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Sample records for manganese ii induces

  1. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-03-15

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1{alpha} protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1{alpha} hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1{alpha} degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1{alpha} protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation.

  2. Conversion of the spin state of the manganese complex in photosystem II induced by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Boussac, A; Girerd, J J; Rutherford, A W

    1996-06-04

    The manganese complex (Mn4) which is responsible for water oxidation in photosystem II is EPR detectable in the S2 state, one of the five redox states of the enzyme cycle. The S2 state is observable at 10 K either as a multiline signal (spin 1/2) or as a signal at g = 4.1 (spin 3/2 or spin 5/2). It is shown here that at around 150 K the state responsible for the multiline signal is converted to that responsible for the g = 4.1 signal upon the absorption of infrared light. This conversion is fully reversible at 200 K. The action spectrum of this conversion has its maximum at 820 nm (12 200 cm-1) and is similar to the intervalence charge transfer band in di-mu-oxo-(MnIIIMnIV) model systems. It is suggested that the conversion of the multiline signal to the g = 4.1 signal results from absorption of infrared light by the Mn cluster itself, resulting in electron transfer from MnIII to MnIV. The g = 4.1 signal is thus proposed to arise from a state which differs from that which gives rise to the multiline signal only in terms of this change in its valence distribution. The near-infrared light effect was observed in the S2 state of Sr(2+)-reconstituted photosystem II and in Ca(2+)-depleted, EGTA (or citrate-)-treated photosystem II but not in ammonia-treated photosystem II. Earlier results in the literature which showed that the g = 4.1 state was preferentially formed by illumination at 130 K are reinterpreted as being the result of two photochemical events: the first being photosynthetic charge separation resulting in an S2 state which gives rise to the multiline signal and the second being the conversion of this state to the g = 4.1 state due to the simultaneous and inadvertent presence of 820 nm light in the broad-band illumination given. There is therefore no reason to consider the state responsible for the g = 4.1 signal as a precursor of that which gives rise to the multiline signal.

  3. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci.

  4. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies of a New Schiff Base Derived Manganese (II) Complex against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcerations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Dhiyaaldeen, Summaya M.; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M.Jamil; El-Ferjani, Rashd M.; Adam, Hoyam; Alkotaini, Bassam; Batran, Rami Al; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a crucial element for health. In this study, the gastroprotective efficacy of Mn (II) complex (MDLA) against acidified ethanol (HCl/Ethanol)-induced gastric ulceration in rats was evaluated. The animals were distributed into 5 groups. Groups 1 and 2 received carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), group 3 was pretreated with omeprazole, and groups 4 and 5 were given 10 and 20 mg/kg of MDLA, respectively. After one hour, CMC and HCl/Ethanol were given to groups 2–5 whilst the animals in group 1 were ingested with CMC. After sacrifice, gastric lesions were evaluated by wall mucus, gross appearance, histology, antioxidant enzymes and immunohistochemistry. Group 2 displayed severe gastric damage with a significant reduction in wall mucus. Conversely, gastric lesions were reduced in groups 3–5 by 85.72%, 56.51% and 65.93%, respectively. The rats in groups 3–5 showed up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) with down-regulation of Bcl-2-associated protein x (Bax). Pretreatment with omeprazole or MDLA led to an increase in the uptake of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) stain in the glandular part of the gastric tissue, raised levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and a reduction in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. These results suggested the gastroprotective action of Mn (II) complex. PMID:27229938

  5. The S0 state of photosystem II induced by hydroxylamine: differences between the structure of the manganese complex in the S0 and S1 states determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guiles, R D; Yachandra, V K; McDermott, A E; Cole, J L; Dexheimer, S L; Britt, R D; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1990-01-16

    Hydroxylamine at low concentrations causes a two-flash delay in the first maximum flash yield of oxygen evolved from spinach photosystem II (PSII) subchloroplast membranes that have been excited by a series of saturating flashes of light. Untreated PSII membrane preparations exhibit a multiline EPR signal assigned to a manganese cluster and associated with the S2 state when illuminated at 195 K, or at 273 K in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). We used the extent of suppression of the multiline EPR signal observed in samples illuminated at 195 K to determine the fraction of PSII reaction centers set back to a hydroxylamine-induced S0-like state, which we designate S0*. The manganese K-edge X-ray absorption edges for dark-adapted PSII preparations with or without hydroxylamine are virtually identical. This indicates that, despite its high binding affinity to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the dark, hydroxylamine does not reduce chemically the manganese cluster within the OEC in the dark. After a single turnover of PSII, a shift to lower energy is observed in the inflection of the Mn K-edge of the manganese cluster. We conclude that, in the presence of hydroxylamine, illumination causes a reduction of the OEC, resulting in a state resembling S0. This lower Mn K-edge energy of S0*, relative to the edge of S1, implies the storage and stabilization of an oxidative equivalent within the manganese cluster during the S0----S1 state transition. An analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the S0* state indicates that a significant structural rearrangement occurs between the S0* and S1 states. The X-ray absorption edge position and the structure of the manganese cluster in the S0* state are indicative of a heterogeneous mixture of formal valences of manganese including one Mn(II) which is not present in the S1 state.

  6. Manganese-induced turnover of TMEM165.

    PubMed

    Potelle, Sven; Dulary, Eudoxie; Climer, Leslie; Duvet, Sandrine; Morelle, Willy; Vicogne, Dorothée; Lebredonchelle, Elodie; Houdou, Marine; Spriet, Corentin; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Peanne, Romain; Klein, André; DE Bettignies, Geoffroy; Morsomme, Pierre; Matthijs, Gert; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lupashin, Vladimir; Foulquier, Francois

    2017-03-07

    TMEM165 deficiencies lead to one of the Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases where the glycosylation process is altered. We recently demonstrated that the Golgi glycosylation defect due to TMEM165 deficiency resulted from Golgi manganese homeostasis defect and that Mn2+ supplementation was sufficient to rescue normal glycosylation. In this paper we highlight TMEM165 as a novel Golgi protein sensitive to manganese. When cells were exposed to high Mn2+ concentrations, TMEM165 was degraded in lysosomes. Remarkably, while the variant R126H was sensitive upon manganese exposure, the variant E108G recently identified in a novel TMEM165-CDG patient, was found to be insensitive. We also showed that the E108G mutation did not abolish the function of TMEM165 in Golgi glycosylation. Altogether this study identified the Golgi protein TMEM165 as a novel Mn2+ sensitive protein in mammalian cells and pointed to the crucial importance of the glutamic acid (E108) in the cytosolic ELGDK motif in Mn2+ induced degradation of TMEM165.

  7. Characterization and Prediction of Flow Behavior in High-Manganese Twinning Induced Plasticity Steels: Part II. Jerky Flow and Instantaneous Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed-Akbari, A.; Mishra, A. K.; Mayer, J.; Bleck, W.

    2012-05-01

    The jerky and smooth flow curves in high-manganese twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steels were investigated by comparing Fe-Mn-C and Fe-Mn-Al-C systems. The pronounced serrations on the flow curves of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel, produced during tensile testing at 300 K (27 °C) and 373 K (100 °C), were shown to be the result of localized high-temperature Portevin Le-Chatelier (PLC) bands moving across the gage length throughout the deformation. The speed of the PLC bands and their temperature effects were found to be strongly dependent on the applied strain rate, which was controlled by adjusting the cross-head speed of the tensile testing machine. The localized temperature-dependent stacking fault energy (SFE) variations resulting from the PLC effect and adiabatic heating were analyzed and compared for both slow and fast deformation rates. The instabilities in the measured logarithmic strain values caused by jerky flow could cause the local strain rate to deviate systematically from the targeted (applied) strain rate. These instabilities are better observed by calculating the instantaneous strain rate (ISR) values for each instant of deformation along the entire gage length. Finally, a new type of diagram was developed by plotting the true stress against the ISR values. From the diagram, the onset of different mechanisms, such as deformation twinning, nonpronounced, and pronounced serrations, could be marked precisely.

  8. Genetic factors and manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Parmalee, Nancy; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), is a trace metal required for normal physiological processes in humans. Mn levels are tightly regulated, as high levels of Mn result in accumulation in the brain and cause a neurological disease known as manganism. Manganism shares many similarities with Parkinson’s disease (PD), both at the physiological level and the cellular level. Exposure to high Mn-containing environments increases the risk of developing manganism. Mn is absorbed primarily through the intestine and then released in the blood. Excessive Mn is secreted in the bile and excreted in feces. Mn enters and exits cells through a number of non-specific importers localized on the cell membrane. Mutations in one of the Mn exporters, SLC30A10 (solute carrier family 30, member 10), result in Mn induced toxicity with liver impairments and neurological dysfunction. Four PD genes have been identified in connection to regulation of Mn toxicity, shedding new light on potential links between manganism and PD. PMID:25136353

  9. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  10. Oxidation kinetics of manganese (II) in seawater at nanomolar concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Langen, Peter J.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Coale, Kenneth H.; Elrod, Virginia A.

    1997-12-01

    Manganese oxidation rates were determined at low (˜ 20 nM) concentrations in seawater by measuring dissolved manganese (Mn(II)) using flow injection analysis with chemiluminescence detection. Mn(II) was measured in samples that had been filtered (0.2 μm) and kept in the dark under controlled temperature and pH conditions for time periods up to 6 months. Eight 9 L carboys with mean pH values ranging from 8 to 8.7 were held at 25°C, another carboy (pH = 9.32) was kept at 5°C. Oxidation followed the Morgan (1967) homogeneous rate equation ( d[Mn(II)]/ dt = k1 [O 2][OH -] 2[Mn(II)]). The mean rate constant k1 = 1.7 ± 0.7 × 10 12 M -3 d -1 (95% CI), determined using hydroxide ion activities determined with pH measurements on the NBS scale, was in agreement with work by Morgan (1967; k1 = 4 × 10 12 M -3 d -1) and Davies and Morgan (1989; k1 = 1.1 × 10 12 M -3 d -1) in dilute solutions. The rate constant at 5°C was 1.3 ± 0.3 × 10 12 M -3 d -1. If free hydroxide concentrations (based on the free proton pH scale) are used, then the rate constant at 25°C was k 1∗ = 0.34 ± 0.14 × 10 12 M -3d -1. Autocatalytic increases in Mn(II) oxidation rates, as predicted by a heterogeneous reaction mechanism (Morgan, 1967) ( d[Mn(II)]/ dt= k2'[Mn(II)][MnO 2]) were not observed, indicating that the homogeneous reaction dominates Mn(II) oxidation at low nM concentrations in seawater. Bacteria were enumerated by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining during the experiments. No significant correlation between bacterial concentrations and Mn(II) oxidation rates was found.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm.

  12. Hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by quercetin manganese(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tan; Bochu, Wang; Liancai, Zhu

    2007-04-01

    Quercetin manganese(II) complexes were investigated focusing on its DNA hydrolytic activity. The complexes successfully promote the cleavage of plasmid DNA, producing single and double DNA strand breaks. The amount of conversion of supercoiled form (SC) of plasmid DNA to the nicked circular form (NC) depends on the concentration of the complex as well as the duration of incubation of the complexes with DNA. The maximum rate of conversion of the supercoiled form to the nicked circular form at pH 7.2 in the presence of 100 microM of the complexes is found to be 1.32 x 10(-4) s(-1). The hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by the complexes was supported by the evidence from free radical quenching, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay and T4 ligase ligation.

  13. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  14. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  15. Helicity inversion and redox chemistry of chiral manganese(II) cubanes.

    PubMed

    Deville, Claire; Granelli, Matteo; Downward, Alan M; Besnard, Céline; Guenée, Laure; Williams, Alan F

    2014-09-14

    The chiral ligand S-1,2-bis(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethanol, 1, reacts with manganese(II) salts to form cubanes which readily undergo oxidation reactions leading either to a tetranuclear manganese(II,III) mixed valence complex 4 or to a tetranuclear complex of ligand 5 where the secondary alcohol has been oxidised to an enolate. N-methylation of ligand 1 slows the oxidation reaction and stable manganese(II) cubanes may be isolated. The fully methylated ligand 2 gives a cubane of opposite helicity to that found previously for 1 with cobalt. The inversion may be explained by conformational analysis. Cyclic voltammetry suggests that the manganese cubanes reported here are insufficiently robust to store oxidising equivalents as in the oxygen evolving system of photosystem II.

  16. Photodamage of a Mn(III/IV)-oxo mixed-valence compound and photosystem II: evidence that a high-valent manganese species is responsible for UV-induced photodamage of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zi; Cady, Clyde W; Brudvig, Gary W; Hou, Harvey J M

    2011-01-01

    The Mn cluster in photosystem II (PS II) is believed to play an important role in the UV photoinhibition of green plants, but the mechanism is still not clear at a molecular level. In this work, the photochemical stability of [Mn(III)(O)(2)Mn(IV)(H(2)O)(2)(Terpy)(2)](NO(3))(3) (Terpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), designated as Mn-oxo mixed-valence dimer, a well characterized functional model of the oxygen-evolving complex in PS II, was examined in aqueous solution by exposing the complex to excess light irradiation at six different wavelengths in the range of 250 to 700 nm. The photodamage of the Mn-oxo mixed-valence dimer was confirmed by the decrease of its oxygen-evolution activity measured in the presence of the chemical oxidant oxone. Ultraviolet light irradiation induced a new absorption peak at around 400-440 nm of the Mn-oxo mixed-valence dimer. Visible light did not have the same effect on the Mn-oxo mixed-valence dimer. We speculate that the spectral change may be caused by conversion of the Mn(III)O(2)Mn(IV) dimer into a new structure--Mn(IV)O(2)Mn(IV). In the processes, the appearance of a 514 nm fluorescence peak was observed in the solution and may be linked to the hydration or protonation of Terpy ligand in the Mn-oxo dimer. In comparing the response of the PS II functional model compound and the PS II complex to excess light radiation, our results support the idea that UV photoinhibition is triggered at the Mn(4)Ca center of the oxygen-evolution complex in PS II by forming a modified structure, possibly a Mn(IV) species, and that the reaction of Mn ions is likely the initial step.

  17. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  18. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  19. Bioelectrochemical Mn(II) leaching from manganese ore by Lactococcus lactis SK071115.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Park, Doo Hyun

    2011-02-01

    L. lactis sk071115 has been shown to grow more actively and generate lower levels of lactate in glucose-defined medium with nitrate than in medium with Mn(IV). By adding Mn(IV) to a L. lactis culture, lactate production was relatively reduced in combination with Mn(II) production, but cell mass production levels did not increase. Both cell-free extract and intact L. lactis cells reacted electrochemically with Mn(IV) but did not react with Mn(II) upon cyclic voltammetry using neutral red (NR) as an electron mediator. A modified graphite felt cathode with NR (NR-cathode) was employed to induce electrochemical reducing equivalence for bacterial metabolism. Cell-free L. lactis extract catalyzed the reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) under both control and electrochemical reduction conditions; however, the levels of Mn(II) generated under electrochemical reduction conditions were approximately 4 times those generated under control conditions. The levels of Mn(II) generated by the catalysis of L. lactis immobilized in the NR-cathode (L-NR-cathode) under electrochemical reduction conditions were more than 4 times that generated under control conditions. Mn(II) production levels were increased by approximately 2.5 and 4.5 times by the addition of citrate to the reactant under control and electrochemical reduction conditions, respectively. The cumulative Mn(II) produced from manganese ore by catalysis of the L-NR-cathode for 30 days reached levels of approximately 3,800 and 16,000 mg/l under control and electrochemical reduction conditions, respectively. In conclusion, the electrochemical reduction reaction generated by the NR-cathode activated the biochemical reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) by L. lactis.

  20. Manganese(II) semiquinonato and manganese(III) catecholato complexes with tridentate ligand: modeling the substrate-binding state of manganese-dependent catechol dioxygenase and reactivity with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Komatsuzaki, Hidehito; Shiota, Akihiko; Hazawa, Shogo; Itoh, Muneaki; Miyamura, Noriko; Miki, Nahomi; Takano, Yoichi; Nakazawa, Jun; Inagaki, Akiko; Akita, Munetaka; Hikichi, Shiro

    2013-06-01

    Catecholate catwalk: Monomeric manganese(III) catecholato and manganese(II) semiquinonato complexes as the substrate-binding model of catechol dioxygenase have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The semiquinonato complex reacted with molecular oxygen to give ring-cleaved products and benzoquinone in the catalytic condition.

  1. The laboratory methods of induced polarization measurement of manganese sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhiguna, D.; Handayani, G.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic minerals are polarizable. The polarizable property can be used as the basis for metallic minerals exploration process. By use of induced polarization method, we observed polarization phenomenon that occur in metallic material. In this study, physical events were observed that occur in rocks containing manganese minerals using induced polarization method. Induced polarization method is a geophysical method that is based on the principle of electrical charging and discharging of a capacitor which is applied to the rock. By using the method of induced polarization, chargeability values can be determined for the rock. Chargeability is one of the important properties of metal material. Measurement on this research will be done in two different ways to determine the induced events that occurred in both methods.

  2. Electrochemical Behavior and Voltammetric Determination of a Manganese(II) Complex at a Carbon Paste Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Karastogianni, Sophia; Girousi, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the electrochemical behavior using cyclic voltammetry and detection of [Mn2+(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2 (triethanolamine)] with adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of a manganese(II) complex [Mn2+(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2(triethanolamine)] (A) was investigated using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry in an acetate buffer of pH 4.6 at a carbon paste electrode. Further, an oxidation–reduction mechanism was proposed. Meanwhile, an adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetric method was developed for the determination of manganese(II) complex. PMID:26819548

  3. Electrochemical Behavior and Voltammetric Determination of a Manganese(II) Complex at a Carbon Paste Electrode.

    PubMed

    Karastogianni, Sophia; Girousi, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the electrochemical behavior using cyclic voltammetry and detection of [Mn(2+)(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2 (triethanolamine)] with adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of a manganese(II) complex [Mn(2+)(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid)2(triethanolamine)] (A) was investigated using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry in an acetate buffer of pH 4.6 at a carbon paste electrode. Further, an oxidation-reduction mechanism was proposed. Meanwhile, an adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetric method was developed for the determination of manganese(II) complex.

  4. Manganese-induced Neurotoxicity: From C. elegans to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Peres, Tanara V.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is one of the most abundant metals on the earth. It is required for normal cellular activities, but overexposure leads to toxicity. Neurons are more susceptible to Mn-induced toxicity than other cells, and accumulation of Mn in the brain results in Manganism that presents with Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms. In the last decade, a number of Mn transporters have been identified, which improves our understanding of Mn transport in and out of cells. However, the mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity is only partially uncovered, with further research needed to explore the whole picture of Mn-induced toxicity. In this review, we will address recent progress in Mn-induced neurotoxicity from C. elegans to humans, and explore future directions that will help understand the mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. PMID:25893090

  5. Speciation of dissolved iron(II) and manganese(II) in a groundwater pollution plume

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, D.L.; Boddum, J.K.; Redemann, S.; Christensen, T.H.

    1998-09-15

    Groundwater samples with high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II), obtained from an anaerobic pollution plume, were speciated under anaerobic conditions in terms of colloidal (screen filtration and cross-flow ultrafiltration), complexed (ion-exchange resins), and free divalent species of Fe(II) and Mn(II). Most of the metal content in a nonfiltered sample passed through a 0.001 {micro}m membrane and was considered truly dissolved. Although free metal ions were the dominant species in the dissolved fraction, speciation modeling using MINTEQA2 suggested an average of 19% Fe(II) a/nd 20% Mn(II) were present as bicarbonate complexes, which are here operationally defined as labile. Organic complexes were not significant, although the groundwater contained up to 67 mg of C L{sup {minus}1}. Calculations with MINTEQA2 indicated that sample solutions representative of the truly dissolved fraction were strongly supersaturated with respect to siderite (FeCO{sub 3}) and moderately supersaturated with respect to rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}). SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis indicated that the colloidal fractions most likely consisted of clay type particles and iron sulfide precipitates. The amount of Mn(II) in the colloidal fractions was too low for determination by SEM-EDS. These results show that roughly 65% of the iron and manganese in anaerobic pollution plumes is present as free divalent ions and, according to the current thermodynamic database in MINTEQA2, the solutions are supersaturated with respect to carbonate.

  6. Influence of calcium(II) and chloride on the oxidative reactivity of a manganese(II) complex of a cross-bridged cyclen ligand.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Coats, Katherine L; Chen, Zhuqi; Hubin, Timothy J; Yin, Guochuan

    2014-11-17

    Available data from different laboratories have confirmed that both Ca(2+) and Cl(-) are crucial for water oxidation in Photosystem II. However, their roles are still elusive. Using a manganese(II) complex having a cross-bridged cyclen ligand as a model, the influence of Ca(2+) on the oxidative reactivity of the manganese(II) complex and its corresponding manganese(IV) analogue were investigated. It has been found that adding Ca(2+) can significantly improve the oxygenation efficiency of the manganese(II) complex in sulfide oxidation and further accelerate the oxidation of sulfoxide to sulfone. Similar improvements have also been observed for Mg(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+). A new monomeric manganese(IV) complex having two cis-hydroxide ligands has also been isolated through oxidation of the corresponding manganese(II) complex with H2O2 in the presence of NH4PF6. This rare cis-dihydroxomanganese(IV) species has been well characterized by X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Notably, using the manganese(IV) complex as a catalyst demonstrates higher activity than the corresponding manganese(II) complex, and adding Ca(2+) further improves its catalytic efficiency. However, adding Cl(-) decreases its catalytic activity. In electrochemical studies of manganese(IV) complexes with no chloride ligand present, adding Ca(2+) positively shifted the redox potential of the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) couple but negatively shifted its Mn(V)/Mn(IV) couple. In the manganese(II) complex having a chloride ligand, adding Ca(2+) shifted both the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) and Mn(V)/Mn(IV) couples in the negative direction. The revealed oxidative reactivity and redox properties of the manganese species affected by Ca(2+) and Cl(-) may provide new clues to understanding their roles in the water oxidation process of Photosystem II.

  7. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment.

  8. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  9. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  10. Manganese induced apoptosis in haematopoietic cells of Nephrops norvegicus (L.).

    PubMed

    Oweson, Carolina A M; Baden, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2006-05-10

    Manganese (Mn) is highly abundant as MnO2 in marine sediments. During hypoxia in bottom waters, the reduced bioavailable fraction of manganese, Mn2+, increases. Thereby, Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, can experience concentrations up to 1000 times normoxic levels. A previous study has shown that exposure to a realistic concentration of 20 mg l(-1) of Mn for 10 days reduced the number of circulating haemocytes in N. norvegicus significantly. Here we aimed to investigate if apoptosis contributes to the Mn-induced haemocytopenia, with the overall hypothesis that Mn induces apoptosis in a time and concentration dependent manner. N. norvegicus were exposed to Mn (0, 5, 10 and 20 mg l(-1)) for 5 and 10 days. After 5 days of exposure the total haemocyte counts were not affected. However, after 10 days there was a gradual decrease in cell numbers, reaching a reduction by 44% when the animals were exposed to 20 mg Mn l(-1). Apoptosis in cells, released from the haematopoietic tissue, was investigated by using TUNEL assay, which detects specific DNA strand breaks. The fraction of apoptotic cells gradually increased from 2.5% in un-exposed lobsters to 15% in those exposed to 20 mg l(-1) but there was no difference related to the exposure time. A gradual increase of apoptosis was further confirmed by electrophoretic DNA-ladder formation, however to a lower extent in lobsters exposed during 5 days. Cell viability, determined by metabolic activity and cell membrane integrity, was not reduced, indicating that apoptosis rather than necrosis caused reduced number of haemocytes. It was concluded that apoptosis seemed to increase already after 5 days of 5 mg l(-1) of Mn-exposure, although exposure for 10 days was required before it was reflected in the haemocyte numbers. Reduced numbers of haemocytes may increase the prevalence for infections in N. norvegicus in their natural habitat.

  11. Manganese(III)-containing Wells-Dawson sandwich-type polyoxometalates: comparison with their manganese(II) counterparts.

    PubMed

    Lebrini, Mounim; Mbomekallé, Israël M; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Berthet, Patrick; Ntienoue, Joseline; Sécheresse, Francis; Vigneron, Jacky; Etcheberry, Arnaud

    2011-07-18

    We present the synthesis and structural characterization, assessed by various techniques (FTIR, TGA, UV-vis, elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction for three compounds, magnetic susceptibility, and electrochemistry) of five manganese-containing Wells-Dawson sandwich-type (WDST) complexes. The dimanganese(II)-containing complex, [Na(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](18-) (1), was obtained by reaction of MnCl(2) with 1 equiv of [As(2)W(15)O(56)](12-) in acetate medium (pH 4.7). Oxidation of 1 by Na(2)S(2)O(8) in aqueous solution led to the dimanganese(III) complex [Na(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) (2), while its trimanganese(II) homologue, [Na(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(H(2)O)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](17-) (3), was obtained by addition of ca. 1 equiv of MnCl(2) to a solution of 1 in 1 M NaCl. The trimanganese(III) and tetramanganese(III) counterparts, [Mn(III)(H(2)O)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](15-) (4) and [Mn(III)(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(III)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](12-) (6), are, respectively, obtained by oxidation of aqueous solutions of 3 and [Mn(II)(2)(H(2)O)(2)Mn(II)(2)(As(2)W(15)O(56))(2)](16-) (5) by Na(2)S(2)O(8). Single-crystal X-ray analyses were carried out on 2, 3, and 4. BVS calculations and XPS confirmed that the oxidation state of Mn centers is +II for complexes 1, 3, and 5 and +III for 2, 4, and 6. A complete comparative electrochemical study was carried out on the six compounds cited above, and it was possible to observe the distinct redox steps Mn(IV/III) and Mn(III/II). Magnetization measurements, as a function of temperature, confirm the presence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the Mn ions in these compounds in all cases with the exception of compound 2.

  12. Triggering autophagic cell death with a di-manganese(II) developmental therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Slator, Creina; Molphy, Zara; McKee, Vickie; Kellett, Andrew

    2017-02-04

    There is an unmet need for novel metal-based chemotherapeutics with alternative modes of action compared to clinical agents such as cisplatin and metallo-bleomycin. Recent attention in this field has focused on designing intracellular ROS-mediators as powerful cytotoxins of human cancers and identifying potentially unique toxic mechanisms underpinning their utility. Herein, we report the developmental di-manganese(II) therapeutic [Mn2(μ-oda)(phen)4(H2O)2][Mn2(μ-oda)(phen)4(oda)2]·4H2O (Mn-Oda) induces autophagy-promoted apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3). The complex was initially identified to intercalate DNA by topoisomerase I unwinding and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Intracellular DNA damage, detected by γH2AX and the COMET assay, however, is not linked to direct Mn-Oda free radical generation, but is instead mediated through the promotion of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to autophagic vacuole formation and downstream nuclear degradation. To elucidate the cytotoxic profile of Mn-Oda, a wide range of biomarkers specific to apoptosis and autophagy including caspase release, mitochondrial membrane integrity, fluorogenic probe localisation, and cell cycle analysis were employed. Through these techniques, the activity of Mn-Oda was compared directly to i.) the pro-apoptotic clinical anticancer drug doxorubicin, ii.) the multimodal histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoyanilide hydroxamic acid, and iii.) the autophagy inducer rapamycin. In conjunction with ROS-specific trapping agents and established inhibitors of autophagy, we have identified autophagy-induction linked to mitochondrial superoxide production, with confocal image analysis of SKOV3 cells further supporting autophagosome formation.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and chemical properties of 1-((E)-2-pyridinylmethylidene)semicarbazone manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbelini, Ellery Regina; Martin, Maria da Graça M. B.; Back, Davi Fernando; Evans, David John; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Ronny Rocha; Lang, Ernesto Schulz; Nunes, Fábio Souza

    2012-01-01

    Manganese(II) perchlorate and iron(II) chloride react with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone (HCSpy) in boiling ethanol to produce [Mn II(HSCpy) 2](ClO 4) 2·C 2H 5OH and [Fe IICl(HSCpy)]Cl. The distorted octahedral manganese complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group P(-1). The ligand HSCpy is tridentate and is coordinated through two nitrogen and one oxygen atoms. Comparison of the bond distances with analogous transition metal complexes that have the same geometry revealed longer bonds for the manganese derivative, an outcome that correlates well with the radius of the metal ions. The iron(II) ion is tetracoordinated to one semicarbazone and one chloride. Mass spectrometry, conductivity measurements, Mössbauer, UV-VIS, FTIR and elemental analysis were all in accordance with the proposed composition and the plausible geometry of [FeCl(HSCpy)]Cl. Mass spectrometry unequivocally detected the presence of the [FeCl(HSCpy)] + ion with a m/ z of 254.97 and intensity of 2 × 10 5.

  14. Copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline coprecipitation system for preconcentration and separation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) in real samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kaya, Betul; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2007-08-25

    A separation-preconcentration procedure based on the coprecipitation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) ions with copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline system has been developed. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of copper(II) as carrier element, amount of 8-hydroxquinoline, sample volume, etc., was investigated for the quantitative recoveries of Co(II) and Mn(II). No interferic effects were observed from the concomitant ions which are present in real samples. The detection limits for analyte ions by three sigma criteria were 0.86microgL(-1) for cobalt and 0.98microgL(-1) for manganese. The validation of the presented preconcentration procedure was performed by the analysis of NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure presented was applied to the analyte contents of real samples including natural waters and some food samples with successfully analytical results.

  15. In Situ Determination of Manganese(II) Speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans by High Magnetic Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tabares, Leandro C.; Un, Sun

    2013-01-01

    High magnetic field high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance techniques were used to measure in situ Mn(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria capable of accumulating high concentrations of Mn(II). It was possible to identify and quantify the evolution of Mn(II) species in intact cells at various stages of growth. Aside from water, 95-GHz high field electron nuclear double resonance showed that the Mn(II) ions are bound to histidines and phosphate groups, mostly from fructose-1,6-bisphosphate but also inorganic phosphates and nucleotides. During stationary growth phase, 285-GHz continuous wave EPR measurements showed that histidine is the most common ligand to Mn(II) and that significant amounts of cellular Mn(II) in D. radiodurans are bound to peptides and proteins. As much as 40% of the total Mn(II) was in manganese superoxide dismutase, and it is this protein and not smaller manganese complexes, as has been suggested recently, that is probably the primary defense against superoxide. PMID:23303180

  16. Photosystem II Functionality in Barley Responds Dynamically to Changes in Leaf Manganese Status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sidsel B.; Powikrowska, Marta; Krogholm, Ken S.; Naumann-Busch, Bianca; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Husted, Søren; Jensen, Poul E.; Pedas, Pai R.

    2016-01-01

    A catalytic manganese (Mn) cluster is required for the oxidation of water in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) in plants. Despite this essential role of Mn in generating the electrons driving photosynthesis, limited information is available on how Mn deficiency affects PSII functionality. We have here used parameters derived from measurements of fluorescence induction kinetics (OJIP transients), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and PSII subunit composition to investigate how latent Mn deficiency changes the photochemistry in two barley genotypes differing in Mn efficiency. Mn deficiency caused dramatic reductions in the quantum yield of PSII and led to the appearance of two new inflection points, the K step and the D dip, in the OJIP fluorescence transients, indicating severe damage to the OEC. In addition, Mn deficiency decreased the ability to induce NPQ in the light, rendering the plants incapable of dissipating excess energy in a controlled way. Thus, the Mn deficient plants became severely affected in their ability to recover from high light-induced photoinhibition, especially under strong Mn deficiency. Interestingly, the Mn-efficient genotype was able to maintain a higher NPQ than the Mn-inefficient genotype when exposed to mild Mn deficiency. However, during severe Mn deficiency, there were no differences between the two genotypes, suggesting a general loss of the ability to disassemble and repair PSII. The pronounced defects of PSII activity were supported by a dramatic decrease in the abundance of the OEC protein subunits, PsbP and PsbQ in response to Mn deficiency for both genotypes. We conclude that regulation of photosynthetic performance by means of maintaining and inducing NPQ mechanisms contribute to genotypic differences in the Mn efficiency of barley genotypes growing under conditions with mild Mn deficiency. PMID:27933084

  17. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  18. Structure and nature of manganese(II) imidazole complexes in frozen aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Un, Sun

    2013-04-01

    A common feature of a large majority of the manganese metalloenzymes, as well as many synthetic biomimetic complexes, is the bonding between the manganese ion and imidazoles. This interaction was studied by examining the nature and structure of manganese(II) imidazole complexes in frozen aqueous solutions using 285 GHz high magnet-field continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-HFEPR) and 95 GHz pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and pulsed electron-double resonance detected nuclear magnetic resonance (PELDOR-NMR). The (55)Mn hyperfine coupling and isotropic g values of Mn(II) in frozen imidazole solutions continuously decreased with increasing imidazole concentration. ENDOR and PELDOR-NMR measurements demonstrated that the structural basis for this behavior arose from the imidazole concentration-dependent distribution of three six-coordinate and two four-coordinate species: [Mn(H2O)6](2+), [Mn(imidazole)(H2O)5](2+), [Mn(imidazole)2(H2O)4](2+), [Mn(imidazole)3(H2O)](2+), and [Mn(imidazole)4](2+). The hyperfine and g values of manganese proteins were also fully consistent with this imidazole effect. Density functional theory methods were used to calculate the structures, spin and charge densities, and hyperfine couplings of a number of different manganese imidazole complexes. The use of density functional theory with large exact-exchange admixture calculations gave isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine couplings that were semiquantitative and of predictive value. The results show that the covalency of the Mn-N bonds play an important role in determining not only magnetic spin parameters but also the structure of the metal binding site. The relationship between the isotropic (55)Mn hyperfine value and the number of imidazole ligands provides a quick and easy test for determining whether a protein binds an Mn(II) ion using histidine residues and, if so, how many are involved. Application of this method shows that as much as 40% of the Mn(II) ions in

  19. Chelate electronic properties control the redox behaviour and superoxide reactivity of seven-coordinate manganese(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao-Feng; Dürr, Katharina; Puchta, Ralph; Heinemann, Frank W; van Eldik, Rudi; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana

    2009-08-28

    We have synthesized and characterized two Mn(II) seven-coordinate complexes with N5 pentadentate ligands, which contain hydrazone and hydrazide groups respectively. We have shown that insertion of hydrazido (amido) groups into the ligand sphere increases the negative charge of the chelate, without changing a donor atom set and coordination geometry, and radically modulate a redox activity of seven-coordinate manganese complexes, which is important for the function of manganese as a superoxide dismutase catalytic center.

  20. Oxidant Selection for the Treatment of Manganese (II), Iron (II), and Arsenic (III) in Groundwaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) arsenic standard and the manganese and iron secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) in water (10µg/L, 50µg/L, and 300µg/L, respectively), many Midwestern water utilities must add a strong...

  1. Synthesis of dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex and interaction with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingquan; Yuan, Juan; Zeng, Jinhua; He, Xiangzhu; Li, Daguang

    2012-11-01

    Dihydromyricetin has many physiological functions and its metal complex could have better effects. DNA is very important in biological body, but little attention has been devoted to the relationship between dihydromyricetin-metal complex and the DNA. In this paper, dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex has been prepared and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG-DTA Analysis). The interaction of dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex with DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectra, fluorescence measurements and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA with binding constant Kb = 5.64 × 104 M and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites with Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksq = 1.16.

  2. Manganese ions enhance mitochondrial H2O2 emission from Krebs cycle oxidoreductases by inducing permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Bonke, Erik; Siebels, Ilka; Zwicker, Klaus; Dröse, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Manganese-induced toxicity has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We could recently show in mechanistic studies that Mn(2+) ions induce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from the ubiquinone binding site of mitochondrial complex II (IIQ) and generally enhance H2O2 formation by accelerating the rate of superoxide dismutation. The present study with intact mitochondria reveals that manganese additionally enhances H2O2 emission by inducing mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). In mitochondria fed by NADH-generating substrates, the combination of Mn(2+) and different respiratory chain inhibitors led to a dynamically increasing H2O2emission which was sensitive to the mPT inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) as well as Ru-360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Under these conditions, flavin-containing enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix, e.g. the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase (OGDH), were major sources of ROS. With succinate as substrate, Mn(2+) stimulated ROS production mainly at complex II, whereby the applied succinate concentration had a marked effect on the tendency for mPT. Also Ca(2+) increased the rate of H2O2 emission by mPT, while no direct effect on ROS-production of complex II was observed. The present study reveals a complex scenario through which manganese affects mitochondrial H2O2 emission: stimulating its production from distinct sites (e.g. site IIQ), accelerating superoxide dismutation and enhancing the emission via mPT which also leads to the loss of soluble components of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems and favors the ROS production from flavin-containing oxidoreductases of the Krebs cycle.

  3. Synthesis, structural analysis, and magnetic properties of ethylmalonate-manganese(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Déniz, Mariadel; Pasán, Jorge; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Fabelo, Oscar; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Yuste, Consuelo; Julve, Miguel; Cano, Joan; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2011-11-07

    Five manganese(II) complexes of formulas [Mn(2)(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)(2)(L)](n) (1-4) and {[Mn(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)][Mn(H(2)O)(4)]}(n) (5) with H(2)Etmal = ethylmalonic acid (1-5) and L = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpa) (1), 4,4'-azobispyridine (azpy) (2), 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) (3), and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe) (4) were synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their thermal behavior and variable-temperature magnetic properties were also investigated. The structure of the compounds 1-4 consists of corrugated layers of aquamanganese(II) units with intralayer carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridges in the anti-syn (equatorial-equatorial) coordination mode which are linked through bis-monodentate bpa (1), azpy (2), 4,4'-bpy (3), and bpe (4) ligands to build up a three-dimensional (3D) framework. The structure of compound 5 is made up by zigzag chains of manganese(II) ions with a regular alternation of [Mn(H(2)O)(4)](2+) and chiral (either Δ or λ enantiomeric forms) [Mn(Etmal)(2)(H(2)O)](2-) units within each chain. In contrast to the bidentate/bis-monodentate coordination mode of the Etmal ligand in 1-4, it adopts the bidentate/monodentate coordination mode in 5 with the bridging carboxylate-ethylmalonate also exhibiting the anti-syn conformation but connecting one equatorial and an axial position from adjacent metal centers. The manganese-manganese separation through the carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridge in 1-5 vary in the range 5.3167(4)-5.5336(7) Å. These values are much shorter than those across the extended bis-monodentate N-donors in 1-4 with longest/shortest values of 11.682(3) (3)/13.9745(9) Å (4). Compounds 1-5 exhibit an overall antiferromagnetic behavior, where the exchange pathway is provided by the carboxylate-ethylmalonate bridge. Monte Carlo simulations based on the classical spin approach (1-5) were used to successfully reproduce the magnetic data of 1-5.

  4. Diverse manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel N; Pinto, Ameet; Anantharaman, Karthik; Ruberg, Steven A; Kramer, Eva L; Raskin, Lutgarde; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-12-09

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are highly reactive minerals that influence the speciation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Although Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are known to catalyze the formation of Mn oxides, little is known about the organisms responsible for Mn oxidation in situ, especially in engineered environments. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are important in drinking water systems, including in biofiltration and water distribution systems. Here, we used cultivation dependent and independent approaches to investigate Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water sources, a treatment plant and associated distribution system. We isolated 29 strains of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and found that highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in all culture-independent datasets and dominant in the studied drinking water treatment plant. These results highlight a potentially important role for Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water systems, where biogenic Mn oxides may affect water quality in terms of aesthetic appearance, speciation of metals and oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds. Deciphering the ecology of these organisms and the factors that regulate their Mn(II)-oxidizing activity could yield important insights into how microbial communities influence the quality of drinking water.

  5. Manganese(II) octa-uranium(IV) hepta-deca-sulfide.

    PubMed

    Oh, George N; Ibers, James A

    2011-09-01

    Single crystals of manganese(II) octa-uranium(IV) hepta-deca-sulfide, MnU(8)S(17), were grown from the reaction of the elements in a RbCl flux. MnU(8)S(17) crystallizes in the space group C2/m in the CrU(8)S(17) structure type. The asymmetric unit is composed of the following atoms with site symmetries shown: U1 (1), U2 (m), U3 (m), Mn1 (2/m), S1 (1), S2 (1); S3 (m), S4 (m), S5 (m), S6 (m) and S7 (2/m). The three U(IV) atoms are each coordinated by eight S atoms in a bicapped trigonal-prismatic arrangement. The Mn(II) atom is coordinated by six S atoms in a distorted octa-hedral arrangement.

  6. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  7. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by hydrous manganese dioxide: adsorption behavior and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Hongjie; Di, Lei; Qu, Dan; Zhai, Yujia; Wang, Yili

    2013-03-01

    Hydrous manganese dioxide (HMO) synthesized by redox of potassium permanganate and hydrogen peroxide was used as an adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. The specific surface area, pore volume and BJH pore diameter of the HMO were 79.31 m2/g, 0.07 cm3/g and 3.38 nm, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium at 298 K could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm equation with qmax value of 352.55 mg/g. The negative values of deltaG and the positive values of deltaH and deltaS indicated the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The pseudo second-order equation could best fit the adsorption data. The value of the calculated activation energy for Pb(II) adsorption onto the HMO was 38.23 kJ/mol. The uptake of Pb(II) by HMO was correlated with increasing surface hydroxyl group content and the main adsorbed speciation was PbOH+. The final chemical state of Pb(II) on the surface of HMO was similar to PbO. HMO was a promising candidate for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution.

  8. A one-dimensional chain structure based on unusual tetranuclear manganese(II) clusters.

    PubMed

    Che, Guang Bo; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chun Bo; Li, Xiu Ying; Liu, Bo

    2008-11-01

    The title coordination polymer, poly[bis(mu(4)-biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxylato)(dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine)manganese(II)], [Mn(2)(C(14)H(8)O(4))(2)(C(18)H(10)N(4))](n), was obtained through the reaction of MnCl(2).4H(2)O, biphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxylic acid (H(2)dpdc) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (L) under hydrothermal conditions. The asymmetric unit contains two crystallographically unique Mn(II) ions, one unique L ligand and two unique dpdc ligands. One Mn ion is six-coordinated by four O atoms from three different dpdc ligands and two N atoms from one L ligand, adopting a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The distortions from ideal octahedral geometry are largely due to the presence of chelating ligands and the resulting acute N-Mn-N and O-Mn-O angles. The second Mn ion is coordinated in a distorted trigonal bipyramidal fashion by five O atoms from four distinct dpdc ligands. Four Mn(II) ions are bridged by the carboxylate groups of the dpdc ligands to form an unusual tetranuclear Mn(II) cluster. Clusters are further connected by the aromatic backbone of the dicarboxylate ligands, forming a one-dimensional chain structure along the b axis. The title compound is the first example of a chain structure based on a tetranuclear Mn(II) cluster.

  9. Leucine 245 is a critical residue for folding and function of the manganese stabilizing protein of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Lydakis-Simantiris, N; Betts, S D; Yocum, C F

    1999-11-23

    In solution, Manganese Stabilizing Protein, the polypeptide which is responsible for the structural and functional integrity of the manganese cluster in photosystem II, is a natively unfolded protein with a prolate ellipsoid shape [Lydakis-Simantiris et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 404-414; Zubrzycki et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 13553-13558]. The C-terminal tripeptide of Manganese Stabilizing Protein was shown to be critical for binding to photosystem II and restoration of O(2) evolution activity [Betts et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 14230-14236]. Here, we report new biochemical, hydrodynamic, and spectroscopic data on mutants E246K, E246STOP, L245E, L245STOP, and Q244STOP. Truncation of the final dipeptide (E246STOP) or substitution of Glu246 with Lys resulted in no significant changes in secondary and tertiary structures of Manganese Stabilizing Protein as monitored by CD spectroscopy. The apparent molecular mass of the protein remained unchanged, both mutants were able to rebind to photosystem II, and both proteins reactivate O(2) evolution. Manganese Stabilizing Protein lacking the final tripeptide (L245STOP), or substitution of Glu for Leu245 dramatically modified the protein's solution structure. The apparent molecular masses of these mutants increased significantly, which might indicate unfolding of the protein in solution. This was verified by CD spectroscopy. Both mutant proteins rebound to photosystem II with lower affinities, and activation of O(2) evolution was decreased dramatically. Enhancement of these defects was observed upon removal of the final tetrapeptide (Q244STOP). These results indicate that Leu245 is essential to maintaining Manganese Stabilizing Protein's solution structure in a conformation that promotes efficient binding to photosystem II and/or for the subsequent steps that lead to enzyme activation. Based on an analysis of the properties of C-terminal mutations, a hypothesis for structural requirements for functional binding of

  10. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  11. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  12. Nutrient input influences fungal community composition and size and can stimulate manganese (II) oxidation in caves.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Sarah K; Zorn, Bryan T; Santelli, Cara M; Roble, Leigh A; Carmichael, Mary J; Bräuer, Suzanna L

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the fungal role in biogeochemical cycling in oligotrophic ecosystems. This study compared fungal communities and assessed the role of exogenous carbon on microbial community structure and function in two southern Appalachian caves: an anthropogenically impacted cave and a near-pristine cave. Due to carbon input from shallow soils, the anthropogenically impacted cave had an order of magnitude greater fungal and bacterial quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) gene copy numbers, had significantly greater community diversity, and was dominated by ascomycotal phylotypes common in early phase, labile organic matter decomposition. Fungal assemblages in the near-pristine cave samples were dominated by Basidiomycota typically found in deeper soils (and/or in late phase, recalcitrant organic matter decomposition), suggesting more oligotrophic conditions. In situ carbon and manganese (II) [Mn(II)] addition over 10 weeks resulted in growth of fungal mycelia followed by increased Mn(II) oxidation. A before/after comparison of the fungal communities indicated that this enrichment increased the quantity of fungal and bacterial cells, yet decreased overall fungal diversity. Anthropogenic carbon sources can therefore dramatically influence the diversity and quantity of fungi, impact microbial community function, and stimulate Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in a cascade of changes that can strongly influence nutrient and trace element biogeochemical cycles in karst aquifers.

  13. Dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II), trinuclear nickel(II), and pentanuclear copper(II) complexes with novel macrocyclic and acyclic Schiff-base ligands having enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamine components.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jue-Chao; Chu, Zhao-Lian; Huang, Wei; Wang, Gang; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2010-07-05

    Four novel [3 + 3] Schiff-base macrocyclic ligands I-IV condensed from 2,6-diformyl-4-substituted phenols (R = CH(3) or Cl) and enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamines have been synthesized and characterized. Metal-ion complexations of these enantiopure and racemic [3 + 3] macrocyclic ligands with different cadmium(II), zinc(II), manganese(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) salts lead to the cleavage of Schiff-base C horizontal lineN double bonds and subsequent ring contraction of the macrocyclic ligands due to the size effects and the spatial restrictions of the coordination geometry of the central metals, the steric hindrance of ligands, and the counterions used. As a result, five [2 + 2] and one [1 + 2] dinuclear cadmium(II) complexes (1-6), two [2 + 2] dinuclear zinc(II) (7 and 8), and two [2 + 2] dinuclear manganese(II) (9 and 10) complexes together with one [1 + 1] trinuclear nickel(II) complex (11) and one [1 + 2] pentanuclear copper(II) complex (12), bearing enantiopure or racemic ligands, different substituent groups in the phenyl rings, and different anionic ligands (Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), and SCN(-)), have been obtained in which the chiral carbon atoms in the camphoric backbones are arranged in different ways (RRSS for the enantiopure ligands in 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7-10 and RSRS for the racemic ligands in 3, 6, 11, and 12). The steric hindrance effects of the methyl group bonded to one of the chiral carbon atoms of camphoric diamine units are believed to play important roles in the formation of the acyclic [1 + 1] trinuclear complex 11 and [1 + 2] dinuclear and pentanuclear complexes 6 and 12. In dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II) complexes 1-10, the sequence of separations between the metal centers is consistent with that of the ionic radii shortened from cadmium(II) to manganese(II) to zinc(II) ions. Furthermore, UV-vis, circular dichroism, (1)H NMR, and fluorescence spectra have been used to characterize and compare the structural

  14. Subchronic inhalation of soluble manganese induces expression of hypoxia-associated angiogenic genes in adult mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Bredow, Sebastian . E-mail: sbredow@LRRI.org; Falgout, Melanie M.; March, Thomas H.; Yingling, Christin M.; Malkoski, Stephen P.; Aden, James; Bedrick, Edward J.; Lewis, Johnnye L.; Divine, Kevin K.

    2007-06-01

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE), these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m{sup 3} for 5 days at 6 h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease.

  15. Purification and Characterization of the Manganese(II) Oxidizing Protein from Erythrobacter sp. SD-21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakama, K. R.; Lien, A.; Johnson, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The manganese(II) oxidizing protein (Mop) found in the alpha-proteobacterium Erythrobacter sp. SD-21 catalyzes the formation of insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides from soluble Mn(II). These Mn(III/IV) oxides formed are one of the strongest naturally occurring oxides, next to oxygen, and can be used to adsorb and oxidize toxic chemicals from the surrounding environment. Because of the beneficial use in the treatment of contaminated sources, the mechanism and biochemical properties of this novel enzyme are being studied. Due to low expression levels in the native host strain, purification of Mop has been problematic. To overcome this problem the gene encoding Mop, mopA, was cloned from the native host into a C-terminal histidine tag vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions have been applied in attempts to purify an active Mop. Western blots have confirmed that the protein is being expressed and is at the expected size of 250 kDa. Preliminary characterization on crude extract containing Mop has shown a Km and vmax value of 2453 uM and 0.025 uM min-1, respectively. Heme and pyrroloquinoline quinone can stimulate Mn(II) oxidizing activity, but hydrogen peroxide does not affect activity, despite the sequence similarity to animal heme peroxidase proteins. Research has been shown that calcium is essential for Mop activity. Purifying an active Mn(II) oxidizing protein will allow for a better understanding behind the enigmatic process of Mn(II) oxidation.

  16. Synthesis, structure and some properties of a manganese(II) benzoate containing diimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pranajit; Roy, Subhadip; Sarkar, Sanjoy; Chowdhury, Shubhamoy; Purkayastha, R. N. Dutta; Raghavaiah, Pallepogu; McArdle, Patrick; Deb, Lokesh; Devi, Sarangthem Indira

    2015-12-01

    A new monomeric manganese(II) benzoate complex containing nitrogen donor 2,2‧-bipyridine, [Mn(OBz)2(bipy)(H2O)] (OBz = benzoate, bipy = 2,2‧-bipyridine) has been synthesized from aqueous methanol medium and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The compound exhibits moderate to appreciable antimicrobial activity. The complex crystallizes in space group P21/n. Mn(II) atom is ligated by two N atoms of bipyridine, three O atoms from a monodentate and a bidentate benzoate ligand and a water molecule forming distorted octahedral structure. The coordinated water molecule forms intramolecular hydrogen bonds and links the monomer molecules into hydrogen bonded dimer. The hydrogen bonded dimers are involved in intermolecular C-H···O and π-π stacking interactions. Density functional theory (DFT) computation was carried out to compute the frequencies of relevant vibrational modes and electronic properties, the results are in compliance with the experimentally obtained structural and spectral data.

  17. Chemoprotective role of quercetin in manganese-induced toxicity along the brain-pituitary-testicular axis in rats.

    PubMed

    Adedara, Isaac A; Subair, Temitayo I; Ego, Valerie C; Oyediran, Oluwasetemi; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-02-01

    Reproductive dysfunction in response to manganese exposure has been reported in humans and animals. Quercetin, a bioflavonoid widely distributed in fruits, vegetables and beverages has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities in different experimental model systems. However, there is dearth of scientific information on the influence of quercetin on manganese-induced reproductive toxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of quercetin on manganese-induced functional alterations along the brain-pituitary- testicular axis in rats. Manganese was administered alone at 15 mg/kg body weight or orally co-treated with quercetin at 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight for 45 consecutive days. Results indicated that quercetin co-treatment significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited manganese-induced elevation in biomarkers of oxidative stress whereas it increased antioxidant enzymes activities and glutathione level in the brain, testes and epididymis of the treated rats. Furthermore, quercetin mediated suppression of inflammatory indices and caspase-3 activity was accompanied by preservation of histo-architectures of the brain, testes and epididymis in manganese-treated rats. The significant reversal of manganese-induced decreases in reproductive hormones (i.e. luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone) and testicular activities of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase by quercetin was complemented by an increase in sperm quality and quantity in the treated rats. Collectively, quercetin modulated manganese-induced toxicity along the brain-pituitary-testicular axis in rats via its intrinsic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, and may thus represent a potential pharmacological agent against manganese-induced male reproductive deficits in humans.

  18. Pathogenesis of Mortalin in Manganese-induced Parkinsonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Travis J.

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary micronutrient for which excessive exposure has long been known to be neurotoxic. Historically, short-term, high-intensity exposure in occupational settings was recognized to cause acute-onset parkinsonism (PS) termed manganism. Although modern day exposures are typically several orders of magnitude lower than those necessary to cause manganism, chronic, low-level exposures are not uncommon among a number of occupations and communities. Recent epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between Mn exposure and risk of PS, and in this regard Mn remains a public health concern. The work described here was designed to provide insight toward questions which remain with respect to Mn exposure and its toxic effect on the brain, and includes studies utilizing Mn exposed human populations and in vitro model systems to address these objectives. Blood plasma samples obtained from a cohort of welders, whose work is recognized as generating appreciable amounts of airborne Mn, and post-mortem brain tissue of Mn mine workers were both found to have discernable alterations related to the mitochondrial chaperone protein mortalin. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that reduced astroglial expression of mortalin confers neuronal susceptibility to toxicity elicited by low levels of Mn, possibly via mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress mediated by alpha-synuclein. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that Mn exposures experienced by modern day populations are sufficient to cause biological alterations in humans that are potentially neurotoxic.

  19. Terphenyl substituted derivatives of manganese(II): distorted geometries and resistance to elimination.

    PubMed

    Ni, Chengbao; Fettinger, James C; Long, Gary J; Power, Philip P

    2010-11-28

    Reaction of {Li(THF)Ar'MnI(2)}(2) (Ar' = C(6)H(3)-2,6-(C(6)H(2)-2,6-(i)Pr(3))(2)) with LiAr', LiC≡CR (R = (t)Bu or Ph), or (C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3))MgBr(THF)(2) afforded the diaryl MnAr'(2) (1), the alkynyl salts Ar'Mn(C≡C(t)Bu)(4){Li(THF)}(3) (2) and Ar'Mn(C≡CPh)(3)Li(3)(THF)(Et(2)O)(2)(μ(3)-I) (3), and the manganate salt {Li(THF)}Ar'Mn(μ-I)(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3)) (4), respectively. Complex 4 reacted with one equivalent of (C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3))MgBr(THF)(2) to afford the homoleptic dimer {Mn(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3))(μ-C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3))}(2) (5), which resulted from the displacement of the bulkier Ar' ligand in preference to the halogen. The reaction of the more crowded {Li(THF)Ar*MnI(2)}(2) (Ar* = C(6)H(3)-2,6-(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(i)Pr(3))(2)) with Li(t)Bu gave complex Ar*Mn(t)Bu (6). Complex 1 is a rare monomeric homoleptic two-coordinate diaryl Mn(II) complex; while 6 displays no tendency to eliminate β-hydrogens from the (t)Bu group because of the stabilization supplied by Ar*. Compounds 2 and 3 have cubane frameworks, which are constructed from a manganese, three carbons from three acetylide ligands, three lithiums, each coordinated by a donor, plus either a carbon from a further acetylide ligand (2) or an iodide (3). The Mn(II) atom in 4 has an unusual distorted T-shaped geometry while the dimeric 5 features trigonal planar manganese coordination. The chloride substituted complex Li(2)(THF)(3){Ar'MnCl(2)}(2) (7), which has a structure very similar to that of {Li(THF)Ar'MnI(2)}(2), was also prepared for use as a possible starting material. However, its generally lower solubility rendered it less useful than the iodo salt. Complexes 1-7 were characterized by X-ray crystallography and UV-vis spectroscopy. Magnetic studies of 2-4 and 6 showed that they have 3d(5) high-spin configurations.

  20. Statics of molybdenum sorption from manganese(II) sulfate solutions on porous and macronetwork anion-exchange resin AN-108

    SciTech Connect

    Kholmogorov, A.G.; Kononova, O.N.; Pashkov, G.L.

    1994-11-20

    The statics have been considered of the ion-exchange equilibrium in the system R{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-MnSO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-Mo(VI)-H{sub 2}O in recovery of molybdenum(VI) ions from sulfate solutions of manganese(II) in relation to the sulfuric acid concentration, physical and chemical structure of the ion-exchange resin, and solution temperatures.

  1. Manganese induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates multiple caspases in nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells, SN4741.

    PubMed

    Chun, H S; Lee, H; Son, J H

    2001-12-04

    Chronic exposure to manganese causes Parkinson's disease (PD)-like clinical symptoms (Neurotoxicology 5 (1984) 13; Arch. Neurol. 46 (1989) 1104; Neurology 56 (2001) 4). Occupational exposure to manganese is proposed as a risk factor in specific cases of idiopathic PD (Neurology 56 (2001) 8). We have investigated the mechanism of manganese neurotoxicity in nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons using the DA cell line, SN4741 (J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 10). Manganese treatment elicited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses, such as an increased level of the ER chaperone BiP, and simultaneously activated the ER resident caspase-12. Peak activation of other major initiator caspases-like activities, such as caspase-1, -8 and -9, ensued, resulting in activation of caspase-3-like activity during manganese-induced DA cell death. The neurotoxic cell death induced by manganese was significantly reduced in the Bcl-2-overexpressing DA cell lines. Our findings suggest that manganese-induced neurotoxicity is mediated in part by ER stress and considerably ameliorated by Bcl-2 overexpression in DA cells.

  2. Mn(II) removal from groundwater with manganese oxide-coated filter media.

    PubMed

    Piispanen, Jutta K; Sallanko, Jarmo T

    2010-11-01

    Removing soluble manganese from groundwater requires a strong chemical oxidant, such as ozone or potassium permanganate, or raising the pH to alkaline value (over pH 9). Biological or adsorption processes can also be applied. Filter media naturally or industrially coated with manganese oxide are effective in adsorptive manganese removal. In this work, a layer of commercial manganese oxide coated medium was added to the top of an experimental sand/anthracite filter column to improve manganese removal. The coated layer was ca 28 cm thick (20% of the total filter depth) and the sand layer was 110 cm thick. The coated layer enhanced the manganese removal markedly. Manganese removal increased by over 91%, and < 0.02 mg/L of manganese remained in the treated water. Also iron removal was enhanced. Filters with added coated layer recovered faster than reference filter from filter backwashes. Sodium hypochlorite feed, which was tested in regeneration of the filter medium, had a slight negative effect on the filter performance.

  3. Determination of proteins with tetracarboxy manganese(II) phthalocyanine by resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning-Li; Peng, Jin-Yun

    2008-12-15

    A novel method for the determination of proteins by using tetracarboxy manganese(II) phthalocyanine (MnC4Pc) as a resonance light scattering (RLS) probe has been developed. At pH 3.0 Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer solution, the RLS intensity of MnC4Pc at 385 nm is greatly enhanced in the presence of proteins. The effects of pH, reaction time, concentration of MnC4Pc and interfering substances on the enhanced RLS intensity are investigated, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the linear ranges of the calibration curves are 0-2.00 microg mL(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), 0.0-1.75 microg mL(-1) for human-IgG and ovalbumin, with a detection limit of 16.37 ng mL(-1) BSA, 17.62 ng mL(-1) HSA, 19.41 ng mL(-1) human-IgG and 20.72 ng mL(-1) ovalbumin. The method has been applied to the determination of total proteins in human serum samples collected from a hospital and the results are in good agreement with those reported by the hospital.

  4. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-01

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn2+ ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn2+ ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn2+ ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550 nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn2+] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn2+ ions reveal the concentration of Mn2+ ions in solution.

  5. Colorimetric detection of manganese(II) ions using gold/dopa nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-10-15

    We report here a one-pot, greener, eco-friendly strategy for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using L-dopa. The as-prepared dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/dopa) can detect low concentrations of manganese(II) metal ions in aqueous solution. The binding forces between dopa and Mn(2+) ions cause dopa-functionalized gold nanoparticles to come closer together, decreasing the interparticle distance and aggregating it with a change in color of colloidal solution from red to purplish-blue. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed a decreased surface charge on the surface of gold nanoparticles when exposed to Mn(2+) ions, which caused cross-linking aggregation. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images also revealed the aggregation of gold nanoparticles with the addition of Mn(2+) ions. The extinction ratio of absorbance at 700-550nm (A700/A550) was linear against the concentration of [Mn(2+)] ions. Thus, the optical absorption spectra of gold colloidal solution before and after the addition of Mn(2+) ions reveal the concentration of Mn(2+) ions in solution.

  6. Synthesis, structure determination and 3D molecular modeling of some novel manganese(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari Kumaran Nair, M. L.; Lalitha, K. P.

    2013-06-01

    Some novel manganese(II) complexes with the ligand (z)-4-((2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl)-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-one, MPAAP, 3-methoxy phenol azoantipyrine, L1, having the formulae [Mn(L1)2(X)2], [Mn(L1)2(Y)2], where X = Cl- / Br-; Y = NCS- were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements, spectral (IR, UV-Visible, EPR, FAB mass) studies, thermogravimetric analysis, powder XRD and cyclic voltammetric studies and by SEM image. An octahedral structure is tentatively proposed for the complexes with respect to the above studies. The [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] was subjected to γ-ray irradiation and the internal changes accompanied were evaluated. The energy minimized configuration of the complex [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] was made with CHEM Bio 3D Ultra 11.0 and the respective parameters are computed. The ligand and its complex [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] were screened for their possible antimicrobial activities.

  7. 24-epibrassinolide mitigates the adverse effects of manganese induced toxicity through improved antioxidant system and photosynthetic attributes in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Fariduddin, Qazi; Ahmed, Mumtaz; Mir, Bilal A; Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Tanveer A

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish relationship between manganese-induced toxicity and antioxidant system response in Brassica juncea plants and also to investigate whether brassinosteroids activate antioxidant system to confer tolerance to the plants affected with manganese induced oxidative stress. Brassica juncea plants were administered with 3, 6, or 9 mM manganese at 10-day stage for 3 days. At 31-day stage, the seedlings were sprayed with deionized water (control) or 10(-8) M of 24-epibrassinolide, and plants were harvested at 45-day stage to assess growth, leaf gas-exchange traits, and biochemical parameters. The manganese treatments diminished growth along with photosynthetic attributes and carbonic anhydrase activity in the concentration-dependent manner, whereas it enhanced lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, accumulation of H2O2 as well as proline, and various antioxidant enzymes in the leaves of Brassica juncea which were more pronounced at higher concentrations of manganese. However, the follow-up application of 24-epibrassinolide to the manganese stressed plants improved growth, water relations, and photosynthesis and further enhanced the various antioxidant enzymes viz. catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase and content of proline. The elevated level of antioxidant enzymes as well as proline could have conferred tolerance to the manganese-stressed plants resulting in improved growth and photosynthetic attributes.

  8. Austenite Stability Effects on Tensile Behavior of Manganese-Enriched-Austenite Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; de Moor, E.; Merwin, M. J.; Clausen, B.; Speer, J. G.; Matlock, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese enrichment of austenite during prolonged intercritical annealing was used to produce a family of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with varying retained austenite contents. Cold-rolled 0.1C-7.1Mn steel was annealed at incremental temperatures between 848 K and 948 K (575 °C and 675 °C) for 1 week to enrich austenite in manganese. The resulting microstructures are comprised of varying fractions of intercritical ferrite, martensite, and retained austenite. Tensile behavior is dependent on annealing temperature and ranged from a low strain-hardening "flat" curve to high strength and ductility conditions that display positive strain hardening over a range of strain levels. The mechanical stability of austenite was measured using in-situ neutron diffraction and was shown to depend significantly on annealing temperature. Variations in austenite stability between annealing conditions help explain the observed strain hardening behaviors.

  9. Impact of Mn(II)-Manganese Oxide Reactions on Ni and Zn Speciation.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, Margaret A G; Dye, Katherine G; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2017-03-01

    Layered Mn oxide minerals (phyllomanganates) often control trace metal fate in natural systems. The strong uptake of metals such as Ni and Zn by phyllomanganates results from adsorption on or incorporation into vacancy sites. Mn(II) also binds to vacancies and subsequent comproportionation with structural Mn(IV) may alter sheet structures by forming larger and distorted Mn(III)O6 octahedra. Such Mn(II)-phyllomanganate reactions may thus alter metal uptake by blocking key reactive sites. Here we investigate the effect of Mn(II) on Ni and Zn binding to phyllomanganates of varying initial vacancy content (δ-MnO2, hexagonal birnessite, and triclinic birnessite) at pH 4 and 7 under anaerobic conditions. Dissolved Mn(II) decreases macroscopic Ni and Zn uptake at pH 4 but not pH 7. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy demonstrates that decreased uptake at pH 4 corresponds with altered Ni and Zn adsorption mechanisms. These metals transition from binding in the interlayer to sheet edges, with Zn increasing its tetrahedrally coordinated fraction. These effects on metal uptake and binding correlate with Mn(II)-induced structural changes, which are more substantial at pH 4 than 7. Through these structural effects and the pH-dependence of Mn(II)-metal competitive adsorption, system pH largely controls metal binding to phyllomanganates in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  10. Apoptosis Induced by Manganese on Neuronal SK-N-MC Cell Line: Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Mitochondria Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyonok; Kim, Do-Sung; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Kim, Kee-Won; Kim, Hyung-Ryong

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is one of heavy metals for causing neurogenerative dysfunction like Manganism. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of MnCl2 using different times and various concentrations including whether manganese toxicity may involve in two intrinsic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondria dysfunction and lead to neuronal apoptosis mediated by organelle disorders in neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC. Methods In the acute toxicity test, five concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000 uM) of MnCl2 with 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 hours exposure were selected to analyze cell viability. In addition, to better understand their toxicity, acute toxicity was examined with 1,000 uM MnCl2 for 24 hours exposure via reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondria membrane potential, western blotting and mitochondrial complex activities. Results Our results showed that both increments of dose and time prompt the increments in the number of dead cells. Cells treated by 1,000 µM MnCl2 activated 265% (±8.1) caspase-3 compared to control cell. MnCl2 induced intracellular ROS produced 168% (±2.3%) compared to that of the control cells and MnCl2 induced neurotoxicity significantly dissipated 48.9% of mitochondria membrane potential compared to the control cells. Conclusions This study indicated that MnCl2 induced apoptosis via ER stress and mitochondria dysfunction. In addition, MnCl2 affected only complex I except complex II, III or IV activities. PMID:22232721

  11. New manganese(II) and nickel(II) coordination compounds with N,O-polydentate ligands obtained from pyridoxal and tripodal units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebani, Patrícia Regina; Fontana, Liniquer Andre; Campos, Patrick Teixeira; Rosso, Eduardo F.; Piquini, Paulo C.; Iglesias, Bernardo Almeida; Back, Davi Fernando

    2016-09-01

    We have reported the synthesis involving the condensation of pyridoxal with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine obtained a tripodal ligand, as well as its subsequent complexation with the manganese(II) and nickel(II) ions. The structural analysis revealed, in the case of complex 1, the formation of a monomeric complex with Mn(II) species. In the complex 2, with Ni(II) metal ion, we describe the probable mechanism for the formation of hemiacetal in these complexes. Only the complex 1 catalyze the dismutation of superoxide efficiently with IC50 equal to 3.38 μM, evaluated through the nitro blue tetrazolium photoreduction inhibition superoxide dismutase assay, in aqueous solution of pH 7.8. Density functional theory calculations are done to characterize and compare the molecular frontier orbitals of the Mn(II) and Ni(II) complexes.

  12. A simple and effective catalytic system for epoxidation of aliphatic terminal alkenes with manganese(II) as the catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kam-Piu; Wong, Wing-Leung; Lam, Kin-Ming; Lai, Cheuk-Piu; Chan, Tak Hang; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2008-01-01

    A simple catalytic system that uses commercially available manganese(II) perchlorate as the catalyst and peracetic acid as the oxidant is found to be very effective in the epoxidation of aliphatic terminal alkenes with high product selectivity at ambient temperature. Many terminal alkenes are epoxidised efficiently on a gram scale in less than an hour to give excellent yields of isolated product (>90 %) of epoxides in high purity. Kinetic studies with some C9-alkenes show that the catalytic system is more efficient in epoxidising terminal alkenes than internal alkenes, which is contrary to most commonly known epoxidation systems. The reaction rate for epoxidation decreases in the order: 1-nonene>cis-3-nonene>trans-3-nonene. ESI-MS and EPR spectroscopic studies suggest that the active form of the catalyst is a high-valent oligonuclear manganese species, which probably functions as the oxygen atom-transfer agent in the epoxidation reaction.

  13. Uraninite oxidation and dissolution induced by manganese oxide: A redox reaction between two insoluble minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zimeng; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kapoor, Pratyul; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    The longevity of subsurface U(IV) produced by reduction of U(VI) during in situ bioremediation can be limited by reoxidation to more mobile U(VI) species. Coupling of the biogeochemical cycles of U and Mn may affect the fate and transport of uranium. Manganese oxides can act as a powerful oxidant that accelerates the oxidative dissolution of UO2. This study investigated the physical and chemical factors controlling the interaction between UO2 and MnO2, which are both poorly soluble minerals. A multi-chamber reactor with a permeable membrane was used to eliminate direct contact of the two minerals while still allowing transport of aqueous species. The oxidation of UO2 was not significantly enhanced by MnO2 if the two solids were physically separated. Complete mixing of MnO2 with UO2 led to a much greater extent and rate of U oxidation. When direct contact is not possible, the reaction slowly progresses through release of soluble U(IV) with its adsorption and oxidation on MnO2. Continuously-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) were used to quantify the steady-state rates of UO2 dissolution induced by MnO2. MnO2 dramatically promoted UO2 dissolution, but the degree of promotion leveled off once the MnO2:UO2 ratio exceeded a critical value. Substantial amounts of U(VI) and Mn(II) were retained on MnO2 surfaces. The total production of Mn(II) was less than that of U(VI), indicating that the fate of Mn products and their impact on UO2-MnO2 reaction kinetics were complicated and may involve formation of Mn(III) phases. At higher dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations, UO2 oxidation by MnO2 was faster and less U(VI) was adsorbed to MnO2. Such an inverse relationship suggested that U(VI) may passivate MnO2 surfaces. A conceptual model was developed to describe the oxidation rate of UO2 by MnO2. This model is potentially applicable to a broad range of water chemistry conditions and is relevant to other environmental redox processes involving two poorly soluble minerals.

  14. Distribution of manganese species in an oxidative dimerization reaction of a bis-terpyridine mononuclear manganese (II) complex and their heterogeneous water oxidation activities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Sato, Taisei; Yamazaki, Hirosato; Yagi, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous water oxidation catalyses were studied as a synthetic model of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis using mica adsorbing various manganese species. Distribution of manganese species formed in the oxidative dimerization reaction of [Mn(II)(terpy)2](2+) (terpy=2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) (1') with various oxidants in water was revealed. 1' was stoichiometrically oxidized to form di-μ-oxo dinuclear manganese complex, [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(III)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](3+) (1) by KMnO4 as an oxidant. When Oxone and Ce(IV) oxidants were used, the further oxidation of 1 to [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(IV)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](4+) (2) was observed after the oxidative dimerization reaction of 1'. The mica adsorbates with various composition of 1', 1 and 2 were prepared by adding mica suspension to the various oxidant-treated solutions followed by filtration. The heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis by the mica adsorbates was examined using a Ce(IV) oxidant. The observed catalytic activity of the mica adsorbates corresponded to a content of 1 (1ads) adsorbed on mica for KMnO4- and Oxone-treated systems, indicating that 1' (1'ads) and 2 (2ads) adsorbed on mica do not work for the catalysis. The kinetic analysis suggested that 1ads works for the catalysis through cooperation with adjacent 1ads or 2ads, meaning that 2ads assists the cooperative catalysis by 1ads though 2ads is not able to work for the catalysis alone. For the Ce(IV)-treated system, O2 evolution was hardly observed although the sufficient amount of 1ads was contained in the mica adsorbates. This was explained by the impeded penetration of Ce(IV) ions (as an oxidant for water oxidation) into mica by Ce(3+) cations (generated in oxidative dimerization of 1') co-adsorbed with 1ads.

  15. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50–1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as Fv/Fm, although the characteristic peak temperature of the S2/3QB – charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700+) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700+ re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed. PMID:23183256

  16. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Millaleo, R; Reyes-Díaz, M; Alberdi, M; Ivanov, A G; Krol, M; Hüner, N P A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50-1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as F(v)/F(m), although the characteristic peak temperature of the S(2/3)Q(B) (-) charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33 kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700(+)) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700(+) re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed.

  17. Complex of manganese (II) with curcumin: Spectroscopic characterization, DFT study, model-based analysis and antiradical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgannezhad, Lena; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati

    2016-04-01

    The complex formation between curcumin (Cur) and Manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate (MnCl2.4H2O) was studied by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data suggest that Cur can chelate Manganese cations. A simple multi-wavelength model-based method was used to define stability constant for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components were extracted using this method. Density functional theory (DFT) was also used to view insight into complexation mechanism. Antioxidant activity of Cur and Cur-Mn(II) complex was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Bond dissociation energy (BDE), the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of Cur and the complex also were calculated at PW91/TZ2P level of theory using ADF 2009.01 package. The experimental results show that Cur has a higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than Cur-Mn(II). This observation is theoretically justified by means of lower BDE and higher HOMO and LUMO energy values of Cur ligand as compared with those of Cur-Mn(II) complex.

  18. Manganese(II,III) Oxyborate, Mn 2OBO 3: A Distorted Homometallic Warwickite—Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Band Calculations, and Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrestam, R.; Kritikos, M.; Sjödin, A.

    1995-02-01

    The manganese(II,III) oxyborate with the composition Mn2OBO3 has been synthesized by high-temperature techniques. X-ray studies show that crystals of the specimen, grown with borax as flux, are monoclinic, with space group P21/n, = 9.2866(7), b = 9.5333(10), c = 3.2438(3) Å, and β = 90.757(7)°. A model of the crystal structure has been refined with the 2064 most significant (l ≥ 5 · σ1) X-ray reflections with sin(θ)/λ ≤ 1.08 Å-1 to R = 0.40. The structure of Mn2OBO3 can be considered to be a distorted modification of the orthorhombic warwickite structure. The distortions, apparently caused by Jahn-Teller effects induced by the Mn3+ ions, remove the mirror symmetry of the parent undistorted warwickite. As a consequence, the space group symmetry is lowered from Pnam to one of its subgroups, P21/n. The structural results as well as the measured magnetic susceptibilities indicate high-spin manganese ions. The magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature region 110-300 K follow the Curie-Weiss law. The Weiss constant of -132(1) K indicates an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The bond distances and calculated bond valence sums indicate that the trivalent manganese ions are located in the two inner columns of the four-octahedra-wide walls. This metal charge distribution is supported by extended Hückel band calculations on some homometallic warwickites. The difference in metal coordination around one of the borate oxygen atoms is reflected by a significant deviation of the borate group geometry from the ideal trigonal symmetry.

  19. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: Putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1. Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  20. Role of transcription factor yin yang 1 in manganese-induced reduction of astrocytic glutamate transporters: putative mechanism for manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant non-neuronal glial cells in the brain. Once relegated to a mere supportive role for neurons, contemporary dogmas ascribe multiple active roles for these cells in central nervous system (CNS) function, including maintenance of optimal glutamate levels in synapses. Regulation of glutamate levels in the synaptic cleft is crucial for preventing excitotoxic neuronal injury. Glutamate levels are regulated predominantly by two astrocytic glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). Indeed, the dysregulation of these transporters has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as manganism, which is caused by overexposure to the trace metal, manganese (Mn). Although Mn is an essential trace element, its excessive accumulation in the brain as a result of chronic occupational or environmental exposures induces a neurological disorder referred to as manganism, which shares common pathological features with Parkinsonism. Mn decreases the expression and function of both GLAST and GLT-1.Astrocytes are commonly targeted by Mn, and thus reduction in astrocytic glutamate transporter function represents a critical mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the role of astrocytic glutamate transporters in neurodegenerative diseases and Mn-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25128239

  1. Removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from wastewater by using triethylenetetramine functionalized grafted cellulose acetate-manganese dioxide composite.

    PubMed

    Yakout, Amr A; El-Sokkary, Ramadan H; Shreadah, Mohamed A; Abdel Hamid, Omnia G

    2016-09-05

    In this manuscript, we have studied the removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by using triethylenetetramine functionalized cellulose acetate grafted with the copolymer-manganese dioxide composite. The novel sorbent cellulose was extracted from the mangrove trees (Avicennia marina) and it was then acetylated and grafted with acrylamide. The sorbent composite was designed to interact simultaneously with higher metal loading by complexation-adsorption process. FT-IR, SEM, EDAX and TGA techniques were employed to characterize the cellulose modified composite. Sorption equilibria were established after 30min and their data were described by Langmuir and Freundlich models. The functionalized hybrid cellulose composite showed maximum adsorption capacity 82.06 and 196.84mgg(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. The studied metal ions were successfully recovered from real wastewater samples of different matrices.

  2. Selective Separation and Extraction of Vanadium (V) Over Manganese (II) from Co-Leaching Solution of Roasted Stone Coal and Pyrolusite Using Solvent Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z. L.; Feng, Y. L.; Zhou, Y. Z.; Li, H. R.; Wang, W. D.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the novel technology for selective separation and extraction of vanadium (V) over manganese (II) from co-leaching solution of roasted stone coal and pyrolusite using solvent extraction, the extraction effect of vanadium (V) and manganese (II) has been studied and many technical conditions have also been optimized. Meanwhile, countercurrent simulation experiments were conducted to verify the results of the experiments. The results indicated that with three countercurrent extraction stages, 99.21% vanadium (V) was extracted using 5% (v/v) N235 and 5% (v/v) secondary octyl alcohol at initial aqueous pH of 3.0 and O/A phase ratio of 1.0. Vanadium (V) could be completely stripped after three-stage countercurrent experiments with 20 wt.% NH4Cl at O/A phase ratio of 1.0. The process flow sheet for the recovery of vanadium (V), as well as manganese (II), was proposed.

  3. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Allancer DC; Ramalho, Laylla S; Souza, Álvaro PS; Mendes, Elizabeth P; Colugnati, Diego B; Zufelato, Nícholas; Sousa, Marcelo H; Bakuzis, Andris F; Castro, Carlos H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for various biomedical applications. Importantly, manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles have useful magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and potential for hyperthermia treatment, but their effects in the cardiovascular system are poorly reported. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular effects of three different types of manganese ferrite-based magnetic nanoparticles: citrate-coated (CiMNPs); tripolyphosphate-coated (PhMNPs); and bare magnetic nanoparticles (BaMNPs). The samples were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The direct effects of the MNPs on cardiac contractility were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. The CiMNPs, but not PhMNPs and BaMNPs, induced a transient decrease in the left ventricular end-systolic pressure. The PhMNPs and BaMNPs, but not CiMNPs, induced an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, which resulted in a decrease in a left ventricular end developed pressure. Indeed, PhMNPs and BaMNPs also caused a decrease in the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dt) and maximal rate of left ventricular pressure decline (−dP/dt). The three MNPs studied induced an increase in the perfusion pressure of isolated hearts. BaMNPs, but not PhMNPs or CiMNPs, induced a slight vasorelaxant effect in the isolated aortic rings. None of the MNPs were able to change heart rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25031535

  4. Fluorophotometric determination of histone with 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone-manganese(II) complex and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Kanako; Hoshino, Mitsuru; Kadobayashi, Hiroko; Moriyama, Kenzo; Asano, Mamiko; Yamaguchi, Takako; Fujita, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    A simple fluorophotometric method for the determination of histone has been developed. This method involves a fluorescence quenching reaction that results in the formation of a complex of manganese(II), 3,4,5,6-tetrafluoro-2-carboxyphenylfluorone (TFCPF), and histone in a non-ionic surfactant micellar medium. The calibration curve was found to be linear in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 µg/mL. The binding parameters (n, number of binding sites; K, binding constant) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), change in Gibbs free energy; ΔH(0), change in enthalpy; ΔS(0), change in entropy) were investigated spectrophotometrically for the elucidation of the reaction mechanism. The resulting binding parameters (n=4.08 and K=3.16×10(4) m(-1) at 25°C) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG=-25.83 kJ/mol, ΔH=-9.83 kJ/mol, and ΔS=53.68 J/(mol K)) suggest that the colored complex in this reaction system is an ion-association complex between manganese(II)-TFCPF and histone.

  5. A novel cellulose-manganese oxide hybrid material by in situ soft chemical synthesis and its application for the removal of Pb(II) from water.

    PubMed

    Maliyekkal, Shihabudheen M; Lisha, Kinattukara P; Pradeep, T

    2010-09-15

    We report an in situ soft chemical synthesis of a novel hybrid material, cellulose-nanoscale-manganese oxide composite (C-NMOC), and its application for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solutions. For comparison, detailed Pb(II) adsorption studies were also performed with nanoscale-manganese oxide powder (NMO), prepared through a similar route. Various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques were used to characterize the as-synthesized materials. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements confirmed the existence of Mn(IV) phase in NMO whereas C-NMOC showed largely the Mn(III) phase. The existence and uniform distribution of manganese oxide in cellulose fiber materials was confirmed by SEM and EDAX analyses. The adsorption studies reveal that the Pb(II) uptake onto C-NMOC is a fast process and >90% of the uptake occurred within the first 10 min contact time. The Sips isotherm predicted the equilibrium data well and the maximum Pb(II) uptake capacity of C-NMOC (4.64% Mn loading) was estimated to be 80.1 mg g(-1). The Pb(II) adsorption capacity of C-NMOC (per gram of Mn present) was several times higher than commercial manganese oxide (beta-MnO2) and at least twice larger than NMO. The experimental evidence reveals that physisorption plays a dominant role in Pb(II) adsorption by both NMO and C-NMOC.

  6. 3D hierarchical flower-like nickel ferrite/manganese dioxide toward lead (II) removal from aqueous water.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Bo; Ling, Dong; Lou, Han; Gu, Hongbo

    2017-03-05

    A functionalized magnetic nickel ferrite/manganese dioxide (NiFe2O4/MnO2) with 3D hierarchical flower-like and core-shell structure was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal approach and applied for the removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study the effect of solution pH, initial Pb(II) concentration, and dose of absorbents on the Pb(II) removal by NiFe2O4/MnO2. The NiFe2O4/MnO2 nanocomposites showed the fast Pb(II) adsorption performance with the maximum adsorption capacity of 85.78mgg(-1). The adsorption kinetics of Pb(II) onto NiFe2O4/MnO2 obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The isothermal experimental results indicated that the Langmuir model was fitted better than the Freundlich model, illustrating a monolayer adsorption process for Pb(II) onto NiFe2O4/MnO2. Meanwhile, the NiFe2O4/MnO2 was easily separated from the solution by an external magnet within a short period of time and still exhibited almost 80% removal capacity after six regenerations. The NiFe2O4/MnO2 is expected to be a new promising adsorbent for heavy metal removal.

  7. Preparation of polyacrylnitrile (PAN)/ Manganese oxide based activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) for adsorption of Cadmium (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, N.; Yusof, N.; Jaafar, J.; Ismail, AF; Che Othman, F. E.; Hasbullah, H.; Salleh, W. N. W.; Misdan, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) from precursor polyacrylnitrile (PAN) and manganese oxide (MnO2) were prepared via electrospinning process. The electrospun PAN/MnO2-based ACNFs were characterised in term of its morphological structure and specific surface area using SEM and BET analysis respectively. The comparative adsorption study of cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solution between the neat ACNFs, composite ACNFs and commercial granular activated carbon was also conducted. SEM analysis illustrated that composite ACNFs have more compact fibers with presence of MnO2 beads with smaller fiber diameter of 437.2 nm as compared to the neat ACNFs which is 575.5 nm. BET analysis elucidated specific surface area of ACNFs/MnO2 to be 67 m2/g. Under adsorption study, it was found out that Cd (II) removal by ACNFs/MnO2 was the highest (97%) followed by neat ACNFs (96%) and GAC (74%).

  8. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s Disease: Shared and Distinguishable Features

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, Gunnar F.; Paoliello, Monica M.B.; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element necessary for physiological processes that support development, growth and neuronal function. Secondary to elevated exposure or decreased excretion, Mn accumulates in the basal ganglia region of the brain and may cause a parkinsonian-like syndrome, referred to as manganism. The present review discusses the advances made in understanding the essentiality and neurotoxicity of Mn. We review occupational Mn-induced parkinsonism and the dynamic modes of Mn transport in biological systems, as well as the detection and pharmacokinetic modeling of Mn trafficking. In addition, we review some of the shared similarities, pathologic and clinical distinctions between Mn-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease. Where possible, we review the influence of Mn toxicity on dopamine, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamate neurotransmitter levels and function. We conclude with a survey of the preventive and treatment strategies for manganism and idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). PMID:26154659

  9. Degradation of the solid electrolyte interphase induced by the deposition of manganese ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hosop; Park, Jonghyun; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The deposition of manganese ions dissolved from the cathode onto the interface between the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and graphite causes severe capacity fading in manganese oxide-based cells. The evolution of the SEI layer containing these Mn compounds and the corresponding instability of the layer are thoroughly investigated by artificially introducing soluble Mn ions into a 1 mol L-1 LiPF6 electrolyte solution. Deposition of dissolved Mn ions induces an oxygen-rich SEI layer that results from increased electrolyte decomposition, accelerating SEI growth. The spatial distribution of Mn shows that dissolved Mn ions diffuse through the porous layer and are deposited mostly at the inorganic layer/graphite interface. The Mn compound deposited on the anode, identified as MnF2, originates from a metathesis reaction between LiF and dissolved Mn ion. It is confirmed that ion-exchange reaction occurs in the inorganic layer, converting SEI species to Mn compounds. Some of the Mn is observed inside the graphite; this may cause surface structural disordering in the graphite, limiting lithium-ion intercalation. The continuous reaction that occurs at the inorganic layer/graphite interfacial regions and the modification of the original SEI layer in the presence of Mn ions are critically related to capacity fade and impedance rise currently plaguing Li-ion cells.

  10. Heavy metal pollution among autoworkers. II. Cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, and nickel.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Rastogi, S C

    1977-01-01

    Garages and auto-repair workshops may be polluted with other heavy metals besides lead. Blood of autoworkers with high lead content was analysed for cadmium, chromium, copper manganese, nickel, ALAD activity and carboxyhaemoglobin level. Cadmium and copper levels in blood of autoworkers were comparable with those of the control subjects while chroimium and nickel levels were significantly higher (P less than 0-01 for both metals), and scattered raised values of manganese were found. There was no significant mutual correlation between levels of various heavy metals determined in whole blood. High copper levels were slightly related to decreasing ALAD activity (P less than 0-1). Nineteen per cent of autoworkers were found to have an abnormally blood level of carboxyhaemoglobin. The amount of particulate heavy metal in autoworkshop air was not related to biochemical abnormalities found in the autoworkers. Various sources of pollution of these heavy metals in autoworkshops are discussed. PMID:71915

  11. Proton Matrix ENDOR Studies on Ca2+-depleted and Sr2+-substituted Manganese Cluster in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Shen, Jian-Ren; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-20

    Proton matrix ENDOR spectra were measured for Ca(2+)-depleted and Sr(2+)-substituted photosystem II (PSII) membrane samples from spinach and core complexes from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the S2 state. The ENDOR spectra obtained were similar for untreated PSII from T. vulcanus and spinach, as well as for Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII, indicating that the proton arrangements around the manganese cluster in cyanobacterial and higher plant PSII and Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII are similar in the S2 state, in agreement with the similarity of the crystal structure of both Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII in the S1 state. Nevertheless, slightly different hyperfine separations were found between Ca(2+)-containing and Sr(2+)-substituted PSII because of modifications of the water protons ligating to the Sr(2+) ion. Importantly, Ca(2+) depletion caused the loss of ENDOR signals with a 1.36-MHz separation because of the loss of the water proton W4 connecting Ca(2+) and YZ directly. With respect to the crystal structure and the functions of Ca(2+) in oxygen evolution, it was concluded that the roles of Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) involve the maintenance of the hydrogen bond network near the Ca(2+) site and electron transfer pathway to the manganese cluster.

  12. Proton Matrix ENDOR Studies on Ca2+-depleted and Sr2+-substituted Manganese Cluster in Photosystem II*

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Shen, Jian-Ren; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Proton matrix ENDOR spectra were measured for Ca2+-depleted and Sr2+-substituted photosystem II (PSII) membrane samples from spinach and core complexes from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the S2 state. The ENDOR spectra obtained were similar for untreated PSII from T. vulcanus and spinach, as well as for Ca2+-containing and Sr2+-substituted PSII, indicating that the proton arrangements around the manganese cluster in cyanobacterial and higher plant PSII and Ca2+-containing and Sr2+-substituted PSII are similar in the S2 state, in agreement with the similarity of the crystal structure of both Ca2+-containing and Sr2+-substituted PSII in the S1 state. Nevertheless, slightly different hyperfine separations were found between Ca2+-containing and Sr2+-substituted PSII because of modifications of the water protons ligating to the Sr2+ ion. Importantly, Ca2+ depletion caused the loss of ENDOR signals with a 1.36-MHz separation because of the loss of the water proton W4 connecting Ca2+ and YZ directly. With respect to the crystal structure and the functions of Ca2+ in oxygen evolution, it was concluded that the roles of Ca2+ and Sr2+ involve the maintenance of the hydrogen bond network near the Ca2+ site and electron transfer pathway to the manganese cluster. PMID:26438823

  13. Melatonin Attenuates Manganese and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Activation of BV2 Microglia.

    PubMed

    Park, Euteum; Chun, Hong Sung

    2017-02-01

    Melatonin, a naturally occurring neurohormone in the pineal gland, has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study examined the effects of melatonin on manganese (Mn) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation. Melatonin (10 μM) inhibited Mn (100 μM) and/or LPS (0.5 μg/ml)-induced phagocytotic activity of activated BV2 microglia. It also inhibited the lipid peroxidation and intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion induced by Mn and/or LPS. Melatonin effectively suppressed the upregulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at both mRNA and protein levels in Mn and/or LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. In addition, melatonin pretreatment attenuated Mn and/or LPS-induced degradation of IκB-α, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its activation, and the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) in BV2 microglial cells. These results suggest that melatonin can effectively modulate phagocytosis and expression of proinflammatory mediators, and can prevent neuroinflammatory disorders accompanied by microglial activation.

  14. Decoration of the layered manganese oxide birnessite with Mn(II/III) gives a new water oxidation catalyst with fifty-fold turnover number enhancement.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Ian G; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K; Shumlas, Samantha L; Strongin, Daniel R; Zdilla, Michael J

    2015-08-07

    The role of the manganese average oxidation state (AOS) in water oxidation catalysis by birnessite was investigated. Low AOS samples were most active, generating O2 immediately. Samples with a relatively high AOS showed an initial induction period and decreased turnover. Mn(ii- and iii)-enriched samples gave a 10-50 fold enhancement in turnover number.

  15. Manganese oxidation induced by water table fluctuations in a sand column.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Claire E; Voegelin, Andreas; Hering, Janet G

    2012-01-03

    On-off cycles of production wells, especially in bank filtration settings, cause oscillations in the local water table, which can deliver significant amounts of dissolved oxygen (DO) to the shallow groundwater. The potential for DO introduced in this manner to oxidize manganese(II) (Mn(II)), mediated by the obligate aerobe Pseudomonas putida GB-1, was tested in a column of quartz sand fed with anoxic influent solution and subject to 1.3 m water table changes every 30-50 h. After a period of filter ripening, 100 μM Mn was rapidly removed during periods of low water table and high dissolved oxygen concentrations. The accumulation of Mn in the column was confirmed by XRF analysis of the sand at the conclusion of the study, and both measured net oxidation rates and XAS analysis suggest microbial oxidation as the dominant process. The addition of Zn, which inhibited GB-1 Mn oxidation but not its growth, interrupted the Mn removal process, but Mn oxidation recovered within one water table fluctuation. Thus transient DO conditions could support microbially mediated Mn oxidation, and this process could be more relevant in shallow groundwater than previously thought.

  16. The Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY haemophore binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Bielecki, Marcin; Wojaczyński, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires haem from host haemoproteins through a haem transporter HmuR and a haemophore HmuY. The aim of this study was to analyse the binding specificity of HmuY towards non-iron metalloporphyrins which may be employed as antimicrobials to treat periodontitis. HmuY binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX which uses His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands. The metal ions in Ga(iii)PPIX and Zn(ii)PPIX can accept only His(166) as an axial ligand, whereas nickel(ii) and copper(ii) interact exclusively with His(134). Two forms of pentacoordinate manganese(iii) are present in the Mn(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex since the metal accepts either His(134) or His(166) as a single axial ligand. The cobalt ion is hexacoordinate in the Co(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex and binds His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands; however, some differences in their environments exist. Despite different coordination modes of the central metal ion, gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), and manganese(iii) protoporphyrin IX bound to the HmuY haemophore cannot be displaced by excess haem. All of the metalloporphyrins examined bind to a P. gingivalis wild-type strain with higher ability compared to a mutant strain lacking a functional hmuY gene, thus corroborating binding of non-iron metalloporphyrins to purified HmuY protein. Our results further clarify the basis of metalloporphyrin acquisition by P. gingivalis and add to understanding of the interactions with porphyrin derivatives which exhibit antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis.

  17. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  18. Interaction of manganese(II) complex with apotransferrin and the apotransferrin enhanced anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Xu, Xiao-Lei; Li, Zan; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Apotransferrin could bind a number of metal ions besides Fe, which makes it an attractive delivery vehicle for metal-based medicines. In order to evaluate whether anticancer Mn(II) complex of [(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] Adpa = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid) (AdpaMn) could be transported by apotransferrin, we investigated its interaction with human apotransferrin by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). The association dynamics show that AdpaMn could bind to apotransferrin spontaneously in Hepes buffer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy show that the conjugation of AdpaMn and apotransferrin by hydrophobic interactions induces the change of the microenvironment and conformation of apotransferrin. The reversible binding and release of AdpaMn was studied with fluorescence titration method. The AdpaMn complex can be released from the AdpaMn-apotransferrin entity in weak acid environments. MTT assay in vitro confirms that apotransferrin can enhance the inhibition rate of AdpaMn on the proliferation of HepG-2 cells, so we deduce that AdpaMn could be transported by apotransferrin in vivo.

  19. Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II) in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar Tarigh, Ghazale; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and used as an adsorbent for preconcentration and determination of lead (II) and manganese (II). The properties of MMWCNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). This adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE) in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. MMWCNT, carrying target metals, was easily separated from the aqueous solutions with the help of an external magnet; so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After extraction and collection of MMWCNT, the adsorbed analytes were eluted and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different sorption/desorption parameters. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits and enhancement factors of the proposed method for Pb and Mn were 1.0 and 0.6 µg L(-1), 390 and 697 respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of Pb(II) and Mn (II) contents in lipstick, rice samples and accuracy was evaluated analyzing a certified reference material Seronorm(™) Urine LOT NO2525.

  20. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  1. Recombinant Mitochondrial Manganese Containing Superoxide Dismutase Protects Against Ochratoxin A-Induced Nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ciarcia, Roberto; Damiano, Sara; Squillacioti, Caterina; Mirabella, Nicola; Pagnini, Ugo; Florio, Alessia; Severino, Lorella; Capasso, Giovambattista; Borrelli, Antonella; Mancini, Aldo; Boffo, Silvia; Romano, Gaetano; Giordano, Antonio; Florio, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a natural mycotoxin, involved in the development of important human and animal diseases. In this work we have studied the role of oxidative stress in the development of OTA nephrotoxicity and the effect of a new recombinant mitochondrial manganese containing superoxide dismutase (rMnSOD) to prevent kidney damage induced by OTA. Blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate and renal histology were analyzed in control rats and in OTA treated rats. In addition, lipid peroxidation, catalase and superoxide dismutase productions were measured. Our data showed that animals treated with OTA presented hypertension and reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These effects are most probably related to an increase in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. In fact, we have shown that treatment with rMnSOD restored the levels of blood pressure and GFR simultaneously. Moreover, we have noted that OTA induced alteration on glomerular and tubular degeneration and interstitial infiltrates and that use of rMnSOD combined with OTA prevent this renal histological damage confirming the potential therapeutic role in the treatment of rMnSOD OTA nephrotoxicity.

  2. "Manganese-induced neurotoxicity: a review of its behavioral consequences and neuroprotective strategies".

    PubMed

    Peres, Tanara V; Schettinger, Maria Rosa C; Chen, Pan; Carvalho, Fabiano; Avila, Daiana S; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2016-11-04

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal. However, Mn's nutritional aspects are paralleled by its role as a neurotoxicant upon excessive exposure. In this review, we covered recent advances in identifying mechanisms of Mn uptake and its molecular actions in the brain as well as promising neuroprotective strategies. The authors focused on reporting findings regarding Mn transport mechanisms, Mn effects on cholinergic system, behavioral alterations induced by Mn exposure and studies of neuroprotective strategies against Mn intoxication. We report that exposure to Mn may arise from environmental sources, occupational settings, food, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), methcathinone drug abuse or even genetic factors, such as mutation in the transporter SLC30A10. Accumulation of Mn occurs mainly in the basal ganglia and leads to a syndrome called manganism, whose symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and motor impairment resemble Parkinson's disease (PD). Various neurotransmitter systems may be impaired due to Mn, especially dopaminergic, but also cholinergic and GABAergic. Several proteins have been identified to transport Mn, including divalent metal tranporter-1 (DMT-1), SLC30A10, transferrin and ferroportin and allow its accumulation in the central nervous system. Parallel to identification of Mn neurotoxic properties, neuroprotective strategies have been reported, and these include endogenous antioxidants (for instance, vitamin E), plant extracts (complex mixtures containing polyphenols and non-characterized components), iron chelating agents, precursors of glutathione (GSH), and synthetic compounds that can experimentally afford protection against Mn-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Estrogen and tamoxifen reverse manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Sook Y; Sidoryk, Marta; Jiang, Haiyan; Yin, Zhaobao; Aschner, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) can cause manganism, a neurodegenerative disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. The toxicity of Mn includes impairment of astrocytic glutamate transporters. 17beta-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to be neuroprotective in various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and some selective estrogen receptor modulators, including tamoxifen (TX), also possess neuroprotective properties. We have tested our hypothesis that E2 and TX reverse Mn-induced glutamate transporter impairment in astrocytes. The results established that E2 and TX increased glutamate transporter function and reversed Mn-induced glutamate uptake inhibition, primarily via the up-regulation of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). E2 and TX also increased astrocytic GLAST mRNA levels and attenuated the Mn-induced inhibition of GLAST mRNA expression. In addition, E2 and TX effectively increased the expression of transforming growth factor beta1, a potential modulator of the stimulatory effects of E2/TX on glutamate transporter function. This effect was mediated by the activation of MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways. These novel findings suggest, for the first time, that E2 and TX enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter expression via increased transforming growth factor beta1 expression. Furthermore, the present study is the first to show that both E2 and TX effectively reverse Mn-induced glutamate transport inhibition by restoring its expression and activity, thus offering a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  4. Determining the Role of Multicopper Oxidases in Manganese(II) Oxidation by Marine Bacillus Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. J.; Tebo, B. M.

    2005-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the environmental cycling of Mn by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) and forming insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides. These biogenic Mn oxides are renowned for their strong sorptive and oxidative properties, which control the speciation and availability of many metals and organic compounds. A wide variety of bacteria are known to catalyze the oxidation of Mn(II); one of the most frequently isolated types are Bacillus species that oxidize Mn(II) only as metabolically dormant spores. We are using genetic and biochemical methods to study the molecular mechanisms of this process in these organisms. mnxG, a gene related to the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes, is required for Mn(II) oxidation in the model organism, Bacillus sp. strain SG-1. Mn(II)-oxidizing activity can be detected in crude protein extracts of the exosporium and as a discrete band in SDS-PAGE gels, however previous attempts to purify or identify this Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme have failed. A direct link between the Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme and the MCO gene suspected to encode it has never been made. We used genetic and biochemical methods to investigate the role of the MCO in the mechanism of Mn(II) oxidation. Comparative analysis of the mnx operon from several diverse Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus spores revealed that mnxG is the most highly conserved gene in the operon, and that copper binding sites are highly conserved. As with Mn(II) oxidases from other organisms, heterologous expression of the Bacillus mnxG in E. coli did not yield an active Mn(II) oxidase. Purifying sufficient quantities of the native Mn(II) oxidase from Bacillus species for biochemical characterization has proven difficult because the enzyme does not appear to be abundant, and it is highly insoluble. We were able to partially purify the Mn(II) oxidase, and to analyze the active band by in-gel trypsin digestion followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS/MS spectra provided a conclusive match to mnx

  5. Synthesis of a high-valent, four-coordinate manganese cubane cluster with a pendant Mn atom: photosystem II-inspired manganese-nitrogen clusters.

    PubMed

    Vaddypally, Shivaiah; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K; Zdilla, Michael J

    2012-04-02

    High-valent, four-coordinate manganese imido- and nitrido-bridged heterodicubane clusters have been prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. The title compound, a corner-nitride-fused dicubane with the chemical formula [Mn(5)Li(3)(μ(6)-N)(N)(μ(3)-N(t)Bu)(6)(μ-N(t)Bu)(3)(N(t)Bu)] (1), has been prepared as an adduct with a nearly isostructural tetramanganese cluster with one Mn atom replaced by Li. An important feature of the reported chemistry is the formation of nitride from tert-butylamide, indicative of N-C bond cleavage facilitated by manganese.

  6. Siderophore-manganese(lll) Interactions. II. Manganite dissolution promoted by desferrioxamine B.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Owen W; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-08-15

    Recent laboratory and field studies suggest that Mn(lll) forms persistent aqueous complexes with high-affinity ligands. Aqueous Mn(lll) species thus may play a significant but largely unexplored role in biogeochemical processes. One formation mechanism for these species is the dissolution of Mn(lll)-bearing minerals. To investigate this mechanism, we measured the steady-state dissolution rates of manganite (gamma-MnOOH) in the presence of desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a common trihydroxamate siderophore. We find that DFOB dissolves manganite by both reductive and nonreductive reaction pathways. For pH > 6.5, a nonreductive ligand-promoted reaction is the dominant dissolution pathway, with a steady-state dissolution rate proportional to the surface concentration of DFOB. In the absence of reductants, the aqueous Mn(lIl)HDFOB+ complex resulting from dissolution is stable for at least several weeks at circumneutral to alkaline pH and at 25 degrees C. For pH < 6.5, Mn2+ is the dominant aqueous species resulting from manganite dissolution, implicating a reductive dissolution pathway. These results have important implications for the biogeochemical cycling of both manganese and siderophores--as well as Fe(lll)--in natural waters and soils.

  7. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenchuan

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  8. Deregulation of Mitochondria-Shaping Proteins Opa-1 and Drp-1 in Manganese-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Agustina; Gorojod, Roxana M.; Beauquis, Juan; Muñoz, Manuel J.; Saravia, Flavia; Kotler, Mónica L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo fusion and fission processes. These events are regulated by mitochondria-shaping proteins. Changes in the expression and/or localization of these proteins lead to a mitochondrial dynamics impairment and may promote apoptosis. Increasing evidence correlates the mitochondrial dynamics disruption with the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we focused on this topic in Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism, a disorder associated with Mn accumulation preferentially in the basal ganglia where mitochondria from astrocytes represent an early target. Using MitoTracker Red staining we observed increased mitochondrial network fission in Mn-exposed rat astrocytoma C6 cells. Moreover, Mn induced a marked decrease in fusion protein Opa-1 levels as well as a dramatic increase in the expression of fission protein Drp-1. Additionally, Mn provoked a significant release of high MW Opa-1 isoforms from the mitochondria to the cytosol as well as an increased Drp-1 translocation to the mitochondria. Both Mdivi-1, a pharmacological Drp-1 inhibitor, and rat Drp-1 siRNA reduced the number of apoptotic nuclei, preserved the mitochondrial network integrity and prevented cell death. CsA, an MPTP opening inhibitor, prevented mitochondrial Δψm disruption, Opa-1 processing and Drp-1 translocation to the mitochondria therefore protecting Mn-exposed cells from mitochondrial disruption and apoptosis. The histological analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining of brain sections of Mn-injected rats in the striatum showed a decrease in cellular mass paralleled with an increase in the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. Opa-1 and Drp-1 expression levels were also changed by Mn-treatment. Our results demonstrate for the first time that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics is implicated in both in vitro and in vivo Mn toxicity. In addition we show that the imbalance in fusion/fission equilibrium might be involved in Mn-induced apoptosis. This knowledge may

  9. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism.

  10. Interplay between lysosomal, mitochondrial and death receptor pathways during manganese-induced apoptosis in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2017-04-04

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal which plays a critical role in brain physiology by acting as a cofactor for several enzymes. However, upon overexposure, Mn preferentially accumulates within the basal ganglia leading to the development of a Parkinsonism known as Manganism. Data from our group have proved that Mn induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in astrocytoma C6 cells. In the present study we described how cathepsins impact on different steps of each apoptotic cascade. Evidence obtained demonstrated that Mn generates lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cathepsin release. Both cathepsins B (Ca-074 Me) and D (Pepstatin A) inhibitors as well as Bafilomycin A1 prevented caspases-3, -7, -8 and -9 activation, FasL upregulation, Bid cleavage, Δφm disruption and cytochrome c release. Results from in vivo studies showed that intrastriatal Mn injection increased cathepsin D levels from corpus striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results point to LMP and lysosomal cathepsins as key mediators in the apoptotic process triggered by Mn. These findings highlight the relevance of targeting the lysosomal pathway for Manganism therapy.

  11. Estrogen attenuates manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. in J Neurochem 80:807-814, 2002; Pawlak et al. in Brain Res Mol Brain Res 138:1-7, 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuro SERMs) (Zhao et al. in Neuroscience 132:299-311, 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamate uptake. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  12. Estrogen attenuates Manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao BT; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17 -Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. 2002; Pawlak et al. 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuroSERMs) (Zhao et al. 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen (TX) may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis. PMID:22878846

  13. Manganese exposure induces α-synuclein aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Verina, Tatyana; Schneider, Jay S; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2013-03-13

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) in the brain is a defining pathological feature of neurodegenerative disorders classified as synucleinopathies. They include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Occupational and environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) is associated with a neurological syndrome consisting of psychiatric symptoms, cognitive impairment and parkinsonism. In this study, we examined α-syn immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of Cynomolgus macaques as part of a multidisciplinary assessment of the neurological effects produced by exposure to moderate levels of Mn. We found increased α-syn-positive cells in the gray matter of Mn-exposed animals, typically observed in pyramidal and medium-sized neurons in deep cortical layers. Some of these neurons displayed loss of Nissl staining with α-syn-positive spherical aggregates. In the white matter we also observed α-syn-positive glial cells and in some cases α-syn-positive neurites. These findings suggest that Mn exposure promotes α-syn aggregation in neuronal and glial cells that may ultimately lead to degeneration in the frontal cortex gray and white matter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mn-induced neuronal and glial cell α-syn accumulation and aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

  14. Manganese-induced oxidative stress in two ontogenetic stages of chamomile and amelioration by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Babula, Petr; Hedbavny, Josef; Švec, Pavel

    2014-02-01

    Impact of manganese (Mn(2+)) excess (100, 500 and 1000 μM over 7 days) on two ontogenetic stages (7-week-old plants and 7-day-old seedlings) of Matricaria chamomilla was compared. Mn excess depressed growth of seedlings (but not germination) and stimulated oxidative stress (ROS and lipid peroxidation) in both plants and seedlings. Growth inhibition could be evoked by higher Mn uptake and higher translocation factor in seedlings than in plants. Total thiols staining revealed elevation in almost all treatments. In 7-week-old plants, activity of peroxidases increased slightly and rather decreased under high Mn doses. Superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide contributed to visualized ROS presence. Fluorescence of nitric oxide (NO) showed stimulation in plants but decrease in seedlings. Impact of exogenous nitric oxide donor (sodium nitroprusside/SNP) was therefore tested and results showed amelioration of 1000 μM Mn-induced oxidative stress in seedlings (decrease in H2O2 and increase in NO content while antioxidative enzyme activities were variably affected) concomitantly with depleted Mn accumulation. It is concluded that NO participates in tolerance to Mn excess but negative effects of the highest SNP dose were also observed. Extensive fluorescence microscopy is also explanatively discussed.

  15. Chemiluminescence accompanied by the reaction of acridinium ester and manganese (II).

    PubMed

    Ren, Lingling; Cui, Hua

    2014-11-01

    An acridinium ester (AE) alkaline solution can react with Mn(II) to generate a strong chemiluminescence (CL) centered at 435 nm. The effects of reaction conditions such as pH and Mn(II) concentration on CL intensity were examined. In order to explore the CL mechanism, the effect of oxygen on the CL reaction was examined and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the reaction precipitate was carried out. The results indicated that oxygen participated in the CL reaction and Mn(IV) was the primary product in the system. A possible mechanism was proposed that involved two pathways: (1) dissolved oxygen was reduced to reactive oxygen radicals by Mn(II), these reactive intermediates then reacted with AE to produce excited state acridone; (2) Mn(II) could reduce AE to partly reduced AE, which then reacted with oxygen to form excited state acridone. The reactions of other metal ions with AE were also tested, and only Mn(II) was shown to trigger strong CL emission of AE, which indicated that the system had good selectivity for Mn(II).

  16. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  17. Vacancy-induced manganese vanadates and their potential application to Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dufficy, Martin K; Luo, Lan; Fedkiw, Peter S; Maggard, Paul A

    2016-06-14

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of a novel manganese vanadate, Mn1.5(H2O)(NH4)V4O12, with rare in situ disorder of Mn(H2O)2(2+)/2NH4(+). We show that vacancies created by ammonium ions and coordinating water molecules within the manganese vanadate crystal structure yield high-charge capacity, favorable rate capability, and long cycle life in Li-ion half-cells.

  18. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; ...

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymesmore » also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.« less

  19. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  20. Manganese(II) chloride alters behavioral and neurochemical parameters in larvae and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Altenhofen, Stefani; Wiprich, Melissa Talita; Nery, Laura Roesler; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Vianna, Monica Ryff Moreira Roca; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal for organisms, but high levels can cause serious neurological damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of MnCl2 exposure on cognition and exploratory behavior in adult and larval zebrafish and correlate these findings with brain accumulation of Mn, overall brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, dopamine (DA) levels, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and cell death markers in the nervous system. Adults exposed to MnCl2 for 4days (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5mM) and larvae exposed for 5days (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5mM) displayed decreased exploratory behaviors, such as distance traveled and absolute body turn angle, in addition to reduced movement time and an increased number of immobile episodes in larvae. Adults exposed to MnCl2 for 4days showed impaired aversive long-term memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. The overall brain TH levels were elevated in adults and larvae evaluated at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Interestingly, the protein level of this enzyme was decreased in larval animals at 10dpf. Furthermore, DOPAC levels were increased in adult animals exposed to MnCl2. Protein analysis showed increased apoptotic markers in both the larvae and adult nervous system. The results demonstrated that prolonged exposure to MnCl2 leads to locomotor deficits that may be associated with damage caused by this metal in the CNS, particularly in the dopaminergic system.

  1. Manganese Dioxide nanosheet suspension: A novel absorbent for Cadmium(II) contamination in waterbody.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Zeng, Qingru; Tie, Boqing; Lei, Ming; Yang, Jiao; Luo, Si; Song, Zhengguo

    2015-10-15

    A MnO2 nanosheet (MnO2-NS) suspension was prepared from tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMA⋅OH), H2O2, and MnCl2⋅4H2O, and its efficiency for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions was investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the MnO2-NS for Cd(II) was evaluated to be about 348 mg/g, which is thus far the highest value reported for MnO2 at pH 6.0. This high adsorption capacity is attributed to efficient ion exchange. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that Cd(II) was adsorbed on MnO2 as CdO and Cd(OH)2. After Cd(II) adsorption, the suspended MnO2-NS aggregated and precipitated within 5.0 min from solution. Therefore, dispersive MnO2-NS can be used to remove Cd(II) from wastewater rapidly and with high efficiency.

  2. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles’ Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A.; Katsnelson, Boris A.; Privalova, Larisa I.; Sutunkova, Marina P.; Gurvich, Vladimir B.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Shishkina, Ekaterina V.; Valamina, Irene E.; Makeyev, Oleg H.; Panov, Vladimir G.; Varaksin, Anatoly N.; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V.; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a “bio-protective complex” (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn3O4-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn3O4-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn3O4-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  3. Valence Tautomerization of High-Valent Manganese(V)-Oxo Corrole Induced by Protonation of the Oxo Ligand.

    PubMed

    Bougher, Curt J; Liu, Shuo; Hicks, Scott D; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-11-18

    The addition of an organic acid to the manganese(V)-oxo corrole complex (tpfc)Mn(V)(O) (tpfc = 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole) induces valence tautomerization resulting in the formation of (tpfc(+•))Mn(IV)(OH) in acetonitrile at 298 K. The corrole radical cation manganese(IV) hydroxo complex has been fully characterized by EPR, (1)H NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The reactivity of the valence tautomer (tpfc(+•))Mn(IV)(OH) is compared to that of (tpfc)Mn(V)(O) in three reaction types: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), electron transfer (ET), and oxygen atom transfer (OAT). (tpfc(+•))Mn(IV)(OH) shows a dramatic 5 orders of magnitude enhancement in the rate of ET but surprisingly does not undergo OAT with PhSMe. The high-valent (tpfc)Mn(V)(O) complex is moderately more reactive toward HAT with substituted phenol and shows superior activity in OAT.

  4. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin‑transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa‑Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa‑Mn time and dose‑dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa‑Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases‑9, ‑7 and ‑3 and poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa‑Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy‑related protein microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3‑methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa‑Mn‑induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa‑Mn‑treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa‑Mn‑induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa‑Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa‑Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti‑glioma therapeutic option.

  5. Pulsed-EPR evidence of a manganese(II) hydroxycarbonyl intermediate in the electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide by a manganese bipyridyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Orio, Maylis; Molton, Florian; Vezin, Hervé; Duboc, Carole; Deronzier, Alain; Chardon-Noblat, Sylvie

    2014-01-03

    A key intermediate in the electroconversion of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, catalyzed by a manganese tris(carbonyl) complex, is characterized. Different catalytic pathways and their potential reaction mechanisms are investigated using a large range of experimental and computational techniques. Sophisticated spectroscopic methods including UV/Vis absorption and pulsed-EPR techniques (2P-ESEEM and HYSCORE) were combined together with DFT calculations to successfully identify a key intermediate in the catalytic cycle of CO2 reduction. The results directly show the formation of a metal-carboxylic acid-CO2 adduct after oxidative addition of CO2 and H(+) to a Mn(0) carbonyl dimer, an unexpected intermediate.

  6. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition.

  7. Manganese(II) Complexes with Schiff Bases Immobilized on Nanosilica as Catalysts of the Reaction of Ozone Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakytska, Tetyana; Truba, Alla; Radchenko, Evgen; Golub, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we submit the description of synthesis and identification of manganese(II) complexes with pyrogenic nanosilica-immobilized ( d av = 10 nm; S sp = 290 m2/g) hydroxyaldimine ligands (Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si}) : salicilaldiminopropyl (L1); 5-bromosalicilaldiminopropyl (L2); 2-hydroxynaphtaldiminopropyl (L3); 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L4); 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichloroacetophenoniminopropyl (L5); and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L6). The ligands and complexes were characterized by UV-VIS and IR spectrometry. Nanocomposites consisting of complexes Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si} showed a high catalytic activity in low-temperature ozone decomposition in the range of concentrations between 2.1 × 10-6 and 8.4 × 10-6 mol/l. The number of catalytic cycles increased for isostructural pseudotetrahedral complexes Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si} (L1-L5) in the following order: Mn(L3)2 >> Mn(L4)2 > Mn(L1)2 > Mn(L2)2 > Mn(L5)2. In the case of pseudooctahedral complexes with L6, the change of coordination polyhedral does not influence the kinetics and stoichiometric parameters of the reaction.

  8. Manganese(II) Complexes with Schiff Bases Immobilized on Nanosilica as Catalysts of the Reaction of Ozone Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rakytska, Tetyana; Truba, Alla; Radchenko, Evgen; Golub, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we submit the description of synthesis and identification of manganese(II) complexes with pyrogenic nanosilica-immobilized (d av = 10 nm; S sp = 290 m(2)/g) hydroxyaldimine ligands [Formula: see text]: salicilaldiminopropyl (L1); 5-bromosalicilaldiminopropyl (L2); 2-hydroxynaphtaldiminopropyl (L3); 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L4); 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichloroacetophenoniminopropyl (L5); and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L6). The ligands and complexes were characterized by UV-VIS and IR spectrometry. Nanocomposites consisting of complexes [Formula: see text] showed a high catalytic activity in low-temperature ozone decomposition in the range of concentrations between 2.1 × 10(-6) and 8.4 × 10(-6) mol/l. The number of catalytic cycles increased for isostructural pseudotetrahedral complexes [Formula: see text] (L1-L5) in the following order: Mn(L3)2 > Mn(L4)2 > Mn(L1)2 > Mn(L2)2 > Mn(L5)2. In the case of pseudooctahedral complexes with L6, the change of coordination polyhedral does not influence the kinetics and stoichiometric parameters of the reaction.

  9. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; Lopez-Lucendo, María F.; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Martinez, Angel T.

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  10. Honeycomb-like S = 5/2 Spin-Lattices in Manganese(II) Vanadates.

    PubMed

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McGuire, Michael A; McMillen, Colin D; Willett, Daniel; Chumanov, George; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-09-19

    New complex manganese vanadate materials were synthesized as high-quality single crystals in multi-millimeter lengths using a high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal method. One compound, Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4, was grown from Mn2O3 and V2O5 in 3 M CsOH at 580 °C and 1.5 kbar. Changing the mineralizer to 1 M CsOH/3MCsCl leads to the formation of another product, Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Both compounds were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4: C2/m, Z = 2, a = 9.6568(9) Å, b = 9.5627(9) Å, c = 5.4139(6) Å, β = 98.529(8)°; Mn6O(VO4)2(OH): P21/m, Z = 2, a = 8.9363(12) Å, b = 6.4678(8) Å, c = 10.4478(13) Å, β = 99.798(3)°), revealing interesting low-dimensional transition-metal features. Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 possesses complex honeycomb-type Mn-O layers, built from edge-sharing [MnO6] octahedra in the bc plane, with bridging vanadate groups connecting these layers along the a-axis. Mn6O(VO4)2(OH) presents a more complicated structure with both octahedral [MnO6] and trigonal bipyramidal [MnO5] units. A different pattern of planar honeycomb sheets are formed by edge-shared [MnO6] octahedra, and these sublattices are connected through edge-shared dimers of [MnO5] trigonal bipyramids to form corrugated sheets. Vanadate groups again condense the sheets into a three-dimensional framework. Infrared and Raman spectroscopies indicated the presence of OH groups and displayed characteristic Raman scattering due to vanadate groups. Temperature-dependent magnetic studies indicated Curie-Weiss behavior above 100 K with significant anti-ferromagnetic coupling for both compounds, with further complex magnetic behavior at lower temperatures. The data indicate canted anti-ferromagnetic order below 57 K in Mn5(VO4)2(OH)4 and below 45 K in Mn6O(VO4)2(OH). Members of another class of compounds, K2M3(VO4)2(OH)2 (M = Mn, Co), also containing a honeycomb-type sublattice, were also synthesized to allow a comparison of the structural features across all three

  11. Controlling the structure of manganese(II) phosphates by the choice and ratio of organophosphate and auxiliary ligands.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Ramaswamy; Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Gogoi, Nayanmoni; Steiner, Alexander; Bacsa, John; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy; Suresh, K G

    2009-01-05

    Tetranuclear manganese(II) phosphates [Mn(dipp)(bpy)](4)4 H(2)O (1) and [Mn(4)(dmpp)(2)(dmppH)(4)(bpy)(4)(H(2)O)(2)]H(2)O (2) have been prepared from Mn(OAc)(2)4 H(2)O and 2,6-diisopropylphenyl phosphate (dippH(2)) or 2,6-dimethylphenyl phosphate (dmppH(2)) in the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy). In contrast, the reaction between [Mn(bpy)(2)(OAc)(ClO(4))]H(2)O and dippH(2) affords [Mn(bpy)(2)(dippH)](2)2 ClO(4)2 CH(3)OH (3). The reactions of Mn(OAc)(2)4 H(2)O, dippH(2), and pyridine (py) or 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (dmpz) in CH(3)CN under reflux afford hexanuclear complexes [Mn(6)(dipp)(6)(py)(8)]2CH(3)CN (4) and [Mn(6)(dipp)(6)(dmpz)(6)(AcOH)(2)]2 H(2)O (5), respectively. Although compounds 1 and 2 are tetrameric, the former is a closed cubane-like structure resembling the D4R secondary building unit of zeolites, whereas the latter exists in a staircase structure with fused Mn(2)O(4)P(2) rings. The core structure of 3 contains a Mn(2)O(4)P(2) eight-membered ring that resembles the S4R building block of zeolites. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that compounds 4 and 5 have a similar core structure and differ from each other by the neutral ligands coordinated to manganese ions. All six phosphate ligands exist in a doubly deprotonated [(RO)PO(3) (2-)] form and exhibit two types of binding modes [5.222] and [3.111]. An interesting feature of compounds 1-5 is that although they are oligonuclear complexes, there is an absence of oxido bridges. The magnetic properties of compounds 1-5 have been investigated in the temperature range 5-298 K, and it was found that all the compounds obey the Curie law.

  12. Synthesis, spectral elucidation, electrochemistry and DFT interpretation of manganese(II)-thioalkyl-arylazoimidazole complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Soumendranath; Das, Kuheli; Datta, Amitabha; Banerjee, Debashis; Roy, Suman; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Debashree; Nanda, Prasanta Kumar; Akitsu, Takashiro; Tanaka, Shinnosuke; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2017-04-01

    One new Mn(II) thioalkyl-arylazoimidazole complex (1), [Mn(SRaaiNR/)2(SCN)2] (SRaaiNR/ = 1-alkyl-2-{(o-thioalkyl)phenylazo}imidazole and R = Me, R/ = Et) is afforded and systematically characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopy. The single crystal X-ray diffraction technique reveals that in complex 1, the central Mn atom possesses a tetrahedral environment of MnN4 sphere; coordinated by a pair of monodentate orientation of Nimidazolyl and NSCN atoms. Variable temperature magnetic moment confirms that in complex 1, there exists an antiferromagnetic coupling in tetrahedral symmetry. Cyclic voltammogram study of complex 1 evidenced the presence of a Mn(III)/Mn(II) redox response at 1.25 V alongwith azo reductions at -0.8 V. DFT computational using optimized geometry clearly explains the electronic and redox properties which is in accordance with the experimental evidence.

  13. Cobalt and manganese diphosphonates with one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures and field-induced magnetic transitions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Deng-Ke; Liu, Mei-Juan; Huang, Jian; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Li-Min

    2011-03-21

    Reactions of 2-(1-Imidazole)-1-hydroxyl-1,1'-ethylidenediphosphonic acid (ImhedpH(4)) and cobalt or manganese salts under hydrothermal conditions result in three new metal diphosphonates: β-Co(3)(ImhedpH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)·2H(2)O (1), Co(3)(ImhedpH)(2)(H(2)O)(4) (2), and Mn(ImhedpH(2))·H(2)O (3). In compound 1, the columns made up of {Co1(2)O(2)} dimers and {PO(3)C} tetrahedra through corner-sharing are cross-linked through {Co2O(6)} octahedra, forming an inorganic layer. Neighboring layers are pillared by coordinated imidazole groups of ImhedpH(-) ligands, leading to a three-dimensional open framework containing two kinds of channels with sizes of 8.256 × 9.851 Å and 8.030 × 4.745 Å (van der Waals radii not accounted for). Compound 2 shows a layer structure, in which Co(3)(ImhedpH)(2)(H(2)O)(4) trimer units are connected through the corner-sharing of {Co1O(5)} trigonal bipyramids and {PO(3)C} tetrahedra, forming an inorganic layer containing 20-member rings composed of six Co atoms, two μ(3)-O1 units, and four O-P-O units. The noncoordinated imidazole groups protrude from two sides of the layer. Compound 3 shows a ladder structure, where the Mn(II) ions are bridged by ImhedpH(2)(2-) ligands through double O-P-O units to form a single chain, and two such chains are further fused together by sharing edges of {MnO(5)} trigonal bipyramids. The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been studied. Ferrimagnetism and field-induced magnetic transition from ferrimagnetism to a fully polarized state are observed in 1. Compounds 2 and 3 reveal dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between metal centers, and two-step field-induced magnetic phase transitions are found in 2.

  14. Crystal structure of hexa-kis-(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)manganese(II) diiodide.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Mathias; Schroffenegger, Martina; Weil, Matthias; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-07-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [Mn(C2H6OS)6]I2, consists of one Mn(II) ion, six O-bound dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ligands and two I(-) counter-anions. The isolated complex cations have an octa-hedral configuration and are grouped in hexa-gonally arranged rows extending parallel to [100]. The two I(-) anions are located between the rows and are linked to the cations through two weak C-H⋯I inter-actions.

  15. Hyperfine structure constants for singly ionized manganese (Mn II) using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley-Smith, Keeley; Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    We expand on the comprehensive study of hyperfine structure (HFS) in Mn II conducted by Holt et al. (1999) by verifying hyperfine magnetic dipole constants (A) for 20 levels previously measured by Holt et al. (1999) and deriving A constants for 47 previously unstudied levels. The HFS patterns were measured in archival spectra from Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at Imperial College London and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Analysis of the FT spectra was carried out in XGREMLIN. Our A constant for the ground level has a lower uncertainty by a factor of 6 than that of Blackwell-Whitehead et al.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of manganese (II) complex of picolinate: A combined experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    A novel manganese (II) complex with picolinic acid (pyridine 2-carboxylic acid, Hpic), namely, [Mn(pic)2(H2O)2] was prepared and its crystal structure was fully characterized by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Picolinate (pic) ligands were coordinated to the central manganese(II) ion as bidentate N,O-donors through the nitrogen atoms of pyridine rings and the oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups forming five-membered chelate rings. The spectroscopic characterization of Mn(II) complex was performed by the applications of FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis and EPR techniques. In order to support these studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out by using B3LYP level. IR and Raman spectra were simulated at B3LYP level, and obtained results indicated that DFT calculations generally give compatible results to the experimental ones. The electronic structure of the Mn(II) complex was predicted using time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model (PCM). Molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength were investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Nonlinear optical properties of Mn(II) complex were investigated by the determining of molecular polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) parameters.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms.

    PubMed

    Arthi, P; Shobana, S; Srinivasan, P; Mitu, L; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2015-05-15

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L(1-3)](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R=CH3, C(CH3)3 or Br) with 2,2'-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn(2+) complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E(1)pc=-0.73 to -0.76V, E(2)pc=-1.30 to -1.36V), and anodic (E(1)pa=1.02-1.11V, E(2)pa=1.32-1.79V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1>2>3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  18. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  19. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael D.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M.; Dorman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers. PMID:22645610

  20. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT-Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael D; Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E; Schroeter, Jeffry D; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M; Dorman, David C

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  1. Ammonia Binds to the Dangler Manganese of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex.

    PubMed

    Oyala, Paul H; Stich, Troy A; Debus, Richard J; Britt, R David

    2015-07-15

    High-resolution X-ray structures of photosystem II reveal several potential substrate binding sites at the water-oxidizing/oxygen-evolving 4MnCa cluster. Aspartate-61 of the D1 protein hydrogen bonds with one such water (W1), which is bound to the dangler Mn4A of the oxygen-evolving complex. Comparison of pulse EPR spectra of (14)NH3 and (15)NH3 bound to wild-type Synechocystis PSII and a D1-D61A mutant lacking this hydrogen-bonding interaction demonstrates that ammonia binds as a terminal NH3 at this dangler Mn4A site and not as a partially deprotonated bridge between two metal centers. The implications of this finding on identifying the binding sites of the substrate and the subsequent mechanism of dioxygen formation are discussed.

  2. Phosphatidylserine metabolism modification precedes manganese-induced apoptosis and phosphatidylserine exposure in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Gambelunghe, A; Mozzi, R; Marchetti, M C; Migliorati, G; Muzi, G; Buratta, S

    2013-12-01

    Long-term exposure to high manganese (Mn) levels can lead to Parkinson-like neurological disorders. Molecular mechanisms underlying Mn cytotoxicity have been not defined. It is known that Mn induces apoptosis in PC12 cells and that this involves the activation of some signal transduction pathways. Although the role of phospholipids in apoptosis and signal transduction is well-known, the membrane phospholipid component in Mn-related damage has not yet been investigated. Phosphatidylserine (PS) facilitates protein translocation from cytosol to plasma membrane and PS exposure on the cell surface allows macrophage recognition of apoptotic cells. This study investigates the effects of MnCl2 on PS metabolism in PC12 cells, relating them to those on cell apoptosis. Apoptosis induction decreased PS radioactivity of PC12 cells incubated with radioactive serine. MnCl2 reduced PS radioactivity even under conditions that did not affect cell viability or PS exposure, suggesting that the effects on PS metabolism may represent an early event in cell apoptosis. Thus the latter conditions that also induced a greater PS decarboxylation were utilized for further investigating on the effects on PS synthesis, by measuring the activity and expression of PS-synthesizing enzymes, in cell lysates and in total cellular membranes (TM). Compared with corresponding controls, enzyme activity of MnCl2-treated cells was lower in cell lysates and greater in TM. Evaluating the expression of two isoforms of PS-synthesizing enzyme (PSS), PSSII was increased both in cell lysate and TM, while PSSI was unchanged. MnCl2 addition to control cell lysate reduced enzyme activity. These results suggest Mn plays a dual role on PS synthesis. Once inside the cell, Mn inhibits the enzyme/s, thus accounting for reduced PS synthesis in lysates and intact cells. On the other hand, it increases PSSII expression in cell membranes. The possibility that this occurs to counteract the direct effects of Mn ions on enzyme

  3. Manganese(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid: structure and biological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zampakou, Marianthi; Rizeq, Natalia; Tangoulis, Vassilis; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Perdih, Franc; Turel, Iztok; Psomas, George

    2014-02-17

    Manganese(II) complexes with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolfenamic acid (Htolf) with the nitrogen-donor heterocyclic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), pyridine (py), or 2,2'-bipyridylamine (bipyam) and/or the oxygen-donor ligands H2O or N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of complexes [Mn(tolf-O)(tolf-O,O')(phen)(H2O)], [Mn2(μ2-tolf-O,O')2(tolf-O,O')2(bipyam)2], [Mn2(μ2-H2O)(μ2-tolf-O,O')2(tolf-O)2(py)4]·1.5MeOH·py, and [Mn(μ2-tolf-O,O')2(DMF)2]n have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complexes with serum albumin proteins was investigated, and relative high binding constant values were calculated. The ability of the compounds to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and hydroxyl radicals was evaluated, and [Mn(tolf)2(phen)(H2O)] was the most active scavenger among the compounds. The compounds have also exhibited noteworthy in vitro inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase. UV titration studies of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus (CT) DNA have proved the binding to CT DNA with [Mn(μ2-tolf)2(DMF)2]n exhibiting the highest DNA-binding constant (Kb = 5.21 (±0.35) × 10(5) M(-1)). The complexes bind to CT DNA probably via intercalation as suggested by DNA-viscosity measurements and competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB), which revealed the ability of the complexes to displace the DNA-bound EB.

  4. Molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of novel manganese(II) complex with sulfamethazine drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Ahmed M.

    2013-03-01

    [MnLCl(H2O)3]·H2O complex (HL = 4-amino-N-(4,6-dimethyl-2-pyrimidinyl)benzenesulfonamide, sulfamethazine) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, TG/DTA, MS, FT-IR, UV-Vis, magnetic, electrochemical, and X-ray powder diffraction. The experimental studies were complemented by quantum chemical calculations at DFT/B3LYP level of theory. Sulfamethazine behaves as a mono-negatively bidentate ligand and interacts with Mn(II) ion through sulfonamidic (N15) and pyrimidic (N23) nitrogen atoms. Electronic structures were investigated using TD-DFT method and the descriptions of frontier molecular orbitals and the relocation of the electron density were determined. The voltammogram of NaL shows one irreversible one-electron process due to oxidation of p-amino group, and one anodic peak characteristic of reduction of sbnd SO2 group. The synthesized complex, in comparison to the parent drug, was screened for its antibacterial activity.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment. PMID:27434633

  7. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats correlates with nucleus accumbens activity on manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Desai, Kirtan; Kohler, Robert J; Eapen, Ajay T; Lisieski, Michael J; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bosse, Kelly E; Conti, Alana C; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of substance abuse research has been to link drug-induced behavioral outcomes with the activity of specific brain regions to understand the neurobiology of addiction behaviors and to search for drug-able targets. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cocaine produces locomotor (behavioral) sensitization that correlates with increased calcium channel-mediated neuroactivity in brain regions linked with drug addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAC), anterior striatum (AST) and hippocampus, as measured using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Rats were treated with cocaine for 5 days, followed by a 2-day drug-free period. The following day, locomotor sensitization was quantified as a metric of cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in the presence of manganese. Immediately following behavioral testing, rats were examined for changes in calcium channel-mediated neuronal activity in the NAC, AST, hippocampus and temporalis muscle, which was associated with behavioral sensitization using MEMRI. Cocaine significantly increased locomotor activity and produced behavioral sensitization compared with saline treatment of control rats. A significant increase in MEMRI signal intensity was determined in the NAC, but not AST or hippocampus, of cocaine-treated rats compared with saline-treated control rats. Cocaine did not increase signal intensity in the temporalis muscle. Notably, in support of our hypothesis, behavior was significantly and positively correlated with MEMRI signal intensity in the NAC. As neuronal uptake of manganese is regulated by calcium channels, these results indicate that MEMRI is a powerful research tool to study neuronal activity in freely behaving animals and to guide new calcium channel-based therapies for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence.

  8. Anti-oxidant, in vitro, in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and antiproliferative activity of mefenamic acid and its metal complexes with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II).

    PubMed

    Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Staninska, Malgorzata; Primikiri, Alexandra; Kotoglou, Chronis; Demertzis, Mavroudis A

    2009-06-01

    Some new complexes of mefenamic acid with potentially interesting biological activity are described. The complexes of mefenamic acid [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 1, [Co(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 2, [Ni(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 3, [Cu(mef)(2)(H(2)O)](2), 4 and [Zn(mef)(2)], 5, were prepared by the reaction of mefenamic acid, a potent anti-inflammatory drug with metal salts. Optical and infrared spectral data of these new complexes are reported. Monomeric six-coordinated species were isolated in the solid state for Mn(II), Ni(II) and Co(II), dimeric five-coordinated for Cu(II) and monomeric four-coordinated for Zn(II). In DMF or CHCl(3) solution the coordination number is retained and the coordinated molecules of water are replaced by solvent molecules. The anti-oxidant properties of the complexes were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH, free radical scavenging assay. The scavenging activities of the complexes were measured and compared with those of the free drug and vitamin C. We have explored their ability to inhibit soybean lipoxygenase, beta-glucuronidase and trypsin- induced proteolysis. The complex [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] exhibits the highest antioxidant activity and the highest inhibitory effect against the soybean lipogygenase (LOX), properties that are not demonstrated by mefenamic acid. Their inhibitory effects on rat paw edema induced by Carrageenan was studied and compared with those of mefenamic acid. The complex [Zn(mef)(2)] exhibited a strong inhibitory effect at 0.1 mmol/Kg B.W. (81.5 +/- 1.3% inhibition), superior to the inhibition induced by mefenamic acid at the same dose (61.5 +/- 2.3% inhibition). Mefenamic acid and its metal complexes have been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma) and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The copper(II) complex displays against T24, MCF-7

  9. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System.

    PubMed

    Sujith, P P; Mourya, B S; Krishnamurthi, S; Meena, R M; Loka Bharathi, P A

    2014-01-01

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral deposition. We also hypothesized that, the Mn-oxidizing microbes may respond reversibly to pulses of fresh organic carbon introduced into the water column by mobilizing the Mn in Mn-oxides. To test these two hypotheses, we enumerated the number of Mn-oxidizers and -reducers and carried out studies on the mobilization of Mn by microbial communities associated with basalt. In medium containing 100 μM Mn(2+), 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) were recovered with undetectable number of reducers on Mn-oxide amended medium, suggesting that the community was more oxidative. Experiments were then conducted with basalt fragments at 4±2 °C in the presence 'G(+)' and absence 'G(-)' of glucose (0.1%). Controls included set-ups, some of which were poisoned with 15 mM azide and the others of which were heat-killed. The mobilization of Mn in the presence of glucose was 1.76 μg g(-1) d(-1) and in the absence, it was 0.17 μg g(-1) d(-1) after 150 d. Mn mobilization with and without added glucose was 13 and 4 times greater than the corresponding azide treated controls. However, rates in 'G(+)' were 16 times and 'G(-)' 24 times more than the respective heat killed controls. The corresponding total counts in the presence of added glucose increased from 1.63×10(6) to 6.71×10(7) cells g(-1) and from 1.41×10(7) to 3.52×10(7) cells g(-1) in its absence. Thus, the addition of glucose as a proxy for organic carbon changed the community's response from Mn(II)-oxidizing to Mn(IV)-reducing activity. The results confirm the participation of Mn oxidizing bacteria in the mobilization of Mn. Identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed taxonomic affiliations to Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium and

  10. In situ FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the low-temperature NO disproportionation mediated by solid state manganese(II) porphyrinates.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Garik G; Azizyan, Arsen S; Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Ford, Peter C

    2006-05-15

    The heterogeneous reaction between NO gas and sublimed layers of manganese(II) porphyrinato complexes Mn(Por) (Por = TPP (tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion), TMP (tetramesitylporphyrinato dianion), or TPP(d20) (perdeuterated tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion)) has been monitored by IR and optical spectroscopy over the temperature range of 77 K to room temperature. These manganese porphyrins promote NO disproportionation to NO2 species and N2O, and the reaction proceeds via several distinct stages. At 90 K, the principal species observed spectrally are the nitric oxide dimer, cis-ONNO, two manganese nitrosyls, the simple NO adduct Mn(Por)(NO), and another intermediate (1) that is apparently critical to the disproportionation mechanism. This key intermediate is formed prior to N2O evolution, and proposals regarding its likely structure are offered. When the system is warmed to 130 K, the disproportionation products, N2O and the O-coordinated nitrito complex Mn(Por)(NO)(ONO) (2), are formed. IR spectral changes show that, upon further warming to 200 K, 2 isomerizes into the N-bonded nitro linkage isomer Mn(Por)(NO)(NO2) (3). After it is warmed to room temperature, the latter species loses NO and converts to the known 5-coordinate nitrito complex Mn(Por)(ONO) (4).

  11. Cefepime, a fourth-generation cephalosporin, in complex with manganese, inhibits proteasome activity and induces the apoptosis of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Fan, Yuhua; Wang, Huannan; Bao, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Cefepime (FEP), which is a member of the fourth-generation cephalosporin class, has been extensively studied as a biochemical and antimicrobial reagent in recent years. Manganese (Mn) is important in the biochemical and physiological processes of many living organisms, and it is also high expressed in some tumor tissues. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the proteasome-inhibitory and anti-proliferative properties of 8 metal complexes (FEP‑Cu, FEP-Zn, FEP-Co, FEP-Ni, FEP-Cd, FEP-Cr, FEP-Fe, FEP-Mn) in MDA-MB‑231 human breast cancer cells. The FEP-Mn complex was found to be more potent in its ability to inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity than the other compounds tested. Moreover, the FEP-Mn complex inhibited proteasomal chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity and induced the apoptosis of breast cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the MCF-10A cells were much less sensitive to the FEP complexes compared with the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. These results demonstrated that the FEP-Mn(II) complex has the potential to act as a proteasome inhibitor and apoptosis inducer and therefore has possible future applications in cancer chemotherapy.

  12. The effect of induced anoxia and reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of organic carbon, phosphate, iron, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Annelie C; Arias-Esquivel, Victor A

    2009-11-15

    Eutrophication causes seasonally anoxic bottom waters in coastal environments, but we lack information on effects of onset of anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of redox-sensitive minerals and associated organic carbon (OC). As the first study, we determined the effect of inducing anoxia and subsequently restoring oxic conditions in mesocosms with surface sediment and water from a coastal environment. These concentration changes were compared with those in an oxygenated control. We determined water column concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), iron, manganese, and phosphate. Benthic fluxes of DOC, POC, and iron increased at the onset of anoxia in oxygen-depleted treatments. DOC and iron concentrations increased concomitantly towards maxima, which may have indicated reductive dissolution of FeOOH and release of associated OC. The subsequent concomitant concentration decreases may have been the result of coprecipitation of OC with iron-containing minerals. In contrast, the phosphate-concentration increase occurred several days after the onset of anoxia and the manganese concentration was not affected by the onset of anoxia. Restoring oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in DOC, POC, and phosphate concentrations, which may indicate coprecipitation of OC with phosphate-containing minerals. The high DOC fluxes at the onset of anoxia indicate that redox oscillations may be important in OC degradation. Further, our results indicate a close coupling between OC cycling and dissolution/precipitation of iron-containing minerals in intermittently anoxic sediments.

  13. Template synthesis and spectral studies on mononuclear complexes of chromium(III) and manganese(II) with tetradentate N4 donor macrocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Masih, Iffat; Fahmi, Nighat

    2013-01-01

    The present article deals with the synthesis, spectral characterization and antimicrobial activity of a series of new complexes of chromium(III) and manganese(II) of general formula [Cr(Macn)Cl2]·Cl and [Mn(Macn)Cl2] respectively. These complexes were prepared via template reaction by mixing methanolic solution of diacetyldihydrazone, diacids (oxalic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid and adipic acid) with CrCl3·6H2O and MnCl2·4H2O in 2:2:1 M ratios respectively. The newly synthesized complexes were characterized on the basis of chemical analysis and spectral studies like IR, UV, ESR and X-ray diffraction. An octahedral structure has been proposed for the chromium(III) and manganese(II) macrocyclic complexes. The synthesized complexes were further tested in vitro against fungi and bacteria in order to assess their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The studies demonstrate that the complexes possess antimicrobial properties.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L1) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L2).

    PubMed

    AbouEl-Enein, S A; El-Saied, F A; Kasher, T I; El-Wardany, A H

    2007-07-01

    Salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(1)) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(2)) and their iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by IR, electronic spectra, molar conductivities, magnetic susceptibilities and ESR. Mononuclear complexes are formed with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 (M:L). The IR studies reveal various modes of chelation. The electronic absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the iron(III), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(1) have octahedral geometry. While the cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(2) were separated as tetrahedral structure. The copper(II) complexes have square planar stereochemistry. The ESR parameters of the copper(II) complexes at room temperature were calculated. The g values for copper(II) complexes proved that the Cu-O and Cu-N bonds are of high covalency.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, P.; Shobana, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Mitu, L.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2015-05-01

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L1-3](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R = sbnd CH3, sbnd C(CH3)3 or sbnd Br) with 2,2‧-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn2+ complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62 B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92 B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E1pc = -0.73 to -0.76 V, E2pc = -1.30 to -1.36 V), and anodic (E1pa = 1.02-1.11 V, E2pa = 1.32-1.79 V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1 > 2 > 3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  16. catena-Poly[[[aqua-chlorido-manganese(II)]-bis-[μ-1,1'-(oxydi-p-phenyl-ene)di-1H-imidazole-κN:N

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiao-Long

    2011-01-15

    The title coordination polymer, {[MnCl(C(18)H(14)N(4)O)(2)(H(2)O)]Cl·C(3)H(7)NO·H(2)O}(n), obtained by the solvothermal reaction of BIDPE and manganese(II) salt in H(2)O/DMF (DMF is dimethyl-formamide), is composed of a chain of [Mn(2)(BIDPE)(2)] [BIDPE is 1,1'-(oxydi-p-phenyl-ene)di-1H-imidazole] metallocyclic rings that exhibit inversion symmetry. The coordination about the Mn(II) ions is distorted octahedral with a MnClN(4)O coordination set. In the crystal, the polymeric chains are linked by O-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (100). A number of C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯O inter-actions are also present.

  17. Electrochemically-induced reversible transition from the tunneled to layered polymorphs of manganese dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boeun; Yoon, Chong Seung; Lee, Hae Ri; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2014-01-01

    Zn-ion batteries are emerging energy storage systems eligible for large-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. These batteries consist of totally environmentally-benign electrode materials and potentially manufactured very economically. Although Zn/α-MnO2 systems produce high energy densities of 225 Wh kg−1, larger than those of conventional Mg-ion batteries, they show significant capacity fading during long-term cycling and suffer from poor performance at high current rates. To solve these problems, the concrete reaction mechanism between α-MnO2 and zinc ions that occur on the cathode must be elucidated. Here, we report the intercalation mechanism of zinc ions into α-MnO2 during discharge, which involves a reversible phase transition of MnO2 from tunneled to layered polymorphs by electrochemical reactions. This transition is initiated by the dissolution of manganese from α-MnO2 during discharge process to form layered Zn-birnessite. The original tunneled structure is recovered by the incorporation of manganese ions back into the layers of Zn-birnessite during charge process. PMID:25317571

  18. 3D homometallic carboxylate ferrimagnet constructed from a manganese(II) succinate carboxylate layer motif pillared by isonicotinate spacers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming-Hua; Wu, Mei-Chun; Liang, Hong; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ng, Seik-Weng

    2007-09-03

    A manganese succinate having a layer structure in which the layers are pillared by the isonicotinate spacers in a 3D architecture exhibits long-range ferrimagnetic order below 5.0 K, with the ferrimagnetism arising, for topological reasons, from the nature of the carboxylate binding modes. The compound is the first structurally authenticated example of a 3D ferrimagnet, featuring a homometallic topological ferrimagnetic sheet among metal carboxylates.

  19. Regional distributions of manganese, iron, copper, and zinc in the brains of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tarohda, Tohru; Ishida, Yasushi; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Amano, Ryohei

    2005-09-01

    Time courses of changes in manganese, iron, copper, and zinc concentrations were examined in regions of the brain of a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentrations were simultaneously determined in brain section at the level of the substantia nigra 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days after the 6-OHDA treatment and compared with those of control rats. The distributions of these elements were obtained for 18 regions of the sagittal section (1-mm thick). The ICP-MS results indicated that Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn levels of the 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian brain were observed to increase in all regions that lay along the dopaminergic pathway. In the substantia nigra, the increase in Mn level occurred rapidly from 3 to 7 days and preceded those in the other elements, reaching a plateau in the 6-OHDA brain. Iron and Zn levels increased gradually until 7 days and then increased rapidly from 7 to 10 days. The increase in the copper level was slightly delayed. In other regions, such as the globus pallidus, putamen, and amygdala, the levels of Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn increased with time after 6-OHDA treatment, although the time courses of their changes were region-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the roles of Mn and Fe in the induction of neurological symptoms and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the development of Parkinson's disease. Manganese may hold the key to disturbing cellular Fe homeostasis and accelerating Fe levels, which play the most important role in the development of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H₂O₂ production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death.

  1. Protective effects of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) against manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Marreilha dos Santos, A.P.; Lucas, Rui L.; Andrade, Vanda; Mateus, M. Luísa; Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Michael; Batoreu, M. Camila

    2012-02-01

    Chronic, excessive exposure to manganese (Mn) may induce neurotoxicity and cause an irreversible brain disease, referred to as manganism. Efficacious therapies for the treatment of Mn are lacking, mandating the development of new interventions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in attenuating the neurotoxic effects of Mn in an in vivo rat model. Exposure biomarkers, inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, as well as behavioral parameters were evaluated. Co-treatment with Mn plus Ebs or Mn plus PAS caused a significant decrease in blood and brain Mn concentrations (compared to rats treated with Mn alone), concomitant with reduced brain E{sub 2} prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) and enhanced brain glutathione (GSH) levels, decreased serum prolactin (PRL) levels, and increased ambulation and rearing activities. Taken together, these results establish that both PAS and Ebs are efficacious in reducing Mn body burden, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and locomotor activity impairments in a rat model of Mn-induced toxicity. -- Highlights: ► The manuscript is unique in its approach to the neurotoxicity of Mn. ► The manuscript incorporates molecular, cellular and functional (behavioral) analyses. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in restoring Mn behavioral function. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in reducing Mn-induced oxidative stress. ► Both PAS and Ebs led to a decrease in Mn-induced neuro-inflammation.

  2. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  4. Silica encapsulated manganese perovskite nanoparticles for magnetically induced hyperthermia without the risk of overheating.

    PubMed

    Kaman, O; Pollert, E; Veverka, P; Veverka, M; Hadová, E; Knízek, K; Marysko, M; Kaspar, P; Klementová, M; Grünwaldová, V; Vasseur, S; Epherre, R; Mornet, S; Goglio, G; Duguet, E

    2009-07-08

    Nanoparticles of manganese perovskite of the composition La(0.75)Sr(0.25)MnO(3) uniformly coated with silica were prepared by encapsulation of the magnetic cores (mean crystallite size 24 nm) using tetraethoxysilane followed by fractionation. The resulting hybrid particles form a stable suspension in an aqueous environment at physiological pH and possess a narrow hydrodynamic size distribution. Both calorimetric heating experiments and direct measurements of hysteresis loops in the alternating field revealed high specific power losses, further enhanced by the encapsulation procedure in the case of the coated particles. The corresponding results are discussed on the basis of complex characterization of the particles and especially detailed magnetic measurements. Moreover, the Curie temperature (335 K) of the selected magnetic cores resolves the risk of local overheating during hyperthermia treatment.

  5. Hydrated manganese(II) phosphate (Mn₃(PO₄)₂·3H₂O) as a water oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Park, Jimin; Lee, Joohee; Yang, Ki Dong; Pradhan, Gajendra Kumar; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jang, Hae Lin; Park, Sangbaek; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Kim, Sun Hee; Han, Seungwu; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-05-21

    The development of a water oxidation catalyst has been a demanding challenge in realizing water splitting systems. The asymmetric geometry and flexible ligation of the biological Mn4CaO5 cluster are important properties for the function of photosystem II, and these properties can be applied to the design of new inorganic water oxidation catalysts. We identified a new crystal structure, Mn3(PO4)2·3H2O, that precipitates spontaneously in aqueous solution at room temperature and demonstrated its high catalytic performance under neutral conditions. The bulky phosphate polyhedron induces a less-ordered Mn geometry in Mn3(PO4)2·3H2O. Computational analysis indicated that the structural flexibility in Mn3(PO4)2·3H2O could stabilize the Jahn-Teller-distorted Mn(III) and thus facilitate Mn(II) oxidation. This study provides valuable insights into the interplay between atomic structure and catalytic activity.

  6. Melatonin inhibits manganese-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss in mice: involvement of oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Jiao, Congcong; Mi, Chao; Xu, Bin; Li, Yuehui; Wang, Fei; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa

    2015-02-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) induces oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the relationship between them during Mn neurotoxicity has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the probable role of melatonin (MLT) against Mn-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss as a result of antagonizing oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Mice were randomly divided into five groups as follows: control, MnCl2, low MLT + MnCl2, median MLT + MnCl2, and high MLT + MnCl2. Administration of MnCl2 (50 mg/kg) for 2 weeks significantly induced hypokinesis, dopaminergic neurons degeneration and loss, neuronal ultrastructural damage, and apoptosis in the substantia nigra and the striatum. These conditions were caused in part by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde accumulation, and dysfunction of the nonenzymatic (GSH) and enzymatic (GSH-Px, superoxide dismutase, quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase) antioxidative defense systems. Mn-induced neuron degeneration, astrocytes, and microglia activation contribute to the changes of oxidative stress markers. Dopamine (DA) depletion and downregulation of DA transporter and receptors were also found after Mn administration, this might also trigger motor dysfunction and neurons loss. Pretreatment with MLT prevented Mn-induced oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inhibited the interaction between them. As a result, pretreatment with MLT significantly alleviated Mn-induced motor dysfunction and neuronal loss. In conclusion, Mn treatment resulted in motor dysfunction and neuronal loss, possibly involving an interaction between oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra and the striatum. Pretreatment with MLT attenuated Mn-induced neurotoxicity by means of its antioxidant properties and promotion of the DA system.

  7. Manganese induces oligomerization to promote down-regulation of the intracellular trafficking receptor used by Shiga toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Ritika; Jarvela, Timothy; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) protects cells against lethal doses of purified Shiga toxin by causing the degradation of the cycling transmembrane protein GPP130, which the toxin uses as a trafficking receptor. Mn-induced GPP130 down-regulation, in addition to being a potential therapeutic approach against Shiga toxicosis, is a model for the study of metal-regulated protein sorting. Significantly, however, the mechanism by which Mn regulates GPP130 trafficking is unknown. Here we show that a transferable trafficking determinant within GPP130 bound Mn and that Mn binding induced GPP130 oligomerization in the Golgi. Alanine substitutions blocking Mn binding abrogated both oligomerization of GPP130 and GPP130 sorting from the Golgi to lysosomes. Further, oligomerization was sufficient because forced aggregation, using a drug-controlled polymerization domain, redirected GPP130 to lysosomes in the absence of Mn. These experiments reveal metal-induced oligomerization as a Golgi sorting mechanism for a medically relevant receptor for Shiga toxin. PMID:25079690

  8. Ammonia binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II identifies the solvent-exchangeable oxygen bridge (μ-oxo) of the manganese tetramer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Navarro, Montserrat; Ames, William M.; Nilsson, Håkan; Lohmiller, Thomas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A.; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Neese, Frank; Boussac, Alain; Messinger, Johannes; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The assignment of the two substrate water sites of the tetra-manganese penta-oxygen calcium (Mn4O5Ca) cluster of photosystem II is essential for the elucidation of the mechanism of biological O-O bond formation and the subsequent design of bio-inspired water-splitting catalysts. We recently demonstrated using pulsed EPR spectroscopy that one of the five oxygen bridges (μ-oxo) exchanges unusually rapidly with bulk water and is thus a likely candidate for one of the substrates. Ammonia, a water analog, was previously shown to bind to the Mn4O5Ca cluster, potentially displacing a water/substrate ligand [Britt RD, et al. (1989) J Am Chem Soc 111(10):3522–3532]. Here we show by a combination of EPR and time-resolved membrane inlet mass spectrometry that the binding of ammonia perturbs the exchangeable μ-oxo bridge without drastically altering the binding/exchange kinetics of the two substrates. In combination with broken-symmetry density functional theory, our results show that (i) the exchangable μ-oxo bridge is O5 {using the labeling of the current crystal structure [Umena Y, et al. (2011) Nature 473(7345):55–60]}; (ii) ammonia displaces a water ligand to the outer manganese (MnA4-W1); and (iii) as W1 is trans to O5, ammonia binding elongates the MnA4-O5 bond, leading to the perturbation of the μ-oxo bridge resonance and to a small change in the water exchange rates. These experimental results support O-O bond formation between O5 and possibly an oxyl radical as proposed by Siegbahn and exclude W1 as the second substrate water. PMID:24023065

  9. Dinuclear manganese(II) complexes of hexaazamacrocycles bearing N-benzoylated pendant separated by aromatic spacers: Antibacterial, DNA interaction, cytotoxic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Arthi, P; Shobana, S; Srinivasan, P; Prabhu, D; Arulvasu, C; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2015-12-01

    Three new homodinuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L(1-3)(ClO4)(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1-3) have been synthesized via cyclocondensation of terephthalaldehyde with three different benzoylated pendants in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate and characterized by spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetric investigation of complexes (1-3) depict two quasi-reversible one electron reduction processes in the cathodic potential region (E(1)pc=-0.73 to-0.83 V, E(2)pc=-1.31 to -1.40 V) and two quasi-reversible one electron oxidation processes in the anodic potential region (E(1)pa=1.03 to 1.10 V, E(2)pa=1.69 to 1.77 V). Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry around the central metal ion. The observed low magnetic moment values (μeff, 5.60-5.68 B.M.) of the complexes indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction between two metal centers, which was also supported by the broad EPR signal. All the compounds were tested for antibacterial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The binding studies of complexes with CT-DNA suggested minor-groove mode of interaction. Molecular docking studies were carried out in order to find the binding affinity of complexes with DNA and protein EGFR Kinase. The complexes are stabilized by additional electrostatic and van der Waals interaction with the DNA, and support minor groove mode of binding. The cleavage activity of complexes on pBR322 plasmid DNA displays efficient activity through a mechanistic pathway involving hydroxyl radicals. The cytotoxicity of complexes 2 and 3 have been tested against human liver adenocarcinoma (HepG2) cell line. Nuclear-chromatin cleavage has also been observed with propidium iodide (PI) staining and alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) techniques.

  10. Ammonia binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II identifies the solvent-exchangeable oxygen bridge (μ-oxo) of the manganese tetramer.

    PubMed

    Pérez Navarro, Montserrat; Ames, William M; Nilsson, Håkan; Lohmiller, Thomas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Nowaczyk, Marc M; Neese, Frank; Boussac, Alain; Messinger, Johannes; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas

    2013-09-24

    The assignment of the two substrate water sites of the tetra-manganese penta-oxygen calcium (Mn4O5Ca) cluster of photosystem II is essential for the elucidation of the mechanism of biological O-O bond formation and the subsequent design of bio-inspired water-splitting catalysts. We recently demonstrated using pulsed EPR spectroscopy that one of the five oxygen bridges (μ-oxo) exchanges unusually rapidly with bulk water and is thus a likely candidate for one of the substrates. Ammonia, a water analog, was previously shown to bind to the Mn4O5Ca cluster, potentially displacing a water/substrate ligand [Britt RD, et al. (1989) J Am Chem Soc 111(10):3522-3532]. Here we show by a combination of EPR and time-resolved membrane inlet mass spectrometry that the binding of ammonia perturbs the exchangeable μ-oxo bridge without drastically altering the binding/exchange kinetics of the two substrates. In combination with broken-symmetry density functional theory, our results show that (i) the exchangable μ-oxo bridge is O5 {using the labeling of the current crystal structure [Umena Y, et al. (2011) Nature 473(7345):55-60]}; (ii) ammonia displaces a water ligand to the outer manganese (MnA4-W1); and (iii) as W1 is trans to O5, ammonia binding elongates the MnA4-O5 bond, leading to the perturbation of the μ-oxo bridge resonance and to a small change in the water exchange rates. These experimental results support O-O bond formation between O5 and possibly an oxyl radical as proposed by Siegbahn and exclude W1 as the second substrate water.

  11. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of a Hot-Rolled High-Manganese Dual-Phase Transformation-Induced Plasticity/Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liming; Shan, Mokun; Zhang, Daoda; Wang, Huanrong; Wang, Wei; Shan, Aidang

    2017-02-01

    The microstructures and deformation behavior were studied in a high-temperature annealed high-manganese dual-phase (28 vol pct δ-ferrite and 72 vol pct γ-austenite) transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity (TRIP/TWIP) steel. The results showed that the steel exhibits a special Lüders-like yielding phenomenon at room temperature (RT) and 348 K (75 °C), while it shows continuous yielding at 423 K, 573 K and 673 K (150 °C, 300 °C and 400 °C) deformation. A significant TRIP effect takes place during Lüders-like deformation at RT and 348 K (75 °C) temperatures. Semiquantitative analysis of the TRIP effect on the Lüders-like yield phenomenon proves that a softening effect of the strain energy consumption of strain-induced transformation is mainly responsible for this Lüders-like phenomenon. The TWIP mechanism dominates the 423 K (150 °C) deformation process, while the dislocation glide controls the plasticity at 573 K (300 °C) deformation. The delta-ferrite, as a hard phase in annealed dual-phase steel, greatly affects the mechanical stability of austenite due to the heterogeneous strain distribution between the two phases during deformation. A delta-ferrite-aided TRIP effect, i.e., martensite transformation induced by localized strain concentration of the hard delta-ferrite, is proposed to explain this kind of Lüders-like phenomenon. Moreover, the tensile curve at RT exhibits an upward curved behavior in the middle deformation stage, which is principally attributed to the deformation twinning of austenite retained after Lüders-like deformation. The combination of the TRIP effect during Lüders-like deformation and the subsequent TWIP effect greatly enhances the ductility in this annealed high-manganese dual-phase TRIP/TWIP steel.

  12. Upregulation of mitochondrial protease HtrA2/Omi contributes to manganese-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat brain striatum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J K; Ma, X; Wu, Q Y; Qian, W B; Wang, N; Shi, S S; Han, J L; Zhao, J Y; Jiang, S Y; Wan, C H

    2014-05-30

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for normal brain functioning. However, excessive intake of Mn has been known to lead to neuronal loss and clinical symptoms resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), whose precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In the study, we established a Mn-exposed rat model and identified a mitochondrial protease, the mature form of high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2/Omi), which was significantly upregulated in rat brain striatum after Mn exposure. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the expression of mature HtrA2 was remarkably increased following Mn exposure. In addition, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that overexposure to Mn could lead to significant elevation in the number of HtrA2-positive neurons. Accordingly, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a well-characterized target of HtrA2-mediated proteolysis, was progressively decreased following Mn exposure, and was correlated with increased level of active caspase-3. Further, we showed that Mn exposure decreased the viability and induced apparent apoptosis of NFG-differentiated PC12 cells. Importantly, the expression of HtrA2 was progressively increased, whereas the level of cellular XIAP was reduced during Mn-induced apoptosis. In addition, blockage of HtrA2 activity with UCF-101 restored Mn-induced reduction in XIAP expression. Finally, we observed that UCF-101 treatment ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings suggested that upregulated HtrA2 played a role in Mn-induced neuronal death in brain striatum.

  13. Downregulation of Mfn2 participates in manganese-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum and PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhang; Yang, Jianbin; Lu, Chunhua; Jiang, Shengyang; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Yin, Lifeng; Jiang, Junkang

    2017-02-21

    Manganese (Mn) is a widely distributed trace element that is essential for normal brain function and development. However, chronic exposure to excessive Mn has been known to lead to neuronal loss and manganism, a disease with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits, whose clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying Mn neurotoxicity remains largely unclear. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal mitochondrial functionality is an early and causal event in Mn-induced neurodegeneration and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a highly conserved dynamin-related protein (DRP), played a role in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. We revealed that Mfn2 was significantly dysregulated in rat striatum and PC12 neuronal-like cells following Mn exposure. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of Mfn2 was remarkably decreased following different concentrations of Mn exposure. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed a remarkable downregulation of Mfn2 in rat striatum after Mn exposure. Immunofluorescent staining showed that Mfn2 was expressed predominantly in neurons, and neuronal loss of Mfn2 was associated with the expression of active caspase-3 following Mn exposure. Importantly, overexpression of Mfn2 apparently attenuated Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. Notably, treatment with caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CH could not rescue Mn-induced downregulation of Mfn2, suggesting that Mn-induced mfn2 occurs prior to neuronal apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicated that down-regulated expression of Mfn2 might contribute to the pathological processes underlying Mn neurotoxicity.

  14. Systems-wide analysis of manganese deficiency-induced changes in gene activity of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Tsai, Yi-Hsiu; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wu, Yu-Ching; Curie, Catherine; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is pivotal for plant growth and development, but little information is available regarding the strategies that evolved to improve Mn acquisition and cellular homeostasis of Mn. Using an integrated RNA-based transcriptomic and high-throughput shotgun proteomics approach, we generated a comprehensive inventory of transcripts and proteins that showed altered abundance in response to Mn deficiency in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis. A suite of 22,385 transcripts was consistently detected in three RNA-seq runs; LC-MS/MS-based iTRAQ proteomics allowed the unambiguous determination of 11,606 proteins. While high concordance between mRNA and protein expression (R = 0.87) was observed for transcript/protein pairs in which both gene products accumulated differentially upon Mn deficiency, only approximately 10% of the total alterations in the abundance of proteins could be attributed to transcription, indicating a large impact of protein-level regulation. Differentially expressed genes spanned a wide range of biological functions, including the maturation, translation, and transport of mRNAs, as well as primary and secondary metabolic processes. Metabolic analysis by UPLC-qTOF-MS revealed that the steady-state levels of several major glucosinolates were significantly altered upon Mn deficiency in both roots and leaves, possibly as a compensation for increased pathogen susceptibility under conditions of Mn deficiency. PMID:27804982

  15. Bavachalcone-induced manganese superoxide dismutase expression through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanqi; Ling, Shuang; Duan, Ju; Ma, Jing; Ni, Rongzhen; Xu, Jin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been suggested as a major etiological factor in cardiovascular diseases. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an essential antioxidant mitochondrial enzyme. Although polyphenols can induce MnSOD expression, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the effect of bavachalcone, a bioactive compound isolated from Psoralea corylifolia, on MnSOD protein expression and explored whether this effect is mediated through the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Our data showed that bavachalcone enhanced the luciferase activity of the MnSOD promoter and increased MnSOD mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, bavachalcone suppressed the mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. Conversely, bavachalcone stimulated liver kinase B1 and AMPKα phosphorylation. mRNA interference by using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of AMPK inhibited bavachalcone-induced MnSOD expression. A-769662, an AMPK activator, also stimulated AMPK activity and increased MnSOD expression. Furthermore, AMPK knockdown by shRNA-AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of bavachalcone on mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. These findings indicate that bavachalcone can protect the endothelial function by increasing AMPK activity and MnSOD expression and reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress. .

  16. Reduced hippocampal manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) signal during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: edema or apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Persike, Daniele Suzete; Castro, Leticia Urbano Cardoso de; Sanches, Talita Rojas Cunha; Andrade, Lúcia da Conceição; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been considered a surrogate marker of Ca(+2) influx into activated cells and tracer of neuronal active circuits. However, the induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainic acid does not result in hippocampal MEMRI hypersignal, in spite of its high cell activity. Similarly, short durations of status (5 or 15min) induced by pilocarpine did not alter the hippocampal MEMRI, while 30 min of SE even reduced MEMRI signal Thus, this study was designed to investigate possible explanations for the absence or decrease of MEMRI signal after short periods of SE. We analyzed hippocampal caspase-3 activation (to evaluate apoptosis), T2 relaxometry (tissue water content) and aquaporin 4 expression (water-channel protein) of rats subjected to short periods of pilocarpine-induced SE. For the time periods studied here, apoptotic cell death did not contribute to the decrease of the hippocampal MEMRI signal. However, T2 relaxation was higher in the group of animals subjected to 30min of SE than in the other SE or control groups. This result is consistent with higher AQP-4 expression during the same time period. Based on apoptosis and tissue water content analysis, the low hippocampal MEMRI signal 30min after SE can potentially be attributed to local edema rather than to cell death.

  17. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription.

  18. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells’ Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  19. Crystal structures of the water and acetone monosolvates of bis-[4'-(pyridin-4-yl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine]-manganese(II) bis-(hexa-fluorido-phosphate).

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Leandro M O; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Fernandes, José A

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structures of bis-[4'-(pyridin-4-yl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine]-man-gan-ese(II) bis-(hexa-fluorido-phosphate) monohydrate, [Mn(C20H14N4)2](PF6)2·H2O, (1), and bis-[4'-(pyridin-4-yl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine]-manganese(II) bis(hexa-fluorido-phosphate) acetone monosolvate, (2), [Mn(C20H14N4)2](PF6)2·CH3COCH3, are described. At 150 K, (1) and (2) have monoclinic (P21/c) and ortho-rhom-bic (C2221) symmetries, respectively. Both structures exhibit octahedrally coordinated Mn(II) atoms and disorder. They display weak inter-actions, such as C-H⋯F, C-H⋯N, C-H⋯π, F⋯π and π-π. The twofold rotation axis in the molecule of (2) is coincident with a twofold rotation axis of the crystal.

  20. Synthesis, physico-chemical studies of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with some p-substituted acetophenone benzoylhydrazones and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod P; Singh, Shweta; Katiyar, Anshu

    2009-04-01

    Complexes of the type [M(pabh)(H2O)Cl], [M(pcbh)(H2O)Cl] and [M(Hpabh)(H2O)2 (SO4)] where, M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); Hpabh = p-amino acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone and Hpcbh = p-chloro acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone have been synthesized and characterized with the help of elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, ESR and IR spectra, thermal (TGA & DTA) and X-ray diffraction studies. Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) chloride complexes are square planar, whereas their sulfate complexes have spin-free octahedral geometry. ESR spectra of Cu(II) complexes with Hpabh are axial and suggest d(x(2)-y(2) as the ground state. The ligand is bidentate bonding through > C = N--and deprotonated enolate group in all the chloro complexes, whereas, >C = N and >C = O groups in all the sulfato complexes. Thermal studies (TGA & DTA) on [Cu(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] indicate a multistep decomposition pattern, which are both exothermic and endothermic in nature. X-ray powder diffraction parameters for [Co(pabh)(H2O)Cl] and [Ni(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] correspond to tetragonal and orthorhombic crystal lattices, respectively. The ligands as well as their complexes show a significant antifungal and antibacterial activity. The metal complexes are more active than the ligand.

  1. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  2. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese (II) to manganese (III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction is promoted by a variety of chemical species, these ancient manganese deposits are often significantly more reduced than modern environmental manganese-rich sediments. We document the impacts of manganese reduction and the mineral phases that form stable manganese deposits from seven sedimentary examples spanning from modern surface environments to rocks over 2 billion years old. Integrating redox and coordination information from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microprobe imaging with scanning electron microscopy and energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, we find that unlike the Mn(IV)-dominated modern manganese deposits, three manganese minerals dominate these representative ancient deposits: kutnohorite (CaMn(CO3)2), rhodochrosite (MnCO3), and braunite (Mn(III)6Mn(II)O8SiO4). Pairing these mineral and textural observations with previous studies of manganese geochemistry, we develop a paragenetic model of post-depositional manganese mineralization with kutnohorite and calcian rhodochrosite as the earliest diagenetic mineral phases, rhodochrosite and braunite forming secondarily, and later alteration forming Mn-silicates.

  3. [Oxidative stress and autophagy in SK-N-SH cells induced by manganese chloride or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium: a comparative analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, W L; Dou, C S; Wang, Y; Zhao, P; Fu, J L; Yao, B Y; Zhou, Z C

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the effect of manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP (+)) on oxidative stress and autophagy in human neuroblastomaSK-N-SH cells and the mechanism of the neurotoxicity of manganese. Methods: SK-N-SH cells were treated with MnCl(2) or MPP(+) at doses of 0.062 5, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mmol/L for 24 hours, and MTT assay was used to measure cell viability. The cells weretreated with MnCl(2) or MPP(+) at doses of 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mmol/L for 24 hours, and flow cytometry was used to measure the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe autophagosome in cells, and Western blot was used to measure the expression of autophagy-related proteins P62 and LC3-II/LC3-I. Results: Compared with the control group, the 0.0625-2.0 mmol/L MnCl(2) and 0.125-2.0 mmol/L MPP (+) treatment groups had significant reductions in the viability of SK-N-SH cells, and the 0.25-2.0 mmol/L MnCl(2) treatment groups had significantly lower viability than the groups treated with the same doses of MPP(+) (all P<0.05) . Compared with the control group, the 0.125-0.25 mmol/L MnCl(2) and 0.125-0.5 mmol/L MPP(+) treatment groups had significant increases in the content of ROS, and the 0.25-0.5 mmol/L MPP(+) treatment groups had significantly higher content of ROS than the groups treated with the same doses of MnCl(2) (all P<0.05) . Compared with the control group, the 0.25-0.5 mmol/L MnCl(2) andMPP(+) treatment groups had significant increases in autophagy-related proteins LC3-II/LC3-I and significant reductions in P62 expression; the 0.125-0.5 mmol/L MPP(+) treatment groups had significantly higher LC3-II/LC3-I than the groups treated with the same doses of MnCl(2), and the 0.125 and 0.25 mmol/L MPP (+) treatment groups had significantly lower P62 expression than the groups treated with the same doses of MnCl(2) (all P<0.05) . Conclusion: Both MnCl(2) and MPP(+) can induce

  4. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  5. A laser ablation ICP-MS based method for multiplexed immunoblot analysis: applications to manganese-dependent protein dynamics of photosystem II in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole Noerregaard; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Jensen, Poul Erik; Thelen, Jay J; Husted, Søren

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) constitutes an essential co-factor in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII). Consequently, Mn deficiency reduces photosynthetic efficiency and leads to changes in PSII composition. In order to study these changes, multiplexed protein assays are advantageous. Here, we developed a multiplexed antibody-based assay and analysed selected PSII subunits in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). A selection of antibodies were labelled with specific lanthanides and immunoreacted with thylakoids exposed to Mn deficiency after western blotting. Subsequently, western blot membranes were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), which allowed selective and relative quantitative analysis via the different lanthanides. The method was evaluated against established liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) methods, based on data-dependent acquisition (DDA) and selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Manganese deficiency resulted in a general decrease in PSII protein abundances, an effect that was shown to be reversible upon Mn re-supplementation. Specifically, the extrinsic proteins PsbP and PsbQ showed Mn-dependent changes in abundances. Similar trends in the response to Mn deficiency at the protein level were observed when comparing DDA, SRM and LA-ICP-MS results. A biologically important exception to this trend was the loss of PsbO in the SRM analysis, which highlights the necessity of validating protein changes by more than one technique. The developed method enables a higher number of proteins to be multiplexed in comparison to existing immunoassays. Furthermore, multiplexed protein analysis by LA-ICP-MS provides an analytical platform with high throughput appropriate for screening large collections of plants.

  6. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    PubMed

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  7. Manganese mineral formation by bacterial spores of the marine Bacillus , strain SG-1: Evidence for the direct oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandernack, Kevin W.; Post, Jeffrey; Tebo, Bradley M.

    1995-11-01

    The spores of a marine Bacillus bacterium, strain SG-1, are able to oxidize Mn (H) over a wide range of temperatures (0-80°C) and Mn (II) concentrations (25 mM), in both low ionic strength N- (2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine- N'-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer (HB) and in HEPES-buffered seawater (SW). Using SG-1 spores as a catalyst for manganese mineral formation, and by varying the temperature and Mn (II) concentration at pH 7.4-8.0, a variety of manganese oxide and manganate minerals were formed under environmentally relevant conditions in HB and SW. In general, mixed phases of lower valence state minerals (hausmannite, Mn 30 4; feitknechtite, βMnOOH; and manganite, γMnOOH) formed in HB and SW at high Mn (II) concentrations (10 mM initial), or at high temperatures (70°C), by two weeks. βMnOOH was favored at low temperatures (3°C) and Mn 3O 4 at higher temperatures (55-70°C). After 1 year of aging, yMnOOH became the dominant or only mineral present at 25 and 55°C. At lower Mn (II) concentrations (initial concentrations ≤100 μM in HB and ≤1 MM in SW), Mn(IV) minerals precipitated. In HB the Mn(IV) minerals most often resembled sodium buserite, evidenced by collapse of a 10 to 7 Å phase with air drying at room temperature. In SW both buserite and Mg-rich noncollapsible 10 Å manganates were formed. The Mg-rich 10 Å manganates did not collapse to 7 Å even with baking at 100°C. The oxidation state of the minerals were generally higher in SW (as high as 3.7) than in HB (3.2). Mn (IV) minerals also formed at higher Mn (II) concentrations in SW than in HB. These observed differences between SW and HB may have resulted from differences in the chemical milieu, or because of the marine adapted physiology of the bacterial spores. Under a variety of conditions (HB and SW, 3-55δC) Mn (IV) mineral formation often occurred at pH and Mn (II) concentrations too high to be favorable for the disproportionation of Mn 30 4, or βMnOOH to Mn (IV). The results

  8. Phosphorus(V) Porphyrin-Manganese(II) Terpyridine Conjugates: Synthesis, Spectroscopy, and Photo-Oxidation Studies on a SnO2 Surface.

    PubMed

    Poddutoori, Prashanth K; Lim, Gary N; Pilkington, Melanie; D'Souza, Francis; van der Est, Art

    2016-11-07

    A major challenge in designing artificial photosynthetic systems is to find a suitable mimic of the highly oxidizing photoactive species P680 in photosystem II. High-potential phosphorus(V) porphyrins have many attractive properties for such a mimic but have not been widely studied. Here, we report the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a novel phosphorus(V) octaethylporphyrin-oxyphenyl-terpyridine conjugate (PPor-OPh-tpy, 1) and its corresponding manganese(II) complex (PPor-OPh-Mn(tpy)Cl2, 2). The X-ray structure of 2 shows that the Mn(II) and P(V) centers are 11.783 Å apart and that the phenoxy linker is not fully conjugated with the terpyridine ligand. The porphyrin fluorescence in 1 and 2 is strongly quenched and has a shorter lifetime compared to a reference compound without the terpyridine ligand. This suggests that electron transfer from tpy or Mn(tpy) to the excited singlet state of the PPor may be occurring. However, femtosecond transient absorbance data show that the rate of relaxation to the ground state in 1 and 2 is comparable to the fluorescence lifetimes. Thus, if charge separation is occurring, its lifetime is short. Because both 1 and 2 are positively charged, they can be electrostatically deposited onto the surface of negatively charged SnO2 nanoparticles. Freeze-trapping EPR studies of 2 electrostatically bound to SnO2 suggest that excitation of the porphyrin results in electron injection from (1)PPor* into the conduction band of SnO2 and that the resulting PPor(•+) species acquires enough potential to photo-oxidize the axially bound Mn(II) (tpy) moiety to Mn(III) (tpy).

  9. Inorganic particulates in removal of heavy metal toxic ions IX. Rapid and efficient removal of Hg(II) by hydrous manganese and tin oxides.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shuddhodan P; Dubey, Som Shankar; Tiwari, Diwakar

    2004-11-01

    Batch studies have been carried out in the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions by using well-synthesized and -characterized hydrous manganese oxide (HMO) and hydrous tin oxide (HTO) employing a radiotracer technique. Results obtained reveal that increased sorptive concentration (10(-8)-10(-2) mol dm(-3)), temperature (298-328 K), and pH (ca. 2.0-10.5) enhance the removal efficiency of these solids. First-order uptake of Hg(II) on HMO and HTO follows the Freundlich adsorption isotherm for entire concentration range. Positive values of DeltaH0 for the uptake process on both solids indicate endothermic uptake and desorption experiments point to irreversible uptake. Radiation stability of the adsorbents has also been assessed using a 300-mCi (Ra-Be) neutron source having an integral neutron flux of 3.85 x 10(6) N cm(-2) s(-1) and associated with a nominal gamma-dose of ca. 1.72 Gy/h.

  10. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  11. Effects of mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Dong, Jiao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Zhai, Jing; Ge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSODm) has been synthesized and reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether MnSODm has anti-inflammatory effects on colitis and any underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study was to investigate therapeutic effects and mechanism of MnSODm on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis model in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered MnSODm (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) per day for 7 days after colitis was induced by TNBS. After treated with MnSODm, the colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and colonic weight/length ratios were significantly decreased compared with colitis model group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malonyldialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in colon tissues were also significantly decreased in MnSODm treatment groups. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased and phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (IκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IKKα/β), and nuclear factor-kappa Bp65 (NF-κBp65) as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation actor 88 (MyD88) in the colonic mucosa were significantly inhibited by MnSODm treatment. Thus, MnSODm was protective against colitis via antioxidant activity and by inhibiting inflammatory mediators by down-regulating TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways. These data suggest a potential therapeutic effect of MnSODm in colitis.

  12. α-Synuclein is involved in manganese-induced ER stress via PERK signal pathway in organotypic brain slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Fei; Wu, Sheng-Wen; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Feng, Shu; Yang, Tian-Yao; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2014-02-01

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) has been known to induce neuronal damage involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, the exact mechanism of Mn-induced ER stress is unclear. Increasing evidence suggested that the overexpression of alpha-synuclein played a critical role in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. To explore whether the occurrence of ER stress was associated with alpha-synuclein overexpression, we made the rat brain slices model of silencing alpha-synuclein using short-interference RNA. After non-silencing alpha-synuclein slices were treated with Mn (0-400 μM) for 24 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic rates of cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase in the culture medium. Moreover, there was a dose-dependent increase in the protein expression of 78, 94-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78/94), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and caspase-12. Moreover, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) phosphorylation, PERK-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2a, and ATF4 expression also increased. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) activation and X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp1) mRNA splicing increased. Activating transcription factor 6 p90 levels did not change. However, after silencing alpha-synuclein slices were treated with 400 μM Mn for 24 h, there was a significant decrease in the expression of GRP78/94, CHOP, and caspase-12 compared with 400 μM Mn-treated non-silencing alpha-synuclein slices. Furthermore, PERK phosphorylation, PERK-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2a, and ATF4 mRNA expression also decreased. However, IRE1 phosphorylation and Xbp1 mRNA splicing did not change. The findings revealed that Mn induced ER stress via activation of PERK and IRE1 signaling pathways and subsequent apoptosis in cultured slices. Moreover, alpha-synuclein protein was associated with Mn-induced activation of PERK signaling pathway.

  13. Binding of manganese(II) to a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme as studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    KISSELEVA, NATALIA; KHVOROVA, ANASTASIA; WESTHOF, ERIC; SCHIEMANN, OLAV

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to study the binding of MnII ions to a tertiary stabilized hammer-head ribozyme (tsHHRz) and to compare it with the binding to the minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz). Continuous wave EPR measurements show that the tsHHRz possesses a single high-affinity MnII binding site with a KD of ≤10 nM at an NaCl concentration of 0.1 M. This dissociation constant is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than the KD determined previously for the single high-affinity MnII site in the mHHRz. In addition, whereas the high-affinity MnII is displaced from the mHHRz upon binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B, it is not from the tsHHRz. Despite these pronounced differences in binding, a comparison between the electron spin echo envelope modulation and hyperfine sublevel correlation spectra of the minimal and tertiary stabilized HHRz demonstrates that the structure of both binding sites is very similar. This suggests that the MnII is located in both ribozymes between the bases A9 and G10.1 of the sheared G · A tandem base pair, as shown previously and in detail for the mHHRz. Thus, the much stronger MnII binding in the tsHHRz is attributed to the interaction between the two external loops, which locks in the RNA fold, trapping the MnII in the tightly bound conformation, whereas the absence of long-range loop–loop interactions in the mHHRz leads to more dynamical and open conformations, decreasing MnII binding. PMID:15611296

  14. The effects of iron(II) on the kinetics of arsenic oxidation and sorption on manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, As(III) oxidation kinetics by a poorly-crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe(II) was investigated using stirred-flow and batch experiments. Chemically synthetic δ-MnO2 was reacted with four influent solutions, containing the same As(III) concentration but different Fe(II) concentrations, at pH 6. The results show an initial rapid As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2, which is followed by an appreciably slow reaction after 8h. In the presence of Fe(II), As(III) oxidation is inhibited due to the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the formation of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides on the δ-MnO2 surface. However, the sorption of As(III), As(V) and Mn(II) are increased, for the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides provide additional sorption sites. This study suggests that the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) and consequently the precipitation of Fe(III) compounds on the δ-MnO2 surface play an important role in As(III) oxidation and As sequestration. Understanding these processes would be helpful in developing in situ strategies for remediation of As-contaminated waters and soils.

  15. MECHANISMS OF MANGANESE-INDUCED RAT PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELL DEATH AND CELL DIFFERENTIATION. (R826248)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytom...

  16. Structure, antimicrobial activity, DNA- and albumin-binding of manganese(II) complexes with the quinolone antimicrobial agents oxolinic acid and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Zampakou, Marianthi; Akrivou, Melpomeni; Andreadou, Eleni G; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Pantazaki, Anastasia A; Psomas, George

    2013-04-01

    The reaction of MnCl2 with the quinolone antibacterial drug oxolinic acid (Hoxo) results to the formation of [KMn(oxo)3(MeOH)3]. Interaction of MnCl2 with the quinolone Hoxo or enrofloxacin (Herx) and the N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) results in the formation of metal complexes with the general formula [Mn(quinolonato)2(phen)]. The crystal structures of [KMn(oxo)3(MeOH)3] and [Mn(erx)2(phen)], exhibiting a 1D polymeric and a mononuclear structure, respectively, have been determined by X-ray crystallography. In these complexes, the deprotonated bidentate quinolonato ligands are coordinated to manganese(II) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. All complexes can act as potential antibacterial agents with [Mn(erx)2(phen)] exhibiting the most pronounced antimicrobial activity against five different microorganisms. Interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA), studied by UV spectroscopy, has shown that they bind to CT DNA. Competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that all complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating their binding to DNA in strong competition with EB. Intercalative binding mode is proposed for the interaction of the complexes with CT DNA and has also been verified by DNA solution viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments suggest that [Mn(erx)2(phen)] binds strongly to supercoiled pDNA and to linearized pDNA possibly by an intercalative manner provoking double-stranded cleavage reflecting in a nuclease-like activity. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein showing relatively high binding constant values. The binding constants of the complexes towards CT DNA and albumins have been compared to their corresponding zinc(II) and nickel(II) complexes.

  17. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  18. Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) and functional MRI in awake rabbits during somatosensory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Matthew P.; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) is a powerful tool to track system-wide neural activity using high resolution, quantitative T1-weighted MRI in animal models and has significant advantages for investigating neural activity over other modalities including BOLD fMRI. With AIM-MRI, Mn2+ ions enter neurons via voltage-gated calcium channels preferentially active during the time of experimental exposure. A broad range of AIM-MRI studies using different species studying different phenomena have been performed, but few of these studies provide a systematic evaluation of the factors influencing the detection of Mn2+ such as dosage and the temporal characteristics of Mn2+ uptake. We identified an optimal dose of Mn2+ (25 mg/kg, s.c.) in order to characterize the time-course of Mn2+ accumulation in active neural regions in the rabbit. T1-weighted MRI and functional MRI were collected 0–3, 6–9, and 24–27 h post-Mn2+ injection while the vibrissae on the right side were vibrated. Significant BOLD activation in the left somatosensory (SS) cortex and left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was detected during whisker vibration. T1-weighted signal intensities were extracted from these regions, their corresponding contralateral regions and the visual cortex (to serve as controls). A significant elevation in T1-weighted signal intensity in the left SS cortex (relative to right)was evident 6–9 and 24–27 h post-Mn2+ injection while the left VPM thalamus showed a significant enhancement (relative to the right) only during the 24–27 h session. Visual cortex showed no hemispheric difference at any timepoint. Our results suggest that studies employing AIM-MRI would benefit by conducting experimental manipulations 6–24 h after subcutaneous MnCl2 injections to optimize the concentration of contrast agent in the regions active during the exposure. PMID:26589332

  19. Quantitative activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI for characterizing cortical layers in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Matthieu; Samim, Idrees; Lepore, Mario; Gruetter, Rolf; Just, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    The ability of Mn(2+) to follow Ca(2+) pathways upon stimulation transform them into remarkable surrogate markers of neuronal activity using activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI). In the present study, a precise follow-up of physiological parameters during MnCl2 and mannitol infusions improved the reproducibility of AIM-MRI allowing in-depth evaluation of the technique. Pixel-by-pixel T1 data were investigated using histogram distributions in the barrel cortex (BC) and the thalamus before and after Mn(2+) infusion, after blood brain barrier opening and after BC activation. Mean BC T1 values dropped significantly upon trigeminal nerve (TGN) stimulation (-38 %, P = 0.02) in accordance with previous literature findings. T1 histogram distributions showed that 34 % of T1s in the range 600-1500 ms after Mn(2+ )+ mannitol infusions shifted to 50-350 ms after TGN stimulation corresponding to a twofold increase of the percentage of pixels with the lowest T1s in BC. Moreover, T1 changes in response to stimulation increased significantly from superficial cortical layers (I-III) to deeper layers (V-VI). Cortical cytoarchitecture detection during a functional paradigm was performed extending the potential of AIM-MRI. Quantitative AIM-MRI could thus offer a means to interpret local neural activity across cortical layers while identification of the role of calcium dynamics in vivo during brain activation could play a key role in resolving neurovascular coupling mechanisms.

  20. Effects of manganese, calcium, magnesium and zinc on nickel-induced suppression of murine natural killer cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Rogers, R.R.; Riddle, M.M.; Luebke, R.W.; Fogelson, L.D.; Rowe, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The effects that divalent metals have on nickel-induced suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity were studied in mice. Male CBA/J mice were given a single intramuscular injection of the following: nickel chloride, 4.5-36 ..mu..g/g; manganese chloride, 20-80 ..mu..g/g; magnesium acetate, 50-200 ..mu..g/g; zinc acetate, 2-8 ..mu..g/g; or calcium acetate, 12.5-50 ..mu..g/g. Twenty-four hours after metal injection, splenic NK cell activity was assessed using a /sup 51/Cr-release assay. Ni significantly suppressed NK activity, while Mn significantly enhanced NK activity. No alteration in NK activity was observed in mice injected with Mg, Ca, or Zn. The injection of Ni and Mn in combination at a single site resulted in the enhancement of NK activity, although this enhancement was at a level below that observed following the injection of Mn alone. Injection of Mg, Zn, or Ca in combination with Ni did not affect NK activity compared to saline controls. In contrast, the injection of Ni in one thigh followed immediately by Mn, Mg, Ca, or Zn into the other thigh resulted in significant suppression of NK activity for all metals compared with saline controls. An interesting finding was that the injection of Ni followed immediately by Mn into the opposite thigh resulted in even greater reduction in NK activity than Ni alone. Suppression of NK activity by Ni and Mn injected at separate sites was not seen when Mn injection preceded Ni injection by 1 h.

  1. Biological Low-pH Mn(II) Oxidation in a Manganese Deposit Influenced by Metal-Rich Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems. IMPORTANCE This study provides multiple lines of evidence to show that microbes are the main drivers of Mn(II) oxidation even at acidic pH, offering new insights into Mn biogeochemical cycling. A distinct, highly adapted microbial community inhabits acidic, oligotrophic Mn deposits and mediates biological Mn oxidation. These data highlight the importance of biological processes for Mn biogeochemical cycling

  2. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Aschner, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic

  3. Crystal structure of bis-(acetato-κO)di-aqua-(2,2'-bi-pyridine-κ(2) N,N')manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Natarajan; Selvam, Parasuraman

    2014-09-01

    In the title monomeric manganese(II) complex, [Mn(CH3COO)2(C10H8N2)(H2O)2], the metal ion is coordinated by a bidentate 2,2'-bi-pyridine (bpy) ligand, two water mol-ecules and two axial acetate anions, resulting in a highly distorted octa-hedral environment. The aqua ligands are stabilized by the formation of strong intra-molecular hydrogen bonds with the uncoordinated acetate O atoms, giving rise to pseudo-bridging arrangement of the terminal acetate groups. In the crystal, the mol-ecules form [010] zigzag chains via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the aqua ligands and acetate O atoms. Further, the water and bpy ligands are trans to each other, and are arranged in an off-set fashion showing inter-molecular π-π stacking between nearly parallel bi-py rings, the centroid-centroid separations being 3.8147 (12) and 3.9305 (13) Å.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of manganese(II)-dependent 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase from Bacillus sp. JF8.

    PubMed

    Senda, Miki; Hatta, Takashi; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Senda, Toshiya

    2010-03-01

    A thermostable manganese(II)-dependent 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase derived from Bacillus sp. JF8 was crystallized. The initial screening for crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using a crystallization robot, resulting in the growth of two crystal forms. The first crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.7, b = 71.4, c = 93.6 A, alpha = 71.2, beta = 81.0, gamma = 64.0 degrees, and diffracted to 1.3 A resolution. The second crystal belonged to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.2, b = 90.8, c = 104.3 A, and diffracted to 1.3 A resolution. Molecular-replacement trials using homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Arthrobacter globiformis (28% amino-acid sequence identity) as a search model provided a satisfactory solution for both crystal forms.

  5. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms. II - The mercury-manganese stars 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis and Kappa Cancri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1987-01-01

    Elemental abundance analyses based on the coaddition of at least 10 2.4 A/mm Ila-O Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms have been performed for three mercury-manganese stars, 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis, and Kappa Cancri. These fine analyses show a greater degree of internal consistency than previous studies based on lower signal-to-noise data. Lines as weak as of order 3 mA are employed in these studies, and lines of atomic species not previously identified have been discovered. The status of 53 Tau as an anomalous member of this class is confirmed in that it lacks a Hg II 3984 A line even at the 2 mA level. Further, its surface gravity indicates it is less evolved than Mu Lep and Chi Cnc. Violations of the odd-even effect in the photospheric abundances of all three stars suggest that nonnuclear processes have operated in their atmospheres. Some of the values are substantially changed from their presumably initial solar values.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  7. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  8. Synthesis, and characterization of low- and high-spin manganese(II) complexes of polyfunctional adipoyldihydrazone: Effect of coordination of N-donor ligands on stereo-redox chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumatary, Debajani; Lal, Ram Ashray; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-07-01

    Manganese(II) complexes [MnII(npahH2)] (1), [MnII(npahH2)(A)2] and [MnII(npahH2)(NN)] (where A = pyridine, (2); 2-picoline, (3); 3-picoline, (4); 4-picoline, (5) and NN = 2,2‧ bipyridine, (6); 1,10-phenanthroline, (7)) have been synthesized from bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde)adipoyldihydrazone (npahH4) in methanol. The composition of metal complexes has been established by elemental analyses. Complexes (1) and (3) have been characterized by mass spectral data also. Structural assessments of the complexes have been based on data obtained from molar conductance, magnetic moment, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectral studies. Conductivity measurements in DMSO suggest that they are non-electrolyte. Electronic spectral studies suggest a six-coordinate octahedral geometry around the manganese center in complexes (2) to (7) and square-planar geometry in complex (1). IR spectral studies reveal that the dihydrazone coordinates to the metal in keto form with an anti-cis configuration. Magnetic moment, and EPR studies suggest manganese in +2 oxidation state in all complexes with high-spin distorted octahedral stereochemistry in complexes (2-7) while low-spin square-planar stereochemistry is involved with significant metal-metal interactions in the solid state in complex (1). Cyclic voltammetric studies reveal that the metal center cycles among the MnII → MnI → Mn0 in complexes (2) to (7) and among MnII → MnI oxidation states in complex (1).

  9. Manganese superoxide dismutase is a mitochondrial fidelity protein that protects Polγ against UV-induced inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bakthavatchalu, V; Dey, S; Xu, Y; Noel, T; Jungsuwadee, P; Holley, A K; Dhar, S K; Batinic-Haberle, I; St Clair, D K

    2012-04-26

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is a nuclear encoded primary antioxidant enzyme localized exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. Genotoxic agents, such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, generates oxidative stress and cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. The mtDNA polymerase (Polγ), a major constituent of nucleoids, is responsible for the replication and repair of the mitochondrial genome. Recent studies suggest that the mitochondria contain fidelity proteins and MnSOD constitutes an integral part of the nucleoid complex. However, it is not known whether or how MnSOD participates in the mitochondrial repair processes. Using skin tissue from C57BL/6 mice exposed to UVB radiation, we demonstrate that MnSOD has a critical role in preventing mtDNA damage by protecting the function of Polγ. Quantitative-PCR analysis shows an increase in mtDNA damage after UVB exposure. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies demonstrate p53 translocation to the mitochondria and interaction with Polγ after UVB exposure. The mtDNA immunoprecipitation assay with Polγ and p53 antibodies in p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) mice demonstrates an interaction between MnSOD, p53 and Polγ. The results suggest that these proteins form a complex for the repair of UVB-associated mtDNA damage. The data also demonstrate that UVB exposure injures the mtDNA D-loop in a p53-dependent manner. Using MnSOD-deficient mice we demonstrate that UVB-induced mtDNA damage is MnSOD dependent. Exposure to UVB results in nitration and inactivation of Polγ, which is prevented by addition of the MnSOD mimetic Mn(III)TE-2-PyP(5+). These results demonstrate for the first time that MnSOD is a fidelity protein that maintains the activity of Polγ by preventing UVB-induced nitration and inactivation of Polγ. The data also demonstrate that MnSOD has a role along with p53 to prevent mtDNA damage.

  10. Inhalation of Talc Induces Infiltration of Macrophages and Upregulation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ilseob; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Yang, Sangyoung; Choi, Min; Seo, Gyun-Baek; Lee, Byung-Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Talc is a mineral that is widely used in cosmetic products, antiseptics, paints, and rubber manufacturing. Although the toxicological effects of talc have been studied extensively, until now no detailed inhalation study of talc focusing on oxidative stress has been done. This repeated 4 weeks whole-body inhalation toxicity study of talc involved Sprague-Dawley rats. Male and female groups of rats were exposed to inhaled talc at 0, 5, 50, and 100 mg/m(3) for 6 hours daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The objective was to identify the 4-week inhalation toxicity of talc and investigate antioxidant activity after exposure to talc. There were no treatment-related symptoms or mortality in rats treated with talc. Glucose (GLU) was decreased significantly in male rats exposed to 50 and 100 mg/m(3) of talc. Histopathological examination revealed infiltration of macrophages on the alveolar walls and spaces near the terminal and respiratory bronchioles. In male and female rats exposed to 100 mg/m(3) talc, expression of superoxide dismutase 2, a typical biological indicator of oxidative damage, was significantly increased. Thus, inhalation of talc induces macrophage aggregations and oxidative damage in the lung.

  11. Adsorption of Zinc(II) on diatomite and manganese-oxide-modified diatomite: a kinetic and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Necla; Kul, Ali Riza; Alkan, Salih; Sogut, Eda Gokirmak; Alacabey, Ihsan

    2011-10-15

    The removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solution was studied using natural and MnO(2) modified diatomite samples at different temperatures. The linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption equations were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. From the D-R model, the mean adsorption energy was calculated as >8 kJ mol(-1), indicating that the adsorption of Zn(II) onto diatomite and Mn-diatomite was physically carried out. In addition, the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to determine the kinetic data. The experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters such as the enthalpy (ΔH(0)), Gibbs' free energy (ΔG(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)) were calculated for natural and MnO(2) modified diatomite. These values showed that the adsorption of Zn(II) ions onto diatomite samples was controlled by a physical mechanism and occurred spontaneously.

  12. Manganese-containing ionic liquids: synthesis, crystal structures and electrodeposition of manganese films and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sniekers, Jeroen; Malaquias, João C; Van Meervelt, Luc; Fransaer, Jan; Binnemans, Koen

    2017-02-21

    Manganese(ii)-containing ionic liquids were synthesized, in which the manganese atoms are coordinated by glymes (diglyme, triglyme, tetraglyme), pyridine-N-oxide, dimethylsulfoxide or N-alkylimidazoles (N-methylimidazole, N-butylimidazole and N-hexylimidazole). As anion, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (bistriflimide, Tf2N(-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate, OTf(-)) or methanesulfonate (mesylate, OMs(-)) were used. The compounds were characterized by CHN analysis, FTIR, DSC and single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. All manganese atoms were six-coordinate. It was found that the glyme-type ligands were replaced by atmospheric water upon leaving the crystals open to the air for several days. The crystal structures of seven compounds were described in detail and the compounds with the lowest melting temperatures were tested as electrolytes for the electrodeposition of manganese (thin) films. An irreversible reduction wave from Mn(ii) to Mn(0) and granular manganese deposits were observed for all compounds, except for liquid manganese salts with N-alkylimidazole ligands and bistriflimide anions, where the electrochemical formation of manganese nanoparticles was observed instead of the deposition of a manganese layer. However, for compounds with the same cation but with a triflate or methanesulfonate anion, manganese metal deposits were obtained, indicating that the nature of the anion has an important effect on the electrochemical properties of liquid metal salts.

  13. Speciation and thermodynamic properties of manganese(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal fluids: In situ XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Etschmann, Barbara; Mei, Yuan; Grundler, Pascal V.; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Elliott, Peter; Ngothai, Yung; Brugger, Joël

    2014-03-01

    The speciation of Mn(II) in acidic brines under a wide range of conditions (30-550 °C, 600 bar, 0.100-10.344 m chloride and 0.110-2.125 m bromide) was investigated using in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Increasing temperature and/or salinity results in a structural change of the Mn(II) complexes from octahedral to (distorted) tetrahedral. Octahedral species predominate at room temperature within the whole salinity range and persist up to ∼400 °C in low salinity solutions (mCl < 1 m), and tetrahedral species become significant above 300 °C. A combination of EXAFS refinements, Density Functional Theory calculations and ab initio XANES simulations shows that at temperatures ⩾400 °C, the highest order chlorocomplex predominating in high salinity solutions (mCl > 3 m, Cl:Mn ratio > 53) is MnCl3(H2O)-, and that a lower order chlorocomplex, MnCl2(H2O)2(aq), is the predominant species in low salinity solutions (mCl < 0.5 m, Cl:Mn ratio < 10). A similar result was also found in Mn bromide solutions: MnBr3(H2O)- and MnBr2(H2O)2(aq) are the dominant species at 500 °C in high salinity solutions (e.g., 2.125 m, Br:Mn ratio = 33.73) and in low salinity solutions (e.g., 0.110 m, Br:Mn ratio = 2.04), respectively. XANES spectra of Mn(II) chloride solutions were used to retrieve formation constants of MnCl2(H2O)2(aq) and MnCl3(H2O)- at 600 bar. The speciation and thermodynamic model of this study are consistent with previous solubility and UV-Vis spectroscopic studies.

  14. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss--A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms.

  15. Degradation of 17beta-estradiol in aqueous solution by ozonation in the presence of manganese(II) and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Jianmeng; Ji, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Natural estrogens, such as 17beta-estradiol (E2), are the main substances responsible for estrogenic activity found in domestic sewage. In the work described herein, the degradation of E2 has been investigated by single ozonation and catalytic ozonation in the presence of manganese ion (Mn2+) and oxalic acid. The presence of Mn2+ and oxalic acid in the ozonation processes significantly improved the E2 degradation and, hence, the reduction of estrogenic activity in aqueous solution. The addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid produced many more hydroxyl radicals in the catalytic ozonation system than in the single ozonation system. Oxidation products formed during ozonation of E2 have been identified by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), on the basis of which a possible reaction pathway for E2 degradation by ozonation is proposed. E2 was first oxidized to hydroxyl-semiquinone isomers, and these were subsequently degraded to low molecular weight compounds such as oxalic acid and malonic acid. The latter were easily oxidized by ozone to form carbon dioxide (CO2). The results demonstrate that the ozonation-Mn(2+)-oxalic acid system may serve as a powerful tool for removing E2, and the addition of Mn2+ and oxalic acid is favourable for the complete removal of estrogenic activity induced by steroid estrogens in aqueous solution.

  16. Employment of methyl 2-pyridyl ketone oxime in manganese non-carboxylate chemistry: Mn(II)(2)Mn(IV) and Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(6) complexes.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Sartzi, Harikleia; Roubeau, Olivier; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J; Nastopoulos, Vassilios; Teat, Simon J; Christou, George; Perlepes, Spyros P

    2009-02-14

    The employment of the anion of methyl 2-pyridyl ketone oxime (mpko(-)) as a tridentate chelating/bridging ligand in manganese chemistry is described. The inorganic anion (Br(-), ClO(4)(-)) used in the reaction affects the identity of the product. The reaction of MnBr(2) and one equivalent of mpkoH in the presence of a base affords [Mn(3)(OMe)(2)(mpko)(4)Br(2)] (3), which is mixed-valence (2Mn(II), Mn(IV)). The central Mn(IV) atom in each of the two, crystallographically independent, centrosymmetric molecules is coordinated by four oximate oxygen atoms belonging to the eta(1):eta(1):eta(1):mu mpko(-) ligands, and two eta(1):mu MeO(-) groups, while six coordination at each terminal Mn(II) atom is completed by four nitrogen atoms belonging to the 'chelating' part of two mpko(-) ligands, and one Br(-) ion. The Mn(II) atoms have trigonal prismatic coordination geometry. The reaction of Mn(ClO(4))(2).6H(2)O, mpkoH and OH(-) (1:2:1) in MeOH gives [Mn(8)O(4)(OMe)(mpko)(9)(mpkoH)](ClO(4))(4) (4), which is also mixed-valence (2Mn(II), 6Mn(III)) and possesses the novel [Mn(8)(mu(3)-O)(4)(mu-OMe)(mu-OR'')(2)](11+) core. The latter possesses a U-shaped sequence of four fused {Mn(II)Mn(III)(2)(mu(3)-O)}(6+) triangular units, with a Mn(III)-Mn(III) edge being shared between the central triangles. Variable-temperature, solid-state dc and ac magnetic susceptibility studies were carried out on complexes 3 and 4 . The dc susceptibility data for 3 in the 5.0-300 K range have been fit to a model with two J values, revealing weak ferromagnetic Mn(II)Mn(IV) (J = +3.4 cm(-1)) and Mn(II)Mn(II) (J' = +0.3 cm(-1)) exchange interactions. Fitting of the magnetization vs. H/T data by matrix diagonalization and including only axial anisotropy (ZFS, D) gave ground state spin (S) and D values of S = 13/2, D = +0.17 cm(-1) for and S = 3, D = -0.09 cm(-1) for 4 . The combined work demonstrates the usefulness of mpko(-) in the preparation of interesting Mn clusters, without requiring the co

  17. NMR investigation of field-induced magnetic order in barium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Steve

    As early as 1956, Matsubara and Matsuda found an exact correspondence between a lattice gas model and a quantum antiferromagnet model[1]. They paved the way for the language of integer spin boson particles to be used interchangeably with quantum magnetic insulator systems in a general manner. For example, an analogy of density of bosons is found in magnetization, and analogy of chemical potential is found in external field. Just as there exist corresponding parameters between these two seemingly unrelated systems, quantum magnets can also exhibit consequences of Boson particle systems. In particular, spin-ordering transition in quantum magnets can be interpreted as Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) transition in Boson particle framework. Direct observation of BEC in Boson particles has been realized in 4He's superfluid transition and in dilute atomic gas clouds cooled to very low temperatures[2]. In this thesis, we try to realize and analyze BEC transition through field-induced spin-ordering transition in the S = 1 antiferromagnetic dimer system, Ba3Mn2O8. We perform NMR measurements with 135,137Ba nucleus as a local probe. Although S = 1 spin properties of Ba 3Mn2O8 come from electronic spins on Mn atoms, hyperfine coupling between Mn electronic spins and Ba nuclear spins allow us to infer Mn electrons' spin information. Since there are 2 inequivalent Ba sites, Ba(1) and Ba(2), in Ba3Mn2O8, we essentially have two probes that provide a detailed picture of structure and nature of magnetism in this material. There are many antiferromagnetic BEC candidates, but there is a significant advantage of studying Ba3Mn 2O8. Unlike the other popular antiferromagnetic BEC candidates such as TlCuCl3[3] or BaCuSi2O6[4], we find no evidence of lattice deformation in Ba3Mn2O8 . This allows us an unprecedented clean look at magnetic properties. Aside from the aforementioned simple technical advantage, there are new physics that we can learn from Ba3Mn2O 8. The geometric frustration of

  18. Chloride ligation in inorganic manganese model compounds relevant to Photosystem II studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Shelly A.; Visser, Hendrik; Cinco, Roehl M.; Robblee, John H.; Pal, Samudranil; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Mok, Henry J.; Sauer, Kenneth; Wieghardt, Karl; Armstrong, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Chloride ions are essential for proper function of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II). Although proposed to be directly ligated to the Mn cluster of the OEC, the specific structural and mechanistic roles of chloride remain unresolved. This study utilizes X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to characterize the Mn–Cl interaction in inorganic compounds that contain structural motifs similar to those proposed for the OEC. Three sets of model compounds are examined; they possess core structures MnIV3O4X (X = Cl, F, or OH) that contain a di-μ-oxo and two mono-μ-oxo bridges or MnIV2O2X (X = Cl, F, OH, OAc) that contain a di-μ-oxo bridge. Each set of compounds is examined for changes in the XAS spectra that are attributable to the replacement of a terminal OH or F ligand, or bridging OAc ligand, by a terminal Cl ligand. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) shows changes in the spectra on replacement of OH, OAc, or F by Cl ligands that are indicative of the overall charge of the metal atom and are consistent with the electronegativity of the ligand atom. Fourier transforms (FTs) of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra reveal a feature that is present only in compounds where chloride is directly ligated to Mn. These FT features were simulated using various calculated Mn–X interactions (X = O, N, Cl, F), and the best fits were found when a Mn–Cl interaction at a 2.2–2.3 Å bond distance was included. There are very few high-valent Mn halide complexes that have been synthesized, and it is important to make such a comparative study of the XANES and EXAFS spectra because they have the potential for providing information about the possible presence or absence of halide ligation to the Mn cluster in PS II. PMID:14758524

  19. Crystal structure of hexa­kis­(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)manganese(II) tetra­iodide

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Md Azimul; Davaasuren, Bambar; Rothenberger, Alexander; Wu, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The title salt, [Mn(C2H6OS)6]I4, is made up from discrete [Mn(DMSO)6]2+ (DMSO is dimethyl sulfoxide) units connected through non-classical hydrogen bonds to linear I4 2− tetra­iodide anions. The MnII ion in the cation, situated on a position with site symmetry -3., is octa­hedrally coordinated by O atoms of the DMSO mol­ecule with an Mn—O distance of 2.1808 (12) Å. The I4 2− anion contains a neutral I2 mol­ecule weakly coordinated by two iodide ions, forming a linear centrosymmetric tetra­iodide anion. The title compound is isotypic with the Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn analogues. PMID:27980832

  20. catena-Poly[[[diaqua­bis[4-(diethyl­amino)benzoato-κO]manganese(II)]-μ-aqua] dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hökelek, Tuncer; Dal, Hakan; Tercan, Barış; Aybirdi, Özgür; Necefoğlu, Hacali

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title complex, {[Mn(C11H14NO2)2(H2O)3]·2H2O}n, the two independent MnII atoms are located on a centre of symmetry and coordinated by two 4-(diethyl­amino)benzoate (DEAB) anions and two water mol­ecules in the basal plane while another water mol­ecule bridges the Mn atoms in the apical directions, forming polymeric chains. The dihedral angles between the carboxyl­ate groups and the adjacent benzene rings are 11.33 (13) and 10.90 (9)° and the benzene rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 67.88 (6)°. The uncoordinated water mol­ecules link the carboxyl­ate groups and coordinated water mol­ecules via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonding. Weak C—H⋯π inter­actions are also found in the crystal structure. PMID:21582685

  1. Multifrequency electron spin-echo envelope modulation studies of nitrogen ligation to the manganese cluster of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Yeagle, Gregory J; Gilchrist, M. Lane; Walker, Lee M; Debus, Richard J; Britt, R. David

    2007-01-01

    The CalEPR Center at UC-Davis (http://brittepr.ucdavis.edu) is equipped with five research grade electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instruments operating at various excitation frequencies between 8 and 130 GHz. Of particular note for this RSC meeting are two pulsed EPR spectrometers working at the intermediate microwave frequencies of 31 and 35 GHz. Previous lower frequency electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) studies indicated that histidine nitrogen is electronically coupled to the Mn cluster in the S2 state of photosystem II (PSII). However, the amplitude and resolution of the spectra were relatively poor at these low frequencies, precluding any in-depth analysis of the electronic structure properties of this closely associated nitrogen nucleus. With the intermediate frequency instruments, we are much closer to the ‘exact cancellation’ limit, which optimizes ESEEM spectra for hyperfine-coupled nuclei such as 14N and 15N. Herein, we report the results from ESEEM studies of both 14N- and 15N-labelled PSII at these two frequencies. Spectral simulations were constrained by both isotope datasets at both frequencies, with a focus on high-resolution spectral examination of the histidine ligation to the Mn cluster in the S2 state. PMID:17954435

  2. A density functional theory study of the magnetic exchange coupling in dinuclear manganese(II) inverse crown structures.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Ederley; Alberola, Antonio; Polo, Víctor

    2009-12-17

    The magnetic exchange coupling constants between two Mn(II) centers for a set of five inverse crown structures have been investigated by means of a methodology based on broken-symmetry unrestricted density functional theory. These novel and highly unstable compounds present superexchange interactions between two Mn centers, each one with S = 5/2 through anionic "guests" such as oxygen, benzene, or hydrides or through the cationic ring formed by amide ligands and alkali metals (Na, Li). Magnetic exchange couplings calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level yield strong antiferromagnetic couplings for compounds linked via an oxygen atom or hydride and very small antiferromagnetic couplings for those linked via a benzene molecule, deprotonated in either 1,4- or 1,3- positions. Analysis of the magnetic orbitals and spin polarization maps provide an understanding of the exchange mechanism between the Mn centers. The dependence of J with respect to 10 different density functional theory potentials employed and the basis set has been analyzed.

  3. Synthesis, crystal structures and properties of three glutarato and adipato bridged manganese(II) coordination polymers under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Hong-Lin; Guo, Xia-Xia; Liu, Ji-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Three Mn(II) polymers Mn(H2O)4(C5H6O4) 1, [Mn(H2O)2(C5H6O4)]·H2O 2 and Mn(H2O)(C6H8O4) 3 were synthesized (H2(C5H6O4) = glutaric acid, H2(C6H8O4) = adipic acid) under mild ambient conditions. The [Mn(H2O)2]2+ units in 2 are interlinked by the glutarate anions with a η4μ3 bridging mode to form 2D (4·82) topological networks, which are stacked via interlayer hydrogen bonds into a 3D (43·65·82)(47·63) topological net. Compound 3 crystallizes in the acentric space group P21 and exhibits significant ferroelectricity (remnant polarization Pr = 0.371 nC cm-2, coercive field Ec = 0.028 kV cm-1, saturation of the spontaneous polarization Ps = 0.972 nC cm-2). The adjacent MnO6 octahedrons in 3 are one atom-shared to generate the Mn2O11 bi-octahedron, leading into 1D metal oxide chains. The resulting chains are interconnected by the η5μ5 adipate anions to form new 2D (48·62) networks, which are held together via strong interlayer hydrogen bonds into 3D α-Po topological supra-molecular architecture. The temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility data of 1-3 shows overall anti-ferromagnetic interactions between the metal ions bridged by the carboxylate groups.

  4. Structural consequences of ammonia binding to the manganese center of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of isotropic and oriented photosystem II particles.

    PubMed

    Dau, H; Andrews, J C; Roelofs, T A; Latimer, M J; Liang, W; Yachandra, V K; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1995-04-18

    The structure and orientation of the manganese complex in NH3-treated photosystem II (PS II) membrane particles of spinach are being studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. On the basis of earlier work by our group, a structure for the tetranuclear manganese complex of PS II, which consists of two di-mu-oxo-bridged binuclear Mn units linked by a mono-mu-oxo group, has been proposed [Yachandra, V. K., et al. (1993) Science 260, 675-679]. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the complex modified by NH3 binding in the S2-state is suggestive of an increase in the Mn-Mn distance of one of these units from 2.72 +/- 0.02 to 2.87 +/- 0.02 A, whereas the Mn-Mn distance of the second unit seems to be unaffected by NH3 treatment. The elongation of one binuclear center could result from the replacement of one bridging mu-oxo by an amido group. The lengthening of one Mn-Mn distance means that, by NH3 treatment, the distance degeneracy of the 2.7 A Mn-Mn EXAFS interaction is removed. Consequently, the orientation of individual binuclear units with respect to the membrane normal becomes resolvable by EXAFS spectroscopy of partially oriented PS II membrane particles. The angle between the normal of the PS II-containing membrane and the Mn-Mn vector is determined to be 67 degrees +/- 3 degrees for the 2.87 A distance and 55 degrees +/- 4 degrees for the 2.72 A distance. Only small effects on position, shape, and orientation dependence of Mn K-edge spectra result from NH3 treatment, indicating that the Mn oxidation state, the symmetry of the Mn ligand environment, and the orientation of the complex remain essentially unaffected in the annealed NH3 S2-state. Therefore, it seems likely that the angles determined for the ammonia-modified manganese complex are similar to the respective angles of the untreated complex. The structure of the manganese complex and its orientation in the membrane are discussed.

  5. A dinuclear manganese(II) complex with the [Mn(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(3)](+) core: synthesis, structure, characterization, electroinduced transformation, and catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Romero, Isabel; Dubois, Lionel; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Latour, Jean-Marc; Pécaut, Jacques

    2002-04-08

    Reactions of Mn(II)(PF(6))(2) and Mn(II)(O(2)CCH(3))(2).4H(2)O with the tridentate facially capping ligand N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine (bpea) in ethanol solutions afforded the mononuclear [Mn(II)(bpea)](PF(6))(2) (1) and the new binuclear [Mn(2)(II,II)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(3)(bpea)(2)](PF(6)) (2) manganese(II) compounds, respectively. Both 1 and 2 were characterized by X-ray crystallographic studies. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/n, with a = 11.9288(7) A, b = 22.5424(13) A, c =13.0773(7) A, alpha = 90 degrees, beta = 100.5780(10 degrees ), gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 4. Crystals of complex 2 are orthorhombic, space group C222(1), with a = 12.5686(16) A, b = 14.4059(16) A, c = 22.515(3) A, alpha = 90 degrees, beta = 90 degrees, gamma = 90 degrees, and Z = 4. The three acetates bridge the two Mn(II) centers in a mu(1,3) syn-syn mode, with a Mn-Mn separation of 3.915 A. A detailed study of the electrochemical behavior of 1 and 2 in CH(3)CN medium has been made. Successive controlled potential oxidations at 0.6 and 0.9 V vs Ag/Ag(+) for a 10 mM solution of 2 allowed the selective and nearly quantitative formation of [Mn(III)(2)(mu-O)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(2)(bpea)(2)](2+) (3) and [Mn(IV)(2)(mu-O)(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(bpea)(2)](3+) (4), respectively. These results have shown that each substitution of an acetate group by an oxo group is induced by a two-electron oxidation of the corresponding dimanganese complexes. Similar transformations have been obtained if 2 is formed in situ either by direct mixing of Mn(2+) cations, bpea ligand, and CH(3)COO(-) anions with a 1:1:3 stoichiometry or by mixing of 1 and CH(3)COO(-) with a 1:1.5 stoichiometry. Associated electrochemical back-transformations were investigated. 2, 3, and the dimanganese [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(mu-O)(2)(mu-O(2)CCH(3))(bpea)(2)](2+) analogue (5) were also studied for their ability to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide. 2 is far more active compared to 3 and 5. The EPR monitoring of the

  6. ADP-Ribose Pyrophosphatase Reaction in Crystalline State Conducted by Consecutive Binding of Two Manganese(II) Ions as Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Furuike, Yoshihiko; Akita, Yuka; Miyahara, Ikuko; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2016-03-29

    Adenosine diphosphate ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase), a member of the Nudix family proteins, catalyzes the metal-induced and concerted general acid-base hydrolysis of ADP ribose (ADPR) into AMP and ribose-5'-phosphate (R5P). The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction of ADPRase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtADPRase) requires divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+), or Mg(2+) as cofactors. Here, we report the reaction pathway observed in the catalytic center of TtADPRase, based on cryo-trapping X-ray crystallography at atomic resolutions around 1.0 Å using Mn(2+) as the reaction trigger, which was soaked into TtADPRase-ADPR binary complex crystals. Integrating 11 structures along the reaction timeline, five reaction states of TtADPRase were assigned, which were ADPRase alone (E), the ADPRase-ADPR binary complex (ES), two ADPRase-ADPR-Mn(2+) reaction intermediates (ESM, ESMM), and the postreaction state (E'). Two Mn(2+) ions were inserted consecutively into the catalytic center of the ES-state and ligated by Glu86 and Glu82, which are highly conserved among the Nudix family, in the ESM- and ESMM-states. The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction was characterized by electrostatic, proximity, and orientation effects, and by preferential binding for the transition state. A new reaction mechanism is proposed, which differs from previous ones suggested from structure analyses with nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues or point-mutated ADPRases.

  7. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in vitrified Mn-doped glasses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Kartha, V. B.; Santhosh, C. E-mail: unnikrishnan.vk@manipal.edu; Sonavane, M. S.; Yeotikar, R. G.; Shah, M. L.; Gupta, G. P.; Suri, B. M.

    2014-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an atomic emission spectroscopy method, has rapidly grown as one of the best elemental analysis techniques over the past two decades. Homogeneity testing and quantitative analysis of manganese (Mn) in manganese-doped glasses have been carried out using an optimized LIBS system employing a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser as the source of excitation. The glass samples have been prepared using conventional vitrification methods. The laser pulse irradiance on the surface of the glass samples placed in air at atmospheric pressure was about 1.7×10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatially integrated plasma emission was collected and imaged on to the spectrograph slit using an optical-fiber-based collection system. Homogeneity was checked by recording LIBS spectra from different sites on the sample surface and analyzing the elemental emission intensities for concentration determination. Validation of the observed LIBS results was done by comparison with scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) surface elemental mapping. The analytical performance of the LIBS system has been evaluated through the correlation of the LIBS determined concentrations of Mn with its certified values. The results are found to be in very good agreement with the certified concentrations.

  8. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  9. Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2015-11-01

    The triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate complex was prepared and its crystal structure was determined by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Its structure was also characterized by the applying of FT-IR, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. The manganese(II) ion was located to center of distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement was carried out on the Mn(II) complex. In order to support experimental results, density functional theory calculations were performed at HSEH1PBE level and LanL2DZ basis set. Obtained results indicated that theoretical results can replace the experimental ones. The relatively active ν(CO) ν(CC) and ν(CN) stretching vibration peaks appeared in IR and Raman spectra of complex 1 which are indicators of charge transfer within complex 1 suggest that complex 1 is a good candidate for nonlinear optical materials. The HOMO and LUMO energies determined that complex 1 is stable and the charge transfer occurs within complex 1.

  10. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  11. Metabolomics in angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mervaala, Eero; Biala, Agnieszka; Merasto, Saara; Lempiäinen, Juha; Mattila, Ismo; Martonen, Essi; Eriksson, Ove; Louhelainen, Marjut; Finckenberg, Piet; Kaheinen, Petri; Muller, Dominik N; Luft, Friedrich C; Lapatto, Risto; Oresic, Matej

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces mitochondrial dysfunction. We tested whether Ang II alters the "metabolomic" profile. We harvested hearts from 8-week-old double transgenic rats harboring human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGRs) and controls (Sprague-Dawley), all with or without Ang II type 1 receptor (valsartan) blockade. We used gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry to detect 247 intermediary metabolites. We used a partial least-squares discriminate analysis and identified 112 metabolites that differed significantly after corrections (false discovery rate q <0.05). We found great differences in the use of fatty acids as an energy source, namely, decreased levels of octanoic, oleic, and linoleic acids in dTGR (all P<0.01). The increase in cardiac hypoxanthine levels in dTGRs suggested an increase in purine degradation, whereas other changes supported an increased ketogenic amino acid tyrosine level, causing energy production failure. The metabolomic profile of valsartan-treated dTGRs more closely resembled Sprague-Dawley rats than untreated dTGRs. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of cytochrome C oxidase was decreased in dTGRs, whereas complex I and complex II were unaltered. Mitochondria from dTGR hearts showed morphological alterations suggesting increased mitochondrial fusion. Cardiac expression of the redox-sensitive and the cardioprotective metabolic sensor sirtuin 1 was increased in dTGRs. Interestingly, valsartan changed the level of 33 metabolites and induced mitochondrial biogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Thus, distinct patterns of cardiac substrate use in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The finding underscores the importance of Ang II in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cardiac metabolomics, even in healthy hearts.

  12. Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokel, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    The etiology of many neurodegenerative diseases has been only partly attributed to acquired traits, suggesting environmental factors may also contribute. Metal dyshomeostasis causes or has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Metal flux across the blood-brain barrier (the primary route of brain metal uptake) and the choroid plexuses as well as sensory nerve metal uptake from the nasal cavity are reviewed. Transporters that have been described at the blood-brain barrier are listed to illustrate the extensive possibilities for moving substances into and out of the brain. The controversial role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease, evidence suggesting brain aluminum uptake by transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis and of aluminum citrate by system Xc;{-} and an organic anion transporter, and results suggesting transporter-mediated aluminum brain efflux are reviewed. The ability of manganese to produce a parkinsonism-like syndrome, evidence suggesting manganese uptake by transferrin- and non-transferrin-dependent mechanisms which may include store-operated calcium channels, and the lack of transporter-mediated manganese brain efflux, are discussed. The evidence for transferrin-dependent and independent mechanisms of brain iron uptake is presented. The copper transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B, and their roles in Menkes and Wilson's diseases, are summarized. Brain zinc uptake is facilitated by L- and D-histidine, but a transporter, if involved, has not been identified. Brain lead uptake may involve a non-energy-dependent process, store-operated calcium channels, and/or an ATP-dependent calcium pump. Methyl mercury can form a complex with L-cysteine that mimics methionine, enabling its transport by the L system. The putative roles of zinc transporters, ZnT and Zip, in regulating brain zinc are discussed. Although brain uptake mechanisms for some metals have been identified, metal efflux from the brain has received little attention, preventing integration of

  13. Brain activation induced by voluntary alcohol and saccharin drinking in rats assessed with manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Mateusz; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Hermann, Derik; Brown, Matthew; Canals, Santiago; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Hyytiä, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The neuroanatomical and neurochemical basis of alcohol reward has been studied extensively, but global alterations of neural activity in reward circuits during chronic alcohol use remain poorly described. Here, we measured brain activity changes produced by long-term voluntary alcohol drinking in the alcohol-preferring AA (Alko alcohol) rats using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). MEMRI is based on the ability of paramagnetic manganese ions to accumulate in excitable neurons and thereby enhance the T1-weighted signal in activated brain areas. Following 6 weeks of voluntary alcohol drinking, AA rats were allowed to drink alcohol for an additional week, during which they were administered manganese chloride (MnCl2 ) with subcutaneous osmotic minipumps before MEMRI. A second group with an identical alcohol drinking history received MnCl2 during the abstinence week following alcohol drinking. For comparing alcohol with a natural reinforcer, MEMRI was also performed in saccharin-drinking rats. A water-drinking group receiving MnCl2 served as a control. We found that alcohol drinking increased brain activity extensively in cortical and subcortical areas, including the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine pathways and their afferents. Remarkably similar activation maps were seen after saccharin ingestion. Particularly in the prelimbic cortex, ventral hippocampus and subthalamic nucleus, activation persisted into early abstinence. These data show that voluntary alcohol recruits an extensive network that includes the ascending dopamine systems and their afferent connections, and that this network is largely shared with saccharin reward. The regions displaying persistent alterations after alcohol drinking could participate in brain networks underlying alcohol seeking and relapse.

  14. Visible light-induced formation of corrole-manganese(V)-oxo complexes: Observation of multiple oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ka, Wai Kwong; Ngo, Fung Lee; Ranburger, Davis; Malone, Jonathan; Zhang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    Two manganese(V)-oxo corroles [Mn(V)(Cor)O] that differ in their electronic environments were produced by visible light irradiation of highly photo-labile corrole-manganese(IV) bromates. The corrole ligands under study include 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFC), and 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole (TPC). The kinetics of oxygen transfer atom (OAT) reactions with various organic reductants by these photo-generated Mn(V)(Cor)O were also studied in CH3CN and CH2Cl2 solutions. Mn(V)(Cor)O exhibits remarkable solvent and ligand effect on its reactivity and spectral behavior. In the more electron-deficient TPFC system and in the polar solvent CH3CN, Mn(V)(Cor)O returned Mn(III) corrole in the end of oxidation reactions. However, in the less polar solvent CH2Cl2 or in the less electron-deficient TPC system, Mn(IV) product was formed instead of Mn(III). Furthermore, with the same substrates and in the same solvent, the order of reactivity of Mn(V)(Cor)O was TPC>TPFC, which is inverted from that expected based on the electron-demand of corrole ligands. Our spectral and kinetic results in this study provide compelling evidence in favor of multiple oxidation pathways, where Mn(V)(Cor)O may serve as direct two-electron oxidant or undergo a disproportionation reaction to form a manganese(VI)-oxo corrole as the true oxidant. The choice of pathways is strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent and the corrole ligand.

  15. CD38 promotes angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Chen, Ting-Tao; Deng, Li-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Jian-Bin; Ji, Guang-Ju; Fu, Mingui; Deng, Ke-Yu; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2017-03-12

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an early hallmark during the clinical course of heart failure and regulated by various signalling pathways. Recently, we observed that mouse embryonic fibroblasts from CD38 knockout mice were significantly resistant to oxidative stress such as H2 O2 -induced injury and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury. In addition, we also found that CD38 knockout mice protected heart from ischaemia reperfusion injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. However, the role of CD38 in cardiac hypertrophy is not explored. Here, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of CD38 in angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Following 14 days of Ang-II infusion with osmotic mini-pumps, a comparable hypertension was generated in both of CD38 knockout and wild-type mice. However, the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were much more severe in wild-type mice compared with CD38 knockout mice. Consistently, RNAi-induced knockdown of CD38 decreased the gene expressions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and reactive oxygen species generation in Ang-II-stimulated H9c2 cells. In addition, the expression of SIRT3 was elevated in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, in which SIRT3 may further activate the FOXO3 antioxidant pathway. The intracellular Ca(2+) release induced by Ang-II markedly decreased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells, which might be associated with the decrease of nuclear translocation of NFATc4 and inhibition of ERK/AKT phosphorylation. We concluded that CD38 plays an essential role in cardiac hypertrophy probably via inhibition of SIRT3 expression and activation of Ca(2+) -NFAT signalling pathway. Thus, CD38 may be a novel target for treating cardiac hypertrophy.

  16. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect.

  17. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  18. A seven-coordinated manganese(II) complex with V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine: synthesis, structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yuan, Jingkun; Bai, Ying; Wang, Hua; Pan, Guolong; Kong, Jin

    2012-11-05

    A manganese(II) complex of the type, [MnL(pic)(2)]·H(2)O, was obtained by the reaction of the V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine (L) with Mn(pic)(2) (pic=picrate). The ligand L and Mn(II) complex were confirmed on the basis of elemental analysis, molarconductivities, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-vis spectra and X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal X-ray revealed that central Mn(II) atom is seven-coordinate with a MnN(3)O(4) environment, in which ligand L acts as a tridentate N-donor. The remaining coordination sites were occupied by four O atoms afforded by two picrate anion. Interaction of the free ligand L and Mn(II) complex with DNA were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that both ligand L and Mn(II) complex bind to DNA in an intercalative binding mode, and DNA-binding affinity of the Mn(II) complex is stronger than that of ligand L. Moreover, antioxidant assay in vitro shows the Mn(II) complex possesses significant antioxidant activities.

  19. Formation of manganese oxides by bacterially generated superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Voelker, B. M.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A. I.; Hansel, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Manganese oxide minerals are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in the environment. The formation of these minerals controls the fate of contaminants, the degradation of recalcitrant carbon, the cycling of nutrients and the activity of anaerobic-based metabolisms. Oxidation of soluble manganese(II) ions to manganese(III/IV) oxides has been primarily attributed to direct enzymatic oxidation by microorganisms. However, the physiological reason for this process remains unknown. Here we assess the ability of a common species of marine bacteria-Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b-to oxidize manganese(II) in the presence of chemical and biological inhibitors. We show that Roseobacter AzwK-3b oxidizes manganese(II) by producing the strong and versatile redox reactant superoxide. The oxidation of manganese(II), and concomitant production of manganese oxides, was inhibited in both the light and dark in the presence of enzymes and metals that scavenge superoxide. Oxidation was also inhibited by various proteases, enzymes that break down bacterial proteins, confirming that the superoxide was bacterially generated. We conclude that bacteria can oxidize manganese(II) indirectly, through the enzymatic generation of extracellular superoxide radicals. We suggest that dark bacterial production of superoxide may be a driving force in metal cycling and mineralization in the environment.

  20. Manganese induced changes in growth, chlorophyll content and antioxidants activity in seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Arya, Shashi K; Roy, B K

    2011-11-01

    The effect of manganese (Mn) on broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was studied with regard to growth, Mn accumulation in root and shoot, chlorophyll, proline content and peroxidase activity. Seeds were treated with Mn (10, 20, 40, 80,120,160 microM) and grown hydroponically up to 15 days. Manganese level in both root and shoot increased progressively in response to increasing concentration and it was high in roots (13 fold) overthe shoots (8 fold). The reductions in root (52%) and shoot (62.92%) development were evident for the maximum Mn concentration (160 microM). The chlorophyll amount gradually declined with increasing Mn concentrations and attained its maximum (42%) at 160 microM. By contrast, the guaiacol peroxidase activity was high (71%) along with the accompanying rise in proline content (75%) in shoots of the highest Mn concentration (160 microM). However, there was about 2 fold increase in total glutathione content at 40 microM than the basal level and further declined to 21.65 microg g(-1) fresh wt. at 160 microM Mn. The alterations in overall reflected Mn concentration-dependent changes in the parameters studied. The results suggest thatthe plant Vicia faba L. copes with Mn exposure through enhanced production of antioxidants.

  1. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, M.; Dočekal, B.; Míšek, I.; Navrátil, J.; Mikuška, P.; Šerý, O.; Večeřa, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, it has been proven that manganese from inhaled particles of manganese compounds can accumulate in the internal organs of laboratory animals. Nevertheless, there were only a few researches dealing with changes in body morphology induced by inhalation of these particles, even though results of some studies indicate existence of such changes. The aim of our research was to assess the effect of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on weight of internal organs. For this purpose a long-term inhalation experiment on laboratory mice was performed, during which the mice were exposed to MnO.Mn2O3 nanoparticles in concentration 2 × 106 particles/cm3 for 17 weeks, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Manganese oxides nanoparticles were synthesized continuously via aerosol route in a hot wall tube flow reactor using thermal decomposition of metal organic precursor manganese(II)acetylacetonate in the flow tube reactor at temperature 750 °C in the presence of 30 vol% of oxygen. It was proven that inhaled nanoparticles can influence the weight of internal organs of mice. Moreover, it was discovered that the resulting change in weight of selected organs is disproportional. The mice from the experimental group had statistically significantly lighter kidneys, liver and spleen and heavier pancreas compared to the mice from the control group.

  2. Focused electron beam induced deposition of pure SIO II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perentes, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Patrik; Munnik, Frans

    2007-02-01

    Focused electron beam induced processing (FEBID) equipments are the "all in one" tools for high resolution investigation, and modification of nano-devices. Focused electron beam induced deposition from a gaseous precursor usually results in a nano-composite sub-structured material, in which the interesting material is embedded in an amorphous carbonaceous matrix. Using the Hydrogen free tetraisocyanatosilane Si(NCO) 4 molecule as Si source, we show how a controlled oxygen flux, simultaneously injected with the precursor vapors, causes contaminants to vanish from the FEB deposits obtained and leads to the deposition of pure SiO II. The chemical composition of the FEBID material could be controlled from SiC IINO 3 to SiO II, the latter containing undetectable foreign element contamination. The [O II] / [TICS] ratio needed to obtain SiO II in our FEB deposition equipment is larger than 300. The evolution of the FEBID material chemical composition is presented as function of the [O II] / [TICS] molecular flux ratios. A hypothetical decomposition pathway of this silane under these conditions is discussed based on the different species formed under electron bombardment of TICS. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated that the deposited oxide is smooth (roughness sub 2nm) and amorphous. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the low concentration of hydroxyl groups. The Hydrogen content of the deposited oxide, measured by elastic recoil detection analysis, is as low as 1 at%. 193nm wavelength AIMS investigations of 125nm thick SiO II pads (obtained with [O II] / [TICS] = 325) showed an undetectable light absorption.

  3. Manganese Potentiates LPS-Induced Heme-Oxygenase 1 in Microglia but not Dopaminergic Cells: Role in Controlling Microglial Hydrogen Peroxide and Inflammatory Cytokine Output

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Celia A.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) exposure increases output of glial-derived inflammatory products, which may indirectly contribute to the neurotoxic effects of this essential metal. In microglia, Mn increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release and potentiates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO). Inducible heme-oxygenase (HO-1) plays a role in the regulation of inflammation and its expression is upregulated in response to oxidative stressors, including metals and LPS. Because Mn can oxidatively affect neurons both directly and indirectly, we investigated the effect of Mn exposure on the induction of HO-1 in resting and LPS-activated microglia (N9) and dopaminergic neurons (N27). In microglia, 24 h exposure to Mn (up to 250 μM) had minimal effects on its own, but it markedly potentiated LPS (100 ng/ml)-induced HO-1protein and mRNA. Inhibition of microglial HO-1 activity with two different inhibitors indicated that HO-1 is a positive regulator of the Mn-potentiated cytokine output and a negative regulator of the Mn-induced H2O2 output. Mn enhancement of LPS-induced HO-1 does not appear to be dependent on H2O2 or NO, as Mn+LPS-induced H2O2 release was not greater than the increase induced by Mn alone and inhibition of iNOS did not change Mn potentiation of HO-1. However, because Mn exposure potentiated the LPS-induced nuclear expression of small Maf proteins, this may be one mechanism Mn uses to affect the expression of HO-1 in activated microglia. Finally, the potentiating effects of Mn on HO-1 appear to be glia-specific for Mn, LPS, or Mn+LPS did not induce HO-1 in N27 neuronal cells. PMID:21963524

  4. The S3 state of photosystem II: differences between the structure of the manganese complex in the S2 and S3 states determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guiles, R D; Zimmermann, J L; McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Cole, J L; Dexheimer, S L; Britt, R D; Wieghardt, K; Bossek, U; Sauer, K

    1990-01-16

    O2-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach have been cryogenically stabilized in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex. The cryogenic trapping of the S3 state was achieved using a double-turnover illumination of dark-adapted PSII preparations maintained at 240 K. A double turnover of PSII was accomplished using the high-potential acceptor, Q400, which is the high-spin iron of the iron-quinone acceptor complex. EPR spectroscopy was the principal tool establishing the S-state composition and defining the electron-transfer events associated with a double turnover of PSII. The inflection point energy of the Mn X-ray absorption K-edge of PSII preparations poised in the S3 state is the same as for those poised in the S2 state. This is surprising in light of the loss of the multiline EPR signal upon advancing to the S3 state. This indicates that the oxidative equivalent stored within the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) during this transition resides on another intermediate donor which must be very close to the manganese complex. An analysis of the Mn extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of PSII preparations poised in the S2 and S3 states indicates that a small structural rearrangement occurs during this photoinduced transition. A detailed comparison of the Mn EXAFS of these two S states with the EXAFS of four multinuclear mu-oxo-bridged manganese compounds indicates that the photosynthetic manganese site most probably consists of a pair of binuclear di-mu-oxo-bridged manganese structures. However, we cannot rule out, on the basis of the EXAFS analysis alone, a complex containing a mononuclear center and a linear trinuclear complex. The subtle differences observed between the S states are best explained by an increase in the spread of Mn-Mn distances occurring during the S2----S3 state transition. This increased disorder in the manganese distances suggests the presence of two inequivalent di-mu-oxo-bridged binuclear structures in the S3 state.

  5. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  6. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata.

  7. Manganese(II)-azido/thiocyanato complexes of naphthylazoimidazoles: X-ray structures of Mn(β-NaiEt) 2(X) 2 (β-NaiEt = 1-ethyl-2-(naphthyl-β-azo)imidazole; X=N3-, NCS -)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Chand, B. G.; Wu, J. S.; Lu, T.-H.; Sinha, C.

    2007-10-01

    Manganese(II)-naphthylazoimidazole complexes using N3- and NCS - as counter ions are characterized as Mn(β-NaiR) 2(X) 2(β-NaiEt = 1-alkyl-2-(naphthyl-β-azo)imidazole; X=N3-, NCS -). The ligands are unsymmetric N(imidazole), N(azo) chelating agents. The microanalytical, spectral (FT-IR, UV-vis), magnetic (bulk moment and EPR) and electrochemical data establish the structure and composition of the complexes. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of Mn(β-NaiEt) 2(N 3) 2 and Mn(β-NaiEt) 2(NCS) 2(β-NaiEt = 1-ethyl-2-(naphthyl-β-azo)imidazole) have confirmed the three dimensional structure of the complexes. Cyclic voltammetry exhibits high potential Mn(III)/Mn(II) couple along with azo reductions. The EPR spectra show usual pattern.

  8. Manganese superoxide dismutase interacts with a large scale of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in low dose radiation-induced adaptive radioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Angela; Fan, Ming; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Cellular adaptive response to certain low level genotoxic stresses including the exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) shows promise as a tool to enhance radioprotection in normal cells but not in tumor cells. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a fundamental mitochondrial antioxidant in mammalian cells plays a key role in LDIR-induced adaptive response. In this study, we aim to elucidate the signaling network associated with the MnSOD-induced radiation protection. A MnSOD-interacting protein profile was established in LDIR-treated human skin cells. Human skin keratinocytes (HK18) were irradiated with a single dose LDIR (10 cGy x-ray) and the cell lysates were immunoprecipitated using α-MnSOD and applied to two different gel-based proteomics followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. Analysis of the profiles of MnSOD interacting partners before and after LDIR detected different patterns of MnSOD protein-protein interactions in response to LDIR. Interestingly, many of the MnSOD interacting proteins are known to have functions related to mitochondrial regulations on cell metabolism, apoptosis and DNA repair. These results provide the evidence indicating that in addition to the enzymatic action detoxifying superoxide, the antioxidant MnSOD may function as a signaling regulator in stress induced adaptive protection through cell survival pathways. PMID:23000060

  9. The role of NLRP3-CASP1 in inflammasome-mediated neuroinflammation and autophagy dysfunction in manganese-induced, hippocampal-dependent impairment of learning and memory ability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Zhang, Jianbin; Jiang, Wenkai; Cao, Zipeng; Zhao, Fang; Cai, Tongjian; Aschner, Michael; Luo, Wenjing

    2017-02-27

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and autophagy dysfunction are known to be involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Manganese (Mn), a neurotoxic metal, has the potential to induce microglia-mediated neuroinflammation as well as autophagy dysfunction. NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3)- CASP1 (caspase 1) inflammasome-mediated neuroinflammation in microglia has specific relevance to neurological diseases. However, the mechanism driving these phenomena remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that Mn activates the NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome pathway in the hippocampus of mice and BV2 cells by triggering autophagy-lysosomal dysfunction. The autophagy-lysosomal dysfunction is induced by lysosomal damage caused by excessive Mn accumulation, damaging the structure and normal function of these organelles. Additionally, we show that the release of lysosomal CTSB (cathepsin B) plays an important role in Mn-induced NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome activation, and that the increased autophagosomes in the cytoplasm are not the main cause of NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome activation. The accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL1B (interleukin 1 β) and IL18 (interleukin 18), as well as the dysfunctional autophagy pathway may damage hippocampal neuronal cells, thus leading to hippocampal-dependent impairment in learning and memory, which is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD).

  10. Multireversible redox processes in pentanuclear bis(triple-helical) manganese complexes featuring an oxo-centered triangular {Mn(II)2Mn(III)(μ3-O)}5+ or {Mn(II)Mn(III)2(μ3-O)}6+ core wrapped by two {Mn(II)2(bpp)3}-.

    PubMed

    Romain, Sophie; Rich, Jordi; Sens, Cristina; Stoll, Thibaut; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Llobet, Antoni; Rodriguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Clérac, Rodolphe; Mathonière, Corine; Duboc, Carole; Deronzier, Alain; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-09-05

    A new pentanuclear bis(triple-helical) manganese complex has been isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction in two oxidation states: [{Mn(II)(μ-bpp)(3)}(2)Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(μ-O)](3+) (1(3+)) and [{Mn(II)(μ-bpp)(3)}(2)Mn(II)Mn(III)(2)(μ-O)](4+) (1(4+)). The structure consists of a central {Mn(3)(μ(3)-O)} core of Mn(II)(2)Mn(III) (1(3+)) or Mn(II)Mn(III)(2) ions (1(4+)) which is connected to two apical Mn(II) ions through six bpp(-) ligands. Both cations have a triple-stranded helicate configuration, and a pair of enantiomers is present in each crystal. The redox properties of 1(3+) have been investigated in CH(3)CN. A series of five distinct and reversible one-electron waves is observed in the -1.0 and +1.50 V potential range, assigned to the Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)/Mn(II)(5), Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2)/Mn(II)(4)Mn(III), Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3)/Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2), Mn(II)Mn(III)(4)/Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3), and Mn(III)(5)/Mn(II)Mn(III)(4) redox couples. The two first oxidation processes leading to Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2) (1(4+)) and Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3) (1(5+)) are related to the oxidation of the Mn(II) ions of the central core and the two higher oxidation waves, close in potential, are thus assigned to the oxidation of the two apical Mn(II) ions. The 1(4+) and 1(5+) oxidized species and the reduced Mn(4)(II) (1(2+)) species are quantitatively generated by bulk electrolyses demonstrating the high stability of the pentanuclear structure in four oxidation states (1(2+) to 1(5+)). The spectroscopic characteristics (X-band electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR, and UV-visible) of these species are also described as well as the magnetic properties of 1(3+) and 1(4+) in solid state. The powder X- and Q-band EPR signature of 1(3+) corresponds to an S = 5/2 spin state characterized by a small zero-field splitting parameter (|D| = 0.071 cm(-1)) attributed to the two apical Mn(II) ions. At 40 K, the magnetic behavior is consistent for 1(3+) with two apical S = 5/2 {Mn(II)(bpp)(3)}(-) and one S

  11. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  12. Polyphenolic Extract of Euphorbia supina Attenuates Manganese-Induced Neurotoxicity by Enhancing Antioxidant Activity through Regulation of ER Stress and ER Stress-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Entaz; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Bhattarai, Kashi Raj; Lee, Hwa-Young; Choi, Min-Kyung; Rashid, Harun-Or; Kim, Ji-Ye; Chae, Han-Jung; Yoon, Hyonok

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an important trace element present in human body, which acts as an enzyme co-factor or activator in various metabolic reactions. While essential in trace amounts, excess levels of Mn in human brain can produce neurotoxicity, including idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like extrapyramidal manganism symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of polyphenolic extract of Euphorbia supina (PPEES) on Mn-induced neurotoxicity and the underlying mechanism in human neuroblastoma SKNMC cells and Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rat brain. PPEES possessed significant amount of total phenolic and flavonoid contents. PPEES also showed significant antioxidant activity in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and reducing power capacity (RPC) assays. Our results showed that Mn treatment significantly reduced cell viability and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, which was attenuated by PPEES pretreatment at 100 and 200 µg/mL. Additionally, PPEES pretreatment markedly attenuated Mn-induced antioxidant status alteration by resolving the ROS, MDA and GSH levels and SOD and CAT activities. PPEES pretreatment also significantly attenuated Mn-induced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis. Meanwhile, PPEES pretreatment significantly reversed the Mn-induced alteration in the GRP78, GADD34, XBP-1, CHOP, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 activities. Furthermore, administration of PPEES (100 and 200 mg/kg) to Mn exposed rats showed improvement of histopathological alteration in comparison to Mn-treated rats. Moreover, administration of PPEES to Mn exposed rats showed significant reduction of 8-OHdG and Bax immunoreactivity. The results suggest that PPEES treatment reduces Mn-induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell loss in SKNMC cells and in the rat brain. Therefore, PPEES may be considered as potential treat-ment in Mn-intoxicated patients. PMID:28146110

  13. Endotoxin treatment protects rats against ozone-induced lung edema: with evidence for the role of manganese superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, I.; Massaro, D. )

    1992-03-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent that can cause lung damage and edema. There is evidence that it does so by causing peroxidation of membrane lipids. However, the elevation in lung activity of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, ZnSOD), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) during exposure to ozone suggests that increased production of superoxide could contribute to lung edema caused by ozone. This latter observation, and preliminary evidence that treatment of rats with endotoxin elevates lung activity of MnSOD without elevation of the activity of Cu, ZnSOD, catalase (CAT), or glutathione peroxidase (GP), led to the present study. We treated rats with endotoxin, exposed them to different concentrations of ozone, measured lung wet weight to dry weight ratio, thiobarbituric acid-reactive material (TBAR), and assayed lung tissue for Cu, ZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, and GP activity. Our major findings are, (1) a strongly edemogenic concentration of ozone-lowered MnSOD activity; (2) endotoxin treatment of air-breathing rats did not decrease lipid peroxidation as indicated by the lung concentration of TBAR; (3) induction of increased MnSOD activity in lung by treatment with endotoxin was associated with virtually complete protection against an otherwise edemogenic concentration of ozone, with less lipid peroxidation, and with less loss of weight; and (4) this protection occurred without elevated Cu, ZnSOD, CAT, or GP activity.

  14. Manganese uptake and distribution in the brain after methyl bromide-induced lesions in the olfactory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Khristy J; Molina, Ramon M; Donaghey, Thomas; Savaliya, Sandeep; Schwob, James E; Brain, Joseph D

    2011-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient with potential neurotoxic effects. Mn deposited in the nose is apparently transported to the brain through anterograde axonal transport, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. However, the role of the olfactory epithelial cells in Mn transport from the nasal cavity to the blood and brain is not well understood. We utilized the methyl bromide (MeBr) lesion model wherein the olfactory epithelium fully regenerates in a time-dependent and cell type-specific manner over the course of 6-8 weeks postinjury. We instilled (54)MnCl(2) intranasally at different recovery periods to study the role of specific olfactory epithelial cell types in Mn transport. (54)MnCl(2) was instilled at 2, 4, 7, 21, and 56 days post-MeBr treatment. (54)Mn concentrations in the blood were measured over the first 4-h period and in the brain and other tissues at 7 days postinstillation. Age-matched control rats were similarly studied at 2 and 56 days. Blood and tissue (54)Mn levels were reduced initially but returned to control values by day 7 post-MeBr exposure, coinciding with the reestablishment of sustentacular cells. Brain (54)Mn levels also decreased but returned to control levels only by 21 days, the period near the completion of neuronal regeneration/bulbar reinnervation. Our data show that Mn transport to the blood and brain temporally correlated with olfactory epithelial regeneration post-MeBr injury. We conclude that (1) sustentacular cells are necessary for Mn transport to the blood and (2) intact axonal projections are required for Mn transport from the nasal cavity to the olfactory bulb and brain.

  15. X-ray crystal structures of manganese(II)-reconstituted and native toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase reveal rotamer shifts in conserved residues and an enhanced view of the protein interior.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael S; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Condon, Karen L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-11-29

    We report the X-ray crystal structures of native and manganese(II)-reconstituted toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 to 1.85 and 2.20 A resolution, respectively. The structures reveal that reduction of the dimetallic active site is accompanied by a carboxylate shift and alteration of the coordination environment for dioxygen binding and activation. A rotamer shift in a strategically placed asparagine 202 accompanies dimetallic center reduction and is proposed to influence protein component interactions. This rotamer shift is conserved between ToMOH and the corresponding residue in methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). Previously unidentified hydrophobic pockets similar to those present in MMOH are assigned.

  16. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  17. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  19. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, W. A.; Azarnia, G. M.; Nakles, M. R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d4D7/2 to the 5p ^4P^circ _{5/2} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d4D7/2-5p ^4P^circ _{5/2} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  20. Spatial memory training induces morphological changes detected by manganese-enhanced MRI in the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminal zone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binbin; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Tjio, Ci'en; Chen, Way Cherng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) can show plasticity of their axon terminal arbor consequent to learning a spatial memory task. Such plasticity is seen as translaminar sprouting from the stratum lucidum (SL) of CA3 into the stratum pyramidale (SP) and the stratum oriens (SO). However, the functional role of this presynaptic remodeling is still obscure. In vivo imaging that allows longitudinal observation of such remodeling could provide a deeper understanding of this presynaptic growth phenomenon as it occurs over time. Here we used manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), which shows a high-contrast area that co-localizes with the MFs. This technique was applied in the detection of learning-induced MF plasticity in two strains of rats. Quantitative analysis of a series of sections in the rostral dorsal hippocampus showed increases in the CA3a' area in MEMRI of trained Wistar rats consistent with the increased SO+SP area seen in the Timm's staining. MF plasticity was not seen in the trained Lister-Hooded rats in either MEMRI or in Timm's staining. This indicates the potential of MEMRI for revealing neuro-architectures and plasticity of the hippocampal MF system in vivo in longitudinal studies.

  1. Solubilisation effect of spent wash on oxide-ores of manganese and iron.

    PubMed

    Pervez, S; Pandey, G S

    1991-09-01

    Samples of iron ore (haematite) and manganese ore (pyrolusite) of known compositions were equilibrated with aliquots of analysed sample of spent wash. The concentrations of iron(II), iron(III), complexed iron, manganese(II) ions and complexed Mn-ions were determined after increasing durations. One litre of the spent wash was found to extract out 141 mg of total iron and 161 mg of total manganese. In case of iron, the predominance was of iron(II) (92%), whereas in case of manganese it was of the complexed form (95%).

  2. The Two-Component System ArlRS and Alterations in Metabolism Enable Staphylococcus aureus to Resist Calprotectin-Induced Manganese Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Radin, Jana N.; Párraga Solórzano, Paola K.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    During infection the host imposes manganese and zinc starvation on invading pathogens. Despite this, Staphylococcus aureus and other successful pathogens remain capable of causing devastating disease. However, how these invaders adapt to host-imposed metal starvation and overcome nutritional immunity remains unknown. We report that ArlRS, a global staphylococcal virulence regulator, enhances the ability of S. aureus to grow in the presence of the manganese-and zinc-binding innate immune effector calprotectin. Utilization of calprotectin variants with altered metal binding properties revealed that strains lacking ArlRS are specifically more sensitive to manganese starvation. Loss of ArlRS did not alter the expression of manganese importers or prevent S. aureus from acquiring metals. It did, however, alter staphylococcal metabolism and impair the ability of S. aureus to grow on amino acids. Further studies suggested that relative to consuming glucose, the preferred carbon source of S. aureus, utilizing amino acids reduced the cellular demand for manganese. When forced to use glucose as the sole carbon source S. aureus became more sensitive to calprotectin compared to when amino acids are provided. Infection experiments utilizing wild type and calprotectin-deficient mice, which have defects in manganese sequestration, revealed that ArlRS is important for disease when manganese availability is restricted but not when this essential nutrient is freely available. In total, these results indicate that altering cellular metabolism contributes to the ability of pathogens to resist manganese starvation and that ArlRS enables S. aureus to overcome nutritional immunity by facilitating this adaptation. PMID:27902777

  3. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Jingyuan; Zheng, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of {sup 64}Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB

  4. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events.

  5. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  6. Photoproduction of catalase-insensitive peroxides on the donor side of manganese-depleted photosystem II: evidence with a specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, Sergey A; Khorobrykh, Andrei A; Yanykin, Denis V; Ivanov, Boris N; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2011-12-13

    The photoproduction of organic peroxides (ROOH) in photosystem II (PSII) membranes was studied using the fluorescent probe Spy-HP. Two types of peroxide, highly lipophilic ones and relatively hydrophilic ones, were distinguished by the rate of reaction with Spy-HP; the former oxidized Spy-HP to the higher fluorescent form Spy-HPOx within 5 min, while the latter did so very slowly (the reaction was still not completed after 180 min). The level of photoproduction of these peroxides was significantly larger in the alkaline-treated, Mn-depleted PSII membranes than that in the untreated membranes, and it was suppressed by an artificial electron donor (diphenylcarbazide or ferrocyanide) and by the electron transport inhibitor diuron. Postillumination addition of Fe(2+) ions, which degrade peroxides by the Fenton mechanism, abolished the accumulation of Spy-HPOx, but catalase did not change the peroxide level, indicating that the detected species were organic peroxides, excluding H(2)O(2). These results agreed with our previous observation of an electron transport-dependent O(2) consumption on the PSII donor side and indicated that ROOH accumulated via a radical chain reaction that started with the formation of organic radicals on the donor side. Illumination (λ > 600 nm; 1500 μmol of photons m(-2) s(-1)) of the Mn-depleted PSII membranes for 3 min resulted in the formation of nearly 200 molecules of hydrophilic ROOH per reaction center, but only four molecules of highly lipophilic ROOH. The limited formation of the latter was due to the limited supply of its precursor to the reaction, suggesting that it represented structurally fixed peroxides, i.e., either protein peroxides or peroxides of the lipids tightly bound to the core complex. These ROOH forms, likely including several species derived from lipid peroxides, may mediate the donor side-induced photoinhibition of PSII via protein modification.

  7. Comparison of photosynthesis recovery dynamics in floating leaves of Trapa natans after inhibition by manganese or molybdenum: effects on Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Costanza; Ferroni, Lorenzo; Pantaleoni, Laura; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2013-09-01

    The aquatic plant Trapa natans L. is highly resistant to Mn and moderately resistant to Mo, mainly thanks to its ability to sequestrate the metals by chelation in the vacuole. Excess of Mn and Mo causes somewhat aspecific toxicity symptoms in plants, but the main target of their toxicity seems to be the photosynthetic process. In this work, we aimed at understanding how the effect on photosynthesis caused by Mn (130 μM, full recovery) or Mo (50 μM, partial recovery) in T. natans is linked to changes occurring in the photosynthetic apparatus, with emphasis on Photosystem II (PSII), during a 10 day treatment with these metals. The time-course of net photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigment content, amount of PSII and its peripheral antenna LHCII, and room-temperature fluorescence emission ratios F694/F680 and F700/(F685 + F695) showed that the early inhibiting effect of Mo and Mn (one day exposure) was essentially non-specific with respect to the metal, though more marked in Mo- than in Mn-treated plants. During the subsequent recovery phase, Mo still impaired PSII assembly and, consequently, photosynthesis could not reach the control values. Conversely, in Mn-treated plants the amount of PSII was fully re-established, as was photosynthesis, but the metal induced the accumulation of LHCII. The extent of inhibition and the effectiveness of photosynthesis recovery are proposed to reflect the different ability of T. natans to sequestrate safely excess Mn or Mo in vacuoles.

  8. Peumus boldus (Boldo) Aqueous Extract Present Better Protective Effect than Boldine Against Manganese-Induced Toxicity in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Matheus Chimelo; Gularte, Claudia Ortiz Alves; Escoto, Dandara Fidélis; Pereira, Geovana; Gayer, Mateus Cristofari; Roehrs, Rafael; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Puntel, Robson L

    2016-10-01

    The cellular, intracellular and molecular mechanism(s) underlying the toxicity of Mn are still incompletely understood, although several points concerning Mn neurotoxicity have been addressed. Importantly, oxidative changes have been reported to be involved in Mn-induced toxicity. As a consequence, antioxidants are expected to offer protection in Drosophila melanogaster exposed to this metal. So, in this study we evaluated the hypothesis that the aqueous extract of boldo (Peumus boldus), and its alkaloids boldine, could prevent/ameliorate behavioral and oxidative alterations induced by Mn in a D. melanogaster intoxication model. Adult wild-type flies were concomitantly exposed to Mn (3 mM) and boldo aqueous extract (5 mg/mL) or boldine (327.37 µg/mL) in the food during 9 days. Mn-fed flies had a worse performance in the negative geotaxis assay and in the open-field test, as well as a higher incidence of mortality and TBARS levels in head and body, when compared to control group. Boldo aqueous extract was found to reduce the mortality rate of the flies exposed to Mn. In turn, boldine was ineffective against Mn-induced mortality and significantly increases mortality per se. Additionally, Mn-induced locomotors dysfunction were fully ameliorated by boldo crude extract and only partially ameliorated by boldine. Likewise, boldo completely normalize head and body TBARS levels, whereas boldine only partially normalize in body. Finally, we found that flies treated with Mn presented significantly decrease in dopamine levels. Our results suggest that boldo crude extract can exert protective effect against Mn-induced toxicity in D. melanogaster, whereas boldine do not. Moreover, our data confirm the utility of this model to investigate potential therapeutic strategies on movement disorders, such as that caused by Mn.

  9. Isostructural dinuclear phenoxo-/acetato-bridged manganese(II), cobalt(II), and zinc(II) complexes with labile sites: kinetics of transesterification of 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenylphosphate.

    PubMed

    Arora, Himanshu; Barman, Suman K; Lloret, Francesc; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2012-05-21

    Using the dinucleating phenol-based ligand 2,6-bis[3-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazol-1-ylmethyl]-4-methylphenol] (HL(2)), in its deprotonated form, the six new dinuclear complexes [M(II)(2)(L(2))(μ-O(2)CMe)(2)(MeCN)(2)][PF(6)] (M = Mn (2a), Co (3a), Zn (4a)) and [M(II)(2)(L(2))(μ-O(2)CMe)(2)(MeCN)(2)][BPh(4)] (M = Mn (2b), Co (3b), Zn (4b)) have been synthesized. Crystallographic analyses on 2b·2MeCN, 3b·2MeCN, and 4b·2MeCN reveal that these complexes have closely similar μ-phenoxo bis(μ-carboxylato) structures. The physicochemical properties (absorption and ESI-MS spectral data, 2a,b, 3a,b, and 4a,b; (1)H NMR, 4a,b) of the cations of 2a-4a are identical with those of 2b-4b. Each metal ion is terminally coordinated by a pyrazole nitrogen and a pyridyl nitrogen from a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazole unit and a solvent molecule (MeCN). Thus, each metal center assumes distorted-octahedral M(II)N(3)O(3) coordination. Temperature-dependent magnetic studies on Mn(II) and Co(II) dimers reveal the presence of intramolecular antiferromagnetic (J = -8.5 cm(-1)) for 2b and ferromagnetic exchange coupling (J = +2.51 cm(-1)) for 3b, on the basis of the Hamiltonian H = -JS(1)·S(2). The exchange mechanism is discussed on the basis of magneto-structural parameters (M···M distance). Spectroscopic properties of the complexes have also been investigated. The pH titration and kinetics of phosphatase (transesterification) activity on 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nirophenylphosphate (HPNP) were studied in MeOH/H(2)O (33%, v/v) with 2a-4a, due to solubility reasons. This comparative kinetic study revealed the effect of the metal ion on the rate of hydrolysis of HPNP, which has been compared with what we recently reported for [Ni(II)(2)(L(2))(μ-O(2)CMe)(2)(MeOH)(H(2)O)][ClO(4)] (1a). The efficacy in the order of conversion of substrate to product (p-nitrophenolate ion) follows the order 4a > 3a > 2a > 1a, under identical experimental conditions. Notably, this trend follows the decrease of pK(a) values of

  10. Air Manganese Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In November 2011 US EPA researchers conducted a health study of airborne manganese exposure in East Liverpool, Ohio. This Web site discusses preliminary results of the study and provides background and other related information.

  11. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments.

  12. Valence tautomerism in a high-valent manganese-oxo porphyrinoid complex induced by a Lewis acid.

    PubMed

    Leeladee, Pannee; Baglia, Regina A; Prokop, Katharine A; Latifi, Reza; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2012-06-27

    Addition of the Lewis acid Zn(2+) to (TBP(8)Cz)Mn(V)(O) induces valence tautomerization, resulting in the formation of [(TBP(8)Cz(+•))Mn(IV)(O)-Zn(2+)]. This new species was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, the Evans method, and (1)H NMR and supported by DFT calculations. Removal of Zn(2+) quantitatively restores the starting material. Electron-transfer and hydrogen-atom-transfer reactions are strongly influenced by the presence of Zn(2+).

  13. Adsorption of antimony(V) onto Mn(II)-enriched surfaces of manganese-oxide and FeMn binary oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiping; Xu, Wei; He, Zan; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Prasai, Tista

    2015-11-01

    Manganese(IV) oxide [Mn(IV)] potentially oxidizes antimony(III) [Sb(III)] to antimony(V) [Sb(V)] and improves Sb removal by FeMn binary oxide (FMBO) through an oxidation-adsorption mechanism. This study focused on the effect of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution by potassium sulfite (K2SO3) on Sb(V) adsorption onto manganese oxide (Mn-oxide) and FMBO. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption (Qmax,Sb(V)) increased from 1.0 to 1.1 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and from 0.4 to 0.6 mmol g(-1) for Mn-oxide after pretreatment with 10 mmol L(-1) K2SO3. The addition of 2.5 mmol L(-1) Mn(2+) also significantly improved Sb(V) adsorption, and the observed Qmax,Sb(V) increased to 1.4 and 1.0 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and Mn-oxide, respectively, with pre-adsorbed Mn(2+). Neither K2SO3 nor Mn(2+) addition had any effect on Sb(V) adsorption onto iron oxide (Fe-oxide). Mn(2+) introduced by either Mn(IV) dissolution or addition tended to form outer-sphere surface complexes with hydroxyl groups on Mn-oxide surfaces (MnOOH). Mn(2+) at 2.5 mmol L(-1) shifted the isoelectric point (pHiep) from 7.5 to 10.2 for FMBO and from 4.8 to 9.2 for Mn-oxide and hence benefited Sb(V) adsorption. The adsorption of Sb(V) onto Mn(2+)-enriched surfaces contributed to the release of Mn(2+), and the X-ray photoelectron spectra also indicated increased binding energy of Mn 2p3/2 after the adsorption of Sb(V) onto K2SO3-pretreated FMBO and Mn-oxide. Sb(V) adsorption involved the formation of inner-sphere complexes and contributed to the release of Mn(2+). In the removal of Sb(III) by Mn-based oxides, the oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) by Mn(IV) oxides had an effect; however, Mn(IV) dissolution and Mn(2+)-enrichment also played an important role.

  14. Production of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Shewanella Species

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Saad M.; White, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several species of the bacterial genus Shewanella are well-known dissimilatory reducers of manganese under anaerobic conditions. In fact, Shewanella oneidensis is one of the most well studied of all metal-reducing bacteria. In the current study, a number of Shewanella strains were tested for manganese-oxidizing capacity under aerobic conditions. All were able to oxidize Mn(II) and to produce solid dark brown manganese oxides. Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 was the strongest oxidizer, producing oxides at a rate of 20.3 mg/liter/day and oxidizing Mn(II) concentrations of up to 9 mM. In contrast, S. oneidensis MR-1 was the weakest oxidizer tested, producing oxides at 4.4 mg/liter/day and oxidizing up to 4 mM Mn(II). Analysis of products from the strongest oxidizers, i.e., S. loihica PV-4 and Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, revealed finely grained, nanosize, poorly crystalline oxide particles with identical Mn oxidation states of 3.86. The biogenic manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced within 2 days by all of the Shewanella strains when culture conditions were made anoxic and an appropriate nutrient (lactate) was added. While Shewanella species were detected previously as part of manganese-oxidizing consortia in natural environments, the current study has clearly shown manganese-reducing Shewanella species bacteria that are able to oxidize manganese in aerobic cultures. IMPORTANCE Members of the genus Shewanella are well known as dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacteria. This study shows that a number of species from Shewanella are also capable of manganese oxidation under aerobic conditions. Characterization of the products of the two most efficient oxidizers, S. loihica and S. putrefaciens, revealed finely grained, nanosize oxide particles. With a change in culture conditions, the manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced by the same bacteria. The ability of Shewanella species both to oxidize and to reduce manganese indicates

  15. Manganese-induced regulations in growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in fragrant rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Ashraf, Umair; Tian, Hua; Mo, Zhaowen; Pan, Shenggang; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Duan, Meiyang; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-06-01

    Micro-nutrient application is essential for normal plant growth while a little is known about manganese (Mn)-induced regulations in morpho-physiological attributes, aroma formation and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2-AP) biosynthesis in aromatic rice. Present study aimed to examine the influence of four levels of Mn i.e., Mn1 (100 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn2 (150 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn3 (200 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), and Mn4 (250 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)) on the growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in two fragrant rice cultivars i.e., Meixiangzhan and Nongxiang 18. Pots without Mn application were served as control (Ck). Each pot contained 15 kg of soil. Effects on agronomic characters, quality attributes, 2-AP contents and enzymes involved in 2-AP biosynthesis have been studied in early and late season rice. Results depicted that Mn improved rice growth, yield and related characters, and some quality attributes significantly. It further up-regulated proline, pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) (precursors of 2-AP), soluble proteins and activities of proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), Δ(1) pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid synthetase (P5CS) ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) that led to enhanced 2-AP production in rice grains. Moreover, higher Mn levels resulted in increased grain Mn contents in both rice cultivars. Along with growth and yield improvement, Mn application significantly improved rice aromatic contents. Overall, Nongxiang 18 accumulated more 2-AP contents than Meixiangzhan in both seasons under Mn application. This study further explored the importance of Mn in rice aroma formation and signifies that micro-nutrients can play significant roles in rice aroma synthesis; however, intensive studies at molecular levels are still needed to understand the exact mechanisms of Mn to improve rice aroma formation.

  16. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  17. Permanganate-Based Synthesis of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles in Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Cameron; Smith, Trevor; Embley, Jacob; Maxfield, Jake; Hansen, Kameron; Peterson, J; Henrichsen, Andrew; Erickson, Stephen; Buck, David; Colton, John S; Watt, Richard

    2017-03-23

    This paper investigates the comproportionation reaction of MnII with MnO4- as a route for manganese oxide nanoparticle synthesis in the protein ferritin. We report that MnO4- serves as the electron acceptor and reacts with MnII in the presence of apoferritin to form manganese oxide cores inside the protein shell. Manganese loading into ferritin was studied under acidic, neutral, and basic conditions and the ratios of MnII and permanganate were varied at each pH. The manganese-containing ferritin samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis absorption, and by measuring the band gap energies for each sample. Manganese cores were deposited inside ferritin under both the acidic and basic conditions. All resulting manganese ferritin samples were found to be indirect band gap materials with band gap energies ranging from 1.01 eV to 1.34 eV. An increased UV/Vis absorption around 370 nm was observed for samples formed under acidic conditions, suggestive of MnO2 formation inside ferritin.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide overload increases adriamycin-induced apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM, a manganese superoxide dismutase-overexpressing human osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadi; Kuroda, Masahiro; Gao, Xian-Shu; Asaumi, Jun-Ichi; Shibuya, Kohichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Akaki, Shiro; St Clair, Daret; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-05-01

    We previously developed a new microscopic observation system that enables time-lapse quantitative analysis of apoptosis and necrosis. With this system we quantitatively analyzed adriamycin (ADR)-induced cell death using manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)- and wild-type p53-gene transfectants on SaOS(2), a p53-deficient human osteosarcoma cell line. A highly MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(H), acquired ADR-tolerance compared to the parent cell line SaOS(2). The ADR-tolerance of SaOS(2)FM(H) diminished by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), to the similar ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2). A wild-type p53-expressing cell line, SaOS(2)wtp53, significantly increased in ADR-sensitivity compared to SaOS(2). This ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2)wtp53 was enhanced by BSO. When isosorbide 5-mononitrate was combined with BSO, isosorbide 5-mononitrate increased ADR sensitivity of a moderately MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(L), decreased that of SaOS(2) FM(H), and did not change those of SaOS(2) and SaOS(2)wtp53 compared to BSO alone. Time-lapse microscopic observations during ADR treatment for 24 h indicated that the most cells of each cell line underwent apoptosis, and a few cells (less than 11%) died by necrosis. When cells were treated with iso-concentration of ADR, apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM(H) was less than that of SaOS(2). BSO, which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), increased appearance rate of ADR-induced apoptosis, but not necrosis of MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. When iso-survival dose of ADR, which reduced surviving fraction to 0.01, was given for each cell line, no difference was observed in appearance of either apoptosis or necrosis between SaOS(2) and MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. On the other hands, appearance of both apoptosis and the following secondary necrosis of SaOS(2) wtp53 was significantly accelerated compared to those of SaOS(2). These findings indicate that hydrogen peroxide

  19. Manganese-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells: Attenuation of thymine base lesions by glutathione and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Adrienne P.; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Nelson, Bryant C.; Atha, Donald H.; Jain, Ashok; Soliman, Karam F. A.; Aschner, Michael; Mazzio, Elizabeth; Reams, R. Renee

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element required for normal function and development. However, exposure to this metal at elevated levels may cause manganism, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with neurological symptoms similar to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Elevated body burdens of Mn from exposure to parental nutrition, vapors in mines and smelters and welding fumes have been associated with neurological health concerns. The underlying mechanism of Mn neurotoxicity remains unclear. Accordingly, the present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects of Mn2+ in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Mn2+ caused a concentration dependent decrease in SH-SY5Y cellular viability compared to controls. The LD50 value was 12.98 μM Mn2+ (p <0.001 for control vs. 24h Mn treatment). Both TUNEL and annexin V/propidium iodide apoptosis assays confirmed the induction of apoptosis in the cells following exposure to Mn2+ (2 μM, 62 μM or 125 μM). In addition, Mn2+ induced both the formation and accumulation of DNA single strand breaks (via alkaline comet assay analysis) and oxidatively modified thymine bases (via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis). Pre-incubation of the cells with characteristic antioxidants, either 1 mM N-acetylcysteine or 1 mM glutathione reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and the formation of thymine base lesions, suggesting protection against oxidative cellular damage. Our findings indicate that 1) exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to Mn promotes both the formation and accumulation of oxidative DNA nucleotide base damage, 2) SH-SY5Y cells with accumulated DNA damage are more likely to die via an apoptotic pathway and 3) the accumulated levels of DNA damage can be abrogated by the addition of exogenous chemical antioxidants. This is the first known report of Mn2+-induction and antioxidant protection of thymine lesions in this SH-SY5Y cell line and contributes new information to the potential use of antioxidants as a

  20. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels.

  1. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3

  2. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    PubMed Central

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups. PMID:871441

  3. Complexation of Manganese with Glutarimidedioxime: Implication for Extraction Uranium from Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiang; Tian, Yin; Qin, Zhen; Yu, Qianhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Xingliang; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-03-01

    The molecule of glutaroimidedioxime, a cyclic imidedioxime moiety that can form during the synthesis of the poly(amidoxime)sorbent and is reputedly responsible for the extraction of uranium from seawater. Complexation of manganese (II) with glutarimidedioxime in aqueous solutions was investigated with potentiometry, calorimetry, ESI-mass spectrometry, electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Results show that complexation reactions of manganese with glutarimidedioxime are both enthalpy and entropy driven processes, implying that the sorption of manganese on the glutarimidedioxime-functionalized sorbent would be enhanced at higher temperatures. Complex formation of manganese with glutarimidedioxime can assist redox of Mn(II/III). There are about ~15% of equilibrium manganese complex with the ligand in seawater pH(8.3), indicating that manganese could compete to some degree with uranium for sorption sites.

  4. Complexation of Manganese with Glutarimidedioxime: Implication for Extraction Uranium from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiang; Tian, Yin; Qin, Zhen; Yu, Qianhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Xingliang; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    The molecule of glutaroimidedioxime, a cyclic imidedioxime moiety that can form during the synthesis of the poly(amidoxime)sorbent and is reputedly responsible for the extraction of uranium from seawater. Complexation of manganese (II) with glutarimidedioxime in aqueous solutions was investigated with potentiometry, calorimetry, ESI-mass spectrometry, electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Results show that complexation reactions of manganese with glutarimidedioxime are both enthalpy and entropy driven processes, implying that the sorption of manganese on the glutarimidedioxime-functionalized sorbent would be enhanced at higher temperatures. Complex formation of manganese with glutarimidedioxime can assist redox of Mn(II/III). There are about ~15% of equilibrium manganese complex with the ligand in seawater pH(8.3), indicating that manganese could compete to some degree with uranium for sorption sites. PMID:28266579

  5. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  6. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    MRI) of Manganese Role of Manganese in Prion Disease Pathogenesis Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron - Deficiency and Supplementation...Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron -Deficiency and Supplementation Aschner, Michael, Ph.D. Fitsanakis, Vanessa...Aschner (2006). Determination of brain manganese and iron accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic absorption spectroscopy. 4 2 nd

  7. Electrochemical deposition of the new manganese(II) Schiff-base complex on a gold template and its application for dopamine sensing in the presence of interfering biogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gorczyński, Adam; Pakulski, Dawid; Szymańska, Martyna; Kubicki, Maciej; Bułat, Kornela; Łuczak, Teresa; Patroniak, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    Facile and efficient template synthesis of new manganese(II) complex [Mn2(H2L)2](ClO4)2 (1) and its crystal structure are reported. Self-assembly leads to the formation of dinuclear, phenoxo-bridged closed species via exploitation of both binding subunits of the in situ formed new Schiff-base ligand. Gold electrode modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of synthesized complex 1 was applied as a voltammetric sensor for quantitative determination of dopamine (DA) in the presence of ascorbic (AA) and uric acids (UA). The linear relationship between the current response of dopamine at the potential of peak maximum and the concentration was found over a wide analyte concentration range (R(2)≥0.993, 1×10(-10)-8.5×10(-4)M) with a very good sensitivity (4.11Acm(-2)M(-1) at dE/dt=0.1Vs(-1)), high detection limit (6.8×10(-9)M) and excellent reproducibility. It has been proven that current peaks of dopamine, ascorbic and uric acids were clearly separated from each other, thus enabling selective detection of these compounds coexisting in a mixture.

  8. Probing the topography of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex: PsbO is required for efficient calcium protection of the manganese cluster against dark-inhibition by an artificial reductant.

    PubMed

    Popelkova, Hana; Boswell, Nicholas; Yocum, Charles

    2011-12-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) manganese-stabilizing protein (PsbO) is known to be the essential PSII extrinsic subunit for stabilization and retention of the Mn and Cl(-) cofactors in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of PSII, but its function relative to Ca(2+) is less clear. To obtain a better insight into the relationship, if any, between PsbO and Ca(2+) binding in the OEC, samples with altered PsbO-PSII binding properties were probed for their potential to promote the ability of Ca(2+) to protect the Mn cluster against dark-inhibition by an exogenous artificial reductant, N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine. In the absence of the PsbP and PsbQ extrinsic subunits, Ca(2+) and its surrogates (Sr(2+), Cd(2+)) shield Mn atoms from inhibitory reduction (Kuntzleman et al., Phys Chem Chem Phys 6:4897, 2004). The results presented here show that PsbO exhibits a positive effect on Ca(2+) binding in the OEC by facilitating the ability of the metal to prevent inhibition of activity by the reductant. The data presented here suggest that PsbO may have a role in the formation of the OEC-associated Ca(2+) binding site by promoting the equilibrium between bound and free Ca(2+) that favors the bound metal.

  9. Manganese biomining: A review.

    PubMed

    Das, A P; Sukla, L B; Pradhan, N; Nayak, S

    2011-08-01

    Biomining comprises of processing and extraction of metal from their ores and concentrates using microbial techniques. Currently this is used by the mining industry to extract copper, uranium and gold from low grade ores but not for low grade manganese ore in industrial scale. The study of microbial genomes, metabolites and regulatory pathways provide novel insights to the metabolism of bioleaching microorganisms and their synergistic action during bioleaching operations. This will promote understanding of the universal regulatory responses that the biomining microbial community uses to adapt to their changing environment leading to high metal recovery. Possibility exists of findings ways to imitate the entire process during industrial manganese biomining endeavor. This paper reviews the current status of manganese biomining research operations around the world, identifies factors that drive the selection of biomining as a processing technology, describes challenges in exploiting these innovations, and concludes with a discussion of Mn biomining's future.

  10. Manganese reduction by microbes from oxic regions of the Lake Vanda (Antarctica) water column

    SciTech Connect

    Bratina, B.J.; Stevenson, B.S.; Schmidt, T.M.; Green, W.J.

    1998-10-01

    Depth profiles of metals in Lake Vanda, a permanently ice-covered, stratified Antarctic lake, suggest the importance of particulate manganese oxides in the scavenging, transport, and release of metals. Since manganese oxides can be solubilized by manganese-reducing bacteria, microbially mediated manganese reduction was investigated in Lake Vanda. Microbes concentrated from oxic regions of the water column, encompassing a peak of soluble manganese [Mn(II)], reduced synthetic manganese oxides (MnO{sub 2}) when incubated aerobically, Pure cultures of manganese-reducing bacteria were readily isolated from waters collected near the oxic Mn(II) peak. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, most of the isolated manganese reducers belong to the genus Carnobacterium. Cultures of a phylogenetically representative strain of Carnobacterium reduced synthetic MnO{sub 2} in the presence of sodium azide, as was seen in field assays. Unlike anaerobes that utilize manganese oxides as terminal electron acceptors in respiration, isolates of the genus Carnobacterium reduced Mn(IV) via a diffusible compound under oxic conditions. The release of adsorbed trace metals accompanying the solubilization of manganese oxides may provide populations of Carnobacterium with a source of nutrients in this extremely oligotrophic environment.

  11. Manganese Health Research Program (MHRP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Via the Olfactory Nerve David Dorman, CPI Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron ...Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron - Deficiency and Supplementation PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron -Deficiency and Supplementation

  12. A click fluorophore sensor that can distinguish Cu(II) and Hg(II) via selective anion-induced demetallation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yu Heng; Price, Jason R; Todd, Matthew H; Rutledge, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    A cyclam-based fluorescent sensor featuring a novel triazole pendant arm has been synthesised using click chemistry. The sensor is highly responsive to both Cu(II) and Hg(II) in neutral aqueous solution and displays excellent selectivity in the presence of various competing metal ions in 50-fold excess. The addition of specific anions such as I(-) and S(2)O(3)(2-) causes a complete revival of fluorescence only in the case of Hg(II), providing a simple and effective method for distinguishing solutions containing Cu(II), Hg(II) or a mixture of both ions, even in doped seawater samples. X-ray crystal structures of both the Hg(II) sensor complex and a model Cu(II) complex show that pendant triazole coordination occurs through the central nitrogen atom (N2), providing to the best of our knowledge the first reported examples of this unusual coordination mode in macrocycles. Fluorescence, mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR experiments reveal that the mechanism of anion-induced fluorescence revival involves either displacement of pendant coordination or complete removal of the Hg(II) from the macrocycle, depending on the anion.

  13. Renal denervation attenuates aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Rui; Ruan, Cheng-Chao; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yong-Jie; Ma, Yu; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system interacts with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we sought to determine if renal denervation (RDN) inhibits aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. Bilateral RDN or SHAM operation was performed before chronic 14-day Ang II subcutaneous infusion (200ng/kg/min) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral RDN blunted Ang II-induced hypertension and ameliorated the mesenteric vascular dysfunction. Cardiovascular hypertrophy in response to Ang II was significantly attenuated by RDN as shown by histopathology and transthoracic echocardiography. Moreover, Ang II-induced vascular and myocardial inflammation and fibrosis were suppressed by RDN with concurrent decrease in fibronectin and collagen deposition, macrophage infiltration, and MCP-1 expression. Interestingly, RDN also inhibited Ang II-induced aldosterone expression in the plasma, kidney and heart. This was associated with the reduction of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the adrenal gland. Ang II promoted aldosterone secretion which was partly attenuated by CGRP in the adrenocortical cell line, suggesting a protective role of CGRP in this model. Activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway was both inhibited by RDN especially in the heart. These results suggest that the regulation of the renal sympathetic nerve in Ang II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes is likely mediated by aldosterone, with CGRP involvement. PMID:27661131

  14. Contribution of Ca^{2+} ions influx in Cu (II) or Cr (VI) induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourahmad, J.; O'Brien, P. J.

    2003-05-01

    Previously we showed that hepatocyte lysis induced by Cu (II) or Cr (VI) could be partly attributed to membrane lipid peroxidation induced by Cu (II) or Cr (VI) [1, 2]. Changes in Na^+ and Ca^{+2} homeostasis induced when Cu^{+2} or Cr VI were incubated with hepatocytes. Na^+ omission from the media or addition of the Na^+/H^+ exchange inhibitor 5-(N, N-dimethyl)-amiloride markedly increased Cu (II) or Cr (VI) cytotoxicity even though Cu (II) or Cr (VI) did not increase hepatocyte Na^+ when the media contained Na^+. The omission of CI^- from the media or addition of glycine, a CI^- channel blocker also enhanced Cu (II) or Cr (VI) induced cytotoxicity. Intracellular Ca^{+2} levels however were markedly increased when the hepatocytes were incubated with Cu^{+2} or Cr VI in a Na^+ free media and removing media Ca^{+2} with EGTA also prevented Cu (II) or Cr (VI) induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. This suggests that intracellular Ca^{+2} accumulation contributes to Cu (II) or Cr (VI) induced cytotoxicity and a Na^+_- dependent Ca^{+2} transporter is involved in controlling excessive Ca^{+2} accumulation caused by Cu (II) or Cr (VI).

  15. Manganese-based complexes of radical scavengers as neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Vajragupta, Opa; Boonchoong, Preecha; Sumanont, Yaowared; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Wongkrajang, Yuvadee; Kammasud, Naparat

    2003-05-15

    Manganese was incorporated in the structure of the selected antioxidants to mimic the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and to increase radical scavenging ability. Five manganese complexes (1-5) showed potent SOD activity in vitro with IC(50) of 1.18-1.84 microM and action against lipid peroxidation in vitro with IC(50) of 1.97-8.00 microM greater than their ligands and trolox. The manganese complexes were initially tested in vivo at 50 mg/kg for antagonistic activity on methamphetamine (MAP)-induced hypermotility resulting from dopamine release in the mice brain. Only manganese complexes of kojic acid (1) and 7-hydroxyflavone (3) exhibited the significant suppressions on MAP-induced hypermotility and did not significantly decrease the locomotor activity in normal condition. Manganese complex 3 also showed protective effects against learning and memory impairment in transient cerebral ischemic mice. These results supported the brain delivery and the role of manganese in SOD activity as well as in the modulation of brain neurotransmitters in the aberrant condition. Manganese complex 3 from 7-hydroxyflavone was the promising candidate for radical implicated neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Three Unique Barium Manganese Vanadates from High-Temperature Hydrothermal Brines.

    PubMed

    Smith Pellizzeri, Tiffany M; McMillen, Colin D; Wen, Yimei; Chumanov, George; Kolis, Joseph W

    2017-04-03

    Three new barium manganese vanadates, all containing hexagonal barium chloride layers interpenetrated by [V2O7](4-) groups, were synthesized using a high-temperature (580 °C) hydrothermal method. Two of the compounds were prepared from a mixed BaCl2/Ba(OH)2 mineralizer, and the third compound was prepared from BaCl2 mineralizer. An interesting structural similarity exists between two of the compounds, Ba2Mn(V2O7)(OH)Cl and Ba4Mn2(V2O7)(VO4)2O(OH)Cl. These two compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma, Z = 4, and are structurally related by a nearly doubled a axis. The first structure, Ba2Mn(V2O7)(OH)Cl (I) (a = 15.097(3) Å, b = 6.1087(12) Å, c = 9.5599(19) Å), consists of octahedral manganese(II) edge-sharing chains linked by pyrovanadate [V2O7] groups, generating a three-dimensional structure. Compound II, Ba4Mn2(V2O7)(VO4)2O(OH)Cl (a = 29.0814(11) Å, b = 6.2089(2) Å, c = 9.5219(4) Å), is composed of manganese(III) edge-sharing chains that are coordinated to one another through pyrovanadate groups in a nearly identical way as in I, forming a zigzag layer. A key difference in II is that these layers are capped on either end by two monomeric [VO4] groups that directly replace one [V2O7] group in I. The third compound, Ba5Mn3(V2O7)3(OH,Cl)Cl3 (III), crystallizes in the trigonal space group R32 (a = 9.7757(4) Å, c = 22.4987(10) Å) and is composed of manganese(II) trimeric units, [Mn3O12(OH,Cl)], coordinated to one another through pyrovanadate [V2O7] groups to form a three-dimensional structure. The unusual manganese trimers are built of three square pyramids all linked by a central (OH/Cl) atom. The key factor directing the formation of the different structures appears to be the identity and concentration of the halide brine mineralizer fluid. The ability of such brines to induce the formation of interpenetrated salt lattices in the present study is suggestive of a versatile realm of descriptive synthetic inorganic chemistry.

  17. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  18. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  19. Nickel(II)-induced nasal epithelial toxicity and oxidative mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lim, Soo-Sung; Baek, Byoung Joon; An, Je-Min; Nam, Hae-Seon; Woo, Kee-Min; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-03-01

    In probing the underlying mechanisms of nickel(II)-induced cytotoxicity on nasal epithelium, we investigated the effects of nickel(II) acetate on nasal epithelial RPMI-2650 cells. Nickel(II) elicited apoptosis, as signified by pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, increased caspase-3/7 activity, and an increase in annexin V binding, hypodiploid DNA, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio. Nickel(II)-induced G2/M arrest was associated with up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression, decrease in phosphorylation at Thr(161) of Cdc2, and down-regulation of cyclin B1. Associated with these responses, ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization increased in a nickel(II) concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated these changes. p53 reporter gene assay and analyses of p53, Puma, Bax, and Bcl-2 protein levels indicated that NAC inhibited nickel(II)-induced activation of p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our study provides evidences that nickel(II) may induce oxidative damage on nasal epithelium in which antioxidant NAC protects cells against nickel(II)-induced apoptosis through the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage.

  20. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  1. Manganese Abundances In Three Metal-poor Stars Using Improved log(gf) Data For Mn I And Mn II Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.; Sobeck, J. S.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.; Truran, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    We present accurate Mn abundances for three very metal-poor stars using new log(gf) measurements [Den Hartog et al. 2011] for transitions of Mn I and Mn II spanning a wavelength range from 2300 to 6050 Å. The three metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.0) program stars are HD 84937 (a warm main sequence turn-off star), HD 122563 (a cool giant deficient in n-capture elements) and HD115444 (a cool giant with extreme enhancements of n-capture elements). Using approximately 20 transitions of Mn I and more than 10 transitions of Mn II we find for each star a highly consistent abundance value, log ɛ(Mn) = 2.9 for HD 84937, log ɛ(Mn) = 1.6 for HD 115444, and log ɛ(Mn) = 1.9 for HD 122563, except for the resonance (E.P. = 0.0) multiplet of Mn I. This multiplet consistently yields lower abundance values with differences ranging from 0.3 dex for HD 84937 (a main sequence star) to 0.7 and 0.9 dex for the giant stars included in the study. We have critically examined aspects of radiative transfer for each of the Mn I and II transitions including depth of formation. Using estimates of the Fe abundances for these three well-studied metal-poor stars, we conclude that [Mn/Fe] = -0.70 ± 0.2 in the metalicity regime [Fe/H] = -2.5 ± 0.3. Supported by NASA grant NNX09AL13G and NSF grants AST-0907732, AST-0908978, and AST-0707447. Den Hartog, E A, Lawler J E, Sobeck J S, Sneden C, and Cowan J J 2011, ApJS 194, 35

  2. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Increased expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs is associated with 3MC-induced mouse tumor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K; Das, Provas; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2011-11-01

    Administration of the chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), in the hind leg induces the progressive formation of tumors in mice within 110 days. Previous reports suggest that transformation of muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes of tumor formation. Molecular events that lead to transformation of normal cells to atypical cells are not well understood. Here, we investigate the effect of 3MC on the expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM IIs) which are known to be involved in cell migration, division and adhesion. Mass spectroscopy analysis reveals that tumor tissue contains 64.5% NM II-A, 34% II-B and only 1.5% II-C of total NM IIs, whereas these three isoforms of NM IIs are undetectable by mass spectroscopy in normal tissue associated with the tumor (NTAT) from the hind leg. Quantification of heavy chain mRNAs of NM II suggests that tumor tissue contains 25.7-fold and 19.03-fold more of NM II-A and II-B, respectively, compared with NTAT. Unlike NM II-B, which is detected only after tumor formation, II-A is detectable as early as day 7 after a second dose of 3MC. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy reveals that fibroblast cells which are sparsely distributed in normal tissue are densely populated but of atypical shape in the tumor. These findings suggest that transformation of fibroblasts or non-fibroblast cells to atypical, cancerous cells is associated with increased levels of NM II-A and NM II-B expression in the 3MC-induced tumor mouse model. 3MC-induced transformation is further demonstrated in C2C12 myotubes.

  4. Crystal structure of trans-di­aqua­bis­(nicotinamide-κN 1)bis­(4-nitro­benzoato-κO)manganese(II)

    PubMed Central

    Aşkın, Gülçin Şefiye; Necefoğlu, Hacali; Tonbul, Ali Murat; Dilek, Nefise; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Mn(C7H4NO4)2(C6H6N2O)2(H2O)2], contains one MnII atom, one 4-nitro­benzoate (NB) anion, one nicotinamide (NA) ligand and one water mol­ecule; NA and NB each act as a monodentate ligand. The MnII atom, lying on an inversion centre, is coordinated by four O atoms and two pyridine N atoms in a distorted octa­hedral geometry. The water mol­ecules are hydrogen bonded to the carboxyl­ate O atoms. The dihedral angle between the carboxyl­ate group and the adjacent benzene ring is 24.4 (3)°, while the benzene and pyridine rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 86.63 (11)°. In the crystal, O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules, forming a layer parallel to the ab plane. The layers are further linked via weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, a π–π stacking inter­action [centroid–centroid distance = 3.868 (2) Å] and a weak C—H⋯π inter­action, resulting in a three-dimensional network. PMID:27308012

  5. Topological ferrimagnetic behaviours of coordination polymers containing manganese(II) chains with mixed azide and carboxylate bridges and alternating F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Hou-Ting; Qi, Yan; Gao, En-Qing

    2014-08-21

    Two Mn(ii) complexes with azide and a new zwitterionic tetracarboxylate ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxylatopyridinium-1-methylene)benzene (L(1)), {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(OH)2]·12H2O}n () and {[Mn5(L(1))2(N3)8(H2O)2](ClO4)2·6H2O}n (), have been synthesized and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. and contain similar alternating chains constructed by azide and carboxylate bridges. The independent sets of bridges alternate in an ABCCB sequence between adjacent Mn(ii) ions: (EO-N3)2 double bridges (EO = end-on) (denoted as A), [(EO-N3)(OCO)2] triple bridges (denoted as B) and [(EO-N3)(OCO)] double bridges (denoted as C). The alternating chains are interlinked into 2D coordination networks by the tetrapyridinium spacers. Magnetic studies demonstrate that the magnetic coupling through the double EO azide bridges is ferromagnetic and that through mixed azide/carboxylate bridges is antiferromagnetic. The unprecedented F/AF/AF'/AF'/AF coupling sequence along the chain dictates an uncompensated ground spin state (S = 5/2 per Mn5 unit) and leads to one-dimensional topological ferrimagnetism, which features a minimum in the χT versus T plot.

  6. Crystal and molecular structure of manganese(II) lapacholate, a novel polymeric species undergoing temperature-reversible metal to ligand electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Martínez, Miguel A; Rossi, Miriam; Goldberg, Alexander; Chacón Villalba, M Elizabeth; Aymonino, Pedro J

    2009-04-20

    Lapachol (2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphtoquinone) (HLap, C(15)H(14)O(3)) reacts with Mn(2+) producing a novel polymeric complex with formula: [Mn(Lap)(2)](n). Two ligands chelate the metal through their ortho oxygen (O1, O2) moiety while two para oxygens, from other Lap ligands, complete the octahedral coordination sphere. Thus far, all reported Lap metal complexes are mononuclear, lack the metal-trans-quinonic (para) oxygen binding and have Lap as a bidentate ligand. Synthesis, X-ray diffraction, IR, and UV-visible spectroscopic properties, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential thermal analysis of this complex are reported along with a density functional theory study describing electron transfer from the Mn to the Lap ligand at low temperature. X-ray structure determinations at 125, 197, and 300 K describe the progressive trend of a Mn contribution to the Mn-O1 bond length as a function of T. The Mn-O1 bond distance increases with temperature and may be therefore associated with a semiquinonate action at low T by the carbonyl O1 donor (and corresponding to Mn(III)). It transforms to a more classical coordinative bond at room T and stabilizes a Mn(II) species; this is a reversible phenomenon involving Mn(II)-Mn(III) oxidation states.

  7. Determination of the oxidizing capacity of manganese ores.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R

    1974-09-01

    An accurate method is described for determining the amount of active oxygen in manganese ores, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between the ore and arsenic(III) in presence of ammonium molybdate, followed by the back-titration of excess of arsenic(III) with cerium(IV), using osmium tetroxide as catalyst and Disulphine Blue V as indicator. A survey has been made of the applicability of this method to various pyrolusite ores containing less than 0.2% phosphorus. Aluminium(III), copper(II), iron(III), manganese(II), and molybdenum(VI) do not interfere. Up to 30% phosphorus(V) causes no interference.

  8. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  9. A new nano-scale manganese (II) coordination polymer constructed from semicarbazone Schiff base and dicyanamide ligands: Synthesis, crystal structure and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Farzaneh; Simpson, Jim

    2016-03-01

    A new nano-structured Mn(II) coordination polymer [Mn(HL)(dca)(Cl)]n(1), [HL= Pyridine-2-carbaldehyde semicarbazone, dca= dicyanamide] has been synthesized by a sonochemical method and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. Single crystals of compound 1 was synthesized by slow evaporation method and was structurally characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The single crystal structure shows one dimensional zig-zag chains with end-to-end dicyanamide-bridged ligand. A distorted octahedral geometry around the Mn2+centers was achieved by NNO atoms from HL, two nitrogen atoms of dicyanamide and one chlorine atom. Also for more details, the structure of 1, has been optimized by density functional theory (DFT calculations).

  10. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  11. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Xin, Ying; Tan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although angiotensin II (Ang II) was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN) via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2. PMID:28191275

  12. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is involved in Ang II-induced kidney damage via mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Yiran; Tang, Taotao; Lv, Linli; Liu, Hong; Ma, Kunling; Liu, Bicheng

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has shown that NLRP3 inflammasome activation promotes the development of tubulointerstitial inflammation and progression of renal injury. We previously found that mitochondrial dysfunction is a critical determinant for the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in albumin-overload rats. Angiotensin (Ang) II plays an important role in mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we investigated the role of Ang II in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in this process. In vitro, Ang II triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and this effect is mediated by AT1 receptor rather than AT2 receptor. MitoTEMPO, a mitochondrial targeted antioxidant, attenuated Ang II induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production and NLRP3 inflammation activation. Following chronic Ang II infusion for 28 days, we observed remarkable tubular epithelial cells (TECs) injury, mitochondrial damage, and albuminuria in WT mice. However, these abnormalities were significantly attenuated in AT1 receptor KO mice. Then, we examined the role of mitochondria in Ang II-infused mice with or without mitoTEMPO treatment. As expected, Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation was markedly inhibited by mitoTEMPO. Notably, NLRP3 deletion signally protected TECs from Ang II-triggered mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Ang II induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation in TECs which is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27509058

  13. Correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the manganese cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II in the S2 state: determination by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Latimer, M J; Dau, H; Roelofs, T A; Yachandra, V K; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1994-04-26

    The structure of the manganese cluster in the S2 state with the g approximately 4 EPR signal (S2-g4 state) generated by 130 K illumination of photosystem II (PSII) membranes prepared from spinach has been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Mn X-ray absorption K-edge spectra of the S2-g4 state not only show a shift of the inflection point to higher energy from the S1 state but also reveal a different edge shape from that of the S2 state with the multiline signal (S2-MLS state). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the Mn K-edge show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is distinctly different from those in the S2-MLS or S1 states. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of back-scatters from the Mn absorber is found to contain two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 and 2.85 A. We interpret this to indicate the presence of two nonequivalent di-mu-oxo-bridged Mn binuclear structures in the Mn cluster of the S2-g4 state. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 A also contains increased heterogeneity. By contrast, very little distance disorder was found to exist in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results in the context of our model for the Mn cluster and the EPR properties of the Mn complex in the S2 state.

  14. Ligation of D1-His332 and D1-Asp170 to the Manganese Cluster of Photosystem II from Synechocystis Assessed by Multifrequency Pulse EPR Spectroscopy†**

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Troy A.; Yeagle, Gregory J.; Service, Rachel J.; Debus, Richard J.; Britt, R. David

    2012-01-01

    Multifrequency electron-spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is used to ascertain the nature of the bonding interactions of various active site amino acids with the Mn ions that compose the oxygen-evolving cluster (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 poised in the S2 state. Spectra of natural isotopic abundance PSII (14N-PSII), uniformly 15N-labeled PSII (15N-PSII), as well as 15N-PSII containing 14N-histidine (14N-His/15N-PSII) are compared. These complementary data sets allow for a precise determination of the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the postulated histidine nitrogen interaction with the Mn ions of the OEC. These results are compared to those from a similar study on PSII isolated from spinach. Upon mutation of His332 of the D1 polypeptide to a glutamate residue, all isotopically sensitive spectral features vanish. Additional Ka- and Q-band ESEEM experiments on the D1-D170H site-directed mutant give no indication of new 14N-based interactions. PMID:21790179

  15. "Big IGF-II"-induced hypoglycemia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbois-Trabut, L; Maillot, F; De Widerspach-Thor, A; Lamisse, F; Couet, C

    2004-06-01

    Non-islet cell tumor-related hypoglycemia is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 63 Year-old man admitted for hemiparesia and a capillary blood glucose of 20 mg/dL. The presence of an immature form of IGF-II that can mimic the effect of insulin, namely "big IGF-II", explained this patient's hypoglycaemia. A moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cardia with metastatic extension to the stomach and the liver was demonstrated. Octreotide failed to control the hypoglycaemia, therefore prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day) and enteral feeding prevented new episodes of severe hypoglycaemia.

  16. Manganese in Madison's drinking water.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Thomas; Hausbeck, John; Sorsa, Kirsti

    2008-12-01

    Public concern over events of manganese-discolored drinking water and the potential for adverse health effects from exposure to excess manganese reached a high level in 2005. In response, Public Health Madison Dane County, together with the Madison Water Utility, conceived and implemented a public health/water utility strategy to quantify the extent of the manganese problem, determine the potential for adverse human health effects, and communicate these findings to the community. This strategy included five basic parts: taking an inventory of wells and their manganese levels, correlating manganese concentration with turbidity, determining the prevalence and distribution of excess manganese in Madison households, reviewing the available scientific literature, and effectively communicating our findings to the community. The year-long public health/water utility strategy successfully resolved the crisis of confidence in the safety of Madison's drinking water.

  17. Diverse manganese(II) coordination polymers derived from achiral/chiral imidazolium-carboxylate zwitterions and azide: structure and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Li, Xiu-Bing; Yan, Ren-He; Wang, Yan-Qin; Gao, En-Qing

    2013-07-21

    Five Mn(II) coordination polymers containing azide and carboxylate as simultaneous bridges have been derived from different imidazolium-carboxylate zwitterionic ligands: 1-methyl-3-(carboxylatomethyl)imidazolium (L(1)), 1,3-bis(carboxylatomethyl)imidazolium (L(2)), (S,S)-, (R,R)-, and (R,S)-1,3-bis(1-carboxylatoethyl)imidazolium (S,S-L(3), R,R-L(3) and R,S-L(3)). The compounds are formulated as [Mn(L(1))(N3)2] (1), [Mn(L(2))(N3)] (2), [Mn(R,R-L(3))(N3)]·0.5CH3OH (3-R), [Mn(S,S-L(3))(N3)]·0.5CH3OH (3-S), [Mn(R,S-L(3))(N3)] (4). In compound 1, the neutral monocarboxylate zwitterion ligand (L(1)) leads to uniform chains with bis(azide)(carboxylate) bridges. For compounds 2-4, the anionic dicarboxylate zwitterions L(2) and L(3) lead to (azide)bis(carboxylate) bridges, but the overall coordination networks are different. In 2 and 3-S (or 3-R), chains with the (azide)bis(carboxylate) bridges are connected by L(2) and S,S-L(3) (or R,R-L(3)), respectively, to give achiral and chiral 2D coordination networks with different connecting topologies. In compounds 4, which is derived from the mesomeric ligand R,S-L(3), linear trinuclear units with the (azide)bis(carboxylate) bridges are linked by μ-1,3 azides to give 2D layers, and the layers are pillared into a 3D framework by the 1,3-dimethyleneimidazolium tethers. Magnetic analyses suggested that compounds 1-3 behave as 1D antiferromagnetic systems, while 4 shows canted antiferromagnetism with weak ferromagnetic ordering below T(C) = 12.4 K.

  18. Structure of the manganese complex of photosystem II upon removal of the 33-kilodalton extrinsic protein: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.L.; Yachandra, V.K.; McDermott, A.E.; Guiles, R.D.; Britt, R.D.; Dexheimer, S.L.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P.

    1987-09-22

    The structure of the Mn complex of photosystem II (PSII) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxygen-evolving spinach PSII membranes containing 4-5 Mn/PSII were treated with 0.8 M CaCl/sub 2/ to extract the 33-, 24-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) extrinsic membrane proteins. Mn was not released by this treatment, but subsequent incubation at low Cl/sup -/ concentration generated preparations containing 2 Mn/PSII. The Mn X-ray absorption K-edge spectrum of the CaCl/sub 2/-washed preparation containing 4 Mn/PSII is very similar to the spectrum of native PSII, indicating that the oxidation states and ligand symmetry of the Mn complex in these preparations are not significantly different. The Mn extended X-ray absorption find structure (EXAFS) of CaCl/sub 2/-washed PSII fits to a Mn neighbor at approx. 2.75 A and two shells of N or O at approx. 1.78 and approx. 1.92 A. The results demonstrate that the structure of the Mn complex is largely unaffected by removal of 33-, 24-, and 16-kDa extrinsic proteins, and thus these proteins do not provide ligands to Mn. The Mn K-edge spectrum of the CaCl/sub 2/-washed sample containing 2 Mn/PSII has a dramatically altered shape, and the edge infection point is shifted to lower energy. The position of the edge is consistent with a Mn oxidation state of +3. The Mn EXAFS of this preparation is also quite different and cannot be simulated by using the parameters for the native Mn complex. Thus the structure of the Mn complex is disrupted upon depletion of half of the Mn.

  19. Orientation of the oxygen-evolving manganese complex in a photosystem II membrane preparation: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, I; Andrews, J C; DeRose, V J; Latimer, M J; Yachandra, V K; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1994-08-16

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been performed on oriented photosystem II membrane particles isolated from spinach. Structural features of the tetranuclear Mn cluster and the orientation of the cluster with respect to the lipid bilayer were determined in both the S1 and S2 states of the Kok cycle. Variation of the sample orientation with respect to the X-ray e-vector yields highly dichroic K-edge and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra (EXAFS), indicative of an asymmetric tetranuclear cluster. Mn-Mn vectors at 2.72 and 3.38 A can be resolved from these measurements using quantitative analysis. The 2.72-A vector, consisting of at least two component vectors, is oriented at an average angle of 60 degrees +/- 7 degrees to the membrane normal, with an average of 1.1 +/- 0.1 interactions per Mn atom. The 3.38-A vector, most probably an average of two vectors, makes an angle of 43 degrees +/- 10 degrees with respect to the membrane normal, with an average of 0.45 +/- 0.07 backscatterer per Mn atom. Upon advance to the S2 state, the orientation of these vectors and the average numbers of backscatterers are approximately invariant. Analysis of more subtle features of the EXAFS reveals changes accompanying this S-state advance that are consistent with the oxidation of Mn during this transition. However, the dominant structural features of the oxygen-evolving complex remain constant in the S1 and S2 states. The structure of the Mn complex and the orientation of the complex in the membrane within the context of dichroism of the X-ray absorption data are discussed.

  20. Structure of the manganese complex of photosystem II upon removal of the 33-kilodalton extrinsic protein: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Yachandra, V K; McDermott, A E; Guiles, R D; Britt, R D; Dexheimer, S L; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1987-09-22

    The structure of the Mn complex of photosystem II (PSII) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxygen-evolving spinach PSII membranes containing 4-5 Mn/PSII were treated with 0.8 M CaCl2 to extract the 33-, 24-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) extrinsic membrane proteins. Mn was not released by this treatment, but subsequent incubation at low Cl- concentration generated preparations containing 2 Mn/PSII. The Mn X-ray absorption K-edge spectrum of the CaCl2-washed preparation containing 4 Mn/PSII is very similar to spectrum of native PSII, indicating that the oxidation states and ligand symmetry of the Mn complex in these preparations are not significantly different. The Mn extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of CaCl2-washed PSII fits to a Mn neighbor at approximately 2.75 A and two shells of N or O at approximately 1.78 and approximately 1.92 A. These distances are similar to those we have previously reported for native PSII preparations [Yachandra, V. K., Guiles, R. D., McDermott, A. E., Cole, J. L., Britt, R. D., Dexheimer, S. L., Sauer, K., & Klein, M. P. (1987) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)] and are indicative of an oxo-bridged Mn complex. Our results demonstrate that the structure of the Mn complex is largely unaffected by removal of 33-, 24-, and 16-kDa extrinsic proteins, do not provide ligands to Mn. The Mn K-edge spectrum of the CaCl2-washed sample containing 2 Mn/PSII has a dramatically altered shape, and the edge inflection point is shifted to lower energy. The position of the edge is consistent with a Mn oxidation state of +3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Picroside II protects myocardium from ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury through inhibition of the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Zhe; Xie, Mei-Qing; Mo, Dan; Zhao, Xiao-Fang; Yu, Shu-Yi; Liu, Li-Juan; Wu, Cheng; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response is important in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Picroside II, the primary active constituent of Picrorhizae, has been reported to protect the myocardium from I/R-induced injury, however, the exact mechanism underlying these protective effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effects of picroside II on I/R-induced myocardial injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 1 h left coronary artery occlusion followed by 3 h reperfusion. Picroside II was administered (10 mg/kg) via the tail vein 30 min prior to left coronary artery occlusion. The results revealed that pretreatment of picroside II could significantly alleviate I/R-induced myocardial injury concomitantly with a decrease in inflammatory factor production. In addition, picroside II was also able to decrease high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression, and release and downregulate the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4. Furthermore, picroside II was able to inhibit nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. The results indicated that the protective effect of picroside II on I/R-induced myocardial injury was associated, at least partly, with inhibition of the inflammatory response by suppressing the HMGB1-RAGE/TLR-2/TLR-4-NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:28105084

  2. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Rateri, Debra L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5 - 10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  3. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Rateri, Debra L; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-09-28

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5-10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms.

  4. Role of protein kinase C delta in angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chintalgattu, Vishnu; Katwa, Laxmansa C

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for angiotensin II (AngII) and myofibroblasts (myoFb) in cardiac fibrosis. However, the role of PKC-δ in AngII mediated cardiac fibrosis is unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac collagen expression and fibrosis. AngII treatment significantly (p<0.05) increased myoFb collagen expression, whereas PKC-δ siRNA treatment or rottlerin, a PKC-δ inhibitor abrogated (p<0.05) AngII induced collagen expression. MyoFb transfected with PKC-δ over expression vector showed significant increase (p<0.05) in the collagen expression as compared to control. Two-weeks of chronic AngII infused rats showed significant (p<0.05) increase in collagen expression compared to sham operated rats. This increase in cardiac collagen expression was abrogated by rottlerin treatment. In conclusion, both in vitro and in vivo data strongly suggest a role for PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19540196

  5. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  6. Calpain-10 Activity Underlies Angiotensin II-Induced Aldosterone Production in an Adrenal Glomerulosa Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Seremwe, Mutsa; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone important in the regulation of blood pressure. Aberrant production of aldosterone results in the development and progression of diseases including hypertension and congestive heart failure; therefore, a complete understanding of aldosterone production is important for developing more effective treatments. Angiotensin II (AngII) regulates steroidogenesis, in part through its ability to increase intracellular calcium levels. Calcium can activate calpains, proteases classified as typical or atypical based on the presence or absence of penta-EF-hands, which are involved in various cellular responses. We hypothesized that calpain, in particular calpain-10, is activated by AngII in adrenal glomerulosa cells and underlies aldosterone production. Our studies showed that pan-calpain inhibitors reduced AngII-induced aldosterone production in 2 adrenal glomerulosa cell models, primary bovine zona glomerulosa and human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells, as well as CYP11B2 expression in the HAC15 cells. Although AngII induced calpain activation in these cells, typical calpain inhibitors had no effect on AngII-elicited aldosterone production, suggesting a lack of involvement of classical calpains in this process. However, an inhibitor of the atypical calpain, calpain-10, decreased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Consistent with this result, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of calpain-10 inhibited aldosterone production and CYP11B2 expression, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calpain-10 resulted in increased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Our results indicate that AngII-induced activation of calpain-10 in glomerulosa cells underlies aldosterone production and identify calpain-10 or its downstream pathways as potential targets for the development of drug therapies for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25836666

  7. Role of α1D -adrenoceptors in vascular wall hypertrophy during angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Ortíz, I A; Rodríguez-Hernández, S N; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; López-Sánchez, P; Touyz, R M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2015-09-01

    The in vivo effect of continuous angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion on arterial blood pressure, vascular hypertrophy and α1 -adrenoceptors (α1 -ARs) expression was explored. Alzet(®) minipumps filled with Ang II (200 ng kg(-1)  min(-1) ) were subcutaneously implanted in male Wistar rats (3 months-old). Groups of rats were also treated with losartan, an AT1 R antagonist, or with BMY 7378, a selective α1D -AR antagonist. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff; after 2 or 4 weeks of treatment, vessels were isolated for functional and structural analyses. Angiotensin II increased systolic blood pressure. Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta was greater (40% higher) in Ang II-treated rats than in the controls, and similar effect occurred with KCl 80 mm. Responses in tail arteries were not significantly different among the different groups. Angiotensin II decreased α1D -ARs without modifying the other α1 -ARs and induced an increase in media thickness (hypertrophy) in aorta, while no structural change occurred in tail artery. Losartan prevented and reversed hypertension and hypertrophy, while BMY 7378 prevented and reversed the aorta's hypertrophic response, without preventing or reversing hypertension. Findings indicate that Ang II-induced aortic hypertrophic response involves Ang II-AT1 Rs and α1D -ARs. Angiotensin II-induced α1D -AR-mediated vascular remodeling occurs independently of hypertension. Findings identify a α1D -AR-mediated process whereby Ang II influences aortic hypertrophy independently of blood pressure elevation.

  8. TNF receptor 1 signaling is critically involved in mediating angiotensin-II-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E; Trial, Joann; Entman, Mark L; Haudek, Sandra B

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34(+)CD45(+) monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34(+)CD45(+) cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart.

  9. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  10. Contribution of arginase to manganese metabolism of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Keni, Sarita; Punekar, Narayan S

    2016-02-01

    Aspects of manganese metabolism during normal and acidogenic growth of Aspergillus niger were explored. Arginase from this fungus was a Mn[II]-enzyme. The contribution of the arginase protein towards A. niger manganese metabolism was investigated using arginase knockout (D-42) and arginase over-expressing (ΔXCA-29) strains of A. niger NCIM 565. The Mn[II] contents of various mycelial fractions were found in the order: D-42 strain < parent strain < ΔXCA-29 strain. While the soluble fraction forms 60% of the total mycelial Mn[II] content, arginase accounted for a significant fraction of this soluble Mn[II] pool. Changes in the arginase levels affected the absolute mycelial Mn[II] content but not its distribution in the various mycelial fractions. The A. niger mycelia harvested from acidogenic growth media contain substantially less Mn[II] as compared to those from normal growth media. Nevertheless, acidogenic mycelia harbor considerable Mn[II] levels and a functional arginase. Altered levels of mycelial arginase protein did not significantly influence citric acid production. The relevance of arginase to cellular Mn[II] pool and homeostasis was evaluated and the results suggest that arginase regulation could occur via manganese availability.

  11. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  12. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Manganese (II) Complexes of Phthalic and Isophthalic Acid: X-Ray Crystal Structures of [Mn(ph)(Phen)2(H2O)]· 4H2O, [Mn(Phen)2(H2O)2]2(Isoph)2(Phen)· 12H2O and {[Mn(Isoph)(bipy)]4· 2.75biby}n(phH2 = Phthalic Acid; isoph = Isophthalic Acid; phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline; bipy = 2,2-Bipyridine)

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Malachy; Leon, Vanessa; Geraghty, Majella; McKee, Vickie; Wikaira, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Manganese(II) acetate reacts with phthalic acid (phH2) to give [Mn(ph)]·0.5H2O (1). Reaction of 1 with 1,10-phenanthroline produces [Mn(ph)(phen)]·2H2O (2) and [Mn(ph)(phen)2(H2O)]·4H2O (3). Reaction of isophthalic acid (isophH2) with manganese(II) acetate results in the formation of [Mn(isoph)]·2H2O (4). The addition of the N,N-donor ligands 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,2'-bipyridine to 4 leads to the formation of [Mn2 (isoph)2(phen)3)]·4H2O (5), [(Mn(phen)2(H2O)2]2(isoph)2(phen)·12H2O (6) and {[Mn(isoph)(bipy)]4·2.75 biby}n (7), respectively. Molecular structures of 3, 6 and 7 were determined crystallographically. In 3 the phthalate ligand is bound to the manganese via just one of its carboxylate groups in a monodentate mode with the remaining coordination sites filled by four phenanthroline nitrogen and one water oxygen atoms. In 6 the isophthalates are uncoordinated with the octahedral manganese center ligated by two phenanthrolines and two waters. In 7 the Isophthalate ligands act as bridges resulting in a polymeric structure. One of the carboxylate groups is chelating a single manganese with the other binding two metal centres in a bridging bidentate mode. The phthalate and isophthalate complexes, the metal free ligands and a number of simple manganes salts were each tested for their ability, to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Only the “metal free” 1,10-phenanthroline and its manganese complexes were found to be active. PMID:18475957

  13. Pressure-Driven Cooperative Spin-Crossover, Large-Volume Collapse, and Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition in Manganese(II) Honeycomb Lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Zhou, Zhengyang; Wen, Ting; Zhou, Yannan; Li, Nana; Han, Fei; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Sun, Junliang; Pravica, Michael; Cornelius, Andrew L; Yang, Wenge; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-12-07

    Spin-crossover (SCO) is generally regarded as a spectacular molecular magnetism in 3d(4)-3d(7) metal complexes and holds great promise for various applications such as memory, displays, and sensors. In particular, SCO materials can be multifunctional when a classical light- or temperature-induced SCO occurs along with other cooperative structural and/or electrical transport alterations. However, such a cooperative SCO has rarely been observed in condensed matter under hydrostatic pressure (an alternative external stimulus to light or temperature), probably due to the lack of synergy between metal neighbors under compression. Here, we report the observation of a pressure-driven, cooperative SCO in the two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb antiferromagnets MnPS3 and MnPSe3 at room temperature. Applying pressure to this confined 2D system leads to a dramatic magnetic moment collapse of Mn(2+) (d(5)) from S = 5/2 to S = 1/2. Significantly, a number of collective phenomena were observed along with the SCO, including a large lattice collapse (∼20% in volume), the formation of metallic bonding, and a semiconductor-to-metal transition. Experimental evidence shows that all of these events occur in the honeycomb lattice, indicating a strongly cooperative mechanism that facilitates the occurrence of the abrupt pressure-driven SCO. We believe that the observation of this cooperative pressure-driven SCO in a 2D system can provide a rare model for theoretical investigations and lead to the discovery of more pressure-responsive multifunctional materials.

  14. c-Abl mediates angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinghua; Ren, Zhilong; Liang, Wei; Zha, Dongqing; Liu, Yipeng; Chen, Cheng; Singhal, Pravin C.; Ding, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Backgroud Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been reported to cause podocyte apoptosis in rats both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl in Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats in groups of 12 were administered either Ang II (400 kg-1·kg-1·min-1) or Ang II + STI-571 (50 mg·kg-1·d-1) by osmotic minipumps. In addition, 12 rats-receiving normal saline served as the control. Glomeruli c-Abl expression was carried out by real time PCR, Western blotting and immunolabeled, and occurrence of apoptosis was carried out by TUNEL staining and transmission electron microscopic analysis. In vitro studies, conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes were treated with Ang II (10-9-10-6 M) in the presence or absence of either c-Abl inhibitor, Src-I1, specific c-Abl siRNA, or c-Abl plasmid alone. Quantification of podocyte c-Abl expression and c-Abl phosphorylation at Y245 and Y412 was carried out by real time PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence imaging. The nuclear c-Abl and p53 were quantified by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting studies. Podocyte apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry and Hoechst-33342 staining. Results c-Abl expression was demonstrated in rat kidney podocytes in vivo and cultured mouse podocytes in vitro. Ang II-receiving rats displayed enhanced podocyte c-Abl expression. And Ang II significantly stimulated c-Abl expression in cultured podocytes. Furthermore Ang II upregulated podocyte c-Abl phosphorylation at Y245 and Y412. Ang II also induced an increase of nuclear p53 protein and nuclear c-Abl-p53 complexes in podocytes and podocyte apoptosis. Down-regulation of c-Abl expression by c-Abl inhibitor (Src-I1) as well as specific siRNA inhibited Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis; conversely, podoctyes transfected with c-Abl plasmid displayed enhanced apoptosis. Conclusions These

  15. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  16. A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II attenuates the cardiac dysfunction induced by myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryo; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Wakayama, Kouji; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Shimamura, Munehisa; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morishita, Ryuichi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2017-01-01

    A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) was recently developed as a novel treatment for hypertension to resolve the problem of noncompliance with pharmacotherapy. Ang II plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI), which causes heart failure. In the present study, we examined whether the Ang II vaccine is effective in preventing heart failure. The injection of the Ang II vaccine in a rat model of MI attenuated cardiac dysfunction in association with an elevation in the serum anti-Ang II antibody titer. Furthermore, any detrimental effects of the Ang II vaccine were not observed in the rats that underwent sham operations. Treatment with immunized serum from Ang II vaccine-injected rats significantly suppressed post-MI cardiac dysfunction in MI rats and Ang II-induced remodeling-associated signaling in cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, our present study demonstrates that the Ang II vaccine may provide a promising novel therapeutic strategy for preventing heart failure. PMID:28266578

  17. ANG II is required for optimal overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Davis, B. S.; Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    ANG II mediates the hypertrophic response of overloaded cardiac muscle, likely via the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor. To examine the potential role of ANG II in overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy, plantaris and/or soleus muscle overload was produced in female Sprague-Dawley rats (225-250 g) by the bilateral surgical ablation of either the synergistic gastrocnemius muscle (experiment 1) or both the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles (experiment 2). In experiment 1 (n = 10/group), inhibiting endogenous ANG II production by oral administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor during a 28-day overloading protocol attenuated plantaris and soleus muscle hypertrophy by 57 and 96%, respectively (as measured by total muscle protein content). ACE inhibition had no effect on nonoverloaded (sham-operated) muscles. With the use of new animals (experiment 2; n = 8/group), locally perfusing overloaded soleus muscles with exogenous ANG II (via osmotic pump) rescued the lost hypertrophic response in ACE-inhibited animals by 71%. Furthermore, orally administering an AT(1) receptor antagonist instead of an ACE inhibitor produced a 48% attenuation of overload-induced hypertrophy that could not be rescued by ANG II perfusion. Thus ANG II may be necessary for optimal overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy, acting at least in part via an AT(1) receptor-dependent pathway.

  18. OKT3-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with release of group II secretory phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Roest, R W; Wolbink-Kamp, A M; Wolbink, G J; Weening, J J; Hack, C E; ten Berge, J M

    1996-10-01

    Administration of the murine IgG2a CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 exerts a transient nephrotoxic effect. Increased levels of group II secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-II) might account for this nephrotoxicity as sPLA2-II induces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, vasoactive lipid mediators that influence glomerular haemodynamics and renal function. Furthermore, extracellular phospholipases seem to be involved in proximal tubular cell injury. We studied plasma sPLA2-II levels in relation to circulating creatinine, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein levels in 15 renal allograft recipients receiving rejection treatment with OKT3. As a control group, we studied 15 renal allograft recipients receiving rejection treatment with methylprednisolone. A maximal fourfold increase in sPLA2-II levels was observed 48 h after the first OKT3 administration, preceded by increased tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 levels and accompanied by increased C-reactive protein levels. Creatinine levels reached a maximal increase 72 h after initiation of treatment. During methylprednisolone treatment no increase in any of the studied parameters was observed. Thus, administration of OKT3 induces increased sPLA2-II levels, presumably via generation of cytokines. We hypothesize that sPLA2-II may contribute to the nephrotoxic effect of OKT3 by inducing vasoconstrictive prostaglandins and renal tubular cell injury.

  19. Signaling of angiotensin II-induced vascular protein synthesis in conduit and resistance arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Christine; Martens, Fabrice MAC; Girardot, Daphné; Dao, Huy Hao; Touyz, Rhian M; Moreau, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Background From in vitro studies, it has become clear that several signaling cascades are involved in angiotensin II-induced cellular hypertrophy. The aim of the present study was to determine some of the signaling pathways mediating angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced protein synthesis in vivo in large and small arteries. Methods Newly synthesized proteins were labeled during 4 hours with tritiated leucine in conscious control animals, or animals infused for 24 hours with angiotensin II (400 ng/kg/min). Hemodynamic parameters were measure simultaneously. Pharmacological agents affecting signaling cascades were injected 5 hours before the end of Ang II infusion. Results Angiotensin II nearly doubled the protein synthesis rate in the aorta and small mesenteric arteries, without affecting arterial pressure. The AT1 receptor antagonist Irbesartan antagonized the actions of Ang II. The Ang II-induced protein synthesis was associated with increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation in aortic, but not in mesenteric vessels. Systemic administration of PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK-1/2 pathway, produced a significant reduction of protein synthesis rate in the aorta, and only a modest decrease in mesenteric arteries. Rapamycin, which influences protein synthesis by alternative signaling, had a significant effect in both vessel types. Rapamycin and PD98059 did not alter basal protein synthesis and had minimal effects on arterial pressure. Conclusion ERK1/2 and rapamycin-sensitive pathways are involved in pressure-independent angiotensin II-induced vascular protein synthesis in vivo. However, their relative contribution may vary depending on the nature of the artery under investigation. PMID:15134586

  20. Humid heat exposure induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowu; Yuan, Binbin; Dong, Wenpeng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Yongchao; Lin, Xi; Gong, Gu

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to humid heat stress leads to the initiation of serious physiological dysfunction that may result in heat-related diseases, including heat stroke, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and even death. Increasing evidences have shown that the humid heat stress-induced dysfunction of the cardiovascular system was accompanied with severe cardiomyocyte injury; however, the precise mechanism of heat stress-induced injury of cardiomyocyte remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that humid heat stress promoted oxidative stress through the activation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiomyocytes. To test our hypothesis, we established mouse models of humid heat stress. Using the animal models, we found that Ang II levels in serum were significantly up-regulated and that the Ang II receptor AT1 was increased in cardiomyocytes. The antioxidant ability in plasma and heart tissues which was detected by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay was also decreased with the increased ROS production under humid heat stress, as was the expression of antioxidant genes (SOD2, HO-1, GPx). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan, effectively relieved oxidative stress, blocked Ang II signaling pathway and suppressed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by humid heat stress. In addition, overexpression of antioxidant genes reversed cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Overall, these results implied that humid heat stress increased oxidative stress and caused apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through the Ang II signaling pathway. Thus, targeting the Ang II signaling pathway may provide a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases caused by humid heat stress.

  1. DNA breakage induced by piceatannol and copper(II): Mechanism and anticancer properties

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHENSHENG; YANG, XIAOZHAN; DONG, SHIWU; LI, XIAOHUI

    2012-01-01

    Piceatannol (3,3′,4,5′-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene; Pice), found in a variety of plant sources including grapes, red wine, peanuts and rhubarb, is known as a metabolite and analog of Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene; Res) and has higher bioactivity than Res. To explore the mechanism of DNA damage induced by Pice in the presence of copper (Cu)(II), gel electrophoresis, UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used. The results of gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the hydroxyl radical played a critical role in DNA cleavage. Spectroscopy confirmed that the mechanism of DNA cleavage induced by Pice-Cu(II) involves the Haber Weiss and Fenton reactions. Pice chelates with Cu(II) as a bidentate ligand, and the Pice-Cu(II) complex undergoes intramolecular electron transfer to form the semiquinone radical anion and Cu(I), which may be reoxidated by O2 to form Cu(II) with hydroxyl radical generation. In brief, the formation of the hydroxyl radical and the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle play a key role in inducing DNA damage. In this process, Pice demonstrated pro-oxidant properties. Oxidative product(s) of Pice, semiquinone, was formed and Cu(I) was reoxidized to Cu(II). The redox cycling of copper generated reactive oxygen species, which induced DNA cleavage, the hallmark of cell apoptosis. The mechanism of DNA breakage induced by Pice-Cu(II) may be a significant pathway through which cancer cells are killed. PMID:22783397

  2. Recovery of manganese and zinc from waste Zn-C cell powder: Mutual separation of Mn(II) and Zn(II) from leach liquor by solvent extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ranjit K; Habib, Mohammad A; Karmakar, Aneek K; Tanzin, Shohely

    2016-05-01

    Acidic organophosphorous extractants were screened for the mutual separation of Mn(II) and Zn(II), in a leach solution of waste Zn-C cell powder. This was done using a 2mol/L H2SO4 solution containing 2g/L glucose. Extraction characteristics of both metal ions in this mixture have been examined as functions of equilibrium pH. Although tech. and anal. grade D2EHPA are not so effective for the separation, PC88A, Cyanex 272, Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 are all promising for this purpose. Strippings of Mn(II) and Zn(II) from the extracted organic phases have been examined, using 0.25, 0.50 and 1mol/L H2SO4; and 1mol/L HCl, HNO3 and HClO4 at different phase ratios. H2SO4 appears to be the best stripping agent. A 1mol/L H2SO4 solution strips almost 100% of target metal ions in 10min, regardless of the extractant used. As ΔpH1/2=2.75 and as the max. separation factor (β)=1793 for Cyanex 302 at pH(eq)=4.0, a flow sheet has been developed for their mutual separations. Finally, classical precipitation methods have been adopted to obtain MnS and ZnS, which can be easily oxidized to MnO2 and ZnO, respectively.

  3. Role of Jagged1-Hey1 Signal in Angiotensin II-induced Impairment of Myocardial Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ai-Li; He, Tao; Shao, Yi-Bing; Chi, Yi-Fan; Dai, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Li; Yang, Xuan; Ding, Hua-Min; Cai, Shang-Lang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major contributor to the development of heart failure. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie this process remain elusive. Inadequate angiogenesis in the myocardium leads to a transition from cardiac hypertrophy to dysfunction, and our previous study showed that Ang II significantly impaired the angiogenesis response. The current study was designed to examine the role of Jagged1-Notch signaling in the effect of Ang II during impaired angiogenesis and cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Ang II was subcutaneously infused into 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 200 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 2 weeks using Alzet micro-osmotic pumps. N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT), a γ-secretase inhibitor, was injected subcutaneously during Ang II infusion at a dose of 10.0 mg·kg−1·d−1. Forty mice were divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): control group; Ang II group, treated with Ang II; DAPT group, treated with DAPT; and Ang II + DAPT group, treated with both Ang II and DAPT. At the end of experiments, myocardial (left ventricle [LV]) tissue from each experimental group was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test followed by the least significant difference method or independent samples t-test. Results: Ang II treatment significantly induced cardiac hypertrophy and impaired the angiogenesis response compared to controls, as shown by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry for CD31, a vascular marker (P < 0.05 for both). Meanwhile, Jagged1 protein was significantly increased, but gene expression for both Jag1 and Hey1 was decreased in the LV following Ang II treatment, compared to that in controls (relative ratio for Jag1 gene: 0.45 ± 0.13 vs. 0.84 ± 0.15; relative ratio for Hey1 gene: 0.51 ± 0.08 vs. 0.91 ± 0.09; P < 0

  4. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    PubMed

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  5. ERK1/2 signaling plays an important role in topoisomerase II poison-induced G2/M checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Ryan H; Greer, Patrick M; Cao, Phu T; Cowan, Kenneth H; Yan, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Topo II poisons, which target topoisomerase II (topo II) to generate enzyme mediated DNA damage, have been commonly used for anti-cancer treatment. While clinical evidence demonstrate a capability of topo II poisons in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, accumulating evidence also show that topo II poison treatment frequently results in cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which was associated with subsequent resistance to these treatments. Results in this report indicate that treatment of MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with topo II poisons resulted in an increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and an subsequent induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation using specific inhibitors markedly attenuated the topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest and diminished the topo II poison-induced activation of ATR and Chk1 kinases. Moreover, decreased expression of ATR by specific shRNA diminished topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest but had no effect on topo II poison-induced ERK1/2 activation. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling had little, if any, effect on topo II poison-induced ATM activation. In addition, ATM inhibition by either incubation of cells with ATM specific inhibitor or transfection of cells with ATM specific siRNA did not block topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest. Ultimately, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling greatly enhanced topo II poison-induced apoptosis. These results implicate a critical role for ERK1/2 signaling in the activation of G2/M checkpoint response following topo II poison treatment, which protects cells from topo II poison-induced apoptosis.

  6. catena-Poly[[(4-methyl­benzoato-κO)manganese(II)]-μ-aqua-bis­(μ-4-methyl­benzoato-κ2 O:O′)[(4-methyl­benzoato-κO)manganese(II)]-bis­(μ-N,N-diethyl­nicotinamide)-κ2 N 3:O;O:N 3

    PubMed Central

    Hökelek, Tuncer; Dal, Hakan; Tercan, Barış; Çimen, Efdal; Necefoğlu, Hacali

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Mn2(C8H7O2)4(C10H14N2O)2(H2O)]n, contains two crystallographically independent units. In each one, the MnII ions are bridged by two 4-methyl­benzoate (PMB) ligands and one water mol­ecule. In the crystal structure, each MnII ion is coordinated by three PMB ligands, one water mol­ecule and two symmetry-related N,N-diethyl­nicotinamide (DENA) ligands. Symmetry-related MnII ions are bridged by the N and O atoms of symmetry-related DENA ligands, forming polymeric chains parallel to [100]. The coord­ination environmnts for the MnII ions are slightly distorted octa­hedral. Intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link bridging water mol­ecules to the carboxyl­ate O atoms of a neigh­boring polymeric chain. In the crystal structure, π–π contacts between benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.562 (1) Å] and weak C—H⋯π inter­actions are also observed. PMID:21587676

  7. Pollutant particles induce arginase II in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse pulmonary effects, including induction and exacerbation of asthma. Recently arginase was shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we hypothesized that PM exposure would induce ar...

  8. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-12-16

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. RESULTS Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. CONCLUSIONS SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis.

  9. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. Material/Methods The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. Results Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. Conclusions SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27980320

  10. Visible-light-induced CO release from a therapeutically viable tryptophan-derived manganese(I) carbonyl (TryptoCORM) exhibiting potent inhibition against E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan S; Lynam, Jason M; Moir, James; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2014-11-10

    The first visible-light-activated carbon-monoxide-releasing molecule (CO-RM) to exhibit a potent effect against Escherichia coli is described. The easily prepared tryptophan-derived manganese-containing complex (TryptoCORM) released 1.4 moles of CO at 465 nm, and 2 moles at 400 nm. A comprehensive synthetic, mechanistic and microbiological study into the behaviour of TryptoCORM is reported. The complex is thermally stable (i.e., does not release CO in solution in the absence of light), shows low toxicity against mammalian cells and releases tryptophan on photoinduced degradation, all of which point to TryptoCORM being therapeutically viable.

  11. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  12. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  13. Metformin inhibits angiotensin II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jian; Zhang, Na; Hua, Ying; Wang, Bingjian; Ling, Lin; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a critical event in the progression of cardiac fibrosis that leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. Metformin, an antidiabetic agent, exhibits a number of cardioprotective properties. However, much less is known regarding the effect of metformin on cardiac fibroblast differentiation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of metformin on angiotensin (Ang) II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its underlying mechanism. Adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with Ang II (100 nM) in the presence or absence of metformin (10-200 µM). Ang II stimulation induced the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, as indicated by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen types I and III, and this effect of Ang II was inhibited by pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with metformin. Metformin also decreased Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cardiac fibroblasts via inhibiting the activation of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway. Further experiments using PKC inhibitor calphostin C and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin confirmed that inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway markedly attenuated Ang II-induced ROS generation and myofibroblast differentiation. These data indicate that metformin inhibits Ang II-induced myofibroblast differentiation by suppressing ROS generation via the inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the cardioprotective effects of metformin and provide an efficient therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac fibrosis.

  14. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  15. Sex differences in the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Hay, Meredith

    2005-05-01

    Sex has an important influence on blood pressure (BP) regulation. There is increasing evidence that sex hormones interfere with the renin-angiotensin system. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine whether there are sex differences in the development of ANG II-induced hypertension in conscious male and female mice. We used telemetry implants to measure aortic BP and heart rate (HR) in conscious, freely moving animals. ANG II (800 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)) was delivered via an osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously. Our results showed baseline BP in male and female mice to be similar. Chronic systemic infusion of ANG II induced a greater increase in BP in male (35.1 +/- 5.7 mmHg) than in female mice (7.2 +/- 2.0 mmHg). Gonadectomy attenuated ANG II-induced hypertension in male mice (15.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg) and augmented it in female mice (23.1 +/- 1.0 mmHg). Baseline HR was significantly higher in females relative to males (630.1 +/- 7.9 vs. 544.8 +/- 16.2 beats/min). In females, ANG II infusion significantly decreased HR. However, the increase in BP with ANG II did not result in the expected decrease in HR in either intact male or gonadectomized mice. Moreover, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardia to phenylephrine was blunted in males (-5.6 +/- 0.3 to -2.9 +/- 0.5) but not in females (-6.5 +/- 0.5 to -5.6 +/- 0.3) during infusion of ANG II, suggesting that, in male mice, infusion of ANG II results in a resetting of the baroreflex control of HR. Ganglionic blockade resulted in greater reduction in BP on day 7 after ANG II infusion in males compared with females (-61.0 +/- 8.9 vs. -36.6 +/- 6.6 mmHg), suggesting an increased contribution of sympathetic nerve activity in arterial BP maintenance in male mice. Together, these data indicate that there are sex differences in the development of chronic ANG II-induced hypertension in conscious mice and that females may be protected from the increases in BP induced by ANG II.

  16. Role of the Na+/H+ exchanger 3 in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao C.; Shull, Gary E.; Miguel-Qin, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The renal mechanisms responsible for angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension remain incompletely understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) is required for ANG II-induced hypertension in mice. Five groups of wild-type (Nhe3+/+) and Nhe3−/− mice were treated with vehicle or high pressor doses of ANG II (1.5 mg/kg/day ip, via minipump for 2 wk, or 10 pmol/min iv for 30 min). Under basal conditions, Nhe3−/− mice had significantly lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean intra-arterial pressure (MAP) (P < 0.01), 24 h urine (P < 0.05), urinary Na+ (P < 0.01) and urinary K+ excretion (P < 0.01). In response to ANG II, SBP and MAP markedly increased in Nhe3+/+ mice in a time-dependent manner, as expected (P < 0.01). However, these acute and chronic pressor responses to ANG II were significantly attenuated in Nhe3−/− mice (P < 0.01). Losartan blocked ANG II-induced hypertension in Nhe3+/+ mice but induced marked mortality in Nhe3−/− mice. The attenuated pressor responses to ANG II in Nhe3−/− mice were associated with marked compensatory humoral and renal responses to genetic loss of intestinal and renal NHE3. These include elevated basal plasma ANG II and aldosterone and kidney ANG II levels, salt wasting from the intestines, increased renal AQP1, Na+/HCO3−, and Na+/K+-ATPase expression, and increased PKCα, mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2, and glycogen synthase kinase 3αβ signaling proteins in the proximal tubules (P < 0.01). We concluded that NHE3 in proximal tubules of the kidney, along with NHE3 in intestines, is required for maintaining basal blood pressure as well as the full development of ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:26242933

  17. [Occupational neurotoxicology due to heavy metals-especially manganese poisoning].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naohide

    2007-06-01

    ganglia has been reported in patients with the poisoning. Thus, increasd signal intensities as a target site dose can be a more useful biomakers of the manganese than other biological indicies such as ambient manganese concentration or blood manganese concentration on individual basis. Manganese poisoning ultimately becomes chronic. However, if the disease is diagnosed while still at the early stages and the patient is removed from exposure, the course may be reversed. Once well established, it becomes progressive and irreversible, even when exposure is terminated. Levodopa therapy is not effective for the management of manganese poisoning. Levodopa unresponsiveness may be usefull to distinguish manganese-induced parkinsonism from Parkinson disease.

  18. Angiotensin II induces MMP 2 activity via FAK/JNK pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Eugenio; Pérez de la Blanca, Enrique; Urso, Loredana; González, Irene; Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes

    2009-03-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and are modified in response to a variety of stimuli such as bioactive peptides, cytokines and/or grown factors. In this study, we demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a time- and dose-dependent increase in the activity of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The effect of Ang II was markedly attenuated in cells pretreated with wortmannin and LY294002, two selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), indicating that PI3K plays a key role in regulating MMP 2 activity. Similar results were observed when HUVEC were pretreated with genistein, a non-selective tyrosine kinases inhibitor, or with the specific Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, demonstrating the involvement of protein tyrosine kinases, and particularly Src-family tyrosine kinases on the downstream signaling pathway of Ang II receptors. Furthermore, Ang II-induced MMP 2 activation was markedly blocked by SP600125, a selective c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, or pre-treatment of cells with antisense oligonucleotide to focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating that both molecules were important for the activation of MMP 2 by Ang II receptor stimulation. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II mediates an increase in MMP 2 activity in macrovascular endothelial cells through signal transduction pathways dependent on PI3K and Src-family tyrosine kinases activation, as well as JNK and FAK phosphorylation.

  19. Nox4-generated superoxide drives angiotensin II-induced neural stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Topchiy, Elena; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Griffin, W Sue T; Barger, Steven W; Das, Mita; Zawada, W Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to affect neural stem cell self-renewal and therefore may be important for normal development and may influence neurodegenerative processes when ROS activity is elevated. To determine if increasing production of superoxide, via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox), increases neural stem cell proliferation, 100 nM angiotensin II (Ang II) - a strong stimulator of Nox - was applied to cultures of a murine neural stem cell line, C17.2. Twelve hours following a single treatment with Ang II, there was a doubling of the number of neural stem cells. This increase in neural stem cell numbers was preceded by a gradual elevation of superoxide levels (detected by dihydroethidium fluorescence) from the steady state at 0, 5, and 30 min and gradually increasing from 1 h to the maximum at 12 h, and returning to baseline at 24 h. Ang II-dependent proliferation was blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of two sources of intracellular ROS in C17.2 cells: (i) mitochondrial and (ii) extramitochondrial; the latter indicative of the involvement of one or more specific isoforms of Nox. Of the Nox family, mRNA expression for one member, Nox4, is abundant in neural stem cell cultures, and Ang II treatment resulted in elevation of the relative levels of Nox4 protein. SiRNA targeting of Nox4 mRNA reduced both the constitutive and Ang II-induced Nox4 protein levels and attenuated Ang II-driven increases in superoxide levels and stem cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with our hypothesis that Ang II-induced proliferation of neural stem cells occurs via Nox4-generated superoxide, suggesting that an Ang II/Nox4 axis is an important regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal and as such may fine-tune normal, stress- or disease-modifying neurogenesis.

  20. Nox4-generated superoxide drives angiotensin II-induced neural stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Barger, Steven W.; Das, Mita; Zawada, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to affect neural stem cell self-renewal and therefore may be important for normal development and may influence neurodegenerative processes when ROS activity is elevated. To determine if increasing production of superoxide, via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox), increases neural stem cell proliferation, 100nM angiotensin II (Ang II) – a strong stimulator of Nox – was applied to cultures of a murine neural stem cell line C17.2. Twelve hours following a single treatment with Ang II there was a doubling of the number of neural stem cells. This increase in neural stem cell numbers was preceded by a gradual elevation of superoxide levels (detected by dihydroethidium, DHE, fluorescence) from the steady state at 0, 5, and 30 minutes and gradually increasing from one hour to the maximum at 12 h, and returning to baseline at 24 h. Ang II-dependent proliferation was blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of two sources of intracellular ROS in C17.2 cells: i) mitochondrial and ii) extramitochondrial; the latter indicative of involvement of one or more specific isoforms of Nox. Of the Nox family, mRNA expression for one member, Nox4, is abundant in neural stem cell cultures, and Ang II treatment resulted in elevation of the relative levels of Nox4 protein. SiRNA targeting of Nox4 mRNA reduced both the constitutive and Ang II-induced Nox4 protein levels and attenuated Ang II-driven increases in superoxide levels and stem cell proliferation. Our findings are consistent with our hypothesis that Ang II-induced proliferation of neural stem cells occurs via Nox4-generated superoxide, suggesting that an Ang II/Nox4 axis is an important regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal and as such may fine-tune normal or stress- or disease-modifying neurogenesis. PMID:23751520

  1. Microtopography of manganese crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Charles L.

    Quantitative examination of the seafloor surface roughness will be necessary for any design of equipment intended for use in collecting surface deposits such as cobalt-rich manganese crusts or nodules. Furthermore, it is an essential prerequisite to the confident interpretation of returns from high frequency side-scan and other acoustic systems. The objectives of the project were to develop the capability at the University of Hawaii of generating high resolution (less than 1 cm horizontal and vertical) topographic models of the seafloor from 35 mm stereo photographs; to produce such models from existing photographs of cobalt-rich manganese crust deposits; and to optimize the configuration of the existing Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) camera system for stereo photograph collection and correlation of acoustic data with the photographic ground-truth. These tasks were accomplished and have also led to the development of a follow-on project (MMTC/OBD Project 1512) dedicated to the simultaneous acquisition of both optical and side-scan acoustic data for future accurate determination of seabed microtopography.

  2. Cardiopulmonary bypass with bivalirudin in type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Stephanie B; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Crumbley, Arthur J; Uber, Walter E

    2004-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia poses significant challenges. Inadequate pharmacokinetic profiles, monitoring, reversibility, and availability often limit alternative anticoagulation strategies. Bivalirudin, a semisynthetic direct thrombin inhibitor, was recently approved for use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Its unique properties, including a relatively short half-life, an anticoagulation effect that closely correlates with activated clotting time, and an alternate metabolic pathway for elimination, make bivalirudin an attractive agent for cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia. We report our experience using bivalirudin in 2 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

  3. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  4. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y.; Simpson, Michael A.; Chong, W. K.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Woltjer, Randy L.; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M.; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R.; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A. M.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C.; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Enns, Caroline A.; Hayflick, Susan J.; Clayton, Peter T.; Mills, Philippa B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  5. Manganese Inhalation as a Parkinson Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez-Librado, José Luis; Anaya-Martínez, Verónica; Gutierrez-Valdez, Ana Luisa; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Montiel-Flores, Enrique; Avila-Costa, Maria Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of divalent and trivalent Manganese (Mn2+/Mn3+) mixture inhalation on mice to obtain a novel animal model of Parkinson disease (PD) inducing bilateral and progressive dopaminergic cell death, correlate those alterations with motor disturbances, and determine whether L-DOPA treatment improves the behavior, to ensure that the alterations are of dopaminergic origin. CD-1 male mice inhaled a mixture of Manganese chloride and Manganese acetate, one hour twice a week for five months. Before Mn exposure, animals were trained to perform motor function tests and were evaluated each week after the exposure. By the end of Mn exposure, 10 mice were orally treated with 7.5 mg/kg L-DOPA. After 5 months of Mn mixture inhalation, striatal dopamine content decreased 71%, the SNc showed important reduction in the number of TH-immunopositive neurons, mice developed akinesia, postural instability, and action tremor; these motor alterations were reverted with L-DOPA treatment. Our data provide evidence that Mn2+/Mn3+ mixture inhalation produces similar morphological, neurochemical, and behavioral alterations to those observed in PD providing a useful experimental model for the study of this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:21209715

  6. Nardosinone protects H9c2 cardiac cells from angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Du, Meng; Huang, Kun; Gao, Lu; Yang, Liu; Wang, Wen-shuo; Wang, Bo; Huang, Kai; Huang, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (AngII) can subsequently give rise to heart failure, a leading cause of mortality. Nardosinone is a pharmacologically active compound extracted from the roots of Nardostachys chinensis, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine. In order to investigate the effects of nardosinone on AngII-induced cardiac cell hypertrophy and the related mechanisms, the myoblast cell line H9c2, derived from embryonic rat heart, was treated with nardosinone (25, 50, 100, and 200 μmol/L) or AngII (1 μmol/L). Then cell surface area and mRNA expression of classical markers of hypertrophy were detected. The related protein levels in PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MEK/ERK signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. It was found that pretreatment with nardosinone could significantly inhibit the enlargement of cell surface area induced by AngII. The mRNA expression of ANP, BNP and β-MHC was obviously elevated in AngII-treated H9c2 cells, which could be effectively blocked by nardosinone at the concentration of 100 μmol/L. Further study revealed that the protective effects of nardosinone might be mediated by repressing the phosphorylation of related proteins in PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. It was suggested that the inhibitory effect of nardosinone on Ang II-induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cells might be mediated by targeting PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways.

  7. Flash-induced absorption spectroscopy studies of copper interaction with photosystem II in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Schröder, W P; Arellano, J B; Bittner, T; Barón, M; Eckert, H J; Renger, G

    1994-12-30

    Measurements of flash-induced absorption changes at 325, 436, and 830 nm and of oxygen evolution were performed in order to analyze in detail the inhibition of photosystem II (PS II) by Cu(II) in PS II membrane fragments from spinach. (a) The kinetics of P680+ reduction become markedly slower in the presence of 100 microM CuSO4. (b) The CuSO4-induced kinetics of P680+ reduction are dominated by a 140-160-microsecond decay. (c) The extent of these 140-160-microsecond kinetics, normalized to the overall decay, remains virtually unaffected by addition of the exogenous PS II donor, NH2OH. (d) In thoroughly dark-adapted samples the CuSO4-induced 140-160-microsecond kinetics are already observed after the first flash and remain unchanged by a train of excitation flashes. (e) The extent of P680+ and QA- formation under repetitive flash excitation is not diminished by addition of 100 microM CuSO4. (f) The induction of microsecond kinetics of P680+ reduction at the expense of ns kinetics and the inhibition of the saturation rate of oxygen evolution exhibit the same dependence on CuSO4 concentration. (g) CuSO4 also transforms the 10-20-microsecond reduction of P680+ by TyrZ in Tris-washed PS II membrane fragments into 140-160-microsecond kinetics without any effect on the extent of flash-induced P680+ formation. These results unambiguously show that Cu(II) does not affect the charge separation (P680+QA-), but instead specifically modifies TyrZ and/or its micro environment so that the electron transfer to P680+ becomes blocked.

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  9. Removal of multi-heavy metals using biogenic manganese oxides generated by a deep-sea sedimentary bacterium - Brachybacterium sp. strain Mn32.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenming; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Yanjun; Wang, Gejiao

    2009-06-01

    A deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium, Brachybacterium sp. strain Mn32, showed high Mn(II) resistance (MIC 55 mM) and Mn(II)-oxidizing/removing abilities. Strain Mn32 removed Mn(II) by two pathways: (1) oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to insoluble biogenic Mn oxides - birnessite (delta-MnO(2) group) and manganite (gamma-MnOOH); (2) the biogenic Mn oxides further adsorb more Mn(II) from the culture. The generated biogenic Mn oxides surround the cell surfaces of strain Mn32 and provide a high capacity to adsorb Zn(II) and Ni(II). Mn(II) oxidation by strain Mn32 was inhibited by both sodium azide and o-phenanthroline, suggesting the involvement of a metalloenzyme which was induced by Mn(II). X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the crystal structures of the biogenic Mn oxides were different from those of commercial pyrolusite (beta-MnO(2) group) and fresh chemically synthesized vernadite (delta-MnO(2) group). The biogenic Mn oxides generated by strain Mn32 showed two to three times higher Zn(II) and Ni(II) adsorption abilities than commercial and fresh synthetic MnO(2). The crystal structure and the biogenic MnO(2) types may be important factors for the high heavy metal adsorption ability of strain Mn32. This study provides potential applications of a new marine Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium in heavy metal bioremediation and increases our basic knowledge of microbial manganese oxidation mechanisms.

  10. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  11. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  12. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  13. Pravastatin activates activator protein 2 alpha to argument the angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Liang, Wen-Jing; Shan, Mei-Rong; Wang, Xue-Qing; Zhou, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Tao; Li, Peng; Yu, Hai-Ya; Liu, Chao; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Yu-Lin; Dong, Bo; Pang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2017-02-04

    We have previously reported that activation of AMP-activated kinase alpha 2 (AMPKα2) by nicotine or angiotensin II (AngII) instigates formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Apoe-/- mice. Statins, used to treat hyperlipidemia widely, activate AMPK in vascular cells. We sought to examine the effects of pravastatin on AAA formation and uncover the molecular mechanism. The AAA model was induced by AngII and evaluated by incidence, elastin degradation, and maximal abdominal aortic diameter in Apoe-/- mice. The phosphorylated levels of AMPKα2 and activator protein 2 alpha (AP-2α) were examined in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) or in mice. We observed that pravastatin (50 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) remarkably increased the AngII-induced AAA incidence in mice. In VSMCs, pravastatin increased the levels of pAMPK, pAP-2α, and MMP2 in both basal and AngII-stressed conditions, which were abolished by tempol and compound C. Pravastatin-upregulated MMP2 was abrogated by AMPKα2 or AP-2α siRNA. Lentivirus-mediated gene silence of AMPKα2 or AP-2α abolished pravastatin-worsened AAA formations in AngII-infused Apoe-/- mice. Clinical investigations demonstrated that both AMPKα2 and AP-2α phosphorylations were increased in AAA patients or human subjects taking pravastatin. In conclusion, pravastatin promotes AAA formation through AMPKα2-dependent AP-2α activations.

  14. Gamma Delta T Cells Mediate Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Vascular Injury.

    PubMed

    Caillon, Antoine; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Fraulob-Aquino, Julio C; Huo, Ku-Geng; Barhoumi, Tlili; Ouerd, Sofiane; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2017-03-22

    Background -Innate antigen-presenting cells and adaptive immune T cells have been implicated in the development of hypertension. However, the T-lymphocyte subsets involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension remain unclear. A small subset of "innate-like" T cells expressing the γδ T cell receptor (TCR) rather than the αβ TCR could play a role in the initiation of the immune response in hypertension. We aimed to determine whether angiotensin (Ang) II caused kinetic changes in γδ T cells, whether deficiency in γδ T cells blunted Ang II-induced hypertension, vascular injury and T-cell activation, and whether γδ T cells are associated with human hypertension. Methods -Male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and Tcrδ(-/-) mice, which are devoid of γδ T cells, or WT mice injected IP with control isotype IgG or γδ T cell-depleting antibodies, were infused or not with Ang II for 3, 7 or 14 days. T cell profiling was determined by flow cytometry, systolic blood pressure (SBP) by telemetry and mesentery artery endothelial function by pressurized myography. TCR γ constant region gene expression levels and clinical data of a whole blood gene expression microarray study including normotensive and hypertensive subjects were used to demonstrate an association between γδ T cells and SBP. Results -Seven- and 14-day Ang II infusion increased γδ T cell numbers and activation in the spleen of WT mice (P<0.05). Fourteen days of Ang II infusion increased SBP (P<0.01) and decreased mesenteric artery endothelial function (P<0.01) in WT mice, both of which were abrogated in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). Anti-TCR γδ antibody-induced γδ T cell depletion blunted Ang II-induced SBP rise and endothelial dysfunction (P<0.05), compared to isotype antibody-treated Ang II-infused mice. Ang II-induced T cell activation in the spleen and perivascular adipose tissue was blunted in Tcrδ(-/-) mice (P<0.01). In humans, the association between SBP and γδ T cells was demonstrated by a

  15. Manganese import is a key element of the OxyR response to hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anjem, Adil; Varghese, Shery; Imlay, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Very little manganese is imported into Escherichia coli under routine growth conditions: the import system is weakly expressed, the manganese content is low, and a manganese-dependent enzyme is not correctly metallated. Mutants that lack MntH, the importer, grow at wild-type rates, indicating that manganese plays no critical role. However, MntH supports the growth of iron-deficient cells, suggesting that manganese can substitute for iron in activating at least some metalloenzymes. MntH is also strongly induced when cells are stressed by hydrogen peroxide. This adaptation is essential, as E. coli cannot tolerate peroxide stress if mntH is deleted. Other workers have observed that manganese improves the ability of a variety of microbes to tolerate oxidative stress, and the prevailing hypothesis is that manganese does so by chemically scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. We found that manganese does not protect peroxide-stressed cells by scavenging peroxide. Instead, the beneficial effects of manganese correlate with its ability to metallate mononuclear enzymes. Because iron-loaded enzymes are vulnerable to the Fenton reaction, the substitution of manganese may prevent protein damage. Accordingly, during H2O2 stress, mutants that cannot import manganese and/or are unable to sequester iron suffer high rates of protein oxidation. PMID:19400769

  16. Tellurium content of marine manganese oxides and other manganese oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lakin, H.W.; Thompson, C.E.; Davidson, D.F.

    1963-01-01

    Tellurium in amounts ranging from 5 to 125 parts per million was present in all of 12 samples of manganese oxide nodules from the floor of the Pacific and Indian oceans. These samples represent the first recognized points of high tellurium concentration in a sedimentary cycle. The analyses may lend support to the theory that the minor-element content of seafloor manganese nodules is derived from volcanic emanations.

  17. Improved Manganese Phosphate Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Conversion coatings 3 . Phosphating bath 20 AGrjC onln odd*. ta It .. c..soMV midP 1J.,alft. by block noc.mb) Work was conducted to determine the mechanism by...34 TABULAR DATA Table I Analyses of Solution and Coating for Phosphating Baths 4 of Di-ferlng Compositions 11 Atomic Absorption...manganese and iron phosphate coating: k * a. Mn(H 2PO4) 2 Nn-P0 4 + H3PO0 k2 k) b. 3MnHPO4 - Mn3 (P04) 2 + H3i’O4 k4 k5 c. Fe(H 2PO4) 2 -01 FeHPO4

  18. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT II) - a drug-associated autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Götz

    2009-11-01

    Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an acquired autoimmune disease characterised by isolated persistent thrombocytopenia and normal megakaryopoiesis. This definition also applies to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT II), a frequent side effect of heparin treatment. In HIT II, the immunogen is a coagulation active complex of heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4). By now, diagnostics of HIT II is often material and time consuming. Three groups of patients were investigated for HIT II antibodies (HIT II-AB): 54 hospitalised stroke patients, 87 hospitalised cardiac patients, and 71 patients on chronic haemodialysis, all treated with heparin. Furthermore, 100 healthy volunteers were investigated. For detection of HIT II-AB the innovative whole blood test PADA-HIT (PADA: platelet adhesion assay) was used. PADA-HIT quantifies the interaction of IgG antibodies with FcgammaIIA receptors by comparing the activation state of platelets in citrated and heparinised whole blood. The occurrence of HIT II-AB in blood was very high with 44 % of stroke patients, 69% of cardiac patients and 38% of haemodialysis patients compared to only 15% of healthy volunteers. This demonstrates a high incidence and a rapid onset of HIT II-AB in patients being acutely treated with heparin. HIT II is one of the most frequent and severe autoimmune diseases bearing a great thrombosis risk. PADA-HIT represents an innovative diagnostic method for detection of autoimmune antibodies of IgG type that are directed against platelet factor 4 (PF4)-heparin-complex. By early and fast diagnostics and appropriate treatment severe complications of HIT II can be prevented.

  19. The role of mAKAPβ in the process of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huixin; Liu, Baoxin; Hou, Lei; The, Erlinda; Li, Gang; Wang, Dongzhi; Jie, Qiqiang; Che, Wenliang; Wei, Yidong

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the central product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and this octapeptide contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. mAKAPβ is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that has the function of binding to the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) and confining the holoenzyme to discrete locations within the cell. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of mAKAPβ in AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the possible mechanisms involved. Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were treated with AngII. Subsequently, the morphology of the cardiomyocytes was observed and the expression of mAKAPβ and cardiomyocyte hypertrophic markers was measured. mAKAPβ‑shRNA was constructed for RNA interference; the expression of mAKAPβ and hypertrophic markers, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate in the AngII‑treated rat cardiomyocytes were detected following RNA interference. Simultaneously, changes in the expression levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK)2 in the cardiomyocytes were assessed. The cell size of the AngII-treated cardiaomyocytes was significantly larger than that of the untreated cardiomyocytes. The expression of hypertrophic markers and p-ERK2, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate were all significantly increased in the AngII‑treated cells. However, the expression of mAKAPβ remained unaltered in this process. RNA interference simultaneously inhibited the protein expression of mAKAPβ and p‑ERK2, and the hypertrophy of the cardiomyocytes induced by AngII was attenuated. These results demonstrate that AngII induces hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes, and mAKAPβ is possibly involved in this process. The effects of mAKAPβ on AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy may be associated with p-ERK2 expression.

  20. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes.

  1. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Xiao, Qiong; Peng, XiaoHua; Wang, HaiJing

    2011-12-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  2. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase prevents ROS-induced vascular contraction in angiotensin-II hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Tostes, Rita C; Webb, R Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is an enzyme that detoxifies aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDH2 deficiency is known to increase oxidative stress, which is the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and antioxidant defense activity. Increased ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and structural remodeling in hypertension. We hypothesized that ALDH2 plays a protective role to reduce vascular contraction in angiotensin-II (AngII) hypertensive mice. Endothelium-denuded aortic rings from C57BL6 mice, treated with AngII (3.6 μg/kg/min, 14 days), were used to measure isometric force development. Rings treated with daidzin (10 μmol/L), an ALDH2 inhibitor, potentiated contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) in AngII mice. Tempol (1 mmol/L) and catalase (600 U/mL) attenuated the augmented contractile effect of daidzin. In normotensive mice, contraction to PE in the presence of the daidzin was not different from control, untreated values. AngII aortic rings transfected with ALDH2 recombinant protein decreased contractile responses to PE compared with control. These data suggest that ALDH2 reduces vascular contraction in AngII hypertensive mice. Because tempol and catalase blocked the contractile response of the ALDH2 inhibitor, ROS generation by AngII may be decreased by ALDH2, thereby preventing ROS-induced contraction.

  3. Cholesterol stimulates and ceramide inhibits Sticholysin II-induced pore formation in complex bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alm, Ida; García-Linares, Sara; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2015-04-01

    The pore forming capacity of Sticholysin II (StnII; isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus) in bilayer membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) and either cholesterol or palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) has been examined. The aim of the study was to elucidate how the presence of differently ordered PSM domains affected StnII oligomerization and pore formation. Cholesterol is known to enhance pore formation by StnII, and our results confirmed this and provide kinetic information for the process. The effect of cholesterol on bilayer permeabilization kinetics was concentration-dependent. In the concentration regime used (2.5-10nmol cholesterol in POPC:PSM 80:20 by nmol), cholesterol also increased the acyl chain order in the fluid PSM domain and thus decreased bilayer fluidity, suggesting that fluidity per se was not responsible for cholesterol's effect. Addition of PCer (2.5-10nmol) to the POPC:PSM (80:20 by nmol) bilayers attenuated StnII-induced pore formation, again in a concentration-dependent fashion. This addition also led to the formation of a PCer-rich gel phase. Addition of cholesterol to PCer-containing membranes could partially reduce the inhibitory effect of PCer on StnII pore formation. We conclude that the physical state of PSM (as influenced by either cholesterol or PCer) affected StnII binding and pore formation under the conditions examined.

  4. Angiotensin II Induces Region-Specific Medial Disruption during Evolution of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Davis, Frank M.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; O’Connor, William N.; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II–induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor–null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45+ cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) is constitutive in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, Jan; Follin, Per; Forslund, Tony; Lindmark, Maria; Sundqvist, Tommy; Skogh, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    The objective was to study the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) in and NO production by human blood neutrophils and in in vivo exudated neutrophils. Cellular expression of NOS II was evaluated by flow cytometry in whole blood, in isolated blood neutrophils, and in neutrophils obtained by exudation in vivo into skin chambers. Neutrophil NOS II was also demonstrated by Western blotting. Uptake of 3H-labelled L-arginine was studied in vitro and NOS activity measured in a whole cell assay by the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline. In contrast to unseparated blood cells, NOS II was demonstrable both in isolated blood neutrophils and exudated cells. The failure to detect NOS II by flow cytometry in whole blood cells thus proved to be due to the quenching effect of hemoglobin. Western blotting revealed a 130 kD band corresponding to NOS II in isolated blood neutrophils, but detection was dependent on diisopropylfluorophosphate for proteinase inhibition. L-arginine was taken up by neutrophils, but enzymatic activity could not be demonstrated. We conclude that human neutrophils constitutively express NOS II, but that its demonstration by FITC-labelling is inhibited by hemoglobin-mediated quenching in whole blood samples.

  6. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chang, Yi-Chuang; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling; Chen, Chang-Yu

    2012-03-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  7. Treatment with Salvianolic Acid B restores endothelial function in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Liu, Jian; Lau, Chi Wai; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2017-04-07

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is one of the most abundant phenolic acids derived from the root of Danshen with potent anti-oxidative properties. The present study examined the vasoprotective effect of Sal B in hypertensive mice induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). Sal B (25 mg/kg/day) was administered via oral gavage for 11 days to Ang II (1.2 mg/kg/day)-infused C57BL/6J mice (8-10 weeks old). The vascular reactivity (both endothelium-dependent relaxations and contractions) in mouse arteries was examined by wire myography. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein level and localization of angiotensin AT1 receptors and the proteins involved in ROS formation were evaluated using dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. The changes of ROS generating proteins were also assessed in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to Ang II with and without co-treatment with Sal B (0.1 - 10 nM). Oral administration of Sal B reversed the Ang II-induced elevation of arterial systolic blood pressure in mice, augmented the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations and attenuated the exaggerated endothelium-dependent contractions in both aortas and renal arteries of Ang II-infused mice. In addition, Sal B treatment normalized the elevated levels of AT1 receptors, NADPH oxidase subunits (NOx-2 and NOx-4) and nitrotyrosine in arteries of Ang II-infused mice or in Ang II-treated HUVECs. In summary, the present study provided additional evidence demonstrating that Sal B treatment for 11 days reverses the impaired endothelial function and with a marked inhibition of AT1 receptor-dependent vascular oxidative stress. This vasoprotective and anti-oxidative action of Sal B most likely contributes to the anti-hypertensive action of the plant-derived compound.

  8. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Wenjian; Chen, Haiyang; Jiang, Jiandong; Kong, Weijia; Wang, Yiguang

    2010-01-15

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-{alpha}, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  9. Manganese Accumulates within Golgi Apparatus in Dopaminergic Cells as Revealed by Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese results in neurological symptoms referred to as manganism and is identified as a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease. In vitro, manganese induces cell death in the dopaminergic cells, but the mechanisms of manganese cytotoxicity are still unexplained. In particular, the subcellular distribution of manganese and its interaction with other trace elements needed to be assessed. Applying synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging, we found that manganese was located within the Golgi apparatus of PC12 dopaminergic cells at physiologic concentrations. At increasing concentrations, manganese accumulates within the Golgi apparatus until cytotoxic concentrations are reached resulting in a higher cytoplasmic content probably after the Golgi apparatus storage capacity is exceeded. Cell exposure to manganese and brefeldin A, a molecule known to specifically cause the collapse of the Golgi apparatus, results in the striking intracellular redistribution of manganese, which accumulates in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. These results indicate that the Golgi apparatus plays an important role in the cellular detoxification of manganese. In addition manganese exposure induces a decrease in total iron content, which could contribute to the overall neurotoxicity. PMID:22778823

  10. Manganese accumulates within golgi apparatus in dopaminergic cells as revealed by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Asunción; Devès, Guillaume; Roudeau, Stéphane; Cloetens, Peter; Bohic, Sylvain; Ortega, Richard

    2010-03-17

    Chronic exposure to manganese results in neurological symptoms referred to as manganism and is identified as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease. In vitro, manganese induces cell death in the dopaminergic cells, but the mechanisms of manganese cytotoxicity are still unexplained. In particular, the subcellular distribution of manganese and its interaction with other trace elements needed to be assessed. Applying synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging, we found that manganese was located within the Golgi apparatus of PC12 dopaminergic cells at physiologic concentrations. At increasing concentrations, manganese accumulates within the Golgi apparatus until cytotoxic concentrations are reached resulting in a higher cytoplasmic content probably after the Golgi apparatus storage capacity is exceeded. Cell exposure to manganese and brefeldin A, a molecule known to specifically cause the collapse of the Golgi apparatus, results in the striking intracellular redistribution of manganese, which accumulates in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. These results indicate that the Golgi apparatus plays an important role in the cellular detoxification of manganese. In addition manganese exposure induces a decrease in total iron content, which could contribute to the overall neurotoxicity.

  11. Evaluation of Manganese Phosphate Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    84003 _____________ 4 . TTLE and -bitle)5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EVALUATION OF MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COATINGS Final 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...rosion resistance of the Endurion phosphate was significantly superior to the 4 . basic manganese phosphate . Endurion phosphate with a Supplementary...OF CONTENTS Page STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 1 BACKGROUND 1 APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM 3 RESULTS 4 CONCLUSIONS 7 TABLES I. Falex Wear Life Test Procedure 8

  12. Protective actions of estrogen on angiotensin II-induced hypertension: role of central nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Singh, Minati; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-11-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) nitric oxide (NO) is involved in attenuated responses to ANG II in female mice, and 2) there is differential expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in response to systemic infusions of ANG II in males vs. females. Aortic blood pressure (BP) was measured in conscious mice with telemetry implants. N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 microg x kg(.-1)day(-1)), an inhibitor of NOS, was administrated into the lateral cerebral ventricle for 14 days before and during ANG II pump implantation. Central infusion of l-NAME augmented the pressor effects of systemic ANG II in females (Delta21.5 + or - 2.2 vs. Delta9.2 + or - 1.5 mmHg) but not in males (Delta29.4 + or - 2.5 vs. Delta30.1 + or - 2.5 mmHg). Central administration of N(5)-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO), a selective nNOS inhibitor, also significantly potentiated the increase in BP induced by ANG II in females (Delta17.5 + or - 3.2 vs. Delta9.2 + or - 1.5 mmHg). In gonadectomized mice, central l-NAME infusion did not affect the pressor response to ANG II in either males or females. Ganglionic blockade after ANG II infusion resulted in a greater reduction in BP in central l-NAME- or l-VNIO-treated females compared with control females. Western blot analysis of nNOS protein expression indicated that levels were approximately 12-fold higher in both the SFO and PVN of intact females compared with those in intact males. Seven days of ANG II treatment resulted in a further increase in nNOS protein expression only in intact females (PVN, to approximately 51-fold). Immunohistochemical studies revealed colocalization of nNOS and estrogen receptors in the SFO and PVN. These results suggest that NO attenuates the increase in BP induced by ANG II through reduced sympathetic outflow in females and that increased nNOS protein expression associated with the presence of female sex hormones plays a

  13. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  14. 7-Methylsulfinylheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rose, P; Faulkner, K; Williamson, G; Mithen, R

    2000-11-01

    Watercress is an exceptionally rich dietary source of beta-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). This compound inhibits phase I enzymes, which are responsible for the activation of many carcinogens in animals, and induces phase II enzymes, which are associated with enhanced excretion of carcinogens. In this study, we show that watercress extracts are potent inducers of quinone reductase (QR) in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells, a widely adopted assay for measuring phase II enzyme induction. However, contrary to expectations, this induction was not associated with PEITC (which is rapidly lost to the atmosphere upon tissue disruption due to its volatility) or a naturally occurring PEITC-glutathione conjugate, but with 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates (ITCs). While it was confirmed that PEITC does induce QR (5 microM required for a two-fold induction in QR), 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs were more potent inducers (0.2 microM and 0.5 microM, respectively, required for a two-fold induction in QR). Thus, while watercress contains three times more phenylethyl glucosinolate than methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, ITCs derived from methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates may be more important phase II enzyme inducers than PEITC, having 10 - to 25-fold greater potency. Analysis of urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) following consumption of watercress demonstrated the presence of N:-acetylcysteine conjugates of 7-methylsulfinylheptyl, 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs and PEITC, indicating that these ITCs are taken up by the gut and metabolized in the body. Watercress may have exceptionally good anticarcinogenic potential, as it combines a potent inhibitor of phase I enzymes (PEITC) with at least three inducers of phase II enzymes (PEITC, 7-methylsulfinylheptyl ITC and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITC). The study also demonstrates the application of LC-MS for the detection of complex glucosinolate-derived metabolites in

  15. NLRP3 Deficiency Improves Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension But Not Fetal Growth Restriction During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Usui, Fumitake; Kobayashi, Motoi; Komada, Tadanori; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kawashima, Akira; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by elevated blood pressure, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Although sterile inflammation appears to be involved, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence indicates that sterile inflammation is mediated through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes, composed of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1. Here we investigated the role of the NLRP3 inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia using Nlrp3(-/-) and Asc(-/-) (Nlrp3 and Asc deficient) pregnant mice. During pregnancy in mice, continuous infusion of high-dose angiotensin II (AngII) induced hypertension, proteinuria, and IUGR, whereas infusion of low-dose AngII caused hypertension alone. AngII-induced hypertension was prevented in Nlrp3(-/-) mice but not in Asc(-/-), indicating that NLRP3 contributes to gestational hypertension independently of ASC-mediated inflammasomes. Although NLRP3 deficiency had no effect on IUGR, it restored the IL-6 up-regulation in the placenta and kidney of AngII-infused mice. Furthermore, treatment with hydralazine prevented the development of gestational hypertension but not IUGR or IL-6 expression in the placenta and kidney. These findings demonstrate that NLRP3 contributes to the development of gestational hypertension independently of the inflammasomes and that IUGR and kidney injury can occur independent of blood pressure elevation during pregnancy.

  16. Sulodexide for hemodialysis anticoagulation in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Zbroch, Edyta; Rydzewska-Rosolowska, Alicja; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II (HIT II) is an immune-mediated prothrombotic state. It requires cessation of all forms of heparin exposure. In maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients, alternative anticoagulants (i.e. bivalirudin, danaparoid, fondaparinux) may be tried for HD procedure anticoagulation. Sulodexide (SLX) - a purified glycosaminoglycan preparation (80% heparan sulfate and 20% dermatan sulfate) - is not neutralized by platelet factor 4 and may be useful in HIT II. A 32-year-old man on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dilaysis (CAPD) and with protracted atrial fibrillation was given enoxaparin prophylaxis. On day 4, his platelets dropped from 119,000/micronL to 27,000/micronL and HIT II was diagnosed by positive heparin-induced platelet aggregation. While enoxaparin was withdrawn, the platelet count increased and remained stable. In the meantime, atrial fibrillation subsided but the patient developed pseudomonal peritonitis; the catheter was removed and the patient was switched to HD with SLX as an anticoagulant (bolus of 30 mg at HD onset). He was uneventfully treated with HD for 6 weeks and then reverted to CAPD. The widely available and inexpensive SLX may be a new, effective and potentially promising alternative anticoagulant in HD patients with HIT II.

  17. Glomerular angiotensin II receptors in gentamicin-induced renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Esquerro, E; Rivas-Cabãnero, L; López-Novoa, J M

    1995-11-01

    We evaluated the properties of glomerular angiotensin II receptors in renal glomeruli isolated from control rats and from rats with gentamicin-induced renal failure. There were no differences in the affinity of angiotensin II for its receptor between glomeruli from control and those from rats treated with gentamicin. Angiotensin II receptor density was lower in glomeruli from rats with renal failure than in those from control rats (985 +/- 71 in gentamicin treated rats vs. 1602 +/- 213 fmol/mg prot in controls). No significant differences were observed in renin activity in the supernatant from glomeruli isolated from control rats (3.74 +/- 0.29 ng angiotensin l/mL h) and those isolated from rats with gentamicin-induced renal failure (2.99 +/- 0.29 ng angiotensin l/mL h, p > 0.1). These findings do not support the contention of a role of angiotensin II in the development and maintenance of gentamicin-induced ARF.

  18. Formation and properties of nanostructured colloidal manganese oxide particles obtained through the thermally controlled transformation of manganese carbonate precursor phase.

    PubMed

    Škapin, Srečo D; Čadež, Vida; Suvorov, Danilo; Sondi, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Structurally and morphologically different colloidal manganese oxide solids, including manganosite (MnO), bixbyite (Mn2O3) and hausmannite (Mn(2+)[Mn(3+)]2O4), were obtained through the initial biomimetically induced precipitation of a uniform, nanostructured and micron-sized rhodochrosite (MnCO3) precursor phase and their subsequent thermally controlled transformation into oxide structures in air and Ar/H2 atmospheres. The structures and morphology of the obtained precipitates were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Their surface properties were investigated by electrophoretic mobilities (EPM) and specific surface area (SSA) measurements. The results showed that the structurally diverse, micron-sized, spherical manganese oxide particles exhibit unusual and fascinating nanostructured surface morphologies. These were developed through the coalescence of an initially formed, nanosized, crystalline, manganese carbonate precursor phase which, during the heating, transformed into coarser, irregular, elongated, micron-sized, manganese oxide solids. It was also shown that structural transformations and morphological tailoring were followed by significant changes in the physico-chemical properties of the obtained solids. Their SSA values were drastically reduced as a result of the progressive coalescence at the particle surfaces occurring at higher temperatures. The isoelectric points (IEPs) of the obtained manganese oxides were diverse. This is the consequence of their range of crystal-chemical properties that governed the complex physico-chemical processes at the interface of the manganese oxide solid and the aqueous solution. The results of this study may lead to a conceptually new method for the synthesis of high-performance, nanostructured, manganese oxide solids with desirable structural, morphological and surface properties.

  19. Modulation of in utero total body irradiation induced newborn mouse growth retardation by maternal manganese superoxide dismutase-plasmid liposome (MnSOD-PL) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Epperly, M W; Smith, T; Zhang, X; Goff, J P; Franicola, D; Greenberger, B; Komanduri, P; Wang, H; Greenberger, J S

    2011-06-01

    To determine the effects of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared with irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.4±0.9 per litter) compared with non-irradiated 3.0 Gy controls 4.9±1.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared with irradiated controls. However, E14 3 Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy-treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (P=0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected intravenously with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100 μg plasmid in 100 μl liposomes), then after 24 h, fetal mice, placentas and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-PCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation, which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice.

  20. Ultrasonic cavitation induced water in vegetable oil emulsion droplets--a simple and easy technique to synthesize manganese zinc ferrite nanocrystals with improved magnetization.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Manickam; Towata, Atsuya; Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Iida, Yasuo; Maiorov, Michail M; Blums, Elmars; Bhattacharya, Dipten; Sivakumar, Neelagesi; Ashok, M

    2012-05-01

    In the present investigation, synthesis of manganese zinc ferrite (Mn(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4)) nanoparticles with narrow size distribution have been prepared using ultrasound assisted emulsion (consisting of rapeseed oil as an oil phase and aqueous solution of Mn(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) acetates) and evaporation processes. The as-prepared ferrite was nanocrystalline. In order to remove the small amount of oil present on the surface of the ferrite, it was subjected to heat treatment at 300 °C for 3h. Both the as-prepared and heat treated ferrites have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), TGA/DTA, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. As-prepared ferrite is of 20 nm, whereas the heat treated ferrite shows the size of 33 nm. In addition, magnetic properties of the as-prepared as well as the heat treated ferrites have also been carried out and the results of which show that the spontaneous magnetization (σ(s)) of the heat treated sample (24.1 emu/g) is significantly higher than that of the as-synthesized sample (1.81 emu/g). The key features of this method are avoiding (a) the cumbersome conditions that exist in the conventional methods; (b) usage of necessary additive components (stabilizers or surfactants, precipitants) and (c) calcination requirements. In addition, rapeseed oil as an oil phase has been used for the first time, replacing the toxic and troublesome organic nonpolar solvents. As a whole, this simple straightforward sonochemical approach results in more phase pure system with improved magnetization.

  1. Manganese Dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, E.; House, C.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the anaerobic oxidation is not only important for understanding hydrocarbon degradation but it also important for understanding the global carbon cycle. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a large sink for methane consuming 5-20% of today's methane flux (Valentine and Reeburgh, 2000), yet the requirements for this process are not well understood. It has been suggested that no other electron acceptors other than sulfate can be used in the AOM (Nauhaus, 2005). However, our new data suggests that manganese, in the form of birnessite, can be used as an electron acceptor instead of sulfate (Beal et al., in prep). Methane seep sediment from the Eel River Basin, CA was incubated with methane, 13C-labeled methane, and carbon dioxide. Because the net result of the AOM is the production of carbon dioxide from methane, the rate of the AOM in each of the incubations can be determined by measuring the incorporation of 13C in the carbon dioxide. Using this method, it was found that cultures incubated with nitrate showed inhibition of the AOM, while cultures incubated with iron gave inconclusive results. The only positive results that were found for alternate electron acceptors are the incubations that were given manganese and no sulfate, which showed methane oxidation. Further, when more manganese was injected into these incubations, the rate of AOM increased. Preliminary analysis of the microbial population using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) targeting the mcr gene showed an unidentified organism in these cultures. Future work with TRFLP, as well as clone libraries, will help to identify the organisms responsible for this process. Nauhaus, K., 2005, Environmental regulation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane: a comparison of ANME-I and ANME-II communities: Environmental microbiology, v. 7, p. 98. Valentine, D.L., and Reeburgh, W.S., 2000, New perspectives on anaerobic methane oxidation: Environmental Microbiology, v. 2, p

  2. Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Baden, Susanne P; Looström, Jakob; Eriksson, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2015-10-01

    In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12 mg L(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn.

  3. Kinetics of manganese(III) acetate in acetic acid: Generation of Mn(III) with Co(III), Ce(IV), and dibromide radicals; reactions of Mn(III) with Mn(II), Co(II), hydrogen bromide, and alkali bromides

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, X.D.; Espenson, J.H.

    2000-04-03

    The reaction of cobalt(III) acetate with excess manganese(II) acetate in acetic acid occurs in two stages, since the two forms Co(IIIc) and Co(IIIs) are not rapidly equilibrated and thus react independently. The rate constants at 24.5 C are {kappa}{sub c} = 37.1 {+-} 0.6 L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and {kappa}{sub s} = 6.8 {+-} 0.2 L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at 24.5 C in glacial acetic acid. The Mn(III) produced forms a dinuclear complex with the excess of Mn(II). This was studied independently and is characterized by the rate constant (3.43 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 2} L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at 24.5 C. A similar interaction between Mn(III) and Co(II) is substantially slower, with {kappa} = (3.73 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup {minus}1} L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at 24.5 C. Mn(II) is also oxidized by Ce(IV), according to the rate law {minus}d[Ce(IV)]/dt = {kappa}[Mn(II)]{sup 2}[Ce(IV)], where {kappa} = (6.0 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup 4} L{sup 2} mol{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The reaction between Mn(II) and HBr{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}}, believed to be involved in the mechanism by which Mn(III) oxidizes HBr, was studied by laser photolysis; the rate constant is (1.48 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup 8} L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at {approximately}23 C in HOAc. Oxidation of Co(II) by HBr{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}} has the rate constant (3.0 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The oxidation of HBr by Mn(III) is second order with respect to [HBr]; {kappa} = (4.10 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 5} L{sup 2} mol{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at 4.5 C in 10% aqueous HOAc. Similar reactions with alkali metal bromides were studied; their rate constants are 17--23 times smaller. This noncomplementary reaction is believed to follow that rate law so that HBr{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}} and not Br{sup {sm_bullet}} (higher in Gibbs energy by 0.3 V) can serve as the intermediate. The analysis of the reaction steps then requires that the oxidation of HBr{sub 2

  4. FTY720 Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Podocyte Damage via Inhibiting Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ke; Zeng, Ping; Liang, Wei; Luo, Zhengyu; Wang, Yiman; Lv, Xifeng; Han, Qi; Yan, Miao

    2017-01-01

    FTY720, a new chemical substance derived from the ascomycete Isaria sinclairii, is used for treating multiple sclerosis, renal cancer, and asthma. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite and exists in red blood cells. FTY720 is a synthetic S1P analog which can block S1P evoking physiological effects. Recently studies show that S1P was participating in activated inflammation cells induced renal injury. The objective of this study was to assess the protective effect of FTY720 on kidney damage and the potential mechanism of FTY720 which alleviate podocyte injury in chronic kidney disease. In this study, we selected 40 patients with IgA nephropathy and examined their clinical characteristics. Ang II-infusion rat renal injury model was established to evaluate the glomeruli and tubulointerstitial lesion. The result showed that the concentration of S1P in serum and urine was positively correlated with IgA nephropathy patients' renal injury. FTY720 could reduce renal histological lesions induced by Ang II-infusion in rats. Moreover, FTY720 decreased S1P synthesis in Ang II-infusion rats via downregulation of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, FTY720 alleviated exogenous S1P-induced podocyte damage. In conclusion, FTY720 is able to attenuate S1P-induced podocyte damage via reducing inflammatory cytokines. PMID:28270699

  5. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  6. MiR-30-Regulated Autophagy Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:23326547

  7. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  8. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  9. Protective effect of angiotensin II-induced increase in nitric oxide in the renal medullary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Cowley, A W

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of intravenous infusion of subpressor doses of angiotensin (Ang II) on renal medullary blood flow (MBF), medullary partial oxygen pressure (PO2), and nitric oxide (NO) concentration under normal conditions and during reduction of the medullary nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in anesthetized rats. With laser Doppler flowmetry and polarographic measurement of PO2 with microelectrodes, Ang II (5 ng/kg per minute) did not alter renal cortical and medullary blood flows or medullary PO2. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was infused into the renal medullary interstitial space at a dose of 1.4 microg/kg per minute, a dose that did not significantly alter basal levels of MBF or PO2. Intravenous infusion of Ang II at the same dose in the presence of L-NAME decreased MBF by 23% and medullary PO2 by 28%, but it had no effect on cortical blood flow or arterial blood pressure. An in vivo microdialysis-oxyhemoglobin NO trapping technique was used in other rats to determine tissue NO concentrations using the same protocol. Ang II infusion increased tissue NO concentrations by 85% in the renal cortex and 150% in the renal medulla. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of L-NAME (1.4 microg/kg per minute) reduced medullary NO concentrations and substantially blocked Ang II-induced increases in NO concentrations in the renal medulla, but not in the renal cortex. Tissue slices of the renal cortex and medulla were studied to determine the effects of Ang II and L-NAME on the nitrite/nitrate production. Ang II stimulated the nitrite/nitrate production predominately in the renal medulla, which was significantly attenuated by L-NAME. We conclude that small elevations of circulating Ang II levels increase medullary NO production and concentrations, which plays an important role in buffering the vasoconstrictor effects of this peptide and in maintaining a constancy of MBF.

  10. Contribution of renal purinergic receptors to renal vasoconstriction in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Franco, Martha; Bautista, Rocio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Santamaría, José; Osorio, Horacio; Pacheco, Ursino; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the participation of purinergic P2 receptors in the regulation of renal function in ANG II-dependent hypertension, renal and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated in chronic ANG II-infused (14 days) and Sham rats during acute blockade of P2 receptors with PPADS. In addition, P2X1 and P2Y1 protein and mRNA expression were compared in ANG II-infused and Sham rats. Chronic ANG II-infused rats exhibited increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reductions in glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), and glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. PPADS restored afferent and efferent resistances as well as glomerular blood flow and SNGFR, but did not ameliorate the elevated arterial blood pressure. In Sham rats, PPADS increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reduced GFR and SNGFR. Since purinergic blockade may influence nitric oxide (NO) release, we evaluated the role of NO in the response to PPADS. Acute blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the vasodilatory effects of PPADS and reduced urinary nitrate excretion (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)) in ANG II-infused rats, indicating a NO-mediated vasodilation during PPADS treatment. In Sham rats, PPADS induced renal vasoconstriction which was not modified by l-NAME, suggesting blockade of a P2X receptor subtype linked to the NO pathway; the response was similar to that obtained with l-NAME alone. P2X1 receptor expression in the renal cortex was increased by chronic ANG II infusion, but there were no changes in P2Y1 receptor abundance. These findings indicate that there is an enhanced P2 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of afferent and efferent arterioles in chronic ANG II-infused rats, which contributes to the increased renal vascular resistance observed in ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  11. Angiotensin II induces kidney inflammatory injury and fibrosis through binding to myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD2)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Weixin; Han, Jibo; Zou, Chunpeng; Huang, Weijian; Yu, Weihui; Shan, Xiaoou; Lum, Hazel; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent biologically active product of RAS, is a key regulator of renal inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Ang II induces renal inflammatory injury and fibrosis through interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD2), the accessory protein of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) of the immune system. Results indicated that in MD2−/− mice, the Ang II-induced renal fibrosis, inflammation and kidney dysfunction were significantly reduced compared to control Ang II-infused wild-type mice. Similarly, in the presence of small molecule MD2 specific inhibitor L6H21 or siRNA-MD2, the Ang II-induced increases of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory molecules were prevented in tubular NRK-52E cells. MD2 blockade also inhibited activation of NF-κB and ERK. Moreover, MD2 blockade prevented the Ang II-stimulated formation of the MD2/TLR4/MyD88 signaling complex, as well as the increased surface binding of Ang II in NRK-52E cells. In addition, Ang II directly bound recombinant MD2 protein, rather than TLR4 protein. We conclude that MD2 is a significant contributor in the Ang II-induced kidney inflammatory injury in chronic renal diseases. Furthermore, MD2 inhibition could be a new and important therapeutic strategy for preventing progression of chronic renal diseases. PMID:28322341

  12. Captopril avoids hypertension, the increase in plasma angiotensin II but increases angiotensin 1-7 and angiotensin II-induced perfusion pressure in isolated kidney in SHR.

    PubMed

    Castro-Moreno, P; Pardo, J P; Hernández-Muñoz, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Del Valle-Mondragón, L; Pastelín-Hernández, G; Ibarra-Barajas, M; Villalobos-Molina, R

    2012-10-01

    We investigated captopril effects, an ACE inhibitor, on hypertension development, on Ang II and Ang-(1-7) plasma concentrations, on Ang II-induced contraction in isolated kidneys, and on kidney AT1R from spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Five weeks-old SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with captopril at 30 mg/kg/day, in drinking water for 2 or 14 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured, and isolated kidneys were tested for perfusion pressure and AT1R expression; while Ang II and Ang-(1-7) concentrations were determined in plasma. Captopril did not modify SBP in WKY rats and avoided its increase as SHR aged. Plasma Ang-II concentration was ∼4-5 folds higher in SHR rats, and captopril reduced it (P<0.05); while captopril increased Ang-(1-7) by ∼2 fold in all rat groups. Captopril increased Ang II-induced pressor response in kidneys of WKY and SHR rats, phenomenon not observed in kidneys stimulated with phenylephrine, a α₁-adrenoceptor agonist. Captopril did not modify AT1R in kidney cortex and medulla among rat strains and ages. Data indicate that captopril increased Ang II-induced kidney perfusion pressure but not AT₁R density in kidney of WKY and SHR rats, due to blockade of angiotensin II synthesis; however, ACE inhibitors may have other actions like activating signaling processes that could contribute to their diverse effects.

  13. Angiotensin II induces the expression of c-reactive protein via MAPK-dependent signal pathway in U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Liu, Juntian; Han, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Pang, Xiaoming; Mao, Junjun

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease in the vessel wall. As an inflammatory molecule, C-reactive protein (CRP) participates in all stages of atherosclerotic process. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) can stimulate the vascular cells to produce CRP, it is unknown whether Ang II induces CRP expression in macrophages. The present study was to observe effect of Ang II on CRP production and the related signal pathway in U937 macrophages so as to provide more evidence for the proinflammatory action of Ang II. The results showed that Ang II significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages in time- and concentration-dependent manners. AT(1) receptor blocker losartan blocked Ang II -induced CRP expression in mRNA and protein levels in U937 macrophages. Losartan and complex II inhibitor TIFA decreased Ang II -stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and antioxidant NAC completely abolished Ang II -induced CRP expression in U937 macrophages. The further study indicated that losartan, NAC, MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited ERK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation, and PD98059, SB203580 and NF-κB inhibitor PDTC reduced Ang II -induced mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages. These demonstrate that Ang II is capable of inducing CRP generation in macrophages via AT(1)-ROS-ERK1/2/p38MAPK-NF-κB signal pathway, which contributes to better understanding of the proinflammatory and proatherosclerotic actions of Ang II.

  14. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  15. Performance in He II of a centrifugal pump with a jet pump inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daney, D. E.; Ludtke, P. R.; Kashani, A.

    1989-05-01

    The tendency of turbopumps operating in He II to cavitate makes their use in zero gravity questionable because of the zero net positive suction head (NPSH) available at the pump inlet. This paper investigates a jet pump, positioned at the inlet of a centrifugal pump with a screw inducer, as a means of operating a centrifugal pump at zero or lower NPSH. Pump performance in He II was measured as a function of NPSH for six different combinations of primary and secondary nozzles. Suction heads down to -91 mm were measured for a 3-percent reduction in developed head. These are referenced to the leading edge of the screw inducer, which is 100 mm above the jet pump inlet. Because cavitation at the primary jet always precedes cavitation in the jet pump secondary nozzle, the reverse (pressure driven) flow through a porous plug as a means of obtaining a subcooled primary jet was also tested. These tests were inconclusive.

  16. Effects of a lipoxygenase inhibitor, panaxynol, on vascular contraction induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Takai, S; Jin, D; Kirimura, K; Ikeda, J; Sakaguchi, M; Baba, K; Fujita, T; Miyazaki, M

    1999-05-01

    We investigated whether a lipoxygenase inhibitor, panaxynol, affected the vascular contraction induced by angiotensin (Ang) II and the mean arterial pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Panaxynol suppressed dose-dependently the contractile responses induced by 30 nM Ang II in isolated intact and endothelial cell-denuded aorta in the hamster. IC50 values in the intact and endothelial cell-denuded aorta were 23 and 20 microM, respectively. In SHR, the mean arterial pressure after injection of 30 and 60 mg/kg panaxynol was reduced, and the maximum hypotensive values were 23 and 48 mmHg, respectively. Thus, lipoxygenase products may affect the renin-angiotensin system.

  17. Methamphetamine-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex II: roles of glutamate and peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey M; Quinton, Maria S; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2005-10-01

    High-dose methamphetamine (METH) is associated with long-term deficits in dopaminergic systems. Although the mechanism(s) which contributes to these deficits is not known, glutamate and peroxynitrite are likely to play a role. These factors are hypothesized to inhibit mitochondrial function, increasing the free radical burden and decreasing neuronal energy supplies. Previous studies suggest a role for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in mediating toxicity of METH. The purpose of the present studies was to determine whether METH administration selectively inhibits complex II of the ETC in rats. High-dose METH administration (10 mg/kg every 2 h x 4) rapidly (within 1 h) decreased complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) activity by approximately 20-30%. In addition, decreased activity of complex II-III, but not complex I-III, of the mitochondrial ETC was also observed 24 h after METH. This inhibition was not due to direct inhibition by METH or METH-induced hyperthermia and was specific to striatal brain regions. METH-induced decreases in complex II-III were prevented by MK-801 and the peroxynitrite scavenger 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-sulphonatophenyl) porphinato iron III. These findings provide the first evidence that METH administration, via glutamate receptor activation and peroxynitrite formation, selectively alters a specific site of the ETC.

  18. Characterization of the safener-induced glutathione S-transferase isoform II from maize.

    PubMed

    Holt, D C; Lay, V J; Clarke, E D; Dinsmore, A; Jepson, I; Bright, S W; Greenland, A J

    1995-01-01

    The safener-induced maize (Zea mays L.) glutathione S-transferase, GST II (EC 2.5.1.18) and another predominant isoform, GST I, were purified from extracts of maize roots treated with the safeners R-25788 (N,N-diallyl-2-dichloroacetamide) or R-29148 (3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidone). The isoforms GST I and GST II are respectively a homodimer of 29-kDa (GST-29) subunits and a heterodimer of 29- and 27-kDa (GST-27) subunits, while GST I is twice as active with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as GST II, GST II is about seven times more active against the herbicide, alachlor. Western blotting using antisera raised against GST-29 and GST-27 showed that GST-29 is present throughout the maize plant prior to safener treatment. In contrast, GST-27 is only present in roots of untreated plants but is induced in all the major aerial organs of maize after root-drenching with safener. The amino-acid sequences of proteolytic fragments of GST-27 show that it is related to GST-29 and identical to the 27-kDa subunit of GST IV.

  19. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  20. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  1. Angiotensin II protects cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Ahmadi, Ferogh; Jones, Susan M; Fariss, Marc W; Weyhenmeyer, James A; Zawada, W Michael

    2005-05-31

    In this study, we demonstrate that angiotensin II (Ang II) protects dopamine (DA) neurons from rotenone toxicity in vitro. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures from E15 rats were grown for 5 days and then cultured in the presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Acute exposure (20 h) to 20 nM rotenone reduced the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons by 50 +/- 6% when compared to untreated cultures. Pre-treatment of VM cultures with 100 nM Ang II decreased TH+ neuronal loss to 25 +/- 10% at the 20-nM rotenone concentration. Ang II in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist, losartan, was even more effective in protecting DA neurons showing a loss of only 13 +/- 4% at 20 nM rotenone. Conversely, the AT2R antagonist, PD123319, abolished the protective effects of Ang II. Furthermore, both the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801, and the antioxidant, alpha-tocopheryl succinate (vitamin E analogue), prevented rotenone-induced toxicity. Here, we show that acute exposure of VM cultures to the pesticide rotenone leads to dopaminergic neuronal cell death and that angiotensin acting through the AT2 receptor protects dopamine neurons from rotenone toxicity.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Limits Angiotensin II-Induced DNA Oxidation and Protein Nitration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pialoux, Vincent; Poulin, Marc J.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Chirico, Erica N.; Faes, Camille; Sola, Darlene Y.; Ahmed, Sofia B.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, celecoxib is associated with a lower cardiovascular risk, though the mechanism remains unclear. Angiotensin II is an important mediator of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of vascular disease. Cyclooxygenase-2 may modify the effects of angiotensin II though this has never been studied in humans. The purpose of the study was to test the effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition on plasma measures of oxidative stress, the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, and nitric oxide metabolites, both at baseline and in respose to Angiotensin II challenge in healthy humans. Measures of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, advanced oxidation protein products, nitrotyrosine, endothelin-1, and nitric oxide metabolites were assessed from plasma samples drawn at baseline and in response to graded angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min) before and after 14 days of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition in 14 healthy subjects (eight male, six female) in high salt balance, a state of maximal renin angiotensin system suppression. Angiotensin II infusion significantly increased plasma oxidative stress compared to baseline (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine; +17%; advanced oxidation protein products; +16%), nitrotyrosine (+76%). Furthermore, levels of endothelin-1 levels were significantly increased (+115%) and nitric oxide metabolites were significantly decreased (−20%). Cycloxygenase-2 inhibition significantly limited the increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, nitrotyrosine and the decrease in nitric oxide metabolites induced by angiotensin II infusion, though no changes in advanced oxidation protein products and endothelin-1 concentrations were observed. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition with celecoxib partially limited the angiotensin II-mediated increases in markers of oxidative stress in humans, offering a potential physiological pathway for the improved cardiovascular risk profile of this drug. PMID:28344559

  3. Alterations in the metabolism of endogenous trace metals due to cadmium, manganese and nickel - effect of partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.C.; Ahmad, I.; Kaur, G.; Hasan, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cadmium, manganese and nickel on the levels of copper, manganese, iron and zinc in liver was studied in sham operated and partially hepatectomized rats, 72 hrs after metal administration. Partial hepatectomy produced significant increase in the level of zinc and decrease in the levels of copper, iron and manganese. The metabolic disposition of these essential micronutrients were significantly altered as a result of cadmium administration in both the groups. Manganese and nickel had little effect and only induced the level of zinc.

  4. Bacteriology of Manganese Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, R. B.; Ehrlich, H. L.

    1968-01-01

    MnO2 reduction by aerobic growing cultures of Bacillus 29 and coccus 32, isolated from ferromanganese nodules, was assessed for 7 days. A 1-day lag was observed before the onset of MnO2 reduction by either culture. Addition of HgCl2 to a final concentration of about 10-3 M caused a rapid cessation of MnO2 reduction by the growing cultures. Neither culture reduced MnO2 when grown under continued anaerobiosis from the start of an experiment. However, if conditions were made anaerobic after MnO2 reduction was initiated, reduction continued at a rate only slightly lower than that under aerobic conditions. Resting-cell cultures reduced MnO2 equally well aerobically and anaerobically, provided that ferricyanide was present to serve as electron carrier. These findings showed that oxygen is needed for culture adaptation to MnO2 reduction, and that oxygen does not interfere with microbial MnO2 reduction itself. Both cultures caused sharp drops in the pH of the medium during MnO2 reduction: with coccus 32, during the entire incubation time; with Bacillus 29, for the first 3 days. The Eh of the medium fluctuated with either culture and never fell below 469 mv with Bacillus 29 and below 394 mv with coccus 32. The rates of glucose consumption and Mn2+ release by Bacillus 29 and coccus 32 were fairly constant, but the rates of lactate and pyruvate production were not. Although acid production undoubtedly helped in the reduction of pyrolusite (MnO2) by the bacteria, it did not appear to be important in the reduction of manganese oxide in ferromanganese nodules, as shown by the results with a nodule enrichment. PMID:16349802

  5. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease.

  6. Manganese uptake and streptococcal virulence.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A; McDevitt, Christopher A; Kitten, Todd

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcal solute-binding proteins (SBPs) associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters gained widespread attention first as ostensible adhesins, next as virulence determinants, and finally as metal ion transporters. In this mini-review, we will examine our current understanding of the cellular roles of these proteins, their contribution to metal ion homeostasis, and their crucial involvement in mediating streptococcal virulence. There are now more than 35 studies that have collected structural, biochemical and/or physiological data on the functions of SBPs across a broad range of bacteria. This offers a wealth of data to clarify the formerly puzzling and contentious findings regarding the metal specificity amongst this group of essential bacterial transporters. In particular we will focus on recent findings related to biological roles for manganese in streptococci. These advances will inform efforts aimed at exploiting the importance of manganese and manganese acquisition for the design of new approaches to combat serious streptococcal diseases.

  7. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of pharmacokinetics of manganese in mice using Manganese-52

    PubMed Central

    Aweda, Tolulope A.; Lewis, Benjamin C.; Gross, Rebecca B.; Lapi, Suzanne E.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is essential to life, and humans typically absorb sufficient quantities of this element from a normal healthy diet; however, chronic, elevated ingestion or inhalation of manganese can be neurotoxic, potentially leading to manganism. Although imaging of large amounts of accumulated Mn(II) is possible by MRI, quantitative measurement of the biodistribution of manganese, particularly at the trace level, can be challenging. In this study, we produced the positron-emitting radionuclide 52Mn (t1/2 = 5.6 d) by proton bombardment (Ep<15 MeV) of chromium metal, followed by solid-phase isolation by cation-exchange chromatography. An aqueous solution of [52Mn]MnCl2 was nebulized into a closed chamber with openings through which mice inhaled the aerosol, and a separate cohort of mice received intravenous (IV) injections of [52Mn]MnCl2. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed at 1 h and 1 d post-injection/inhalation (p.i.). In both trials, we observed uptake in lungs and thyroid at 1 d p.i. Manganese is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, as confirmed in our studies following IV injection (0.86%ID/g, 1 d p.i.) and following inhalation of aerosol, (0.31%ID/g, 1 d p.i.). Uptake in salivary gland and pancreas were observed at 1 d p.i. (0.5 and 0.8%ID/g), but to a much greater degree from IV injection (6.8 and 10%ID/g). In a separate study, mice received IV injection of an imaging dose of [52Mn]MnCl2, followed by in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo biodistribution. The results from this study supported many of the results from the biodistribution-only studies. In this work, we have confirmed results in the literature and contributed new results for the biodistribution of inhaled radiomanganese for several organs. Our results could serve as supporting information for environmental and occupational regulations, for designing PET studies utilizing 52Mn, and/or for predicting the biodistribution of manganese-based MR contrast agents. PMID

  8. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Fruit-juice concentrate of Asian plum inhibits growth signals of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Takekoshi, Susumu; Gato, Nobuki; Utatsu, Hisao; Motley, Evangeline D; Eguchi, Kunie; Fitzgerald, Trinita G; Mifune, Mizuo; Frank, Gerald D; Eguchi, Satoru

    2002-12-27

    Bainiku-ekisu, the fruit-juice concentrate of the Oriental plum (Prunus mume) has recently been shown to improve human blood fluidity. We have shown that angiotensin II (AngII) stimulates growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To better understanding the possible cardiovascular protective effect of Bainiku-ekisu, we have studied whether Bainiku-ekisu inhibits AngII-induced growth promoting signals in VSMCs. Bainiku-ekisu markedly inhibited AngII-induced EGF receptor transactivation. H(2)O(2)-induced EGF receptor transactivation was also inhibited by Bainiku-ekisu. Thus, Bainiku-ekisu markedly inhibited AngII-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. However, EGF-induced ERK activation was not affected by Bainiku-ekisu. AngII stimulated leucine uptake in VSMCs that was significantly inhibited by Bainiku-ekisu. Also, Bainiku-ekisu possesses a potent antioxidant activity. Since the activation of EGF receptor, ERK and the production of ROS play central roles in mediating AngII-induced vascular remodeling, these data suggest that Bainiku-ekisu could exert a powerful cardiovascular protective effect with regard to cardiovascular diseases.

  10. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  11. SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-04-22

    The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

  12. Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic catalysts for water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahimeh; Aro, Eva-Mari; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2012-10-07

    There has been a tremendous surge in research on the synthesis of various metal compounds aimed at simulating the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) of photosystem II (PSII). This is crucial because the water oxidation half reaction is overwhelmingly rate-limiting and needs high over-voltage (approx. 1 V), which results in low conversion efficiencies when working at current densities required for hydrogen production via water splitting. Particular attention has been given to the manganese compounds not only because manganese has been used by nature to oxidize water but also because manganese is cheap and environmentally friendly. The manganese-calcium cluster in PSII has a dimension of about approximately 0.5 nm. Thus, nano-sized manganese compounds might be good structural and functional models for the cluster. As in the nanometre-size of the synthetic models, most of the active sites are at the surface, these compounds could be more efficient catalysts than micrometre (or bigger) particles. In this paper, we focus on nano-sized manganese oxides as functional and structural models of the WOC of PSII for hydrogen production via water splitting and review nano-sized manganese oxides used in water oxidation by some research groups.

  13. Characterization of iron and manganese precipitates from an in situ ground water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Mettler, S; Abdelmoula, M; Hoehn, E; Schoenenberger, R; Weidler, P; von Gunten, U

    2001-01-01

    Aquifer samples from the precipitation zone of an in situ iron and manganese removal plant that was operated for 10 years were analyzed for iron and manganese minerals. Measurements were performed by various chemical extraction techniques (5 M HCI, 0.008 M Ti(III)-EDTA, 0.114 M ascorbic acid), X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Chemical extractions showed that iron was precipitated as ferric oxides, whereas manganese was not oxidized but deposited as Mn(II) probably within carbonates. The ferric oxides in particular accumulate preferentially in the smaller grain- size fractions. This tendency was observed to a lesser extent for manganese. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the ferric oxides were mainly crystalline (goethite, 50% to 100% of the iron). Ferrihydrite was found as well, but only as a minor fraction (< or = 12%). Pure manganese minerals were not found by X-ray diffraction. The precipitated amounts of iron (5 to 27 micromol/g Fe as ferric oxide) and manganese (1 to 4 micromol/g Mn) during 10 years operation of the treatment plant agree with values that were estimated from operational parameters (9 to 31 micromol/g Fe and 3 to 6 micromol/g Mn). Considering the small amounts of precipitated iron and manganese, no long-term risks of clogging of the aquifer are expected.

  14. Angiotensin II and VEGF are involved in angiogenesis induced by short-term exercise training.

    PubMed

    Amaral, S L; Papanek, P E; Greene, A S

    2001-09-01

    Results from our laboratory have suggested a pathway involving angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in angiogenesis induced by electrical stimulation. The present study investigated if similar mechanisms underlie the angiogenesis induced by short-term exercise training. Seven days before training and throughout the training period, male Sprague-Dawley rats received either captopril or losartan in their drinking water. Rats underwent a 3-day treadmill training protocol. The tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles were harvested under anesthesia and lightly fixed in formalin (vessel density) or frozen in liquid nitrogen (VEGF expression). In controls, treadmill training resulted in a significant increase in vessel density in all muscles studied. However, the angiogenesis induced by exercise was completely blocked by either losartan or captopril. Western blot analysis showed that VEGF expression was increased in the exercised control group, and both losartan and captopril blocked this increase. The role of VEGF was directly confirmed using a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. These results confirm the role of angiotensin II and VEGF in angiogenesis induced by exercise.

  15. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang; Yang, Hua

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  16. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Woodward W; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet-it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn(2+), and ultimately water.

  17. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet—it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn2+, and ultimately water.

  18. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  19. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

  20. Swimming training prevents fat deposition and decreases angiotensin II-induced coronary vasoconstriction in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, Patrick Wander; Claudio, Erick Roberto Gonçalves; da Silva Gonçalves, Washington Luiz; Gouvêa, Sonia Alves; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; de Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic swimming training (ST) on the deposition of abdominal fat and vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II (ANG II) in the coronary arterial bed of estrogen deficient rats. Twenty-eight 3-month old Wistar female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary sham (SS), sedentary-ovariectomized (SO), swimming-trained sham (STS) and swimming-trained ovariectomized (STO). ST protocol consisted of a continuous 60-min session, with a 5% BW load attached to the tail, completed 5 days/week for 8-weeks. The retroperitoneal, parametrial, perirenal and inguinal fat pads were measured. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and a concentration-response curve to ANG II in the coronary bed was constructed using the Langendorff preparation. Ovariectomy (OVX) significantly reduced 17-β-estradiol plasma levels in SO and STO groups (p<0.05). The STO group had a significantly reduced retroperitoneal and parametrial fat pad compared with the SO group (p<0.05). IHR values were similar in all groups; however, baseline CPP was significantly reduced in the SO, STS and STO groups compared with the SS group (p<0.05). ANG II caused vasoconstriction in the coronary bed in a concentration-dependent manner. The SO group had an increased response to ANG II when compared with all other experimental groups (p<0.05), which was prevented by 8-weeks of ST in the STO group (p<0.05). OVX increased ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the coronary vascular bed and abdominal fat pad deposition. Eight weeks of swimming training improved these vasoconstrictor effects and decreased abdominal fat deposition in ovariectomized rats.

  1. Fibulin-2 is Essential for Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Fibrosis Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaukat A.; Dong, Hailong; Joyce, Jennifer; Sasaki, Takako; Chu, Mon-Li; Tsuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is an ominous pathological process in failing myocardium, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We recently reported that loss of an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, fibulin-2, protected against ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in association with absence of activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling and suppressed up-regulation of ECM protein expression during myocardial remodeling. Here, we investigated a role of fibulin-2 in the development of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by continuous pressor-dosage of Ang II infusion. Both wild type (WT) and fibulin-2 null (Fbln2KO) mice developed comparable hypertension and myocardial hypertrophy by Ang II infusion. However, myocardial fibrosis with significant up-regulation of collagen type I and III mRNA was only seen in WT but not in Fbln2KO mice.Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and its downstream signal, Smad2, were significantly up-regulated in WT by Ang II, whereas there were no Ang II-induced changes in Flbn2KO, suggesting fibulin-2 is necessary for Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling that induces myocardial fibrosis. To test whether fibulin-2 is sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β up-regulation, isolated Flbn2KO cardiac fibroblasts were treated with Ang II after transfecting with fibulin-2 expression vector or pretreating with recombinant fibulin-2 protein. Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling in Fbln2KO cells was partially rescued by exogenous fibulin-2, suggesting that fibulin-2 is required and probably sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β activation. Smad2 phosphorylation was induced just by adding recombinant fibulin-2 to KO cells, suggesting that extracellular interaction between fibulin-2 and latent TGF-β triggered initial TGF-β activation. Our study indicates that Ang II cannot induce TGF-β activation without fibulin-2 and that fibulin-2 pl