of humic acids (HAs) obtained from low-rank coal (lignite) to fulvic acids (FAs) was investigated in a cell-free system (in vitro) using manganese peroxidase (MnP) from the white-rot fungus Clitocybula dusenii b11. MnP was produced in surface cultures of C. dusenii which were induced with manganese (II) ions (Mn2+, 300 microM). The optimum conditions for the action of MnP were determined by varying following parameters of the enzyme assay: i) concentration of Mn2+, ii) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), iii) pH value and iv) temperature. Optimum parameters determined were used in subsequent in vitro depolymerization studies of humic acids. For that purpose, following parameters of the reaction mixture were additionally varied: concentration of HAs, concentration of the thiol mediator glutathione (GSH), presence and concentration of organic solvents. As the result, following parameters were found to be optimal for the MnP-catalyzed in vitro depolymerization of HAs into low-molecular weight FAs (MnP activity 0.12 U/ml): 250 micrograms/ml HAs, 1 mM MnCl2, 46 microM/min H2O2 (continuously supplied by glucose oxidase), 600 microM GSH, 4% (v/v) N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), pH 4.0, and 37 degrees C.

  9. ERK1/2 activation by angiotensin II inhibits insulin-induced glucose uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Yuki; Yoshizumi, Masanori; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ali, Nermin; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Obata, Toshiyuki; Ebina, Yousuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2005-08-15

    Clinical evidence suggests a relationship between hypertension and insulin resistance, and cross-talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin signaling pathways may take place. We now report the effect of Ang II on insulin-induced glucose uptake and its intracellular mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We examined the translocation of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucose uptake in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and Akt activities, and phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at the serine and tyrosine residues were measured by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. As a result, Ang II inhibited insulin-induced GLUT-4 translocation from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in RASMC. Ang II induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and IRS-1 phosphorylation at Ser307 and Ser616. Ang II-induced Ser307 and Ser616 phophorylation of IRS-1 was inhibited by a MEK inhibitor, PD98059, and a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Ang II inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosyl phophorylation and Akt activation were reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. Ang II inhibited insulin-induced glucose uptake, which was also reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. It is shown that Ang II-induced ERK1/2 activation inhibits insulin-dependent glucose uptake through serine phophorylation of IRS-1 in RASMC.

  10. Qiliqiangxin inhibits angiotensin II-induced transdifferentiation of rat cardiac fibroblasts through suppressing interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingmin; Jiang, Kun; Ding, Xuefeng; Fu, Mingqiang; Wang, Shijun; Zhu, Lingti; He, Tao; Wang, Jingfeng; Sun, Aijun; Hu, Kai; Chen, Li; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    Qiliqiangxin (QL), a traditional Chinese medicine, had long been used to treat chronic heart failure. Recent studies revealed that differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) into myofibroblasts played an important role in cardiac remodelling and development of heart failure, however, little was known about the underlying mechanism and whether QL treatment being involved. This study aimed to investigate the effects of QL on angiotensin II (AngII)-induced CFs transdifferentiation. Study was performed on in vitro cultured CFs from Sprague–Dawley rats. CFs differentiation was induced by AngII, which was attenuated by QL through reducing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our data showed that AngII-induced IL-6 mRNA as well as typeI and typeIII collagens were reduced by QL. IL-6 deficiency could suppress TGF-β1 and α-SMA, and both IL-6 siRNA and QL-mediated such effect was reversed by foresed expression of recombined IL-6. Increase in actin stress fibres reflected the process of CFs differentiation, we found stress fibres were enhanced after AngII stimulation, which was attenuated by pre-treating CFs with QL or IL-6 siRNA, and re-enhanced after rIL-6 treatment. Importantly, we showed that calcineurin-dependent NFAT3 nuclear translocation was essential to AngII-mediated IL-6 transcription, QL mimicked the effect of FK506, the calcineurin inhibitor, on suppression of IL-6 expression and stress fibres formation. Collectively, our data demonstrated the negative regulation of CFs differentiation by QL through an IL-6 transcriptional mechanism that depends on inhibition of calcineurin/NFAT3 signalling. PMID:25752645

  11. Paraquat-induced injury of type II alveolar cells. An in vitro model of oxidant injury

    SciTech Connect

    Skillrud, D.M.; Martin, W.J.

    1984-06-01

    Paraquat, a widely used herbicide, causes severe, often fatal lung damage. In vivo studies suggest the alveolar epithelial cells (types I and II) are specific targets of paraquat toxicity. This study used /sup 51/Cr-labeled type II cells to demonstrate that paraquat (10-5 M) resulted in type II cell injury in vitro, independent of interacting immune effector agents. With /sup 51/Cr release expressed as the cytotoxic index (Cl), type II cell injury was found to accelerate with increasing paraquat concentrations (10(-5) M, 10(-4) M, and 10(-3) M, resulting in a Cl of 12.5 +/- 2.2, 22.8 +/- 1.8, and 35.1 +/- 1.9, respectively). Paraquat-induced cytotoxicity (10(-4) M, with a Cl of 22.8 +/- 1.8) was effectively reduced by catalase 1,100 U/ml (Cl 8.0 +/- 3.2, p less than 0.001), superoxide dismutase, 300 U/ml (Cl 17.4 +/- 1.7, p less than 0.05), alpha tocopherol, 10 micrograms/ml (Cl 17.8 +/- 1.6, p less than 0.05). Paraquat toxicity (10(-3) M) was potentiated in the presence of 95% O2 with an increase in Cl from 31.1 +/- 1.7 to 36.4 +/- 2.3 (p less than 0.05). Paraquat-induced type II cell injury was noted as early as 4 h incubation by electron microscopic evidence of swelling of mitochondrial cristae and dispersion of nuclear chromatin. Thus, this in vitro model indicates that paraquat-induced type II cell injury can be quantified, confirmed by morphologic ultrastructural changes, significantly reduced by antioxidants, and potentiated by hyperoxia.

  12. Upregulation of M3 muscarinic receptor inhibits cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR) is stably expressed in the myocardium, but its pathophysiological role remains largely undefined. This study aimed to investigate the role of M3-mAChR in cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Cardiac-specific M3-mAChR overexpression transgenic (TG) mice and rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with ectopic expression of M3-mAChR were established. Models of cardiac hypertrophy were induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or Ang II infusion in the mice in vivo, and by isoproterenol (ISO) or Ang II treatment of H9c2 cells in vitro. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by electrocardiography (ECG) measurement, hemodynamic measurement and histological analysis. mRNA and protein expression were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results M3-mAChR was upregulated in hypertrophic heart, while M2-mAChR expression did not change significantly. M3-mAChR overexpression significantly attenuated the increased expression of atrial natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy chain induced by Ang II both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, M3-mAChR overexpression downregulated AT1 receptor expression and inhibited the activation of MAPK signaling in the heart. Conclusion The upregulation of M3-mAChR during myocardial hypertrophy could relieve the hypertrophic response provoked by Ang II, and the mechanism may involve the inhibition of MAPK signaling through the downregulation of AT1 receptor. PMID:24028210

  13. SIRT1 Functions as an Important Regulator of Estrogen-Mediated Cardiomyocyte Protection in Angiotensin II-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Ding, Ling; Ruan, Yang; Qin, Weiwei; Lin, Yajun; Xi, Chao; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Zhu, Yuping; Cao, Yuan; Man, Yong; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Shu; Xiao, Chuanshi; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a member of the sirtuin family, which could activate cell survival machinery and has been shown to be protective in regulation of heart function. Here, we determined the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates Angiotensin II- (AngII-) induced cardiac hypertrophy and injury in vivo and in vitro. Methods. We analyzed SIRT1 expression in the hearts of control and AngII-induced mouse hypertrophy. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and pretreated with 17β-estradiol to measure SIRT1 expression. Protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte surface area analysis, qRT-PCR, TUNEL staining, and Western blot were performed on AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy samples and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) to investigate the function of SIRT1. Results. SIRT1 expression was slightly upregulated in AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. SIRT1 overexpression relieves AngII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. 17β-Estradiol was able to protect cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced injury with a profound upregulation of SIRT1 and activation of AMPK. Moreover, estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI 182,780 and SIRT1 inhibitor niacinamide could block SIRT1's protective effect. Conclusions. These results indicate that SIRT1 functions as an important regulator of estrogen-mediated cardiomyocyte protection during AngII-induced heart hypertrophy and injury. PMID:25614777

  14. Role of T lymphocytes in collagen II-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L.; Holmdahl, R.; Larsson, E.; Wigzell, H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of T lymphocytes in collagen II induced arthritis in rats has been investigated. Functional T cells were needed for the development of arthritis since none out of 14 nude rats injected with collagen type II developed arthritis, whereas 11 out of 14 of their normal counterparts did. With the help of antibodies specific for Ia antigens and different T cell subsets in the rats, an immunohistochemical method was used to demonstrate that T cells, predominantly of `helper' type and anti-Ia reactive non-T cells were abundant in the arthritic synovial tissue. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:6219836

  15. Electrochemistry of copper(II) induced complexes in mycorrhizal maize plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Merlos, Miguel-Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Ferrol, Nuria; Pohanka, Miroslav; Hubalek, Jaromir; Zehnalek, Josef; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2012-02-15

    Aim of the present paper was to study the electrochemical behavior of copper(II) induced complexes in extracts obtained from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) plants grown at two concentrations of copper(II): physiological (31.7 ng/mL) and toxic (317 μg/mL). Protein content was determined in the plant extracts and, after dilution to proper concentration, various concentrations of copper(II) ions (0, 100, 200 and 400 μg/mL) were added and incubated for 1h at 37°C. Further, the extracts were analyzed using flow injection analysis with electrochemical detection. The hydrodynamic voltammogram (HDV), which was obtained for each sample, indicated the complex creation. Steepness of measured dependencies was as follows: control 317 μg/mL of copperII) ions to upper parts of a plant by means of adsorbing of copper(II) in roots. Rapid complex formation was determined under applied potentials 300, 500 and 600 mV during the measuring HDVs. It was also verified that mycorrhizal colonization reduced root to shoot translocation of Cu(II) ions.

  16. Angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 is a major endogenous source of oxidative stress in kidney tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Tae-Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Moon, Ju-Young

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) oxidase leads to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), an important intracellular second messenger in renal disease. Recent findings suggest that Ang II induces mitochondrial depolarization and further amplifies mitochondrial generation of ROS. We examined the hypothesis that ROS injury mediated by Ang II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 plays a pivotal role in mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular cells and is related to cell survival. In addition, we assessed whether angiotensin (1-7) peptide (Ang-(1-7)) was able to counteract Ang II-induced ROS-mediated cellular injury. Cultured NRK-52E cells were stimulated with 10(-6) M Ang II for 24 h with or without Ang-(1-7) or apocynin. Ang II simulated mitochondrial Nox4 and resulted in the abrupt production of mitochondrial superoxide (O(2) (-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Ang II also induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytosolic secretion of cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Ang-(1-7) attenuated Ang II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 expression and apoptosis, and its effect was comparable to that of the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor. These findings suggest that Ang II-induced activation of mitochondrial Nox4 is an important endogenous source of ROS, and is related to cell survival. The ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis should be investigated further as a novel target of Ang II-mediated ROS injury.

  17. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y.; Simpson, Michael A.; Chong, W. K.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Woltjer, Randy L.; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M.; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R.; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A. M.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C.; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Enns, Caroline A.; Hayflick, Susan J.; Clayton, Peter T.; Mills, Philippa B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  18. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y; Simpson, Michael A; Chong, W K; Jacques, Thomas S; Woltjer, Randy L; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A M; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A; Enns, Caroline A; Hayflick, Susan J; Clayton, Peter T; Mills, Philippa B; Kurian, Manju A; Wilson, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  19. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  3. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. PMID:26830585

  4. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes.

  5. Glycogen accumulation in alveolar type II cells in 3-methylindole--induced pulmonary edema in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Atwal, O. S.; Bray, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    The present study shows that intravenous infusion of 3-methylindole (3MI) induced acute pulmonary edema in goats. Edematous changes were seen in the alveoli and the interalveolar interstitium. At 72 hours after treatment, an accumulation of glycogen that had a pathognomonic appearance of alpha particles was observed in the alveolar Type II cells. A rich accumulation of glycogen particles and defective lamellar bodies containing triglycerides were the significant morphologic changes in the alveolar Type II cells. These findings suggest that massive glycogen deposition in the alveolar Type II cells is a defect that might interfere with surfactant production, further complicating the disease process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6274198

  6. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  7. Manganese Complexes of 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA): The First Nitrogen Bound Transition Metal Complex of PTA

    SciTech Connect

    Frost,B.; Bautista, C.; Huang, R.; Shearer, J.

    2006-01-01

    The structures of two manganese(II) complexes of 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA) reveal the first transition-metal complexes of PTA in which the metal preferentially coordinates to a nitrogen and not the phosphorus of PTA. The coordination environment about the manganese was probed using X-ray crystallography (solid state) and EXAFS spectroscopy (solution).

  8. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors.

  9. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors. PMID:27401876

  10. Manganese reduction and its stabilization in the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Savalia, P.; Kocar, B. D.; Webb, S. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese oxides are abundant and highly reactive electron acceptors present within many environments. Their occurance is intimately tied to the availability of oxygen, as only O2 and oxygen-derived species such as superoxide and peroxide can oxidize reduced Mn(II). Because Mn2+ is soluble and Mn3+ and Mn4+ readily undergo hydrolysis to form insoluble precipitates, the record of manganese in sedimentary deposits can yield interesting insights into the history of atmospheric oxygen--the largest manganese deposits in Earth history (approximately 2.2 billion years ago) are associated with the rise of oxygen. From studying modern environments, we understand that manganese is concentrated in sediments by the oxidation and deposition of Mn(IV) minerals; however, our observations of the geologic record show diagenetic stabilization of only Mn(II) carbonate or mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) oxide minerals--all Mn(IV)-oxide phases in ancient samples are associated with modern weathering and oxidation processes. Reduction is a key element within the manganese cycle, yet the (bio)geochemical processes responsible for the formation of mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) minerals have not been fully elucidated. To better understand how manganese is converted from insoluble Mn(IV) oxide to these Mn(II/III)-bearing phases, we investigated secondary mineral precipitates which form during and after Mn(IV)-oxide reduction using a well-studied metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. To examine changes in Mn mineralogy and oxidation state during the progression of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution/transformation by S. oneidensis, we utilized a flow through reactor system allowing for in-situ and real time x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. We also confirmed mineral phases using XRD and FTIR spectrometry. Our experiments reveal that when solution phosphate concentrations are high, a Mn(II) phosphate phase quickly forms as a secondary precipitate during complete reduction of Mn(IV) oxides

  11. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  12. Systematic identification of type I and type II interferon-induced antiviral factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, David Jesse; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Lu, Sun; Cheng, Genhong

    2012-03-13

    Type I and type II interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that establish the cellular antiviral state through the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We sought to understand the basis of the antiviral activity induced by type I and II IFNs in relation to the functions of their ISGs. Based on gene expression studies, we systematically identified antiviral ISGs by performing blinded, functional screens on 288 type I and type II ISGs. We assessed and validated the antiviral activity of these ISGs against an RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and a DNA virus, murine gammaherpes virus (MHV-68). Overall, we identified 34 ISGs that elicited an antiviral effect on the replication of either one or both viruses. Fourteen ISGs have uncharacterized antiviral functions. We further defined ISGs that affect critical life-cycle processes in expression of VSV protein and MHV-68 immediate-early genes. Two previously undescribed antiviral ISGs, TAP1 and BMP2, were further validated. TAP1-deficient fibroblasts were more susceptible to VSV infection but less so to MHV-68 infection. On the other hand, exogenous BMP2 inhibits MHV-68 lytic growth but did not affect VSV growth. These results delineate common and distinct sets of type I and type II IFN-induced genes as well as identify unique ISGs that have either broad or specific antiviral effects on these viruses. PMID:22371602

  13. [Extracorporeal circulation with danaparoid sodium for valve replacement in thrombocytopenia induced by type II heparin].

    PubMed

    Salmi, L; Leroy-Matheron, C; LeBesnerais, P; Rosanval, O; Duvaldestin, P; Gouault-Heilmann, M

    2001-11-01

    A type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) was diagnosed in a 64-year-old woman at day 20 of intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) therapy, given after myocardial infarction treated by angioplasty and intracoronary stent. The infarction was complicated by a mitral insufficiency that led to a mitral valve replacement. Cardiopulmonary bypass was successfully performed with sodium danaparoid (Orgaran), as an alternative to UFH, without thrombotic or haemorrhagic complications and the follow-up was uneventful. PMID:11759322

  14. Manganese import is a key element of the OxyR response to hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anjem, Adil; Varghese, Shery; Imlay, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Very little manganese is imported into Escherichia coli under routine growth conditions: the import system is weakly expressed, the manganese content is low, and a manganese-dependent enzyme is not correctly metallated. Mutants that lack MntH, the importer, grow at wild-type rates, indicating that manganese plays no critical role. However, MntH supports the growth of iron-deficient cells, suggesting that manganese can substitute for iron in activating at least some metalloenzymes. MntH is also strongly induced when cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. This adaptation is essential, as E. coli cannot tolerate peroxide stress if mntH is deleted. Other workers have observed that manganese improves the ability of a variety of microbes to tolerate oxidative stress, and the prevailing hypothesis is that manganese does so by chemically scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. We found that manganese does not protect peroxide-stressed cells by scavenging peroxide. Instead, the beneficial effects of manganese correlate with its ability to metallate mononuclear enzymes. Because iron-loaded enzymes are vulnerable to the Fenton reaction, the substitution of manganese may prevent protein damage. Accordingly, during H2O2 stress, mutants that cannot import manganese and/or are unable to sequester iron suffer high rates of protein oxidation. PMID:19400769

  15. A Food-Derived Flavonoid Luteolin Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Atsuko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Toshihiro; Sumida, Tomokazu; Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Tadashi; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in cardiac remodeling (cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy), which impairs cardiac function and metabolism; therefore, it is anticipated antioxidative compounds will have protective properties against cardiac remodeling. Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a widely distributed flavonoid found in many herbal extracts including celery, green pepper, perilla leaves and seeds, and chamomile, is a known to be a potent antioxidant and was previously demonstrated to exert an antifibrotic effect in the lungs and the liver. In this study, we clearly demonstrate that oral pretreatment with the higher-luteolin diet (0.035% (wt/wt)) protected against cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy as well as a hyperoxidative state in Ang II-infused rats. In cardiac tissue, increased gene expression levels of TGFβ1, CTGF, Nox2, Nox4, ANP, and BNP induced by Ang II were restored by oral pretreatment of this high-luteolin diet. In cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts, H2O2-induced TGFβ1 expression and the phosphorylation of JNK were suppressed by luteolin pretreatment. In conclusion, food-derived luteolin has protective actions against Ang II-induced cardiac remodeling, which could be mediated through attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:26327560

  16. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  17. Enhanced biosorption of mercury(II) and cadmium(II) by cold-induced hydrophobic exobiopolymer secreted from the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07.

    PubMed

    Zamil, Sheikh Shawkat; Choi, Mun Hwan; Song, Jung Hyun; Park, Hyunju; Xu, Ju; Chi, Ki-Whan; Yoon, Sung Chul

    2008-09-01

    The cells of psychrotrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 were found to secrete large amounts of exobiopolymer (EBP) composed of mainly hydrophobic (water insoluble) polypeptide(s) (as contain approximately 50 mol% hydrophobic amino acids, lacking cysteine residue) when grown on fructose containing limited M1 medium at the temperatures as low as 0-10 degrees C but trace amount at high (30 degrees C, optimum growth) temperature. Two types of nonliving BM07 cells (i.e., cells grown at 30 degrees C and 10 degrees C) as well as the freeze-dried EBP were compared for biosorption of mercury (Hg(II)) and cadmium (Cd(II)). The optimum adsorption pH was found 7 for Hg(II) but 6 for Cd(II), irrespective of the type of biomass. Equilibrium adsorption data well fitted the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption (Q(max)) was 72.3, 97.4, and 286.2 mg Hg(II)/g dry biomass and 18.9, 27.0, and 61.5 mg Cd(II)/g dry biomass for cells grown at 30 degrees C and 10 degrees C and EBP, respectively, indicating major contribution of heavy metal adsorption by cold-induced EBP. Mercury(II) binding induced a significant shift of infrared (IR) amide I and II absorption of EBP whereas cadmium(II) binding showed only a very little shift. These IR shifts demonstrate that mercury(II) and cadmium(II) might have different binding sites in EBP, which was supported by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric analysis and sorption results of chemically modified biomasses. This study implies that the psychrotrophs like BM07 strain may play an important role in the bioremediation of heavy metals in the temperate regions especially in the inactive cold season. PMID:18679675

  18. Bacterial contribution to manganese oxidation in a deep coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenborn, H. M.; Paquin, Y.; Chateauneuf, G.

    1985-12-01

    The characteristics of Mn(II) removal from sediment porewater and the potential role of manganese-oxidizing bacteria in this process were examined in sediments from a 335-m deep station in the Laurentian Trough of the St. Lawrence estuary. Manganese-oxidizing bacteria were most abundant in the thin layer of oxidized surface sediment, where Mn(II) removal rates were also fastest. The first-order rate constants for Mn(II) removal decreased from 1·2 × 10 3 day -1 to 6·6 day -1 over the first 30-mm depth. In experimental slurries, sediments removed Mn(II) from reduced zone porewater by a two-step process: a rapid saturation of Mn(II) binding sites was followed by a slower O 2-enhanced removal rate which paralleled the apparent rate of Mn(II) oxidation. Sodium azide and mercuric chloride were tested specifically for their usefulness as bacterial poisons in sediment slurry systems. Sodium azide interfered with Mn(II) removal at low concentrations and was not an effective poison. Mercuric chloride inhibited bacterial activity at concentrations far lower than those at which significant interference of Mn(II) removal occurred. The response of sediment slurries treated with mercuric chloride indicated that the initial oxidation of sorbed Mn(II) was not bacterially-mediated under the experimental conditions tested.

  19. Statin Treatment in Hypercholesterolemic Men Does Not Attenuate Angiotensin II-Induced Venoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Christoph; Guenther, Kristina; Hermann, Cosima; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Schroeder, Christoph; Haufe, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies suggested that statins attenuate vascular AT1 receptor responsiveness. Moreover, the augmented excessive pressor response to systemic angiotensin II infusions in hypercholesterolemic patients was normalized with statin treatment. In 12 hypercholesterolemic patients, we tested the hypothesis that statin treatment attenuates angiotensin II-mediated vasoconstriction in hand veins assessed by a linear variable differential transducer. Subjects ingested daily doses of either atorvastatin (40 mg) or positive control irbesartan (150 mg) for 30 days in a randomized and cross-over fashion. Ang II–induced venoconstriction at minute 4 averaged 59%±10% before and 28%±9% after irbesartan (mean ± SEM; P<0.05) compared to 65%±11% before and 73%±11% after 30 days of atorvastatin treatment. Plasma angiotensin levels increased significantly after irbesartan treatment (Ang II: 17±22 before vs 52±40 pg/mL after [p = 0.048]; Ang-(1–7): 18±10 before vs 37±14 pg/mL after [p = 0.002]) compared to atorvastatin treatment (Ang II: 9±4 vs 11±10 pg/mL [p = 0.40]; Ang-(1–7): 24±9 vs 32±8 pg/mL [p = 0.023]). Our study suggests that statin treatment does not elicit major changes in angiotensin II-mediated venoconstriction or in circulating angiotensin II levels whereas angiotensin-(1–7) levels increased modestly. The discrepancy between local vascular and systemic angiotensin II responses might suggest that statin treatment interferes with blood pressure buffering reflexes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00154024 PMID:25264877

  20. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease. PMID:26943326

  1. Ultrasonic cavitation induced water in vegetable oil emulsion droplets--a simple and easy technique to synthesize manganese zinc ferrite nanocrystals with improved magnetization.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Manickam; Towata, Atsuya; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Iida, Yasuo; Maiorov, Michail M; Blums, Elmars; Bhattacharya, Dipten; Sivakumar, Neelagesi; Ashok, M

    2012-05-01

    In the present investigation, synthesis of manganese zinc ferrite (Mn(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4)) nanoparticles with narrow size distribution have been prepared using ultrasound assisted emulsion (consisting of rapeseed oil as an oil phase and aqueous solution of Mn(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) acetates) and evaporation processes. The as-prepared ferrite was nanocrystalline. In order to remove the small amount of oil present on the surface of the ferrite, it was subjected to heat treatment at 300 °C for 3h. Both the as-prepared and heat treated ferrites have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), TGA/DTA, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. As-prepared ferrite is of 20 nm, whereas the heat treated ferrite shows the size of 33 nm. In addition, magnetic properties of the as-prepared as well as the heat treated ferrites have also been carried out and the results of which show that the spontaneous magnetization (σ(s)) of the heat treated sample (24.1 emu/g) is significantly higher than that of the as-synthesized sample (1.81 emu/g). The key features of this method are avoiding (a) the cumbersome conditions that exist in the conventional methods; (b) usage of necessary additive components (stabilizers or surfactants, precipitants) and (c) calcination requirements. In addition, rapeseed oil as an oil phase has been used for the first time, replacing the toxic and troublesome organic nonpolar solvents. As a whole, this simple straightforward sonochemical approach results in more phase pure system with improved magnetization.

  2. Manganese status, gut endogenous losses of manganese, and antioxidant enzyme activity in rats fed varying levels of manganese and fat.

    PubMed

    Malecki, E A; Huttner, D L; Greger, J L

    1994-07-01

    We hypothesized that manganese deficient animals fed high vs moderate levels of polyunsaturated fat would either manifest evidence of increased oxidative stress or would experience compensatory changes in antioxidant enzymes and/or shifts in manganese utilization that result in decreased endogenous gut manganese losses. Rats (females in Study 1, males in Study 2, n = 8/treatment) were fed diets that contained 5 or 20% corn oil by weight and either 0.01 or 1.5 mumol manganese/g diet. In study 2, 54Mn complexed to albumin was injected into the portal vein to assess gut endogenous losses of manganese. The manganese deficient rats: 1. Had 30-50% lower liver, tibia, kidney, spleen, and pancreas manganese concentrations than manganese adequate rats; 2. Conserved manganese through approximately 70-fold reductions in endogenous fecal losses of manganese; 3. Had lower heart manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity; and 4. Experienced only two minor compensatory changes in the activity of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Gut endogenous losses of manganese tended to account for a smaller proportion of absorbed manganese in rats fed high-fat diets; otherwise fat intake had few effects on tissue manganese concentrations. PMID:7986658

  3. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  5. Fibulin-2 is essential for angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis mediated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaukat A; Dong, Hailong; Joyce, Jennifer; Sasaki, Takako; Chu, Mon-Li; Tsuda, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Fibrosis is an ominous pathological process in failing myocardium, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We recently reported that loss of an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, fibulin-2, protected against ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in association with absence of activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling and suppressed upregulation of ECM protein expression during myocardial remodeling. Here we investigated the role of fibulin-2 in the development of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by continuous pressor-dosage of angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. Both wild type (WT) and fibulin-2 null (Fbln2KO) mice developed comparable hypertension and myocardial hypertrophy by Ang II infusion. However, myocardial fibrosis with significant upregulation of collagen type I and III mRNA was only seen in WT but not in Fbln2KO mice.Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and its downstream signal, Smad2, were significantly upregulated in WT by Ang II, whereas there were no Ang II-induced changes in Flbn2KO, suggesting fibulin-2 is necessary for Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling that induces myocardial fibrosis. To test whether fibulin-2 is sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β upregulation, isolated Flbn2KO cardiac fibroblasts were treated with Ang II after transfecting with fibulin-2 expression vector or pretreating with recombinant fibulin-2 protein. Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling in Fbln2KO cells was partially rescued by exogenous fibulin-2, suggesting that fibulin-2 is required and probably sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β activation. Smad2 phosphorylation was induced just by adding recombinant fibulin-2 to KO cells, suggesting that extracellular interaction between fibulin-2 and latent TGF-β triggered initial TGF-β activation. Our study indicates that Ang II cannot induce TGF-β activation without fibulin-2 and that fibulin-2 has an essential role in Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling and subsequent myocardial

  6. Tumor Necrosis Factor: A Mechanistic Link between Angiotensin-II-Induced Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Trial, JoAnn; Wang, Yanlin; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion induced the uptake of monocytic fibroblast precursors that initiated the development of cardiac fibrosis; these cells and concurrent fibrosis were absent in mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1 (TNFR1). We now investigated their cellular origin and temporal uptake, and the involvement of TNFR1 in monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation. Methods and Results Within a day, Ang-II induced a pro-inflammatory environment characterized by production of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and TH1-interleukins and uptake of bone marrow-derived M1-cells. After a week, the cardiac environment changed to profibrotic with growth-factor and TH2-interleukin synthesis, uptake of bone marrow-derived M2-cells, and presence of M2-related fibroblasts. TNFR1 signaling was not necessary for early M1 uptake, but its absence diminished the amount of M2-cells. TNFR1-KO hearts also showed reduced levels of cytokine expression, but not of TH-related lymphokines. Reconstitution of wild-type bone marrow into TNFR1-KO mice was sufficient to restore M2 uptake, upregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic genes, and development of fibrosis in response to Ang-II. We also developed an in vitro mouse monocyte-to-fibroblast-maturation assay that confirmed the essential role of TNFR1 in the sequential progression of monocyte activation and fibroblast formation. Conclusions Development of cardiac fibrosis in response to Ang-II was mediated by myeloid precursors and consisted of two stages. A primary M1 inflammatory response was followed by a subsequent M2 fibrotic response. While the first phase appeared to be independent of TNFR1 signaling, the later phase (and development of fibrosis) was abrogated by deletion of TNFR1. PMID:25550440

  7. Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases.

    PubMed

    Okafuji, Asako; Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kaiser, Gebhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Bacher, Adelbert; Hidema, Jun; Teranishi, Mika; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa has been examined by UV/Vis and pulsed Davies-type electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, and the results compared with structure-known class I enzymes, CPD photolyase and (6-4) photolyase. By ENDOR spectroscopy, the local environment of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor is probed by virtue of proton hyperfine couplings that report on the electron-spin density at the positions of magnetic nuclei. Despite the amino-acid sequence dissimilarity as compared to class I enzymes, the results indicate similar binding motifs for FAD in the class II photolyases. Furthermore, the photoreduction kinetics starting from the FAD cofactor in the fully oxidized redox state, FAD(ox), have been probed by UV/Vis spectroscopy. In Escherichia coli (class I) CPD photolyase, light-induced generation of FADH from FAD(ox), and subsequently FADH(-) from FADH, proceeds in a step-wise fashion via a chain of tryptophan residues. These tryptophans are well conserved among the sequences and within all known structures of class I photolyases, but completely lacking from the equivalent positions of class II photolyase sequences. Nevertheless, class II photolyases show photoreduction kinetics similar to those of the class I enzymes. We propose that a different, but also effective, electron-transfer cascade is conserved among the class II photolyases. The existence of such electron transfer pathways is supported by the observation that the catalytically active fully reduced flavin state obtained by photoreduction is maintained even under oxidative conditions in all three classes of enzymes studied in this contribution. PMID:20227927

  8. Selective modulation of MHC class II chaperons by a novel IFN-γ-inducible class II transactivator variant in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Bau-Lin; Li, Chia-Hsuan; Chang, Chien-Chung

    2013-10-11

    Class II transactivator (CIITA) plays a critical role in controlling major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene expression. In this study, two novel alternatively spliced variants of human interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible CIITA, one missing exon 7 (CIITAΔE7), the other with TAG inserted at exon 4/5 junction (CIITA-TAG), were identified and characterized. Both variants are naturally occurring since they are present in primary cells. Unlike CIITA-TAG, CIITAΔE7 is expressed more abundantly in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than in the non-transformed counterpart BEAS-2B cells following IFN-γ stimulation. Transfection experiments showed that CIITAΔE7 induced a markedly lower level of surface HLA-DR, -DP, -DQ expression than CIITA-TAG in A549 cells but not in BEAS-2B cells, although both variants elicited similar amounts of total DR, DP, and DQ proteins. This differential effect was correlated with, in A549 cells, decreased expression of Ii and HLA-DM genes, along with increased expression of HLA-DO genes. Ii and HLA-DM are chaperons assisting in HLA class II assembly, while HLA-DO functions to inhibit endosomal peptide loading and HLA class II membrane transport. These findings raise the possibility that CIITAΔE7 interacts with unknown cancer-associated factors to selectively modulate genes involved in the assembly and transport of HLA class II molecules.

  9. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1-4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  10. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1–4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  11. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular remodeling induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Yamato; Elliott, Katherine J; Tilley, Douglas G; Davisson, Robin L; Park, Joon-Young; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms by which angiotensin II (AngII) elevates blood pressure and enhances end-organ damage seem to be distinct. However, the signal transduction cascade by which AngII specifically mediates vascular remodeling such as medial hypertrophy and perivascular fibrosis remains incomplete. We have previously shown that AngII-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), and that this signaling is required for vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy but not for contractile signaling in response to AngII. Recent studies have implicated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hypertension. Interestingly, EGFR is capable of inducing ER stress. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of EGFR and ER stress are critical components required for vascular remodeling but not hypertension induced by AngII. Mice were infused with AngII for 2 weeks with or without treatment of EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, or ER chaperone, 4-phenylbutyrate. AngII infusion induced vascular medial hypertrophy in the heart, kidney and aorta, and perivascular fibrosis in heart and kidney, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension. Treatment with erlotinib as well as 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated vascular remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy but not hypertension. In addition, AngII infusion enhanced ADAM17 expression, EGFR activation, and ER/oxidative stress in the vasculature, which were diminished in both erlotinib-treated and 4-phenylbutyrate-treated mice. ADAM17 induction and EGFR activation by AngII in vascular cells were also prevented by inhibition of EGFR or ER stress. In conclusion, AngII induces vascular remodeling by EGFR activation and ER stress via a signaling mechanism involving ADAM17 induction independent of hypertension.

  12. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

  13. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  14. Reduced proximal tubule angiotensin II receptor expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Burns, K D; Harris, R C

    1994-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by alterations in the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, including decreases in glomerular angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor density. Since Ang II regulates proximal tubule transport function, the present studies examined whether diabetes altered expression of proximal tubule receptors. In basolateral membranes from 14 day streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, specific binding of 125I Ang II was decreased to 53 +/- 8% of control (3.2 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg protein; N = 7; P < 0.02). Similarly, in proximal tubule brush border membranes from diabetic animals, specific binding was decreased to 63 +/- 11% of control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 fmol/mg protein; N = 9; P < 0.05). Concomitant insulin treatment reversed the decrease in specific binding of 125I Ang II to basolateral membranes (109 +/- 26% of control; N = 3) and to brush border membranes (85 +/- 17% of control; N = 6). In order to determine if changes in expression of type-1 Ang II receptors (AT1R) accompanied the changes in binding, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of AT1R mRNA was performed and expressed as the ratio of the amplified AT1R to that of an Msc1/Msc1 internal deletion mutant and normalized to that of beta-actin. In total RNA from proximal tubule suspensions of diabetic animals, AT1R mRNA expression decreased by 38% (21 +/- 3 vs. 13 +/- 2 cpm AT1R/cpm deletion mutant/cpm beta actin/10(6); N = 4; P < 0.0025). Insulin treatment reverted AT1R mRNA expression to control levels (22 +/- 3 cpm AT1R/cpm deletion mutant/cpm beta actin/10(6); P < 0.001 compared to the untreated group).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7700017

  15. Differential expression of manganese peroxidase and laccase in white-rot fungi in the presence of manganese or aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Scheel, T; Höfer, M; Ludwig, S; Hölker, U

    2000-11-01

    White-rot fungi (basidiomycetes) play an important role in the degradation of lignin which is, beside cellulose, the major compound of wood. This process is catalyzed by ligninolytic enzymes, which are able to cleave oxidatively aromatic rings in lignin structure. Manganese peroxidase and laccase of white-rot-fungi are the most important of these among the ligninolytic enzymes. In addition, they are able to degrade xenobiotic aromatic polymers, persisting as environmental pollutants. Manganese and aromatic compounds have often been discussed as being inducers, enhancers or mediators of these ligninolytic enzymes. It is known that supplementing the growth medium with either Mn2+, veratryl alcohol or coal-derived humic acids leads to significantly enhanced extracellular ligninolytic activities. Measuring the amount of expressed mRNA of the two enzymes by quantitative RT-PCR provided evidence that the expression of manganese peroxidase was induced in the three tested white-rot fungi, Clitocybula dusenii b11, Nematoloma frowardii b19, and a straw-degrading strain designated i63-2. Laccase, on the other hand, was expressed in all three fungi with a significant basic activity even without inducer added. However, since the level of laccase mRNA was higher in cultures supplemented with any one of the tested inducers, we conclude that both manganese and the aromatic substances also increase the expression of laccase.

  16. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II–induced renal disease. PMID:26943326

  17. Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Baden, Susanne P; Looström, Jakob; Eriksson, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2015-10-01

    In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12 mg L(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn.

  18. Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Baden, Susanne P; Looström, Jakob; Eriksson, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2015-10-01

    In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12 mg L(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn. PMID:26254768

  19. Manganese and epilepsy: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Reyes, Rodrigo E; Gutierrez-Alvarez, Angela M; Moreno, Carlos B

    2007-02-01

    Manganese is an essential trace element for the development and function of the central nervous system. Alterations in manganese concentrations, whether excessive or deficient, can be accompanied by convulsions. This article represents a systematic review of available quantitative evidence that might clarify this issue. We searched The Cochrane Library, Medline and LILACS databases from January 1966 through June 2006 and reviewed all resulting English and Spanish language publications, as well as those possibly relevant in other languages based on their abstracts. The final selection included for this review comprises all investigations in humans and animals that compared manganese levels in any tissue of a group with spontaneous or induced convulsions (with or without antiepileptic treatment) and a convulsion-free control group. The literature search identified thirteen publications since then relevant to the issue, four of which failed to meet our criteria for inclusion. Of the remaining nine, six were in humans and three in rodents. At present, there is no satisfactory explanation for the relationship between low manganese levels and the presence of convulsions. There is a documented correlation between low blood manganese levels and the presence of convulsions in both humans and animals. The lack of evidence indicating whether this is a cause or an effect of the convulsions clearly justifies more detailed follow-up investigations in humans. PMID:17166592

  20. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system. PMID:24136144

  1. Low-dose enalapril reduces angiotensin II and attenuates diabetic-induced cardiac and autonomic dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Malfitano, Christiane; De Angelis, Kátia; Fernandes, Tiago; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Rosa, Kaleizu; Pazzine, Mariana; Mostarda, Cristiano; Ronchi, Fernanda Aparecida; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Irigoyen, Maria-Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Activation of renin-angiotensin system has been linked to cardiovascular and autonomic dysfunctions in diabetes. Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), enalapril, on cardiac and autonomic functions in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg), and rats were treated with enalapril (1 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)). After 30 days, evaluations were performed in control, diabetic, and enalapril-treated groups. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and through cannulation of the left ventricle (at baseline and in response to volume overload). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure variabilities were evaluated in the time and frequency domains. Streptozotocin rats had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunctions, expressed by reduced ejection fraction and increased isovolumic relaxation time. The ACEI prevented these changes, improved diastolic cardiac responses to volume overload and total power of heart rate variability, reduced the ACE1 activity and protein expression and cardiac angiotensin (Ang) II levels, and increased angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity, despite unchanged blood pressure. Correlations were obtained between Ang II content with systolic and diastolic functions and heart rate variability. These findings provide evidence that the low-dose ACEI prevents autonomic and cardiac dysfunctions induced by diabetes without changing blood pressure and associated with reduced cardiac Ang II and increased angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity. PMID:21921804

  2. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  3. Manganese exposure, essentiality & toxicity.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, A B

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element present in all living organisms and is naturally present in rocks, soil, water, and food. Exposure to high oral, parenteral, or ambient air concentrations of Mn can result in elevations in Mn tissue levels and neurological effects. However, current understanding of the impact of Mn exposure on the nervous system leads to the hypothesis that there should be no adverse effects at low exposures, because Mn is an essential element; therefore, there should be some threshold for exposure above which adverse effects may occur and adverse effects may increase in frequency with higher exposures beyond that threshold. Data gaps regarding Mn neurotoxicity include what the clinical significance is of the neurobehavioural, neuropsychological, or neurological endpoints measured in many of the occupational studies that have evaluated cohorts exposed to relatively low levels of Mn. Specific early biomarkers of effect, such as subclinical neurobehavioural or neurological changes or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes have not been established or validated for Mn, although some studies have attempted to correlate biomarkers with neurological effects. Experimental studies with rodents and monkeys provide valuable information about the absorption, bioavailability, and tissue distribution of various Mn compounds with different solubilities and oxidation states in different age groups. Studies have shown that rodents and primates maintain stable tissue manganese levels as a result of homeostatic mechanisms that tightly regulate absorption and excretion. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are being developed to provide for the ability to conduct route-to-route extrapolations, evaluate nasal uptake to the CNS, and evaluate lifestage differences in Mn pharmacokinetics. Such models will facilitate more rigorous quantitative analysis of the available pharmacokinetic data for Mn and will be used to identify situations

  4. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  5. Manganese peroxidases of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida.

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, C; Cullen, D; Lamar, R T

    1994-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymes produced by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida in liquid culture were studied. Only manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity could be detected in the supernatant liquid of the cultures. Lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase activities were not detected under a variety of different culture conditions. The highest MnP activity levels were obtained in nitrogen-limited cultures grown under an oxygen atmosphere. The enzyme was induced by Mn(II). The initial pH of the culture medium did not significantly affect the MnP production. Three MnP isozymes were identified (MnPI, MnPII, and MnPIII) and purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography followed by hydrophobic chromatography. The isozymes are glycoproteins with approximately the same molecular mass (around 45 kDa) but have different pIs. The pIs are 5.3, 4.2, and 3.3 for MnPI, MnPII, and MnPIII, respectively. The three isozymes are active in the same range of pHs (pHs 3.0 to 6.0) and have optimal pHs between 4.5 and 5.0. Their amino-terminal sequences, although highly similar, were distinct, suggesting that each is the product of a separate gene. Images PMID:8135519

  6. Iron(II)-catalyzed enhancement of ultrasonic-induced degradation of diethylstilbestrol (DES)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abderrazik, N.; Azmani, A.; R’kiek, C.; Song, Weihua; O’Shea, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of the endocrine disruptor, diethylstilbestrol (DES) in aqueous media by ultrasound is significantly enhanced by Fe(II) catalyst. The observed enhancement is likely the result of increased levels of hydroxyl radicals from the iron-promoted reduction of the hydrogen peroxide produced during ultrasonic irradiation. The degradation is effective over a range of concentrations and is consistent with pseudo first-order kinetics. Relatively high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, ~450 mM, are present in solution under our experimental conditions after 1 h of ultrasonic irradiation (665 kHz). The concentration of H2O2 in solution decreased with the addition of Fe(II) along with an increase in the degradation of DES. Hydrogen peroxide alone does not appreciably degrade DES. Our results demonstrate ultrasonic-induced degradation of DES can be accelerated with the addition of Fe(II). The combination of ultrasonic irradiation and Fe(II)-promoted conversion of H2O2 to hydroxyl radical may provide a valuable strategy for the treatment of organic pollutants. PMID:27019549

  7. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity alters blood pressure response to angiotensin II administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Aghdas; Saberi, Shadan; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CP) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinic, which is accompanied with nephrotoxicity. CP may also disturb hemodynamics of the circulation system. We have tested the role of CP in mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to graded angiotensin (Ang) II infusion in rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female rats were treated with CP (2.5 mg/kg/day) for a period of 1-week and compared with the vehicle-treated animals. The blood pressure response to Ang II (100–1000 ng/kg/min) was determined under the anesthesia condition. Endothelial permeability of aorta was measured according to the Evans blue uptake. The kidney tissue was also subjected to histological investigation. Results: Significant increase in serum levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and pathological findings in CP-treated rats verified CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Significant difference in percentage of change in MAP response to Ang II between male and female rats was detected in vehicle-treated groups (P < 0.05) while in CP-treated animals this response difference was not observed. The groups were not significantly different with regard to the endothelial permeability of aorta while the serum level of nitrite in male rats increased significantly following administration of CP (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It seems the different response in percentage of change of MAP to graded Ang II infusion between male and female indicates the effect of CP on renin Ang system parameters. PMID:27110550

  8. Penetratin-induced transdermal delivery from H(II) mesophases of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-05-10

    Penetratin, a cell penetrating peptide is embedded within a reversed hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The H(II) mesophase serves as the solubilization reservoir and gel matrix whereas penetratin is the transdermal penetration enhancer for the drug. The systems were characterized and the interactions between the components were determined by SAXS, ATR-FTIR and SD-NMR. High affinity of Na-DFC to glycerol monooleate (GMO) was revealed, associated with increasing the order within the water channels. This affinity is enhanced upon heating and seems to be associated with GMO dehydration. Penetratin (PEN) is entrapped at the hydrophilic region of the H(II) mesophase, between the GMO headgroups, reducing the order of the system and decreasing the size of the hexagonal domains. The transdermal delivery rate of Na-DFC through porcine skin, from the H(II) mesophases, was enhanced by PEN and so also the cumulative transport crossing the skin. PEN induced accelerated drug diffusion through the stratum corneum, towards the different skin layers. The transdermal delivery enhancement is explained from the results of the ATR-FTIR analysis. It seems that PEN accelerates the structural transition of skin lipids from hexagonal to liquid. The disordering results in enhanced diffusion of Na-DFC through the stratum corneum, followed by enhanced overall penetration of the drug.

  9. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenescu, Violeta; Arsenescu, Razvan; Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Baker, Nicki; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments AngII-induced

  11. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  12. Acetylation of RNA Polymerase II Regulates Growth-Factor-Induced Gene Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A.; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes. PMID:24207025

  13. Bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazole-κN 3)[N,N′-o-phenyl­enebis(pyridine-2-carbox­amido)-κ4 N]manganese(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Zaki N.; Xu, Nan; Powell, Douglas R.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, [Mn(C18H12N4O2)(C4H6N2)2], belongs to the family of 1,2-bis­(pyridine-2-carboxamido)benzene (H2bpb) ligated metal complexes. The manganese center is octa­hedrally coordinated by a bpb ligand and two axial 1-methyl­imidazole mol­ecules. The axial N—Mn—N group is bent with a bond angle of 151.79 (7)°. PMID:21581541

  14. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/cAMP response element-binding protein/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Song, Yuxian; Li, Jianzhong; Mao, Junhua; Zhao, Allan Zijian; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2013-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pivotal role in promoting podocyte dysfunction and albuminuria, however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. In this study, we found that Ang II induced Wnt1 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation in cultured mouse podocytes. Blocking Wnt signaling with Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) or β-catenin siRNA attenuated Ang II-induced podocyte injury. Ang II could also induce the phosphorylation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cultured podocytes. Blockade of this pathway with CK59 or CREB siRNA could significantly inhibit Ang II-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and podocyte injury. In in vivo studies, administration of Ang II promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, aggregated podocyte damage, and albuminuria in mice. CK59 could remarkably ameliorate Ang II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of exogenous Dkk1 also attenuated Ang II-induced podocytopathy in mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the CaMK II/CREB/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade plays an important role in regulating Ang II-induced podocytopathy. Targeting this signaling pathway may offer renal protection against the development of proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:23803607

  15. Bis(μ-5-carboxyl­ato-1-carboxyl­ato­methyl-2-oxidopyridinium)-κ2 O 5:O 1;κ2 O 1:O 5-[diaqua­(phenan­throline-κ2 N,N′)manganese(II)] dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mei-Xiang; Feng, Yun-Long

    2009-01-01

    The centrosymmetric binuclear title complex, [Mn2(C8H5NO5)2(C12H8N2)2(H2O)4]·2H2O, was obtained by the reaction of manganese chloride with 5-carb­oxy-1-carboxy­methyl-2-oxidopyridinium and 1,10-phenanthroline. The MnII atom is coordinated by two N atoms from the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand, two O atoms from two 5-carboxyl­ato-1-carboxyl­atomethyl-2-oxidopyridinium ligands and two water mol­ecules, leading to a distorted octahedral MnN2O4 environment. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link neighbouring mol­ecules into a layer structure parallel to (001). PMID:21583018

  16. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  17. High sodium augments angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the ERK 1/2-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular injury is exacerbated by high-salt diets. This study examined the effects of high-sodium level on Ang II-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The cells were cultured in a standard medium containing 137.5 mmol l(-1) of sodium. The high-sodium medium (140 mmol l(-1)) contained additional sodium chloride. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation. Ang II (100 nmol l(-1)) significantly increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in the both medium containing standard sodium and high sodium. High-sodium level augmented Ang II-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation compared with standard sodium. Pre-treatment with candesartan (1 μmol l(-1), Ang II type 1 receptor blocker) or PD98095 (10 μmol l(-1), ERK kinase iinhibitor) abolished the proliferative effect induced by high sodium/Ang II. Pre-treatment with 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (30 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor), but not SN-6 (10 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) or ouabain (1 mmol l(-1), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) attenuated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Osmotic pressure or chloride had no effect on Ang II-induced proliferative changes. High-sodium level did not affect Ang II receptor expression. Ang II increased intracellular pH via NHE-1 activation, and high-sodium level augmented the pH increase induced by Ang II. These data suggest that high-sodium level directly augments Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through NHE-1- and ERK 1/2-dependent pathways and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vascular remodeling by high-sodium/Ang II.

  18. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L). A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic) manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined-space welder, and may present

  19. Changes in antenna of photosystem II induced by short-term heating.

    PubMed

    Kochubey, Svetlana M

    2010-12-01

    Changes in antenna of photosystem II, induced by short-term heating, were studied using characteristics of a short-wavelength band in low-temperature fluorescence spectra (77 K) of pea chloroplasts. Heating for 5 min was carried out at 25 and 45°C in the darkness or in the presence of white light with intensity of 260 or 1,400 μmol/m(2)s. Most modes of thermal treating induced a decrease in integral intensity of the band and an increase of its half-width. The changes were more prominent at high-temperature heating. The second derivative of the contour of a short-wavelength band showed its three components around 680, 685, and 693 nm, the first of which belongs to emission of the outer antenna of Photosystem II, and the other two to its inner antenna. As the fourth derivative shows, high-temperature heating in the presence of light evokes an appearance of some additional components in a short-wavelength region (654, 658, 661, 666, 672, and 675 nm) as well as of two additional components, 682 and 689 nm, in the region of 685-nm peak. Two subcomponents, 692 and 694 nm, can be detected in the 693-nm component. The results are discussed on the basis of the data concerning energy levels and pathways of energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes of the outer and the inner antennas of photosystem II. It is assumed that a protective role of low light relates to inducing of an essential disarrangement in the outer and the inner antennas and of a subsequent decrease in energy funneling to reaction centers, which, in turn, lowers the extent of photoinhibition.

  20. A X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of Manganese Containing Compounds and Photosynthetic Spinach Chloroplasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo -tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the "coordination charge" of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2. If the manganese is in a dimeric form the oxidation states are most probably (II,III). Underlying these results is an extensive data analysis methodology. The method developed involves the use of many different background removal techniques, Fourier transforms and ultimately curve fitting to the modulations in the x-ray absorption cross sections. A large number of model compounds were used to evaluate the analysis method. These analyses are used to show that the two major curve fitting models available are essentially equivalent. Due to its greater versatility, the theoretical model of Teo and Lee is preferred (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1979), 101, 2815). The results are also used to determine the informational limitations of XAS within the limits of the present understanding of X-ray absorption phenomena by inner shell electrons for atoms with atomic number greater than that

  1. Plasma exchange in the treatment of thyroid storm secondary to type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zainudin, Sueziani Binte; Kaushik, Manish; Khor, Li Yan; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2016-01-01

    Summary Type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm. Due to the rarity of the condition, little is known about the role of plasma exchange in the treatment of severe AIT. A 56-year-old male presented with thyroid storm 2months following cessation of amiodarone. Despite conventional treatment, his condition deteriorated. He underwent two cycles of plasma exchange, which successfully controlled the severe hyperthyroidism. The thyroid hormone levels continued to fall up to 10h following plasma exchange. He subsequently underwent emergency total thyroidectomy and the histology of thyroid gland confirmed type II AIT. Management of thyroid storm secondary to type II AIT can be challenging as patients may not respond to conventional treatments, and thyroid storm may be more harmful in AIT patients owing to the underlying cardiac disease. If used appropriately, plasma exchange can effectively reduce circulating hormones, to allow stabilisation of patients in preparation for emergency thyroidectomy. Learning points Type II AIT is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm and may not respond well to conventional thyroid storm treatment. Prompt diagnosis and therapy are important, as patients may deteriorate rapidly. Plasma exchange can be used as an effective bridging therapy to emergency thyroidectomy. This case shows that in type II AIT, each cycle of plasma exchange can potentially lower free triiodothyronine levels for 10h. Important factors to consider when planning plasma exchange as a treatment for thyroid storm include timing of each session, type of exchange fluid to be used and timing of surgery. PMID:27398220

  2. Differential Phenotypes of Tissue-Infiltrating T Cells during Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zihui; Spizzo, Iresha; Diep, Henry; Drummond, Grant R.; Widdop, Robert E.; Vinh, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Experimental hypertension is associated with increased T cell infiltration into blood pressure-controlling organs, such as the aorta and kidney; importantly in absence of T cells of the adaptive immune system, experimental hypertension is significantly blunted. However, the function and phenotype of these T cell infiltrates remains speculative and undefined in the setting of hypertension. The current study compared T cell-derived cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from normotensive and hypertensive mice. Splenic, blood, aortic, kidney and brain T cells were isolated from C57BL/6J mice following 14-day vehicle or angiotensin (Ang) II (0.7 mg/kg/day, s.c.) infusion. T cell infiltration was increased in aorta, kidney and brain from hypertensive mice. Cytokine analysis in stimulated T cells indicated an overall Th1 pro-inflammatory phenotype, but a similar proportion (flow cytometry) and quantity (cytometric bead array) of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-17 between vehicle- and Ang II- treated groups. Strikingly, elevated T cell-derived production of a chemokine, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2), was observed in aorta (∼6-fold) and kidney in response to Ang II, but not in brain, spleen or blood. Moreover, T cell-derived ROS production in aorta was elevated ∼3 -fold in Ang II-treated mice (n = 7; P<0.05). Ang II-induced hypertension does not affect the overall T cell cytokine profile, but enhanced T cell-derived ROS production and/or leukocyte recruitment due to elevated CCL2, and this effect may be further amplified with increased infiltration of T cells. We have identified a potential hypertension-specific T cell phenotype that may represent a functional contribution of T cells to the development of hypertension, and likely several other associated vascular disorders. PMID:25501574

  3. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  5. Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghan; Li, Yuan; Buckett, Peter D.; Böhlke, Mark; Thompson, Khristy J.; Takahashi, Masaya; Maher, Timothy J.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D2 (D2R) levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed “rescue response” with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status. PMID:22479410

  6. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  7. Sorption behavior of heavy metals on poorly crystalline manganese oxides: roles of water conditions and light.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Jungwon; Choi, Sung-Chan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of solution properties and light on the metal uptake and release in a nanosized, poorly crystalline manganese oxide (δ-MnO2) system. The results from synthetic water matrices revealed that the aggregation state was strongly affected by ionic strength, Ca(2+), and humic acid, and the particle aggregation subsequently changed the ability of δ-MnO2 to adsorb and sequester heavy metal ions (Cu(ii)). The extent of Cu(ii) uptake onto δ-MnO2 exhibited a negative correlation with the attachment efficiency value, which suggested that a lower sorption capacity could be achieved under aggregation-inducing conditions. Upon exposure to light, the adsorbed Cu(ii) was released from the δ-MnO2 surface via photoinduced dissolution of MnO2. The concentration of Cu(ii) desorbed was substantially higher when the humic acid was present together with Ca(2+). The present investigation enables us to better understand the adsorption-desorption processes of heavy metals occurring at the MnO2-solution interface in response to common environmental stimuli.

  8. Thermal bleaching induced changes in photosystem II function not reflected by changes in photosystem II protein content of Stylophora pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, J.; Szabó, M.; Campbell, D. A.; Larkum, A. W. D.; Ralph, P. J.; Hill, R.

    2014-03-01

    Scleractinian corals exist in a symbiosis with marine dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium that is easily disrupted by changes in the external environment. Increasing seawater temperatures cause loss of pigments and expulsion of the symbionts from the host in a process known as coral bleaching; though, the exact mechanism and trigger of this process has yet to be elucidated. We exposed nubbins of the coral Stylophora pistillata to bleaching temperatures over a period of 14 daylight hours. Fifty-nine percent of the symbiont population was expelled over the course of this short-term treatment. Maximum quantum yield ( F V/ F M) of photosystem (PS) II for the in hospite symbiont population did not change significantly over the treatment period, but there was a significant decline in the quantity of PSII core proteins (PsbA and PsbD) at the onset of the experimental increase in temperature. F V/ F M from populations of expelled symbionts dropped sharply over the first 6 h of temperature treatment, and then toward the end of the experiment, it increased to an F V/ F M value similar to that of the in hospite population. This suggests that the symbionts were likely damaged prior to expulsion from the host, and the most damaged symbionts were expelled earlier in the bleaching. The quantity of PSII core proteins, PsbA and PsbD, per cell was significantly higher in the expelled symbionts than in the remaining in hospite population over 6-10 h of temperature treatment. We attribute this to a buildup of inactive PSII reaction centers, likely caused by a breakdown in the PSII repair cycle. Thus, thermal bleaching of the coral S. pistillata induces changes in PSII content that do not follow the pattern that would be expected based on the results of PSII function.

  9. Hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas producing protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yasuo; Notohara, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    We describe a rare case of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas with production of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The patient was a 49-year-old woman admitted because of high serum levels of PIVKA-II (1.63 AU/ml) and AFP (623 ng/ml) and abnormal ultrasonographic findings of the pancreas, found incidentally at medical checkup. Both ultrasonography and computed tomography showed swelling of the pancreas with small areas of low density, but no hepatic lesions. The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were not increased. A PIVKA-II and AFP-producing pancreatic cancer was strongly suspected, and total pancreatectomy was performed. Pathological examination showed that the tumor cells were arranged in trabecular and solid patterns with bile production, and were immunohistochemically positive for PIVKA-II and AFP, resembling hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The tumor was diagnosed as hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas, and the patient has survived 48 months after initial diagnosis. It is important that hepatoid carcinoma be considered as a possible malignant tumor of the pancreas, and simultaneous measurement of the serum levels of AFP and PIVKA-II will enable earlier diagnosis. This is the first report describing hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas producing PIVKA-II.

  10. A label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) based on platinum (II)-oligonucleotide coordination induced gold nanoparticles aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhai, Qingfeng; Zhou, Weijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) was constructed for the first time. Four bases (G-G mismatch) mismatched streptavidin aptamer (MSAA) was used to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation and recognize Pt (II) specifically. Only in the presence of Pt (II), coordination occurs between G-G bases and Pt (II), leading to the activation of streptavidin aptamer. Streptavidin coated magnetic beads (MBs) were used as separation agent to separate Pt (II)-coordinated MSAA. The residual less amount of MSAA could not efficiently protect AuNPs anymore and aggregation of AuNPs will produce a colorimetric product. With the addition of Pt (II), a pale purple-to-blue color variation could be observed by the naked eye. A detection limit of 150nM and a linear range from 0.6μM to 12.5μM for Pt (II) could be achieved without any amplification. PMID:27281107

  11. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  12. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Con