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Sample records for manganese iron copper

  1. Metabolism of manganese, iron, copper, and selenium in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.Y.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen male Holstein calves were used to study manganese and iron metabolism. The calves were fed one of the following diets for 18 days: control, control + iron, control + manganese, and control + iron and manganese. All calves were dosed orally with manganese-54. Tissue concentrations of manganese, iron and manganese-54 were determined. Small intestinal iron was lower in calves fed the high manganese diet than in controls. Tissue manganese-54 was lower in calves fed a high manganese diet. Fecal manganese content increased in calves fed both high manganese and high manganese-high iron diets. Serum total iron was not affected by the dietary treatments. To study the effects of high dietary levels of copper and selenium on the intracellular distributions of these two elements in liver and kidney cytosol, calves were fed one of four diets for 15 days. These were 0 and 100 ppM supplemental copper and 0 and 1 ppM added selenium. The control diet containing 0.1 ppM of selenium and 15 ppM of copper. All calves were orally dosed 48 hrs prior to sacrifice with selenium-75. A high copper diet increased copper concentrations in all intracellular liver fractions and most kidney fractions. Only the effects in the liver were significant. Less copper was found in the mitochondria fractions in liver and kidney of calves fed a high selenium diet. Three major copper-binding protein peaks were separated from the soluble fractions of calf liver and kidney. Peak 1 appeared to be the major copper-binding protein in liver and kidney cytosol of copper-loaded animals. Added selenium alone or in combination with copper accentuated the copper accumulation in this peak. Most of selenium-75 was recovered in the same peak as the copper. The results of this experiment indicated that the large molecular proteins in liver and kidney cytosol of calves play an important role in copper and selenium-75 metabolism. (ERB)

  2. Interactions of manganese, iron, and copper in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paohwa.

    1989-01-01

    In study I, plasma levels of manganese and iron were measured after an oral load was ingested. Four hourly samples of plasma were collected postdose. The ingestion of a dose of 40 mg Mn alone produced a typical response in plasma manganese, which peaked at either the first or second hour postdose. When a combined dose of 40 mg inorganic Fe plus 40 mg Mn was given, the plasma uptake of manganese was substantially inhibited when compared to a dose of 40 mg Mn alone. When the same quantity of heme Fe was substituted for the inorganic Fe in the load of inorganic Fe plus Mn, no depression in plasma manganese was observed. In study II, eight healthy female subjects were fed a baseline Mn-adequate diet of conventional foods for 18 days, followed by a Mn-deficient semi-purified diet for 41 days. Dietary levels of iron and copper averaged 17.7 mg and 4.3 mg/day, respectively, for both diets. Mean iron balance increased significantly from initial levels of 2.20 {plus minus} 1.07 mg/d to 5.02 {plus minus} 1.14 mg/d at the end of the Mn-deficient period. Parameters of iron status were not influenced by the variations of dietary manganese. In contrast, mean copper balance decreased from 2.61 {plus minus} 0.1 mg/d to 0.91 {plus minus} 0.4 mg/d at the end of the Mn-deficient period. Correspondingly, plasma copper and serum ceruloplasmin decreased from 18.57 {plus minus} 1.1 {mu}mol/L to 15.27 {plus minus} 0.94 {mu}mol/L and 269.1 {plus minus} 14.6 mg/L to 205.6 {plus minus} 17.8 mg/L., respectively.

  3. Iron, Manganese and Copper Release from Synthetic Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic stir-flow dissolution experiments were performed on iron- (Fe-SHA), manganese- (Mn-SHA), and copper- (Cu-SHA) containing synthetic hydroxyapatites. Solution treatments consisted of de-ionized water, citric acid and DTPA. Initially, Mn concentrations were higher than Cu concentrations and Fe concentrations were the lowest in all treatments. At later times Mn and Cu concentrations dropped in the DTPA treatment while Fe rose to the concentration similar to Mn and Cu. At all times, metal release concentrations in the water and citric acid treatments followed the trend of Mn>Cu>Fe. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffraction data and ^31P NMR indicated that the metals substituted for Ca in the SHA structure. However, EPR data suggested that a metal (hydr)oxide phase existed either on the SHA surface or between the SHA crystallites. The metal concentration trend of Mn>Cu>Fe suggested that the initial solution metal concentrations are dependent on the dissolution of (hydr)oxides from SHA surfaces or between SHA crystallites. Similar metal concentrations at later times in the DTPA experiments suggests that metal concentrations were controlled by the release of Mn, Cu, or Fe from the SHA structure.

  4. Occupational exposure to manganese, copper, lead, iron, mercury and zinc and the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gorell, J M; Johnson, C C; Rybicki, B A; Peterson, E L; Kortsha, G X; Brown, G G; Richardson, R J

    1999-01-01

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in metropolitan Detroit to assess occupational exposures to manganese, copper, lead, iron, mercury and zinc as risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). Non-demented men and women 50 years of age who were receiving primary medical care at HFHS were recruited, and concurrently enrolled cases (n = 144) and controls (n = 464) were frequency-matched for sex, race and age (+/- 5 years). A risk factor questionnaire, administered by trained interviewers, inquired about every job held by each subject for 6 months from age 18 onward, including a detailed assessment of actual job tasks, tools and environment. An experienced industrial hygienist, blinded to subjects' case-control status, used these data to rate every job as exposed or not exposed to one or more of the metals of interest. Adjusting for sex, race, age and smoking status, 20 years of occupational exposure to any metal was not associated with PD. However, more than 20 years exposure to manganese (Odds Ratio [OR] = 10.61, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.06, 105.83) or copper (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.06,5.89) was associated with PD. Occupational exposure for > 20 years to combinations of lead-copper (OR = 5.24, 95% CI = 1.59, 17.21), lead-iron (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.07,7.50), and iron-copper (OR = 3.69, 95% CI = 1.40,9.71) was also associated with the disease. No association of occupational exposure to iron, mercury or zinc with PD was found. A lack of statistical power precluded analyses of metal combinations for those with a low prevalence of exposure (i.e., manganese, mercury and zinc). Our findings suggest that chronic occupational exposure to manganese or copper, individually, or to dual combinations of lead, iron and copper, is associated with PD.

  5. Content of total iron, copper and manganese in liver of animals during hypokinesia, muscle activity and process of recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapovich, G. M.; Taneyeva, G. V.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the content of total iron, copper and manganese in the liver of animals is altered depending on the intensity and duration of their swimming. Hypodynamia for 7 days does not alter the concentration of iron, but sufficiently increases the content of copper and manganese. The barometric factor effectively influences the maintenance of constancy in the content of microelements accumulated in the liver after intensive muscle activity.

  6. The Proteome of Copper, Iron, Zinc, and Manganese Micronutrient Deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott I.; Castruita, Madeli; Malasarn, Davin; Urzica, Eugen; Erde, Jonathan; Page, M. Dudley; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals such as copper, iron, zinc, and manganese play important roles in several biochemical processes, including respiration and photosynthesis. Using a label-free, quantitative proteomics strategy (MSE), we examined the effect of deficiencies in these micronutrients on the soluble proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We quantified >103 proteins with abundances within a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrated statistically significant changes in ∼200 proteins in each metal-deficient growth condition relative to nutrient-replete media. Through analysis of Pearson's coefficient, we also examined the correlation between protein abundance and transcript abundance (as determined via RNA-Seq analysis) and found moderate correlations under all nutritional states. Interestingly, in a subset of transcripts known to significantly change in abundance in metal-replete and metal-deficient conditions, the correlation to protein abundance is much stronger. Examples of new discoveries highlighted in this work include the accumulation of O2 labile, anaerobiosis-related enzymes (Hyd1, Pfr1, and Hcp2) in copper-deficient cells; co-variation of Cgl78/Ycf54 and coprogen oxidase; the loss of various stromal and lumenal photosynthesis-related proteins, including plastocyanin, in iron-limited cells; a large accumulation (from undetectable amounts to over 1,000 zmol/cell) of two COG0523 domain-containing proteins in zinc-deficient cells; and the preservation of photosynthesis proteins in manganese-deficient cells despite known losses in photosynthetic function in this condition. PMID:23065468

  7. The role of manganese and copper in the eutectoid transformation of spheroidal graphite cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, J.; Boudot, A.; Gerval, V.; Oquab, D.; Santos, H.

    1997-10-01

    The decomposition of austenite to ferrite plus graphite or to pearlite in spheroidal graphite (SG) cast iron is known to depend on a number of factors among which are the nodule count, the cooling rate, and the alloying additions (Si, Mn, Cu, etc.). This study was undertaken in order to deepen the understanding of the effect of alloying with Mn and/or Cu on the eutectoid reaction. For this purpose, differential thermal analyses (DTAs) were carried out in which samples were subjected to a short homogenization treatment designed to smooth out the microsegregations originating from the solidification step. The effect of various additions of copper and manganese and of the cooling rate on the temperature of the onset of the stable and metastable eutectoid reactions was investigated. The experimental results can be explained if the appropriate reference temperature is used. The cooling rate affects the temperature of the onset of the ferrite plus graphite growth in the same way as for the eutectic reaction, with a measured undercooling that can be extrapolated to a zero value when the cooling rate is zero. The growth undercooling of pearlite had values that were in agreement with similar data obtained on silicon steels. The detrimental effect of Mn on the growth kinetics of ferrite during the decomposition of austenite in the stable system is explained in terms of the driving force for diffusion of carbon through the ferrite ring around the graphite nodules. Finally, it is found that copper can have a pearlite promoter role only when combined with a low addition of manganese.

  8. Copper, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, and zinc levels in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Naveed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Bilal; Jalbani, Nussarat; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas

    2008-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the metabolism of several trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus and that these nutrients might have specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of this disease. The aim of present study was to compare the level of essential trace elements, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of patients who have diabetes mellitus type 2 (n = 257), with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 166), age ranged (45-75) of both genders. The element concentrations were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-induced acid digestion. The validity and accuracy was checked by conventional wet-acid-digestion method and using certified reference materials. The overall recoveries of all elements were found in the range of (97.60-99.49%) of certified values. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Zn, Mn, and Cr were significantly reduced in blood and scalp-hair samples of diabetic patients as compared to control subjects of both genders (p < 0.001). The urinary levels of these elements were found to be higher in the diabetic patients than in the age-matched healthy controls. In contrast, high mean values of Cu and Fe were detected in scalp hair and blood from patients versus the nondiabetic subjects, but the differences found in blood samples was not significant (p < 0.05). These results are consistent with those obtained in other studies, confirming that deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  9. Zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Alikhan, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The Sudbury basin has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. Elevated concentrations of copper, cadmium, and nickel have been reported in crayfish populations close to the Sudbury smelting works. The present study compares concentrations of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. These metals were selected since they are known to be emitted in moderately high quantities into the Sudbury environment as byproduct of the smelting process. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish were also examined to determined specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  10. Effect of excessive dietary fluoride on nutrient digestibility and retention of iron, copper, zinc, and manganese in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Xu, Z R; Wang, Y Z

    2005-11-01

    Ninety-six crossbred growing pigs were used to evaluate the effects of fluoride levels on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and the retention of minerals in tissues. Four dietary treatments were formulated by supplementing fluorine (as NaF) to a corn-soybean basal diet (39.75 mg/kg F) to provide the following added fluorine levels: 0, 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg fluorine. The results showed pigs of the 100 and 150 mg/kg fluorine-added groups had decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed gain ratio (F/G) compared to the control (p < 0.05). Apparent digestibility of protein and calcium in 100 and 150 mg/kg fluorine-treated groups was significantly lower than that of the control (p < 0.05). On the other hand, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese levels in most tissues of the 100 and 150 mg/kg fluorine groups were markedly changed compared to the control (p < 0.05). However, growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and mineral concentrations in all tissues of pigs were not significantly affected by the addition of 50 mg/kg fluorine (p > 0.05). Thus, this study suggested that excess fluoride levels could decrease growth performance and change the retention of iron, copper, zinc, and manganese in pigs.

  11. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  12. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities.

  13. Regional distributions of manganese, iron, copper, and zinc in the brains of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Tarohda, Tohru; Ishida, Yasushi; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Amano, Ryohei

    2005-09-01

    Time courses of changes in manganese, iron, copper, and zinc concentrations were examined in regions of the brain of a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentrations were simultaneously determined in brain section at the level of the substantia nigra 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days after the 6-OHDA treatment and compared with those of control rats. The distributions of these elements were obtained for 18 regions of the sagittal section (1-mm thick). The ICP-MS results indicated that Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn levels of the 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian brain were observed to increase in all regions that lay along the dopaminergic pathway. In the substantia nigra, the increase in Mn level occurred rapidly from 3 to 7 days and preceded those in the other elements, reaching a plateau in the 6-OHDA brain. Iron and Zn levels increased gradually until 7 days and then increased rapidly from 7 to 10 days. The increase in the copper level was slightly delayed. In other regions, such as the globus pallidus, putamen, and amygdala, the levels of Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn increased with time after 6-OHDA treatment, although the time courses of their changes were region-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the roles of Mn and Fe in the induction of neurological symptoms and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the development of Parkinson's disease. Manganese may hold the key to disturbing cellular Fe homeostasis and accelerating Fe levels, which play the most important role in the development of Parkinson's disease.

  14. Intestinal DMT1 is critical for iron absorption in the mouse but is not required for the absorption of copper or manganese.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Ali; Anthony, Sarah R; Nose, Yasuhiro; Engevik, Melinda A; Niespodzany, Eric J; Barrientos, Tomasa; Öhrvik, Helena; Worrell, Roger T; Thiele, Dennis J; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2015-10-15

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a widely expressed iron-preferring membrane-transport protein that serves a critical role in erythroid iron utilization. We have investigated its role in intestinal metal absorption by studying a mouse model lacking intestinal DMT1 (i.e., DMT1(int/int)). DMT1(int/int) mice exhibited a profound hypochromic-microcytic anemia, splenomegaly, and cardiomegaly. That the anemia was due to iron deficiency was demonstrated by the following observations in DMT1(int/int) mice: 1) blood iron and tissue nonheme-iron stores were depleted; 2) mRNA expression of liver hepcidin (Hamp1) was depressed; and 3) intraperitoneal iron injection corrected the anemia, and reversed the changes in blood iron, nonheme-iron stores, and hepcidin expression levels. We observed decreased total iron content in multiple tissues from DMT1(int/int) mice compared with DMT1(+/+) mice but no meaningful change in copper, manganese, or zinc. DMT1(int/int) mice absorbed (64)Cu and (54)Mn from an intragastric dose to the same extent as did DMT1(+/+) mice but the absorption of (59)Fe was virtually abolished in DMT1(int/int) mice. This study reveals a critical function for DMT1 in intestinal nonheme-iron absorption for normal growth and development. Further, this work demonstrates that intestinal DMT1 is not required for the intestinal transport of copper, manganese, or zinc.

  15. Elements in rice on the Swedish market: part 2. Chromium, copper, iron, manganese, platinum, rubidium, selenium and zinc.

    PubMed

    Jorhem, L; Astrand, C; Sundstrom, B; Baxter, M; Stokes, P; Lewis, J; Grawe, K P

    2008-07-01

    A survey of the levels of some essential and non-essential trace elements in different types of rice available on the Swedish retail market was carried out in 2001-03. The types of rice included long and short grain, brown, white, and parboiled white. The mean levels found were: chromium (Cr) = 0.008 mg kg(-1), copper (Cu) = 1.9 mg kg(-1), iron (Fe) = 4.7 mg kg(-1), manganese (Mn) = 16 mg kg(-1), platinum (Pt) < 0.0003 mg kg(-1), rubidium (Rb) = 3.3 mg kg(-1), selenium (Se) =0.1 mg kg(-1); and zinc (Zn) = 15 mg kg(-1). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the determination of Pt, Rb, and Se, after acid digestion. All other elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after dry ashing. Intake calculations were performed and it was concluded that rice may contribute considerably to the daily requirements of the essential elements Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn if rice consumption is high. The levels of some elements, e.g. Fe and Mn, were significantly higher in brown compared with white rice.

  16. Alterations of serum zinc, copper, manganese, iron, calcium, and magnesium concentrations and the complexity of interelement relations in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Shohag, Hasanuzzaman; Ullah, Ashik; Qusar, Shalahuddin; Rahman, Mustafizur; Hasnat, Abul

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the status of serum trace elements: zinc, copper, manganese, iron, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. Forty-eight obsessive-compulsive disorder patients and 48 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Patients were recruited from Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University by random sampling. Serum trace element concentrations were determined using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (for zinc, copper, iron, calcium, and magnesium) as well as graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (for manganese). Data were analyzed using independent t test, Pearson's correlation analysis, regression analysis, and ANOVA. Statistical analysis of these data showed a definite pattern of variation among certain elements in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder compared to controls. In patients' serum, zinc, iron, and magnesium concentrations decreased significantly (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Serum manganese and calcium concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients compared to the controls. These data showed a definite imbalance in the interelement relations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients compared to controls and therefore suggest a disturbance in the element homeostasis.

  17. Selenium, copper, zinc, iron and manganese content of seven meat cuts from Hereford and Braford steers fed pasture in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M C; Ramos, A; Saadoun, A; Brito, G

    2010-03-01

    Tenderloin (T), eye of rump (E), striploin (S), eye round (ER), tri-tip (TT), rib-eye roll (RR) and three rib plate-flank on (RP) meat cuts were evaluated. Selenium contents ranged between 0.42 and 1.20 mg/kg wet tissue (wt) in Hereford (H) breed and between 0.49 and 1.3 mg/kg wt in Braford (B) breed. In H and B breeds, T, TT and RP, and TT and RP were the richest cuts in selenium, respectively. Copper contents ranged between 0.25 and 1.04 mg/kg wt in H, and between 0.19 and 1.09 mg/kg wt in B. In H breed, RP had significantly more Cu than ER, TT, and RR. In B breed, ER and RR show a significant lower Cu level in comparison to the other meat cuts. Zinc contents ranged between 23 and 72.7 mg/kg wt in H, and between 23 and 63.9 mg/kg wt in B. RP is the richest cut in Zn compared to the other cuts in the two breeds. Iron contents ranged between 16.4 and 48.2 mg/kg wt in H, and between 14.2 and 47.9 mg/kg wt in B. In H breed, RR shows a lower content compared to the other cuts, except RP and S. In B breed, RR had the lowest level of Fe compared to the other cuts, except RP and T. Manganese contents ranged between 0.05 and 0.17 mg/kg wt in H, and between 0.04 and 0.48 mg/kg wt in B. In H no differences were detected between cuts. In B breed, ER cut shows the highest level of Mn.

  18. The neurotoxicity of iron, copper and manganese in Parkinson's and Wilson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Dusek, Petr; Roos, Per M; Litwin, Tomasz; Schneider, Susanne A; Flaten, Trond Peder; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Impaired cellular homeostasis of metals, particularly of Cu, Fe and Mn may trigger neurodegeneration through various mechanisms, notably induction of oxidative stress, promotion of α-synuclein aggregation and fibril formation, activation of microglial cells leading to inflammation and impaired production of metalloproteins. In this article we review available studies concerning Fe, Cu and Mn in Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease. In Parkinson's disease local dysregulation of iron metabolism in the substantia nigra (SN) seems to be related to neurodegeneration with an increase in SN iron concentration, accompanied by decreased SN Cu and ceruloplasmin concentrations and increased free Cu concentrations and decreased ferroxidase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid. Available data in Wilson's disease suggest that substantial increases in CNS Cu concentrations persist for a long time during chelating treatment and that local accumulation of Fe in certain brain nuclei may occur during the course of the disease. Consequences for chelating treatment strategies are discussed.

  19. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  20. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  1. Solid state 31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Taylor, R. E.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for Lunar or Martian outposts. Solid state 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was utilized to examine the paramagnetic effects of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ to determine if they were incorporated into the SHA structure. Separate Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ containing SHA materials along with a transition metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. The proximity (<1 nm) of the transition metals to the 31P nuclei of SHA were apparent when comparing the integrated 31P signal intensities of the pure-SHA (87 arbitrary units g-1) with the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (37-71 arbitrary units g-1). The lower integrated 31P signal intensities of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials relative to the pure-SHA suggested that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were incorporated in the SHA structure. Further support for Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ incorporation was demonstrated by the reduced spin-lattice relaxation constants of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (T'=0.075-0.434s) relative to pure-SHA (T1=58.4s). Inversion recovery spectra indicated that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were not homogeneously distributed about the 31P nuclei in the SHA structure. Extraction with diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (DTPA) suggested that between 50 and 80% of the total starting metal concentrations were incorporated in the SHA structure. Iron-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu in the ALS cropping system.

  2. Study on determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by solid-phase extraction and RP-HPLC with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol as precolumn derivatizing reagent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiufen; Yang, Guanyu; Yang, Jihong; Yin, Jiayuan

    2002-12-01

    A new method for the determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (QADEAP) as precolumn derivatizing reagent was studied in this paper. The iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese ions react with QADEAP to form color chelates in the presence of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution medium of pH 4.0. These chelates were enriched by solid-phase extraction with a Waters Nova-Pak C18 cartridge and eluted the retained chelates from the cartridge with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The enrichment factor of 100 was achieved. Then the chelates were separated on a Waters Nova-Pak C18 column (3.9 x 150 mm, 5 microm) by gradient elution with methanol (containing 0.2% of acetic acid and 0.1% of CTMAB) and 0.05 mol L(-1) acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution (containing 0.1% of CTMAB) (pH 4.0) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 ml min(-1), and monitored with a photodiode array detector from 450 approximately 700 nm. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese are 0.8, 1.1, 0.9, 1.1, 1.5 and 2.0 ng L(-1), respectively, in the original sample. This method can be applied to determination at the microg L(-1) level of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water with good results.

  3. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of the Contents Of Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, and Calcium in the Collective Diet Of Preschool Children in the Northwestern Region of Bosnia.

    PubMed

    Đermanović, Mirjana; Miletić, Ivanka; Pavlović, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    Researches conducted worldwide indicate a frequent deficiency in mineral matters. Due to the increased need during the period of accelerated growth and development, children belong to the group that is exposed to the highest risk of mineral matter deficiency. Our objectives were to determine the iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and calcium intake in the collective diet of the preschool population in the in the northwestern region of Bosnia- in the Republic of Srpska and to estimate the adequacy of the application of the international food composition tables for nutrition planning relating to mineral matters. Samples of food intended for children's diet were collected in the preschool institution "Radost" (a kindergarten), in the city of Prijedor. In daily portions, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ca contents were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Contents of mineral matters in daily meals were also calculated by the food composition tables. An average daily meal contained 2.86 mg of Fe, 1.71 mg of Zn, 0.19 mg of Cu, 0.21 mg of Mn, and 83.5 mg of Ca. With calculation method, contents of all minerals are significantly higher than the experimental data for all used food composition tables. The obtained results indicate a significant deficiency in mineral matters in the collective diet of the preschool population in the Republic of Srpska, a certain non-compliance with the applicable recommendations, and also suggest a need to create food composition tables for food being consumed in our region.

  5. The Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY haemophore binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Bielecki, Marcin; Wojaczyński, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires haem from host haemoproteins through a haem transporter HmuR and a haemophore HmuY. The aim of this study was to analyse the binding specificity of HmuY towards non-iron metalloporphyrins which may be employed as antimicrobials to treat periodontitis. HmuY binds gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), manganese(iii), nickel(ii), and copper(ii) protoporphyrin IX but in a manner different to iron(iii) protoporphyrin IX which uses His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands. The metal ions in Ga(iii)PPIX and Zn(ii)PPIX can accept only His(166) as an axial ligand, whereas nickel(ii) and copper(ii) interact exclusively with His(134). Two forms of pentacoordinate manganese(iii) are present in the Mn(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex since the metal accepts either His(134) or His(166) as a single axial ligand. The cobalt ion is hexacoordinate in the Co(iii)PPIX-HmuY complex and binds His(134) and His(166) as axial ligands; however, some differences in their environments exist. Despite different coordination modes of the central metal ion, gallium(iii), zinc(ii), cobalt(iii), and manganese(iii) protoporphyrin IX bound to the HmuY haemophore cannot be displaced by excess haem. All of the metalloporphyrins examined bind to a P. gingivalis wild-type strain with higher ability compared to a mutant strain lacking a functional hmuY gene, thus corroborating binding of non-iron metalloporphyrins to purified HmuY protein. Our results further clarify the basis of metalloporphyrin acquisition by P. gingivalis and add to understanding of the interactions with porphyrin derivatives which exhibit antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis.

  6. Iron, copper, zinc, and manganese transport and regulation in pathogenic Enterobacteria: correlations between strains, site of infection and the relative importance of the different metal transport systems for virulence

    PubMed Central

    Porcheron, Gaëlle; Garénaux, Amélie; Proulx, Julie; Sabri, Mourad; Dozois, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    For all microorganisms, acquisition of metal ions is essential for survival in the environment or in their infected host. Metal ions are required in many biological processes as components of metalloproteins and serve as cofactors or structural elements for enzymes. However, it is critical for bacteria to ensure that metal uptake and availability is in accordance with physiological needs, as an imbalance in bacterial metal homeostasis is deleterious. Indeed, host defense strategies against infection either consist of metal starvation by sequestration or toxicity by the highly concentrated release of metals. To overcome these host strategies, bacteria employ a variety of metal uptake and export systems and finely regulate metal homeostasis by numerous transcriptional regulators, allowing them to adapt to changing environmental conditions. As a consequence, iron, zinc, manganese, and copper uptake systems significantly contribute to the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. However, during the course of our experiments on the role of iron and manganese transporters in extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence, we observed that depending on the strain tested, the importance of tested systems in virulence may be different. This could be due to the different set of systems present in these strains, but literature also suggests that as each pathogen must adapt to the particular microenvironment of its site of infection, the role of each acquisition system in virulence can differ from a particular strain to another. In this review, we present the systems involved in metal transport by Enterobacteria and the main regulators responsible for their controlled expression. We also discuss the relative role of these systems depending on the pathogen and the tissues they infect. PMID:24367764

  7. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  8. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  9. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  10. Metabolic crossroads of iron and copper

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James F; Prohaska, Joseph R; Knutson, Mitchell D

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between the essential dietary metals, iron and copper, have been known for many years. This review highlights recent advances in iron-copper interactions with a focus on tissues and cell types important for regulating whole-body iron and copper homeostasis. Cells that mediate dietary assimilation (enterocytes) and storage and distribution (hepatocytes) of iron and copper are considered, along with the principal users (erythroid cells) and recyclers of red cell iron (reticuloendothelial macrophages). Interactions between iron and copper in the brain are also discussed. Many unanswered questions regarding the role of these metals and their interactions in health and disease emerge from this synopsis, highlighting extensive future research opportunities. PMID:20384844

  11. Determination of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc in fortified food products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry in order to modernize AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved extension of the scope to all food matrixes (including infant formula), optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed- or open-vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proven through a successful RT using experienced independent food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD, and HorRat values) regarding SLVs and RTs. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an extended updated version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula.

  12. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes.

  13. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  14. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  15. The Interaction of Mitochondrial Iron with Manganese Superoxide Dismutase*

    PubMed Central

    Naranuntarat, Amornrat; Jensen, Laran T.; Pazicni, Samuel; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) is one of the rare mitochondrial enzymes evolved to use manganese as a cofactor over the more abundant element iron. Although mitochondrial iron does not normally bind SOD2, iron will misincorporate into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sod2p when cells are starved for manganese or when mitochondrial iron homeostasis is disrupted by mutations in yeast grx5, ssq1, and mtm1. We report here that such changes in mitochondrial manganese and iron similarly affect cofactor selection in a heterologously expressed Escherichia coli Mn-SOD, but not a highly homologous Fe-SOD. By x-ray absorption near edge structure and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analyses of isolated mitochondria, we find that misincorporation of iron into yeast Sod2p does not correlate with significant changes in the average oxidation state or coordination chemistry of bulk mitochondrial iron. Instead, small changes in mitochondrial iron are likely to promote iron-SOD2 interactions. Iron binds Sod2p in yeast mutants blocking late stages of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis (grx5, ssq1, and atm1), but not in mutants defective in the upstream Isu proteins that serve as scaffolds for iron-sulfur biosynthesis. In fact, we observed a requirement for the Isu proteins in iron inactivation of yeast Sod2p. Sod2p activity was restored in mtm1 and grx5 mutants by depleting cells of Isu proteins or using a dominant negative Isu1p predicted to stabilize iron binding to Isu1p. In all cases where disruptions in iron homeostasis inactivated Sod2p, we observed an increase in mitochondrial Isu proteins. These studies indicate that the Isu proteins and the iron-sulfur pathway can donate iron to Sod2p. PMID:19561359

  16. Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Beal, Emily J; House, Christopher H; Orphan, Victoria J

    2009-07-10

    Anaerobic methanotrophs help regulate Earth's climate and may have been an important part of the microbial ecosystem on the early Earth. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is often thought of as a sulfate-dependent process, despite the fact that other electron acceptors are more energetically favorable. Here, we show that microorganisms from marine methane-seep sediment in the Eel River Basin in California are capable of using manganese (birnessite) and iron (ferrihydrite) to oxidize methane, revealing that marine AOM is coupled, either directly or indirectly, to a larger variety of oxidants than previously thought. Large amounts of manganese and iron are provided to oceans from rivers, indicating that manganese- and iron-dependent AOM have the potential to be globally important.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  19. Lead, cadmium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, calcium and magnesium in SPF male rats exposed to a dilution of automotive exhaust gas throughout their lives.

    PubMed

    Stupfel, M; Valleron, A J; Radford, E

    1983-12-15

    Male pathogen free CFE albino Sprague Dawley rats were exposed 8 h per day, 5 days per week, for three years to a 1/1000 dilution of automotive exhaust gas, containing 58 ppm carbon monoxide, 0.37% carbon dioxide, 23 ppm nitrogen oxides, 2 ppm aldehydes, less than 5 mg/l hydrocarbons and 8.5 micrograms/m3 lead. Lead, cadmium, iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium were measured by atomic absorption in the femurs and tibias of the rats which died during the experiment. A comparison with two control groups revealed that the only significant difference in the elements measured in the bones was a 500% increase in lead concentration. The calculations of the correlations between the percentages of the elements in bones, the ages and the body weights of the rats, as well as cluster analysis, did not show consistent variations of the water, calcium, magnesium concentrations nor of the other studied metals related to this increase in lead concentration. Moreover, longevity was the same in the 3 groups of rats, but the body weight was statistically smaller (4%) in the group exposed to the auto exhaust dilution.

  20. Effects of methionine chelate- or yeast proteinate-based supplement of copper, iron, manganese and zinc on broiler growth performance, their distribution in the tibia and excretion into the environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhay Kumar; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar; Haldar, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    A straight-run flock of 1-day-old Cobb 400 chicks (n = 432) was distributed into four treatment groups (9 replicate pens in each group, 12 birds in a pen) for a 38-day feeding trial evaluating the effects of a methionine chelate (Met-TM)- or a yeast proteinate (Yeast-TM)-based supplement of copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) on growth performance, bone criteria and some metabolic indices in commercial broiler chickens. The diets were either not supplemented with any trace elements at all (negative control, NC) or supplemented with an inorganic (sulphate) trace element premix (inorganic TM (ITM), 1 g/kg feed), the Met-TM (1 g/kg feed) and the Yeast-TM (0.5 g/kg feed). Body weight, feed conversion ratio and dressed meat yield at 38 days were better in the Yeast-TM-supplemented group as compared with the NC, ITM and Met-TM groups (p < 0.01). The birds supplemented with Met-TM and Yeast-TM consumed less feed than the NC and ITM-supplemented group (p < 0.001). Supplementation of trace elements irrespective of source increased the total ash content in the tibia (p < 0.001). However, concentration of Cu was lower in the Met-TM and Yeast-TM groups compared with the NC and the ITM groups (p < 0.05) although that of Fe, Mn and Zn was not affected at all by the dietary treatments. Total protein concentration in serum increased when either Met-TM or Yeast-TM was supplemented (p < 0.05) to the birds. Serum alkaline phosphatase activity, however, increased when the trace elements from either inorganic or organic sources were supplemented (p < 0.05). Compared with the ITM-supplemented group, excretion of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn was lower in the birds supplemented with Met-TM or Yeast-TM, especially in the latter group (p < 0.05). The present experiment revealed that supplementation of broilers with methionine chelates or yeast proteinate forms of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn improved body weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR) and markedly reduced

  1. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in fertilizers by microwave acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry detection: single-laboratory validation of a modification and extension of AOAC 2006.03.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sharon; Bartos, James; Boles, Rhonda; Hasty, Elaine; Thuotte, Ethel; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in all major types of commercial fertilizer products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analysis. This validation study proposes an extension and modification of AOAC 2006.03. The extension is the inclusion of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, and the modification is incorporation of hydrochloric acid in the digestion system. This dual acid digestion utilizes both hydrochloric and nitric acids in a 3 to 9 mL volume ratio/100 mL. In addition to 15 of the 30 original validation materials used in the 2006.03 collaborative study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 695 and Magruder 2009-06 were incorporated as accuracy materials. The main benefits of this proposed method are a significant increase in laboratory efficiency when compared to the use of both AOAC Methods 965.09 and 2006.03 to achieve the same objective and an enhanced recovery of several metals.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L1) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L2).

    PubMed

    AbouEl-Enein, S A; El-Saied, F A; Kasher, T I; El-Wardany, A H

    2007-07-01

    Salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(1)) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(2)) and their iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by IR, electronic spectra, molar conductivities, magnetic susceptibilities and ESR. Mononuclear complexes are formed with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 (M:L). The IR studies reveal various modes of chelation. The electronic absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the iron(III), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(1) have octahedral geometry. While the cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(2) were separated as tetrahedral structure. The copper(II) complexes have square planar stereochemistry. The ESR parameters of the copper(II) complexes at room temperature were calculated. The g values for copper(II) complexes proved that the Cu-O and Cu-N bonds are of high covalency.

  3. Solubilisation effect of spent wash on oxide-ores of manganese and iron.

    PubMed

    Pervez, S; Pandey, G S

    1991-09-01

    Samples of iron ore (haematite) and manganese ore (pyrolusite) of known compositions were equilibrated with aliquots of analysed sample of spent wash. The concentrations of iron(II), iron(III), complexed iron, manganese(II) ions and complexed Mn-ions were determined after increasing durations. One litre of the spent wash was found to extract out 141 mg of total iron and 161 mg of total manganese. In case of iron, the predominance was of iron(II) (92%), whereas in case of manganese it was of the complexed form (95%).

  4. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Kang, J.-K.; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. Iron and manganese deposits occur in five forms: nodules, crusts, cements, mounds and sediment-hosted stratabound layers. Seafloor oxides show a wide range of compositions from nearly pure iron to nearly pure manganese end members. Fe/Mn ratios vary from about 24 000 (up to 58% elemental Fe) for hydrothermal seamount ironstones to about 0.001 (up to 52% Mn) for hydrothermal stratabound manganese oxides from active volcanic arcs. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts that occur on most seamounts in the ocean basins have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.7 for open-ocean seamount crusts and 1.2 for continental margin seamount crusts. Fe-Mn nodules of potential economic interest from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.3, whereas the mean ratio for nodules from elsewhere in the Pacific is about 0.7. Crusts are enriched in Co, Ni and Pt and nodules in Cu and Ni, and both have significant concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ba, Mo, V and other elements. In contrast, hydrothermal deposits commonly contain only minor trace metal contents, although there are many exceptions, for example, with Ni contents up to 0.66%, Cr to 1.2%, and Zn to 1.4%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns generally show a positive Ce anomaly and abundant ??REEs for hydrogenetic and mixed hydrogenetic-diagenetic deposits, whereas the Ce anomaly is negative for hydrothermal deposits and ??REE contents are low. However, the Ce anomaly in crusts may vary from strongly positive in East Pacific crusts to slightly negative in West Pacific crusts, which may reflect

  5. Iron isotopes constrain biogeochemical redox cycling of iron and manganese in a Palaeoproterozoic stratified basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikos, Harilaos; Matthews, Alan; Erel, Yigal; Moore, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The Hotazel Formation in the uppermost stratigraphic portion of the Neoarchaean-Palaeoproterozoic Transvaal Supergroup of southern Africa is an unusual sedimentary sequence of banded iron-formation (BIF) intercalated with three manganese-rich layers. As such, it is a succession that holds great potential to offer a unique view of one of the most dramatic transitions in early Earth history — the switch to a full oxidative cycle in shallow oceans at ca. 2.3 Ga. We present iron isotope results from BIF and Mn-rich samples collected across the entire Hotazel sequence, with a view to constraining processes of biogeochemical redox cycling for both metals close to the transition from a reducing to an oxidizing ocean-atmosphere system. The recorded de-coupling of Fe- and Mn reduction during anaerobic organic carbon cycling in the Hotazel strata, suggests that manganese became an important electron acceptor in stratified marine environments of the Palaeoproterozoic during periods of increased primary manganese precipitation relative to iron. Very low δ 57Fe values registered across the entire Hotazel sequence and especially in manganese-rich samples (-2.4 to -3.5‰) signify deposition of iron and manganese in a terminal, stratified aqueous reservoir that was depleted in the heavy iron isotopes. These isotopic signatures, in conjunction with the unusual endowment of the Hotazel sequence in manganese, are interpreted to have evolved by Rayleigh distillation processes during protracted deposition of Mn-poor BIFs as preserved in the lower stratigraphic portion of the Transvaal Supergroup (Kuruman and Griquatown BIFs). The unique end-member geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the Hotazel rocks may therefore constitute a potential link between the widespread deposition of BIF during the Neoarchaean and Palaeoproterozoic, and the postulated rise in atmospheric oxygen levels around 2.3 Ga ago.

  6. Structural, FTIR, thermal and dielectric studies of gel grown manganese-copper mixed levo tartrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sudhir J.; Tank, Kashmira P.; Vyas, Poorvesh M.; Joshi, Mihirkumar J.

    2014-09-01

    Pure manganese tartrate and copper tartrate compounds find various applications. In the present study, manganese-copper mixed levo tartrate crystals of different compositions have been grown by single diffusion gel growth technique in silica hydro gel. Purple blue colored mainly dendrite type crystals with orthorhombic system were grown. From EDAX analysis, the estimation of the presence of copper and manganese was made in the crystal. The coloration of the crystals as well their unit cell dimensions changed with the contents of copper and manganese. The presence of various functional groups was confirmed from FTIR spectra and the effect of composition of the crystals on the spectra was identified. The crystals were found to be hydrated and thermally unstable. Results are discussed.

  7. Cobalt promoted copper manganese oxide catalysts for ambient temperature carbon monoxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher; Taylor, Stuart H; Burrows, Andrew; Crudace, Mandy J; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2008-04-14

    Low levels of cobalt doping (1 wt%) of copper manganese oxide enhances its activity for carbon monoxide oxidation under ambient conditions and the doped catalyst can display higher activity than current commercial catalysts.

  8. Consequences of manganese replacement of copper for prion protein function and proteinase resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David R.; Hafiz, Farida; Glasssmith, Leslie L.; Wong, Boon-Seng; Jones, Ian M.; Clive, Christine; Haswell, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds copper and has antioxidant activity enhancing the survival of neurones in culture. The ability of the PrP to bind other cations was tested and it was found that only manganese could substitute for copper. Although initially manganese-loaded PrP exhibited similar structure and activity to copper-loaded PrP, after aging, manganese-loaded PrP became proteinase resistant and lost function. It was also found that manganese could be incorporated into PrP expressed by astrocytes and that this PrP was partially proteinase resistant. These results show that it is possible to generate proteinase-resistant PrP from cells and suggest a possible mechanism for the formation of the scrapie isoform of the PrP as generated in sporadic prion disease. PMID:10716918

  9. Use of potassium permanganate for iron and manganese removal from acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Boll, J.E.; Deshinsky, G.

    1985-12-09

    Surface and deep shaft coal mining operations find it difficult to meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards concerning acid, iron and manganese in drainage waters. Correcting the acid and iron problem is relatively simple, but effectively controlling manganese is more difficult. The best way to remove manganese is by chemical oxidation. A common treatment method is pH adjustment with lime or soda ash. This practice neutralizes the acid and removes most of the iron by forming an insoluble precipitate. The amount of lime or soda ash needed to remove manganese raises the pH beyond the acceptable range of 6-9. Potassium permanganate (KMnO/sub 4/) can be used to oxidize the dissolved manganese to an insoluble manganese precipitate. It can also oxidize any residual iron. The adjusted pH reduces unnecessary consumption of permanganate needed to oxidize manganese and meets EPA standards. It reacts on contact producing an insoluble manganese dioxide (MnO/sub 2/). The MnO/sub 2/ supplements the oxidation with a settling effect. Permanganate can be applied at all pHs, with faster results at neutral or slightly alkaline levels. Its use for iron and manganese removal is very attractive because the reactions are complete, rapid, and require only a minimal amount of chemicals. Laboratory evaluation and field case histories will be discussed in the paper. 3 figures.

  10. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  11. Manganese and copper fluxes from continental margin sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Heggie, D.; Klinkhammer, G.; Cullen, D.

    1987-05-01

    Total dissolvable Cu and Mn have been measured in sea water collected from the continental shelf of the eastern Bering Sea. Copper concentrations of <3 nmole kg/sup -1/ were measured over the shelf break but concentrations increased to >4 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of a hydrographic front over the 100 m isobath. Manganese concentrations also were low over the shelf break, <10 nmole kg/sup -1/, and increased systematically to concentrations >10 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of the hydrographic front. Depth distributions of Mn at all continental shelf stations showed gradients into the sediments, with concentrations typically >20 nmole kg/sup -1/ in a bottom layer extending about 30 m off the bottom. Benthic Cu and Mn fluxes are indicated by cross-shelf pore water profiles that show interfacial concentrations more than an order of magnitude greater than in bottom water. These data and the results of a model of metal transport across the shelf suggest that Cu and Mn fluxes, estimated at 2 and 18 nmole cm/sup -2/y/sup -1/, respectively, from continental shelf sediments may be one source of these metals to the deep sea.

  12. Characterization of iron and manganese precipitates from an in situ ground water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Mettler, S; Abdelmoula, M; Hoehn, E; Schoenenberger, R; Weidler, P; von Gunten, U

    2001-01-01

    Aquifer samples from the precipitation zone of an in situ iron and manganese removal plant that was operated for 10 years were analyzed for iron and manganese minerals. Measurements were performed by various chemical extraction techniques (5 M HCI, 0.008 M Ti(III)-EDTA, 0.114 M ascorbic acid), X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Chemical extractions showed that iron was precipitated as ferric oxides, whereas manganese was not oxidized but deposited as Mn(II) probably within carbonates. The ferric oxides in particular accumulate preferentially in the smaller grain- size fractions. This tendency was observed to a lesser extent for manganese. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the ferric oxides were mainly crystalline (goethite, 50% to 100% of the iron). Ferrihydrite was found as well, but only as a minor fraction (< or = 12%). Pure manganese minerals were not found by X-ray diffraction. The precipitated amounts of iron (5 to 27 micromol/g Fe as ferric oxide) and manganese (1 to 4 micromol/g Mn) during 10 years operation of the treatment plant agree with values that were estimated from operational parameters (9 to 31 micromol/g Fe and 3 to 6 micromol/g Mn). Considering the small amounts of precipitated iron and manganese, no long-term risks of clogging of the aquifer are expected.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  16. Tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient or iron-deficient rats after stainless steel welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Duck; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Won; Choi, Seong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Sun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kwon, Il Hoon; Mun, Je-Hyeok; Yu, Il Je

    2007-05-01

    Welders can be exposed to high levels of manganese through welding fumes. Although it has already been suggested that excessive manganese exposure causes neurotoxicity, called manganism, the pathway of manganese transport to the brain with welding-fume exposure remains unclear. Iron is an essential metal that maintains a homeostasis in the body. The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) transports iron and other divalent metals, such as manganese, and the depletion of iron is known to upregulate DMT1 expression. Accordingly, this study investigated the tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats after welding-fume exposure. The feeding of an iron-deficient diet for 4 wk produced a depletion of body iron, such as decreased iron levels in the serum and tissues, and upregulated the DMT1 expression in the rat duodenum. The iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats were then exposed to welding fumes generated from manual metal arc stainless steel at a concentration of 63.5 +/- 2.3 mg/m3 for 2 h per day over a 30-day period. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 15, and 30. The level of body iron in the iron-deficient rats was restored to the control level after the welding-fume exposure. However, the tissue distributions of manganese after the welding-fume exposure showed similar patterns in both the iron-sufficient and iron-deficient groups. The concentration of manganese increased in the lungs and liver on days 15 and 30, and increased in the olfactory bulb on day 30. Slight and heterogeneous increases of manganese were observed in different brain regions. Consequently, these findings suggest that the presence of Fe in the inhaled welding fumes may not have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain. Thus, the condition of iron deficiency did not seem to have any apparent effect on the transport of Mn into the brain after the inhalation of welding fumes.

  17. Hawaiian submarine manganese-iron oxide crusts - A dating tool?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Black manganese-iron oxide crusts form on most exposed rock on the ocean floor. Such crusts are well developed on the steep lava slopes of the Hawaiian Ridge and have been sampled during dredging and submersible dives. The crusts also occur on fragments detached from bedrock by mass wasting, on submerged coral reefs, and on poorly lithified sedimentary rocks. The thickness of the crusts was measured on samples collected since 1965 on the Hawaiian Ridge from 140 dive or dredge localities. Fifty-nine (42%) of the sites were collected in 2001 by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The thinner crusts on many samples apparently result from post-depositional breakage, landsliding, and intermittent burial of outcrops by sediment. The maximum crust thickness was selected from each dredge or dive site to best represent crusts on the original rock surface at that site. The measurements show an irregular progressive thickening of the crusts toward the northwest-i.e., progressive thickening toward the older volcanic features with increasing distance from the Hawaiian hotspot. Comparison of the maximum crust thickness with radiometric ages of related subaerial features supports previous studies that indicate a crust-growth rate of about 2.5 mm/m.y. The thickness information not only allows a comparison of the relative exposure ages of two or more features offshore from different volcanoes, but also provides specific age estimates of volcanic and landslide deposits. The data indicate that some of the landslide blocks within the south Kona landslide are the oldest exposed rock on Mauna Loa, Kilauea, or Loihi volcanoes. Crusts on the floors of submarine canyons off Kohala and East Molokai volcanoes indicate that these canyons are no longer serving as channelways for downslope, sediment-laden currents. Mahukona volcano was approximately synchronous with Hilo Ridge, both being younger than Hana Ridge. The Nuuanu landslide is considerably older than the Wailau landslide. The Waianae

  18. Interactions between excessive manganese exposures and dietary iron-deficiency in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Keith M; Syversen, Tore; Aschner, Judy L; Aschner, Michael

    2005-05-01

    For nearly a century, manganese has been recognized as an essential nutrient for proper bone formation, lipid, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism. While manganese deficiency is characterized by symptoms ranging from stunted growth and poor bone remodeling to ataxia, it is manganese toxicity that is far more devastating from a public health standpoint. Most cases of manganese toxicity are the result of occupational exposure to high levels of the metal, and are characterized by specific neurological symptoms referred to as manganism. While manganism shares many common features with Parkinson's disease, there are distinct differences between the two disorders suggesting that manganism might indirectly affect nigrostriatal dopaminergic function. Recent studies from our laboratory show that dietary iron deficiency is a risk factor for brain manganese accumulation and that the striatum is particularly vulnerable. This review briefly discusses manganese from nutritional and toxicological aspects.

  19. Copper and nickel partitioning in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J. S.; Prinz, M.; Smith, J. V.

    1987-01-01

    Trace element analyses using proton induced X-ray emission and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence have been made on metal and troilite from nine iron meteorites representing five geochemical groups. Nickel and copper distribution coefficients D (troilite/metal) vary by factors of 600 and 20, respectively, correlate positively with kamacite bandwidth and correlate negatively with bulk nickel content. Meteorites with bulk Ni of less than 10 percent have Cu-enriched troilite while those with Ni greater than 10 percent have Cu-depleted troilite. Since magmatic evolution and partial melting will produce Cu-enriched troilite only, the observation of Cu-depleted troilite in Ni-rich meteorites is evidence for subsolidus reequilibration, a process which reduces D(Cu) by transfer of Cu to exsolving metal. Elemental redistribution may have played an important role in establishing the present chemical trends in iron meteorites.

  20. Iron versus Copper II. Principles and Applications in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the differences between iron and copper. Describes various aspects of the behaviors of these two elements, including those of biological and environmental significance. Addresses the evolution of the atmosphere and sedimentary ore formation, the phylogeny of iron and copper, and some anthropological notes regarding the use of the metals.…

  1. Recovery of Iron from Copper Tailings by Direct Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jing; Xia, De-Hong; Gu, Jing; Liu, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shou-Zeng; Qi, Zhao-Dong; Ao, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Direct reduction of copper tailings were performed to recover iron efficiently by carbon-containing pellets, and the metallization rate was gained by chemical analysis method. The results showed that the metallization rate of copper tailings was up to 85.32% and the best reduction parameters are also found. Content of precious metals, such as, gold, silver in copper tailings can be enriched by 1.8~1.9 times through removing iron. The apparent activation energy of direct reduction of iron oxide in copper tailings is calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and the restrictive factor of reduction process is solid diffusion.

  2. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  3. Copper, iron and the organic ligands that bind them - updates from San Francisco Bay and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, K. N.; Bundy, R.; Biller, D.; Bruland, K. W.; Barbeau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Building on more than 30 years of measurements in San Francisco Bay by Russ Flegal and others, the concentrations of dissolved manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead were determined from a suite of water quality monitoring program stations in North, Central and South Bay using inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry following preconcentration on a Nobias-chelate PA1 resin. Given the importance of organic ligands in governing iron solubility and copper bioavailability in natural waters, the organic complexation of dissolved iron and copper in these samples was determined from multiple analytical windows applied to competitive ligand exchange- adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. This study constitutes the first dataset of iron speciation in San Francisco Bay and expands upon prior work evaluating the potential for copper toxicity in this urbanized estuary. Recent advances in voltammetric techniques emerging from a Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) working group on metal-binding ligands in the marine environment, and insights gained from high-resolution ligand measurements from the U.S. GEOTRACES program, highlight how metal-binding ligands in San Francisco Bay compare with those of the coastal and open ocean.

  4. Immobilization of iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacteria with a biofilm-forming bacterium for the effective removal of iron and manganese from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Shuting; Du, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Xiaosong; Fu, Meng; Hou, Ning; Li, Dapeng

    2016-11-01

    In this study, three bacteria with high Fe- and Mn-oxidizing capabilities were isolated from groundwater well sludge and identified as Acinetobacter sp., Bacillus megaterium and Sphingobacterium sp. The maximum removal ratios of Fe and Mn (99.75% and 96.69%) were obtained by an optimal combination of the bacteria at a temperature of 20.15°C, pH 7.09 and an inoculum size of 2.08%. Four lab-scale biofilters were tested in parallel for the removal of iron and manganese ions from groundwater. The results indicated that the Fe/Mn removal ratios of biofilter R4, which was inoculated with iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacteria and a biofilm-forming bacterium, were approximately 95% for each metal during continuous operation and were better than the other biofilters. This study demonstrated that the biofilm-forming bacterium could promote the immobilization of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacteria on the biofilters and enhance the removal efficiency of iron and manganese ions from groundwater.

  5. The role of iron and copper molecules in the neuronal vulnerability of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra during aging.

    PubMed

    Zecca, Luigi; Stroppolo, Antonella; Gatti, Alberto; Tampellini, Davide; Toscani, Marco; Gallorini, Mario; Giaveri, Giuseppe; Arosio, Paolo; Santambrogio, Paolo; Fariello, Ruggero G; Karatekin, Erdem; Kleinman, Mark H; Turro, Nicholas; Hornykiewicz, Oleh; Zucca, Fabio A

    2004-06-29

    In this study, a comparative analysis of metal-related neuronal vulnerability was performed in two brainstem nuclei, the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra (SN), known targets of the etiological noxae in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. LC and SN pars compacta neurons both degenerate in Parkinson's disease and other Parkinsonisms; however, LC neurons are comparatively less affected and with a variable degree of involvement. In this study, iron, copper, and their major molecular forms like ferritins, ceruloplasmin, neuromelanin (NM), manganese-superoxide dismutase (SOD), and copper/zinc-SOD were measured in LC and SN of normal subjects at different ages. Iron content in LC was much lower than that in SN, and the ratio heavy-chain ferritin/iron in LC was higher than in the SN. The NM concentration was similar in LC and SN, but the iron content in NM of LC was much lower than SN. In both regions, heavy- and light-chain ferritins were present only in glia and were not detectable in neurons. These data suggest that in LC neurons, the iron mobilization and toxicity is lower than that in SN and is efficiently buffered by NM. The bigger damage occurring in SN could be related to the higher content of iron. Ferritins accomplish the same function of buffering iron in glial cells. Ceruloplasmin levels were similar in LC and SN, but copper was higher in LC. However, the copper content in NM of LC was higher than that of SN, indicating a higher copper mobilization in LC neurons. Manganese-SOD and copper/zinc-SOD had similar age trend in LC and SN. These results may explain at least one of the reasons underlying lower vulnerability of LC compared to SN in Parkinsonian syndromes.

  6. Heavy metal pollution among autoworkers. II. Cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, and nickel.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Rastogi, S C

    1977-01-01

    Garages and auto-repair workshops may be polluted with other heavy metals besides lead. Blood of autoworkers with high lead content was analysed for cadmium, chromium, copper manganese, nickel, ALAD activity and carboxyhaemoglobin level. Cadmium and copper levels in blood of autoworkers were comparable with those of the control subjects while chroimium and nickel levels were significantly higher (P less than 0-01 for both metals), and scattered raised values of manganese were found. There was no significant mutual correlation between levels of various heavy metals determined in whole blood. High copper levels were slightly related to decreasing ALAD activity (P less than 0-1). Nineteen per cent of autoworkers were found to have an abnormally blood level of carboxyhaemoglobin. The amount of particulate heavy metal in autoworkshop air was not related to biochemical abnormalities found in the autoworkers. Various sources of pollution of these heavy metals in autoworkshops are discussed. PMID:71915

  7. Recent research progress on iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials for rechargeable sodium batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale high-energy batteries with electrode materials made from the Earth-abundant elements are needed to achieve sustainable energy development. On the basis of material abundance, rechargeable sodium batteries with iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials are the ideal candidates for large-scale batteries. In this review, iron- and manganese-based electrode materials, oxides, phosphates, fluorides, etc, as positive electrodes for rechargeable sodium batteries are reviewed. Iron and manganese compounds with sodium ions provide high structural flexibility. Two layered polymorphs, O3- and P2-type layered structures, show different electrode performance in Na cells related to the different phase transition and sodium migration processes on sodium extraction/insertion. Similar to layered oxides, iron/manganese phosphates and pyrophosphates also provide the different framework structures, which are used as sodium insertion host materials. Electrode performance and reaction mechanisms of the iron- and manganese-based electrode materials in Na cells are described and the similarities and differences with lithium counterparts are also discussed. Together with these results, the possibility of the high-energy battery system with electrode materials made from only Earth-abundant elements is reviewed. PMID:27877694

  8. Recent research progress on iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials for rechargeable sodium batteries.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale high-energy batteries with electrode materials made from the Earth-abundant elements are needed to achieve sustainable energy development. On the basis of material abundance, rechargeable sodium batteries with iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials are the ideal candidates for large-scale batteries. In this review, iron- and manganese-based electrode materials, oxides, phosphates, fluorides, etc, as positive electrodes for rechargeable sodium batteries are reviewed. Iron and manganese compounds with sodium ions provide high structural flexibility. Two layered polymorphs, O3- and P2-type layered structures, show different electrode performance in Na cells related to the different phase transition and sodium migration processes on sodium extraction/insertion. Similar to layered oxides, iron/manganese phosphates and pyrophosphates also provide the different framework structures, which are used as sodium insertion host materials. Electrode performance and reaction mechanisms of the iron- and manganese-based electrode materials in Na cells are described and the similarities and differences with lithium counterparts are also discussed. Together with these results, the possibility of the high-energy battery system with electrode materials made from only Earth-abundant elements is reviewed.

  9. Recent research progress on iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials for rechargeable sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale high-energy batteries with electrode materials made from the Earth-abundant elements are needed to achieve sustainable energy development. On the basis of material abundance, rechargeable sodium batteries with iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials are the ideal candidates for large-scale batteries. In this review, iron- and manganese-based electrode materials, oxides, phosphates, fluorides, etc, as positive electrodes for rechargeable sodium batteries are reviewed. Iron and manganese compounds with sodium ions provide high structural flexibility. Two layered polymorphs, O3- and P2-type layered structures, show different electrode performance in Na cells related to the different phase transition and sodium migration processes on sodium extraction/insertion. Similar to layered oxides, iron/manganese phosphates and pyrophosphates also provide the different framework structures, which are used as sodium insertion host materials. Electrode performance and reaction mechanisms of the iron- and manganese-based electrode materials in Na cells are described and the similarities and differences with lithium counterparts are also discussed. Together with these results, the possibility of the high-energy battery system with electrode materials made from only Earth-abundant elements is reviewed.

  10. Multi-Copper Oxidases and Human Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vashchenko, Ganna; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are a small group of enzymes that oxidize their substrate with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. Generally, multi-copper oxidases are promiscuous with regards to their reducing substrates and are capable of performing various functions in different species. To date, three multi-copper oxidases have been detected in humans—ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Each of these enzymes has a high specificity towards iron with the resulting ferroxidase activity being associated with ferroportin, the only known iron exporter protein in humans. Ferroportin exports iron as Fe2+, but transferrin, the major iron transporter protein of blood, can bind only Fe3+ effectively. Iron oxidation in enterocytes is mediated mainly by hephaestin thus allowing dietary iron to enter the bloodstream. Zyklopen is involved in iron efflux from placental trophoblasts during iron transfer from mother to fetus. Release of iron from the liver relies on ferroportin and the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin which is found in blood in a soluble form. Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen show distinctive expression patterns and have unique mechanisms for regulating their expression. These features of human multi-copper ferroxidases can serve as a basis for the precise control of iron efflux in different tissues. In this manuscript, we review the biochemical and biological properties of the three human MCOs and discuss their potential roles in human iron homeostasis. PMID:23807651

  11. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  12. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  13. Copper's influence on iron metabolism in K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Percival, S.S.; Armstrong, E. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper deficiency is associated with a cellular defect in iron metabolism that results in poor hemoglobin synthesis. In order to determine this mechanisms, K562 cells, a human erythroleukemic cell line, were incubated with 1 mM bethocuproine disulfonic acid (BCS) to produce a copper deficiency or were supplemented with 8 {mu}M copper. Hemoglobin was simultaneously induced in some cells by the addition of 25 {mu}M hemin to the culture medium. Incubation with BCS resulted in a 30 to 40% reduction in intracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activity while supplementation resulted in a 20 to 50% increase in activity. The authors then examined the effect of these copper manipulations on {sup 59}Fe uptake from transferrin, on ferritin levels and on hemoglobin levels. Hemoglobin was only slightly affected by the copper treatments. In both noninduced cells and induced cells, copper supplementation resulted in a greater level of intracellular iron, a greater level of immunoreactive ferritin, and an enhanced uptake of {sup 59}Fe from transferrin. In BCS-incubated cells, intracellular iron, ferritin and {sup 59}Fe uptake from transferrin were reduced by at least 50%. Because the ferritin levels were reduced, intracellular iron mobilization did not appear to be impaired in copper deficiency. The results suggest that copper deficiency impairs the transport of iron by transferrin into the cell.

  14. Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron for preparation of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazim, Muhammad

    Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron also known as cementation is a well known process used for the recovery of copper for a long time. In this study, the kinetics of the reaction of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder has been investigated. The reaction kinetics was studied as a function of different process parameters such as initial concentration, temperature and pH. In this research work, the effects of the above three parameters were studied for both types of iron substrates. It was found that with the iron wire the reaction obeys first order kinetics with respect to copper concentration whereas with the iron powder the order was found to be 1.5. The initial concentration was found to have considerable effect on the reaction kinetics of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The rate of reaction increases with an increase in the initial copper concentration up to a certain level and then decreases for the case of iron wire. However, for the reaction of copper sulphate with iron powder, the reaction rate decreases with an increase in the initial copper concentration. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate of copper sulphate for both types iron substrates (iron wire and iron powder) has also been studied in the temperature range of 23-54ºC. In both the cases, the reaction rate increases with an increase in temperature according to Arrhenius law. The activation energy for the reactions of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder was found to be 25.36 kJ/mol and 26.32 kJ/mol, respectively. The copper cementation reaction was found to be suitable to operate at a pH of 2.5-3 for iron wire and a pH of 3-4 for iron powder considering possible inhibition by copper hydroxyl complex formation at higher pH and the possible excess iron consumption by hydrogen reduction at lower pH. The copper particles were produced by the reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The produced copper particles were obtained in the micro to nano

  15. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, plasma copper and hemoglobin types in anemic and poikilocytic calves.

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, S R; Searcy, G P; Hirsch, V M

    1985-01-01

    Ninety-eight calves were studied to determine if anemia and poikilocytosis were related to iron or copper status or hemoglobin type. No significant differences were found in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, marrow iron, plasma copper or hemoglobin type between affected and normal calves. Poikilocytes were strongly inversely correlated (-0.9177) with age. Calves less than six weeks of age had more poikilocytes, lower serum iron, higher total iron binding capacity, less adult hemoglobin and more neonatal and fetal hemoglobin than calves greater than six weeks of age. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2412677

  16. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  17. Old iron, young copper: from Mars to Venus.

    PubMed

    Crichton, R R; Pierre, J L

    2001-06-01

    Iron and copper are metals which play an important role in the living world. From a brief consideration of their chemistry and biochemistry we conclude that the early chemistry of life used water soluble ferrous iron while copper was in the water-insoluble Cu(I) state as highly insoluble sulphides. The advent of oxygen was a catastrophic event for most living organisms, and can be considered to be the first general irreversible pollution of the earth. In contrast to the oxidation of iron and its loss of bioavailability as insoluble Fe(III), the oxidation of insoluble Cu(I) led to soluble Cu(II). A new iron biochemistry became possible after the advent of oxygen, with the development of chelators of Fe(III), which rendered iron once again accessible, and with the control of the potential toxicity of iron by its storage in a water soluble, non-toxic, bio-available storage protein (ferritin). Biology also discovered that whereas enzymes involved in anaerobic metabolism were designed to operate in the lower portion of the redox spectrum, the arrival of dioxygen created the need for a new redox active metal which could attain higher redox potentials. Copper, now bioavailable, was ideally suited to exploit the oxidizing power of dioxygen. The arrival of copper also coincided with the development of multicellular organisms which had extracellular cross-linked matrices capable of resisting attack by oxygen free radicals. After the initial 'iron age' subsequent evolution moved, not towards a 'copper age', but rather to an 'iron-copper' age. In the second part of the review, this symbiosis of iron and copper is examined in yeast. We then briefly consider iron and copper metabolism in mammals, before looking at iron-copper interactions in mammals, particularly man, and conclude with the reflection that, as in Greek and Roman mythology, a better understanding of the potentially positive interactions between Mars (iron) and Venus (copper) can only be to the advantage of our

  18. Geological reconnaissance of some Uruguayan iron and manganese deposits in 1962

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Roberts Manning

    1976-01-01

    Three mineralized areas lie in an area near the town of Minas de Corrales in the Departamento de Rivera; they are the Cerro Amelia, the Cerro de Papagayo, and the Cerro Iman. The Cerro Amelia is composed of small bands of iron-rich rock separated by an amphibolitic or mafic rock. Selective mining would be necessary to extract the 31,000 tons per meter of depth of iron-rich rock that ranges from 15 to 40 percent metallic iron. The Cerro de Papagayo district contains many small, rich deposits of ferruginous manganese ore. The ratio of Mn to Fe varies widely within each small deposit as well as from deposit to deposit. Some ferruginous manganese ore contains 50-55 percent manganese dioxide. Although there are many thousands of tons of ore in the district, small-scale mining operations are imperative. One deposit, the Cerro Avestuz manganese mine, was visited. The manganese ore body lies within contorted highly metamorphosed itabirite that contains both hard low grade and soft high grade ferruginous manganese ores estimated to average 40 percent Mn. About 38,000 tons of manganese ore is present in this deposit. The Cerro Iman is a large block of itabirite that contains about 40 percent Fe. The grade is variable and probably runs from less than 35 percent Fe to more than 50 percent Fe. No exploration has been done on this deposit. It is recommended that the Cerro de Iman area be geologically mapped in detail, and that a geological reconnaissance be made of the area that is between the Cuchilla de Corrales and the Cuchilla de Areycua/Cuchilla del Cerro Pelado area.

  19. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  20. Effect of zinc on copper and iron bioavailability as influenced by dietary copper and fat source

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.C.; Jones, B.P.; Lin, F.; Sinthusek, G.; Frimpong, N.A.; Wu, S.

    1986-03-05

    In a number of experiments, they have observed that liver copper levels of young male rats fed low zinc diets were essentially the same as liver copper levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Liver iron levels of rats fed low zinc diets, however, tended to be markedly higher than liver iron levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Increases in dietary zinc (up to 200 ppm) were generally associated with decreases in liver iron deposition, but had little effect on liver copper deposition. Iron bioavailability appeared to be enhanced when fat sources high in saturated fatty acids were used, and there was evidence that the type of dietary fat influenced the effect of zinc on iron bioavailability. Liver copper deposition, however, did not appear to be markedly affected by the type of dietary fat suggesting that copper bioavailability is less affected by fat source. Increases in dietary copper were associated with increases in liver copper levels and decreases in liver iron levels of rats fed increasing levels of zinc. These data suggest that potential interrelationships between dietary factors not being considered as experimental variables could have significant effects on results and on the interrelationships between dietary variables which are being studied.

  1. Oxidant Selection for the Treatment of Manganese (II), Iron (II), and Arsenic (III) in Groundwaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) arsenic standard and the manganese and iron secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) in water (10µg/L, 50µg/L, and 300µg/L, respectively), many Midwestern water utilities must add a strong...

  2. Distribution and Remobilization of Iron and Copper in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    GARNETT, TREVOR P.; GRAHAM, ROBIN D.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The amount of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) that is loaded into grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum) depends on both the amount of nutrient taken up by the plant post-anthesis and the amount that is remobilized from vegetative organs as they senesce. Previous reports have shown that these two micronutrients behave quite differently in wheat in that Cu is readily remobilized to the grain whilst Fe shows poor remobilization. The object was to quantify the distribution of Fe and Cu in wheat and to show how this distribution changes from anthesis to grain maturity. • Methods The uptake and distribution of both Fe and Cu were investigated in wheat grown at two levels, adequate and low, of both micronutrients. Plants were grown in sand culture and the main culms were harvested at anthesis, 18 days post-anthesis and at maturity. Plants were separated into various organs and analysed for Fe and Cu using ICP-OES. • Key Results There was good remobilization of Fe from the rest of the shoot to the grain with 77 % of the total shoot Fe in the grain at maturity. In the adequate-Cu treatment there was 62 % of the total plant Cu in the grain at maturity, whereas in the low-Cu treatment this was only 40 %. There was no net Fe taken up into the above-ground plant parts post-anthesis whilst for Cu there was. The remobilization evident for Fe and Cu was greater than that found for zinc and much greater than evident for manganese in the same material. • Conclusions The results reported here represent good evidence for the high reproductive mobility of both Fe and Cu in wheat. PMID:15701664

  3. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River.

  4. Copper-Based Electrochemical Sensor with Palladium Electrode for Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Manganese

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River. PMID:25476591

  5. Effect of excess iron and copper on physiology of aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Huang, Wenmin; Liu, Guihua

    2010-04-01

    To elucidate effect of chemical reagents addition on growth of aquatic plants in restoration of aquatic ecosystem, Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid was used to evaluate its physiological responses to excess iron (Fe(3+)) and copper (Cu(2+)) in the study. Results showed that accumulation of iron and copper both reached maximum at 100 mg L(-1) iron or copper after 24 h short-term stress, but excess iron and copper caused plants necrosis or death and colonies disintegration as well as roots abscission at excess metal concentrations except for 1 mg L(-1) iron. Significant differences in chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) were observed at 1-100 mg L(-1) iron or copper. The synthesis of chlorophyll and protein as well as carbohydrate and the uptake of phosphate and nitrogen were inhibited seriously by excess iron and copper. Proline content decreased with increasing iron or copper concentration, however, MDA content increased with increasing iron or copper concentration.

  6. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  7. Bioavailability of zinc, copper, and manganese from infant diets

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of trace element absorption experiments were performed using the Sprague-Dawley suckling rat put and infant rhesis monkey (Macaca mulatta) with extrinsic radiolabeling to assess the bioavailability of Zn, Cu, and Mn from infant diets and to examine specific factors that affect absorption of these essential nutrients. Bioavailability of Cu as assessed by 6 h liver uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) was highest from human milk and cow milk based formula and significantly lower from cow milk and soy based formula. Copper bioavailability from infant cereal products as assessed by whole body uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was low compared to the bioavailability from cow milk or human milk alone. /sup 65/Zn uptake in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was significantly lower from cereals fed alone or in combination with cow or human milk as compared to the uptake from the milks fed alone. Zn bioavailability varied among cereal diets, (lowest from cereals containing phytate and highest from cereal/fruit products). Mn bioavailability from infant diets was assessed using a modified suckling rat pup model. Bioavailability (24 h whole body retention of /sup 54/Mn) was high from all milks and commercial formulas tested.

  8. Effect of oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride on friction behavior of copper-iron contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron rider on a copper disk and a copper rider on an iron disk. The sputter cleaned iron and copper disk surfaces were saturated with oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride at atmospheric pressure. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the surfaces. Lower friction was obtained in all experiments with the copper rider sliding on the iron disk than when the couple was reversed. For both iron and copper disks, methyl mercaptan gave the best surface coverage and was most effective in reducing friction. For both iron and copper disks, methyl chloride was the least effective in reducing friction. With sliding, copper transferred to iron and iron to copper.

  9. Investigating relationships between biomarkers of exposure and environmental copper and manganese levels in house dusts from a Portuguese industrial city.

    PubMed

    Reis, A P; Costa, S; Santos, I; Patinha, C; Noack, Y; Wragg, J; Cave, M; Sousa, A J

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on data obtained from a pilot survey focusing on house dust and toenail metal(loids) concentrations in residents living in the industrial city of Estarreja. The study design hereby described aims at investigating relationships between human toenails and both copper and manganese levels in settled house dusts. A total of 21 households and 30 individuals were recruited for the pilot study: 19 households corresponding to 27 residents living near the industrial complex, forming the exposed group, plus 2 households and 3 residents from residential areas with no anticipated environmental contaminants that were used for comparison. Factorial analysis was used for source identification purposes. Investigation on the potential influence of environmental factors over copper and manganese levels in the toenails was carried out via questionnaire data and multiple correspondence analysis. The results show that copper concentrations are more elevated in the indoor dusts, while manganese concentrations are more elevated in the outdoor dust samples. The geometrical relationships in the datasets suggest that the backyard soil is a probable source of manganese to the indoor dust. Copper and manganese contents in the toenail clippings are more elevated in children than in adults, but the difference between the two age groups is not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Investigation of environmental factors influencing the exposure-biomarker association indicates a probable relationship between manganese contents in indoor dust and manganese levels in toenail clippings, a result that is partially supported by the bioaccessibility estimates. However, for copper, no relationship was found between indoor dusts and the biomarkers of exposure.

  10. Iron et al.: Incorporation of Manganese in the Crystal Lattice of Magnetosome Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozorov, Tanya; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Mallapragada, Surya K.; Howse, Paul; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2010-03-01

    Incorporation of foreign metal into the crystal matrix of the magnetotactic bacterial magnetite has been attempted worldwide. Recently, presence of small amounts of cobalt and manganese in magnetosome magnetite crystals in cultured and uncultured magnetotactic bacteria, respectively, was reported. Magnetization of the uncultured cells and their magnetosomes were not determined, while only marginal changes in the magnetic properties of the cultured cobalt-grown cells and their magnetosomes were observed, however no evidence of incorporation of these metals into the crystalline lattice was presented. We grew cells of a magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1, in the presence of manganese, ruthenium, zinc and vanadium, of which only manganese was incorporated within the magnetosome magnetite crystals. For the first time we demonstrate that the magnetic properties of magnetite crystals of magnetotactic bacteria can be significantly altered by the incorporation of metal ions, other than iron, in the crystal structure, as signaled by a major shift in the Verwey transition.

  11. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  12. Zebrafish in the sea of mineral (iron, zinc, and copper) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Xia, Zhidan; Wang, Fudi

    2014-01-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, and eight other minerals are classified as essential trace elements because they present in minute in vivo quantities and are essential for life. Because either excess or insufficient levels of trace elements can be detrimental to life (causing human diseases such as iron-deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease), the endogenous levels of trace minerals must be tightly regulated. Many studies have demonstrated the existence of systems that maintain trace element homeostasis, and these systems are highly conserved in multiple species ranging from yeast to mice. As a model for studying trace mineral metabolism, the zebrafish is indispensable to researchers. Several large-scale mutagenesis screens have been performed in zebrafish, and these screens led to the identification of a series of metal transporters and the generation of several mutagenesis lines, providing an in-depth functional analysis at the system level. Moreover, because of their developmental advantages, zebrafish have also been used in mineral metabolism-related chemical screens and toxicology studies. Here, we systematically review the major findings of trace element homeostasis studies using the zebrafish model, with a focus on iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, and iodine. We also provide a homology analysis of trace mineral transporters in fish, mice and humans. Finally, we discuss the evidence that zebrafish is an ideal experimental tool for uncovering novel mechanisms of trace mineral metabolism and for improving approaches to treat mineral imbalance-related diseases. PMID:24639652

  13. Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokel, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    The etiology of many neurodegenerative diseases has been only partly attributed to acquired traits, suggesting environmental factors may also contribute. Metal dyshomeostasis causes or has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Metal flux across the blood-brain barrier (the primary route of brain metal uptake) and the choroid plexuses as well as sensory nerve metal uptake from the nasal cavity are reviewed. Transporters that have been described at the blood-brain barrier are listed to illustrate the extensive possibilities for moving substances into and out of the brain. The controversial role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease, evidence suggesting brain aluminum uptake by transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis and of aluminum citrate by system Xc;{-} and an organic anion transporter, and results suggesting transporter-mediated aluminum brain efflux are reviewed. The ability of manganese to produce a parkinsonism-like syndrome, evidence suggesting manganese uptake by transferrin- and non-transferrin-dependent mechanisms which may include store-operated calcium channels, and the lack of transporter-mediated manganese brain efflux, are discussed. The evidence for transferrin-dependent and independent mechanisms of brain iron uptake is presented. The copper transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B, and their roles in Menkes and Wilson's diseases, are summarized. Brain zinc uptake is facilitated by L- and D-histidine, but a transporter, if involved, has not been identified. Brain lead uptake may involve a non-energy-dependent process, store-operated calcium channels, and/or an ATP-dependent calcium pump. Methyl mercury can form a complex with L-cysteine that mimics methionine, enabling its transport by the L system. The putative roles of zinc transporters, ZnT and Zip, in regulating brain zinc are discussed. Although brain uptake mechanisms for some metals have been identified, metal efflux from the brain has received little attention, preventing integration of

  14. [Analysis on the variation characteristics of iron and manganese concentration and its genesis in Changtan Reservoir in Taizhou, Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Yuan; Zheng, Chen; Yuan, Qi; Wang, Xian-Bing; Wang, Zi-Yan

    2014-10-01

    Changtan Reservoir in Taizhou City Zhejiang Province and its inflow rivers were surveyed in January and from April to December in 2013. Based on those data and the water quality monitoring data in Changtan Reservoir collected in previous years, the change characteristics of iron and manganese concentrations in source water reservoir were investigated. Furthermore, the causes of water pollution by iron and manganese were discussed based on the variation of water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) in reservoir with water depth. The results showed that the seasonal variation characteristics of iron and the manganese concentrations in reservoir were much in evidence. Their concentrations were high from June to August and the highest values over the years at the outlet of Changtan Reservoir were 2.38 mg · L(-1) and 1.24 mg · L(-1), respectively. The iron and the manganese concentrations exceeded the Surface Water Environment Quality Standard (GB 383822002) of 0.3 mg · L(-1) and 0.1 mg · L(-1) from May to October. And in 2013, their highest values in the reservoir outlet exceeded the standard by 5. 6 times and 12. 4 times, respectively. The maxima of iron and manganese concentrations in the major rivers were 0.89 mg · L(-1) and 0.56 mg · L(-1), which were lower than those in the reservoir outlet. The comprehensive analysis result indicated that the exogenous pollution was not the major source of iron and manganese in the reservoir. The iron and manganese concentration at the bottom of the reservoir reached the maximum in July, 2.42 mg · L(-1) and 1.20 mg · L(-1), respectively. The typical vertical distribution of temperature, DO and iron and manganese concentrations in the reservoir in summer showed that seasonal anoxic environment caused by the thermal stratification led to the release of iron manganese from the deposits. The endogenous pollution caused by thermal stratification effect was the direct cause for the high iron and manganese concentrations in water

  15. The copper-iron connection: hereditary aceruloplasminemia.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Thalia; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2002-10-01

    Hereditary aceruloplasminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron homeostasis due to loss-of-function mutations in the ceruloplasmin gene. Affected individuals may present in adulthood with evidence of hepatic iron overload, diabetes, peripheral retinal degeneration, dystonia, dementia, or dysarthria. Laboratory studies demonstrate microcytic anemia, elevated serum ferritin, and a complete absence of serum ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity. Consistent with the observed neurologic findings, magnetic resonance imaging reveals iron accumulation within the basal ganglia. Histologic studies detect abundant iron in hepatocytes, reticuloendothelial cells of the liver and spleen, beta cells of the pancreas, and astrocytes and neurons throughout the central nervous system. Characterization of this disorder reveals an essential role for ceruloplasmin in determining the rate of iron efflux from cells with mobilizable iron stores and provides new insights into the mechanisms of human iron metabolism.

  16. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5) μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]). TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements. PMID:22074419

  17. Modified clinoptilolite in the removal of iron and manganese from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barloková, D.; Ilavský, J.

    2012-11-01

    It is necessary to treat water intended for drinking purposes in many cases to meet the requirements of the Regulation of the Government of the Slovak Republic No. 496/2010 on Drinking Water. There is a tendency to look for technology with new, more efficient and cost-effective materials and technologies. The goal of this study is to compare activated natural zeolite known as clinoptilolite (rich deposits of clinoptilolite were found in the region of East Slovakia Region in the 1980s) with the imported Greensand and Cullsorb materials in the removal of iron and manganese from water. The results obtained from experiments carried out at WTP Kúty prove that Klinopur-Mn is suitable for the removal of iron and manganese from water and is comparable with the imported materials.

  18. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  19. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  20. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  1. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  2. The concentration of manganese, iron and strontium in bone of red fox Vulpes vulpes (L. 1758).

    PubMed

    Budis, Halina; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Lanocha, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I

    2013-12-01

    The aims of the study were to determine manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr) concentrations in fox bone samples from north-western Poland and to examine the relationships between the bone Mn, Fe and Sr concentrations and the sex and age of the foxes. In the studied samples of fox cartilage, cartilage with adjacent compact bone, compact bone and spongy bone, the concentrations of the analysed metals had the following descending order: Fe > Sr > Mn. The only exception was in compact bone, in which the concentrations were arranged in the order Sr > Fe > Mn. Manganese concentrations were significantly higher in cartilage, compact bone and cartilage with compact bone than in spongy bone. Iron concentrations were higher in cartilage and spongy bone compared with compact bone. Strontium concentrations were greater in compact bone than in cartilage and spongy bone. The manganese, iron and strontium concentrations in the same type of bone material in many cases correlated with each other, with the strongest correlation (r > 0.70) between Mn and Fe in almost all types of samples. In addition, concentrations of the same metals in different bone materials were closely correlated for Mn and Fe in cartilage and cartilage with adjacent compact bone, and for Sr in compact bone and cartilage with compact bone. In the fox from NW Poland, there were no statistically significant differences in Mn, Fe and Sr in any of the types of bone material between the sexes and immature and adult foxes.

  3. Abu Zenima synthetic zeolite for removing iron and manganese from Assiut governorate groundwater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrag, Abd El Hay Ali; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mohamed, Atef Mohamed Gad; Saleem, Saleem Sayed; Fathy, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater in Upper Egypt especially in Assiut Governorate is considered the second source of fresh water and used for drinking, agriculture, domestic and industrial purposes. Unfortunately, it is characterized by high concentrations of iron and manganese ions. The study aimed at synthesizing zeolite-4A from kaolinite for removing the excess iron and manganese ions from Assiut Governorate groundwater wells. Therefor, the kaolinite was hydrothermally treated through the metakaolinization and zeolitization processes to produce crystalline zeolite-4A. The chemical composition of crystalline zeolite-4A and its morphology were then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the column experiments were conducted to study the performance of crystalline salt-4A as ion exchange and investigate their operating parameters and regeneration conditions. Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to predict adsorption capacity and the time required for 50 % breakthrough curves. The effects of initial concentrations of 600 and 1000 mg L-1 for Fe2+ and Mn2+, feed flow rate of 10-30 ml/min, and height range of 0.4-1.5 cm on the breakthrough behavior of the adsorption system were determined. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized zeolite-A4 can remove iron and manganese ions from groundwater to the permissible limit according to the standards drinking water law.

  4. Iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding and iron, copper and zinc status of lactating women from a human milk bank.

    PubMed

    Mello-Neto, Julio; Rondó, Patricia Helen Carvalho; Oshiiwa, Marie; Morgano, Marcelo Antonio; Zacari, Cristiane Zago; dos Santos, Mariana Lima

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of iron supplementation in pregnancy and breastfeeding on iron status of lactating women from a Brazilian Human Milk Bank. Blood and mature breast milk samples were collected from 145 women for assessment of iron status, as well as copper and zinc status. Haemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin were determined, respectively, by electronic counting, colorimetry and chemiluminescence. Transferrin and ceruloplasmin were analysed by nephelometry. Serum copper and zinc were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and serum alkaline phosphatase was measured by a colorimetric method. Iron, zinc and copper in breast milk were determined by spectrometry. Mean values of iron, copper and zinc (blood and breast milk) were compared by ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Iron supplementation was beneficial to prevent anaemia in pregnancy but not effective to treat anaemia. During breastfeeding, iron supplementation had a negative effect on maternal copper status, confirming an interaction between these micronutrients.

  5. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  6. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported.

  7. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  8. Occurrence and Distribution of Iron, Manganese, and Selected Trace Elements in Ground Water in the Glacial Aquifer System of the Northern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groschen, George E.; Arnold, Terri L.; Morrow, William S.; Warner, Kelly L.

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved trace elements, including iron and manganese, are often an important factor in use of ground water for drinking-water supplies in the glacial aquifer system of the United States. The glacial aquifer system underlies most of New England, extends through the Midwest, and underlies portions of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Concentrations of dissolved trace elements in ground water can vary over several orders of magnitude across local well networks as well as across regions of the United States. Characterization of this variability is a step toward a regional screening-level assessment of potential human-health implications. Ground-water sampling, from 1991 through 2003, of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey determined trace element concentrations in water from 847 wells in the glacial aquifer system. Dissolved iron and manganese concentrations were analyzed in those well samples and in water from an additional 743 NAWQA land-use and major-aquifer survey wells. The samples are from monitoring and water-supply wells. Concentrations of antimony, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, thallium, uranium, and zinc vary as much within NAWQA study units (local scale; ranging in size from a few thousand to tens of thousands of square miles) as over the entire glacial aquifer system. Patterns of trace element concentrations in glacial aquifer system ground water were examined by using techniques suitable for a dataset with zero to 80 percent of analytical results reported as below detection. During the period of sampling, the analytical techniques changed, which generally improved the analytical sensitivity. Multiple reporting limits complicated the comparison of detections and concentrations. Regression on Order Statistics was used to model probability distributions and estimate the medians and other quantiles of the trace element

  9. Effect of dietary iron and copper on performance and oxidative stability in broiler leg meat.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J A; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2000-05-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of removal of supplemental iron and copper from broiler diets during the last 3 weeks before slaughter on broiler performance, tissue vitamin E concentrations and oxidation values in raw; cooked and stored broiler leg meat. 2. Removal of supplemental iron and copper from the diet slightly decreased food efficiency; the differences were significant only when both minerals were removed simultaneously 3. Effect of iron withdrawal on iron concentration in tissue was low. However, total copper concentration in tissue was reduced in animals deprived of iron or both minerals simultaneously. 4. Removal of dietary iron and copper did not affect vitamin E concentration in raw and cooked meat, while stored meat showed lower concentrations in animals deprived of iron and copper simultaneously. 5. The removal of iron and copper from the diet reduced oxidation values in cooked broiler leg meat as measured by the thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances method (TBARS).

  10. Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Steinhauser, Georg; Peroutka, Marianne; Musilek, Andreas; Sterba, Johannes H; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Bichler, Max

    2009-12-01

    Carnivorous plants use animals as fertiliser substitutes which allow them to survive on nutrient deficient soils. Most research concentrated on the uptake of the prey's nitrogen and phosphorus; only little is known on the utilisation of other elements. We studied the uptake of three essential nutrients, potassium, iron and manganese, in three species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Cephalotus follicularis LaBilladiere, Sarracenia purpureaL., Heliamphora nutans Bentham). Using relatively short-lived and gamma-emitting radiotracers, we significantly improved the sensitivity compared to conventional protocols and gained the following results. We demonstrated the uptake of trace elements like iron and manganese. In addition, we found direct evidence for the uptake of potassium into the pitcher tissue. Potassium and manganese were absorbed to virtually 100% if offered in physiological concentrations or below in Cephalotus. Analysis of pitcher fluid collected in the natural habitat showed that uptake was performed here as efficiently as in the laboratory. The absorption of nutrients is an active process depending on living glandular cells in the pitcher epidermis and can be inhibited by azide. Unphysiologically high amounts of nutrients were taken up for a short time, but after a few hours the absorbing cells were damaged, and uptake stopped. Absorption rates of pitcher leaves from plants under controlled conditions varied highly, indicating that each trap is functionally independent. The comparison of minerals in typical prey with the plants' tissues showed that a complete coverage of the plants' needs by prey capture is improbable.

  11. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of banded iron formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Holland, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of the deposition of superior-type Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) is investigated in experiments where the effect of UV radiation on dissolved manganese was studied to determine if the commonly accepted photochemical model for BIF formation is consistent with the distribution of Mn in BIFs. Solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and about 180 microM MnCl2, with or without 3 to 200 microM FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light for up to 8 hrs; the solutions were deaerated and buffered to a pH of 7, and the experiments were conducted under oxygen-free atmosphere. Data on the rate of manganese photooxidation confirmed that a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations.

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biosorption of iron and manganese from aqueous medium using rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekola, F. A.; Hodonou, D. S. S.; Adegoke, H. I.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption behavior of rice husk ash with respect to manganese and iron has been studied by batch methods to consider its application for water and waste water treatment. The optimum conditions of adsorption were determined by investigating the effect of initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium time was observed at 120 min. The adsorption efficiencies were found to be pH dependent. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data were found to fit the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms for iron, but fitted only Langmuir isotherm for manganese. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to describe the manganese and iron kinetics more effectively. The thermodynamic experiment revealed that the adsorption processes involving both metals were exothermic. The adsorbent was finally applied to typical raw water with initial manganese and iron concentrations of 3.38 mg/l for Fe and 6.28 mg/l, respectively, and the removal efficiency was 100 % for Mn and 70 % for Fe. The metal ions were desorbed from the adsorbent using 0.01 M HCl, it was found to quantitatively remove 67 and 86 % of Mn and Fe, respectively, within 2 h. The results revealed that manganese and iron are considerably adsorbed on the adsorbent and could be an economic method for the removal of these metals from aqueous solutions.

  13. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  14. Sulfide, iron, manganese, and phosphate in the deep water of the Chesapeake Bay during anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavis, Jerome; Grant, Virginia

    1986-10-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen and sulfide, and of dissolved and particulate iron, manganese, and phosphate were measured as functions of salinity at a station in the Chesapeake Bay during stratification and deep water anoxia in spring and summer, 1981. The observed concentration/salinity profiles showed that oxygen was transported in a direction opposite to that of salt, while dissolved sulfide was transported in the same direction as salt through the anoxic water to be oxidized in oxygen consumption zones located below the steepest parts of the halocline. Both oxygen and sulfide were transported conservatively on 18 June. Their fluxes were 1·2 and 2 mol m -2 d -1, respectively. The oxygen flux was 30% of that stoichiometrically needed to oxidize the sulfide transported, suggesting that the oxygen consumption zone was advancing to shallower, less saline water, thus increasing the volume of anoxic water. Although oxygen was transported conservatively, sulfide was produced as it was transported through the anoxic water on 8 July. The anoxic water was supersaturated with respect to ferrous sulfide on 18 June, but most of the anoxic water was saturated on 8 July. Precipitation of ferrous sulfide had little effect on the sulfide flux on 18 June. The manganese(II) concentration/salinity profile exhibited a maximum in the oxygen consumption zone on 18 June. On 8 July the profile was independent of salinity at high salinities. Iron(II) and manganese(II) consumed little if any oxygen in the oxygen consumption zone. Soluble reactive phosphate was transported conservatively through the anoxic water on 18 June. It was produced as it was transported on 8 July. All of the phosphate was consumed in the oxygen consumption zones by sulfide oxidizing bacteria. On 18 June its flux, estimated to be 2·8 mmol m -2 d -1, was less than 10% of that required for bacterial oxidation of the sulfide reaching the oxygen consumption zone. The rest was oxidized chemically. The growth and

  15. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of Banded Iron Formations.

    PubMed

    Anbar, A D; Holland, H D

    1992-07-01

    The photochemical oxidation of Fe(2+) -hydroxide complexes dissolved in anoxic Precambrian oceans has been suggested as a mechanism to explain the deposition of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs). Photochemical studies have not yet addressed the low levels of manganese in many of these deposits, which probably precipitated from solutions bearing similar concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+. Depositional models must also explain the stratigraphic separation of iron and manganese ores in manganiferous BIFs. In this study, solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and approximately 180 micromoles MnCl2 with or without 3 to 200 micromoles FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light from a medium-pressure mercury-vapor lamp for up to 8 hours. The solutions were deaerated and buffered to pH approximately 7, and all experiments were conducted under O2-free (< 1 ppm) atmospheres. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2, approximately 20% of the Mn2+ was oxidized and precipitated as birnessite in 8 hours. Manganese precipitation was only observed when light with lambda < 240 nm was used. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2 + FeCl2, little manganese was lost from solution, while Fe2+ was rapidly oxidized to Fe3+ and precipitated as gamma-FeOOH or as amorphous ferric hydroxide. The Mn:Fe ratio of these precipitates was approximately 1:50, similar to the ratios observed in BIFs. A strong upper limit on the rate of manganese photo-oxidation during the Precambrian is estimated to be 0.1 mg cm-2 yr-1, a factor of 10(3) slower than the rate of iron photo-oxidation considered reasonable in BIF depositional basins. Thus, a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations, although models that invoke molecular O2 as the oxidant of Fe2+ and Mn2+ are not precluded. Apparently, oxide facies BIFs could have formed under anoxic, as well as under mildly oxygenated atmospheres.

  16. High-rate deformation of nanocrystalline iron and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinani, A. B.; Shpeizman, V. V.; Vlasov, A. S.; Zil'berbrand, E. L.; Kozachuk, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    Stress-strain curves are recorded during a high-speed impact and slow loading for nanocrystalline and coarse-grained iron and copper. The strain-rate sensitivity is determined as a function of the grain size and the strain. It is shown that the well-known difference between the variations of the strain-rate sensitivity of the yield strength with the grain size in fcc and bcc metals can be extended to other strain dependences: the strain-rate sensitivity of flow stresses in iron decreases with increasing strain, and that in copper increases. This difference also manifests itself in different slopes of the dependence of the strain-rate sensitivity on the grain size when the strain changes.

  17. Copper Iron Conversion Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolig, Jan Gustav; Alnegren, Patrik; Froitzheim, Jan; Svensson, Jan-Erik

    2015-11-01

    A conversion coating of iron and copper was investigated with the purpose of increasing the performance of Sanergy HT as a potential SOFC interconnect material. Samples were exposed to a simulated cathode atmosphere (air, 3 % H2O) for durations of up to 1000 h at 850 °C. Their performance in terms of corrosion, chromium evaporation and electrical resistance (ASR) was monitored and compared to uncoated and cobalt-coated Sanergy HT samples. The copper iron coating had no negative effects on corrosion protection and decreased chromium evaporation by about 80%. An Area Specific Resistance (ASR) of 10 mΩcm2 was reached after 1000 h of exposure. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed well adherent oxide layers comprised of an inner chromia layer and an outer spinel oxide layer.

  18. Growth and Dissolution of Iron and Manganese Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Scot T. Martin

    2008-12-22

    Growth and dissolution of Fe and Mn oxide films are key regulators of the fate and transport of heavy metals in the environment, especially during changing seasonal conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. The Fe and Mn are present at much higher concentrations than the heavy metals, and, when Fe and Mn precipitate as oxide films, heavy metals surface adsorb or co-precipitate and are thus essentially immobilized. Conversely, when the Fe and Mn oxide films dissolve, the heavy metals are released to aqueous solution and are thus mobilized for transport. Therefore, understanding the dynamics and properties of Fe and Mn oxide films and thus on the uptake and release of heavy metals is critically important to any attempt to develop mechanistic, quantitative models of the fate, transport, and bioavailablity of heavy metals. A primary capability developed in our earlier work was the ability to grow manganese oxide (MnO{sub x}) films on rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}) substrate in presence of dissolved oxygen under mild alkaline conditions. The morphology of the films was characterized using contact-mode atomic force microscopy. The initial growth began by heteroepitaxial nucleation. The resulting films had maximum heights of 1.5 to 2 nm as a result of thermodynamic constraints. Over the three past years, we have investigated the effects of MnO{sub x} growth on the interactions of MnCO{sub 3} with charged ions and microorganisms, as regulated by the surface electrical properties of the mineral. In 2006, we demonstrated that MnO{sub x} growth could induce interfacial repulsion and surface adhesion on the otherwise neutral MnCO{sub 3} substrate under environmental conditions. Using force-volume microscopy (FVM), we measured the interfacial and adhesive forces on a MnO{sub x}/MnCO{sub 3} surface with a negatively charged silicon nitride tip in a 10-mM NaNO3 solution at pH 7.4. The interfacial force and surface adhesion of MnOx were approximately 40 pN and 600 pN, respectively

  19. Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

  20. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Copper, ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase and iron parameters in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tórsdóttir, G; Kristinsson, J; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, S; Snaedal, J; Jóhannesson, T

    1999-11-01

    In a previous study we found copper dyshomeostasis in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, levels of copper in plasma, of ceruloplasmin in serum and ceruloplasmin oxidative activity as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in erythrocytes were determined in 40 patients with Parkinson's disease and their healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Copper concentrations did not differ significantly in the two groups, whereas both ceruloplasmin concentrations and ceruloplasmin oxidative activity were significantly lower in the patients, also relative to ceruloplasmin mass. SOD activity was not significantly different in the two groups but decreased significantly with the duration of disease. The same was found for ceruloplasmin oxidative activity. Ceruloplasmin oxidative activity and SOD activity did not decrease with age. Levels of serum iron, serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity were determined in about 30 of the patients and an equal number of controls and were not found to differ. Transferrin levels were significantly lower in the patients than in their controls but, conversely, the transferrin saturation was significantly higher in the patients. The results indicate that patients with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease have defective ceruloplasmin and SOD activities in common and that these defects are not necessarily associated with major disturbances in iron homeostasis.

  2. Plasma copper, zinc and iron in burn patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.K.; Tamura, T.; Sauberlich, H.E.; Dimick, A.R. )

    1989-02-09

    Plasma copper, zinc and iron levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry in 25 patients admitted to the Burn Care Center from December 1986 to May 1988. The plasma samples were obtained within 48 hours of admission while the patients were beginning aggressive oral nutrition support therapy. The percentage of total body-surface area (TBSA) burn ranged from 11 to 65 (mean 29.2%) and involved 2nd and 3rd degree burns. The mean plasma zinc and iron levels were 0.77 ({plus minus} 0.23; SD) and 0.58 ({plus minus} 0.22) {mu}g/ml, respectively, in 11 patients with < 25% TBSA burns. These levels were higher than the means of 14 patients with {ge} 25% TBSA burns (0.67 {plus minus} 0.23 and 0.50 {plus minus} 0.13 {mu}g/ml, respectively). Plasma copper levels were significantly decreased in patients with {ge} 25% TBSA burns (0.56 {plus minus} 0.27 {mu}l/ml) compared to patients with < 25% TBSA burns. A significant correlation between TBSA burn and plasma copper levels was also found among all patients. The data indicate that the plasma copper levels are lower as the percentage of body surface area burn increases. Although the mechanisms of this rapid decline of plasma levels are not known, careful attention should be given to monitor the nutrient status of these minerals during the treatment and recovery of burn patients.

  3. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A.; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A.; Mirts, Evan N.; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  4. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A; Mirts, Evan N; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  5. THEORETICAL TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE CUMULATIVE IMPACT OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDATION IN STREAMS RECEIVING COAL-MINE DISCHARGE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, Keith E.; Banaszak, Konrad J.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Two U. S. Geological Survey computer programs are modified and linked to predict the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in coal-mine discharge on the dissolved-chemical quality of a receiving stream. The coupled programs calculate the changes in dissolved-iron, dissolved-manganese, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and the pH of surface water downstream from the discharge. The cumulative impact of representative discharges from several coal mines on stream quality in a small watershed in southwestern Indiana was simulated to determine the effectiveness and sensitivity of the coupled programs.

  6. Alterations in the metabolism of endogenous trace metals due to cadmium, manganese and nickel - effect of partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.C.; Ahmad, I.; Kaur, G.; Hasan, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cadmium, manganese and nickel on the levels of copper, manganese, iron and zinc in liver was studied in sham operated and partially hepatectomized rats, 72 hrs after metal administration. Partial hepatectomy produced significant increase in the level of zinc and decrease in the levels of copper, iron and manganese. The metabolic disposition of these essential micronutrients were significantly altered as a result of cadmium administration in both the groups. Manganese and nickel had little effect and only induced the level of zinc.

  7. Quenching of cast iron with a high copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Natalia; Bataev, Anatoly; Razumakov, Aleksey

    2015-10-01

    The structure, hardness, and microhardness of hypoeutectic white cast iron alloyed with copper after quenching at 1000 and 1120°C is studied. Features of cupric inclusion separation are detected and its size distribution is shown. After quenching the structure consists of martensite, residual austenite, and vermicular graphite. A decrease in the size and volume fraction of globular cupric inclusions is detected, along with the complete dissolution of nanoscale cupric inclusions, which are located in the ferrite of pearlite colonies. The result of these structural changes is a 30% increase in iron hardness. Cast iron quenching at 1120° C is followed by an increase in the austenite volume fraction to 69%. This effect is due to a decrease in the volume fraction of graphite and a corresponding increase in the carbon content in γ-Fe. Cupric inclusions are located mainly along boundaries of austenitic grains.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  9. The hierarchy of transition metal homeostasis: iron controls manganese accumulation in a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Shir; Salomon, Eitan; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Lehmann, Robert; Georg, Jens; Zer, Hagit; Hess, Wolfgang R; Keren, Nir

    2014-12-01

    Iron and manganese are part of a small group of transition metals required for photosynthetic electron transport. Here, we present evidence for a functional link between iron and manganese homeostasis. In the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, Fe and Mn deprivation resulted in distinct modifications of the physiological status. The effect on growth and photosynthetic activity under Fe limitation were more severe than those observed under Mn limitation. Moreover, the intracellular elemental quotas of Fe and Mn were found to be linked. Fe limitation reduced the intracellular Mn quota. Mn limitation did not exert a reciprocal effect on Fe quotas. Microarray analysis comparing Mn and Fe limitation revealed a stark difference in the extent of the transcriptional response to the two limiting conditions, reflective of the physiological responses. The effects of Fe limitation on the transcriptional network are widespread while the effects on Mn limitation are highly specific. Our analysis also revealed an overlap in the transcriptional response of specific Fe and Mn transporters. This overlap provides a framework for explaining Fe limitation induced changes in Mn quotas.

  10. Manganese, iron and phosphorus cycling in an estuarine mudflat, Loire, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Mouret, A.; Knoery, J.; Geslin, E.; Péron, O.; Metzger, E.

    2016-12-01

    The sampling of surface sediment from two sites of a mudflat of the Loire Estuary during four contrasting seasons has led to new information about geochemical cycling under transient diagenesis fuelled by flood deposition. Based on stocks of reactive iron-oxides and manganese-oxides (ascorbate-extracted) and pore water concentrations, the progressive evolution of flood deposits is described. Three major steps are observed: at first, there is no manganese, iron and phosphorus release into pore water within the flood-deposited layer. Then, during a period of approximately 1 month, Mn oxides are consumed while the dissolved Mn concentration increases. Simultaneously, the Fe oxide-rich layer from flood deposition prevents (or at least limits) phosphorus release into pore water as shown by the increasing P/Fe ratio of the ascorbate extractions. During spring and summer, Fe oxides are reductively dissolved until complete depletion results. This period also corresponds to the saturation of Fe oxides by phosphorus and probably maximum P release to the water column. The site located closer to the shore showed higher density of benthic faunas leading to more intense bioirrigation. The importance of bioturbation on the year scale for biogeochemical processes is discussed according to both bioirrigation and biomixing processes.

  11. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    PubMed

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident.

  12. Pilot scale evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes for the removal of high level of iron and manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Yannoni, C.C.; Kinsley, B.P.; Marston, T.R.

    1996-11-01

    Iron and manganese originating from groundwater supplies have a long history of causing consumer complaints in water distribution systems. Although iron and manganese are not public health concerns, they are a major concern from an aesthetic standpoint. The elevated awareness of consumers in regard to the quality of drinking water, an increase in regulations requiring additional treatment and the cost associated with developing new sources of supply, has required many utilities to implement improvements to existing facilities. Historical water quality data collected from the Connecticut Water Company`s (CWC) Westbrook Well revealed an increasing trend in iron and manganese concentrations. As a result, the existing greensand filtration facility located at the well, provides insufficient removal rates and inefficient operating cycles. Variations in operating procedures were not successful in correcting these problems. A water treatment feasibility study recommended evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes to reduce iron (9 mg/l) and manganese (1.5 mg/l) levels below the secondary maximum contaminant levels of 0.30 and 0.05 mg/l, respectively. Assessment of these processes was accomplished through the construction and operation of a 5 gallon per minute (gpm) capacity pilot plant at the Westbrook Water Treatment Plant. Application of biological treatment for iron removal was then piloted on the existing full-scale treatment facility.

  13. Iron depletion increases manganese uptake and potentiates apoptosis through ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Li, Yuan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a risk factor for manganese (Mn) accumulation. Excess Mn promotes neurotoxicity but the mechanisms involved and whether iron depletion might affect these pathways is unknown. To study Mn intoxication in vivo, iron deficient and control rats were intranasally instilled with 60 mg MnCl2/kg over 3 weeks. TUNEL staining of olfactory tissue revealed that Mn exposure induced apoptosis and that iron deficiency potentiated this effect. In vitro studies using the dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line confirmed that Mn-induced apoptosis was enhanced by iron depletion using the iron chelator desferrioxamine. Mn has been reported to induce apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress. In SH-SY5Y cells, Mn exposure induced the ER stress genes glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Increased phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (phospho-eIF2α) was also observed. These effects were accompanied by the activation of ER resident enzyme caspase-12, and the downstream apoptotic effector caspase-3 was also activated. All of the Mn-induced responses were enhanced by DFO treatment. Inhibitors of ER stress and caspases significantly blocked Mn-induced apoptosis and its potentiation by DFO, indicating that ER stress and subsequent caspase activation underlie cell death. Taken together, these data reveal that Mn induces neuronal cell death through ER stress and the UPR response pathway and that this apoptotic effect is potentiated by iron deficiency most likely through upregulation of DMT1. PMID:23764342

  14. Promotion of atherogenesis by copper or iron-Which is more likely?

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Ren, Minqin; Ning, Pan; Tan Kwong Huat, Benny; Halliwell, Barry . E-mail: bchbh@nus.edu.sg; Watt, Frank

    2007-02-02

    Iron levels increase in atherosclerotic lesions in cholesterol fed-rabbits and play a role in atherosclerosis. We investigated whether copper also rises. Male New Zealand White rabbits were fed high-cholesterol diets for 8 weeks. After sacrifice, lesion sizes were determined, and elemental analyses of the lesion and unaffected artery wall performed using nuclear microscopy. Unlike iron, lesion copper is decreased by about half compared with the unaffected artery wall, and much less copper than iron is present. Our data suggest that iron may be more likely to play a role in the promotion of atherosclerosis than copper.

  15. Influence of copper, manganese and pH on the growth and several enzyme activities in mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria.

    PubMed

    Kong, E X

    1995-01-01

    The effects of various concentrations of copper, manganese and pH on the growth and several enzyme activities of mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria were investigated. Cu (5-25 mg l-1) and lower pH (3.0-4.0) strongly inhibited the mycelial growth (dry weight), however, the protein content was not affected evidently. Some enzyme activities were lower as the Cu and Mn concentrations were higher and other enzymes had the maximum values at the specified concentration. The activities of the following enzymes were significantly correlated with the fungal growth after the treatment with Cu: G6PDH, MTLDH and trehalase, and with Mn: G6PDH, MTLDH and alpha-mannosidase respectively. Measurement of these enzyme activities might provide a useful biochemical criterion for the evaluation of the fungitoxicity of soil contaminated by copper or manganese.

  16. Coprecipitation and redox reactions of manganese oxides with copper and nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.; Roberson, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Open-system, continuous-titration experiments have been done in which a slow flux of ???0.02 molar solution of Mn2+ chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate with Cu2+ or Ni2+ in lesser concentrations was introduced into an aerated reactor solution held at constant temperature and at constant pH by a pH-stat titrator that added dilute NaOH. The resulting mixtures of metal oxyhydroxides and their native solutions were aged for periods as long as 2 1/2 years. Fresh and aged precipitates were characterized by chemical analysis, oxidation state determinations, X-ray and electron diffraction, and electron microscopy. The precipitates can be described as mixtures of oxide and oxyhydroxide species, using concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical thermodynamics. The metal-ion content of the aged precipitates in systems that contained copper is distributed among three principal components. One of these is a mixed oxide Cu2Mn3O8 in which all Mn is in the 4+ oxidation state. A major component in all precipitates is feitknechtite, ??MnOOH. These forms are supplemented by CuO or by birnessite or ramsdellite forms of MnO2 where stoichiometry and thermodynamic calculations predict them. In systems that contained nickel and manganese, identifiable components included ??MnOOH, Ni(OH)2, and the same two forms of MnO2. The oxidation number of the precipitated manganese increased during aging, and the pH of the supernatant solution decreased. The maximum Mn oxidation number observed was 3.55 in an Mn + Cu precipitate aged for 18 months. Concentrations of Cu2+ and Ni2+ generally decreased to values substantially below those predicted by oxide or hydroxide equilibrium. Scavenging effects of this type are common in natural aqueous systems. ?? 1989.

  17. Ternary copper complexes and manganese (III) tetrakis(4-benzoic acid) porphyrin catalyze peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Sueta, G; Ruiz-Ramírez, L; Radi, R

    1997-12-01

    Peroxynitrite is a powerful oxidant formed in biological systems from the reaction of nitrogen monoxide and superoxide and is capable of nitrating phenols at neutral pH and ambient temperature. This peroxynitrite-mediated nitration is catalyzed by a number of Lewis acids, including CO2 and transition-metal ion complexes. Here we studied the effect of ternary copper-(II) complexes constituted by a 1,10-phenanthroline and an amino acid as ligands. All the complexes studied accelerate both the decomposition of peroxynitrite and its nitration of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid at pH > 7. The rate of these reactions depends on the copper complex concentration in a hyperbolic plus linear manner. The yield of nitrated products increases up to 2.6-fold with respect to proton-catalyzed nitration and has a dependency on the concentration of copper complexes which follows the same function as observed for the rate constants. The manganese porphyrin complex, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin [Mn(tbap)], also promoted peroxynitrite-mediated nitration with an even higher yield (4-fold increase) than the ternary copper complexes. At pH = 7.5 +/- 0.2 the catalytic behavior of the copper complexes can be linearly correlated with the pKa of the phenanthroline present as a ligand, implying that a peroxynitrite anion is coordinated to the copper ion prior to the nitration reaction. These observations may prove valuable to understand the biological effects of these transition-metal complexes (i.e., copper and manganese) that can mimic superoxide dismutase activity and, in the case of the ternary copper complexes, show antineoplastic activity.

  18. Isoflavones Reduce Copper with Minimal Impact on Iron In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karlíčková, Jana; Macáková, Kateřina; Říha, Michal; Pinheiro, Liliane Maria Teixeira; Filipský, Tomáš; Horňasová, Veronika; Hrdina, Radomír; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are commonly consumed in many Asian countries and have potentially positive effects on human being. Only a few and rather controversial data on their interactions with copper and iron are available to date. 13 structurally related isoflavones were tested in the competitive manner for their Cu/Fe-chelating/reducing properties. Notwithstanding the 5-hydroxy-4-keto chelation site was associated with ferric, ferrous, and cupric chelation, the chelation potential of isoflavones was low and no cuprous chelation was observed. None of isoflavones was able to substantially reduce ferric ions, but the vast majority reduced cupric ions. The most important feature for cupric reduction was the presence of an unsubstituted 4′-hydroxyl; contrarily the presence of a free 5-hydroxyl decreased or abolished the reduction due to chelation of cupric ions. The results from this study may enable additional experiments which might clarify the effects of isoflavones on human being and/or mechanisms of copper absorption. PMID:26273421

  19. Isoflavones Reduce Copper with Minimal Impact on Iron In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Karlíčková, Jana; Macáková, Kateřina; Říha, Michal; Pinheiro, Liliane Maria Teixeira; Filipský, Tomáš; Horňasová, Veronika; Hrdina, Radomír; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are commonly consumed in many Asian countries and have potentially positive effects on human being. Only a few and rather controversial data on their interactions with copper and iron are available to date. 13 structurally related isoflavones were tested in the competitive manner for their Cu/Fe-chelating/reducing properties. Notwithstanding the 5-hydroxy-4-keto chelation site was associated with ferric, ferrous, and cupric chelation, the chelation potential of isoflavones was low and no cuprous chelation was observed. None of isoflavones was able to substantially reduce ferric ions, but the vast majority reduced cupric ions. The most important feature for cupric reduction was the presence of an unsubstituted 4'-hydroxyl; contrarily the presence of a free 5-hydroxyl decreased or abolished the reduction due to chelation of cupric ions. The results from this study may enable additional experiments which might clarify the effects of isoflavones on human being and/or mechanisms of copper absorption.

  20. Metabolism and tissue distribution of trace elements in broiler chickens' fed diets containing deficient and plethoric levels of copper, manganese, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sovik; Haldar, Sudipto; Saha, Pinaki; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar

    2010-11-01

    Supplementation of broiler diets with copper, manganese, and zinc at levels higher than that stipulated by the National Research Council 1994 reportedly improved live weight, feed conversion, and cured leg abnormality supposedly caused by inadequate intake of Mn and Zn. The objective of the study was to ascertain the effects of plethoric supplementation of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) on performance and metabolic responses in broiler chickens. The study also aimed to discriminate the responses of the birds when the mineral elements were supplemented either in an inorganic or in an organic form. Cobb 400 broiler chickens (1-day old, n = 300) were assigned to three dietary treatments each containing nine replicates with ten birds for 39 days. The treatments included a control in which the diet was devoid of supplemental trace elements and treatments supplemented with an inorganic trace element premix (ITM) and supplemented with a combination of the inorganic and an organic trace element premix (OTM). The ITM contained (per kilogram) copper, 15 g; iron, 90 g; manganese, 90 g; zinc, 80 g (all as sulfated salts); iodine (as potassium iodide), 2 g; and selenium (as sodium selenite), 0.3 g. The OTM on the other hand, contained copper, 2.5 g; iron, 15 g; manganese, 15 g; zinc, 13.33 g; and chromium, 0.226 g (all as protein chelates). Plethoric supplementation of trace elements improved live weight gain and feed/gain ratio (p < 0.05). Leg abnormality developed in the 16% of the control group of birds but not in the supplemented group. Metabolizability of dry matter, organic matter, and protein was higher (p < 0.01) in the ITM and OTM groups. Excretion of Cu, Fe, and Zn decreased (p < 0.1) due to supplementation of the trace elements leading to increased apparent absorption of the said mineral elements (p < 0.01). Concentration of the concerned trace elements in serum, liver, and composite muscle samples was higher (p < 0.05) in the ITM and OTM dietary groups

  1. Joint toxic action of binary metal mixtures of copper, manganese and nickel to Paronychiurus kimi (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Son, Jino; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Yongeun; Shin, Key-Il; Hyun, Seunghun; Cho, Kijong

    2016-10-01

    The joint toxic effects of binary metal mixtures of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and nickel (Ni) on reproduction of Paronhchiurus kimi (Lee) was evaluated using a toxic unit (TU) approach by judging additivity across a range of effect levels (10-90%). For all metal mixtures, the joint toxic effects of metal mixtures on reproduction of P. kimi decreased in a TU-dependent manner. The joint toxic effects of metal mixtures also changed from less than additive to more than additive at an effect level lower than or equal to 50%, while a more than additive toxic effects were apparent at higher effect levels. These results indicate that the joint toxicity of metal mixtures is substantially different from that of individual metals based on additivity. Moreover, the close relationship of toxicity to effect level suggests that it is necessary to encompass a whole range of effect levels rather than a specific effect level when judging mixture toxicity. In conclusion, the less than additive toxicity at low effect levels suggests that the additivity assumption is sufficiently conservative to warrant predicting joint toxicity of metal mixtures, which may give an additional margin of safety when setting soil quality standards for ecological risk assessment.

  2. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  3. Iron supplementation does not affect copper and zinc absorption in breastfed infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplements are commonly recommended for infants but were suggested to inhibit zinc and copper absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate potential effects of iron supplementation, infant age, and mineral status on zinc and copper absorption in infants at 6 and 9 mo of age. Twen...

  4. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  5. Mild copper deficiency alters gene expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Coudray, Charles; Schneider, Susanne; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Mazur, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Iron and copper homeostasis share common proteins and are therefore closely linked to each other. For example, copper-containing proteins like ceruloplasmin and hephaestin oxidize Fe(2+) during cellular export processes for transport in the circulation bound to transferrin. Indeed, copper deficiency provokes iron metabolism disorders leading to anemia and liver iron accumulation. The aim of the present work was to understand the cross-talk between copper status and iron metabolism. For this purpose we have established dietary copper deficiency in C57BL6 male mice during twelve weeks. Hematological parameters, copper and iron status were evaluated. cDNA microarray studies were performed to investigate gene expression profiles of proteins involved in iron metabolism in the liver, duodenum and spleen. Our results showed that copper deficiency induces microcytic and hypochromic anemia as well as liver iron overload. Gene expression profiles, however, indicate that hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression neither compensates for hepatic iron overload nor the anemia observed in this mouse model. Instead, major modifications of gene expression occurred in the spleen. We observed increased mRNA levels of the transferrin receptors 1 and 2 and of several proteins involved in the heme biosynthesis pathway (ferrochelatase, UroD, UroS,...). These results suggest that copper-deficient mice respond to the deficiency induced anemia by an adaptation leading to an increase in erythrocyte synthesis.

  6. Determination of Nickel and Manganese Contaminants in Pharmaceutical Iron Supplements Using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Pedro; Amaro, Pedro; Santos, José Paulo; de Assis, Joaquim T; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the capability of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXF) spectrometry in a triaxial geometry apparatus as a fast and nondestructive determination method of both dominant and contaminant elements in pharmaceutical iron supplements. The following iron supplements brands with their respective active ingredients were analyzed: Neutrofer fólico (iron gylcinate), Anemifer (iron(II) sulfate monohydrate), Noripurum (iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex), Sulferbel (iron(II) sulfate monohydrate), and Combiron Fólico (carbonyl iron). Although we observe a good agreement between the iron content obtained by the present method and that indicated in the supplement's prescribed dose, we observe contamination by manganese and nickel of up to 180 μg and 36 μg, respectively. These contents correspond to 7.2% and 14.4% of the permitted daily exposure of manganese and nickel, respectively, for an average adult individual as determined by the European Medicine Agency (EMEA). The method was successfully validated against the concentrations of several certified reference materials of biological light matrices with similar concentrations of contaminants. Moreover, we also validated our method by comparing the concentrations with those obtained with the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission technique.

  7. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  8. Serum concentration of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt and the copper/zinc ratio in horses with equine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Yörük, Ibrahim; Deger, Yeter; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat; Ataseven, Veysel

    2007-07-01

    The serum concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt and copper/zinc ratio were investigated in horses infected with equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). Nine horses were naturally infected with the virus and nine healthy horses served as controls. The concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, and cobalt were determined spectrophotometrically in the blood serum of all horses. The results were (expressed in micrograms per deciliters) copper 2.80 +/- 0.34 vs 1.12 +/- 0.44, zinc 3.05 +/- 0.18 vs 0.83 +/- 0.06, iron 2.76 +/- 0.17 vs 3.71 +/- 0.69, cobalt 0.19 +/- 0.37 vs 0.22 +/- 0.45, and copper/zinc ratio 0.72 +/- 0.38 vs 1.41 +/- 0.36 for control vs infected group, respectively. In conclusion, copper and zinc concentrations of the infected group were lower than the control group (p < 0.001), whereas iron concentration and the copper/zinc ratio of the infected group were higher than the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). The cobalt concentration was not found to be statistically different between two groups. It might be emphasized that copper/zinc ratio was significantly affected by the EHV-1 infection, so it could be taken into consideration during the course of infection.

  9. Lead-210, polonium-210, manganese and iron in the Cariaco Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Michael P.; Brewer, Peter G.; Spencer, Derek W.; Murray, James W.; Goddard, John

    1980-02-01

    Measurements of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, sulfide, 226Ra, Mn, Fe, 210Pb, 210Po, and total suspended matter from three cruises of R.V. Atlantis II in the Cariaco Trench are reported. Distributions of dissolved and particulate Mn and Fe are similar to those for the Black Sea and reflect similar diffusion and redox-potential controls. Results for 210Pb and 226Ra in the anoxic deep water indicate a residence time for 210Pb in solution of less than two years. Particulate 210Pb results suggest that removal occurs largely by incorporation into metal sulfide phases forming in the water column. There is also evidence for precipitation of 210Pb with manganese oxide or iron hydroxide just above the O 2-H 2S interface. In the upper 300 m, 210Po is enriched by 55% over radioactive equilibrium with 210Pb. Possible sources of this excess include the bottom sediments and the water upwelling along the Venezuelan coast.

  10. Sources and leaching of manganese and iron in the Saigon River Basin, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Van; Takizawa, Satoshi; Oguma, Kumiko; Phuoc, Nguyen Van

    2011-01-01

    High concentrations of manganese and iron in the Saigon River are major problems for the water supply in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Viet Nam. To identify their sources and leaching processes, we surveyed water quality along the Saigon River and ran batch leaching tests using soil and sediment samples. Two important leaching processes were identified: acidic leaching from acid sulfate soil (ASS) in the middle reaches of the river, and Mn dissolution and Fe reduction from sediments in the downstream reaches. Low pH caused the concurrent release of Fe and Mn from the ASS. In contrast, anoxia caused the release of Fe but not Mn from the sediments, whereas low pH facilitated Mn dissolution. Sediments are a more important source of Mn because of their higher Mn contents (10 times) and release rates (14 times) than those from ASS.

  11. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate.

  12. High-valent iron and manganese complexes of corrole and porphyrin in atom transfer and dioxygen evolving catalysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2011-04-14

    Manganese(V) imido complexes of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (H(3)tpfc) can be prepared by the reaction of Mn(III)(tpfc) and organic nitrene generated from either photolytic or thermal activation of organic azides. The terminal imido complexes of manganese(V) were among the first structurally characterized examples of Mn(V) terminal imido complexes in the literature. They feature a short Mn≡N triple bond and a nearly linear M[triple bond, length as m-dash]N-C angle. The ground state of (tpfc)Mn(V)(NAr) is singlet. Contrary to expectations, arylimido complexes of manganese(V) were stable to moisture and did not undergo [NR] group transfer to olefins. Manganese(V) imido corrole with an activated tosyl imido ligand was prepared from iodoimine (ArINTs) and manganese(III) corrole. The resulting complex (tpfc)Mn(NTs) is paramagnetic (S = 1), hydrolyzes to (tpfc)Mn(O) in the presence of water, abstracts hydrogen atoms from benzylic C-H bonds, and catalyzes aziridination of alkenes. Mechanistic studies on the aziridination and hydrogen atom transfer reactions are reviewed. This perspective also describes the reaction chemistry of the heme enzyme chlorite dismutase, the mechanism by which dioxygen is formed on a single-metal site, and recent advances in functional modelling of this enzyme. We also compare the reactivity of water-soluble iron versus manganese porphyrins towards the chlorite anion.

  13. Biogeochemistry of the coupled manganese-iron-sulfur cycles of intertidal surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosselmann, K.; Boettcher, M. E.; Billerbeck, M.; Walpersdorf, E.; Debeer, D.; Brumsack, H.-J.; Huettel, M.; Joergensen, B. B.

    2003-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of the coupled iron-manganese-sulfur-carbon cycles was studied in temperate intertidal surface sediments of the German Wadden Sea (North Sea). Coastal sampling sites include sand, mixed and mud flats with different organic matter and metal contents and permeability reflecting different hydrodynamic regimes. The field study focusses on the influence of temperature, organic matter load, and sediment types on the dynamics of biogeochemical reactions on different time scales (season, day-night, tidal cycles). One of the main interests was related to the cycling of metals (Mn, Fe) in relation to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Pore water profiles were investigated by sediment sectioning and high resolution gel sampling techniques. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured using radiolabeled sulfate with the whole core incubation technique and the spatial distribution of bacterial activity was visualised by using "2D-photoemulsion-monitoring technique". The biogeochemical sulfur cycle was additionally characterised by the stable isotope ratios (S,O) of different sulfur species (e.g., SO_4, AVS, pyrite). Element transfers (metals, nutrients) across the sediment-water interface were additionally quantified by the application of benthic flux chambers. Microbial sulfate reduction was generally highest in the suboxic zone of the surface sediments indicating its potential importance for the mobilization of iron and manganese. In organic matter poor permeable sediments tidal effects additionally influence the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved redox-sensitive metals. In organic matter-rich silty and muddy sediments, temperature controlled the microbial sulfate reduction rates. Depth-integrated sulfate reduction rates in sandy sediments were much lower and controlled by both temperature and organic matter. Formation of anoxic sediment surfaces due to local enhanced organic matter load (so-called "black spots") may create windows

  14. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  15. Interface driven magnetic interactions in nanostructured thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Desautels, R. D. Lierop, J. van; Shueh, C.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.

    2015-05-07

    We have fabricated thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix using a dual ion beam assisted deposition technique. A secondary End-Hall ion beam bombarded the iron atoms during deposition altering significantly the morphology of the films and allowing for control of the intermixing between iron and copper components. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray reflectometry experiments indicated that the morphology of the films was that of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix. Rietveld refinements of the diffraction pattern identified fcc-copper and amorphous iron. An increased amount of disorder was observed with a reduction in the amount of deposited iron from a 1:1 Fe:Cu ratio to 0.25:0.75 Fe:Cu ratio. Interfacial copper-iron alloys were identified by DC susceptibility experiments through their reduced T{sub C,Alloy} (370, 310, and 280 K) compared with that of bulk iron (∼1000 K). Element specific x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments were performed to identify the contributions to the magnetism from the iron and the copper-iron alloy.

  16. Integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed-membrane hybrid process for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Dashtban Kenari, Seyedeh Laleh; Barbeau, Benoit

    2017-04-15

    Newly developed ceramic membrane technologies offer numerous advantages over the conventional polymeric membranes. This work proposes a new configuration, an integrated pyrolucite fluidized bed (PFB)-ceramic MF/UF hybrid process, for improved iron and manganese control in drinking water. A pilot-scale study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this process with respect to iron and manganese control as well as membrane fouling. In addition, the fouling of commercially available ceramic membranes in conventional preoxidation-MF/UF process was compared with the hybrid process configuration. In this regard, a series of experiments were conducted under different influent water quality and operating conditions. Fouling mechanisms and reversibility were analyzed using blocking law and resistance-in-series models. The results evidenced that the flux rate and the concentration of calcium and humic acids in the feed water have a substantial impact on the filtration behavior of both membranes. The model for constant flux compressible cake formation well described the rise in transmembrane pressure. The compressibility of the filter cake substantially increased in the presence of 2 mg/L humic acids. The presence of calcium ions caused significant aggregation of manganese dioxide and humic acid which severely impacted the extent of membrane fouling. The PFB pretreatment properly alleviated membrane fouling by removing more than 75% and 95% of iron and manganese, respectively.

  17. In vitro susceptibility of the oomycete Pythium insidiosum to metallic compounds containing cadmium, lead, copper, manganese or zinc.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tatiana Corrêa; Weiblen, Carla; Botton, Sônia de Avila; Pereira, Daniela Isabel Brayer; de Jesus, Francielli Pantella Kunz; Verdi, Camila Marina; Gressler, Leticia Trevisan; Sangioni, Luís Antonio; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2016-11-05

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that causes pythiosis, an important and severe disease of difficult treatment that affects humans, domestic and wild animals. This infection is often described in horses in Brazil and humans in Thailand. In clinical practice, we have observed many cases that do not respond to available therapies, indicating the need to explore alternative therapeutic approaches. In this sense, studies using metal compounds in conjunction with available antimicrobial agents have been demonstrated greater antimicrobial activity. Thus, in this research, we tested in vitro activities of metallic compounds containing cadmium, lead, copper, manganese, or zinc against 23 isolates of P. insidiosum The assays were performed by broth microdilution based on CLSI M38-A2 document. The minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations were established for all isolates. Copper acetate and cadmium acetate showed the highest inhibitory effects, with minimal inhibitory concentration ranging from 4-64 μg/ml and 16-256 μg/ml, respectively. The mean geometric for minimal fungicidal concentrations were, respectively, 26 μg/ml and 111.43 μg/ml for copper acetate and cadmium acetate. These results suggest that copper and cadmium can inhibit P. insidiosum growth, highlighting the greater inhibitory activity of copper acetate. In addition, our results propose that copper and/or cadmium compounds can be used in upcoming researches to formulate effective new complexed drugs against P. insidiosum in in vitro and in vivo experimental models.

  18. Response of plasma copper, ceruloplasmin, iron and ions in carp, Cyprinus carpio to waterborne copper ion and nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Aliakbar; Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Cyprinus carpio was exposed to 0.25mgL(-1) copper as either copper sulfate (CuSO4) or copper oxide nanoparticles (nano-Cu), and 25mgL(-1) copper as nano-Cu for 14days. CuSO4 and high concentration of nano-Cu led to a significant increase in plasma total copper levels. Plasma free copper levels increased significantly in all copper-exposed treatments. Except for low concentration of nano-Cu after 7 and 14days, copper exposure generally led to a significant decrease in plasma ceruloplasmin levels. Plasma iron levels increased significantly in CuSO4 (all times) and nano-Cu (7th and 14th days) treatments. A significant elevation in plasma total iron binding capacity (TIBC) was observed after 3days in the fish exposed to low concentration nano-Cu, and after 14days in all copper-exposed treatments. Transferrin saturation (TSA) ratio showed significant increase in CuSO4 (3rd and 7th days) and the high concentration nano-Cu (7th day) treatments. Decrease in plasma chloride (7th and 14th days) and sodium (14th days) was observed in CuSO4 treatment. In conclusion, the results suggest that ionic copper is mainly absorbed via fish gill, whereas, nano-copper are more likely absorbed via gut. Also, data suggest that ionic copper has more adverse effects on the examined plasma biochemical characteristics compared to the equivalent nano-copper concentration, which may be due to the lower copper absorption by fish in the nano-copper suspension.

  19. Coexistence of Copper in the Iron-Rich Particles of Aceruloplasminemia Brain.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Hisao; Wakusawa, Shinya; Shigemasa, Ryota; Koide, Ryoji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Kato, Koichi; Ohara, Shinji; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between iron and copper has been discussed in association with human health and diseases for many years. Ceruloplasmin, a multi-copper oxidase, is mainly involved in iron metabolism and its genetic defect, aceruloplasminemia (ACP), shows neurological disorders and diabetes associated with excessive iron accumulation, but little is known about the state of copper in the brain. Here, we investigated localization of these metals in the brains of three patients with ACP using electron microscopes equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer. Histochemically, iron deposition was observed mainly in the basal ganglia and dentate nucleus, and to lesser degree in the cerebral cortex of the patients, whereas copper grains were not detected. X-ray microanalysis identified two types of iron-rich particles in their brains: dense bodies, namely hemosiderins, and their aggregated inclusions. A small number of hemosiderins and most inclusions contained a significant amount of copper which was enough for distinct Cu x-ray images. These copper-containing particles were observed more frequently in the putamen and dentate nucleus than the cerebral cortex. Coexistence of iron and copper was supported by good correlations in the molecular ratios between these two metals in iron-rich particles with Cu x-ray image. Iron-dependent copper accumulation in iron-rich particles may suggest that copper recycling is enhanced to meet the increased requirement of cuproproteins in iron overload brain. In conclusion, the iron-rich particles with Cu x-ray image were found in the ACP brain.

  20. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of Copper/Cobalt/Copper/Iron nanostructurated films with magnetoresistive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupinǎ, Victor; Prioteasa, Iulian; Ilie, Daniela; Manu, Radu; Petrǎşescu, Lucian; Tutun, Ştefan Gabriel; Dincǎ, Paul; MustaÅ£ǎ, Ion; Lungu, Cristian Petricǎ; Jepu, IonuÅ£; Vasile, Eugeniu; Nicolescu, Virginia; Vladoiu, Rodica

    2017-02-01

    Copper/Cobalt/Copper/Iron thin films were synthesized in order to obtain nanostructured materials with special magnetoresistive properties. The multilayer films were deposited on silicon substrates. In this respect we used Thermionic Vacuum Arc Discharge Method (TVA). The benefit of this deposition technique is the ability to have a controlled range of thicknesses starting from few nanometers to hundreds of nanometers. The purity of the thin films was insured by a high vacuum pressure and a lack of any kind of buffer gas inside the coating chamber. The morphology and structure of the thin films were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Techniques and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Magnetoresistive measurement results depict that thin films possess Giant Magneto-Resistance Effect (GMR). Magneto-Optic-Kerr Effect (MOKE) studies were performed to characterize the magnetic properties of these thin films.

  2. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  3. Gene expression profiling and phenotype analyses of S. cerevisiae in response to changing copper reveals six genes with new roles in copper and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Wijmenga, Cisca; Holstege, Frank C P

    2005-08-11

    Exhaustive microarray time course analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during copper starvation and copper excess reveal new aspects of metal-induced gene regulation. Aside from identifying targets of established copper- and iron-responsive transcription factors, we find that genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are downregulated and that copper-independent iron transport genes are preferentially upregulated, both during prolonged copper deprivation. The experiments also suggest the presence of a small regulatory iron pool that links copper and iron responses. One hundred twenty-eight genes with putative roles in metal metabolism were further investigated by several systematic phenotype screens. Of the novel phenotypes uncovered, hsp12-Delta and arn1-Delta display increased sensitivity to copper, cyc1-Delta and crr1-Delta show resistance to high copper, vma13-Delta exhibits increased sensitivity to iron deprivation, and pep12-Delta results in reduced growth in high copper and low iron. Besides revealing new components of eukaryotic metal trafficking pathways, the results underscore the previously determined intimate links between iron and copper metabolism and mitochondrial and vacuolar function in metal trafficking. The analyses further suggest that copper starvation can specifically lead to downregulation of respiratory function to preserve iron and copper for other cellular processes.

  4. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12-60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17-30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46-60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80-25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541-1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349-9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs.

  5. Baseline Blood Levels of Manganese, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in Residents of Beijing Suburb

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 μg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μ/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μ/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μ/L; for blood Pb, <100 μ/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μ/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. PMID:25836720

  6. Regulation of Copper Transport Crossing Brain Barrier Systems by Cu-ATPases: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Jiang, Wendy; Monnot, Andrew Donald; Bates, Christopher Alexander; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cellular copper (Cu) homeostasis involves Cu-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), i.e., ATP7A and ATP7B. The question as to how these Cu-ATPases in brain barrier systems transport Cu, i.e., toward brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or blood, remained unanswered. This study was designed to characterize roles of Cu-ATPases in regulating Cu transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCB) and to investigate how exposure to toxic manganese (Mn) altered the function of Cu-ATPases, thereby contributing to the etiology of Mn-induced parkinsonian disorder. Studies by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry revealed that both Cu-ATPases expressed abundantly in BBB and BCB. Transport kinetic studies by in situ brain infusion and ventriculo-cisternal (VC) perfusion in Sprague Dawley rat suggested that the BBB was a major site for Cu entry into brain, whereas the BCB was a predominant route for Cu efflux from the CSF to blood. Confocal evidence showed that the presence of excess Cu or Mn in the choroid plexus cells led to ATP7A relocating toward the apical microvilli facing the CSF, but ATP7B toward the basolateral membrane facing blood. Mn exposure inhibited the production of both Cu-ATPases. Collectively, these data suggest that Cu is transported by the BBB from the blood to brain, which is mediated by ATP7A in brain capillary. By diffusion, Cu ions move from the interstitial fluid into the CSF, where they are taken up by the BCB. Within the choroidal epithelial cells, Cu ions are transported by ATP7B back to the blood. Mn exposure alters these processes, leading to Cu dyshomeostasis-associated neuronal injury. PMID:24614235

  7. Metals, Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration: A focus on Iron, Manganese and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Avila, Daiana Silva; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Essential metals are crucial for the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Among the 23 elements that have known physiological functions in humans, 12 are metals, including iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). Nevertheless, excessive exposure to these metals may lead to pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration. Similarly, exposure to metals that do not have known biological functions, such as mercury (Hg), also present great health concerns. This reviews focuses on the neurodegenerative mechanisms and effects of Fe, Mn and Hg. Oxidative stress (OS), particularly in mitochondria, is a common feature of Fe, Mn and Hg toxicity. However, the primary molecular targets triggering OS are distinct. Free cationic iron is a potent pro-oxidant and can initiate a set of reactions that form extremely reactive products, such as OH•. Mn can oxidize dopamine (DA), generating reactive species and also affect mitochondrial function, leading to accumulation of metabolites and culminating with OS. Cationic Hg forms have strong affinity for nucleophiles, such as –SH and –SeH. Therefore, they target critical thiol- and selenol-molecules with antioxidant properties. Finally, we address the main sources of exposure to these metals, their transport mechanisms into the brain, and therapeutic modalities to mitigate their neurotoxic effects. PMID:23266600

  8. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  9. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  10. Manganese oxide shuttling in pre-GOE oceans - evidence from molybdenum and iron isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Florian; Wille, Martin; Gantert, Niklas; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2016-10-01

    The local occurrence of oxygen-rich shallow marine water environments has been suggested to significantly predate atmospheric oxygenation, which occurred during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) ca. 2.4 billion years ago. However, the potential influence of such 'oxygen oases' on the mobility, distribution and isotopic composition of redox sensitive elements remains poorly understood. Here, we provide new molybdenum and iron isotopic data from shallow marine carbonate and silicate iron formations of the Koegas Subgroup, South Africa, that confirm local ocean redox stratification prior to the GOE. Mn concentrations correlate negatively with both δ98 Mo and δ56 Fe values, which highlights the substantial role of particulate manganese for the cycling of Mo and Fe in the Paleoproterozoic oceans. Based on these trends we propose that pore water molybdate was recharged (1) by the diffusional transport of seawater molybdate with high δ98 Mo and (2) by the re-liberation of adsorbed molybdate with low δ98 Mo during Mn oxide dissolution within the sediment. The relative contribution of isotopically light Mo is highest close to a Mn chemocline, where the flux of Mn oxides is largest, causing the negative correlation of Mn concentrations and δ98 Mo values in the Koegas sediments. The negative correlation between δ56 Fe values and Mn concentrations is likely related to Fe isotope fractionation during Fe(II) oxidation by Mn oxides, resulting in lower δ56 Fe values in the uppermost water column close to a Mn chemocline. We argue that the preservation of these signals within Paleoproterozoic sediments implies the existence of vertically extended chemoclines with a smoother gradient, probably as a result of low atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, we suggest that abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by a Mn oxide particle shuttle might have promoted the deposition of the Koegas iron formations.

  11. Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to manganese and iron among welders.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Weiss, Tobias; Kendzia, Benjamin; Henry, Jana; Lehnert, Martin; Lotz, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Van Gelder, Rainer; Berges, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Mattenklott, Markus; Punkenburg, Ewald; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated airborne and internal exposure to manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) among welders. Personal sampling of welding fumes was carried out in 241 welders during a shift. Metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mn in blood (MnB) was analyzed by graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry. Determinants of exposure levels were estimated with multiple regression models. Respirable Mn was measured with a median of 62 (inter-quartile range (IQR) 8.4-320) μg/m(3) and correlated with Fe (r=0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94). Inhalable Mn was measured with similar concentrations (IQR 10-340 μg/m(3)). About 70% of the variance of Mn and Fe could be explained, mainly by the welding process. Ventilation decreased exposure to Fe and Mn significantly. Median concentrations of MnB and serum ferritin (SF) were 10.30 μg/l (IQR 8.33-13.15 μg/l) and 131 μg/l (IQR 76-240 μg/l), respectively. Few welders were presented with low iron stores, and MnB and SF were not correlated (r=0.07, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.20). Regression models revealed a significant association of the parent metal with MnB and SF, but a low fraction of variance was explained by exposure-related factors. Mn is mainly respirable in welding fumes. Airborne Mn and Fe influenced MnB and SF, respectively, in welders. This indicates an effect on the biological regulation of both metals. Mn and Fe were strongly correlated, whereas MnB and SF were not, likely due to higher iron stores among welders.

  12. In vitro preparation of iron-substituted human manganese superoxide dismutase: possible toxic properties for mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yamakura, Fumiyuki; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Furukawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yasunori

    2007-08-01

    We prepared an iron-substituted form of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) by using guanidine hydrochloride for the first time as a model of iron-misincorporated MnSOD, the formation of which has been reported by M. Yang et al. upon disruption of mitochondrial metal homeostasis in yeast (Yang et al. 2006, EMBO J. 25, 1775-1783). The iron-substituted enzyme contained 0.79 g atoms of Fe/mol of subunits and had a specific activity of 80 units/mg protein/g atom of Fe/mol of subunit, which was less than 3% of the activity of the purified MnSOD. Fe-substituted MnSOD (Fe-MnSOD) showed the same absorption spectrum as that of bacterial Fe-MnSODs reported, a similar pH-dependent change of the enzymatic activity, and a similar electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum. Fe-MnSOD showed more thermal stability than native MnSOD. The Fe-substituted enzyme showed a hydrogen-peroxide-mediated radical-generating activity, which was monitored by a cation radical of 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) formation similar to that of Cu,ZnSOD, but native human MnSOD and FeSOD showed no radical-generation ability. This evidence suggests that a substitution of Mn to Fe in human MnSOD in mitochondria may produce a disadvantage for oxidative stress in three ways: loss of the enzymatic activity, increase of stability, and gain of radical-generating ability.

  13. Removal of copper from carbon-saturated steel with an aluminum sulfide/iron sulfide slag

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Blander, M.

    1995-12-01

    Scrap iron and steel has long been considered a resource in the steel-making industry, and its value is largely determined by its impurity content. As the mini-mills, the major consumers of scrap iron and steel, expand into producing flat-rolled sheet, the demand for high-quality scrap will increase. Of the impurities present in scrap, copper is particularly troublesome because of its role in causing hot shortness. Therefore, the copper content of scrap should be kept below {approx} 0.1 wt%. A method for removing copper from steel could be used to improve the quality of scrap and make it more available for use by mini-mills. To determine the effectiveness of a binary slag consisting of aluminum sulfide and iron sulfide on the removal of copper from steel and iron, the distribution coefficient of copper between the slag and a carbon-saturated iron melt was investigated at 1,365 C. The composition of the slag was varied from nearly pure aluminum sulfide to pure iron sulfide. A maximum distribution coefficient of 30 was found, and the copper level in the iron melt was reduced to as low as 0.07 wt.% with a 4:1 ratio of iron to slag.

  14. Net Emission Coefficients for Copper and Iron Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassubek, Frank; Zilberberg, Oded; Doiron, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Radiative heat transfer is an important mechanism for heat transport in electrical arcs, e.g. in electrical switchgear. An exact description of this phenomenon is important (i) for the energy balance of the arc itself, and (ii) for the estimate of the escaping radiation that leads to evaporation of polymer nozzles; the evaporated material and its flow have a strong effect on the arcs. For low voltage arcs, the plasma composition within the arc is dominated by the contact material. In the present study, we compare copper and iron. Especially, we discuss the calculation of absorption and emission spectra and their characterisation by net emission coefficients. The latter describe well the effective power balance at the centre of the arc. We show that in addition to the net emission coefficients, it is important to characterise the radiation that is emitted from the arc core.

  15. The transition metals copper and iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Ríos, Camilo; Tristán-López, Luis; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montes, Sergio

    2010-07-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a worldwide health problem. Metals like iron and copper are essential for life, but they are also involved in several neurodegenerative mechanisms such as protein aggregation, free radical generation and oxidative stress. The role of Fe and Cu, their pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic relevance are discussed regarding four of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Metal-mediated oxidation by Fenton chemistry is a common feature for all those disorders and takes part of a self-amplifying damaging mechanism, leading to neurodegeneration. The interaction between metals and proteins in the nervous system seems to be a crucial factor for the development or absence of neurodegeneration. The present review also deals with the therapeutic strategies tested, mainly using metal chelating drugs. Metal accumulation within the nervous system observed in those diseases could be the result of compensatory mechanisms to improve metal availability for physiological processes.

  16. FENDL data testing for beryllium, lead, iron and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Wiegner, E.

    1994-12-31

    The Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL is a compilation of fusion-oriented data evaluations selected from the nuclear data files ENDF/B-VI (USA), BROND (Russian Federation), JENDL (Japan) and EFF (European Community) through an international effort initiated and coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The FENDL data file will serve as reference library for design calculations in the Engineering and Development Activities (EDA) phase of the ITER project. Prior to its use in design calculations there is a need to validate the FENDL data base through data tests against 14-MeV benchmark experiments. This work reports on the FENDL data testing performed at KfK for beryllium, lead, iron and copper. The FENDL data used for this purpose are those processed by IAEA/NDS in the Vitamin-J group structure (175 neutron and 42 gamma groups).

  17. Urinary excretion of copper, zinc and iron with and without D-penicillamine administration in relation to hepatic copper concentration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fieten, H; Hugen, S; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Hendriks, W H; Vernooij, J C M; Bode, P; Watson, A L; Leegwater, P A J; Rothuizen, J

    2013-08-01

    Hereditary copper-associated hepatitis in dogs resembles Wilson's disease, a copper storage disease in humans. Values for urinary copper excretion are well established in the diagnostic protocol of Wilson's disease, whereas in dogs these have not been evaluated. The objectives of this study were to characterize both basal and D-penicillamine induced urinary copper, zinc and iron excretion in dogs in relation to hepatic copper concentration. Beagles, Beagle-Bedlington terrier cross-breeds homozygous for the COMMD1 gene mutation that causes copper toxicosis, and Labrador retrievers with normal or increased hepatic copper concentrations were investigated. The hepatic copper phenotype was determined by histological evaluation of liver biopsies and measurement of the hepatic copper concentration by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Urinary excretion of copper, iron and zinc was measured via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry under basal conditions and after oral administration of a single dose (20mg/kg bodyweight) of the chelator D-penicillamine. There was a rapid increase in urinary excretion of copper and zinc, but not iron after D-penicillamine administration. This increase was not different between dogs with high or normal hepatic copper concentrations. D-penicillamine-induced urinary copper excretion and the copper/creatinine ratio did not correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in the dogs studied, although basal urinary copper/zinc ratios did correlate with hepatic copper concentrations in Labrador retrievers. The latter parameter may be useful in diagnostic and follow-up protocols for copper-associated hepatitis in Labrador retrievers.

  18. The commercialization of the FENIX iron control system for purifying copper electrowinning electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, D. R.; Dreisinger, D. B.; Lancaster, T.; Richmond, G. D.; Tomlinson, M.

    2004-07-01

    The FENIX Hydromet Iron Control System was installed at Western Metals Copper Ltd.’s Mt. Gordon Operations in Queensland, Australia. The system uses a novel and patented ion-exchange resin to selectively remove iron from copper electrolyte at the solvent extraction/electrowinning plant. At Mt. Gordon, the system delivered significant savings in reagent consumption (acid and cobalt sulfate for electrowinning and lime for neutralization of the raffinate bleed) and has the potential to deliver higher current efficiencies in copper electrowinning, leading to increased copper production.

  19. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  20. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  1. Evaluation of iron and manganese-coated pumice application for the removal of as(v) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Far, Leila Babaie; Souri, Bubak; Heidari, Masoumeh; Khoshnavazi, Roshan

    2012-12-10

    Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declined following every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by both adsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could be considered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions.

  2. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  3. The effect of induced anoxia and reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of organic carbon, phosphate, iron, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Annelie C; Arias-Esquivel, Victor A

    2009-11-15

    Eutrophication causes seasonally anoxic bottom waters in coastal environments, but we lack information on effects of onset of anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of redox-sensitive minerals and associated organic carbon (OC). As the first study, we determined the effect of inducing anoxia and subsequently restoring oxic conditions in mesocosms with surface sediment and water from a coastal environment. These concentration changes were compared with those in an oxygenated control. We determined water column concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), iron, manganese, and phosphate. Benthic fluxes of DOC, POC, and iron increased at the onset of anoxia in oxygen-depleted treatments. DOC and iron concentrations increased concomitantly towards maxima, which may have indicated reductive dissolution of FeOOH and release of associated OC. The subsequent concomitant concentration decreases may have been the result of coprecipitation of OC with iron-containing minerals. In contrast, the phosphate-concentration increase occurred several days after the onset of anoxia and the manganese concentration was not affected by the onset of anoxia. Restoring oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in DOC, POC, and phosphate concentrations, which may indicate coprecipitation of OC with phosphate-containing minerals. The high DOC fluxes at the onset of anoxia indicate that redox oscillations may be important in OC degradation. Further, our results indicate a close coupling between OC cycling and dissolution/precipitation of iron-containing minerals in intermittently anoxic sediments.

  4. Removal of copper from aqueous solution using iron-containing adsorbents derived from methane fermentation sludge.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qingrong; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Takao; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2009-12-30

    Iron-containing adsorbents prepared from methane fermentation sludge (MFS) were characterized by N(2) adsorption, XRD, SEM, EDX, pH determination and elemental analysis. The experiments for copper removal from aqueous solution using the MFS-derived adsorbents were performed, and the effects of iron content, forms of the iron (hydr)oxides, surface basicity and pH of the aqueous solution on copper removal were elucidated respectively. The desorption studies were also performed and the mechanism of Cu(II) adsorption was proposed. The results indicated that the adsorbent obtained at 700 degrees C for 1h in a steam atmosphere possessed the highest capability for Cu(II) adsorption. The high copper removal ability of the MFS-derived materials is attributed to their intermediate surface area, strong surface basicity and the presence of iron (hydr)oxides on their surface. The Cu(II) adsorption onto the composite adsorbents is via ion-exchange with H, Ca and K ions, surface precipitation and binding with active sites on the surface of iron (hydr)oxides at various pH values. The desorption of copper in deionized water is quite low. The irreversibility of copper adsorption on the iron-containing adsorbents is attributed to the formation of strong bonds between Cu(II) and the iron (hydr)oxides. The adsorbent can be applied to remove copper from water or soil by fixation onto the surface.

  5. [Research on removal of copper, manganese and zinc ions using cation exchange membrane based on Donnan dialysis].

    PubMed

    Xie, De-Hua; Shi, Zhou; Chen, Shi-Yang; Xie, Peng; Song, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Based on Donnan dialysis technique, the mechanism that influences the exchange capacity of the membrane and the interaction mechanism between two co-existing ions are investigated in this paper, where the cation exchange membrane is applied to remove the heavy metal ions such as copper, manganese, zinc. The following results were obtained: It is applicable to use the cation exchange membrane to remove copper, manganese and zinc ions and 75%-85% of removal efficiency can be obtained; when the concentration and charge number are the same, the smaller the radius of hydrated heavy metal, the quicker the ion diffuse and consequently the higher removal efficiency the membrane can achieve, which is the main factor; when the radius of the hydrated heavy metals are approximately same, the membrane will have higher removal efficiency to the ion with lower atomic number; when the ions with same charge number and concentration co-exist, both of them are removed but with different removal speeds for existing of disturbance between them and there exist diffusion competition, i.e. those who are more prone to be exchanged will be more competitive and more likely to low the removal rate of the other ion seriously; if the total concentration of the ions is far lower than the exchange capacity of the membrane, the removal efficiency when the ions coexist is not lower too much than that of the case when they exist lonely.

  6. Copper in microbial pathogenesis: meddling with the metal.

    PubMed

    Samanovic, Marie I; Ding, Chen; Thiele, Dennis J; Darwin, K Heran

    2012-02-16

    Transition metals such as iron, zinc, copper, and manganese are essential for the growth and development of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Numerous studies have focused on the impact of iron availability during bacterial and fungal infections, and increasing evidence suggests that copper is also involved in microbial pathogenesis. Not only is copper an essential cofactor for specific microbial enzymes, but several recent studies also strongly suggest that copper is used to restrict pathogen growth in vivo. Here, we review evidence that animals use copper as an antimicrobial weapon and that, in turn, microbes have developed mechanisms to counteract the toxic effects of copper.

  7. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. - Highlights: • Baseline blood levels of metals in residents of Beijing suburb are investigated. • BMn and BPb in this cohort are higher than those in other developed countries. • Remarkably lower blood levels of Cu and Zn in this Chinese cohort are noticed. • The reference values for blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd are established.

  8. Geochemistry and Microbial Communities in Iron- and Manganese-Enriched Cold Groundwater Biofiltration Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Dangeti, S.; Roshani, B.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring how to enhance the microbially mediated oxidization of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in natural and engineered environments in cold climates requires an understanding of the interactive relationships between the geochemistry of cold groundwater and Fe- and Mn-oxidizing bacteria. This study precisely measured geochemical and microbial communities in a scaled-up biofiltration system using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) analyses coupled with next-generation sequencing (Illumina Miseq). Two pilot-scale biofiltration columns for Fe (Filter 1) and Mn (Filter 2) were connected in series and installed at the Langham Water Treatment Plant in Saskatoon, Canada. The groundwater temperature ranged from 4 to 8 °C. The pilot-scale study showed that successful treatment (99% removal) of both Fe and Mn was achieved in the biofilters. However, the Mn removal was significantly retarded for four months, likely due to the slow growth of Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MnOB) in Filter 2. The removal of Mn was accelerated once the redox potential in Filter 2 exceeded +300 mV. At that point, the XANES analyses showed that the oxidization states of Mn in Filter 2 were mainly +3 and +4, confirming that Mn oxidization had occurred. Geochemical analyses (PHREEQCi) also indicated changed geochemical conditions that favoured the formation of Mn-oxides during biofiltration. Next-generation sequencing analyses indicated the enrichment of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including Gallionella sp. and Sideroxydans sp., in Filter 1. There were high read numbers for MnOB relatives, including Pseudomonas sp., Hydrogenophaga sp., Bdellovibrio sp., and Leptothrix sp., in Filter 2. Furthermore, the addition of anthracite (coal-based filter media) positively affected the growth MnOB and enhanced Mn oxidization. The evidence obtained in this study provides insight into how Mn oxidization can be accelerated in cold groundwater treatment systems.

  9. Speciation of dissolved iron(II) and manganese(II) in a groundwater pollution plume

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, D.L.; Boddum, J.K.; Redemann, S.; Christensen, T.H.

    1998-09-15

    Groundwater samples with high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II), obtained from an anaerobic pollution plume, were speciated under anaerobic conditions in terms of colloidal (screen filtration and cross-flow ultrafiltration), complexed (ion-exchange resins), and free divalent species of Fe(II) and Mn(II). Most of the metal content in a nonfiltered sample passed through a 0.001 {micro}m membrane and was considered truly dissolved. Although free metal ions were the dominant species in the dissolved fraction, speciation modeling using MINTEQA2 suggested an average of 19% Fe(II) a/nd 20% Mn(II) were present as bicarbonate complexes, which are here operationally defined as labile. Organic complexes were not significant, although the groundwater contained up to 67 mg of C L{sup {minus}1}. Calculations with MINTEQA2 indicated that sample solutions representative of the truly dissolved fraction were strongly supersaturated with respect to siderite (FeCO{sub 3}) and moderately supersaturated with respect to rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}). SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis indicated that the colloidal fractions most likely consisted of clay type particles and iron sulfide precipitates. The amount of Mn(II) in the colloidal fractions was too low for determination by SEM-EDS. These results show that roughly 65% of the iron and manganese in anaerobic pollution plumes is present as free divalent ions and, according to the current thermodynamic database in MINTEQA2, the solutions are supersaturated with respect to carbonate.

  10. Overlap of copper and iron uptake systems in mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vest, Katherine E; Wang, Jing; Gammon, Micah G; Maynard, Margaret K; White, Olivia L; Cobine, Jai A; Mahone, Wilkerson K; Cobine, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial carrier family protein Pic2 imports copper into the matrix. Deletion of PIC2 causes defects in mitochondrial copper uptake and copper-dependent growth phenotypes owing to decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity. However, copper import is not completely eliminated in this mutant, so alternative transport systems must exist. Deletion of MRS3, a component of the iron import machinery, also causes a copper-dependent growth defect on non-fermentable carbon. Deletion of both PIC2 and MRS3 led to a more severe respiratory growth defect than either individual mutant. In addition, MRS3 expressed from a high copy number vector was able to suppress the oxygen consumption and copper uptake defects of a strain lacking PIC2. When expressed in Lactococcus lactis, Mrs3 mediated copper and iron import. Finally, a PIC2 and MRS3 double mutant prevented the copper-dependent activation of a heterologously expressed copper sensor in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Taken together, these data support a role for the iron transporter Mrs3 in copper import into the mitochondrial matrix.

  11. Overlap of copper and iron uptake systems in mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Gammon, Micah G.; Maynard, Margaret K.; White, Olivia L.; Cobine, Jai A.; Mahone, Wilkerson K.

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial carrier family protein Pic2 imports copper into the matrix. Deletion of PIC2 causes defects in mitochondrial copper uptake and copper-dependent growth phenotypes owing to decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity. However, copper import is not completely eliminated in this mutant, so alternative transport systems must exist. Deletion of MRS3, a component of the iron import machinery, also causes a copper-dependent growth defect on non-fermentable carbon. Deletion of both PIC2 and MRS3 led to a more severe respiratory growth defect than either individual mutant. In addition, MRS3 expressed from a high copy number vector was able to suppress the oxygen consumption and copper uptake defects of a strain lacking PIC2. When expressed in Lactococcus lactis, Mrs3 mediated copper and iron import. Finally, a PIC2 and MRS3 double mutant prevented the copper-dependent activation of a heterologously expressed copper sensor in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Taken together, these data support a role for the iron transporter Mrs3 in copper import into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:26763345

  12. [The serum copper/serum iron ratio in malignant tumors of the female genitalia].

    PubMed

    Maas, D H; Hinckers, H J

    1975-08-01

    Copper and iron in blood of 83 women with maligne tumors of the genitalia were regulary controled before, during and till 69 weeks after therapy. The relation between the copper/iron-ratio and the expansion and histology of the tumors, the success of the therapy and the incidence of a recurrence was checked for any significancy. Our results show the improtance of the ratio in the diagnosis and differentialdiagnosis of the ovarian-cancer and the corpus-uteri-cancer, and in the success-controll during tumor-therapy. In the group of the patients with collum-uteri-cancer we found a significant difference in the copper/iron-ratio of the patients with and without a recurrence during the controllperiod after therapy, which emphasizes the importance of this copper/iron-ratio.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of aminopropyl-functionalized manganese-loaded SBA-15 for copper removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lei, Di; Zheng, Qianwen; Wang, Yili; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-02-01

    A novel material, aminopropyl-functionalized manganese-loaded SBA-15 (NH2-Mn-SBA-15), was synthesized by bonding 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) onto manganese-loaded SBA-15 (Mn-SBA-15) and used as a Cu2+ adsorbent in aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the NH2-Mn-SBA-15. The ordered mesoporous structure of SBA-15 was remained after modification. The manganese oxides were mainly loaded on the internal surface of the pore channels while the aminopropyl groups were mainly anchored on the external surface of SBA-15. The adsorption of Cu2+ on NH2-Mn-SBA-15 was fitted well by the Langmuir equation and the maximum adsorption capacity of NH2-Mn-SBA-15 for Cu2+ was over two times higher than that of Mn-SBA-15 under the same conditions. The Elovich equation gave a good fit for the adsorption process of Cu2+ by NH2-Mn-SBA-15 and Mn-SBA-15. Both the loaded manganese oxides and the anchored aminopropyl groups were found to contribute to the uptake of Cu2+. The NH2-Mn-SBA-15 showed high selectivity for copper ions. Consecutive adsorption-desorption experiments showed that the NH2-Mn-SBA-15 could be regenerated by acid treatment without altering its properties.

  14. Theoretical technique for predicting the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in streams receiving discharge from coal mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, Keith E.

    1986-01-01

    Two U.S. Geological Survey computer programs are modified and linked to predict the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in coal-mine discharge water on the dissolved chemical quality of a receiving stream. The coupled programs calculate the changes in dissolved iron, dissolved manganese, and dissolved oxygen concentrations; alkalinity; and, pH of surface water downstream from the point of discharge. First, the one-dimensional, stead-state stream, water quality program uses a dissolved oxygen model to calculate the changes in concentration of elements as a function of the chemical reaction rates and time-of-travel. Second, a program (PHREEQE) combining pH, reduction-oxidation potential, and equilibrium equations uses an aqueous-ion association model to determine the saturation indices and to calculate pH; it then mixes the discharge with a receiving stream. The kinetic processes of the first program dominate the system, whereas the equilibrium thermodynamics of the second define the limits of the reactions. A comprehensive test of the technique was not possible because a complete set of data was unavailable. However, the cumulative impact of representative discharges from several coal mines on stream quality in a small watershed in southwestern Indiana was simulated to illustrate the operation of the technique and to determine its sensitivity to changes in physical, chemical, and kinetic parameters. Mine discharges averaged 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 6.0, and concentrations of 7.0 mg/L dissolved iron, 4.0 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.08 mg/L dissolved oxygen. The receiving stream discharge was 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 7.0, and concentrations of 0.1 mg/L dissolved iron, 0.1 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.70 mg/L dissolved oxygen. Results of the simulations indicated the following cumulative impact on the receiving stream from five discharges as compared with the effect from one discharge: 0.30 unit decrease in pH, 1.82 mg/L increase in dissolved

  15. Early diagenetic processes generate iron and manganese oxide layers in the sediments of Lake Baikal, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Torres, Natascha T; Och, Lawrence M; Hauser, Peter C; Furrer, Gerhard; Brandl, Helmut; Vologina, Elena; Sturm, Michael; Bürgmann, Helmut; Müller, Beat

    2014-04-01

    Distinct layers of iron(III) and manganese(IV) (Fe/Mn) oxides are found buried within the reducing part of the sediments in Lake Baikal and cause considerable complexity and steep vertical gradients with respect to the redox sequence. For the on-site investigation of the responsible biogeochemical processes, we applied filter tube samplers for the extraction of sediment porewater combined with a portable capillary electrophoresis instrument for the analyses of inorganic cations and anions. On the basis of the new results, the sequence of diagenetic processes leading to the formation, transformation, and dissolution of the Fe/Mn layers was investigated. With two exemplary cores we demonstrate that the dissolution of particulate Fe and Mn is coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of CH₄ (AOM) either via the reduction of sulphate (SO₄(2-)) and the subsequent generation of Fe(II) by S(-II) oxidation, or directly coupled to Fe reduction. Dissolved Fe(II) diffuses upwards to reduce particulate Mn(IV) thus forming a sharp mineral boundary. An alternative dissolution pathway is indicated by the occurrence of anaerobic nitrification of NH₄(+) observed at locations with Mn(IV). Furthermore, the reasons and consequences of the non-steady-state sediment pattern and the resulting redox discontinuities are discussed and a suggestion for the burial of active Fe/Mn layers is presented.

  16. Manganese doped iron oxide theranostic nanoparticles for combined T1 magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Wang, Lina; Ma, Yufei; Tu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-03-04

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a noninvasive and convenient way to ablate tumor tissues. Integrating PTT with imaging technique could precisely identify the location and the size of tumor regions, thereby significantly improving the therapeutic efficacy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in clinical diagnosis due to its superb spatial resolution and real-time monitoring feature. In our work, we developed a theranostic nanoplatform based on manganese doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles modified with denatured bovine serum albumin (MnIO-dBSA). The in vitro experiment revealed that the MnIO nanoparticles exhibited T1-weighted MRI capability (r1 = 8.24 mM(-1) s(-1), r2/r1 = 2.18) and good photothermal effect under near-infrared laser irradiation (808 nm). Using 4T1 tumor-bearing mice as an animal model, we further demonstrated that the MnIO-dBSA composites could significantly increase T1 MRI signal intensity at the tumor site (about two times) and effectively ablate tumor tissues with photoirradiation. Taken together, this work demonstrates the great potential of the MnIO nanoparticles as an ideal theranostic platform for efficient tumor MR imaging and photothermal therapy.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinates with pyridinemethanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Pavlik, Ján; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Dlháň, Ľubor; Koman, Marian; Boča, Roman; Moncoľ, Ján

    2014-11-01

    Four ionic iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinato complexes of the formula (2-pymeH) [FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ[FeIII(H2O)2Cl(dipic)]ṡ2H2O, (3-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ1.5H2O, (4-pymeH)[FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O and (4-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O, where H2dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, 2-pyme = 2-pyridinemethanol, 3-pyme = 3-pyridinemethanol, 4-pyme = 4-pyridinemethanol, have been prepared and characterized by the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The magnetic data were fitted to a zero-field splitting model revealing a slight magnetic anisotropy for Mn(III) systems. The molecular field correction was consistently formulated and included in the analysis for both, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data.

  18. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  19. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  20. Role of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, G

    1981-01-01

    The possible carcinogenicity of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium is reviewed, taking into account epidemiological data, the results of animal experimental studies, data on mutagenic effects and on other in vitro test systems. Of the great variety of occupations where exposure to one of these metals may occur, only haematite mining has been clearly shown to involve an increased human cancer risk. While the possibility that haematite might in some way act as a carcinogen has to be taken into consideration it is more likely that other carcinogens are responsible. Certain platinum coordination complexes are used in cancer chemotherapy, are mutagenic, and likely to be carcinogenic. Cobalt, its oxide and sulfide, certain lead salts, one organomanganese, and one organotitanium compound have been shown to have a limited carcinogenic effect in experimental animal studies, and except for titanium appear to be mutagenic. Certain mercury compounds are mutagenic but none have been shown to be carcinogenic. The presently available data are inadequate to assess the possible carcinogenicity of selenium compounds, but a few observations suggest that selenium may suppress the effect of other carcinogens administered to experimental animals and may even be associated with lower cancer mortality rates in man. Epidemiological observations are essential for the assessment of a human cancer risk, but the difficulty in collecting past exposure data in occupational groups and the complexity of multiple occupational exposures with changes over time, limits the usefulness of retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:7023929

  1. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1) Mediates Copper Transport in the Duodenum of Iron-Deficient Rats and When Overexpressed in Iron-Deprived HEK-293 Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lingli; Garrick, Michael D.; Garrick, Laura M.; Zhao, Lin; Collins, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular copper-binding proteins (metallothionein I/II) and a copper exporter (Menkes copper-transporting ATPase) are upregulated in duodenal enterocytes from iron-deficient rats, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa. How copper enters enterocytes during iron deficiency is, however, not clear. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1), the predominant iron importer in the mammalian duodenum, also transports other metal ions, possibly including copper. Given this possibility and that Dmt1 expression is upregulated by iron deprivation, we sought to test the hypothesis that Dmt1 transports copper during iron deficiency. Two model systems were utilized: the Belgrade (b) rat, expressing mutant Dmt1, and an inducible Dmt1-overexpression cell culture system. Mutant rats (b/b) were fed a semipurified, AIN93G-based control diet and phenotypically normal littermates (+/b) were fed control or iron-deficient diets for ∼14 wk. An everted gut sleeve technique and a colorimetric copper quantification assay were utilized to assess duodenal copper transport. The control diet-fed +/b rats had normal hematological parameters, whereas iron-deprived +/b and b/b rats were iron deficient and Dmt1 mRNA and protein levels increased. Importantly, duodenal copper transport was similar in the control +/b and b/b rats; however, it significantly increased (∼4-fold) in the iron-deprived +/b rats. Additional experiments in Dmt1 overexpressing HEK-293 cells showed that copper (64Cu) uptake was stimulated (∼3-fold) in the presence of an iron chelator. Dmt1 transcript stabilization due to a 3′ iron-responsive element was also documented, likely contributing to increased transport activity. In summary, these studies suggest that Dmt1 enhances copper uptake into duodenal enterocytes during iron deprivation. PMID:24089420

  2. Manganese Health Research Program (MHRP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Via the Olfactory Nerve David Dorman, CPI Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron ...Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron - Deficiency and Supplementation PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron -Deficiency and Supplementation

  3. Synthesis, characterization and chemical properties of 1-((E)-2-pyridinylmethylidene)semicarbazone manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbelini, Ellery Regina; Martin, Maria da Graça M. B.; Back, Davi Fernando; Evans, David John; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Ronny Rocha; Lang, Ernesto Schulz; Nunes, Fábio Souza

    2012-01-01

    Manganese(II) perchlorate and iron(II) chloride react with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone (HCSpy) in boiling ethanol to produce [Mn II(HSCpy) 2](ClO 4) 2·C 2H 5OH and [Fe IICl(HSCpy)]Cl. The distorted octahedral manganese complex crystallizes in the triclinic system with space group P(-1). The ligand HSCpy is tridentate and is coordinated through two nitrogen and one oxygen atoms. Comparison of the bond distances with analogous transition metal complexes that have the same geometry revealed longer bonds for the manganese derivative, an outcome that correlates well with the radius of the metal ions. The iron(II) ion is tetracoordinated to one semicarbazone and one chloride. Mass spectrometry, conductivity measurements, Mössbauer, UV-VIS, FTIR and elemental analysis were all in accordance with the proposed composition and the plausible geometry of [FeCl(HSCpy)]Cl. Mass spectrometry unequivocally detected the presence of the [FeCl(HSCpy)] + ion with a m/ z of 254.97 and intensity of 2 × 10 5.

  4. A Superoxide Dismutase Capable of Functioning with Iron or Manganese Promotes the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Calprotectin and Nutritional Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Emma; Skaar, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a devastating mammalian pathogen for which the development of new therapeutic approaches is urgently needed due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance. During infection pathogens must overcome the dual threats of host-imposed manganese starvation, termed nutritional immunity, and the oxidative burst of immune cells. These defenses function synergistically, as host-imposed manganese starvation reduces activity of the manganese-dependent enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). S. aureus expresses two SODs, denoted SodA and SodM. While all staphylococci possess SodA, SodM is unique to S. aureus, but the advantage that S. aureus gains by expressing two apparently manganese-dependent SODs is unknown. Surprisingly, loss of both SODs renders S. aureus more sensitive to host-imposed manganese starvation, suggesting a role for these proteins in overcoming nutritional immunity. In this study, we have elucidated the respective contributions of SodA and SodM to resisting oxidative stress and nutritional immunity. These analyses revealed that SodA is important for resisting oxidative stress and for disease development when manganese is abundant, while SodM is important under manganese-deplete conditions. In vitro analysis demonstrated that SodA is strictly manganese-dependent whereas SodM is in fact cambialistic, possessing equal enzymatic activity when loaded with manganese or iron. Cumulatively, these studies provide a mechanistic rationale for the acquisition of a second superoxide dismutase by S. aureus and demonstrate an important contribution of cambialistic SODs to bacterial pathogenesis. Furthermore, they also suggest a new mechanism for resisting manganese starvation, namely populating manganese-utilizing enzymes with iron. PMID:28103306

  5. Effects of copper and ceruloplasmin on iron transport in the Caco 2 cell intestinal model.

    PubMed

    Zerounian, Nora R.; Linder, Maria C.

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have implicated copper proteins, including ceruloplasmin, in intestinal iron transport. Polarized Caco2 cells with tight junctions were used to examine the possibilities that (a) ceruloplasmin promotes iron absorption by enhancing release at the basolateral cell surface and (b) copper deficiency reduces intestinal iron transport. Iron uptake and overall transport were followed for 90 min with 1 &mgr;M 59Fe(II) applied to the apical surface of Caco2 cell monolayers. Apotransferrin (38 &mgr;M) was in the basolateral chamber. Induction of iron deficiency with desferrioxamine (100 &mgr;M; 18 h) markedly increased uptake and overall transport of iron. Uptake increased from about 20% to about 65% of dose, and overall 59Fe transport from <1% to 60% of dose. On the basis of actual iron released into the basal chamber (measured with bathophenanthroline), transport increased 8-fold. Desferrioxamine pretreatment reduced cellular Fe by 55%. The addition of freshly isolated, enzymatically active human ceruloplasmin to the basolateral chamber during absorption had no effect on uptake or transport of iron by the cells. Unexpectedly, pretreatment with three different chelators of copper (18 h), which reduced cellular levels about 40%, more than doubled iron uptake and raised overall transport to 20%. This was so, whether or not cells were also made iron deficient with desferrioxamine. Acute addition of 1 &mgr;M Cu(II) to the apical chamber had no significant effect upon iron uptake, retention, or transport in iron deficient or normal cells, in the presence of absence of ascorbate. We conclude that intestinal absorption of Fe(II) is unlikely to depend upon plasma ceruloplasmin, and that cuproproteins involved in this form of iron transport must be binding copper tightly.

  6. Indirect Redox Transformations of Iron, Copper, and Chromium Catalyzed by Extremely Acidophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. Barrie; Hedrich, Sabrina; Pakostova, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine redox transformations of copper and chromium by acidophilic bacteria (Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum, and Acidiphilium), and also of iron (III) reduction by Acidithiobacillus spp. under aerobic conditions. Reduction of iron (III) was found with all five species of Acidithiobacillus tested, grown aerobically on elemental sulfur. Cultures maintained at pH 1.0 for protracted periods displayed increasing propensity for aerobic iron (III) reduction, which was observed with cell-free culture liquors as well as those containing bacteria. At. caldus grown on hydrogen also reduced iron (III) under aerobic conditions, confirming that the unknown metabolite(s) responsible for iron (III) reduction were not (exclusively) sulfur intermediates. Reduction of copper (II) by aerobic cultures of sulfur-grown Acidithiobacillus spp. showed similar trends to iron (III) reduction in being more pronounced as culture pH declined, and occurring in both the presence and absence of cells. Cultures of Acidithiobacillus grown anaerobically on hydrogen only reduced copper (II) when iron (III) (which was also reduced) was also included; identical results were found with Acidiphilium cryptum grown micro-aerobically on glucose. Harvested biomass of hydrogen-grown At. ferridurans oxidized iron (II) but not copper (I), and copper (I) was only oxidized by growing cultures of Acidithiobacillus spp. when iron (II) was also included. The data confirmed that oxidation and reduction of copper were both mediated by acidophilic bacteria indirectly, via iron (II) and iron (III). No oxidation of chromium (III) by acidophilic bacteria was observed even when, in the case of Leptospirillum spp., the redox potential of oxidized cultures exceeded +900 mV. Cultures of At. ferridurans and A. cryptum reduced chromium (VI), though only when iron (III) was also present, confirming an indirect mechanism and contradicting an earlier report of direct chromium reduction by A

  7. Biochemical Evolution of Iron and Copper Proteins, Substances Vital to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes studies in the area of biochemical evolution of iron, copper, and heme proteins to provide an historical outline. Included are lists of major kinds of proteins and enzymes and charts illustrating electron flow in a cytochrome electron transport system and interconversion of jerrous to ferric ion in iron metabolism. (CC)

  8. Serum Concentration of Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Manganese, and Cu/Zn Ratio in Children and Adolescents with Myopia.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Monika; Socha, Katarzyna; Urban, Beata; Soroczyńska, Jolanta; Matyskiela, Monika; Borawska, Maria H; Bakunowicz-Łazarczyk, Alina

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was the assessment of the serum concentration of antioxidant microelements-zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, and Cu/Zn ratio in children and adolescents with myopia. Eighty-three children were examined (mean age 14.36 ± 2.49 years) with myopia. The control group was 38 persons (mean age 12.89 ± 3.84 years). Each patient had complete eye examination. The serum concentration of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cu/Zn ratio, which is the indicator of the oxidative stress, was also calculated. The average serum concentration of zinc in myopic patients was significantly lower (0.865 ± 0.221 mg L(-1)) in comparison to the control group (1.054 ± 0.174 mg L(-1)). There was significantly higher Cu/Zn ratio in myopic patients (1.196 ± 0.452) in comparison to that in the control group (0.992 ± 0.203). The average serum concentration of selenium in the study group was significantly lower (40.23 ± 12.07 μg L(-1)) compared with that in the control group (46.00 ± 12.25 μg L(-1)). There were no essential differences between serum concentration of copper and manganese in the study group and the control group. Low serum concentration of zinc and selenium in myopic children may imply an association between insufficiency of these antioxidant microelements and the development of the myopia and could be the indication for zinc and selenium supplementation in the prevention of myopia. Significantly, higher Cu/Zn ratio in the study group can suggest the relationship between myopia and oxidative stress.

  9. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-08-04

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca{sub 9.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe{sup 3+} ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn{sup 2+} ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca{sup 2+} ions, indicate that the Mn{sup 2+} ion substitute into the Ca{sup 2+} sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites.

  10. Single, binary, and multicomponent sorption of iron and manganese on lignite.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Chander, Subhash

    2006-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has long been a significant environmental problem resulting from the microbial oxidation of iron pyrite in the presence of water and air, affording an acidic solution that contains toxic metal ions. The main objective of this study was to remove metal ions [Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Zn(II)] from AMD using lignite, a low-cost adsorbent. The lignite sorbent was utilized for the sorption of ferrous, ferric, manganese, zinc, and calcium ions in aqueous solutions. Studies were performed at different pH to find optimum pH. Equilibrium isotherms were determined to assess the maximum adsorption capacity of lignite for different metal ions. Sorption capacities were compared in single, binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems. The sorption data are correlated with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms in each system. Both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms fit the data reasonably well in terms of regression coefficients. Sorption studies were also performed at different temperatures to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of the process. The maximum lignite adsorption capacities at 25 degrees C were 34.22, 25.84, and 11.90 mg/g for Fe(II), Mn(II), and Fe(III), respectively. Adsorption of Fe(2+) (24.70 mg/g at 10 degrees C and 46.46 mg/g at 40 degrees C) increased with increased temperature, while Mn(2+) adsorption (28.11 mg/g at 10 degrees C and 7.70 mg/g at 40 degrees C) decreased with increased temperature.

  11. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism.

  12. Oxidation and competitive retention of arsenic between iron- and manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Samantha C.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) oxides are ubiquitous solids in terrestrial systems that have high sorptive capacities for many trace metals, including arsenic (As). Although numerous studies have characterized the effects of As adsorption onto Fe and Mn oxides individually, the fate of arsenic within mixed systems representative of natural environments has not been completely resolved. Here, we examine oxidation and competitive retention of As on goethite and birnessite using a Donnan reactor, where each oxide is isolated by a semi-permeable membrane through which arsenic can migrate. To initiate the Donnan reactor experiments, As(III) was simultaneously added to both chambers. Arsenic(III) injected into the birnessite chamber is rapidly oxidized to As(V) and then slowly redistributes across both chambers, while that added to the goethite chamber undergoes rapid adsorption; the adsorbed As(III) on goethite subsequently undergoes desorption and diffusion into the birnessite chamber followed by oxidation to As(V). With increased reaction time, As(V) is generated and preferentially partitioned onto goethite due to higher adsorption affinity compared to birnessite. Furthermore, the dissolved concentration of As(V) is controlled by the adsorption capacity of the goethite surface, which when saturated, leads to increased aqueous As concentrations; despite an increase in As(V) loading on birnessite with increasing initial As(III) concentration, the resulting aqueous As(V) concentration increase appreciably once the goethite surface is saturated. Our findings show that Mn oxides in soils act as a temporary sorbent of As, but operate primarily as strong oxidants responsible for transformation of As(III) to As(V), which can then strongly adsorb on the surrounding Fe oxide matrix.

  13. Phytoavailability and fractions of iron and manganese in calcareous soil amended with composted urban wastes.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Lara, Francisco; Azcón, Mariano; Polo, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of applying composted urban wastes on the phytoavailability and distribution of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) among chemical fractions in soil. In order to study this concern several experiments in pots containing calcareous soil were carried out. The received treatments by adding separately two rates (20 and 80 Mg ha-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and/or municipal solid waste and sewage sludge (MSW-SS) co-compost. The cropping sequence was a lettuce crop followed by a barley crop. It was observed that treatments amended with composted urban wastes tended to promote slight increases in lettuce yield compared to the control. The highest Fe levels in lettuce were found when higher rates of MSW-SS co-compost were applied; these values were significant compared to those obtained in the other treatments. In all cases, the application of organic materials increased the concentration and uptake of Mn in lettuce compared to the control; however, these increases were significant only when higher rates of MSW compost were applied. The organic amendments had beneficial delayed effects on barley yields, showing, in most cases, significant increases compared to the control. In this context, treatments with MSW compost were found to be more effective than the equivalent treatments amended with MSW-SS co-compost. Compared to the control, composted urban wastes increased Fe concentration in straw and rachis, and decreased Fe concentration in barley grain. Similarly, a decreased concentration of Mn in the dry matter of barley crop grown in soils treated with composted urban wastes was observed.

  14. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-03-15

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  15. Isolation and reconstitution of iron- and manganese-containing superoxide dismutases from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, C D; Gregory, E M

    1986-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) from extracts of anaerobically maintained Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was a dimer of equally sized 23,000-molecular-weight monomers joined noncovalently. A preparation with a specific activity of 1,200 U/mg contained 1.1 g-atom of Fe, 0.6 g-atom of Zn, and less than 0.05 g-atom of Mn per mol of dimer. The apoprotein, prepared by dialysis of iron-SOD in 5 M guanidinium chloride-20 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline, had no superoxide-scavenging activity when renatured without exogenous metal. Enzymatic activity was restored to the denatured apoprotein by dialysis against either 1 mM Fe(NH4)2 or 1 mM MnCl2 in 20 mM Tris (pH 7.0). The Fe-reconstituted enzyme and the native enzyme were inhibited approximately 50% by 0.2 mM NaN3, whereas the Mn-reconstituted enzyme was inhibited 60% by 10 mM NaN3. Aeration of the anaerobic cells resulted in a fourfold induction of an azide-resistant SOD. The enzyme (43,000 molecular weight) isolated from aerated cells was a dimer of equally sized subunits. The metal content was 1.0 g-atom of Mn, 0.55 g-atom of Fe, and 0.3 g-atom of Zn per mol of dimer. Enzymatic activity of the denatured apoprotein from this enzyme was also restored on addition of either iron or manganese. The constitutive Fe-SOD and the O2-induced Mn-SOD, tested alone and in combination, migrated identically on acrylamide gels, had similar amino acid compositions, and had alanine as the sole N-terminal amino acid. These data are consistent with the synthesis of a single apoprotein in either anaerobically maintained or oxygenated cells. We have observed a similar phenomenon with SOD from Bacteroides fragilis (E. M. Gregory, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 238:83-89, 1985). PMID:3700336

  16. Influence of indigenous and added iron on copper extraction from soil.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Luca

    2009-10-15

    Experimental tests of copper leaching from a low permeability soil are presented and discussed. The objective of the experiments was to investigate the influence of indigenous and added iron in the soil towards copper mobilization. Metals' leaching was performed by flushing (column tests) or washing (batch tests) the soil with an aqueous solution of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA. An excess of EDTA was used in flushing tests (up to a EDTA:Cu molar ratio of about 26.2:1), while, in washing tests, the investigated EDTA vs. copper molar ratios were in the range between 1 (equimolar tests) and 8. Copper extraction yield in flushing tests (up to about 85%) was found to depend upon contact time between the soil and the leaching solution and the characteristics of the conditioning solution. The saturation of the soil with a NaNO(3) solution before the treatment, favoured the flushing process reducing the time of percolation, but resulted in a lower metal extraction during the following percolation of EDTA. The indigenous iron was competitive with copper to form EDTA complexes only when it was present in the organic and oxides-hydroxides fractions. Artificial iron addition to the soil resulted in an increase of both the exchangeable iron and the iron bonded to the organic fraction of the soil, thus increasing the overall amount of iron available to extraction. In both batch and continuous tests, the mechanism of copper extraction was found to involve the former dissolution of metal salts, that lead to an initial high concentration of both copper and selected competitive cations (essentially Ca(2+)), and the following EDTA exchange reaction between calcium and copper complexes. The initial metal salts dissolution was found to be pH-dependant.

  17. An experimental study for enhancing the catalytic effects of various copper forms on the oxidation of ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Babak, Manizhe Moradi Shahre; Goharrizi, Ataallah Soltani; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Roayaei, Emad

    2013-01-01

    In this research the catalytic effect of copper compounds (ionic, oxide and oxide nanopowder) on the oxidation of ferrous iron by aeration was studied experimentally. When copper exists in solution, the oxidation rate of iron(II) will increase. The experimental results showed that the oxidation rate increases with an increasing copper concentration. From the experimental data it can be determined that the copper oxide nanopowder is the most effective for the oxidation reaction among the used copper forms. Aeration is the most economical oxidation method when water exhibits a high ferrous iron concentration.

  18. Kinematic gait analysis and lactation performance in dairy cows fed a diet supplemented with zinc, manganese, copper and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ito, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Kii; Matsushima, Yuki; Watanabe, Izumi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Abiko, Keima; Kamada, Toshihiko; Sato, Kan

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated how supplementation of the diet of dairy cows with trace minerals (zinc, manganese, copper and cobalt) affected kinematic gait parameters and lactation performance. Eight Holstein cows were divided into two groups, with each group receiving a different dietary treatment (control diet, or control diet supplemented with trace minerals) in a two-period crossover design. Kinematic gait parameters were calculated by using image analysis software. Compared to cows fed the control diet, cows that received the trace mineral-supplemented diet exhibited significantly increased walking and stepping rates, and had a shorter stance duration. Feed intake and milk production increased in cows fed the trace mineral-supplemented diet compared with control groups. The plasma manganese concentration was not different in control and experimental cows. In contrast, cobalt was only detected in the plasma of cows fed the supplemented diet. These results provide the first evidence that trace mineral supplementation of the diet of dairy cows affects locomotion, and that the associated gait changes can be detected by using kinematic gait analysis. Moreover, trace mineral supplementation improved milk production and only minimally altered blood and physiological parameters in dairy cows.

  19. Evidence that intrinsic iron but not intrinsic copper determines S-nitrosocysteine decomposition in buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Muller, Bernard; Alencar, Jacicarlos L; Lobysheva, Irina I; Nepveu, Françoise; Stoclet, Jean-Claude

    2002-11-01

    The present experiments were designed to analyze the influence of copper and iron ions on the process of decomposition of S-nitrosocysteine (cysNO), the most labile species among S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). CysNO fate in buffer solution was evaluated by optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and the consequences on its vasorelaxant effect were studied on noradrenaline-precontracted rat aortic rings. The main results are the following: (i) copper or iron ions, especially in the presence of the reducing agent ascorbate, accelerated the decomposition of cysNO and markedly attenuated the amplitude and duration of the relaxant effect of cysNO; (ii) by contrast, the iron and copper chelators bathophenantroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) and bathocuproine disulfonic acid (BCS) exerted a stabilizing effect on cysNO, prolonged its vasorelaxant effect, and abolished the influence of ascorbate; (iii) in the presence of ascorbate, BPDS displayed a selective inhibitory effect toward the influence of iron ions (but not toward copper ions) on cysNO decomposition and vasorelaxant effect, while BCS prevented the effects of both copper and iron ions; (iv) L-cysteine enhanced stability and prolonged the relaxant effect of cysNO; (v) the process of iron-induced decomposition of cysNO was associated with the formation of EPR-detectable dinitrosyl-iron complexes (DNIC) either with non-thiol- or thiol-containing ligands (depending on the presence of L-cysteine), both of which exhibiting vasorelaxant properties. From these data, it is concluded that the amount of intrinsic copper was probably too low to produce a destabilizing effect even on the most labile RSNO, cysNO, and that only intrinsic iron, through the formation of DNIC, was responsible for the process of cysNO decomposition and thus influenced its vasorelaxant properties.

  20. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    MRI) of Manganese Role of Manganese in Prion Disease Pathogenesis Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron - Deficiency and Supplementation...Imaging (MRI) of Manganese Accumulation in the Rat Brain Associated with Iron -Deficiency and Supplementation Aschner, Michael, Ph.D. Fitsanakis, Vanessa...Aschner (2006). Determination of brain manganese and iron accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic absorption spectroscopy. 4 2 nd

  1. Total iron, heme iron, zinc, and copper content in rabbit meat and viscera.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carolina; de Romaña, Daniel Lopez; Schmiede, Camila; Morales, María Sol; Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the content of total iron (TFe), heme iron (HeFe), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in different cuts of meat and viscera from rabbit. Five young New Zealand rabbits were used in the study. Samples in triplicate were obtained from three meat cuts (foreleg, hind leg, and loin) and from main viscera. TFe, Zn, and Cu concentrations from samples were determined by wet acid digestion followed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), while HeFe was determined by acid extraction followed by AAS. Mean TFe, HeFe, Zn, and Cu in meat was 0.83 ± 0.09, 0.56 ± 0.11, 0.95 ± 0.35, and 0.08 ± 0.01 mg/100 g, respectively. TFe content was less than 1 mg/100 g in all meat cuts. Sixty-seven percent of iron content was HeFe. The cut of meat with highest Zn concentrations was the foreleg with 1.33 ± 0.12 mg/100 g. Cu content was low for all meat cuts. TFe, HeFe, Zn, and Cu content in viscera varied greatly. The spleen was the organ with the highest TFe and Zn concentrations (82.79 ± 9.22 mg/100 g and 3.49 ± 0.63 mg/100 g, respectively). Nevertheless, the lungs had the highest concentration of HeFe (5.79 ± 0.90 mg/100 g), accounting for 91% of the total iron. The liver had the highest Cu content (3.89 ± 0.89 mg/100 g). Rabbit meat has low TFe concentration, similar to that of poultry, and most of the iron is HeFe. The amount of minerals in viscera closely depends on their function.

  2. Iron, copper and zinc isotopic fractionation up mammal trophic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Pons, Marie-Laure; Balter, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that some non-traditional elements exhibit stable isotope compositions that are distinct in botanical and animal products, providing potential new tracers for diet reconstructions. Here, we present data for iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) stable isotope compositions in plants and bones of herbivores and carnivores. The samples come from trophic chains located in the Western Cape area and in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Fe, Cu and Zn isotope systematics are similar in both parks. However, local Cu, and possibly Zn, isotopic values of soils influence that of plants and of higher trophic levels. Between plants and bones of herbivores, the Zn isotope compositions are 66Zn-enriched by about 0.8‰ whereas no significant trophic enrichment is observed for Fe and Cu. Between bones of herbivores and bones of carnivores, the Fe isotope compositions are 56Fe-depleted by about 0.6‰, the Cu isotope compositions are 65Cu-enriched by about 1.0‰, and the Zn isotope compositions are slightly 66Zn-depleted by about 0.2‰. The isotopic distributions of the metals in the body partly explain the observed trophic isotopic systematics. However, it is also necessary to invoke differential intestinal metal absorption between herbivores and carnivores to account for the observed results. Further studies are necessary to fully understand how the Fe, Cu and Zn isotope values are regulated within the ecosystem's trophic levels, but the data already suggests significant potential as new paleodietary and paleoecological proxies.

  3. Ferromagnets based on diamond-like semiconductors GaSb, InSb, Ge, and Si supersaturated with manganese or iron impurities during laser-plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, E. S.; Podol'skii, V. V.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Sapozhnikov, M. V.; Druzhnov, D. M.; Gusev, S. N.; Gribkov, B. A.; Filatov, D. O.; Stepanova, Yu. S.; Levchuk, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Properties of thin (30-100 nm) layers of diluted magnetic semiconductors based on diamond-like compounds III-V (InSb and GaSb) and elemental semiconductors Ge and Si doped with 3d impurities of manganese and iron up to 15% were measured and discussed. The layers were grown by laser-plasma deposition onto heated single-crystal gallium arsenide or sapphire substrates. The ferromagnetism of layers with the Curie temperature up to 500 K appeared in observations of the ferromagnetic resonance, anomalous Hall effect, and magneto-optic Kerr effect. The carrier mobility of diluted magnetic semiconductors is a hundred times larger than that of the previously known highest temperature magnetic semiconductors, i.e., copper and chromium chalcogenides. The difference between changes in the magnetization with temperature in diluted semiconductors based on III-V, Ge, and Si was discussed. A complex structure of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in Si:Mn/GaAs was observed. The results of magnetic-force microscopy showed a weak correlation between the surface relief and magnetic inhomogeneity, which suggests that the ferromagnetism is caused by the 3d-impurity solid solution, rather than ferromagnetic phase inclusions.

  4. Reactions of hydrogen peroxide with superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii--an enzyme which is equally active with iron or manganese--are independent of the prosthetic metal.

    PubMed

    Meier, B; Sehn, A P; Michel, C; Saran, M

    1994-09-01

    Propionibacterium shermanii contains a single constitutive superoxide dismutase (SOD) which is active with either iron or manganese incorporated in the same protein moiety. Copper and cobalt can also be incorporated by the bacteria in the active center of the SOD under conditions of metal deficiency, but in this case the enzyme is enzymatically inactive. In contrast to other bacterial SODs, the Fe-SOD of P. shermanii remains highly resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide, as does Mn-SOD. Both SOD types cannot be distinguished by their inactivation patterns. Incubation with hydrogen peroxide results in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in tryptophan fluorescence, independent of the metal present in the active center. Moreover, the Fe-SOD shows a time-dependent decrease in spin concentration after addition of hydrogen peroxide, which reflects alterations in the environment of the metal rather than a reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+. No obvious correlations exist, however, between these effects and the enzymatic activity of the enzyme. The resistance of the SODs from P. shermanii to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide seems to be caused by the fact that a tryptophan residue near the metal-chelating histidine-75--which is present in all Fe-SODs being rapidly inactivated by this agent--is exchanged for valine.

  5. Manganese: it turns iron into steel (and does so much more)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is a common ferrous metal with atomic weight of 25 and the chemical symbol Mn. It constitutes roughly 0.1 percent of the Earth’s crust, making it the 12th most abundant element. Its early uses were limited largely to pigments and oxidants in chemical processes and experiments, but the significance of manganese to human societies exploded with the development of modern steelmaking technology in the 1860s. U.S consumption of manganese is about 500,000 metric tons each year, predominantly by the steel industry. Because manganese is essential and irreplaceable in steelmaking and its global mining industry is dominated by just a few nations, it is considered one of the most critical mineral commodities for the United States.

  6. Arabidopsis copper transport protein COPT2 participates in the cross talk between iron deficiency responses and low-phosphate signaling.

    PubMed

    Perea-García, Ana; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2013-05-01

    Copper and iron are essential micronutrients for most living organisms because they participate as cofactors in biological processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress protection. In many eukaryotic organisms, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, copper and iron homeostases are highly interconnected; yet, such interdependence is not well established in higher plants. Here, we propose that COPT2, a high-affinity copper transport protein, functions under copper and iron deficiencies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). COPT2 is a plasma membrane protein that functions in copper acquisition and distribution. Characterization of the COPT2 expression pattern indicates a synergic response to copper and iron limitation in roots. We characterized a knockout of COPT2, copt2-1, that leads to increased resistance to simultaneous copper and iron deficiencies, measured as reduced leaf chlorosis and improved maintenance of the photosynthetic apparatus. We propose that COPT2 could play a dual role under iron deficiency. First, COPT2 participates in the attenuation of copper deficiency responses driven by iron limitation, possibly to minimize further iron consumption. Second, global expression analyses of copt2-1 versus wild-type Arabidopsis plants indicate that low-phosphate responses increase in the mutant. These results open up new biotechnological approaches to fight iron deficiency in crops.

  7. Manganese-tuned chemical etching of a platinum-copper nanocatalyst with platinum-rich surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Y.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhao, G.; Yan, X. H.; Xu, K.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a modified chemical etching strategy to fabricate binary metal nanocatalysts with large active areas. The strategy employs PtCu alloy particles with Pt-rich outer layers as the precursor and manganese species to manipulate the acid leaching processes. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are used to analyze the catalyst structures and the tuning mechanism of manganese species during etching. It is found that the introduction of manganese species allows more Pt active sites to be formed onto the catalyst surface after etching, possibly due to reduction in the number of Pt atoms enclosed inside particles. The electrochemically active surface area of the synthetic MnA-PtCu/C catalyst increases by 90% relative to commercial Pt/C catalyst. As a result of the increase in active areas and the additional promotion effects by Cu, the MnA-PtCu/C catalyst reveals a methanol oxidation activity 1.7 and 4.0 times higher than that of the synthetic PtCu/C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively.

  8. Microwave digestion techniques in the sequential extraction of calcium, iron, chromium, manganese, lead, and zinc in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, K.I.; Foderaro, T.A.; Garza, T.L.; Martinez, R.M.; Maroney, G.A.; Trivisonno, M.R.; Willging, E.M.

    1987-04-01

    The sequential extraction scheme of Tessier partitions metals in sediments into exchangeable, carbonate bound iron-manganese oxide bound, organic bound, and residual binding fractions. Extraction rate experiments using conventional and microwave heating showed that microwave heating produces results comparable to the conventional procedure. Sequential microwave extraction procedures were established from the results of the extraction rate experiments. Recoveries of total metals from NBS SRM 1645 ranged from 76% to 120% for the conventional procedure and 62% to 120% for the microwave procedure. Recoveries of total metals using the microwave and conventional techniques were reasonably comparable except for iron (62% by microwave vs. 76% by conventional). Substitution of an aqua regia/HF extraction for total/residual metals results in essentially complete recovery of metals. Precision obtained from 31 replicate samples of the California Gulch, Colorado, sediment yielded about an average 11% relative standard deviation excluding the exchangeable fraction which was more variable.

  9. Influence of biofilms on iron and manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Wylie, Jason; Plumb, Jason

    2011-02-01

    Although health risk due to discoloured water is minimal, such water continues to be the source of one of the major complaints received by most water utilities in Australia. Elevated levels of iron (Fe) and/or manganese (Mn) in bulk water are associated with discoloured water incidents. The accumulation of these two elements in distribution systems is believed to be one of the main causes for such elevated levels. An investigation into the contribution of pipe wall biofilms towards Fe and Mn deposition, and discoloured water events is reported in this study. Eight laboratory-scale reactors were operated to test four different conditions in duplicate. Four reactors were exposed to low Fe (0.05 mg l(-1)) and Mn (0.02 mg l(-1)) concentrations and the remaining four were exposed to a higher (0.3 and 0.4 mg l(-1) for Fe and Mn, respectively) concentration. Two of the four reactors which received low and high Fe and Mn concentrations were chlorinated (3.0 mg l(-1) of chlorine). The biological activity (measured in terms of ATP) on the glass rings in these reactors was very low (∼1.5 ng cm(-2) ring). Higher concentrations of Fe and Mn in bulk water and active biofilms resulted in increased deposition of Fe and Mn on the glass rings. Moreover, with an increase in biological activity, an increase in Fe and Mn deposition was observed. The observations in the laboratory-scale experiments were in line with the results of field observations that were carried out using biofilm monitors. The field data additionally demonstrated the effect of seasons, where increased biofilm activities observed on pipe wall biofilms during late summer and early autumn were found to be associated with increased deposition of Fe and Mn. In contrast, during the cooler months, biofilm activities were a magnitude lower and the deposited metal concentrations were also significantly less (ie a drop of 68% for Fe and 86% for Mn). Based on the laboratory-scale investigations, detachment of pipe wall

  10. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  11. Iron and copper toxicity in diseases of aging, particularly atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J

    2007-02-01

    In this review, we point out that natural selection does not act to lessen human diseases after the reproductive and caregiving period and that normal levels of iron and copper that may be healthy during the reproductive years appear to be contributing to diseases of aging and possibly the aging process itself. It is clear that oxidant damage contributes to many of the diseases of aging, such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's diseases, diabetes, diseases of inflammation, diseases of fibrosis, diseases of autoimmunity, and so on. It is equally clear that both iron and copper can contribute to excess production of damaging reactive oxygen species through Fenton chemistry. Here, we examine the evidence that "normal" levels of iron and copper contribute to various diseases of aging.

  12. Serum iron, zinc and copper levels and lipid peroxidation in children with chronic giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Mustafa; Delibas, Namik; Altuntas, Irfan; Oktem, Faruk; Yönden, Zafer

    2003-03-01

    This study investigated the levels of iron, zinc, and copper and their demolishing effects against lipid peroxidation in chronic giardiasis. Serum iron, zinc and copper levels, erythrocyte cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, and malondialdehyde levels were measured in 34 children with chronic giardiasis and were compared with controls. The serum iron and zinc levels and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity were significantly lower, and malondialdehyde levels were significantly higher among the children with chronic giardiasis compared to the control group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in copper levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). Consequently, the oxidant-antioxidant balance may tilt towards the oxidative side due to weakness of the antioxidant system in giardiasis. If early and proper treatment is not performed, free radical-mediated damage might occur in children with chronic giardiasis.

  13. Chemical and structural investigations of the incorporation of metal manganese into ruthenium thin films for use as copper diffusion barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Hughes, G.; Lozano, J. G.; Nellist, P. D.

    2012-12-03

    The incorporation of manganese into a 3 nm ruthenium thin-film is presented as a potential mechanism to improve its performance as a copper diffusion barrier. Manganese ({approx}1 nm) was deposited on an atomic layer deposited Ru film, and the Mn/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal the chemical interaction of Mn with the SiO{sub 2} substrate to form manganese-silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}), implying the migration of the metal through the Ru film. Electron energy loss spectroscopy line profile measurements of the intensity of the Mn signal across the Ru film confirm the presence of Mn at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  14. Some new chromogens for iron, cobalt, and copper Substituted hydrazidines and 1,2,4-triazines containing the ferroin group.

    PubMed

    Schilt, A A

    1966-07-01

    The spectral characteristics and solution conditions requisite for formation of the iron(II), cobalt(II), and copper(I) complexes of some newly synthesised compounds containing the ferroin functional grouping have been determined. These properties are useful for evaluation of the possible analytical effectiveness of the compounds as spectrophotometric reagents for the determination of iron, cobalt, and copper.

  15. Copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline coprecipitation system for preconcentration and separation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) in real samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kaya, Betul; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2007-08-25

    A separation-preconcentration procedure based on the coprecipitation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) ions with copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline system has been developed. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of copper(II) as carrier element, amount of 8-hydroxquinoline, sample volume, etc., was investigated for the quantitative recoveries of Co(II) and Mn(II). No interferic effects were observed from the concomitant ions which are present in real samples. The detection limits for analyte ions by three sigma criteria were 0.86microgL(-1) for cobalt and 0.98microgL(-1) for manganese. The validation of the presented preconcentration procedure was performed by the analysis of NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure presented was applied to the analyte contents of real samples including natural waters and some food samples with successfully analytical results.

  16. Trace Element Status (Iron, Zinc, Copper, Chromium, Cobalt, and Nickel) in Iron-Deficiency Anaemia of Children under 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Maria Georgieva; Petkova-Marinova, Tsvetelina Valentinova; Pogorielov, Maksym Vladimirovich; Loboda, Andrii Nikolaevich; Nedkova-Kolarova, Vania Nedkova; Bozhinova, Atanaska Naumova

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine trace element status and aetiologic factors for development of trace elements deficiencies in children with iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) aged 0 to 3 years. Contingent and Methods. 30 patients of the University Hospital, Pleven, Bulgaria—I group; 48 patients of the Sumy Regional Child's Clinical Hospital, Sumy, Ukraine—II group; 25 healthy controls were investigated. Serum concentrations of iron, zinc, copper, chromium, cobalt, and nickel were determined spectrophotometrically and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. Because the obtained serum levels of zinc, copper, and chromium were near the lower reference limits, I group was divided into IA and IB. In IA group, serum concentrations were lower than the reference values for 47%, 57%, and 73% of patients, respectively. In IB group, these were within the reference values. In II group, results for zinc, cobalt, and nickel were significantly lower (P < 0.05), and results for copper were significantly higher in comparison to controls. Conclusion. Low serum concentrations of zinc, copper, cobalt, and nickel were mainly due to inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and micronutrient interactions in both studied groups. Increased serum copper in II group was probably due to metabolic changes resulting from adaptations in IDA. Data can be used for developing a diagnostic algorithm for IDA. PMID:24839556

  17. Influence of dietary excess methionine on the relationship between dietary copper and the concentration of copper and iron in organs of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Ekperigin, H E; Vohra, P

    1981-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted to study the nature of the relationship between methionine, copper and iron. The day-old broiler chicks used were adapted to an isolated soyprotein-cornstarch diet containing 20% protein, 3,300 kcal metabolizable energy (ME)/kg, normal levels of minerals and 0.59% methionine. They were then fed the basal diet, alone or supplemented with 1.5% DL-methionine, 2,000 ppm molybdenum (Mo), 4,000 ppm Mo, or 100, 250, 500 or 1,000 ppm copper for 1 or 3 weeks. In contrast to 1.5% excess methionine, excess Mo increased plasma copper concentrations significantly, had no effect on spleen or liver iron and did not induce neurological changes. Dietary copper or methionine significantly influenced body weight gain, and the concentrations of copper in plasmas or livers. Supplements of 1.5% DL-methionine, 500 ppm or 1,000 ppm copper retarded body weight. A direct relationship between dietary copper, and the concentration of copper in livers or plasmas was demonstrated in chicks fed either the basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with 1.5% DL-methionine. However, chicks fed excess methionine had lower levels of copper in their plasmas and livers at every level of excess dietary copper. Liver and spleen iron concentrations were increased by 1.5% excess DL-methionine, but were not significantly altered by supplementary copper.

  18. Impact of wine production on the fractionation of copper and iron in Chardonnay wine: Implications for oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Rousseva, Michaela; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2016-07-15

    Copper and iron in wine can influence oxidative, reductive and colloidal stability. The current study utilises a solid phase extraction technique to fractionate these metals into hydrophobic, cationic and residual forms, with quantification by ICP-OES. The impact of aspects of wine production on the metal fractions was examined, along with the relationship between metal fractions and oxygen decay rates. Addition of copper and iron to juice, followed by fermentation, favoured an increase in all of their respective metal fractions in the wine, with the largest increase observed for the cationic form of iron. Bentonite fining of the protein-containing wines led to a significant reduction in the cationic fraction of copper and an increase in the cationic form of iron. Total copper correlated more closely with oxygen consumption in the wine compared to total iron, and the residual and cationic forms of copper provided the largest contribution to this impact.

  19. Production, sintering, and application of nanocrystalline iron-copper additions in a powder steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilakh, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for activated sintering of a sprayed iron powder by the coalescence of pressed particles through fine-grained layers based on iron-copper nanodispersed (ND) additions. The mechanical properties of composite materials containing 2% Fe-Cu ND addition are higher than those of the materials prepared from a mixture of standard powders by a factor of 1.5.

  20. Replacement of a cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase by a novel cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase in crustaceans that use copper (haemocyanin) for oxygen transport.

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Marius; Hoexum Brouwer, Thea; Grater, Walter; Brown-Peterson, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, which uses the copper-dependent protein haemocyanin for oxygen transport, lacks the ubiquitous cytosolic copper-dependent enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) as evidenced by undetectable levels of Cu,ZnSOD activity, protein and mRNA in the hepatopancreas (the site of haemocyanin synthesis) and gills. Instead, the crab has an unusual cytosolic manganese SOD (cytMnSOD), which is retained in the cytosol, because it lacks a mitochondrial transit peptide. A second familiar MnSOD is present in the mitochondria (mtMnSOD). This unique phenomenon occurs in all Crustacea that use haemocyanin for oxygen transport. Molecular phylogeny analysis suggests the MnSOD gene duplication is as old as the origin of the arthropod phylum. cytMnSOD activity in the hepatopancreas changes during the moulting cycle of the crab. Activity is high in intermoult crabs and non-detectable in postmoult papershell crabs. mtMnSOD is present in all stages of the moulting cycle. Despite the lack of cytCu,ZnSOD, crabs have an extracellular Cu,ZnSOD (ecCu,ZnSOD) that is produced by haemocytes, and is part of a large, approx. 160 kDa, covalently-linked protein complex. ecCu,ZnSOD is absent from the hepatopancreas of intermoult crabs, but appears in this tissue at premoult. However, no ecCu,ZnSOD mRNA can be detected, suggesting that the protein is recruited from the haemolymph. Screening of different taxa of the arthropod phylum for Cu,ZnSOD activity shows that those crustaceans that use haemoglobin for oxygen transport have retained cytCu,ZnSOD. It appears, therefore, that the replacement of cytCu,ZnSOD with cytMnSOD is part of an adaptive response to the dynamic, haemocyanin-linked, fluctuations in copper metabolism that occur during the moulting cycle of the crab. PMID:12769817

  1. Human health risk assessment of lead, manganese and copper from scrapped car paint dust from automobile workshops in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, John Kanayochukwu; Onyenezi Amuka, John Paul; Onwuka, Jude Chinedu; Udowelle, Nnaemeka Arinze; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2016-10-01

    The economic downturn in Nigeria and Structural Adjustment Programme led to the flooding of Nigerian market with imported used automobiles. Most of these vehicles needed refurbishing and reworking. The present study is a human health risk assessment of metal exposure resulting from reworking of imported used vehicles in Nigeria. Scrap paint dusts from 56 Japanese made cars were collected from 8 different mechanic villages (workshops A-H] in Southeastern Nigeria. Scrap paints were homogenized, mixed, divided into fine particles and digested by standard method. The filtrates were assayed of lead, manganese and copper with atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Workshop B has the highest concentration of Pb (4.26 ± 0.93). Manganese in workshops A and F were (3.31 ± 0.85) and (3.04 ± 0.47) respectively and were higher than the levels from workshops C, B, D, G and H. Copper in workshop D (7.11 ± 0.21) was significantly greater than the other workshops. The highest hazard quotient (HQ) through ingestion, inhalation and dermal exposures in adults were 9.44E-05 (workshop B), 4.20E-01 (workshop B) and 1.08E-05 (workshop D) respectively. The highest values for HQ through ingestion, inhalation and dermal in children were 8.82E-04, 7.61E-01 and 2.86E-05 all in workshop B respectively. For children, the highest carcinogenic risk levels were 7.05E-08, 6.09E-05 and 2.29E-10 for ingestion, inhalation and dermal exposures respectively. In adults, the carcinogenic risk levels were 7.55E-09, 3.39E-05 and 8.67E-10 for ingestion, inhalation and dermal exposures respectively. Chronic exposure to scrap car paint dusts may be of significant public health importance in Nigeria as this may add to the body burden of some heavy metals.

  2. Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women

    SciTech Connect

    Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

    1986-03-05

    Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

  3. Hexavalent chromium removal from near natural water by copper-iron bimetallic particles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ching-Yao; Lo, Shang-Lien; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Shih, Kaimin; Lin, Chin-Jung

    2010-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) is self-inhibiting in near natural groundwater because insulating Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxide film forms on the ZVI surface during the reaction. This study tries to overcome this deficiency by coating the surface of ZVI with copper to form copper-iron bimetallic particles. The Cr(VI) removal rate by ZVI rose significantly after the copper coating was applied. The copper loading needed for enhancing Cr(VI) removal was much higher than that needed for enhancing removal of chlorinated organic compounds or other oxidative contaminants, because of the higher oxidation potential of Cr(VI). The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that coating copper onto the surface of ZVI can not only increase the deepness of the oxidation film but also increase the oxidation state of iron in the film. This phenomenon means higher Cr(VI) removal capacity per unit weight of ZVI.

  4. Scalable procedure for the fragmentation of hydroperoxides mediated by copper and iron tetrafluoroborate salts†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, David; Schuppe, Alexander W.; Liang, Michael Z.

    2016-01-01

    An improved protocol for the formal elimination of propene from organic substrates is reported. This process entails the ozonolytic conversion of an alkene to a methoxy hydroperoxide which undergoes fragmentation mediated by copper and iron. The use of soluble Cu(BF4)2 and Fe(BF4)2 results in reproducible results up to a 100 gram scale. PMID:27273761

  5. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  6. Microelectrodes Based investigation of the Impacts of Water Chemistry on Copper and Iron Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of bulk drinking water quality on copper and iron pipe corrosion has been extensively studied. Despite past research, many have argued that bulk water quality does not necessarily reflect water quality near the water-metal interface and that such knowledge is necessary...

  7. Effect of space flight on sodium, copper, manganese and magnesium content in the skeletal bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhonchukov, A. A.; Taitsev, V. P.; Shakhunov, B. A.; Zhizhina, V. A.; Kolesnik, A. G.; Komissarova, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium content decreased in the human skeletal bones and rose in the rat bones following space flight. In man copper content rose in the femoral bone and decreased in the vertebral body and the sternum, but was unchanged in the rest of the bones. Magnesium content was decreased in the femoral bone and the sternum, and in the vertebrae, but remained unchanged in the rest of the bones. Possible mechanisms of the changes detected are discussed.

  8. Zinc, copper, iron, and chromium concentrations in young patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Basaki, M; Saeb, M; Nazifi, S; Shamsaei, H A

    2012-08-01

    Homeostasis of trace elements can be disrupted by diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, disturbance in trace element status in diabetes mellitus may contribute to the insulin resistance and development of diabetic complications. The aim of present study was to compare the concentration of essential trace elements, zinc, copper, iron, and chromium in serum of patients who have type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20) with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 20). The serum concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and chromium were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Shimadzu AA 670, Kyoto, Japan) after acid digestion. The results of this study showed that the mean values of zinc, copper, and chromium were significantly lower in the serum of patients with diabetes as compared to the control subjects (P < 0.05). Our results show that deficiency of some essential trace elements may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  9. Serum levels of copper, selenium and manganese in forestry workers testing IgG positive for Brucella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Simona; Giorgianni, Concetto; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Brecciaroli, Renato; Catanoso, Rosaria; Alibrando, Carmela; Spatari, Giovanna; Gangemi, Silvia; Abbate, Carmelo

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the alterations in the trace levels of serum copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and manganese (Mn) in forestry workers testing immunoglobulin G (IgG)-positive for Brucella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia. The study was conducted on a sample of 758 subjects (560 male and 198 female). All the subjects underwent medical examinations, which investigated particularly the presence of clinical signs compatible with zoonoses, and routine blood tests from venous blood sample, which tested previous immunisation versus cited microorganisms and serum concentration of Cu, Se, and Mn. The subjects were divided according to IgG positivity versus the cited microorganisms. The group of subjects with IgG positive versus Brucella showed statistically significant higher Cu levels than controls, while the Mn levels were not; the group of subjects with IgG positive versus Rickettsia showed higher levels of all three tested metals. The concentration of the examined metals did not show statistically significant difference between IgG-positive subjects versus subjects with Borrelia compared to controls. These data could confirm the role of both Cu and Se  in the regulation of immune response.

  10. Evaluation of arsenic, cobalt, copper and manganese in biological Samples of Steel mill workers by electrothermal atomic absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Afridi, H I; Kazi, T G; Kazi, N G; Jamali, M K; Arain, M B; Sirajuddin; Kandhro, G A; Shah, A Q; Baig, J A

    2009-02-01

    The determination of trace and toxic elements in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of human beings is an important clinical test. The aim of our present study was to determine the concentration of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn), in biological samples of male production workers (PW) and quality control workers (QW) of steel mill, with aged 25-55 years, to assess the possible influence of environmental exposure. For comparison purpose, the same biological samples of unexposed healthy males of same age group were collected as control subjects. The determination of all elements in biological samples was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the As, Cu, Co and Mn measurements was tested by simultaneously analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and for comparative purposes conventional wet acid digestion method was used on the same CRMs. No significant differences were observed between the analytical results and the certified values, using both methods (paired t-test at P > 0.05). The results indicate that concentrations of As, Cu, Co and Mn in all three biological samples of the exposed workers (QW and PW) were significantly higher than those of the controls. The possible correlation of these elements with the etiology of different physiological disorders is discussed. The results were also demonstrated the need of attention for improvements in workplace, ventilation and industrial hygiene practices.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents in biomedical imaging: recent advances in iron- and manganese-based magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Felton, Charlette; Karmakar, Alokita; Gartia, Yashraj; Ramidi, Punnamchandar; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2014-05-01

    Improvements in diagnostic measures for biomedical applications have been investigated in various studies for better interpretations of biological abnormalities and several medical conditions. The use of imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is widespread and becoming a standard procedure for such specialized applications. A major avenue being studied in MRI is the use of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) as contrast agents (CAs). Among various approaches, current research also incorporates use of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs and manganese-based NPs with biocompatible coatings for improved stability and reduced biodegradation when exposed to a biological environment. In this review, recent advances with these types of magnetic NPs and their potential use as CAs in MRI are reported, as well as new insights into the selectivity and cellular transport mechanism that occurs following injection.

  12. Antibacterial activity and spectral studies of trivalent chromium, manganese, iron macrocyclic complexes derived from oxalyldihydrazide and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Kumar, Ramesh; Singh, Jitender

    2009-06-01

    A new series of complexes is synthesized by template condensation of oxalyldihydrazide and glyoxal in methanolic medium in the presence of trivalent chromium, manganese and iron salts forming complexes of the type: [M(C(8)H(8)N(8)O(4))X]X(2) where M = Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) and X = Cl(-1), NO(-1)(3), CH(3)COO(-1). The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, NMR, infrared and far infrared spectral studies. On the basis of these studies, a five coordinate square pyramidal geometry for these complexes has been proposed. The biological activities of the metal complexes were tested in vitro against a number of pathogenic bacteria and some of the complexes exhibited remarkable antibacterial activities.

  13. Conversion of syngas to light olefins over silicalite-1 supported iron and cobalt catalysts: Effects of manganese addition

    SciTech Connect

    Das, D.; Ravichandran, G.; Chakrabarty, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    As the demand for light (C2-C4) olefins, an important raw materials for a number of chemical industries, is ever increasing considerable attention is now being paid to the design of suitable catalysts with high selectivity for small chain olefins. Although Fischer-Tropsch synthesis yields a wide spectrum of products from methane to waxes it is possible to restrict the chain growth to a few carbon atoms by containing the active metal panicles inside the small pores of a suitable support like zeolite. The nature of the zeolite support also has a strong influence on the product selectivity due to secondary reactions. This paper discusses the results of syngas conversion to light olefins over iron and cobalt catalysts supported on silicalite-1. Effect of the addition of manganese which is known to improve the selectivity to light olefins is also discussed.

  14. Possibility of using a lithotrophic iron-oxidizing microbial fuel cell as a biosensor for detecting iron and manganese in water samples.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong Hoang Nguyen; Luong, Tha Thanh Thi; Nguyen, Thuy Thu Thi; Nguyen, Huy Quang; Duong, Hop Van; Kim, Byung Hong; Pham, Hai The

    2015-10-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacterial consortia can be enriched in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated with ferrous iron as the sole electron donor. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using such lithotrophic iron-oxidizing MFC (LIO-MFC) systems as biosensors to monitor iron and manganese in water samples. When operated with anolytes containing only ferrous iron as the sole electron donor, the experimented LIO-MFCs generated electrical currents in response to the presence of Fe(2+) in the anolytes. For the concentrations of Fe(2+) in the range of 3-20 mM, a linear correlation between the current and the concentration of Fe(2+) could be achieved (r(2) = 0.98). The LIO-MFCs also responded to the presence of Mn(2+) in the anolytes but only when the Mn(2+) concentration was less than 3 mM. The presence of other metal ions such as Ni(2+) or Pb(2+) in the anolytes reduced the Fe(2+)-associated electricity generation of the LIO-MFCs at various levels. Organic compounds, when present at a non-excessive level together with Fe(2+) in the anolytes, did not affect the generation of electricity, although the compounds might serve as alternative electron donors for the anode bacteria. The performance of the LIO-MFCs was also affected to different degrees by operational parameters, including surrounding temperature, pH of the sample, buffer strength and external resistance. The results proved the potential of LIO-MFCs as biosensors sensing Fe(2+) in water samples with a significant specificity. However, the operation of the system should be in compliance with an optimal procedure to ensure reliable performance.

  15. The neurotoxicity of iron, copper and cobalt in Parkinson's disease through ROS-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lan, A P; Chen, J; Chai, Z F; Hu, Y

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease with gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons. Despite extensive research in the past decades, the etiology of PD remains elusive. Nevertheless, multiple lines of evidence suggest that oxidative stress is one of the common causes in the pathogenesis of PD. It has also been suggested that heavy metal-associated oxidative stress may be implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of PD. Here we review the roles of redox metals, including iron, copper and cobalt, in PD. Iron is a highly reactive element and deregulation of iron homeostasis is accompanied by concomitant oxidation processes in PD. Copper is a key metal in cell division process, and it has been shown to have an important role in neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. Cobalt induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in brain tissues.

  16. Role of the metal in the bonding and properties of bimetallic complexes involving manganese, iron, and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Tereniak, Stephen J; Carlson, Rebecca K; Clouston, Laura J; Young, Victor G; Bill, Eckhard; Maurice, Rémi; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Kim, Hyun Jung; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C

    2014-02-05

    A multidentate ligand platform is introduced that enables the isolation of both homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of divalent first-row transition metal ions such as Mn(II), Fe(II), and Co(II). By means of a two-step metalation strategy, five bimetallic coordination complexes were synthesized with the general formula M1M2Cl(py3tren), where py3tren is the triply deprotonated form of N,N,N-tris(2-(2-pyridylamino)ethyl)amine. The metal-metal pairings include dicobalt (1), cobalt-iron (2), cobalt-manganese (3), diiron (4), and iron-manganese (5). The bimetallic complexes have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray anomalous scattering studies, cyclic voltammetry, magnetometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, combustion analyses, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and ab initio quantum chemical methods. Only the diiron chloride complex in this series contains a metal-metal single bond (2.29 Å). The others show weak metal-metal interactions (2.49 to 2.53 Å). The diiron complex is also distinct with a septet ground state, while the other bimetallic species have much lower spin states from S = 0 to S = 1. We propose that the diiron system has delocalized metal-metal bonding electrons, which seems to correlate with a short metal-metal bond and a higher spin state. Multiconfigurational wave function calculations revealed that, indeed, the metal-metal bonding orbitals in the diiron complex are much more delocalized than those of the dicobalt analogue.

  17. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  18. Copper vs. iron: Microwave magnetism in the metamaterial age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acher, Olivier

    2009-07-01

    It is now well established that metamaterials based on copper patterns can exhibit significant permeability levels, but can such materials outdo conventional magnetic materials? In the case where permeability levels and bandwidth are the key figures-of-merit, it is acknowledged that copper-based metamaterials can exceed the performance of ferrites at operating frequencies above 10 GHz. As for low-frequency operation, magnetic metamaterials may also be preferred to conventional magnetic materials when requirements include excellent temperature stability or immunity to external magnetic fields. However, in many cases, metamaterials need to include certain conventional magnetic constituents in order to compete with conventional magnetic materials.

  19. Magnetostrictive iron gallium thin films grown onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride: Structure and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Corbett, Joseph P.; Richard, Andrea L.; Gallagher, James; Meng, Keng-Yuan; Ingram, David C.; Yang, Fengyuan; Smith, Arthur R.

    2016-10-01

    We report structural and magnetic properties of magnetostrictive Fe100 -xGax (x ≈ 15) alloys when deposited onto antiferromagnetic manganese nitride and non-magnetic magnesium oxide substrates. From X-ray diffraction measurements, we find that the FeGa films are single crystalline. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals that the surface morphologies are dictated by the growth temperature, composition, and substrate. The magnetic properties can be tailored by the substrate, as found by magnetic force microscopy imaging and vibrating sample magnetometry measurements. In addition to pronounced tetragonal deformations, depositing FeGa onto manganese nitride leads to the formation of stripe-like magnetic domain patterns and to the appearance of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  20. Measuring brain manganese and iron accumulation in rats following 14 weeks of low-dose manganese treatment using atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Zhang, Na; Anderson, Joel G; Erikson, Keith M; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Aschner, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to a movement disorder due to preferential Mn accumulation in the globus pallidus and other basal ganglia nuclei. Iron (Fe) deficiency also results in increased brain Mn levels, as well as dysregulation of other trace metals. The relationship between Mn and Fe transport has been attributed to the fact that both metals can be transported via the same molecular mechanisms. It is not known, however, whether brain Mn distribution patterns due to increased Mn exposure vs. Fe deficiency are the same, or whether Fe supplementation would reverse or inhibit Mn deposition. To address these questions, we utilized four distinct experimental populations. Three separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats on different diets (control diet [MnT], Fe deficient [FeD], or Fe supplemented [FeS]) were given weekly intravenous Mn injections (3 mg Mn/kg body mass) for 14 weeks, whereas control (CN) rats were fed the control diet and received sterile saline injections. At the conclusion of the study, both blood and brain Mn and Fe levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The data indicate that changes in dietary Fe levels (either increased or decreased) result in regionally specific increases in brain Mn levels compared with CN or MnT animals. Furthermore, there was no difference in either Fe or Mn accumulation between FeS or FeD animals. These data suggest that dietary Fe manipulation, whether increased or decreased, may contribute to brain Mn deposition in populations vulnerable to increased Mn exposure.

  1. Deoxidation Equilibria of Manganese, Silicon, and Aluminum in Iron-Nickel-Chromium Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevskii, Viktor; Aleksandrov, Aleksandr; Kanevskii, Akim; Leont'ev, Leopold

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen solution in Fe-Ni-Cr melts containing manganese, silicon, and aluminum has been thermodynamically analyzed and experimentally studied at 1873 K (1600 °C). The Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr compositions were studied as examples of the most frequently used alloys. Manganese is not a deoxidizer in these alloys, since manganese and chromium have similar affinities for oxygen. At low contents, silicon is also not a deoxidizer. However, above 0.358 pct for the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 0.261 pct for the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy, silicon decreases the oxygen concentration in the melts. Aluminum is an effective deoxidizer in the Fe-Ni-Cr melts. It decreases the oxygen concentration when its content is higher than 2.914 × 10-4 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 2.109 × 10-3 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. Minimum oxygen concentrations are observed at aluminum contents of about 0.24 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and at about 0.23 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. The combined deoxidation of Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloys with silicon and manganese and also with aluminum and silicon was studied. The lower oxygen concentrations were reached as a result of complex deoxidation in comparison with the cases when deoxidized separately by each element at the same concentration levels.

  2. Alloys of the Fe-C-Mn system. Part 5. Special features of structure formation in white high-manganese irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'man, G. I.

    2006-03-01

    Eutectic polyhedration of the diagram is presented and special features of structure formation in high-manganese irons are analyzed. It is shown that eutectics of two kinds (alloyed ledeburite and a eutectic based on M7C3 carbides), which are in peritectic equilibrium with the melt, can be formed and be accompanied by a special austenite-carbide component having a pearlite-like structure. The quasi-eutectic and the M7C3-bearing eutectic in heat-treated high-manganese irons have a special morphology with composite arrangement of carbides in austenite. It is shown that additional alloying of manganese irons with silicon might be a promising direction. Silicon stabilizes the M7C3 carbide in its competition with cementite and ensures the possibility of fabricating austenitic mottles with such carbide. Mottles alloyed with manganese and silicon and having globular graphite, M7C3 carbides and metastable austenitic matrix are characterized by high wear resistance, good antifriction properties, and a combination of high mechanical properties.

  3. Zinc pyrithione inhibits yeast growth through copper influx and inactivation of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Nancy L; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D; Schwartz, James R; Grant, Raymond A; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L; Saunders, Charles W

    2011-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal.

  4. In Vivo Self-Hydroxylation of an Iron-Substituted Manganese-Dependent Extradiol Cleaving Catechol Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Erik R.; Emerson, Joseph P.; Koehntop, Kevin D.; Reynolds, Mark F.; Trmčić, Milena

    2011-01-01

    The homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Arthrobacter globiformis (MndD) catalyzes the oxidative ring cleavage reaction of its catechol substrate in an extradiol fashion. While this reactivity is more typically associated with nonheme iron enzymes, MndD exhibits an unusual specificity for manganese(II). MndD is structurally very similar to the iron(II)-dependent homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Brevibacterium fuscum (HPCD), and we have previously shown that both MndD and HPCD are equally active towards substrate turnover with either Fe(II) or Mn(II) [J P Emerson, et al. (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 105: 7347–7352]. However, expression of MndD in E. coli under aerobic conditions in the presence of excess iron results in the isolation of inactive blue-green Fe-substituted MndD (BG-FeMndD). Spectroscopic studies indicate that this form of Fe-substituted MndD contains an Fe(III) center with a bound catecholate, which is presumably generated by in vivo self-hydroxylation of a second-sphere tyrosine residue, as found for other self-hydroxylated nonheme iron oxygenases,. The absence of this modification in either the native Mn-containing MndD or Fe-containing HPCD suggests that the metal center of Fe-substituted MndD is able to bind and activate O2 in the absence of its substrate, employing a high-valent oxoiron oxidant to carry out the observed self-hydroxylation chemistry. These results demonstrate that the active site metal in MndD can support two dramatically different O2 activation pathways, further highlighting the catalytic flexibility of enzymes containing a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad metal binding motif. PMID:21279661

  5. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics of trivalent oxides of iron and manganese

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2002-01-01

    A new method for combining elemental iron and other metals to form an inexpensive ceramic to stabilize arsenic, alkaline red mud wastes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast.

  6. Thermal chemistry of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} during deposition of thin manganese films on silicon oxide and on copper surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xiangdong; Sun Huaxing; Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of dimanganese decacarbonyl on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers was characterized with the aid of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial experiments in a small stainless-steel reactor identified a narrow range of temperatures, between approximately 445 and 465 K, in which the deposition of manganese could be achieved in a self-limiting fashion, as is desirable for atomic layer deposition. Deposition at higher temperatures leads to multilayer growth, but the extent of this Mn deposition reverses at even higher temperatures (about 625 K), and also ifhydrogen is added to the reaction mixture. Extensive decarbonylation takes place below room temperature, but limited C-O bond dissociation and carbon deposition are still seen after high exposures at 625 K. The films deposited at low ({approx}450 K) temperatures are mostly in the form of MnO, but at 625 K that converts to a manganese silicate, and upon higher doses a manganese silicide forms at the SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface as well. No metallic manganese could be deposited with this precursor on either silicon dioxide or copper surfaces.

  7. Copper Deficiency Leads to Anemia, Duodenal Hypoxia, Upregulation of HIF-2α and Altered Expression of Iron Absorption Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Pavle; Zumerle, Sara; Mastrogiannaki, Maria; El Balkhi, Souleiman; Delga, Stephanie; Mathieu, Jacques R. R.; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Poupon, Joel; Sharp, Paul A.; Vaulont, Sophie; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron and copper are essential trace metals, actively absorbed from the proximal gut in a regulated fashion. Depletion of either metal can lead to anemia. In the gut, copper deficiency can affect iron absorption through modulating the activity of hephaestin - a multi-copper oxidase required for optimal iron export from enterocytes. How systemic copper status regulates iron absorption is unknown. Mice were subjected to a nutritional copper deficiency-induced anemia regime from birth and injected with copper sulphate intraperitoneally to correct the anemia. Copper deficiency resulted in anemia, increased duodenal hypoxia and Hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) levels, a regulator of iron absorption. HIF-2α upregulation in copper deficiency appeared to be independent of duodenal iron or copper levels and correlated with the expression of iron transporters (Ferroportin - Fpn, Divalent Metal transporter – Dmt1) and ferric reductase – Dcytb. Alleviation of copper-dependent anemia with intraperitoneal copper injection resulted in down regulation of HIF-2α-regulated iron absorption genes in the gut. Our work identifies HIF-2α as an important regulator of iron transport machinery in copper deficiency. PMID:23555700

  8. Promotion of iron-induced rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation by copper.

    PubMed

    Beckman, J K; Borowitz, S M; Greene, H L; Burr, I M

    1988-06-01

    Although copper has been demonstrated to promote lipid peroxidation in a number of systems, the mechanisms involved have not been fully defined. In this study, the role of copper in modifying lipid peroxidation has been explored in rat hepatic microsomes. In an in vitro system containing reduced glutathione (GSH, 200 microM) and Tris buffer, pH 7.4, cupric sulfate (1-50 microM) potentiated lipid peroxidation induced by ferrous sulfate (10 microM) but was unable to elicit peroxidation in the absence of iron. Higher levels of cupric sulfate (100 microM or greater) were inhibitory. The nature as well as the extent of the peroxidative response of microsomes to cupric sulfate were dependent on glutathione levels in addition to those of iron. Cupric sulfate (100 microM) strongly potentiated ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation in the presence of 400-800 microM GSH, while it inhibited peroxidation at lower levels of GSH (0-200 microM) and did not affect ferrous ion-induced peroxidation with glutathione levels of 3-10 mM. The potentiating effect of copper on ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation was further explored by investigating: (1) potential GSH-mediated reduction of cupric ions; (2) potential copper/GSH-mediated reduction of ferric ions (formed by oxidation during incubation); and (3) possible promotion of propagation reactions by copper/GSH. Our results indicate that cupric ions are reduced by GSH and thus are converted from an inhibitor to an enhancer of iron-induced lipid peroxidation. Cuprous ions appear to potentiate lipid peroxidation by reduction of ferric ions, rather than by promoting propagation reactions. Iron (in a specific Fe+2/Fe+3 ratio) is then an effective promoter of initiation reactions.

  9. Protein-folding location can regulate manganese-binding versus copper- or zinc-binding.

    PubMed

    Tottey, Steve; Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Reale, Brian; Bessant, Conrad; Sato, Katsuko; Cheek, Timothy R; Gray, Joe; Banfield, Mark J; Dennison, Christopher; Robinson, Nigel J

    2008-10-23

    Metals are needed by at least one-quarter of all proteins. Although metallochaperones insert the correct metal into some proteins, they have not been found for the vast majority, and the view is that most metalloproteins acquire their metals directly from cellular pools. However, some metals form more stable complexes with proteins than do others. For instance, as described in the Irving-Williams series, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) typically form more stable complexes than Mn(2+). Thus it is unclear what cellular mechanisms manage metal acquisition by most nascent proteins. To investigate this question, we identified the most abundant Cu(2+)-protein, CucA (Cu(2+)-cupin A), and the most abundant Mn(2+)-protein, MncA (Mn(2+)-cupin A), in the periplasm of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Each of these newly identified proteins binds its respective metal via identical ligands within a cupin fold. Consistent with the Irving-Williams series, MncA only binds Mn(2+) after folding in solutions containing at least a 10(4) times molar excess of Mn(2+) over Cu(2+) or Zn(2+). However once MncA has bound Mn(2+), the metal does not exchange with Cu(2+). MncA and CucA have signal peptides for different export pathways into the periplasm, Tat and Sec respectively. Export by the Tat pathway allows MncA to fold in the cytoplasm, which contains only tightly bound copper or Zn(2+) (refs 10-12) but micromolar Mn(2+) (ref. 13). In contrast, CucA folds in the periplasm to acquire Cu(2+). These results reveal a mechanism whereby the compartment in which a protein folds overrides its binding preference to control its metal content. They explain why the cytoplasm must contain only tightly bound and buffered copper and Zn(2+).

  10. Determination of the oxidizing capacity of manganese ores.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R

    1974-09-01

    An accurate method is described for determining the amount of active oxygen in manganese ores, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction between the ore and arsenic(III) in presence of ammonium molybdate, followed by the back-titration of excess of arsenic(III) with cerium(IV), using osmium tetroxide as catalyst and Disulphine Blue V as indicator. A survey has been made of the applicability of this method to various pyrolusite ores containing less than 0.2% phosphorus. Aluminium(III), copper(II), iron(III), manganese(II), and molybdenum(VI) do not interfere. Up to 30% phosphorus(V) causes no interference.

  11. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  12. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  13. Characterization of vanadium, manganese and iron model clusters by vibrational and optical spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin

    1999-12-01

    The active ferryl intermediates in the catalytic cycles of heme proteins are subject to interactions from the proximal and distal amino acid residues which control their activities and affect the ν(FeIVO) frequency. The effects of sixth axial ligation, hydrogen bonding, and solvent induced polarization on the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferryl porphyrin analogs, vanadyl (VIVO) porphyrins and their π-cation radicals, are characterized. ν(VIVO) stretching bands for (VO)TMPyP and (VO)PPIX are observed to be sensitive to the pH value of the aqueous solutions, and reveal a number of coexisting 5-coordinate (c) and 6- c vanadyl porphyrins in solution. Moreover, the ν(VIVO) bands for (VO)TMP and (VO)TPP porphyrins upshift to higher frequencies with the formation of their π-cation radicals, in agreement with that of the (VO)OEP radical. For both a1u (OEP) and a2u (TPP, TMP) type radicals, an increased positive charge on the porphyrin reduces the porphyrin --> vanadium electron donation, but enhances the oxo --> V donation. The UV-Vis absorption and RR spectroscopic studies on a series of oxo-bridged vanadium(III) and manganese (III, IV) complexes established spectrostructural correlations that are useful as monitors of the structure of vanadium(III) and manganese(III, IV) centers in biological systems. The linear and bent V-O-V dimers display distinctive RR and absorption spectra. The linear V-O-V bridge displays an intense μ-O --> V charge transfer (CT) absorption band and a strongly enhanced symmetric (νs) or antisymmetric (νas) V-O-V stretching band in RR spectra, depending upon terminal ligands. In contrast, the bent bridge shows two μ-O --> V CT bands and both νs and νas V- O-V stretches are observed in RR spectra. These νs and νas vibrations are used to indicate that the vanadium(III) oxo-bridged dimer intercalates with DNA. The Mn-O-Mn vibrational frequencies in the 400-700 cm -1 region of the oxo-bridged manganese(III, IV) dimers, trimers, and

  14. Copper, nickel, and iron in plumage of three upland gamebird species from non-contaminated environments

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.H.

    1985-12-01

    High levels of atmospheric contamination and particulate fallout characterizing the Industrial Basin of the copper-nickel smelting operations at Sudbury, Ontario, were shown to be reflected in the feather chemistry of resident ruffed grouse populations. Of considerable concern, however, is the paucity of information on background concentrations of elemental metals that could be considered normal for non-contaminated environments. The present report examines concentrations of copper, nickel and iron in the plumage of three tetraonid species collected from remote and undisturbed areas in Northern Ontario and Quebec.

  15. [Efficacy of to'thema in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in early childhood with concomitant copper deficiency].

    PubMed

    Mtvarelidze, Z; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Pagava, K

    2005-04-01

    IDA is still the major medico-social problem in pediatric hematology, especially in early childhood. In this correction ferroresistant forms of IDA are interesting. The aim of our investigation was: studying the Efficacy of Tot'hema in the treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Early childhood with concomitant copper deficiency. We observed 42 patients with IDA (age 0,4 - 3 years) in open control investigation. The carried-out investigations revealed that IDA in early childhood is often proceeded by the concomitant copper deficiency and ceruloplasmin, mainly in premature infants and in children with prolonged diarrhea in anamnesis. In such cases it is important to investigate the copper metabolism together with the peripheral blood index and iron metabolism. Tot'hema improves hematologic and biochemical index, completely supplies iron and copper deficiency, prevents of iron resistant form of IDA. Tot'hema has no side effects.

  16. Concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in the equine liver and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Mainzer, Barbara; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Palavinskas, Richard; Breithaupt, Angele; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of specific elements in the equine liver and kidneys are of practical relevance since horses are not only food-producing animals, but also partially serve as an indicator for the environmental pollution, as the basic feed includes plants like grass, grain and fruits. In this study, the concentrations of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) were measured in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla of 21 horses (8 male; 13 female; aged between 5 months-28 years), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Comparable Cu and Zn concentrations were detected in the liver and renal cortex, while approximately 50% lower concentrations were measured in the renal medulla. The lowest Sr, Cd and Se, but the highest Mn, Sb and Pb concentrations were measured in the liver. The Ba concentrations were comparable in the renal cortex and medulla, but lower in the liver of the horses. Gender-related differences were observed for Cd, Mn and Cr, with higher Cd concentrations in the liver, but lower Mn concentrations in the renal cortex and lower Cr concentrations in the renal medulla of female horses. Age-related differences were detected for most measured elements, however, the animal number per age-group was only low. In conclusion, the present study provides important reference data for the storage of Sr, Ba, Cd, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Sb, Se and Pb in the liver and kidneys of horses, which are of practical relevance for an evaluation of the exposure of horses to these elements, either via feed or the environment.

  17. Nickel, manganese and copper removal by a mixed consortium of sulfate reducing bacteria at a high COD/sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, L P; Costa, P F; Bertolino, S M; Silva, J C C; Guerra-Sá, R; Leão, V A; Teixeira, M C

    2014-08-01

    The use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in passive treatments of acidic effluents containing heavy metals has become an attractive alternative biotechnology. Treatment efficiency may be linked with the effluent conditions (pH and metal concentration) and also to the amount and nature of the organic substrate. Variations on organic substrate and sulfate ratios clearly interfere with the biological removal of this ion by mixed cultures of SRB. This study aimed to cultivate a mixed culture of SRB using different lactate concentrations at pH 7.0 in the presence of Ni, Mn and Cu. The highest sulfate removal efficiency obtained was 98 %, at a COD/sulfate ratio of 2.0. The organic acid analyses indicated an acetate accumulation as a consequence of lactate degradation. Different concentrations of metals were added to the system at neutral pH conditions. Cell proliferation and sulfate consumption in the presence of nickel (4, 20 and 50 mg l(-1)), manganese (1.5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) and copper (1.5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) were measured. The presence of metals interfered in the sulfate biological removal however the concentration of sulfide produced was high enough to remove over 90 % of the metals in the environment. The molecular characterization of the bacterial consortium based on dsrB gene sequencing indicated the presence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfomonas pigra and Desulfobulbus sp. The results here presented indicate that this SRB culture may be employed for mine effluent bioremediation due to its potential for removing sulfate and metals, simultaneously.

  18. Substrate specificity and copper loading of the manganese-oxidizing multicopper oxidase Mnx from Bacillus sp. PL-12.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tebo, Bradley M

    2017-02-22

    Manganese(ii) oxidation in the environment is thought to be driven by bacteria because enzymatic catalysis is many orders of magnitude faster than the abiotic processes. The heterologously purified Mn oxidase (Mnx) from marine Bacillus sp. PL-12 is made up of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) MnxG and two small Cu and heme-binding proteins of unknown function, MnxE and MnxF. Mnx binds Cu and oxidizes both Mn(ii) and Mn(iii), generating Mn(iv) oxide minerals that resemble those found on the Bacillus spore surface. Spectroscopic techniques have illuminated details about the metallo-cofactors of Mnx, but very little is known about their requirement for catalytic activity, and even less is known about the substrate specificity of Mnx. Here we quantify the canonical MCO Cu and persistent peripheral Cu bound to Mnx, and test Mnx oxidizing ability toward different substrates at varying pH. Mn(ii) appears to be the best substrate in terms of kcat, but its oxidation does not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, instead showing a sigmoidal cooperative behavior. Mnx also oxidizes Fe(ii) substrate, but in a Michaelis-Menten manner and with a decreased activity, as well as organic substrates. The reduced metals are more rapidly consumed than the larger organic substrates, suggesting the hypothesis that the Mnx substrate site is small and tuned for metal oxidation. Of biological relevance is the result that Mnx has the highest catalytic efficiency for Mn(ii) at the pH of sea water, especially when the protein is loaded with greater than the requisite four MCO copper atoms, suggesting that the protein has evolved specifically for Mn oxidation.

  19. Molecular characterization of a manganese superoxide dismutase and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Yuan, Zeyi; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Feng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2013-05-01

    The full-length cDNA sequences coding respectively for a manganese superoxide dismutase (Mg-MnSOD) and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Mg-CuZnSOD) were cloned from Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mg-MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD cDNAs encoded a polypeptide of 228 and 211 amino acids, respectively. Sequence analysis indicated Mg-MnSOD was a mitochondrial MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD was an intracellular CuZnSOD. Multiple alignment analysis showed that both Mg-MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD sequences had the common features conserved in MnSODs and CuZnSODs, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mg-MnSOD clustered together with MnSODs from other mollusks, whereas Mg-CuZnSOD clustered with other mollusk intracellular CuZnSODs with a wider phylogenetic distance. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) analysis, both Mg-MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD transcripts were detected in all tissues examined with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. Following bacterial challenge, the expression level of Mg-MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD increased first and subsequently decreased to the original level in hemocytes. In hepatopancreas, Mg-CuZnSOD mRNA was up-regulated significantly at 72 h and 96 h post challenge, while the level of Mg-MnSOD transcript had no significant change. Therefore, Mg-MnSOD and Mg-CuZnSOD expressions were inducible and they were probably involved in the immune response against bacterial challenge. These results suggest that these SODs may play important roles in the immune defense system of M. galloprovincialis and perhaps contribute to the protective effects against oxidative stress in this mussel.

  20. Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Yu, Jia; Huang, Wen; Bai, Shunjie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Qi, Zhigang; Shao, Weihua; Xie, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Although some studies have reported the associations between specific metal element intake and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), the associations between specific metal element intake such as iron intake and PD are still conflicted. We aimed to determine whether intake of iron, zinc, and copper increases/decreases the risk of PD. PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar were searched. We pooled the multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios using random effects. Study quality was evaluated by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Five studies including 126,507 individuals remained for inclusion, pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate dietary iron intake was 1.08 (95 % CI 0.61-1.93, P = 0.787), and for high dietary iron intake was (1.03, 95 % CI 0.83-1.30, P = 0.766), respectively. The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for the highest compared with the lowest dietary iron intake were 1.47 (95 % CI 1.17-1.85, P = 0.001) in western population and in males (RR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.01, P = 0.041). The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate or high intake of zinc, and copper were not statistically different (P > 0.05). PD increased by 18 % (RR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.02-1.37) for western population by every 10-mg/day increment in iron intake. Higher iron intake appears to be not associated with overall PD risk, but may be associated with risk of PD in western population. Sex may be a factor influencing PD risk for higher iron intake. However, further studies are still needed to confirm the sex-selective effects.

  1. Ultrasonic recovery of copper and iron through the simultaneous utilization of Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) spent acid etching solution and PCB waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Fengchun; Ma, Yang

    2011-01-15

    A method was developed to recover the copper and iron from Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) manufacturing generated spent acid etching solution and waste sludge with ultrasonic energy at laboratory scale. It demonstrated that copper-containing PCB spent etching solution could be utilized as a leaching solution to leach copper from copper contained PCB waste sludge. It also indicated that lime could be used as an alkaline precipitating agent in this method to precipitate iron from the mixture of acidic PCB spent etching solution and waste sludge. This method provided an effective technique for the recovery of copper and iron through simultaneous use of PCB spent acid solution and waste sludge. The leaching rates of copper and iron enhanced with ultrasound energy were reached at 93.76% and 2.07% respectively and effectively separated copper from iron. Followed by applying lime to precipitate copper from the mixture of leachate and rinsing water produced by the copper and iron separation, about 99.99% and 1.29% of soluble copper and calcium were settled as the solids respectively. Furthermore the settled copper could be made as commercial rate copper. The process performance parameters studied were pH, ultrasonic power, and temperature. This method provided a simple and reliable technique to recover copper and iron from waste streams generated by PCB manufacturing, and would significantly reduce the cost of chemicals used in the recovery.

  2. Increased manganese uptake by primary astrocyte cultures with altered iron status is mediated primarily by divalent metal transporter.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Keith M; Aschner, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Neurotoxicity due to excessive brain manganese (Mn) accumulation can occur via occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (>1-5 mg Mn/m(3)) of Mn, or metabolic aberrations (decreased biliary excretion). Given the putative role of astrocytes in regulating the movement of metals across the blood-brain barrier, we sought to examine the relationship between iron (Fe) status and Mn transport in astrocytes. Furthermore, our study examined the effect of Fe status on astrocytic transferrin receptor (TfR) and divalent metal transporter (DMT-1) levels and their relationship to Mn uptake, as both have been implicated as putative Mn transporters. All experiments were carried out in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rats when the cells reached full confluency (about three weeks in culture). Astrocytes were incubated for 24h in astrocyte growth medium (AGM) containing 200 microM desferroxamine (ID), 500 microM ferrous sulfate (+Fe), or no compound (CN). After 24h, 5 min (54)Mn uptake was measured and protein was harvested from parallel culture plates for DMT-1 and TfR immunoblot analysis. Both iron deprivation (ID) and iron overload (+Fe) caused significant increases (p<0.05) in (54)Mn uptake in astrocytes. TfR levels were significantly increased (p<0.05) due to ID and decreased in astrocytes exposed to +Fe treatments. As expected, DMT-1 was increased due to Fe deprivation, but surprisingly, DMT-1 levels were also increased due to +Fe treatment, albeit not to the extent noted in ID. The decreased TfR associated with +Fe treatment and the increased DMT-1 levels suggest that DMT-1 is a likely putative transporter of Mn in astrocytes.

  3. Direct Functionalization of (Un)protected Tetrahydroisoquinoline and Isochroman under Iron and Copper Catalysis: Two Metals, Two Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A highly facile, straightforward synthesis of 1-(3-indolyl)-tetrahydroisoquinolines was developed using either simple copper or iron catalysts. N-protected and unprotected tetrahydroisoquinolines (THIQ) could be used as starting materials. Extension of the substrate scope of the pronucleophile from indoles to pyrroles and electron-rich arenes was realized. Additionally, methoxyphenylation is not limited to THIQ but can be carried out on isochroman as well, again employing iron and copper catalysis. PMID:21902275

  4. Trace elements in the human endometrium. I. Zinc, copper, manganese, sodium and potassium concentrations at various phases of the normal menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagenfeldt, K; Plantin, L O; Diczfalusy, E

    1970-11-01

    The cyclic variations in the content of 5 trace elements in the normal human endometrium were studied by means of neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of zinc, copper, manganese, sodium, and potassium were measured in endometrial biopsy specimens taken from 6 healthy, normally menstruating volunteers from 10 to 32 years of age. 4 specimens were obtained from each during 4 consecutive cycles in the following phases: a) early proliferative (Days 6-10); late proliferative (Days 11-14); c) early secretory (Days 15-18); and d) late secretory Days 22-27). Biopsies were taken with a Novak type suction curette without anesthesia and without dilation of the cervix. Chemical methodology is described. An analysis of variance of the data revealed that in the early proliferative phase the human endometrium is characterized by significantly elevated concentrations of manganese (p greater than .001), sodium (p greater than .01), and potassium (p greater than .001). However, the late secretory endometrium is characterized by a highly significant rise in its zinc concentration (p greater than .001), accompanied by a highly significantly decreased concentration of sodium (p greater than .001) and potassium (p greater than .001). The copper concentration of the secretory endometria was significantly higher than that of the proliferative endometria (p greater than .001). The significance of the findings was the same whether values were expressed per g protein or per g wet tissue. It is suggested that the high concentrations of zinc and copper associated with low levels of manganese, sodium, and potassium at the expected time of implantation may be a reflection of changes in endometrial enzyme activities. Investigations are in progress to explore this possibility.

  5. An aqueous method for the controlled manganese (Mn(2+)) substitution in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI.

    PubMed

    Ereath Beeran, Ansar; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Fernandez, Francis Boniface; Muvvala, Krishna Surendra; Wunderlich, Wilfried; Anil, Sukumaran; Vellappally, Sajith; Ramachandra Rao, M S; John, Annie; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Varma, P R Harikrishna

    2015-02-14

    Despite the success in the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) for various scientific applications, its potential in biomedical fields has not been exploited to its full potential. In this context, an in situ substitution of Mn(2+) was performed in SPION and a series of ferrite particles, MnxFe1-xFe2O4 with a varying molar ratio of Mn(2+) : Fe(2+) where 'x' varies from 0-0.75. The ferrite particles obtained were further studied in MRI contrast applications and showed appreciable enhancement in their MRI contrast properties. Manganese substituted ferrite nanocrystals (MnIOs) were synthesized using a novel, one-step aqueous co-precipitation method based on the use of a combination of sodium hydroxide and trisodium citrate (TSC). This approach yielded the formation of highly crystalline, superparamagnetic MnIOs with good control over their size and bivalent Mn ion crystal substitution. The presence of a TSC hydrophilic layer on the surface facilitated easy dispersion of the materials in an aqueous media. Primary characterizations such as structural, chemical and magnetic properties demonstrated the successful formation of manganese substituted ferrite. More significantly, the MRI relaxivity of the MnIOs improved fourfold when compared to SPION crystals imparting high potential for use as an MRI contrast agent. Further, the cytocompatibility and blood compatibility evaluations demonstrated excellent cell morphological integrity even at high concentrations of nanoparticles supporting the non-toxic nature of nanoparticles. These results open new horizons for the design of biocompatible water dispersible ferrite nanoparticles with good relaxivity properties via a versatile and easily scalable co-precipitation route.

  6. Urinary iron loss in the nephrotic syndrome--an unusual cause of iron deficiency with a note on urinary copper losses.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E. A.; Sampson, B.; Muller, B. R.; Curtis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients with long-standing nephrotic syndrome are described in whom urinary iron losses may have contributed towards an iron deficiency state. Seven other nephrotic patients were also studied. Increased urinary iron excretion was found in six out of nine patients and increased urinary copper excretion in all eight patients in whom it was measured. Trace metal losses in the urine in nephrotics may be important clinically. PMID:6709543

  7. Effect of fulvic and humic acids on iron and manganese homeostasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Szabó, József; Vucskits, András Valentin; Berta, Erzsébet; Andrásofszky, Emese; Bersényi, András; Hullár, István

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA) as the two main compounds of humic substances, separately on Fe and Mn homeostasis. Seventy-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 9 experimental groups. The control diet (AIN-93G formula) and diets supplemented with 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.8% HA or FA were fed for 26 days. Fe and Mn concentrations of the large intestinal content, liver, kidney, femur and hair were determined. No significant differences were observed in the production parameters. The effects of FA and HA on iron homeostasis were significantly different. FA proved to be a good iron source, and slightly increased the iron content of liver and kidney, but - up to a dietary iron level of 52.7 mg/kg - it did not influence the efficiency of iron absorption. Above a dietary iron level of 52.7 mg/kg down-regulation of Fe absorption can be assumed. HA significantly stimulated the iron uptake and there was no down-regulation of Fe absorption up to 0.8% dietary HA supplementation level (61.5 mg Fe/kg diet). In the HA groups the iron content of the liver and kidney decreased significantly, suggesting that in spite of the better Fe absorption, the HA-Fe complex does not provide iron to the investigated organs. Neither FA nor HA supplementation influenced the Fe content of the femur and hair and slightly decreased the Mn concentration in the large intestinal content. This effect was significant (with a 22.7% Mn concentration decrease) only at the HA supplementation rate of 0.8%. Neither FA nor HA influenced significantly the Mn concentrations of the liver, kidney and femur. The Mn concentration of the hair in rats receiving FA- or HA-supplemented diets was higher than in the control rats; however, this result needs further confirmation.

  8. [Intake of trace elements and heavy metals with the diet of 2-14 years old children. Zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen; lead, cadmium, mercury (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stolley, H; Kersting, M; Droese, W

    1981-04-01

    For 2-14 year old children the intake of the trace elements zinc, manganese, copper, fluoride, iodine, selen, and of the heavy metals, lead, cadmium and mercury is calculated from their food intake. The results give a representative statement of the average supply of trace elements and of the average intake of heavy metals with the diet of children in the Federal Republic of Germany. It is shown that the choice of foodstuffs for the diet has an important influence on the supply of trace elements.

  9. Generation of oxidant response to copper and iron nanoparticles and salts: Stimulation by ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Robert H.; Vidrio, Edgar A.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Qin, Qin; Willits, Neil H.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Anastasio, Cort

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes a two-stage approach to analyzing combustion-generated samples for their potential to produce oxidant stress. This approach is illustrated with the two commonly encountered transition metals, copper and iron. First, their abilities to generate hydroxyl radical were measured in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline solution containing ascorbate and/or citrate. Second, their abilities to induce heme oxygenase-1 in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were assessed in cell culture. Combustion-generated copper oxide nanoparticles were active in both assays and were found to be soluble in culture medium. Depletion of glutathione in the cells or loading the cells with ascorbate greatly increased heme oxygenase-1 induction in the presence of copper. By contrast, iron oxide nanoparticles were active in the phosphate buffered saline but not in cell culture, and they aggregated in culture medium. Soluble salts of copper and iron exhibited the same contrast in activities as the respective combustion-generated particles. The results suggest that the capability of combustion-generated environmental samples to produce oxidant stress can be screened effectively in a two step process, first in phosphate buffered saline with ascorbate and subsequently in epithelial cell culture for those exhibiting activity initially. The results also point to an unanticipated interaction in cells of oxidant stress-generating metals with an anti-oxidant (ascorbate) that is usually missing in culture medium formulations. Thus, ascorbate supplementation of cultured human cells is likely to improve their ability to model the in vivo effects of particulate matter containing copper and other redox-active metals. PMID:19683516

  10. Generation of oxidant response to copper and iron nanoparticles and salts: Stimulation by ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Rice, Robert H; Vidrio, Edgar A; Kumfer, Benjamin M; Qin, Qin; Willits, Neil H; Kennedy, Ian M; Anastasio, Cort

    2009-10-30

    The present work describes a two-stage approach to analyzing combustion-generated samples for their potential to produce oxidant stress. This approach is illustrated with the two commonly encountered transition metals, copper and iron. First, their abilities to generate hydroxyl radical were measured in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline solution containing ascorbate and/or citrate. Second, their abilities to induce heme oxygenase-1 in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were assessed in cell culture. Combustion-generated copper oxide nanoparticles were active in both assays and were found to be soluble in culture medium. Depletion of glutathione in the cells or loading the cells with ascorbate greatly increased heme oxygenase-1 induction in the presence of copper. By contrast, iron oxide nanoparticles were active in the phosphate-buffered saline but not in cell culture, and they aggregated in culture medium. Soluble salts of copper and iron exhibited the same contrast in activities as the respective combustion-generated particles. The results suggest that the capability of combustion-generated environmental samples to produce oxidant stress can be screened effectively in a two step process, first in phosphate-buffered saline with ascorbate and subsequently in epithelial cell culture for those exhibiting activity initially. The results also point to an unanticipated interaction in cells of oxidant stress-generating metals with an antioxidant (ascorbate) that is usually missing in culture medium formulations. Thus, ascorbate supplementation of cultured human cells is likely to improve their ability to model the in vivo effects of particulate matter containing copper and other redox-active metals.

  11. Trithiocyanurate complexes of iron, manganese and nickel and their anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Kopel, Pavel; Dolezal, Karel; Langer, Vratislav; Jun, Daniel; Adam, Vojtech; Kuca, Kamil; Kizek, Rene

    2014-04-08

    The complexes of Fe(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II) with a combination of a Schiff base, nitrogen-donor ligand or macrocyclic ligand and trithiocyanuric acid (ttcH3) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopies. Crystal and molecular structures of the iron complex of composition [Fe(L1)](ttcH2)(ClO4)·EtOH·H2O (1), where L1 is Schiff base derived from tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, were solved. It was found that the Schiff base is coordinated to the central iron atom by six nitrogens forming deformed octahedral arrangement, whereas trithiocyanurate(1-) anion, perchlorate and solvent molecules are not coordinated. The X-ray structure of the Schiff base sodium salt is also presented and compared with the iron complex. The anticholinesterase activity of the complexes was also studied.

  12. Presence of acute phase changes in zinc, iron, and copper metabolism in turkey embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, K.C.; Richards, M.P.; Darcey, S.E.; Laurin, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Acute phase changes in trace mineral metabolism were examined in turkey embryos. An endotoxin injection resulted in increased concentrations of serum copper and liver zinc and decreased concentrations of serum zinc in embryos incubated either in ovo or ex ovo. Changes in zinc and copper metabolism occurred when endotoxin either was injected intramuscularly, into the amnionic fluid, or administered onto the chorioallantoic membrane. Unlike poults, embryos did not respond to an inflammatory challenge with decreased serum iron concentrations. Acute phase changes in embryo serum zinc and copper as well as liver zinc concentrations were similar to those in poults. Increased liver zinc concentrations were associated with increased zinc in metallothionein (MT). An injection of a crude interleukin 1 preparation into embryos resulted in similar increases in hepatic zinc and MT concentrations as an endotoxin injection, suggesting a role for this cytokine in mediating the acute phase changes in embryonic zinc metabolism.

  13. Retronasal perception and flavour thresholds of iron and copper in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Omur-Ozbek, Pinar; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2011-03-01

    Drinking water flavour has a strong role in water quality perception, service satisfaction, willingness to pay and selection of water sources. Metallic flavours are often caused by the dissolved iron and copper, commonly found in groundwater or introduced to tap water by corroding infrastructure. Taste thresholds of iron and copper have been investigated by several studies; however, reported results and test methods vary considerably. This study determined the taste thresholds of ferrous and cuprous ions in room temperature reagent water by using the one-of-five test with multi-nation panellists in the United States. For ferrous and cuprous ions, individual thresholds ranged from 0.003 to >5 mg l(-1) and 0.035 to >5 mg l(-1), respectively. Population thresholds were determined by logistic regression and geometric mean methods as 0.031 and 0.05 mg l(-1) for ferrous ion, and 0.61 mg l(-1) for cuprous ion by both methods. The components of metallic sensation were investigated by use of nose-clips while panellists ingested iron and copper solutions. Results showed that metallic sensation has a significant odour component and should be treated as a flavour instead of a taste. Ferrous, cuprous and cupric ions also produced weak bitter and salty tastes as well as astringent mouthfeel. In comparison, ferric ion produced no sensation.

  14. Effects of Copper and Malleablizing Time on Mechanical Properties of Austempered Malleable Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lu, Jung-Kai; Chen, Fan-Shiong

    2007-10-01

    In this study, both the unalloyed and 1 wt pct copper alloyed white irons were successively treated with a duplex heating process consisting of malleablizing and austempering, and then the effects of copper and processing variables on microstructure and mechanical properties of the austempered malleable iron (AMI) were investigated. The results showed that AMI could effectively shorten malleablizing time to obtain the constituents of irregular graphite, acicular ferrite, and retained austenite in the microstructure. Moreover, 1 pct Cu-AMI had a higher retained austenite content than unalloyed AMI. This is because copper is an austenite stabilizer and acts to delay the start of the transformation into ausferrite. In the case of mechanical properties, AMI increased tensile strength (1083 to 1190 MPa) and impact toughness (16 to 22 J) by 2 to 3 times after 930 °C 20 hours malleablizing treatment as compared to as-cast (572 to 580 MPa and 5 to 6 J). In particular, 1 pct Cu-AMI had better performance than unalloyed AMI except for hardness. In comparison with conventional malleable irons, AMI was found to possess better tensile and impact properties.

  15. Maternal-fetal distribution of calcium, iron, copper, and zinc in pregnant teenagers and adults.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Milena Lima; de Faria Barbosa, Renata; Santo, Raquel Espírito; da Silva Santos, Flávia; de Jesus, Edgar Francisco Oliveira; Sardinha, Fátima Lúcia de Carvalho; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2011-02-01

    Adolescence is marked by intensive growth and development. When pregnancy occurs during this period of the mother's growth, there is an increase in her nutritional needs. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of calcium, iron, copper, and zinc in maternal plasma, the placenta, and in the cord plasma of pregnant teenagers and adults. A total of 80 sets of maternal plasma, placentas, and cord plasma (40 from teenagers and 40 from adults) were analyzed using synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence. The levels of calcium, copper, and zinc in the maternal and cord plasma from teenagers were not significantly different than those from adults. Iron levels in the teenagers maternal and cord plasma were higher than in the adults. All of the minerals analyzed were present at higher levels in the placentas from adults than those from teenagers. However, the low quantities of placental calcium, iron, copper, and zinc in the teenagers do not compromise the levels of these minerals in the cord plasma. Future research regarding the placental transport of these minerals is recommended to investigate the efficiency of mechanisms of transfer of these minerals in pregnant teenagers.

  16. Impact of orchard and tillage management practices on soil leaching of atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Lipiec, J.; Siczek, A.; Kotowska, U.; Nosalewicz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments were carried out on an Orthic Luvisol developed from loess, over limestone, at the experimental field of Lublin Agricultural University in Felin (51o15'N, 22o35'E), Poland. The investigation deals with the problems of leaching's rate of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,2,3-triazine), potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates from two management systems of soil: (i) conventionally tilled field with main tillage operations including stubble cultivator (10 cm) + harrowing followed by mouldboard ploughing to 20 cm depth, and crop rotation including selected cereals, root crops and papillionaceous crops, (ii) 35-year-old apple orchard field (100x200m) with a permanent sward that was mown in the inter-rows during the growing season. The conventionally tilled plot was under the current management practice for approximately 30 years. Field sites were close to each other (about 150 m). Core samples of 100 cm3 volume and 5 cm diameter were taken from two depths 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, and were used to determine the soil water characteristic curve. It was observed that management practices impacted on the physic-chemical properties of soils. pH (in H2O) in tilled soil ranged from 5.80 to 5.91. However soil of orchard soil revealed higher values of pH than tilled soil and ranged from 6.36 to 6.40. The content of organic carbon for tilled soil ranged from 1.13 to 1.17%, but in orchard soil from 1.59 to 1.77%. Tillled soil showed broader range of bulk density 1.38-1.62 mg m-3, than orchard soil 1.33-134 mg m-3. The first-order kinetic reaction model was fitted to the experimental atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, nitrates, ammonium and phosphates leaching vs. time data. The concentrations of leached chemical compounds revealed linear curves. The correlation coefficients ranged from -0.873 to -0.993. The first-order reaction constants measured for the orchard soils were from 3.8 to 19 times higher than

  17. Effects of iron, manganese, copper, and zinc enrichments on productivity and biomass in the subarctic Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, K.H. )

    1991-12-01

    Natural plankton populations from subarctic Pacific surface waters were incubated in 7-d experiments with added concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Small additions of metals were used to simulate natural perturbations in metal concentrations potentially experienced by marine plankton. Trace metal concentrations, phytoplankton productivity, Chl a, and the species composition of phytoplankton and microzooplankton were measured over the course of the experiment. Although the controls indicated little growth, increases in phytoplankton productivity, Chl a, and cell densities were dramatic after the addition of 0.89 nM Fe, indicating that it may limit the rates of algal production in these waters. Similar increases were observed in experiments with 3.9 nM Cu added. The Cu effect is attributed to a decrease in the grazing activities of the microzooplankton and increases in the rates of production. Mn enrichment had its greatest effect on diatom biomass, whereas Zn enrichment had its greatest effect on other autofluorescent organisms. The extent of trace metal adsorption onto carboy walls was also evaluated. These results imply that natural systems may be affected as follows: natural levels of Fe and Cu may influence phytoplankton productivity and trophic structure in open-ocean, high-nutrient, low-biomass systems; rates of net production are not limited by one micronutrient alone.

  18. Characterization of iron, manganese, and copper synthetic hydroxyapatites by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, B; Wasowicz, T; Howard, T; Hossner, L R; Ming, D W

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu) into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for long-duration space missions. Separate Fe3+ (Fe-SHA), Mn2+ (Mn-SHA), and Cu2+ (Cu-SHA) containing SHA materials were synthesized by a precipitation method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the location of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ ions in the SHA structure and to identify other Fe(3+)-, Mn(2+)-, and Cu(2+)-containing phases that formed during precipitation. The EPR parameters for Fe3+ (g=4.20 and 8.93) and for Mn2+ (g=2.01, A=9.4 mT, D=39.0 mT and E=10.5 mT) indicated that Fe3+ and Mn2+ possessed rhombic ion crystal fields within the SHA structure. The Cu2+ EPR parameters (g(z)=2.488, A(z)=5.2 mT) indicated that Cu2+ was coordinated to more than six oxygens. The rhombic environments of Fe3+ and Mn2+ along with the unique Cu2+ environment suggested that these metals substituted for the 7 or 9 coordinate Ca2+ in SHA. The EPR analyses also detected poorly crystalline metal oxyhydroxides or metal-phosphates associated with SHA. The Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu for ALS and terrestrial cropping systems.

  19. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Clearfield, A.; Hossner, L. R.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program is evaluating the use of Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) as a slow release fertilizer for crops that might be grown on the International Space Station or at Lunar and Martian outposts. Separate Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA materials along with a transition-metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. Chemical and mineralogical analyses determined if and how Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into the SHA structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that SHA materials with the apatite structure were produced. Chemical analyses indicated that the metal containing SHA materials were deficient in Ca relative to pure-SHA. The shift in the infrared PO4-mu 3 vibrations, smaller unit cell parameters, smaller particle size, and greater structural strain for Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA compared with pure-SHA suggested that Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into SHA structure. Rietveld analyses revealed that Fe, Mn, and Cu substituted into the Ca2 site of SHA. An Fe-rich phase was detected by TEM analyses and backscattered electron microscopy in the Fe-containing SHA material with the greatest Fe content. The substitution of metals into SHA suggests that metal-SHA materials are potential slow-release sources of micronutrients for plant uptake in addition to Ca and P.

  20. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Sutter, B; Ming, D W; Clearfield, A; Hossner, L R

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program is evaluating the use of Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) as a slow release fertilizer for crops that might be grown on the International Space Station or at Lunar and Martian outposts. Separate Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA materials along with a transition-metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. Chemical and mineralogical analyses determined if and how Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into the SHA structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that SHA materials with the apatite structure were produced. Chemical analyses indicated that the metal containing SHA materials were deficient in Ca relative to pure-SHA. The shift in the infrared PO4-mu 3 vibrations, smaller unit cell parameters, smaller particle size, and greater structural strain for Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA compared with pure-SHA suggested that Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into SHA structure. Rietveld analyses revealed that Fe, Mn, and Cu substituted into the Ca2 site of SHA. An Fe-rich phase was detected by TEM analyses and backscattered electron microscopy in the Fe-containing SHA material with the greatest Fe content. The substitution of metals into SHA suggests that metal-SHA materials are potential slow-release sources of micronutrients for plant uptake in addition to Ca and P.

  1. Characterization of iron, manganese, and copper synthetic hydroxyapatites by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Wasowicz, T.; Howard, T.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu) into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for long-duration space missions. Separate Fe3+ (Fe-SHA), Mn2+ (Mn-SHA), and Cu2+ (Cu-SHA) containing SHA materials were synthesized by a precipitation method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the location of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ ions in the SHA structure and to identify other Fe(3+)-, Mn(2+)-, and Cu(2+)-containing phases that formed during precipitation. The EPR parameters for Fe3+ (g=4.20 and 8.93) and for Mn2+ (g=2.01, A=9.4 mT, D=39.0 mT and E=10.5 mT) indicated that Fe3+ and Mn2+ possessed rhombic ion crystal fields within the SHA structure. The Cu2+ EPR parameters (g(z)=2.488, A(z)=5.2 mT) indicated that Cu2+ was coordinated to more than six oxygens. The rhombic environments of Fe3+ and Mn2+ along with the unique Cu2+ environment suggested that these metals substituted for the 7 or 9 coordinate Ca2+ in SHA. The EPR analyses also detected poorly crystalline metal oxyhydroxides or metal-phosphates associated with SHA. The Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu for ALS and terrestrial cropping systems.

  2. Dissolution kinetics of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Micronutrient-substituted synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is being evaluated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program for crop production on long-duration human missions to the International Space Station or for future Lunar or Martian outposts. The stirred-flow technique was utilized to characterize Ca, P, Fe, Mn, and Cu release characteristics from Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA in deionized (DI) water, citric acid, and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA). Initially, Ca and P release rates decreased rapidly with time and were controlled by a non-SHA calcium phosphate phase(s) with low Ca/P solution molar ratios (0.91-1.51) relative to solid SHA ratios (1.56-1.64). At later times, Ca/P solution molar ratios (1.47-1.79) were near solid SHA ratios and release rates decreased slowly indicating that SHA controlled Ca and P release. Substituted SHA materials had faster dissolution rates relative to unsubstituted SHA. The initial metal release rate order was Mn >> Cu > Fe which followed metal-oxide/phosphate solubility suggesting that poorly crystalline metal-oxides/phosphates were dominating metal release. Similar metal release rates for all substituted SHA (approximately 0.01 cmol kg-1 min-1) at the end of the DTPA experiment indicated that SHA dissolution was supplying the metals into solution and that poorly crystalline metal-oxide/phosphates were not controlling metal release. Results indicate that non-SHA Ca-phosphate phases and poorly crystalline metal-oxide/phosphates will contribute Ca, P, and metals. After these phases have dissolved, substituted SHA will be the source of Ca, P, and metals for plants.

  3. Exposure to bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) increases levels of hepcidin mRNA and impairs the homeostasis of iron but not that of manganese.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Cristina; Rivas-García, Lorenzo; López-Chaves, Carlos; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Gálvez, Julio; Gómez-Aracena, Jorge; Vera-Ramírez, Laura; Montes-Bayon, Maria; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Llopis, Juan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether alterations in iron homeostasis, caused by exposure to vanadium, are related to changes in the gene expression of hepatic hepcidin. Two groups of rats were examined: control and vanadium-exposed. Vanadium, as bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) was supplied in the drinking water. The experiment had a duration of five weeks. Iron and manganese were measured in excreta, serum and tissues. Leptin, ferritin, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, red blood cells, haemoglobin and haematocrit were determined. Protein carbonyl group levels and hepcidin gene expression were determined in the liver. In the vanadium-exposed rats, iron absorption, serum iron and leptin and all haematological parameters decreased. Levels of IL-6, TNF-α and ferritin in serum and of iron in the liver, spleen and heart increased. In the liver, levels of protein carbonyl groups and hepcidin mRNA were also higher in the vanadium-exposed group. Exposure to vanadium did not modify manganese homeostasis. The results obtained from this study provide the first evidence that bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) produces an increase in the gene expression of the hepcidin, possibly caused by an inflammatory process. Both factors could be the cause of alterations in Fe homeostasis and the appearance of anaemia. However, Mn homeostasis was not affected.

  4. Shelf-to-basin shuttling of iron and manganese as a driver of phosphorus burial in the Landsort Deep during past periods of hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Nikki; Slomp, Caroline P.; Ash, Jeanine; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Hardisty, Dalton; Martin, Ellen; Riedinger, Natascha

    2015-04-01

    Bottom water hypoxia (i.e. low oxygen conditions) in coastal systems is an increasing world-wide problem. Enhanced external phosphorus inputs may contribute to the development of hypoxia by increasing primary production in the water column. The associated elevated flux of organic matter to the seafloor may then result in an oxygen demand in bottom waters that outpaces supply. The mechanisms leading to removal of phosphorus from the Baltic Sea system through burial in the sediment are still incompletely understood. The Baltic Sea is currently hypoxic and has experienced two earlier periods of hypoxia during the Holocene. These are the Holocene Thermal Maximum (ca 8000-4000 yrs ago) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (ca 700-1000 yrs ago) (Zillen et al., 2008). Based on sediment records for the Gotland Deep area, Jilbert and Slomp (2013) suggest that particle shuttles of iron and manganese oxides from the shelves act as drivers for authigenesis of phosphorus-bearing minerals in the deep euxinic basins. Here, we present geochemical results for a long sediment record (0 - 90 mbsf) from the deepest basin in the Baltic Sea (Landsort Deep, 451 m, Site M0063), which was retrieved during the International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment Expedition 347 in 2013. Bulk sediment and pore water geochemical analyses, results of sequential extractions for phosphorus, iron and sulfur, and various micro-analyses are combined to assess whether shelf-to-basin shuttling of manganese and iron affects the long-term burial of phosphorus in the Landsort Deep. We find that highly organic-rich sediments were deposited in the Landsort Deep following the transition from a lacustrine to a brackish/marine environment. This is reflected, for example, in the organic carbon content and pore water geochemistry. Elevated molybdenum and organic carbon/phosphorus ratios in the sediment allow the two major hypoxic periods during the early and mid-Holocene to be identified. All

  5. Dynamic Coupling of Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus Behavior in Water and Sediment of Shallow Ice-Covered Eutrophic Lakes.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Andrew W; Giles, Courtney D; Isles, Peter D F; Xu, Yaoyang; Perzan, Zachary; Druschel, Gregory K

    2015-08-18

    Decreasing duration and occurrence of northern hemisphere ice cover due to recent climate warming is well-documented; however, biogeochemical dynamics underneath the ice are poorly understood. We couple time-series analyses of water column and sediment water interface (SWI) geochemistry with hydrodynamic data to develop a holistic model of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and phosphorus (P) behavior underneath the ice of a shallow eutrophic freshwater bay. During periods of persistent subfreezing temperatures, a highly reactive pool of dissolved and colloidal Fe, Mn, and P develops over time in surface sediments and bottom waters due to reductive dissolution of Fe/Mn(oxy)hydroxides below the SWI. Redox dynamics are driven by benthic O2 consumption, limited air-water exchange of oxygen due to ice cover, and minimal circulation. During thaw events, the concentration, distribution and size partitioning of all species changes, with the highest concentrations of P and "truly dissolved" Fe near the water column surface, and a relatively well-mixed "truly dissolved" Mn and "colloidal" Fe profile due to the influx of geochemically distinct river water and increased circulation. The partitioning and flux of trace metals and phosphorus beneath the ice is dynamic, and heavily influenced by climate-dependent physical processes that vary in both time and space.

  6. Intracellular localization and subsequent redistribution of metal transporters in a rat choroid plexus model following exposure to manganese or iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xueqian; Miller, David S.

    2008-07-15

    Confocal microscopy was used to investigate the effects of manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) exposure on the subcellular distribution of metal transporting proteins, i.e., divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), metal transporter protein 1 (MTP1), and transferrin receptor (TfR), in the rat intact choroid plexus which comprises the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In control tissue, DMT1 was concentrated below the apical epithelial membrane, MTP1 was diffuse within the cytosol, and TfR was distributed in vesicles around nuclei. Following Mn or Fe treatment (1 and 10 {mu}M), the distribution of DMT1 was not affected. However, MTP1 and TfR moved markedly toward the apical pole of the cells. These shifts were abolished when microtubules were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed a significant increase in mRNA and protein levels of TfR but not DMT1 and MTP1 after Mn exposure. These results suggest that early events in the tissue response to Mn or Fe exposure involve microtubule-dependent, intracellular trafficking of MTP1 and TfR. The intracellular trafficking of metal transporters in the choroid plexus following Mn exposure may partially contribute to Mn-induced disruption in Fe homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following Mn exposure.

  7. Self-organization of recent rhythmic iron-manganese precipitations in underground mines in the Harz mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, S.; Jacob, K.-H.

    1996-03-01

    A recent early diagenetic banded iron-manganese mud has been forming underground in a closed lead-zinc mine for approximately 40 years. The processes leading to the banded structure of the precipitate were studied during a period of 2 years. Therefore, 19 physical and chemical parameters were measured regularly in short intervals. The resulting time series were analysed with respect to the data sets of the monthly chemical analyses of the descendent mine water, the daily rainfall and the mineral content. The results reveal that the precipitated material undergoes internal self-organization due to interaction of redox, colloid-chemical, microbial, electrical and ripening processes, and not exclusively produced by seasonal fluctuations of material input. Thus, the primary banding of the material, caused by externally forced fluctuations of the redox conditions within the mine water, is reorganized after a short time. The finally observed bands are controlled by non-linear coupling of reaction and transport processes within the mud. A genetic model for the banded mineralization was developed and verified by numerical simulation.

  8. [Colloid effects on temporal-spatial variability of iron and manganese in shallow groundwater of garbage contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Hai-Ming; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Yun

    2011-03-01

    Simulation tank experiment was conducted to elucidate the temporal-spatial variability of Iron and Manganese in leachate pollution plumes of water-bearing media. Colloid effects on transport and transformation of Fe and Mn in water-bearing media were determined emphatically. Moreover, the mechanism of Fe and Mn transport and transformation were discussed by the convection-dispersion, dissolution and transport-deposition of colloid. The results show that the total Fe and Mn in leachate pollution plume was 2.82 times and 7.51 times of infiltration leachate due to the dissolution of water-bearing medium. Along the flow direction, Fe and Mn pollution plumes spread, and the central region of plumes gradually widened by the convection-dispersion and dissolution. In the presence of colloid, the average transport velocity of Fe and Mn plumes central axis from 1.17 cm/d and 1.75 cm/d increased to 1.83 cm/d and 2.5 cm/d respectively, colloid had obvious facilitation to the migration of Fe and Mn.

  9. Iron and manganese-related magnetic centers in hexagonal silicon carbide: A possible roadmap for spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, W. V. M.; Assali, L. V. C.; Justo, J. F.

    2015-07-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of manganese- and iron-doped 4H-SiC were investigated by first-principles calculations, using an all electron methodology. The results on stability, spin configurations, formation and transition energies, local magnetic moments, and hyperfine parameters were compared to available theoretical and experimental data. The results indicated that transition metal impurities are energetically more favorable in lattice sites with carbon atoms as their first nearest neighbors, in both substitutional and interstitial configurations, which results from the larger electronegativity of carbon with respect to that of silicon. The analysis of the electronic properties of those impurity centers showed that they could stay in several stable charge states, depending on the Fermi energy level position within the host SiC bandgap. Additionally, by computing the p-d exchange coupling constant, which is related to a spin polarization in the SiC valence band top, we explored the possibility of achieving macroscopic magnetism in SiC. The results indicated that some centers, in both substitutional and interstitial configurations, present reasonably strong magnetic couplings to mediate macroscopic magnetism at high temperatures, which may generate spin polarized currents, leading to applications in spintronic devices.

  10. Copper-manganese mixed oxides: CO2-selectivity, stable, and cyclic performance for chemical looping combustion of methane.

    PubMed

    Mungse, Pallavi; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Uchiyama, Tomoki; Nishibori, Maiko; Teraoka, Yasutake; Rayalu, Sadhana; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2014-09-28

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a key technology for oxy-fuel combustion with inherent separation of CO2 from a flue gas, in which oxygen is derived from a solid oxygen carrier. Multi-cycle CLC performance and the product selectivity towards CO2 formation were achieved using mixed oxide of Cu and Mn (CuMn2O4) (Fd3[combining macron]m, a = b = c = 0.83 nm) as an oxygen carrier. CuMn2O4 was prepared by the co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 900 °C using copper(II) nitrate trihydrate and manganese(II) nitrate tetrahydrate as metal precursors. CuMn2O4 showed oxygen-desorption as well as reducibility at elevated temperatures under CLC conditions. The lattice of CuMn2O4 was altered significantly at higher temperature, however, it was reinstated virtually upon cooling in the presence of air. CuMn2O4 was reduced to CuMnO2, Mn3O4, and Cu2O phases at the intermediate stages, which were further reduced to metallic Cu and MnO upon the removal of reactive oxygen from their lattice. CuMn2O4 showed a remarkable activity towards methane combustion reaction at 750 °C. The reduced phase of CuMn2O4 containing Cu and MnO was readily reinstated when treated with air or oxygen at 750 °C, confirming efficient regeneration of the oxygen carrier. Neither methane combustion efficiency nor oxygen carrying capacity was altered with the increase of CLC cycles at any tested time. The average oxygen carrying capacity of CuMn2O4 was estimated to be 114 mg g(-1), which was not altered significantly with the repeated CLC cycles. Pure CO2 but no CO, which is one of the possible toxic by-products, was formed solely upon methane combustion reaction of CuMn2O4. CuMn2O4 shows potential as a practical CLC material both in terms of multi-cycle performance and product selectivity towards CO2 formation.

  11. Impact of selenium, iron, copper and zinc in on/off Parkinson's patients on L-dopa therapy.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, G A; Qureshi, A A; Memon, S A; Parvez, S H

    2006-01-01

    We have quantitated CSF and serum levels of Selenium, iron, copper and zinc by Atomic absorption spectrophotometer in 36 patients with parkinson's disease all on L-dopa therapy. Out of these 19 showed on or positive response to L-dopa where as 21 patients showed on and off response. These data were compared with 21 healthy controls. The results showed that serum levels of iron, copper and zinc remained unchanged where as in CSF, significant decrease in zinc was found in both on and on/off PD patients indicating the deficiency of zinc which continues in the worsening clinical condition of off patients. The level of copper remained unchanged in both on and on/off PD patients. Iron and selenium increase in CSF of both patients which is a clear evidence of relationship between increased iron and selenium level in brain which could be correlated with decrease in dopamine levels and oxidative stress in PD Patients.

  12. Cointercalation of titanium dichalcogenides with transition metals and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. A.; Titov, A. N.; Titova, S. G.; Pryanichnikov, S. V.; Chezganov, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cointercalated materials are studied, obtained by introducing copper into a TiSe2 lattice preintercalated with transition metals M = Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni. The analysis of the state of cointercalated systems at 950°C shows that copper reduces manganese and iron, but it is incapable of reducing cobalt or nickel. To explain the results, the values of the binding energy of hybrid states M3d/Ti3 d are compared.

  13. The copper-iron connection in biology: Structure of the metallo-oxidase Fet3p

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. B.; Stoj, C. S.; Ziegler, L.; Kosman, D. J.; Hart, P. J.

    2005-10-17

    Fet3p is a multicopper-containing glycoprotein localized to the yeast plasma membrane that catalyzes the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). This ferrous iron oxidation is coupled to the reduction of O2 to H2O and is termed the ferroxidase reaction. Fet3p-produced Fe(III) is transferred to the permease Ftr1p for import into the cytosol. The posttranslational insertion of four copper ions into Fet3p is essential for its activity, thus linking copper and iron homeostasis. The mammalian ferroxidases ceruloplasmin and hephaestin are homologs of Fet3p. Loss of the Fe(II) oxidation catalyzed by these proteins results in a spectrum of pathological states, including death. Here, we present the structure of the Fet3p extracellular ferroxidase domain and compare it with that of human ceruloplasmin and other multicopper oxidases that are devoid of ferroxidase activity. The Fet3p structure delineates features that underlie the unique reactivity of this and homologous multicopper oxidases that support the essential trafficking of iron in diverse eukaryotic organisms. The findings are correlated with biochemical and physiological data to cross-validate the elements of Fet3p that define it as both a ferroxidase and cuprous oxidase.

  14. [Iron and copper in Plagioscion squamosissimus (Piscis: Sciaenidae) from the Orinoco river, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    González, A R; Márquez, A; Chung, K S

    2000-12-01

    Bauxite explotation of the Orinoco River in recent years is an important source of heavy metals discharge in the ecosystem, changing the natural biochemical flow of these elements and their concentrations in water, sediment and organisms. Iron and copper concentrations were measured in the fish Plagioscion squamosissimus in the Orinoco river, by sampling the fish population for three months (September-November 1998) in the main channel of the middle Orinoco (07 degrees 38' 21.2" N; 66 degrees 19' 10.9" W) and in Castillero lagoon (7 degrees 39' 09" N; 66 degrees 09' 00" W) with 2 and 4 cm mesh sizes. The internal organs of 30 fishes per month and site were stove-dried at 80 degrees C, pulverized and dried in disecator for 30 min to use as indicators with the acid digestion method for predicting the effect of heavy metals. We found relatively high values of iron and copper concentrations in fishes of the lagoon, and high seasonal variations in the iron concentration.

  15. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status of young women fed vitamin B-6 deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    Turnlund, J.R.; Keyes, W.R.; Hudson, C.A.; Betschart, A.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Sauberlich, H.E. Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA )

    1991-03-11

    A study was conducted in young women to determine the effect of vitamin B-6 deficient diets on copper, iron and zinc metabolism. Young women were confined to a metabolic research unit for 84 and 98 days. They were fed a vitamin B-6 deficient formula diet initially, followed by food diet containing four increasing levels of vitamin B-6. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status were determined at intervals throughout the study. Absorption was determined using the stable isotopes {sup 65}Cu, {sup 54}Fe, and {sup 67}Zn. Status was based on serum copper and zinc, hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume. Copper absorption averaged 18 {plus minus} 1% during vitamin B-6 depletion, significantly lower than 24 {plus minus} 1% during repletion, but serum copper was not affected and balance was positive. Iron absorption was not impaired significantly by vitamin B-6 deficient diets, but status declined during the depletion period. Zinc absorption averaged 40 {plus minus} 2% during depletion and 27 {plus minus} 2% during repletion. Zinc absorption and retention were significantly greater during vitamin B-6 depletion, but serum zinc declined suggesting the absorbed zinc was not available for utilization. The results suggest that vitamin B-6 depletion of young women may inhibit copper absorption, affect iron status and alter zinc metabolism. The effects of vitamin B-6 depletion differ markedly among these elements.

  16. A chemical potentiator of copper-accumulation used to investigate the iron-regulons of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W; Dainty, Samantha J; Patterson, Carl J; Pohl, Ehmke; Blackburn, Hannah; Wilson, Clare; Hess, Corinna R; Rutherford, Julian C; Quaranta, Laura; Corran, Andy; Robinson, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The extreme resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to copper is overcome by 2-(6-benzyl-2-pyridyl)quinazoline (BPQ), providing a chemical-biology tool which has been exploited in two lines of discovery. First, BPQ is shown to form a red (BPQ)2Cu(I) complex and promote Ctr1-independent copper-accumulation in whole cells and in mitochondria isolated from treated cells. Multiple phenotypes, including loss of aconitase activity, are consistent with copper-BPQ mediated damage to mitochondrial iron–sulphur clusters. Thus, a biochemical basis of copper-toxicity in S. cerevisiae is analogous to other organisms. Second, iron regulons controlled by Aft1/2, Cth2 and Yap5 that respond to mitochondrial iron–sulphur cluster status are modulated by copper-BPQ causing iron hyper-accumulation via upregulated iron-import. Comparison of copper-BPQ treated, untreated and copper-only treated wild-type and fra2Δ by RNA-seq has uncovered a new candidate Aft1 target-gene (LSO1) and paralogous non-target (LSO2), plus nine putative Cth2 target-transcripts. Two lines of evidence confirm that Fra2 dominates basal repression of the Aft1/2 regulons in iron-replete cultures. Fra2-independent control of these regulons is also observed but CTH2 itself appears to be atypically Fra2-dependent. However, control of Cth2-target transcripts which is independent of CTH2 transcript abundance or of Fra2, is also quantified. Use of copper-BPQ supports a substantial contribution of metabolite repression to iron-regulation. PMID:24895027

  17. Electrodeposition of iron-cobalt-nickel-copper quaternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang

    Electrodeposition is a cost-effective method to produce thin film materials, which have been used widely in the microelectronic industry, and is advantageous to fabricate metal deposits into recessed and curved areas. In this dissertation, a FeCoNiCu quaternary alloy system was investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, for fabrication of multilayers, grating structures, and nanowires. Multilayer structures are composed of alternating ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic nanometric layers, and are of interest due to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) property it possesses, a change in electric resistance in the presence of an external magnetic field. In addition, the compositional modulation, or the composition contrast, in multilayer structures can be used to develop a grating structured mold for the development of a novel nanoimprinting process. FeCoNiCu was investigated as a more general alloy system containing iron-group metals and a nonmagnetic element, Cu, which can be simplified and adapted to any binary or ternary systems. With a dilute tartrate sulfate bath nanometric multilayers were successfully fabricated with pulse plating and GMR value was reported for this electrodeposited system for the first time. A value of -6% was achieved on rotating disk electrode (RDE) and this maximum occurred when the structure had no preferred crystal phase. Over 40% GMR has been achieved when the multilayer was plated onto a polycrystalline Cu foil. A mathematical model was developed to tailor the deposition process on RDE, and both steady state and nonsteady state cases were simulated. A compositional gradient, which is inherent to a nonsteady state deposition process when the layer size is of nanometer scale was predicted. The quaternary system was explored for other applications. Selective etching of electrodeposited multilayer structures was investigated for different etching solutions. A diluted K2Cr2O 7/H2SO4 solution was successfully developed to produce grating

  18. Isotopic composition of zinc, copper, and iron in lunar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Albarède, F.; Herzog, G. F.

    2006-12-01

    We determined by ICP-MS the concentrations and isotopic ratios of Fe, Cu, and Zn in the Ti-rich lunar basalt 74275, in the lunar orange glass 74220, and in up to 10 lunar soils, namely, 14163, 15231, 64501, 66041, 68841, 69941, 70011, 72501, 75081, and 76501. Two analyses of zinc in lunar basalt 74275 give δ 66Zn = 0.17‰ and 0.75‰, values within the range of those measured in terrestrial basalts; copper in lunar basalt 74275 has δ 65Cu ˜ +1.4‰, which is isotopically heavier than values observed in terrestrial basalts. In the orange glass, we measured δ 56Fe = -0.24‰, δ 65Cu = -0.42‰, and δ 66Zn ˜ -3.6‰. These values of δ are more negative than those obtained for 74275 and for typical lunar basalts, but for Cu, comparable to those observed in terrestrial sulfides and meteorites. In lunar soils we found 0.11‰ ⩽ δ 56Fe ⩽ 0.51‰, 2.6‰ ⩽ δ 65Cu ⩽ 4.5‰, and 2.2‰ ⩽ δ 66Zn ⩽ 6.4‰. Insofar as we can generalize from a small sample set, S, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd show similar trends in isotopic fractionation on the Moon. Lunar basalts have nearly terrestrial isotopic ratios. Relative to the lunar basalt 74275, the pyroclastic glass 74220 is enriched in the lighter isotopes of Fe, Cu, and Zn, and the soils are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe, Cu, and Zn. The patterns in the basalts are likely inherited from the source material; the light-isotope enrichments seen in the orange glass originated during lava fountaining or, less probably, during partial condensation of vapor; and the heavy-isotope enrichments in the lunar soils were likely created by a combination of processes that included micrometeorite vaporization and sputtering. In the orange glass, the light-isotope enrichments (relative to lunar basalts) of Zn are larger than those of Cu. If these enrichments reflect accurately the isotopic composition of the gas, they suggest that Cu is more volatile than Zn in the liquid from which the gas derived. A simple model built on

  19. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  20. Electrodeposition and Characterization of Nickel, Iron, Copper Thin Films and the Creation of Nanoporous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarranton, Jonathan; Hampton, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    There has been much research in creating nanoporous platinum or gold thin films for catalysis, but there has not been as much work done with other, less noble metals. This research explored the deposition of nickel, iron, and copper ternary alloys using controlled potential electrolysis (CPE) and the selective removal of the copper with DC potential amperometry (DCPA) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) to create nanoporous structures. These structures have the advantage of increased surface area creating more efficient catalysts. All films were characterized before and after dealloying using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for composition. The roughness of each of the films was characterized by the capacitance of the film, with higher capacitances indicating a higher electrochemical surface area. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under RUI Grant DMR-1104725, MRI Grant CHE-0959282, and ARI grant PHY-0963317.

  1. Determination of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements in lunar surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, L. I.; Simonova, L. V.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution regularities of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements were investigated in basaltoid rocks of lunar and terrestrial origin. Samples of various regolith zones taken in the area of the Sea of Fertility were analyzed, along with samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks of the East African Rift for their content of the trace admixtures listed. Data obtained on the abundance of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, cobalt, nickel, chromium, and vanadium in Luna 16 lunar surface material were compared with the abundance of these elements in samples of lunar rocks returned by Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14, with the exception of scandium; its content in the latter samples was considerably higher.

  2. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic form and thereby activates hydrogen.

  3. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    DOE PAGES

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; ...

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic formmore » and thereby activates hydrogen.« less

  4. Iron and copper act synergistically to delay anaerobic growth of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bird, Lina J; Coleman, Maureen L; Newman, Dianne K

    2013-06-01

    Transition metals are known to cause toxic effects through their interaction with oxygen, but toxicity under anoxic conditions is poorly understood. Here we investigated the effects of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) on the anaerobic growth and gene expression of the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. We found that Fe(II) and Cu(II) act synergistically to delay anaerobic growth at environmentally relevant metal concentrations. Cu(I) and Cu(II) had similar effects both alone and in the presence of ascorbate, a Cu(II) reductant, indicating that reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by Fe(II) is not sufficient to explain the growth inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) increased the toxicity of Co(II) and Ni(II); in contrast, Ni(II) toxicity was diminished in the presence of Fe(II). The synergistic anaerobic toxicity of Fe(II) and Cu(II) was also observed for Escherichia coli MG1655, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Gene expression analyses for R. palustris identified three regulatory genes that respond to Cu(II) and not to Fe(II): homologs of cueR and cusR, two known proteobacterial copper homeostasis regulators, and csoR, a copper regulator recently identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Two P-type ATPase efflux pumps, along with an F(o)F(1) ATP synthase, were also upregulated by Cu(II) but not by Fe(II). An Escherichia coli mutant deficient in copA, cus, and cueO showed a smaller synergistic effect, indicating that iron might interfere with one or more of the copper homeostasis systems. Our results suggest that interactive effects of transition metals on microbial physiology may be widespread under anoxic conditions, although the molecular mechanisms remain to be more fully elucidated.

  5. Arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium concentrations in private bedrock wells in southeastern New Hampshire, 2012-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Belaval, Marcel; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals, such as arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium, in groundwater used for drinking have long been a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health and the aesthetic or nuisance problems that some present. Moderate to high concentrations of the trace metal arsenic have been identified in drinking water from groundwater sources in southeastern New Hampshire, a rapidly growing region of the State (Montgomery and others, 2003). During the past decade (2000–10), southeastern New Hampshire, which is composed of Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford Counties, has grown in population by nearly 48,700 (or 6.4 percent) to 819,100. These three counties contain 62 percent of the State’s population but encompass only about 22 percent of the land area (New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning, 2011). According to a 2005 water-use study (Hayes and Horn, 2009), about 39 percent of the population in these three counties in southeastern New Hampshire uses private wells as sources of drinking water, and these wells are not required by the State to be routinely tested for trace metals or other contaminants. Some trace metals have associated human-health benchmarks or nonhealth guidelines that have been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate public water supplies. The EPA has established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L) for arsenic (As) and a MCL of 30 μg/L for uranium (U) because of associated health risks (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012). Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) are essential for human health, but Mn at high doses may have adverse cognitive effects in children (Bouchard and others, 2011; Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 2012); therefore, the EPA has issued a lifetime health advisory (LHA) of 300 μg/L for Mn. Recommended secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCLs) for Fe (300 μg/L) and Mn (50 μg/L) were established primarily as

  6. Simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Luterotti, Svjetlana; Kordić, Tončica Vukman; Dodig, Slavica

    2011-03-01

    A new and simple flame atomic-absorption spectrometric (FAAS) method is proposed for simultaneous determination of iron and copper in children's sera. It is based on single-step sample pretreatment (deproteinization with 3 mol L-1 HCl, ratio 1:1) and single-step calibration using 1.5 mol L-1 HCl standard. During method's optimization a short multifactorial design experiment was used. The proposed method assures accuracy, sensitivity and precision comparable to that of the reference methods. The new approach is simple and time-, labour- and serum-saving, the latter being especially important in pediatric diagnostics.

  7. Contact Killing of Bacteria on Copper Is Suppressed if Bacterial-Metal Contact Is Prevented and Is Induced on Iron by Copper Ions

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Salima; Hans, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces, and copper ions released from the surface have been proposed to play a major role in the killing process. However, it has remained unclear whether contact of the bacteria with the copper surface is also an important factor. Using laser interference lithography, we engineered copper surfaces which were covered with a grid of an inert polymer which prevented contact of the bacteria with the surface. Using Enterococcus hirae as a model organism, we showed that the release of ionic copper from these modified surfaces was not significantly reduced. In contrast, killing of bacteria was strongly attenuated. When E. hirae cells were exposed to a solid iron surface, the loss of cell viability was the same as on glass. However, exposing cells to iron in the presence of 4 mM CuSO4 led to complete killing in 100 min. These experiments suggest that contact killing proceeds by a mechanism whereby the metal-bacterial contact damages the cell envelope, which, in turn, makes the cells susceptible to further damage by copper ions. PMID:23396344

  8. Reactive iron and manganese distributions in seabed sediments near small mountainous rivers off Oregon and California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Moutusi; McManus, James; Goñi, Miguel A.; Chase, Zanna; Borgeld, Jeffry C.; Wheatcroft, Robert A.; Muratli, Jesse M.; Megowan, Meghan R.; Mix, Alan

    2013-02-01

    We examined the spatial distribution of sedimentary reactive iron (FeR) and manganese (MnR) along the continental shelf near the mouth of the Umpqua River, Oregon (USA). A well-defined muddy (silt+clay) depocenter of fluvial origin characterizes this part of the Oregon margin. Reactive Fe and Mn contents are elevated within the silt-rich landward edge of the depocenter. Away from this depocenter, sediments are predominantly sandy both along the inner-shelf (<˜100 m depth) and mid-shelf (˜100-150 m depth) and have lower concentrations of reactive metals compared to the depocenter. Sediments are also muddy along the slope (>˜150 m depth) and have elevated FeR and MnR. Based on their correlation with sediment grain size, it appears that FeR and to a lesser extent MnR, are associated with mud size sediments. Reactive metal concentration is also positively correlated with organic carbon (OC) content, indicating a potentially common source. Seabed sediments from five other small, mountainous river systems (Klamath, Eel, Navarro, Russian, and Salinas) located south of Umpqua show the same general relationship between FeR and OC. Although both FeR and MnR exhibit similar relationships to grain size and OC, the relationships with MnR exhibit considerable scatter. Comparison of Umpqua River suspended sediment data with the seabed data suggests that MnR is more prone to loss from sediment particles during transit to the seabed as compared to FeR, and this difference explains why FeR maintains a reasonably tight relationship with organic carbon and particle size along the seafloor relative to MnR.

  9. Novel Mode of Microbial Energy Metabolism: Organic Carbon Oxidation Coupled to Dissimilatory Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1988-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe3O4). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35°C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO2 was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO3). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments. Images PMID:16347658

  10. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n - butane and propane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsz-Keung, Cheung; d`Itri, J.L.; Lange, F.C.; Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate the potential value of solid superacid catalysts of the sulfated zirconia type for light hydrocarbon conversion. The key experiments catalytic testing of the performance of such catalysts in a flow reactor fed with streams containing, for example, n-butane or propane. Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia was used to catalyze the conversion of n-butane at atmospheric pressure, 225-450{degrees}C, and n-butane partial pressures in the range of 0.0025-0.01 atm. At temperatures <225{degrees}C, these reactions were accompanied by cracking; at temperatures >350{degrees}C, cracking and isomerization occurred. Catalyst deactivation, resulting at least in part from coke formation, was rapid. The primary cracking products were methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene. The observation of these products along with an ethane/ethylene molar ratio of nearly 1 at 450{degrees}C is consistent with cracking occurring, at least in part, by the Haag-Dessau mechanism, whereby the strongly acidic catalyst protonates n-butane to give carbonium ions. The rate of methane formation from n-butane cracking catalyzed by Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia at 450{degrees}C was about 3 x 10{sup -8} mol/(g of catalyst {center_dot}s). The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

  11. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  12. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on the shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Static-friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration, 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration; however, it was independent of the type of metal and the adsorbate species. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio of the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0 and the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was about 0.835 for all the systems tested.

  13. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Static friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration. It was independent of the metal and the adsorbate. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio sub a/sub m where sub a is the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0, and sub m is the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was 0.835 + or - 0.012 for all the systems tested.

  14. Iron and Manganese Pyrophosphates as Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hui; Upreti, Shailesh; Chernova, Natasha A.; Hautier, Geoffroy; Ceder, Gerbrand; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2015-10-15

    The mixed-metal phases, (Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, 0 {le} y {le} 1), were synthesized using a 'wet method', and found to form a solid solution in the P2{sub 1}/a space group. Both thermogravimetric analysis and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the 2+ oxidation state for both the Mn and Fe. The electrochemical capacity improves as the Fe concentration increases, as do the intensities of the redox peaks of the cyclic voltammogram, indicating higher lithium-ion diffusivity in the iron phase. The two Li{sup +} ions in the three-dimensional tunnel structure of the pyrophosphate phase allows for the cycling of more than one lithium per redox center. Cyclic voltammograms show a second oxidation peak at 5 V and 5.3 V, indicative of the extraction of the second lithium ion, in agreement with ab initio computation predictions. Thus, electrochemical capacities exceeding 200 Ah/kg may be achieved if a stable electrolyte is found.

  15. X-ray fluorescence analysis of iron and manganese distribution in primary dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dučić, Tanja; Barski, Elisabeth; Salome, Murielle; Koch, Jan C; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. X-ray microscopy combined with a cryogenic setup is a powerful method for elemental imaging in low concentrations and high resolution in intact cells, eliminating the need for fixation and sectioning of the specimen. Here, we performed an elemental distribution analysis in cultured primary midbrain neurons with a step size in the order of 300 nm and ∼ 0.1 ppm sensitivity under cryo conditions by using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. We report the elemental mappings on the subcellular level in primary mouse dopaminergic (DAergic) and non-DAergic neurons after treatment with transition metals. Application of Fe2+ resulted in largely extracellular accumulation of iron without preference for the neuronal transmitter subtype. A quantification of different Fe oxidation states was performed using X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. After treatment with Mn2+, a cytoplasmic/paranuclear localization of Mn was observed preferentially in DAergic neurons, while no prominent signal was detectable after Mn3+ treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis correlated the preferential Mn uptake to increased expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in DAergic neurons. We discuss the implications of this differential elemental distribution for the selective vulnerability of DAergic neurons and Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23106162

  16. Association of Maternal Diet With Zinc, Copper, and Iron Concentrations in Transitional Human Milk Produced by Korean Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cho, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Soo; Choi, Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the transitory milk of Korean lactating mothers and to investigate the relationship between these concentrations and maternal diet. Human milk samples were collected between 5 and 15 days postpartum from 96 healthy, lactating mothers in postpartum care centers in Seoul, Korea. Dietary intake during lactation was determined based on a 3-day dietary record. The mean zinc, copper, and iron concentrations in the human milk samples collected were 3.88 ± 1.74 mg/L, 0.69 ± 0.25 mg/L, and 5.85 ± 8.53 mg/L, respectively. The mothers who consumed alcoholic beverages during pregnancy had tended to have lower concentrations of zinc and copper, as well as significantly lower concentrations of iron, in their milk (p < 0.047). In contrast, the mothers who took daily supplements had much higher iron concentrations in their milk (p = 0.002). Dietary intakes of zinc, copper, and iron during lactation did not affect the concentrations of zinc, copper, and iron in the milk samples analyzed. Intakes of vitamin C, selenium, and iodine were associated with the concentration of copper in the milk samples analyzed, and consumption of food categorized as 'meat and meat products' was positively associated with the concentration of zinc. Consumption of rice was the top contributor to the concentrations of all three minerals. In conclusion, associations between maternal diet and nutrient concentrations in transitory human milk can provide useful information, particularly in regard to infant growth. PMID:26839873

  17. Thermochemistry of perovskites in the lanthanum-strontium-manganese-iron oxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, Cornelia; Vradman, Leonid; Tanasescu, Speranta; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    The enthalpies of formation from binary oxides of perovskites (ABO3) based on lanthanum strontium manganite La(Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and lanthanum strontium ferrite La(Sr)FeO3 (LSF) and mixed lanthanum strontium manganite ferrite La(Sr)Mn(Fe)O3 (LSMF) were measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. Using iodometric titration, the oxygen content was derived. The perovskites with A-site cation deficiency have greater oxygen deficiency than the corresponding A-site stoichiometric series. Stability of LSMF decreases with increasing iron content. Increasing oxygen deficiency clearly destabilizes the perovskites. The results suggest an enthalpy of oxygen incorporation that is approximately independent of composition. 0.35La2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+Mn2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+0.3SrO (xl, 25 °C)+Fe2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+O2 (g, 25 °C)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 °C). (b) ∆ Hf,ox* (La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ) .0.35 La2O3 (xl, 25 ººC) + (0.7-y+ 2δ)/2 Mn2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + 0.3 SrO (xl, 25 ºC) + y/2Fe2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + (0.3-2δ) MnO2 (xl, 25 ºC)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 ºC).

  18. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  19. The Significance of Diagenesis versus Riverine Input in Contributing to the Sediment Geochemical Matrix of Iron and Manganese in an Intertidal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. A.; Bendell-Young, L. I.

    1999-06-01

    Summer porewater and spring and summer surficial sediment samples were collected from 26 locations in the intertidal region of the Fraser River estuary. Porewaters were analysed for dissolved iron and manganese (as defined by species <0·2μm in diameter) to assess the contribution of diagenesis to concentrations of iron and manganese oxides at the sediment-water interface. Surficial sediment samples were geochemically characterized as: % organic matter (% LOI); reducible iron (RED Fe, iron oxides) and easily reducible manganese (ER Mn, manganese oxides). Grain size at each site was also determined. The sediment geochemical matrix, as defined by the above four parameters, was highly heterogeneous throughout the intertidal region (three-way ANOVA; P<0·0001). For RED Fe and ER Mn, this heterogeneity could be explained by either diagenetic processes (RED Fe) or by a combination of the proximity of the sample sites to the mouth of the Fraser River estuary plus diagenetic processes (ER Mn). Correlation (Spearman Rank Correlation Test (r s), of dissolved iron within the subsurface sediments with amounts of RED Fe recovered from the associated surface sediments was highly significant (r s=0·80, P<0·0001); high concentrations of RED Fe at the sediment-water interface co-occurred with high concentrations of dissolved iron, regardless of the proximity of the sample locations to riverine input. Compared with iron, the relationship between dissolved manganese and ER Mn from surface sediments was lower (r s=0·58; P<0·0008). Locations most strongly influenced by the Fraser River contained greater concentrations of ER Mn at the sediment-water interface than that which would be expected based on the contribution from diagenesis alone. Sediment grain size and organic matter were also influenced by the proximity to riverine input. Surficial sediment of sites close to the river mouth were comprised primarily of percent silt (2·0μm-50μm) whereas sites not influenced by

  20. Friction and transfer of copper, silver, and gold to iron in the presence of various adsorbed surface films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the noble metals copper, silver, and gold and two binary alloys of these metals contacting iron in the presence of various adsorbates including, oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride. A pin on disk specimen configuration was used with a load of 100 grams, sliding velocity of 60 mm/min; at 25 C with the surfaces saturated with the adsorbates. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor surface films. Results of the experiments indicate that friction and transfer characteristics are highly specific with respect to both the noble metal and surface film present. With all three metals and films transfer of the noble metal to iron occurred very rapidly. With all metals and films transfer of the noble metal to iron continuously increased with repeated passes except for silver and copper sliding on iron sulfide.

  1. Rapid Size- Controlled Synthesis of Dextran-Coated, Copper-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ray M.

    2011-12-01

    Development of dual modality probes enabled for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has been on the rise in recent years due to the potential for these probes to facilitate combining the complementary high resolution of MRI and the high sensitivity of PET. The efficient synthesis of multimodal probes that include the radiolabels for PET can be hindered due to prolonged reaction times during radioisotope incorporation, and the resulting decay of the radiolabel. Along with a time-efficient synthesis, one also needs an optimal synthesis that yields products in a desirable size range (between 20-100 nm) to increase blood retention time. In this work, we describe a novel, rapid, microwave-based synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles doped with copper (DIO/Cu). Traditional methods for synthesizing dextran-coated iron oxide particles require refluxing for 2 hours and result in approximately 50 nm particles. We demonstrate that microwave synthesis can produce 50 nm nanoparticles in 5 minutes of heating. We discuss the various parameters used in the microwave synthesis protocol to vary the size distribution of DIO/Cu, and demonstrate the successful incorporation of copper into these particles with the aim of future use for rapid 64Cu incorporation.

  2. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  3. Acute Copper and Ascorbic Acid Supplementation Inhibits Non-heme Iron Absorption in Humans.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Figueroa, Constanza; Pizarro, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of copper (Cu) plus the reducing agent ascorbic acid (AA) on the absorption of non-heme iron (Fe). Experimental study with block design in which each subject was his own control. After signing an informed consent, 14 adult women using an effective method of contraception and negative pregnancy test received 0.5 mg Fe, as ferrous sulfate, alone or with Cu, as copper sulfate, plus ascorbic acid (AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) at 4/1; 6/1 and 8/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios as an aqueous solution on days 1, 2, 14, and 15 of the study. Fe absorption was assessed by erythrocyte incorporation of iron radioisotopes (55)Fe and (59)Fe. Geometric mean (range ± SD) absorption of Fe at 4/1 and 6/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios (and AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) and Fe alone was 57.4 % (35.7-92.1 %), 64.2 % (45.8-89.9 %), and 38.8 % (20.4-73.8 %), respectively (ANOVA for repeated measures p < 0.001; post hoc test Scheffé, p < 0.05). This is attributable to the enhancing effect of AA on non-heme Fe absorption; however, Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio was 47.3 % (27.7-80.8) (p = NS compared with Fe alone). It was expected that Fe absorption would have been equal or greater than at 4/1 and 6/1 molar ratios. Copper in the presence of ascorbic acid inhibits non-heme Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio.

  4. Haemolysis and Perturbations in the Systemic Iron Metabolism of Suckling, Copper-Deficient Mosaic Mutant Mice – An Animal Model of Menkes Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Starzyński, Rafał R.; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Grzmil, Paweł; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Ogórek, Mateusz; Pierzchała, Olga; Staroń, Robert; Gajowiak, Anna; Lipiński, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The biological interaction between copper and iron is best exemplified by the decreased activity of multicopper ferroxidases under conditions of copper deficiency that limits the availability of iron for erythropoiesis. However, little is known about how copper deficiency affects iron homeostasis through alteration of the activity of other copper-containing proteins, not directly connected with iron metabolism, such as superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). This antioxidant enzyme scavenges the superoxide anion, a reactive oxygen species contributing to the toxicity of iron via the Fenton reaction. Here, we analyzed changes in the systemic iron metabolism using an animal model of Menkes disease: copper-deficient mosaic mutant mice with dysfunction of the ATP7A copper transporter. We found that the erythrocytes of these mutants are copper-deficient, display decreased SOD1 activity/expression and have cell membrane abnormalities. In consequence, the mosaic mice show evidence of haemolysis accompanied by haptoglobin-dependent elimination of haemoglobin (Hb) from the circulation, as well as the induction of haem oxygenase 1 (HO1) in the liver and kidney. Moreover, the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis is strongly affected in mosaic mice. These findings indicate that haemolysis is an additional pathogenic factor in a mouse model of Menkes diseases and provides evidence of a new indirect connection between copper deficiency and iron metabolism. PMID:25247420

  5. Micronutrient status in female university students: iron, zinc, copper, selenium, vitamin B12 and folate.

    PubMed

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-11-13

    Young women are at an increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies, particularly due to higher micronutrient requirements during childbearing years and multiple food group avoidances. The objective of this study was to investigate biomarkers of particular micronutrients in apparently healthy young women. Female students (n = 308; age range 18-35 year; Body Mass Index 21.5 ± 2.8 kg/m2; mean ± SD) were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Blood samples were obtained from participants in the fasted state and analysed for biomarkers of iron status, vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine, selenium, zinc, and copper. The results show iron deficiency anaemia, unspecified anaemia, and hypoferritinemia in 3%, 7% and 33.9% of participants, respectively. Low vitamin B12 concentrations (<120 pmol/L) were found in 11.3% of participants, while 4.7% showed sub-clinical deficiency based on serum methylmalonic acid concentrations >0.34 μmol/L. Folate concentrations below the reference range were observed in 1.7% (serum) or 1% (erythrocytes) of participants, and 99.7% of the participant had erythrocyte-folate concentrations >300 nmol/L. Serum zinc concentrations <10.7 μmol/L were observed in 2% of participants. Serum copper and selenium concentrations were below the reference range in 23% and 11% of participants, respectively. Micronutrient deficiencies including iron and vitamin B12, and apparent excess of folate are present in educated Australian female students of childbearing age, including those studying nutrition. The effects of dietary behaviours and food choices on markers of micronutrient status require further investigation.

  6. The effect of iron and copper as an essential nutrient on mitochondrial electron transport system and lipid peroxidation in Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Tavsan, Zehra; Ayar Kayali, Hulya

    2013-08-01

    Iron and copper are essential nutrients for all living organisms as cofactors of many enzymes and play important roles in electron transport system (ETS) enzymes which have heme and iron-sulfur centers. In the present study, ETS enzymes, namely, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX), activities as well as adenine nucleotides and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels of eukaryotic model Trichoderma harzianum grown in varied concentrations of iron (0-20 mg/l) and copper (0-25 mg/l) mediums have been examined. SDH and COX activities increased up to 10 mg/l of iron. COX and SDH activities increased significantly up to 15 and 1 mg/l of copper, respectively. ATP and ADP levels showed a positive correlation with SDH activity with respect to iron-copper concentrations. The trends of AMP were similar with those of ATP and ADP for iron concentrations, while AMP levels elevated until 5 mg/l of copper. As an indicative marker of membrane damage, LPO levels increased with iron and copper concentration. In conclusion, iron and copper concentrations are of critical importance on activities of the ETS enzymes besides adenine nucleotides and LPO levels by maintenance of this metal homeostasis.

  7. The precipitation of aluminum, iron and manganese at the junction of Deer Creek with the Snake River in Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Lakin, H.W.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1963-01-01

    The oxidation of disseminated pyrite in relatively acid schists and gneisses of the Snake River drainage basin provides abundant iron sulfate and sulfuric acid to ground and surface water. This acid water dissolves large quantities of many elements, particularly aluminum and surprisingly large quantities of elements, such as magnesium and zinc, not expected to be abundant in the drainage basin. The adjoining drainage to the west, Deer Creek, is underlain by basic rocks, from which the water inherits a high pH. Despite the presence of base- and precious- metal veins in the drainage basin of Deer Creek, it carries less metal than the Snake River. The principal precipitate on the bed of the Snake River is hydrated iron oxide with small quantities of the other metals. In Deer Creek manganese oxide is precipitated with iron oxide and large quantities of other metals are carried down with this precipitate. Below the junction of these streams the pH stabilizes at a near-neutral value. Iron is removed from the Snake River water at the junction, and aluminum is precipitated for some distance downstream. The aluminum precipitate carries down other metals in concentrations slightly less than that in the manganese precipitate on Deer Creek. The natural processes observed in this junction if carried to a larger scale could provide the mechanism described by Ansheles (1927) for the formation of bauxite. In the environment described, geochemical exploration by either water or stream sediment techniques is difficult because of (1) the extreme pH differential between the streams above their junction and (2) the difference in the precipitates formed on the streambeds. ?? 1963.

  8. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process

    PubMed Central

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 μg/mL for the MTT assay and 20 μg/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of

  9. Insights into the iron-ome and manganese-ome of Δmtm1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy

    2013-01-01

    Biophysical spectroscopies and LC-ICP-MS were used to evaluate the iron-ome and manganese-ome of mitochondria from Δmtm1 yeast cells. Deleting the mitochondrial carrier gene MTM1 causes Fe to accumulate in mitochondria and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) activity to decline. One explanation for this is that some accumulated Fe misincorporates into apo-Sod2p. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that most of the accumulated Fe was FeIII nanoparticles which are unlikely to misincorporate into apo-Sod2p. Under anaerobic conditions, Fe did not accumulate yet SOD2 activity remained low, suggesting that the two phenomena are independent. Mn concentrations were two-fold higher in Δmtm1 mitochondria than in WT mitochondria. Soluble extracts from such samples were subjected to size-exclusion LC and fractions were analyzed with an on-line ICP-MS. Two major Mn peaks were observed, one due to MnSod2p and the other to a Mn species with a mass of 2–3 kDa (called Mn2–3). Mn2–3 may deliver Mn into apo-Sod2p. Most Mn in WT mitochondria was associated with MnSod2p, whereas most Mn in Δmtm1 mitochondria was associated with Mn2–3. The [Mn2–3] increased in cells grown on high MnCl2 while the MnSod2p concentration remained unchanged. Corresponding Fe traces showed numerous peaks, including a complex of ~ 3 kDa which may be the form of Fe that misincorporates, and an Fe peak with the molecular mass of Sod2p that may correspond to FeSod2p. The intensity of this peak suggests that deleting MTM1 probably diminishes SOD2 activity by some means other than Fe misincorporation. A portion of Sod2p in Δmtm1 mitochondria might be unfolded or immature. Mtm1p may import a species required for apo-Sod2p maturation, activity or stability. PMID:23598994

  10. Reactive iron and manganese in estuarine sediments of the Baltic Sea: Impacts of flocculation and redox shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Asmala, Eero; Hietanen, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) play important roles in sedimentary carbon cycling in both freshwater and marine systems. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe and Mn oxides is known to be a major pathway of suboxic organic matter remineralization in surface sediments, while recent studies have shown that Fe and Mn oxides may be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane deeper in the sediment column (e.g., Egger et al., 2015). Estuaries are transitional environments, characterized by gradients of salinity and redox conditions which impact on the mobility of Fe and Mn. In turn, the distribution of Fe and Mn in estuarine sediments, and the role of the two metals in carbon cycling, is expected to be spatially heterogeneous. However, few studies have attempted to describe the sedimentary distribution of Fe and Mn in the context of processes occurring in the estuarine water column. In particular, salinity-driven flocculation and redox shuttling are two key processes whose relative impacts on sedimentary Fe and Mn have not been clearly demonstrated. In this study we investigated the coupled water column and sedimentary cycling of Fe and Mn along a 60km non-tidal estuarine transect in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. We show that riverine Fe entering the estuary as colloidal oxides associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) is quickly flocculated and sedimented within 5 km of the river mouth, despite the shallow lateral salinity gradient. Sediments within this range are enriched in Fe (up to twice the regional average), principally in the form of crystalline Fe oxides as determined by sequential extractions. The high crystallinity implies relative maturity of the oxide mineralogy, likely due to sustained oxic conditions and long residence time in the river catchment. Despite the reducing conditions below the sediment-water interface, Fe is largely retained in the sediments close to the river mouth. In contrast, sedimentary Mn concentrations are highest in a deep silled

  11. Effect of manganese and iron at a neutral and acidic pH on the hematology of the banded Tilapia (Tilapia sparrmanii)

    SciTech Connect

    Wepener, V.; Van Vuren, J.H.J.; Du Preez, H.H.

    1992-10-01

    The pollution of natural water bodies is a common phenomenon in developing countries. Increases in population densities lead to increased mining and industrial activities in the area. With the establishment of gold and coal mines in South Africa, several industrial zones were created to support the mining industry. Many of these industries consist of heavy metal processing factories. Over the years pollution from the mines has led to acidification of the streams and lakes in the Transvaal. It was also found that high concentrations of heavy metals occurred in the water, sediments, plants and fish tissue in the affected water systems. Of all the heavy metals, iron and manganese were found in the highest concentrations. In order to determine the subtle, non-lethal effects induced by sublethal concentrations of heavy metals on the physiology of fish, it is necessary to monitor certain clinical parameters. The use of hematological methods as indicators of sublethal stress can supply valuable information concerning the physiological reactions of fish in a changing environment. The reason for this is the close association between the circulatory system of the fish and the external environment. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of manganese and iron at a neutral and acidic pH on the hematology of Tilapia sparrmanii. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  12. pH-Dependent reactivity of oxidants formed by iron and copper-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongshin; Lee, Hye-Jin; Sedlak, David L; Lee, Changha

    2013-07-01

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by iron and copper leads to the generation of reactive oxidants capable of oxidizing various organic compounds. However, the specific nature of the reactive oxidants is still unclear, with evidence suggesting the production of hydroxyl radical or high-valent metal species. To identify the reactive species in the Fenton system, the oxidation of a series of different compounds (phenol, benzoic acid, methanol, Reactive Black 5 and arsenite) was studied for iron- and copper-catalyzed reactions at varying pH values. At lower pH values, more reactive oxidants appear to be formed in both iron and copper-catalyzed systems. The aromatic compounds, phenol and benzoic acid, were not oxidized under neutral or alkaline pH conditions, whereas methanol, Reactive Black 5, and arsenite were oxidized to a different degree, depending on the catalytic system. The oxidants responsible for the oxidation of compounds at neutral and alkaline pH values are likely to be high-valent metal complexes of iron and copper (i.e., ferryl and cupryl ions).

  13. Improvement of the trace metal composition of medium for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria: Iron (II) and copper (II) make a difference.

    PubMed

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Pan, Yawei; Cai, Chaoyang; Wang, Jiaqi; Wang, Liqiao; Liu, Shuai; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-11-15

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a potential bioprocess for treating nitrogen-containing wastewater. This process uses methane, an inexpensive and nontoxic end-product of anaerobic digestion, as an external electron donor. However, the low turnover rate and slow growth rate of n-damo functional bacteria limit the practical application of this process. In the present study, the short- and long-term effects of variations in trace metal concentrations on n-damo bacteria were investigated, and the concentrations of trace metal elements of medium were improved. The results were subsequently verified by a group of long-term inoculations (90 days) and were applied in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) (84 days). The results indicated that iron (Fe(II)) and copper (Cu(II)) (20 and 10 μmol L(-1), respectively) significantly stimulated the activity and the growth of n-damo bacteria, whereas other trace metal elements, including zinc (Zn), molybdenum (Mo), cobalt (Co), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), had no significant effect on n-damo bacteria in the tested concentration ranges. Interestingly, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that a large number of dense, large aggregates (10-50 μm) of n-damo bacteria were formed by cell adhesion in the SBR reactor after using the improved medium, and to our knowledge this is the first discovery of large aggregates of n-damo bacteria.

  14. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  15. A Holistic Model That Physicochemically Links Iron Oxide - Apatite and Iron Oxide - Copper - Gold Deposits to Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.; Reich, M.; Knipping, J.; Bilenker, L.; Barra, F.; Deditius, A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits (IOCG) are important sources of their namesake metals and increasingly for rare earth metals in apatite. Studies of natural systems document that IOA and IOCG deposits are often spatially and temporally related with one another and coeval magmatism. However, a genetic model that accounts for observations of natural systems remains elusive, with few observational data able to distinguish among working hypotheses that invoke meteoric fluid, magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, and immiscible melts. Here, we use Fe and O isotope data and high-resolution trace element (e.g., Ti, V, Mn, Al) data of individual magnetite grains from the world-class Los Colorados (LC) IOA deposit in the Chilean Iron Belt to elucidate the origin of IOA and IOCG deposits. Values of d56Fe range from 0.08‰ to 0.26‰, which are within the global range of ~0.06‰ to 0.5‰ for magnetite formed at magmatic conditions. Values of δ18O for magnetite and actinolite are 2.04‰ and 6.08‰, respectively, consistent with magmatic values. Ti, V, Al, and Mn are enriched in magnetite cores and decrease systematically from core to rim. Plotting [Al + Mn] vs. [Ti + V] indicates that magnetite cores are consistent with magmatic and/or magmatic-hydrothermal (i.e., porphyry) magnetites. Decreasing Al, Mn, Ti, V is consistent with a cooling trend from porphyry to Kiruna to IOCG systems. The data from LC are consistent with the following new genetic model for IOA and IOCG systems: 1) magnetite cores crystallize from silicate melt; 2) these magnetite crystals are nucleation sites for aqueous fluid that exsolves and scavenges inter alia Fe, P, S, Cu, Au from silicate melt; 3) the magnetite-fluid suspension is less dense that the surrounding magma, allowing ascent; 4) as the suspension ascends, magnetite grows in equilibrium with the fluid and takes on a magmatic-hydrothermal character (i.e., lower Al, Mn, Ti, V); 5) during ascent, magnetite, apatite and

  16. Iron-[S,S']-EDDS (FeEDDS) Chelate as an Iron Source for Horticultural Crop Production: Marigold Growth and Nutrition, Spectral Properties, and Photodegradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopolycarboxylic acid (APCA) complexones, commonly referred to as ligands or chelating agents, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are commonly used in soluble fertilizers to supply copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and/or zinc (Zn) to p...

  17. Photometric and spectrochemical determination of gold in iron pyrites, copper and lead concentrates.

    PubMed

    Jordanov, N; Mareva, S; Krasnobaeva, N; Nedyalkova, N

    1968-09-01

    A photometric and a spectrochemical method have been developed for determining gold in iron pyrites, copper and lead concentrates. In both, the sample is dissolved and gold is extracted from 1M hydrochloric add solution with a mixture of ethyl methyl ketone and chloroform (1:1). Gold was determined photometrically with N,N'-tetramethyl-o-tolidine. Conditions have been found for satisfactorily sensitive and reproducible spectral determination of gold. For this purpose the effect of various collectors and buffers on the evaporation curves of gold has been studied, as well as excitation conditions, form of the electrodes, optimum slit-width, and photographic variables. The sensitivity and precision of both methods have been evaluated.

  18. Molecular understanding of copper and iron interaction with alpha-synuclein by fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Bharathi; Rao, K S J

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-synuclein aggregation is a hallmark pathological feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). The conversion of alpha-synuclein from a soluble monomer to an insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with PD. Redox-active metal ions such as iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are known to enhance alpha-synuclein fibrillogenesis. In the present investigation, we analyzed the binding efficiency of Cu and Fe to alpha-synuclein by fluorescence studies. It is interesting to note that Cu and Fe showed differential binding pattern toward alpha-synuclein (wild type and A30P, A53T, and E46K mutant forms) as revealed by intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence, thioflavin-T fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate-binding studies, and scatchard plot analysis. The experimental data might prove useful in understanding the hierarchy of metals binding to alpha-synuclein and its role in neurodegeneration.

  19. Three-dimensional atlas of iron, copper, and zinc in the mouse cerebrum and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; Lee, Jason K; Beavis, Alison D; van Gramberg, Amanda; George, Jessica; Adlard, Paul A; Finkelstein, David I; Doble, Philip A

    2012-05-01

    Atlases depicting molecular and functional features of the brain are becoming an integral part of modern neuroscience. In this study we used laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to quantitatively measure iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) levels in a serially sectioned C57BL/6 mouse brain (cerebrum and brainstem). Forty-six sections were analyzed in a single experiment of approximately 158 h in duration. We constructed a 46-plate reference atlas by aligning quantified images of metal distribution with corresponding coronal sections from the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas. The 46 plates were also used to construct three-dimensional models of Fe, Cu, and Zn distribution. This atlas represents the first reconstruction of quantitative trace metal distribution through the brain by LA-ICPMS and will facilitate the study of trace metals in the brain and help to elucidate their role in neurobiology.

  20. Hardening due to copper precipitates in alpha-iron studied by atomic-scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a large-scale atomic-level study of dislocation-precipitate interaction. We have considered a 1/2 <111> edge dislocation gliding in {alpha}-iron containing coherent copper precipitates of size from 0.7 to 6 nm over a temperature range from 0 to 450 K. The results demonstrate that some features are qualitatively consistent with earlier theoretical conclusions, e.g. the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) is proportional to L{sup -1} and ln(D), where L and D are precipitate spacing and diameter. Other features, which are intrinsic to the atomic-level nature of the dislocation-precipitate interaction, include strong dependence of the CRSS on temperature, dislocation climb and precipitate phase transformation.

  1. Closed circuit recovery of copper, lead and iron from electronic waste with citrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Torres, Robinson; Lapidus, Gretchen T

    2017-02-01

    An integral closed circuit hydrometallurgical process is presented for base metal recovery from electronic waste. The leaching medium consists of a sodium citrate solution, from which base metals are retrieved by direct electrowinning, and the barren solution is recycled back to the leaching stage. This leaching-electrowinning cycle was repeated four times. The redox properties of the fresh citrate solution, as well as the leach liquors, were characterized by cyclic voltammetry to determine adequate conditions for metal reduction, as well as to limit citrate degradation. The leaching efficiency of electronic waste, employing the same solution after four complete cycles was 71, 83 and 94% for copper, iron and lead, respectively, compared to the original leach with fresh citrate solution.

  2. Maps showing mineral resource assessment for skarn deposits of gold, silver, copper, tungsten, and iron in the Butte 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.E.; Wallace, C.A.; Lee, G.K.; Antweiler, J.C.; Lidke, D.J.; Rowan, L.C.; Hanna, W.F.; Trautwein, C.M.; Dwyer, J.L.; Moll, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the potential for undiscovered skarn deposits of gold, silver, copper, tungsten, and iron in the Butte 1 °X2° quadrangle. Other deposit types have been assessed and reports for each of the following have been prepared: Vein and replacement deposits of gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, ·manganese, and tungsten; porphyry-stockwork deposits of copper, molybdenum, and tungsten; stockwork-disseminated deposits of gold and silver; placer deposits of gold; and miscellaneous deposit types including strata-bound deposits of copper and silver in rocks of the Middle Proterozoic Belt Supergroup, phosphate deposits in the Permian Phosporia Formation, and deposits of barite and fluorite. The Butte quadrangle, in west-central Montana, is one of the most mineralized and productive mining regions in the U.S. Its mining districts, including the world famous Butte or Summit Valley district, have produced a variety of metallic and nonmetallic mineral commodities valued at more than $6.4 billion (at the time of production). Because of its importance as a mineral producing region, the Butte quadrangle was selected for study by the U.S. Geological Survey under the Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Under this program, new data on geology, geochemistry, geophysics, geochronology, mineral resources, and remote sensing were collected and synthesized. The field and laboratory studies were supported, in part, by funding from the Geologic Framework and Synthesis Program and the Wilderness Program. The methods used in resource assessment include a compilation of all data into data sets, the development of an occurrence model for skarn deposits in the quadrangle, and the analysis of data using techniques provided by a Geographic Information System (GIS). This map is one of a number of reports and maps on the Butte 1 °X2° quadrangle. Other publications resulting from this study include U.S. Geological Survey (USGS

  3. Zinc Pyrithione Inhibits Yeast Growth through Copper Influx and Inactivation of Iron-Sulfur Proteins▿†

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Nancy L.; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R. Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D.; Schwartz, James R.; Grant, Raymond A.; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P.; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L.; Saunders, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal. PMID:21947398

  4. Predicting copper-, iron-, and zinc-binding proteins in pathogenic species of the Paracoccidioides genus

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, Gabriel B.; Assunção, Leandro do Prado; dos Santos, Luiz Paulo A.; Borges, Clayton L.; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Soares, Célia M. de Almeida; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Bailão, Alexandre M.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one-third of all proteins have been estimated to contain at least one metal cofactor, and these proteins are referred to as metalloproteins. These represent one of the most diverse classes of proteins, containing metal ions that bind to specific sites to perform catalytic, regulatory and structural functions. Bioinformatic tools have been developed to predict metalloproteins encoded by an organism based only on its genome sequence. Its function and the type of metal binder can also be predicted via a bioinformatics approach. Paracoccidioides complex includes termodimorphic pathogenic fungi that are found as saprobic mycelia in the environment and as yeast, the parasitic form, in host tissues. They are the etiologic agents of Paracoccidioidomycosis, a prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Many metalloproteins are important for the virulence of several pathogenic microorganisms. Accordingly, the present work aimed to predict the copper, iron and zinc proteins encoded by the genomes of three phylogenetic species of Paracoccidioides (Pb01, Pb03, and Pb18). The metalloproteins were identified using bioinformatics approaches based on structure, annotation and domains. Cu-, Fe-, and Zn-binding proteins represent 7% of the total proteins encoded by Paracoccidioides spp. genomes. Zinc proteins were the most abundant metalloproteins, representing 5.7% of the fungus proteome, whereas copper and iron proteins represent 0.3 and 1.2%, respectively. Functional classification revealed that metalloproteins are related to many cellular processes. Furthermore, it was observed that many of these metalloproteins serve as virulence factors in the biology of the fungus. Thus, it is concluded that the Cu, Fe, and Zn metalloproteomes of the Paracoccidioides spp. are of the utmost importance for the biology and virulence of these particular human pathogens. PMID:25620964

  5. Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc concentrations in kidneys of grey wolves, Canis lupus, from Alaska, Idaho, Montana (USA) and the Northwest Territories (Canada).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S R; Blunck, S A; Petersen, K N; Jones, E M; Koval, J C; Misek, R; Frick, J A; Cluff, H D; Sime, C A; McNay, M; Beckman, K B; Atkinson, M W; Drew, M; Collinge, M D; Bangs, E E; Harper, R G

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc levels were measured in the kidneys of 115 grey wolves (Canis lupus) from Idaho, Montana and Alaska (United States), and from the Northwest Territories (Canada). No significant differences in the levels of iron or copper were observed between locations, but wolf kidneys from more northern locations had significantly higher cadmium levels (Alaska > Northwest Territories > Montana ≈ Idaho), and wolves from Alaska showed significantly higher zinc than other locations. Additionally, female wolves in Alaska had higher iron levels than males, and adult wolves in Montana had higher copper levels than subadults.

  6. Bioremediation of copper-containing wastewater by sulfate reducing bacteria coupled with iron.

    PubMed

    Bai, He; Kang, Yong; Quan, Hongen; Han, Yang; Sun, Jiao; Feng, Ying

    2013-11-15

    In order to treat copper-containing wastewater effectively using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron (Fe(0)) was added to enhance the activity of SRB. The SRB system and the SRB + Fe(0) system were operated under continuous operation. The sulfate reduction efficiency of the SRB + Fe(0) system was twice as much as that of the SRB system with the sulfate loading rate at 125  mg L(-1) h(-1). The effect of COD/SO4(2-) on sulfate reduction indicates an enhanced activity of SRB by adding Fe(0). 99% of total sulfate was deducted in both systems at pH 4.0-7.0, and temperature slightly influenced the removal of sulfate in the SRB + Fe(0) system. In the copper-containing wastewater treatment, the SRB + Fe(0) system shows a better performance since sulfate removal in this system was higher than the SRB system, and the removal ratio of Cu(2+) was held above 95% in SRB + Fe(0) system at all influent Cu(2+) concentrations.

  7. Copper(I)- and copper(0)-promoted homocoupling and homocoupling-hydrodehalogenation reactions of dihalogenoclathrochelate precursors for C-C conjugated iron(II) bis-cage complexes.

    PubMed

    Varzatskii, Oleg A; Shul'ga, Sergey V; Belov, Alexander S; Novikov, Valentin V; Dolganov, Alexander V; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Voloshin, Yan Z

    2014-12-28

    Iron(II) dibromo- and diiodoclathrochelates undergo copper(I)-promoted reductive homocoupling in HMPA at 70-80 °C leading to C-C conjugated dibromo- and diiodo-bis-clathrochelates in high yields. Under the same conditions, their dichloroclathrochelate analog does not undergo the same homocoupling reaction, so the target dichloro-bis-cage product was obtained in high yield via dimerization of its heterodihalogenide iodochloromonomacrobicyclic precursor. The use of NMP as a solvent at 120-140 °C gave the mixture of bis-clathrochelates resulting from a tandem homocoupling-hydrodehalogenation reaction: the initial acetonitrile copper(I) solvato-complex at a high temperature underwent re-solvatation and disproportionation leading to Cu(II) ions and nano-copper, which promoted the hydrodehalogenation process even at room temperature. The most probable pathway of this reaction in situ includes hydrodehalogenation of the already formed dihalogeno-bis-clathrochelate via the formation of reduced anion radical intermediates. As a result, chemical transformations of the iron(II) dihalogenoclathrochelates in the presence of an acetonitrile copper(I) solvato-complex were found to depend both on the nature of halogen atoms in their ribbed chelate fragments and on reaction conditions (i.e. solvent and temperature). The C-C conjugated iron(II) dihalogeno-bis-clathrochelates easily undergo nucleophilic substitution with various N,S-nucleophiles giving ribbed-functionalized bis-cage species. These iron(II) complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction; their electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry. The isomeric shift values in (57)Fe Mössbauer spectra of such cage compounds allowed identifying them as low-spin iron(II) complexes, while those of the quadrupole splitting are the evidence for a significant TP distortion of their FeN6-coordination polyhedra

  8. Electron paramagnetic studies of the copper and iron containing soluble ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2010-08-01

    Soluble ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) from Nitrosomonas europaea was purified to homogeneity and metals in the active sites of the enzyme (Cu, Fe) were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were obtained for a type 2 Cu(II) site with g(parallel) = 2.24, A(parallel) = 18.4 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.057 as well as for heme and non heme iron present in purified soluble AMO from N. europaea. A second type 2 Cu(II) EPR signal with g(parallel) = 2.29, A(parallel) = 16.1 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.03 appeared in the spectrum of the ferricyanide oxidized enzyme and was attributed to oxidation of cuprous sites. Comparison of EPR-detectable Cu(2+) with total copper determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) suggests that there are six paramagnetic Cu(2+) and three diamagnetic Cu(1+) per heterotrimeric soluble AMO (two paramagnetic and one diamagnetic Cu per alphabetagamma-protomer). A trigonal EPR signal at g = 6.01, caused by a high-spin iron, indicative for cytochrome bound iron, and a rhombic signal at g = 4.31, characteristic of specifically bound Fe(3+) was detectable. The binding of nitric oxide in the presence of reductant resulted in a ferrous S = 3/2 signal, characteristic of a ferrous nitrosyl complex. Inactivation of soluble AMO with acetylene did neither diminish the ferrous signal nor the intensity of the Cu(2+)-EPR signal.

  9. The Homeostasis of Iron, Copper, and Zinc in Paracoccidioides Brasiliensis, Cryptococcus Neoformans Var. Grubii, and Cryptococcus Gattii: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Mirelle Garcia; Schrank, Augusto; Bailão, Elisa Flávia L.C.; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Staats, Charley Christian; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pereira, Maristela; Salem-Izacc, Silvia Maria; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Oliveira, Rosely Maria Zancopé; Silva, Lívia Kmetzsch Rosa e; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Iron, copper, and zinc are essential for all living organisms. Moreover, the homeostasis of these metals is vital to microorganisms during pathogenic interactions with a host. Most pathogens have developed specific mechanisms for the uptake of micronutrients from their hosts in order to counteract the low availability of essential ions in infected tissues. We report here an analysis of genes potentially involved in iron, copper, and zinc uptake and homeostasis in the fungal pathogens Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, and Cryptococcus gattii. Although prior studies have identified certain aspects of metal regulation in Cryptococcus species, little is known regarding the regulation of these elements in P. brasiliensis. We also present amino acid sequences analyses of deduced proteins in order to examine possible conserved domains. The genomic data reveals, for the first time, genes associated to iron, copper, and zinc assimilation and homeostasis in P. brasiliensis. Furthermore, analyses of the three fungal species identified homologs to genes associated with high-affinity uptake systems, vacuolar and mitochondrial iron storage, copper uptake and reduction, and zinc assimilation. However, homologs to genes involved in siderophore production were only found in P. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in silico analysis of the genomes of P. brasiliensis Pb01, Pb03, and Pb18 revealed significant differences in the presence and/or number of genes involved in metal homeostasis, such as in genes related to iron reduction and oxidation. The broad analyses of the genomes of P. brasiliensis, C. neoformans var. grubii, and C. gattii for genes involved in metal homeostasis provide important groundwork for numerous interesting future areas of investigation that are required in order to validate and explore the function of the identified genes and gene pathways. PMID:21833306

  10. Structural and phase transformations during copper and iron mechanical alloying in liquid medium studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryomina, Marina Anatol'evna; Lomayeva, Svetlana Fedorovna; Ul'yanov, Alexandr Leonidovich; Yelsukov, Evgeny Petrovich

    2016-03-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to study the kinetics of structural and phase transformations in Cu + 2 at% 57Fe during mechanical activation in liquid media (heptane, distilled water) and subsequent heat treatment (600 and 700 °C). The initial stages of mechanical alloying are associated with the transition of components to the nanostructural state. Iron atom groups form near the grain boundaries, and isolated iron atoms penetrate from the boundaries into the grains. Oxidation of groups of iron atoms that form highly dispersed phases of ternary oxide and magnetite occur in the initial stages of mechanical alloying of Cu + 2 at% 57Fe in water. The formation of the solid solution in the form of isolated iron atoms in the lattice of copper proceeds, regardless of the milling media used. Samples prepared in heptane contain carbon and oxygen, and upon heat treatment, carbide and oxide phases are formed.

  11. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  12. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition.

  13. Characterization of the Bacillus stearothermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase gene and its ability to complement copper/zinc superoxide dismutase deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, C; Van Kaer, L; Van Camp, W; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Dhaese, P

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant clones containing the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus were isolated with an oligonucleotide probe designed to match a part of the previously determined amino acid sequence. Complementation analyses, performed by introducing each plasmid into a superoxide dismutase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, allowed us to define the region of DNA which encodes the MnSOD structural gene and to identify a promoter region immediately upstream from the gene. These data were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. Since MnSOD is normally restricted to the mitochondria in eucaryotes, we were interested (i) in determining whether B. stearothermophilus MnSOD could function in eucaryotic cytosol and (ii) in determining whether MnSOD could replace the structurally unrelated copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) which is normally found there. To test this, the sequence encoding bacterial MnSOD was cloned into a yeast expression vector and subsequently introduced into a Cu/ZnSOD-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional expression of the protein was demonstrated, and complementation tests revealed that the protein was able to provide tolerance at wild-type levels to conditions which are normally restrictive for this mutant. Thus, in spite of the evolutionary unrelatedness of these two enzymes, Cu/ZnSOD can be functionally replaced by MnSOD in yeast cytosol. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:2407726

  14. Structural analysis and physico-chemical characterization of mononuclear manganese(II) and polynuclear copper(II) complexes with pyridine-based alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienkiewicz-Machnik, Małgorzata; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Two novel manganese(II) and copper(II) complexes, mononuclear [Mn(H2O)2(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2](NO3)2 (1) and polynuclear [Cu(SO4)(2-(CH2)2OHpy)2]n (2), based on 2-(hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-(CH2)2OHpy) were synthesised and fully characterised using X-ray structure analysis as well as spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal methods. Both central metal ions Mn(1) and Cu(1) are coordinated by two N,O-donor 2-(CH2)2OHpy ligands and possess an almost perfect octahedral geometry (a chromophore of {MN2O4} type). The coordination sphere of Mn(II) is completed by two molecules of water, whereas, in polynuclear complex 2, Cu(II) atoms are linked along the a crystallographic direction by bridging sulfate ligands in a μ2-κ2 binding mode to form chains. The intermolecular interactions in 1 and 2 have been interpreted in view of the 3D Hirshfeld surface analysis and associated 2D fingerprint plots. Furthermore, the complexes have been tested with ABTSrad + assay in order to assess their antioxidant activity. In addition, the IC50 values calculated for 1 and 2 revealed that the complexes show a higher antioxidant activity than corresponding ligand.

  15. Effects of Aqueous Extracts of Chicory and Milk Thistle on Serum Concentrations of Copper, Zinc, and Manganese in Tamoxifen-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Ziamajidi, Nasrin; Nasiri, Abolfazl; Behrouj, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Some medications may change trace element levels in the body. Extracts of various plants, due to having the several elements, can have beneficial effects. Consumption of herbal extracts with chemical drugs may reduce adverse effects of medication. The goal of this study was to evaluate copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and manganese (Mn) concentrations in serum of rats treated with tamoxifen, chicory, and/or milk thistle extracts. Therefore, 36 adult female Wistar rats were divided into six groups: normal control, chicory control, milk thistle control, tamoxifen, tamoxifen-chicory, and tamoxifen-milk thistle. At the end of the study, the blood samples were collected and sera isolated by centrifugation and analyzed by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry for Cu, Zn, and Mn levels. The Zn concentration increased in milk thistle-supplemented groups. The Cu level increased in the chicory control group only. Tamoxifen had no affect on Cu, Zn, and Mn levels, but seed extract of milk thistle increased Zn concentration, and chicory root extract increased Cu concentration. Although elevated levels of Cu in rats receiving tamoxifen-chicory were milder than rats treated only with chicory, it seems that the extract and tamoxifen impact on the Cu are in conflict with each other.

  16. Synthesis of iron and copper nano-clusters in SiO 2 by ion implantation and the magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashia, N.; Sakamoto, I.; Moriwaki, T.; Wakabayashi, H.; Toriyama, T.

    2005-04-01

    The formation of iron and copper nano-clusters in crystalline SiO2 by sequential implantations of Fe and Cu ions was studied. The implantation was performed at room temperature to a total dose of 1.9×1019 ions/cm2. The addition of Cu ions was done by a dose of 0.7×1017 Cu ions/cm2. It is shown by the measurements of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction that the addition of Cu ions promotes the transitions from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic states in the iron nano-clusters aggregated beforehand.

  17. [MORPHOFUNCTIONAL ADJUSTMENT VASCULAR AND CELLULAR COMPONENTS OF THE CEREBELLAR CORTEX IN EXPOSURE TO BODY SULFATES OF COPPER, ZINC AND IRON].

    PubMed

    Grintsova, N; Vasko, L; Kiptenko, L; Gortinsky, A; Murenets, N

    2015-09-01

    In order to analyze the morphological and morphometric reconstructions of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex of rats in long-term action (for 90 days) on the body of sulphates of copper, zinc and iron, an experiment was conducted on 48 adult white male rats weighing 200-250 g in age 5-7 months. We used anatomical, morphometric, statistical and common methods of microanatomical research. It was found that the combined effect on the body of sulphates of copper and zinc, and iron in the cerebellum has enough expressive toxicity, which affects the condition of the vascular bed, and Purkinje cells. The degree of morphological transformations is in direct proportion to the duration of the experiment. In the pathogenesis of violations leading role played by hypoxia, develop signs of swelling of the cerebellar cortex with signs hemorrhagic infiltration, the severity of which is maximum on the 60th day of the experiment.

  18. Alteration of the Copper-Binding Capacity of Iron-Rich Humic Colloids during Transport from Peatland to Marine Waters.

    PubMed

    Muller, François L L; Cuscov, Marco

    2017-02-28

    Blanket bogs contain vast amounts of Sphagnum-derived organic substances which can act as powerful chelators for dissolved iron and thus enhance its export to the coastal ocean. To investigate the variations in quantity and quality of these exports, adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) was used to characterize the metal binding properties of molecular weight-fractionated dissolved organic matter (MW-fractionated DOM) in the catchment and coastal plume of a small peat-draining river over a seasonal cycle. Within the plume, both iron- and copper-binding organic ligands showed a linear, conservative distribution with increasing salinity, illustrating the high stability of peatland-derived humic substances (HS). Within the catchment, humic colloids lost up to 50% of their copper-binding capacity, expressed as a molar ratio to organic carbon, after residing for 1 week or more in the main reservoir of the catchment. Immediately downstream of the reservoir, the molar ratio [L2]/[Corg], where L2 was the second strongest copper-binding ligand, was 0.75 × 10(-4) when the reservoir residence time was 5 h but 0.34 × 10(-4) when it was 25 days. Residence time did not affect the carbon specific iron-binding capacity of the humic substances which was [L]/[Corg] = (0.80 ± 0.20) × 10(-2). Our results suggest that the loss of copper-binding capacity with increasing residence time is caused by intracolloidal interactions between iron and HS during transit from peat soil to river mouth.

  19. Acyloxylation of 1,4-Dioxanes and 1,4-Dithianes Catalyzed by a Copper-Iron Mixed Oxide.

    PubMed

    García-Cabeza, Ana Leticia; Marín-Barrios, Rubén; Moreno-Dorado, F Javier; Ortega, María J; Vidal, Hilario; Gatica, José M; Massanet, Guillermo M; Guerra, Francisco M

    2015-07-02

    The use of a copper-iron mixed oxide as a heterogeneous catalyst for the efficient synthesis of α-acyloxy-1,4-dioxanes and 1,4-dithianes employing t-butyl peroxyesters is reported. The preparation and characterization of the catalyst are described. The effect of the heteroatoms and a plausible mechanism are discussed. The method is operationally simple and involves low-cost starting materials affording products in good to excellent yields.

  20. Tribological behaviour and statistical experimental design of sintered iron-copper based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Ileana Nicoleta; Ghiţă, Constantin; Bratu, Vasile; Palacios Navarro, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    The sintered iron-copper based composites for automotive brake pads have a complex composite composition and should have good physical, mechanical and tribological characteristics. In this paper, we obtained frictional composites by Powder Metallurgy (P/M) technique and we have characterized them by microstructural and tribological point of view. The morphology of raw powders was determined by SEM and the surfaces of obtained sintered friction materials were analyzed by ESEM, EDS elemental and compo-images analyses. One lot of samples were tested on a "pin-on-disc" type wear machine under dry sliding conditions, at applied load between 3.5 and 11.5 × 10-1 MPa and 12.5 and 16.9 m/s relative speed in braking point at constant temperature. The other lot of samples were tested on an inertial test stand according to a methodology simulating the real conditions of dry friction, at a contact pressure of 2.5-3 MPa, at 300-1200 rpm. The most important characteristics required for sintered friction materials are high and stable friction coefficient during breaking and also, for high durability in service, must have: low wear, high corrosion resistance, high thermal conductivity, mechanical resistance and thermal stability at elevated temperature. Because of the tribological characteristics importance (wear rate and friction coefficient) of sintered iron-copper based composites, we predicted the tribological behaviour through statistical analysis. For the first lot of samples, the response variables Yi (represented by the wear rate and friction coefficient) have been correlated with x1 and x2 (the code value of applied load and relative speed in braking points, respectively) using a linear factorial design approach. We obtained brake friction materials with improved wear resistance characteristics and high and stable friction coefficients. It has been shown, through experimental data and obtained linear regression equations, that the sintered composites wear rate increases

  1. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  2. Purity-enhanced bulk synthesis of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes using iron-copper catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lim, H E; Miyata, Y; Nakayama, T; Chen, S; Kitaura, R; Shinohara, H

    2011-09-30

    We report high purity and high yield synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of narrow diameter from iron-copper bimetal catalysts. The SWCNTs with diameter of 0.8-1.2 nm are synthesized using the zeolite-supported alcohol chemical vapour deposition method. Single metal and bimetal catalysts are systematically investigated to achieve both the enhancement of SWCNT yield and the suppression of the undesired formation of graphitic impurities. The relative yield and purity of SWCNTs are quantified using optical absorption spectroscopy with an ultracentrifuge-based purification technique. For the single metal catalyst, iron shows the highest catalytic activity compared with the other metals such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, copper, and platinum. It has been found that the addition of copper to iron results in the suppression of carbonaceous impurity formation without decreasing the SWCNT yield. The purity-enhanced SWCNT shows fairly low sheet resistance due to the improvement of inter-nanotube contacts. This scalable design of SWCNT synthesis with enhanced purity is therefore a promising tool for shaping future high performance devices.

  3. Purity-enhanced bulk synthesis of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes using iron-copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. E.; Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Chen, S.; Kitaura, R.; Shinohara, H.

    2011-09-01

    We report high purity and high yield synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of narrow diameter from iron-copper bimetal catalysts. The SWCNTs with diameter of 0.8-1.2 nm are synthesized using the zeolite-supported alcohol chemical vapour deposition method. Single metal and bimetal catalysts are systematically investigated to achieve both the enhancement of SWCNT yield and the suppression of the undesired formation of graphitic impurities. The relative yield and purity of SWCNTs are quantified using optical absorption spectroscopy with an ultracentrifuge-based purification technique. For the single metal catalyst, iron shows the highest catalytic activity compared with the other metals such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, copper, and platinum. It has been found that the addition of copper to iron results in the suppression of carbonaceous impurity formation without decreasing the SWCNT yield. The purity-enhanced SWCNT shows fairly low sheet resistance due to the improvement of inter-nanotube contacts. This scalable design of SWCNT synthesis with enhanced purity is therefore a promising tool for shaping future high performance devices.

  4. The Variations of Glycolysis and TCA Cycle Intermediate Levels Grown in Iron and Copper Mediums of Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Tavsan, Zehra; Ayar Kayali, Hulya

    2015-05-01

    The efficiency of optimal metabolic function by microorganism depends on various parameters, especially essential metal supplementation. In the present study, the effects of iron and copper metals on metabolism were investigated by determination of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites' levels with respect to the metal concentrations and incubation period in Trichoderma harzianum. The pyruvate and citrate levels of T. harzianum increased up to 15 mg/L of copper via redirection of carbon flux though glycolysis by suppression of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). However, the α-ketoglutarate levels decreased at concentration higher than 5 mg/L of copper to overcome damage of oxidative stress. The fumarate levels correlated with the α-ketoglutarate levels because of substrate limitation. Besides, in T. harzianum cells grown in various concentrations of iron-containing medium, the intracellular pyruvate, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate levels showed positive correlation with iron concentration due to modifying of expression of glycolysis and TCA cycle enzymes via a mechanism involving cofactor or allosteric regulation. However, as a result of consuming of prior substrates required for fumarate production, its levels rose up to 10 mg/L.

  5. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  6. Manganese biomining: A review.

    PubMed

    Das, A P; Sukla, L B; Pradhan, N; Nayak, S

    2011-08-01

    Biomining comprises of processing and extraction of metal from their ores and concentrates using microbial techniques. Currently this is used by the mining industry to extract copper, uranium and gold from low grade ores but not for low grade manganese ore in industrial scale. The study of microbial genomes, metabolites and regulatory pathways provide novel insights to the metabolism of bioleaching microorganisms and their synergistic action during bioleaching operations. This will promote understanding of the universal regulatory responses that the biomining microbial community uses to adapt to their changing environment leading to high metal recovery. Possibility exists of findings ways to imitate the entire process during industrial manganese biomining endeavor. This paper reviews the current status of manganese biomining research operations around the world, identifies factors that drive the selection of biomining as a processing technology, describes challenges in exploiting these innovations, and concludes with a discussion of Mn biomining's future.

  7. Ion paired chromatography of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) as their 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline chelates.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Yoshioka, N; Inoue, H

    1997-07-01

    A reversed phase ion-paired chromatographic method that can be used to determine trace amounts of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) was developed and applied to the determination of iron (II) and iron (III) levels in natural water. The separation of these metal ions as their 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) chelates on an Inertsil ODS column was investigated by using acetonitrile-water (80/20, v/v) containing 0.06 M perchloric acid as mobile phase and diode array spectrophotometric detection at 250-650 nm. Chromatographic parameters such as composition of mobile phase and concentration of perchloric acid in mobile phase were optimized. The calibration graphs of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) ions were linear (r > 0.991) in the concentration range 0-0.5, 0-2.0 and 0-4.0 mug ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) were 2.67, 5.42 and 18.2 ng ml(-1) with relative standard deviation (n = 5) of 3.11, 5.81 and 7.16% at a concentration level of 10 ng ml(-1) for iron (II) and nickel (II) and 25 ng ml(-1) for copper (II), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of iron(II) and iron(III) in tap water and sea water samples without any interference from other common metal ions.

  8. Knockdown of copper-transporting ATPase 1 (Atp7a) impairs iron flux in fully-differentiated rat (IEC-6) and human (Caco-2) intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Collins, James F

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal iron absorption is highly regulated since no mechanism for iron excretion exists. We previously demonstrated that expression of an intestinal copper transporter (Atp7a) increases in parallel with genes encoding iron transporters in the rat duodenal epithelium during iron deprivation (Am. J. Physiol.: Gastrointest. Liver Physiol., 2005, 288, G964-G971). This led us to postulate that Atp7a may influence intestinal iron flux. Therefore, to test the hypothesis that Atp7a is required for optimal iron transport, we silenced Atp7a in rat IEC-6 and human Caco-2 cells. Iron transport was subsequently quantified in fully-differentiated cells plated on collagen-coated, transwell inserts. Interestingly, (59)Fe uptake and efflux were impaired in both cell lines by Atp7a silencing. Concurrent changes in the expression of key iron transport-related genes were also noted in IEC-6 cells. Expression of Dmt1 (the iron importer), Dcytb (an apical membrane ferrireductase) and Fpn1 (the iron exporter) was decreased in Atp7a knockdown (KD) cells. Paradoxically, cell-surface ferrireductase activity increased (>5-fold) in Atp7a KD cells despite decreased Dcytb mRNA expression. Moreover, increased expression (>10-fold) of hephaestin (an iron oxidase involved in iron efflux) was associated with increased ferroxidase activity in KD cells. Increases in ferrireductase and ferroxidase activity may be compensatory responses to increase iron flux. In summary, in these reductionist models of the mammalian intestinal epithelium, Atp7a KD altered expression of iron transporters and impaired iron flux. Since Atp7a is a copper transporter, it is a logical supposition that perturbations in intracellular copper homeostasis underlie the noted biologic changes in these cell lines.

  9. Assessing plasma levels of selenium, copper, iron and zinc in patients of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Wen; Lin, Jie; Wang, Xue-Bao; Cheng, Xing; Wang, Jian-Yong; Hu, Bei-Lei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiong; Zhu, Jian-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Trace elements have been recognized to play an important role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is difficult to precisely identify the relationship between these elements and the progression of PD because of an insufficient number of patients. In this study, quantifications of selenium (Se), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry were performed in plasma from 238 PD patients and 302 controls recruited from eastern China, which is so far the largest cohort of PD patients and controls for measuring plasma levels of these elements. We found that plasma Se and Fe concentrations were significantly increased whereas Cu and Zn concentrations decreased in PD patients as compared with controls. Meanwhile, these four elements displayed differential changes with regard to age. Linear and logistic regression analyses revealed that both Fe and Zn were negatively correlated with age in PD patients. Association analysis suggests that lower plasma Se and Fe levels may reduce the risk for PD, whereas lower plasma Zn is probably a PD risk factor. Finally, a model was generated to predict PD patients based on the plasma concentrations of these four trace elements as well as other features such as sex and age, which achieved an accuracy of 80.97±1.34% using 10-fold cross-validation. In summary, our data provide new insights into the roles of Se, Cu, Fe and Zn in PD progression.

  10. Calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, silicon and zinc content of hair in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Alimonti, Alessandro; Violante, Nicola; Di Gregorio, Marco; Senofonte, Oreste; Petrucci, Francesco; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Bocca, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still unknown, but some hypotheses have focused on the imbalances in body levels of metals as co-factors of risk. To assess whether hair could be a reliable marker of possible changes, calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), silicon (Si) and zinc (Zn) were determined in hair from 81 patients affected by PD and 17 age-matched controls. Care was taken to eliminate external contamination of the hair by thorough washing. Digestion of the matrix was achieved by an acid-assisted microwave procedure. Quantification of the elements was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Results indicated significantly lower levels of Fe in the hair of patients (p=0.018) compared with controls. Ca and Mg levels were slightly lower while Zn levels were higher in patients, although these differences were not significant; neither were variations in Cu and Si. Ca and Mg were at least 1.5 times higher in females than in males in both controls and patients. In addition, Ca correlated positively with Mg in both groups and in both sexes (p-value always less than 0.03), and negatively with age in patients (p<0.01). Finally, element levels did not correlate with either the duration or the severity of the disease or with anti-Parkinson treatment.

  11. Reactivity of food phenols with iron and copper ions: binding, dioxygen activation and oxidation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nkhili, Ezzohra; Loonis, Michèle; Mihai, Simona; El Hajji, Hakima; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the affinity of common dietary phenols (gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechin, and rutin) for iron and copper ions was quantitatively investigated in neutral phosphate buffer as well as the reactivity of the complexes toward dioxygen. Contrasting behaviors were observed: because of the competing phosphate ions, Fe(III) binding is much slower than Fe(II) binding, which is rapidly followed by autoxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III). With both ions, O2 consumption and H2O2 production are modest and the phenolic ligands are only slowly oxidized. By contrast, metal-phenol binding is fast with both Cu(I) and Cu(II). With Cu(I), O2 consumption and H2O2 production are very significant and the phenolic ligands are rapidly oxidized into a complex mixture of oligomers. The corresponding mechanism with Cu(II) is hampered by the preliminary rate-determining step of Cu(II) reduction by the phenols. The consequences of these findings for the stability and antioxidant activity of plant phenols are discussed.

  12. Timing of multiple hydrothermal events in the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Creaser, Robert A.; DuFrane, S. Andrew; Melo, Gustavo H. C.; Delinardo da Silva, Marco A.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Sato, Kei

    2015-06-01

    The Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil, hosts several iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, including Sossego, Cristalino, Alvo 118, Bacuri, Bacaba, Castanha, and Visconde. Mapping and U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) IIe zircon geochronology allowed the characterization of the host rocks, situated within regional WNW-ESE shear zones. They encompass Mesoarchean (3.08-2.85 Ga) TTG orthogneiss, granites, and remains of greenstone belts, Neoarchean (ca. 2.74 Ga) granite, shallow-emplaced porphyries, and granophyric granite coeval with gabbro, and Paleoproterozoic (1.88 Ga) porphyry dykes. Extensive hydrothermal zones include albite-scapolite, biotite-scapolite-tourmaline-magnetite alteration, and proximal potassium feldspar, chlorite-epidote and chalcopyrite formation. U-Pb laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) analysis of ore-related monazite and Re-Os NTIMS analysis of molybdenite suggest multiple Neoarchean (2.76 and 2.72-2.68 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.06 Ga) hydrothermal events at the Bacaba and Bacuri deposits. These results, combined with available geochronological data from the literature, indicate recurrence of hydrothermal systems in the Southern Copper Belt, including 1.90-1.88-Ga ore formation in the Sossego-Curral ore bodies and the Alvo 118 deposit. Although early hydrothermal evolution at 2.76 Ga points to fluid migration coeval with the Carajás Basin formation, the main episode of IOCG genesis (2.72-2.68 Ga) is related to basin inversion coupled with Neoarchean (ca. 2.7 Ga) felsic magmatism. The data suggest that the IOCG deposits in the Southern Copper Belt and those in the Northern Copper Belt (2.57-Ga Salobo and Igarapé Bahia-Alemão deposits) do not share a common metallogenic evolution. Therefore, the association of all IOCG deposits of the Carajás Province with a single extensive hydrothermal system is precluded.

  13. A multielement trace mineral injection improves liver copper and selenium concentrations and manganese superoxide dismutase activity in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Genther, O N; Hansen, S L

    2014-02-01

    Trace minerals (TM) are vital to health and growth of livestock, but low dietary concentrations and dietary antagonists may reduce mineral status and feeder cattle TM status is usually unknown at arrival. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of TM status on response to mineral injection in beef cattle. Forty steers were equally assigned to diets for an 84-d depletion period: control (CON; supplemental Cu, Mn, Se, and Zn) or deficient (DEF; no supplemental Cu, Mn, Se, or Zn plus Fe and Mo as TM antagonists). Lesser liver Cu and Se concentrations (79.0 ± 11.60 and 1.66 ± 0.080 mg/kg DM, respectively) in DEF steers compared with CON steers (228.8 ± 11.60 and 2.41 ± 0.080 mg/kg DM, respectively) on d 71 of depletion indicated mild deficiencies of these TM (P < 0.001). On d 1 of the 85-d repletion period, 10 steers within each dietary treatment were injected with sterilized saline (SAL) or Multimin90 (MM), containing 15, 10, 5, and 60 mg/mL of Cu, Mn, Se, and Zn, respectively, at a dose of 1 mL/68 kg BW. All steers were fed the same repletion diet supplemented with Cu, Mn, Se, and Zn to meet or exceed NRC recommendations. Blood was collected on d 0 and 1, and blood and liver biopsies were collected on d 8, 15, 29, 57, and 85 postinjection. Red blood cell lysate manganese-superoxide dismutase activity was greater in MM (P = 0.02), suggesting incorporation of injectable TM into a biological process. The increase in liver Se in response to MM was greater in CON vs. DEF (P = 0.02), suggesting TM from injection were used rather than stored in DEF steers. Liver Se and Cu (P < 0.05) were elevated through at least d 30 by MM. Dietary TM deficiency decreased neutrophil bacteria killing ability and increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) degranulation (P < 0.04) as measured on d 0, 1, 13, and 14 during the repletion period while injection had no impact. Within CON animals, total MPO was greater in animals that received TM injection, but injection did not affect MPO

  14. Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A G V; Lima, F S; Bicalho, M L S; Kussler, A; Lima, S F; Felippe, M J; Bicalho, R C

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2 subcutaneous injections of a multimineral preparation, each containing 60 mg of zinc, 10mg of manganese, 5mg of selenium, and 15 mg of copper at 3 and 30 d after birth on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves during the preweaning period. The study was conducted in upstate New York in 2 commercial dairy farms. A total of 790 Holstein heifer calves were randomly allocated at birth into 1 of 2 treatments: trace mineral supplement (TMS) treated or control. Blood samples were collected at 3, 14, and 35 d after birth to evaluate glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, haptoglobin, and neutrophil and monocyte function. Incidence of diseases and average daily gain was evaluated in the first 50 d of life. At 14 d of life, TMS-treated calves had increased neutrophil activity compared with control calves. Moreover, TMS-treated calves had greater GPx activity on d 14 after birth than control calves. The TMS treatment reduced the incidence of diarrhea (TMS=41.7% vs. control=49.7%) and combined incidence of pneumonia or otitis or both (TMS=41.7% vs. control=49.1%). Additionally, GPx was greater for calves diagnosed with otitis at d 35 after birth. However, calves diagnosed with pneumonia had decreased GPx activity at d 35 after birth. Serum SOD and haptoglobin concentrations were not affected by treatment or disease. Moreover, no effects were observed on average daily gain and survivability between TMS-treated and control calves during the preweaning period. Supplementation with trace minerals at 3 and 30 d of life increased neutrophil function and GPx activity and reduced the incidence of health disorders.

  15. A bias in the "mass-normalized" DTT response - An effect of non-linear concentration-response curves for copper and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Jessica G.; McFall, Alexander S.; Vu, Kennedy K.-T.; Baroi, James; Olea, Catalina; Hasson, Alam; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-11-01

    The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay is widely used to measure the oxidative potential of particulate matter. Results are typically presented in mass-normalized units (e.g., pmols DTT lost per minute per microgram PM) to allow for comparison among samples. Use of this unit assumes that the mass-normalized DTT response is constant and independent of the mass concentration of PM added to the DTT assay. However, based on previous work that identified non-linear DTT responses for copper and manganese, this basic assumption (that the mass-normalized DTT response is independent of the concentration of PM added to the assay) should not be true for samples where Cu and Mn contribute significantly to the DTT signal. To test this we measured the DTT response at multiple PM concentrations for eight ambient particulate samples collected at two locations in California. The results confirm that for samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, the mass-normalized DTT response can strongly depend on the concentration of PM added to the assay, varying by up to an order of magnitude for PM concentrations between 2 and 34 μg mL-1. This mass dependence confounds useful interpretation of DTT assay data in samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, requiring additional quality control steps to check for this bias. To minimize this problem, we discuss two methods to correct the mass-normalized DTT result and we apply those methods to our samples. We find that it is possible to correct the mass-normalized DTT result, although the correction methods have some drawbacks and add uncertainty to DTT analyses. More broadly, other DTT-active species might also have non-linear concentration-responses in the assay and cause a bias. In addition, the same problem of Cu- and Mn-mediated bias in mass-normalized DTT results might affect other measures of acellular redox activity in PM and needs to be addressed.

  16. 6-Hydroxydopamine-lesioning of the nigrostriatal pathway in rats alters basal ganglia mRNA for copper, zinc- and manganese-superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Kunikowska, G; Jenner, P

    2001-12-13

    The effects of nigrostriatal pathway destruction on the mRNA levels of copper, zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase in basal ganglia of adult rat were investigated using in situ hybridization histochemistry and oligodeoxynucleotide (single-stranded complementary DNA) probes. The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal pathway resulted in contralateral rotation to apomorphine and a marked loss of specific [(3)H]mazindol binding in the striatum (93%; P<0.05) and of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in substantia nigra pars compacta (SC) (93%; P<0.05) compared with control rats. Levels of Cu,Zn-SOD mRNA were decreased in the striatum, globus pallidus, and SC on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared with sham-lesioned rats (P<0.05). Levels of Mn-SOD mRNA were increased in the nucleus accumbens (P<0.05), but decreased in the SC (P<0.05) on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-treated rats compared with sham-lesioned rats. Lesioning with 6-OHDA had no effect on glutathione peroxidase mRNA levels in any region of basal ganglia examined. The significant changes in Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD mRNA indicate that SOD is primarily expressed by dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway, and that the Mn-SOD gene appears to be inducible in rat basal ganglia in response to both physical and chemical damage 5 weeks after 6-OHDA-lesioning. These findings may clarify the status of antioxidant enzymes, particularly Mn-SOD, in patients with Parkinson's disease and their relevance to disease pathogenesis.

  17. Relationship between dietary magnesium, manganese, and copper and metabolic syndrome risk in Korean adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2008).

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Bae, Yun-Jung

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have reported correlations between mineral intake and metabolic syndrome (MS), but accurate relationships and consistency in the results are difficult to confirm. Accordingly, this study aims to assess the dietary intakes of magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) to determine their relationship with MS. Data from a total of 5,136 adults (2,084 men, 3,052 women) was collected from the 2007-2008 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), and the intakes of Mg, Mn, and Cu of the MS patients were compared with those of healthy adults. The relationship between the intakes of these minerals and the MS risks was analyzed. Diagnosis of MS was evaluated by the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) standards. Among all study subjects, 25.9 % (540 subjects) of the men and 24.5 % (748 subjects) of the women met diagnostic criteria for inclusion in the MS group. In the men, daily intakes of Mg and Cu in the MS group were significantly lower than those in control group, and in the women, daily intakes of energy, Mg, Mn, and Cu in the MS group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The women subjects with high blood pressure showed significantly lower intakes of Mg, Mn, and Cu than control subjects. In addition, in the women, the highest quartile of Mg and Cu was inversely associated with MS, but with adjustment were not maintained. However, in the postmenopausal women, MS was significant and inversely associated with the highest quartiles of Cu intake and the association remained significant after adjustments. Considering that MS incidence increases and dietary intake and nutrient density decrease with increasing age, and mineral intake is reduced accordingly, these results suggest that meal management with adequate mineral intake is advisable to control MS.

  18. The effect of copper(II), iron(II) sulphate, and vitamin C combinations on the weak antimicrobial activity of (+)-catechin against Staphylococcus aureus and other microbes.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Andrew C; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Gould, Simon W J; Fielder, Mark D; Naughton, Declan P; Kelly, Alison F

    2012-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to improve the activity of plant compounds with low antimicrobial efficacy. (+)-Catechin, a weak antimicrobial tea flavanol, was combined with putative adjuncts and tested against different species of bacteria. Copper(II) sulphate enhanced (+)-catechin activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis or Escherichia coli. Attempts to raise the activity of (+)-catechin against two unresponsive species, S. aureus and E. coli, with iron(II) sulphate, iron(III) chloride, and vitamin C, showed that iron(II) enhanced (+)-catechin against S. aureus, but not E. coli; neither iron(III) nor combined iron(II) and copper(II), enhanced (+)-catechin activity against either species. Vitamin C enhanced copper(II) containing combinations against both species in the absence of iron(II). Catalase or EDTA added to active samples removed viability effects suggesting that active mixtures had produced H(2)O(2)via the action of added metal(II) ions. H(2)O(2) generation by (+)-catechin plus copper(II) mixtures and copper(II) alone could account for the principal effect of bacterial growth inhibition following 30 minute exposures as well as the antimicrobial effect of (+)-catechin-iron(II) against S. aureus. These novel findings about a weak antimicrobial flavanol contrast with previous knowledge of more active flavanols with transition metal combinations. Weak antimicrobial compounds like (+)-catechin within enhancement mixtures may therefore be used as efficacious agents. (+)-Catechin may provide a means of lowering copper(II) or iron(II) contents in certain crop protection and other products.

  19. Manganese and iron reduction dominate organic carbon oxidation in surface sediments of the deep Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Han; Mok, Jin-Sook; Cho, Hyeyoun; Lee, Tongsup; Vandieken, Verona; Thamdrup, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Rates and pathways of benthic organic carbon (Corg) oxidation were investigated in surface sediments of the Ulleung Basin (UB) characterized by high Corg contents ( > 2.5 %, dry wt.) and very high contents of Mn oxides ( > 200 µmol cm-3) and Fe oxides (up to 100 µmol cm-3). The combination of geochemical analyses and independently executed metabolic rate measurements revealed that Mn and Fe reduction were the dominant Corg oxidation pathways in the center of the UB, comprising 45 and 20 % of total Corg oxidation, respectively. By contrast, sulfate reduction was the dominant Corg oxidation pathway, accounting for 50 % of total Corg mineralization in sediments of the continental slope. The relative significance of each Corg oxidation pathway matched the depth distribution of the respective electron acceptors. The relative importance of Mn reduction for Corg oxidation displays saturation kinetics with respect to Mn oxide content with a low half-saturation value of 8.6 µmol cm-3, which further implies that Mn reduction can be a dominant Corg oxidation process even in sediments with lower MnO2 content as known from several other locations. This is the first report of a high contribution of manganese reduction to Corg oxidation in offshore sediments on the Asian margin. The high manganese oxide content in the surface sediment in the central UB was maintained by an extreme degree of recycling, with each Mn atom on average being reoxidized ˜ 3800 times before permanent burial. This is the highest degree of recycling so far reported for Mn-rich sediments, and it appears linked to the high benthic mineralization rates resulting from the high Corg content that indicate the UB as a biogeochemical hotspot for turnover of organic matter and nutrient regeneration.

  20. X-Ray Microanalytic Concentration Measurements in Unsectioned Specimens: a Technique and its Application to Zinc, Manganese, and Iron Enriched Mechanical Structures of Organisms from Three Phyla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Robert M. S.

    A method for measuring concentrations of minor elements in microscopic volumes of heterogeneous, unsectioned biological specimens using an ion microprobe is developed. The element quantity is obtained from PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and the total quantity of material is derived from STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) energy loss measurements. Sources of error, including changes in x-ray production cross section with proton energy and absorption of induced x-rays, are discussed and a method of calculating the total measurement uncertainty, typically about 25% here, is developed. The measurement accuracy is shown to be improved for symmetric specimens, and a method of using the bremsstrahlung background to correct for x-ray attenuation within irregular specimens is developed. Methods for measuring local concentrations in internal features are also discussed. With this technique, scorpions were found to contain cuticular accumulations of one or more heavy metals (manganese up to 5% of dry weight, iron up to 8%, zinc up to 24%) in the chelicera, pedipalp denticles, tarsal claws, and stingers; different region soften contained different metals. The stingers are argued to be of particular interest because they are not homologous to legs. Similar accumulations were found in spiders, some other chelicerates and crustaceans. Previous reports of manganese and zinc accumulations in insect and worm mouth parts were augmented with local concentration measurements and with the detection of other enrichment features (such as 6% iron in the paragnaths of the worm Nereis vexillosa). Zinc accumulations (up to only 0.1%) were also found in the tips of the teeth of a hagfish, Myxine + glutinosa. X-ray images of several of these features are presented. It is argued that the extreme magnitude of some concentration values suggests that some metals are incorporated in unusual biominerals rather than organically bound. Results of x-ray diffractometry and Vickers

  1. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  2. Effect of the metals iron, copper and silver on fluorobenzene biodegradation by Labrys portucalensis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina S; Amorim, Catarina L; Carvalho, Maria F; Ferreira, António C; Afonso, Carlos M; Castro, Paula M L

    2013-04-01

    Organic and metallic pollutants are ubiquitous in the environment. Many metals are reported to be toxic to microorganisms and to inhibit biodegradation. The effect of the metals iron, copper and silver on the metabolism of Labrys portucalensis F11 and on fluorobenzene (FB) biodegradation was examined. The results indicate that the addition of 1 mM of Fe(2+) to the culture medium has a positive effect on bacterial growth and has no impact in the biodegradation of 1 and 2 mM of FB. The presence of 1 mM of Cu(2+) was found to strongly inhibit the growth of F11 cultures and to reduce the biodegradation of 1 and 2 mM of FB to ca. 50 %, with 80 % of stoichiometrically expected fluoride released. In the experiments with resting cells, the FB degraded (from 2 mM supplied) was reduced ca. 20 % whereas the fluoride released was reduced to 45 % of that stoichiometrically expected. Ag(+) was the most potent inhibitor of FB degradation. In experiments with growing cells, the addition of 1 mM of Ag(+) to the culture medium containing 1 and 2 mM of FB resulted in no fluoride release, whereas FB degradation was only one third of that observed in control cultures. In the experiments with resting cells, the addition of Ag(+) resulted in 25 % reduction in substrate degradation and fluoride release was only 20 % of that stoichiometrically expected. The accumulation of catechol and 4-fluorocatechol in cultures supplemented with Cu(2+) or Ag(+) suggest inhibition of the key enzyme of FB metabolism-catechol 1,2-dioxygenase.

  3. Factors influencing the DNA nuclease activity of iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J A

    2011-10-05

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological co-reactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-order rate constants for DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) conversion up to 2.5 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 7 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Relative rates of radical generation and characterization of radical species were determined by reaction with the fluorescent radical probes TEMPO-9-AC and rhodamine B. Ascorbate turnover rate constants ranging from 3 × 10(-4) to 0.13 min(-1) were determined, although many complexes demonstrated no measurable activity. Inhibition and Freifelder-Trumbo analysis of DNA cleavage supported concerted cleavage of dsDNA by a metal-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the case of Cu(2+)(aq), Cu-KGHK, Co-KGHK, and Cu-NTA and stepwise cleavage for Fe(2+)(aq), Cu-cyclam, Cu-cyclen, Co-cyclen, Cu-EDTA, Ni-EDTA, Co-EDTA, Cu-GGH, and Co-NTA. Reduction potentials varied over the range from -362 to +1111 mV versus NHE, and complexes demonstrated optimal catalytic activity in the range of the physiological redox co-reactants ascorbate and peroxide (-66 to +380 mV).

  4. Rat liver mitochondrial dysfunction by addition of copper(II) or iron(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Acosta, Juan M; Bajicoff, Sofía; Paredes-Fleitas, Paola; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2017-01-01

    Increased copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) levels in liver and brain are associated to oxidative stress and damage with increased phospholipid oxidation process. The aim of this work was to assess the toxic effects of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) addition to rat liver mitochondria by determining mitochondrial respiration in states 3 (active respiration) and 4 (resting respiration), and phospholipid peroxidation. Both, Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) produced decreases in O2 consumption in a concentration-dependent manner in active state 3: both ions by 42% with malate-glutamate as complex I substrate (concentration for half maximal response (C50) 60μM Cu(2+) and 1.25mM Fe(3+)), and with succinate as complex II substrate: 64-69% with C50 of 50μM Cu(2+) and with C50 of 1.25mM of Fe(3+). Respiratory control decreased with Cu(2+) (C50 50μM) and Fe(3+) (C50 1.25-1-75mM) with both substrates. Cu(2+) produced a 2-fold increase and Fe(3+) a 5-fold increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) content from 25μM Cu(2+) (C50 40μM) and from 100μM Fe(3+) (C50 1.75mM). Supplementations with Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) ions induce mitochondrial dysfunction with phospholipid peroxidation in rat liver mitochondria. Although is proved that a Fenton/Haber Weiss mechanism of oxidative damage occurs in metal-ion induced mitochondrial toxicity, slightly different responses to the metal ions suggest some differences in the mechanism of intracellular toxicity. The decreased rates of mitochondrial respiration and the alteration of mitochondrial function by phospholipid and protein oxidations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular dyshomeostasis and cell death.

  5. Comparative Study of Serum Copper, Iron, Magnesium, and Zinc in Type 2 Diabetes-Associated Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al Jameil, Noura; Arjumand, Sadia; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Tabassum, Hajera; Alenzi, Naif; Hijazy, Sereen; Alenzi, Samyah; Subaie, Sahar; Fatima, Sabiha

    2015-12-01

    Trace element (TE) disturbances are well noted in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its associated complications. In present study, the effect of proteinuria on serum copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), and zinc (Zn) in T2DM patients with and without proteinuria was seen. Total subjects were aged between 30 and 90 years; 73 had proteinuria, 76 had T2DM with proteinuria, 76 had T2DM, and 75 were controls. Serum Cu(II), Fe(III), Mg(II), and Zn(II) were assayed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Urinary albumin estimation was performed by turbidimetric method. Other biochemical parameters were analyzed by ROCHE Module COBAS 6000 analyzer. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) at P<0.0001 followed by t test. Pearson correlation was applied to estimate the effect of proteinuria on TE. Serum Cu(II) level was increased in T2DM patients with proteinuria while Fe(III) was found elevated in T2DM (P<0.0001) compared to control groups. Zn(II) and Mg(II) were significantly low in proteinuria, T2DM with proteinuria, and T2DM (P<0.0001) compare to controls. Serum Cu(II) showed strong positive association with albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) in T2DM with proteinuria group and T2DM group (P<0.01). Fe(III) was positively and Zn(II) was negatively associated with ACR at P<0.10, in T2DM with proteinuria group. Mg(II) was negatively linked with ACR P<0.01 in proteinuria, T2DM with proteinuria, and T2DM group. TE were observed more disturbed in T2DM with proteinuria group, thus considered to be the part of T2DM routine checkup and restricts the disease towards its progression.

  6. Factors Influencing the DNA Nuclease Activity of Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, and Copper Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological coreactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-order rate constants for DNAsupercoiled to DNAnicked conversion up to 2.5 ×106 M-1min-1, and for DNAnicked to DNAlinear up to 7 ×105 M-1min-1. Relative rates of radical generation and characterization of radical species were determined by reaction with the fluorescent radical probe TEMPO-9-AC and rhodamine B. Ascorbate turnover rate constants ranging from 9.1×10-3 to 8.2 min-1 were determined, although many complexes demonstrated no measureable activity. Inhibition and Freifelder-Trumbo analysis of DNA cleavage supported concerted cleavage of dsDNA by a metal associated ROS in the case of Cu2+(aq), Cu-KGHK, Co-KGHK, and Cu-NTA and stepwise cleavage for Fe2+(aq), Cu-cyclam, Cu-cyclen, Co-cyclen, Cu-EDTA, Ni-EDTA, Co-EDTA, Cu-GGH, and Co-NTA. Reduction potentials varied over the range from -362 mV to +1111 mV versus NHE, and complexes demonstrated optimal catalytic activity in the range of the physiological redox coreactants ascorbate and peroxide (-66 to +380 mV). PMID:21815680

  7. The acute toxicity of iron and copper: biomolecule oxidation and oxidative damage in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Boveris, Alberto; Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Torti, Horacio; Massot, Francisco; Repetto, Marisa G

    2012-11-01

    The transition metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are needed at low levels for normal health and at higher levels they become toxic for humans and animals. The acute liver toxicity of Fe and Cu was studied in Sprague Dawley male rats (200 g) that received ip 0-60 mg/kg FeCl(2) or 0-30 mg/kg CuSO(4). Dose and time-responses were determined for spontaneous in situ liver chemiluminescence, phospholipid lipoperoxidation, protein oxidation and lipid soluble antioxidants. The doses linearly defined the tissue content of both metals. Liver chemiluminescence increased 4 times and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses at contents (C(50%)) of 110 μgFe/g and 42 μgCu/g liver, and with half maximal time responses (t(1/2)) of 4h for both metals. Phospholipid peroxidation increased 4 and 1.8 times with C(50%) of 118 μg Fe/g and 45 μg Cu/g and with t(1/2) of 7h and 8h. Protein oxidation increased 1.6 times for Fe with C(50%) at 113 μg Fe/g and 1.2 times for Cu with 50 μg Cu/g and t(1/2) of 4h and 5h respectively. The accumulation of Fe and Cu in liver enhanced the rate of free radical reactions and produced oxidative damage. A similar free radical-mediated process, through the formation HO(•) and RO(•) by a Fenton-like homolytic scission of H(2)O(2) and ROOH, seems to operate as the chemical mechanism for the liver toxicity of both metals.

  8. Fractionation of fulvic acid by iron and aluminum oxides: influence on copper toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathleen S.; James F. Ranville,; Emily K. Lesher,; Daniel J. Diedrich,; Diane M. McKnight,; Ruth M. Sofield,

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect on aquatic copper toxicity of the chemical fractionation of fulvic acid (FA) that results from its association with iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide precipitates. Fractionated and unfractionated FAs obtained from streamwater and suspended sediment were utilized in acute Cu toxicity tests on ,i>Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity test results with equal FA concentrations (6 mg FA/L) show that the fractionated dissolved FA was 3 times less effective at reducing Cu toxicity (EC50 13 ± 0.6 μg Cu/L) than were the unfractionated dissolved FAs (EC50 39 ± 0.4 and 41 ± 1.2 μg Cu/L). The fractionation is a consequence of preferential sorption of molecules having strong metal-binding (more aromatic) moieties to precipitating Fe- and Al-rich oxyhydroxides, causing the remaining dissolved FA to be depleted in these functional groups. As a result, there is more bioavailable dissolved Cu in the water and hence greater potential for Cu toxicity to aquatic organisms. In predicting Cu toxicity, biotic ligand models (BLMs) take into account dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration; however, unless DOC characteristics are accounted for, model predictions can underestimate acute Cu toxicity for water containing fractionated dissolved FA. This may have implications for water-quality criteria in systems containing Fe- and Al-rich sediment, and in mined and mineralized areas in particular. Optical measurements, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), show promise for use as spectral indicators of DOC chemical fractionation and inferred increased Cu toxicity.

  9. Nutritional status of lactating mothers and their breast milk concentration of iron, zinc and copper in rural Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Masayo; Ninh, Nguyen Xuan; Isomura, Haruhiko; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Hien, Vu Thi Thu; Nhug, Bui Thi; Nhien, Nguyen Van; Nakano, Takashi; Khan, Nguyen Cong; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2009-08-01

    Breast milk is considered to be the best nutrient source for infants. However, nutritional compositions of breast milk in developing countries, especially among malnourished women, have not been fully investigated. This study aimed to assess nutritional status and nutrient composition of breast milk in lactating mothers in rural Vietnam. Sixty breastfeeding mothers at 6 to 12 mo postpartum, free from any medical disorder and/or medication, and not pregnant were randomly selected in Yen The, Bac Giang, Vietnam. Their nutritional status, breast milk concentration and dietary intakes were assessed. Among the study participants, anemia (39.0%) and low serum zinc concentration (55.4%) were frequently observed. Dietary assessment revealed lower intakes of iron (10.2+/-2.5 mg/d) and zinc (10.4+/-2.2 mg/d) than estimated requirements. The breast milk concentration of iron, zinc and copper was 0.43+/-0.15 mg/L, 0.56 (0.37, 0.82) mg/L and 0.19+/-0.05 mg/L, respectively. The breast milk concentration of iron, zinc and copper was not correlated to the serum concentration or dietary intakes. In conclusion, we uncovered a high prevalence of anemia and zinc deficiency in lactating mothers in rural Vietnam. The findings demonstrate a low breast milk zinc concentration among the participants, but need further investigation.

  10. Microsequential injection lab-on-valve system for the spectrophotometric bi-parametric determination of iron and copper in natural waters.

    PubMed

    González, Alba; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Avivar, Jessica; Moniz, Tânia; Rangel, Maria; Cerdà, Víctor; Rangel, António O S S

    2017-05-15

    The determination of iron and copper exploiting a microsequential injection lab-on-valve system with online spectrophotometric detection is described. A new, environmental friendly 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelator, functionalized with a polyethylene glycol chain (MRB12) to improve water solubility, was used for iron determination. For copper determination, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used. Different parameters affecting the formation of the complexes were studied, namely sample volume, reagent concentration, and buffer composition and concentration. The optimized conditions, 150µL of sample volume and 250mgL(-1) of MRB12 for iron determination, and 200µL of sample and 120mgL(-1) of PAN for copper determination, enabled an LOD of 15 and 18µgL(-1) for iron and copper, respectively. The robustness of the developed procedure was assessed by the calculation of the relative standard deviation (RSD), 5% for iron determination and 2% for copper determination. The accuracy of the method was assessed comparing the results with two certified samples (RD<7.5%) and calculating recovery percentages with five river water samples (average<107%).

  11. Observed transitions in n = 2 ground configurations of copper, nickel, iron, chromium and germanium in tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnov, E.; Suckewer, S.; Cohen, S.; Sato, K.

    1981-11-01

    A number of spectrum lines of highly ionized copper, nickel, iron, chromium, and germanium have been observed and the corresponding transitions identified. The element under study is introduced into the discharge of the PLT Tokamak by means of rapid ablation by a laser pulse. The ionization state is generally distinguishable from the time behavior of the emitted light. New identifications of transitions are based on predicted wavelengths (from isoelectronic extrapolation and other data) and on approximate expected intensities. All the transitions pertain to the ground configurations of the respective ions, which are the only states strongly populated at tokamak plasma conditions. These lines are expected to be useful for spectroscopic plasma diagnostics in the 1-3 keV temperature range, and they provide direct measurement of intersystem energy separations from chromium through copper in the oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon isoelectronic sequences.

  12. Determination of copper, iron and zinc in spirituous beverages by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, T.; Marcó, L. M.; Alvarado, J.; Greaves, E. D.

    1999-10-01

    The concentration of copper in traditional homemade alcoholic distillates produced in Venezuela (Cocuy de Penca) were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) using vanadium as internal standard. The results were compared to those obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Three preparative methods of addition of vanadium were compared: classical internal standard addition, 'layer on layer' internal standard addition and in situ addition of internal standard. The TXRF procedures were accurate and the precision was comparable to that obtained by the FAAS technique. Copper levels were above the maximum allowed limits for similar beverages. Zinc and iron in commercial and homemade distilled beverages were also analyzed by TXRF with in situ addition of internal standard demonstrating the usefulness of this technique for trace metal determination in distillates.

  13. In vitro toxicological assessment of iron oxide, aluminium oxide and copper nanoparticles in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Rakhshinda; Khan, Qaiser Mahmood; Mobeen, Ameena; Hashmat, Amer Jamal

    2015-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) have a variety of applications in different industries including pharmaceutical industry where these NPs are used mainly for image analysis and drug delivery. The increasing interest in nanotechnology is largely associated with undefined risks to the human health and to the environment. Therefore, in the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of iron oxide, aluminium oxide and copper nanoparticles were evaluated using most commonly used assays i.e. Ames assay, in vitro cytotoxicity assay, micronucleus assay and comet assay. Cytotoxicity to bacterial cells was assessed in terms of colony forming units by using Escherichia coli (gram negative) and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive). Ames assay was carried out using two bacterial strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Genotoxicity of these NPs was evaluated following exposure to monkey kidney cell line, CHS-20. No cytotoxic and genotoxic effects were observed for iron oxide, and aluminium oxide NPs. Copper NPs were found mutagenic in TA98 and in TA100 and also found cytotoxic in dose dependent manner. Copper NPs induced significant (p < 0.01) increase in number of binucleated cells with micronuclei (96.6 ± 5.40) at the highest concentration (25 µg/mL). Copper NPs also induced DNA strand breaks at 10 µg/mL and oxidative DNA damage at 5 and 10 µg/mL. We consider these findings very useful in evaluating the genotoxic potential of NPs especially because of their increasing applications in human health and environment with limited knowledge of their toxicity and genotoxicity.

  14. The Role of Transition Metal Transporters for Iron, Zinc, Manganese, and Copper in the Pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Robert D.; Bobrov, Alexander G.; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic plague, encodes a multitude of Fe transport systems. Some of these are defective due to frameshift or IS element insertions, while others are functional in vitro but have no established role in causing infections. Indeed only 3 Fe transporters (Ybt, Yfe and Feo) have been shown to be important in at least one form of plague. The yersiniabactin (Ybt) system is essential in the early dermal/lymphatic stages of bubonic plague, irrelevant in the septicemic stage, and critical in pneumonic plague. Two Mn transporters have been characterized (Yfe and MntH). These two systems play a role in bubonic plague but the double yfe mntH mutant is fully virulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. The same in vivo phenotype occurs with a mutant lacking two (Yfe and Feo) of four ferrous transporters. A role for the Ybt siderophore in Zn acquisition has been revealed. Ybt-dependent Zn acquisition uses a transport system completely independent of the Fe-Ybt uptake system. Together Ybt components and ZnuABC play a critical role in Zn acquisition in vivo. Single mutants in either system retain high virulence in a mouse model of septicemic plague while the double mutant is completely avirulent. PMID:25891079

  15. The influence of aminopolycarboxylates on the sorption of copper (II) cations by (Hydro)oxides of iron, Aluminum, and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropacheva, T. N.; Antonova, A. S.; Kornev, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of some complexing agents of (poly)aminopolycarboxylic acids (diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and iminodiacetic acid (IDA)) on the sorption of Cu2+ by crystal and amorphous (hydr)oxides of Fe(III), Al(III), and Mn(IV) that are widespread mineral components of soils was studied. The obtained results are considered in terms of complex-formation in the solution and on the sorbent's surface. The effect of the complexing agents on the metal sorption (mobilization/immobilization) is determined by (1) the stability, structure, and sorption capability of compexonates formed in the solution; (2) the acidity, and (3) the nature of the sorbent. The desorption effect on Cu2+ cations was found to change in the following sequence of complexing agents: EDTA > DTPA ≫ NTA > IDA. The high-dentate complexing agents (EDTA, DTPA) had the greatest impact on ?u2+ cations bound with crystalline (hydr)oxides of Fe, Al, and Mn. The low denticity of the complexing agents (IDA, NTA) and binding of ?u2+ with amorphous sorbents leads to the weakening of desorption. The decrease in acidity promoted the mobilization of the metal under the influence of complexing agents; the increase in acidity caused its immobilization. The growth in the mobility of heavy metals bound with soil (hydr)oxides of Fe, Al, and Mn due to the complexing agents entering the surface and ground water is considered a factor of ecological risk.

  16. Digestibility and retention of zinc, copper, manganese, iron, calcium, and phosphorus in pigs fed diets containing inorganic or organic minerals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Ma, Y L; Zhao, J M; Vazquez-Añón, M; Stein, H H

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this experiment was to measure the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and the retention rate of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe in pigs fed either inorganic or organic sources of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. There were 2 types of diets (corn grits-based or corn-soybean meal [SBM]-based diets) and 3 micromineral treatments (basal micromineral premix [BMM], inorganic micromineral premix [IMM], and organic micromineral premix [OMM]). The BMM contained no added Zn, Cu, Mn, or Fe; the IMM microminerals were provided as sulfates of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe at 40, 50, 20, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. The OMM contained the same levels of the 4 microminerals as IMM, but Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe in this premix were provided by Zn(2-hydroxy-4-methylthio butanoic acid [HMTBa])2, Cu(HMTBa)2, Mn(HMTBa)2, and FeGly, respectively. Forty-eight barrows (initial BW: 31.1 ± 4.2 kg) were housed individually and allowed ad libitum access to the corn grits diet with BMM for 2 wk. All pigs were then moved to metabolism cages and randomly assigned to 1 of the 6 treatment diets with 8 replicates per diet. Fecal and urine samples were collected for 5 d following a 5-d adaptation period. Compared with corn grits diets, pigs fed corn-SBM diets had greater (P < 0.05) absorption and retention of Zn, Cu, and Mn but less (P < 0.05) ATTD of Zn and Cu. Compared with BMM, supplementation of IMM or OMM increased (P < 0.05) absorption, retention, ATTD, and retention rate of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe. Compared with IMM, adding OMM to the corn-SBM diet improved (P < 0.05) the absorption and retention of Cu and Mn and the ATTD of Cu, but these differences were not observed in the corn grits diets (interaction, P < 0.05). In addition, adding OMM to the corn-SBM diet increased (P < 0.05) absorption and retention of Zn and Fe and ATTD of Zn, Mn, and Fe compared with adding IMM to the corn-SBM diet. Supplementation of OMM also increased (P < 0.05) the ATTD and retention rate of P in corn-SBM diets. Results indicate that Zn(HMTBa)2 has greater digestibility and Cu(HMTBa)2 and Mn(HMTBa)2 have greater digestibility and retention rates compared with their inorganic sulfates, if included in a corn-SBM diet. Supplementation of organic microminerals also improves the digestibility of P in a corn-SBM diet.

  17. Extracellular norepinephrine, norepinephrine receptor and transporter protein and mRNA levels are differentially altered in the developing rat brain due to dietary iron deficiency and manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Fordahl, Steven C; Cooney, Paula T; Weaver, Tara L; Colyer, Christa L; Erikson, Keith M

    2009-07-24

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element, but overexposure is characterized by Parkinson's like symptoms in extreme cases. Previous studies have shown that Mn accumulation is exacerbated by dietary iron deficiency (ID) and disturbances in norepinephrine (NE) have been reported. Because behaviors associated with Mn neurotoxicity are complex, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of Mn exposure and ID-associated Mn accumulation on NE uptake in synaptosomes, extracellular NE concentrations, and expression of NE transport and receptor proteins. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four dietary groups: control (CN; 35 mg Fe/kg diet), iron-deficient (ID; 6 mg Fe/kg diet), CN with Mn exposure (via the drinking water; 1 g Mn/L) (CNMn), and ID with Mn (IDMn). (3)H-NE uptake decreased significantly (R=-0.753, p=0.001) with increased Mn concentration in the locus coeruleus, while decreased Fe was associated with decreased uptake of (3)H-NE in the caudate putamen (R=0.436, p=0.033) and locus coeruleus (R=0.86; p<0.001). Extracellular concentrations of NE in the caudate putamen were significantly decreased in response to Mn exposure and ID (p<0.001). A diverse response of Mn exposure and ID was observed on mRNA and protein expression of NE transporter (NET) and alpha(2) adrenergic receptor. For example, elevated brain Mn and decreased Fe caused an approximate 50% decrease in NET and alpha(2) adrenergic receptor protein expression in several brain regions, with reductions in mRNA expression also observed. These data suggest that Mn exposure results in a decrease in NE uptake and extracellular NE concentrations via altered expression of transport and receptor proteins.

  18. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  19. Manganese oxide supported on gold/iron as a water-oxidizing catalyst in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maedeh; Zand, Zahra

    2016-05-31

    Herein, we reported that KMnO4 with iron nanoparticles coated with gold layers was a promising catalyst for water oxidation. The compound was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The new compound was a conductive, recyclable, highly dispersible, magnetically separable, environmentally friendly, and nano-sized catalyst for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate or Ru(bpy)3(3+) and electrochemical water oxidation. The turnover frequency of Mn oxide/gold/iron for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate is 0.4 mmol O2 per mol Mn per second, which shows that this catalyst is among the best Mn-based catalysts for water oxidation. We also showed a strategy for placing this catalyst on the surface of an electrode without adding any other compounds.

  20. Effect of iron-manganese-sepiolite as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Li, Weiguang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Wu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of iron (Fe)-manganese (Mn)-sepiolite, as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge. During the short-term exposure experiments, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased from 73.1% to 64.1% with the presence of 100mg/L of catalyst. However, long-term exposure to the catalyst did not significantly affect the COD removal efficiency (81.8%) as compared to the control (83.5%). Meanwhile, the absorption peaks of coenzyme F420 in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge samples were remarkable by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. After long-term exposure, the presence of the catalyst increased secretions of EPS from 83.7mg/g VSS to 89.1mg/g VSS. Further investigations with high throughput sequencing indicated that the abundance of Methanosaeta increased from 57.7% to 70.4% after long-term exposure. In bacterial communities, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Synergistetes were predominant.

  1. Manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide-graphene magnetic nanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, and application for the arsenic(III)-sorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Gupta, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup Kumar; De, Amitabha; Banerjee, Sangam; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2012-12-01

    High specific surface area of graphene (GR) has gained special scientific attention in developing magnetic GR nanocomposite aiming to apply for the remediation of diverse environmental problems like point-of-use water purification and simultaneous separation of contaminants applying low external magnetic field (<1.0 T) from ground water. Fabrication of magnetic manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide (Mn x 2+Fe2- x 3+O4 2-) (IMBO)-GR nanocomposite is reported by exfoliating the GR layers. Latest microscopic, spectroscopic, powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device characterizations showed that the material is a magnetic nanocomposite with high specific surface area (280 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.3362 cm3 g-1). Use of this composite for the immobilization of carcinogenic As(III) from water at 300 K and pH 7.0 showed that the nanocomposite has higher binding efficiency with As(III) than the IMBO owing to its high specific surface area. The composite showed almost complete (>99.9 %) As(III) removal (≤10 μg L-1) from water. External magnetic field of 0.3 T efficiently separated the water dispersed composite (0.01 g/10 mL) at room temperature (300 K). Thus, this composite is a promising material which can be used effectively as a potent As(III) immobilizer from the contaminated groundwater (>10 μg L-1) to improve drinking water quality.

  2. Hydroxyapatite formation on titania-based materials in a solution mimicking body fluid: Effects of manganese and iron addition in anatase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Euisup; Kim, Ill Yong; Cho, Sung Baek; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite formation on the surfaces of implanted materials plays an important role in osteoconduction of bone substitutes in bone tissues. Titania hydrogels are known to instigate hydroxyapatite formation in a solution mimicking human blood plasma. To date, the relationship between the surface characteristics of titania and hydroxyapatite formation on its surface remains unclear. In this study, titania powders with varying surface characteristics were prepared by addition of manganese or iron to examine hydroxyapatite formation in a type of simulated body fluid (Kokubo solution). Hydroxyapatite formation was monitored by observation of deposited particles with scale-like morphology on the prepared titania powders. The effect of the titania surface characteristics, i.e., crystal structure, zeta potential, hydroxy group content, and specific surface area, on hydroxyapatite formation was examined. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed on the surface of titania powders that were primarily anatase, and featured a negative zeta potential and low specific surface areas irrespective of the hydroxy group content. High specific surface areas inhibited the formation of hydroxyapatite because calcium and phosphate ions were mostly consumed by adsorption on the titania surface. Thus, these surface characteristics of titania determine its osteoconductivity following exposure to body fluid.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  4. Chemical versus Enzymatic Digestion of Contaminated Estuarine Sediment: Relative Importance of Iron and Manganese Oxides in Controlling Trace Metal Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A.; Olsen, Y. S.

    2000-12-01

    Chemical and enzymatic reagents have been employed to determine available concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in contaminated estuarine sediment. Gastric and intestinal enzymes (pepsin, pH 2, and trypsin, pH 7·6, respectively) removed significantly more metal than was water-soluble or exchangeable (by seawater or ammonium acetate), while gastro-intestinal fluid of the demersal teleost, Pleuronectes platessa L. (plaice), employed to operationally define a bioavailable fraction of contaminants, generally solubilized more metal than the model enzymes. Manganese was considerably more available than Fe under these conditions and it is suggested that the principal mechanism of contaminant release is via surface complexation and reductive solubilization of Mn oxides, a process which is enhanced under conditions of low pH. Of the chemical reagents tested, acetic acid best represents the fraction of Mn (as well as Cu and Zn) which is available under gastro-intestinal conditions, suggesting that the reducing tendency of acetate is similar to that of the ligands encountered in the natural digestive environment. Although the precise enzymatic and non-enzymatic composition of plaice gastro-intestinal fluid may be different to that encountered in more representative, filter-feeding or burrowing organisms, a general implication of this study is that contaminants associated with Mn oxides are significantly more bioavailable than those associated with Fe oxides, and that contaminant bioavailability may be largely dictated by the oxidic composition of contaminated sediment.

  5. Copper mobility in the Eastern Creek Volcanics, Mount Isa, Australia: evidence from laser ablation ICP-MS of iron-titanium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Melissa J.

    2006-10-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Eastern Creek Volcanics are a series of copper-rich tholeiitic basalts which occur adjacent to the giant sediment-hosted Mount Isa copper deposit in Queensland, Australia. The volcanic rocks are often cited as the source of metals for the deposit. New laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of iron-titanium oxides from the basalts provide evidence for the local mobilisation of copper during regional greenschist facies metamorphism. This interpretation is based on the observation that copper-bearing magmatic titanomagnetite was destabilised during greenschist facies metamorphism, and the new magnetite which crystallised was copper poor. Petrological observations, regional geochemical signatures and geochemical modelling suggest that the mobilised copper was concentrated in syn-metamorphic epidote-rich alteration zones, creating a pre-concentration of copper before the main mineralisation event at Mount Isa. Geochemical modelling demonstrates this process is enhanced by the addition of CO2 from adjacent carbonate-rich sediments during metamorphic devolatilisation. Regional geochemical data illustrate elevated copper concentrations in epidote-rich zones (high CaO), but where these zones are overprinted by potassic alteration (high K2O), copper is depleted. A two-stage model is proposed whereby after metamorphic copper enrichment in epidote-titanite alteration zones, an oxidised potassium-rich fluid leached copper from the epidote-altered metabasalts and deposited it in the overlying sedimentary rocks to form the Mount Isa copper deposit. This ore-forming fluid is expressed regionally as potassium feldspar-rich veins and locally as biotite-rich alteration, which formed around major fluid conduits between the metabasalt metal source rocks and the overlying deposit host sequence. This model is consistent with the remobilisation of copper from mafic source rocks, as has been found at other world-class copper deposits.

  6. The Yin and Yang of copper during infection.

    PubMed

    Besold, Angelique N; Culbertson, Edward M; Culotta, Valeria C

    2016-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for both pathogens and the animal hosts they infect. However, copper can also be toxic in cells due to its redox properties and ability to disrupt active sites of metalloproteins, such as Fe-S enzymes. Through these toxic properties, copper is an effective antimicrobial agent and an emerging concept in innate immunity is that the animal host intentionally exploits copper toxicity in antimicrobial weaponry. In particular, macrophages can attack invading microbes with high copper and this metal is also elevated at sites of lung infection. In addition, copper levels in serum rise during infection with a wide array of pathogens. To defend against this toxic copper, the microbial intruder is equipped with a battery of copper detoxification defenses that promote survival in the host, including copper exporting ATPases and copper binding metallothioneins. However, it is important to remember that copper is also an essential nutrient for microbial pathogens and serves as important cofactor for enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase for respiration, superoxide dismutase for anti-oxidant defense and multi-copper oxidases that act on metals and organic substrates. We therefore posit that the animal host can also thwart pathogen growth by limiting their copper nutrients, similar to the well-documented nutritional immunity effects for starving microbes of essential zinc, manganese and iron micronutrients. This review provides both sides of the copper story and evaluates how the host can exploit either copper-the-toxin or copper-the-nutrient in antimicrobial tactics at the host-pathogen battleground.

  7. Methods for accelerating nitrate reduction using zerovalent iron at near-neutral pH: effects of H2-reducing pretreatment and copper deposition.

    PubMed

    Liou, Y H; Lo, S L; Lin, C I; Hu, C Y; Kuan, W H; Weng, S C

    2005-12-15

    Both surface treatments, H2-reducing pretreatment at 400 degrees C and the deposition of copper as a catalyst, were attempted to enhance the removal of nitrate (40 (mg N) L(-1)) using zerovalent iron in a HEPES buffered solution at a pH of between 6.5 and 7.5. After the iron surface was pretreated with hydrogen gas, the removal of the passive oxide layers that covered the iron was indicated by the decline in the oxygen fraction (energy dispersive X-ray analysis) and the overlap of the cyclic polarization curves. The reaction rate was doubled, and the lag of the early period disappeared. Then, the deposition of copper onto freshly pretreated iron promoted nitrate degradation more effectively than that onto a nonpretreated iron surface, because of the high dispersion and small size of the copper particles. An optimum of 0.25-0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe accelerated the rate by more than six times that of the nonpretreated iron. The aged 0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe with continual dipping in nitrate solution for 20 days completely restored its reactivity by a regeneration process with H2 reduction. Hence, these two iron surface treatments considerably promoted the removal of nitrate from near-neutral water; the reactivity of Cu/Fe was effectively recovered.

  8. Dissolution of copper, tin, and iron from sintered tungsten-bronze spheres in a simulated avian gizzard, and an assessment of their potential toxicity to birds.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vernon G; McGill, Ian R

    2008-05-15

    The rates of dissolution of copper, tin, and iron from sintered tungsten-bronze spheres (51.1%W, 44.4%Cu, 3.9%Sn, 0.6%Fe, by mass) were measured in an in vitro simulated avian gizzard at pH 2.0, and 42C. Most of the spheres had disintegrated completely to a fine powder by day 14. Dissolution of copper, tin, and iron from the spheres was linear over time; all r>0.974; all P<0.001. The mean rate of release of copper, tin, and iron was 30.4 mg, 2.74 mg, and 0.38 mg per g tungsten-bronze per day, respectively. These rates of metal release were compared to those in published studies to determine whether the simultaneous ingestion of eight spheres of 3.48 mm diameter would pose a toxic risk to birds. The potential absorption rates of iron and tin (0.54 mg Fe/day, and 3.89 mg Sn/day) from eight tungsten-bronze spheres of total mass 1.42 g would not prove toxic, based on empirical studies of tin and iron ingestion in waterfowl. The release of 43.17 mg copper/day from eight tungsten-bronze spheres, while exceeding the daily copper requirements of domesticated birds, is far below the levels of copper known to cause copper toxicosis in birds. We conclude that sintered tungsten-bronze material made into gunshot, fishing weights, or wheel balance weights, would not pose a toxic risk to wild birds when ingested.

  9. Iron promotes protein insolubility and aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Ida M.; Schilling, Birgit; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Andersen, Julie K.; Swoboda, Peter; Killilea, David W.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Lithgow, Gordon J.

    2014-01-01

    Many late-onset proteotoxic diseases are accompanied by a disruption in homeostasis of metals (metallostasis) including iron, copper and zinc. Although aging is the most prominent risk factor for these disorders, the impact of aging on metallostasis and its role in proteotoxic disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, it is not clear whether a loss of metallostasis influences normal aging. We have investigated the role of metallostasis in longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that calcium, copper, iron, and manganese levels increase as a function of age, while potassium and phosphorus levels tend to decrease. Increased dietary iron significantly accelerated the age-related accumulation of insoluble protein, a molecular pathology of aging. Proteomic analysis revealed widespread effects of dietary iron in multiple organelles and tissues. Pharmacological interventions to block accumulation of specific metals attenuated many models of proteotoxicity and extended normal lifespan. Collectively, these results suggest that a loss of metallostasis with aging contributes to age-related protein aggregation. PMID:25554795

  10. Does an infrasonic acoustic shock wave resonance of the manganese 3+ loaded/copper depleted prion protein initiate the pathogenesis of TSE?

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Intensive exposures to natural and artificial sources of infrasonic acoustic shock (tectonic disturbances, supersonic aeroplanes, etc.) have been observed in ecosystems supporting mammalian populations that are blighted by clusters of traditional and new variant strains of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). But TSEs will only emerge in those 'infrasound-rich' environments which are simultaneously influenced by eco-factors that induce a high manganese (Mn)/low copper (Cu)-zinc (Zn) ratio in brains of local mammalian populations. Since cellular prion protein (PrPc) is a cupro-protein expressed throughout the circadian mediated pathways of the body, it is proposed that PrP's Cu component performs a role in the conduction and distribution of endogenous electromagnetic energy; energy that has been transduced from incoming ultraviolet, acoustic, geomagnetic radiations. TSE pathogenesis is initiated once Mn substitutes at the vacant Cu domain on PrPc and forms a nonpathogenic, protease resistant, 'sleeping' prion. A second stage of pathogenesis comes into play once a low frequency wave of infrasonic shock metamorphoses the piezoelectric atomic structure of the Mn 3+ component of the prion, thereby 'priming' the sleeping prion into its fully fledged, pathogenic TSE isoform - where the paramagnetic status of the Mn 3+ atom is transformed into a stable ferrimagnetic lattice work, due to the strong electron-phonon coupling resulting from the dynamic 'Jahn-Teller' type distortions of the oxygen octahedra specific to the trivalent Mn species. The so called 'infectivity' of the prion is a misnomer and should be correctly defined as the contagious field inducing capacity of the ferrimagnetic Mn 3+ component of the prion; which remains pathogenic at all temperatures below the 'curie point'. A progressive domino-like 'metal to ligand to metal' ferrimagnetic corruption of the conduits of electromagnetic superexchange is initiated. The TSE diseased brain can be likened to

  11. Relative contribution of CTR1 and DMT1 in copper transport by the blood–CSF barrier: Implication in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Jingyuan; Zheng, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The homeostasis of copper (Cu) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is partially regulated by the Cu transporter-1 (CTR1) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) at the blood–CSF barrier (BCB) in the choroid plexus. Data from human and animal studies suggest an increased Cu concentration in blood, CSF, and brains following in vivo manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to investigate the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport under normal or Mn-exposed conditions using an immortalized choroidal Z310 cell line. Mn exposure in vitro resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake and the up-regulation of both CTR1 and DMT1. Knocking down CTR1 by siRNA counteracted the Mn-induced increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake, while knocking down DMT1 siRNA resulted in an increased cellular {sup 64}Cu uptake in Mn-exposed cells. To distinguish the roles of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport, the Z310 cell-based tetracycline (Tet)-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines were developed, namely iZCTR1 and iZDMT1 cells, respectively. In iZCTR1 cells, Tet induction led to a robust increase (25 fold) of {sup 64}Cu uptake with the time course corresponding to the increased CTR1. Induction of DMT1 by Tet in iZDMT1 cells, however, resulted in only a slight increase of {sup 64}Cu uptake in contrast to a substantial increase in DMT1 mRNA and protein expression. These data indicate that CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB in the choroid plexus. Mn-induced cellular overload of Cu at the BCB is due, primarily, to Mn-induced over-expression of CTR1. -- Highlights: ► This study compares the relative role of CTR1 and DMT1 in Cu transport by the BCB. ► Two novel tetracycline-inducible CTR1 and DMT1 expression cell lines are created. ► CTR1, but not DMT1, plays an essential role in transporting Cu by the BCB. ► Mn-induced cellular Cu overload is due to its induction of CTR1 rather than DMT1. ► Induction of CTR1 by Mn in the BCB

  12. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-04

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide.

  13. Does mercury promote lipid peroxidation? An in vitro study concerning mercury, copper, and iron in peroxidation of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Kari; Soininen, Pasi; Salonen, Jukka T; Lötjönen, Simo; Laatikainen, Reino

    2004-11-01

    In order to explore the observed association among mercury, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease, the effects of mercury, copper, and iron on the peroxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and on the enzymatic activities of glutathione peroxidase and myeloperoxidase were investigated in vitro. On the basis of our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, we conclude that mercury does not promote the direct nonenzymatic peroxidation of LDL, like copper and iron. In our enzyme measurements, mercury inhibited slightly myeloperoxidase, although not significantly in presence of LDL. Instead, inorganic mercury, but not methylmercury chloride, inhibited glutathione peroxidase effectively and copper even at 10 micromol/L, below physiological concentrations, doubled the inhibition rate. Copper and iron had no direct effect on glutathione peroxidase, but they both seem to activate production of HOCl by myeloperoxidase. We conclude here that, first, mercury and methylmercury do not promote direct lipid peroxidation, but that, second, a simultaneous exposure to high inorganic mercury, copper, and iron and low selenium concentrations can lead to a condition in which mercury promotes lipid peroxidations. This mechanism provides a plausible molecular-level explanation for the observed association between high body mercury content and atherosclerosis.

  14. Magnetic and gravity gradiometry framework for Mesoproterozoic iron oxide-apatite and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Phillips, Jeffrey; Driscoll, Rhonda L.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution airborne magnetic and gravity gradiometry data provide the geophysical framework for evaluating the exploration potential of hidden iron oxide deposits in Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of southeast Missouri. The data are used to calculate mineral prospectivity for iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ± rare earth element (REE) and iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits. Results delineate the geophysical footprints of all known iron oxide deposits and reveal several previously unrecognized prospective areas. The airborne data are also inverted to three-dimensional density and magnetic susceptibility models over four concealed deposits at Pea Ridge (IOA ± REE), Boss (IOCG), Kratz Spring (IOA), and Bourbon (IOCG). The Pea Ridge susceptibility model shows a magnetic source that is vertically extensive and traceable to a depth of greater than 2 km. A smaller density source, located within the shallow Precambrian basement, is partly coincident with the magnetic source at Pea Ridge. In contrast, the Boss models show a large (625-m-wide), vertically extensive, and coincident dense and magnetic stock with shallower adjacent lobes that extend more than 2,600 m across the shallow Precambrian paleosurface. The Kratz Spring deposit appears to be a smaller volume of iron oxides and is characterized by lower density and less magnetic rock compared to the other iron deposits. A prospective area identified south of the Kratz Spring deposit shows the largest volume of coincident dense and nonmagnetic rock in the subsurface, and is interpreted as prospective for a hematite-dominant lithology that extends from the top of the Precambrian to depths exceeding 2 km. The Bourbon deposit displays a large bowl-shaped volume of coincident high density and high-magnetic susceptibility rock, and a geometry that suggests the iron mineralization is vertically restricted to the upper parts of the Precambrian basement. In order to underpin the evaluation of the prospectivity and three

  15. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  16. Iron, copper, and zinc transport: inhibition of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) by shRNA.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Alejandra; Le Blanc, Solange; Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando; Ruz, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) fulfill various essential biological functions and are vital for all living organisms. They play important roles in oxygen transport, cell growth and differentiation, neurotransmitter synthesis, myelination, and synaptic transmission. Because of their role in many critical functions, they are commonly used in food fortification and supplementation strategies globally. To determine the involvement of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) on Fe, Cu, and Zn uptake, Caco-2 cells were transfected with four different shRNA plasmids to selectively inhibit DMT1 or hCTR1 transporter expression. Fe and Cu uptake and total Zn content measurements were performed in shRNA-DMT1 and shRNA-hCTR1 cells. Both shRNA-DMT1 and shRNA-hCTR1 cells had lower apical Fe uptake (a decrease of 51% and 41%, respectively), Cu uptake (a decrease of 25.8% and 38.5%, respectively), and Zn content (a decrease of 23.1% and 22.7%, respectively) compared to control cells. These results confirm that DMT1 is involved in active transport of Fe, Cu, and Zn although Zn showed a different relative capacity. These results also show that hCTR1 is able to transport Fe and Zn.

  17. Circulating Immune Complexes and trace elements (Copper, Iron and Selenium) as markers in oral precancer and cancer : a randomised, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Sunali S; Karjodkar, Freny R

    2006-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the levels of circulating immune complexes, trace elements (copper, iron and selenium) in serum of patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), oral leukoplakia (L), and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), analyze the alteration and identify the best predictors amongst these parameters for disease occurrence and progression. Methods Circulating immune complexes (CIC) were estimated using 37.5% Polyethylene Glycol 6000(PEG) serum precipitation. Serum estimation of copper (Cu), Iron (Fe) and selenium (Se) was done using the Oxalyl Dihydrazide method, Colorimetric Dipyridyl method and the Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltametry respectively. Results The data analysis revealed increased circulating immune complex levels in the precancer and cancer patients. Serum copper levels showed gradual increase from precancer to cancer patients. However, serum iron levels were decreased significantly in the cancer group. Selenium levels showed marked decrease in the cancer group. Among CIC, serum, copper, iron and selenium the best predictors for the occurrence of lesions were age, serum iron, CIC, serum selenium in the decreasing order. Conclusion The present study shows that these immunological and biological markers may be associated with the pathogenesis of oral premalignant and malignant lesions and their progressions. Concerted efforts would, therefore, help in early detection, management, and monitoring the efficacy of treatment. PMID:17040577

  18. Adsorption of low concentration ceftazidime from aqueous solutions using impregnated activated carbon promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, three impregnated activated carbon IAC (AC-Cu, AC-Fe, and AC-Al) promoted by Iron, Copper and Aluminum were used for adsorption of ceftazidime. Iron(III), Copper(II) and Aluminum(III) nitrate were used as an impregnant. The IACs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The influence of factors, such as ion strength, pH, temperature, initial concentration, and concentration of natural organic matter organic matter on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of ceftazidime were studied for the three IACs. The results showed that the adsorption was accurately represented by pseudo-second order model. Under different temperature, the maximum adsorption quantity of ceftazidime on AC-Cu calculated by pseudo-second order kinetic model were 200.0 mg g-1 (298 K), 196.1 mg g-1 (303 K) and 185.2 mg g-1 (308 K). It was much higher than that of AC-Fe and AC-Al. And the process was controlled by both film diffusion and intra particle mass transport. The results also showed that, the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm fit the adsorption well.

  19. Enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal from effluent by sulfate-reducing bacteria with copper-iron bimetallic particles support.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Chen, Yongzhe; Yang, Ming; Li, Wenkai; Deng, Le

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of copper-iron bimetallic particles supported sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in enhancing the reduction of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) in effluent. The results showed that the copper-iron bimetallic particles can enhance Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal and the resistance of the sulfate-reducing bacteria towards metals toxicity, the inhibiting concentration of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) for SRB was significantly increased (from 100 to 200 mg/L for Cu(2+) and 300 to 400 mg/L for Zn(2+)). The removal efficiencies of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (initial concentration 100 mg/L) were 98.17% and 99.67% in SRB-Cu/Fe system after 48 h, while only 29.83% Cu(2+), 90.88% Zn(2+) and 63.81% Cu(2+), 72.63% Zn(2+) were removed in the SRB and Cu/Fe system at the same condition.

  20. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  1. A role for copper in protozoan grazing - two billion years selecting for bacterial copper resistance.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiuli; Lüthje, Freja; Rønn, Regin; German, Nadezhda A; Li, Xuanji; Huang, Fuyi; Kisaka, Javan; Huffman, David; Alwathnani, Hend A; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    The Great Oxidation Event resulted in integration of soft metals in a wide range of biochemical processes including, in our opinion, killing of bacteria by protozoa. Compared to pressure from anthropologic copper contamination, little is known on impacts of protozoan predation on maintenance of copper resistance determinants in bacteria. To evaluate the role of copper and other soft metals in predatory mechanisms of protozoa, we examined survival of bacteria mutated in different transition metal efflux or uptake systems in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our data demonstrated a strong correlation between the presence of copper/zinc efflux as well as iron/manganese uptake, and bacterial survival in amoebae. The growth of protozoa, in turn, was dependent on bacterial copper sensitivity. The phagocytosis of bacteria induced upregulation of Dictyostelium genes encoding the copper uptake transporter p80 and a triad of Cu(I)-translocating PIB -type ATPases. Accumulated Cu(I) in Dictyostelium was monitored using a copper biosensor bacterial strain. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cu(I) is ultimately involved in protozoan predation of bacteria, supporting our hypothesis that protozoan grazing selected for the presence of copper resistance determinants for about two billion years.

  2. Concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel in boar semen and relation to the spermatozoa quality.

    PubMed

    Massányi, Peter; Trandzík, Jozef; Nad, Pavol; Koréneková, Beáta; Skalická, Magdaléna; Toman, Robert; Lukác, Norbert; Strapák, Peter; Halo, Marko; Turcan, Ján

    2003-01-01

    The concentration of copper, iron, zinc, cadmium, lead, and nickel as well as its relation to spermatozoa quality was investigated. The semen samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The concentration of copper in boar semen was 1.64 +/- 0.28 mg kg(-1) and of iron 16.14 +/- 10.35 mg kg(-1). The concentration of zinc in boar semen reached an average value of 171.74 +/- 64.72 mg kg(-1) and the level of cadmium reached 0.01-0.16 mg kg(-1) with the average value of 0.05 mg kg(-1). The analysis of lead showed that the concentration of this element in boar semen was 0.02 +/- 0.03 mg kg(-1) and the average level of nickel was 0.06 +/- 0.08 mg kg(-1). The total percentage of pathological spermatozoa was 9.82 +/- 1.47%. Detail analysis determined 3.18% of separated flagellum, 2.26% knob twisted flagellum, 0.88% flagellum torso, 0.85% flagellum ball, 0.42% broken flagellum, 0.23% retention of the cytoplasmic drop, 0.14% small heads, 0.03% large heads, and 1.83% forms other of pathological changes. Correlation analysis showed significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation between copper and lead (r = 0.52). High correlation between small head and knob twisted tail (r = 0.67), small head and broken flagellum (r = 0.88) as well as between small head and total number of pathological spermatozoa (r = 0.73) was determined.

  3. Different mechanisms between copper and iron in catecholamines-mediated oxidative DNA damage and disruption of gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Yoshihiko; Ando, Motozumi; Makino, Rena; Ueda, Koji; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Kojima, Nakao

    2011-07-01

    Catechols produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative DNA damage through reduction-oxidation reactions with metals such as copper. Here, we examined oxidative DNA damage by neurotransmitter catecholamines in the presence of copper or iron and evaluated the effects of this damage on gene expression in vitro. Dopamine induced strand breaks and base oxidation in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II) or Fe(III)-NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid). The extent of this damage was greater for Cu(II) than for Fe(III)-NTA. For the DNA damage induced by dopamine, the responsible reactive species were hydrogen peroxide and Cu(I) for Cu(II) and hydroxyl radicals and Fe(II) for Fe(III)-NTA. Cu(II) induced DNA conformational changes, but Fe(III)-NTA did not in the presence of dopamine. These differences indicate different modes of action between Cu and Fe-NTA with regard to the induction of DNA damage. Expression of the lacZ gene coded on plasmid DNA was inhibited depending on the extent of the oxidative damage and strand breaks. Endogenous catecholamines (dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) were more potent than catechols (no aminoalkyl side chains) or 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (aminomethyl side chain). These results suggest that the metal-mediated DNA damage induced by dopamine disrupts gene expression, and leukoaminochromes (further oxidation products of O-quinones having aminoethyl side chain) are involved in the DNA damage. These findings indicate a possibility that metal (especially iron and copper)-mediated oxidation of catecholamines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease.

  4. The resistance to embrittlement by a hydrogen environment of selected high strength iron-manganese base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. B., Jr.; Kim, D. K.; Atteridge, D.; Gerberich, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    Fe-16Mn and Fe-25Mn base alloys, which had been cold worked to yield strength levels of 201 and 178 KSI, were resistant to degradation of mechanical properties in a one atmosphere hydrogen environment at ambient temperature under the loading conditions employed in this investigation. Transmission electron microscopy established that bands of epsilon phase martensite and fcc mechanical twins were formed throughout the fcc matrix when these alloys were cold worked. In the cold worked alloys a high density of crystal defects were observed associated with both types of strain induced structures, which should contribute significantly to the strengthening of these alloys. High strength iron base alloys can be produced which appear to have some resistance to degradation of mechanical properties in a hydrogen environment under certain conditions.

  5. In vitro and in vivo corrosion properties of new iron-manganese alloys designed for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Drynda, Andreas; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm; Peuster, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    The principle of biodegradation for the production of temporary implant materials (e.g. stents) plays an important role in the treatment of congenital heart defects. In the last decade several attempts have been made with different alloy materials-mainly based on iron and magnesium. None of the currently available materials in this field have demonstrated satisfying results and have therefore not found entry into broad clinical practice. While magnesium or magnesium alloy systems corrode too fast, the corrosion rate of pure iron-stents is too slow for cardiovascular applications. In the last years FeMn alloy systems were developed with the idea that galvanic effects, caused by different electrochemical properties of Fe and Mn, would increase the corrosion rate. In vitro tests with alloys containing up to 30% Mn showed promising results in terms of biocompatibility. This study deals with the development of new FeMn alloy systems with lower Mn concentrations (FeMn 0.5 wt %, FeMn 2.7 wt %, FeMn 6.9 wt %) to avoid Mn toxicity. Our results show, that these alloys exhibit good mechanical features as well as suitable in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion properties. In contrast, the evaluation of these alloys in a mouse model led to unexpected results-even after 9 months no significant corrosion was detectable. Preliminary SEM investigations showed that passivation layers (FeMn phosphates) might be the reason for corrosion resistance. If this can be proved in further experiments, strategies to prevent or dissolve those layers need to be developed to expedite the in vivo corrosion of FeMn alloys.

  6. Effect of excess dietary iron as ferrous sulfate and excess dietary ascorbic acid on liver zinc, copper and sulfhydryl groups and the ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.H.; Adkins, J.S.; Harrison, B.

    1986-03-05

    Female guinea pigs of the NIH 13/N strain, weighing between 475 and 512 g, were fed diets supplemented with 50 to 2500 mg of iron per kg of diet as ferrous sulfate and 0.2 to 8.0 g of ascorbic acid per kg of diet. A significant effect was observed on tissue copper and zinc, ovary weight and liver protein sulfhydryl groups. The mean ovary weight for guinea pigs fed 2500 mg of iron was significantly less than that of animals fed 50 mg of iron, 0.045 +/- 0.012 g and 0.061 +/- 0.009 g, respectively. Liver zinc content of animals fed 2500 mg of iron and 200 mg of ascorbic acid per kg of diet was significantly less than that of animals fed 50 mg of iron and 200 mg of ascorbic acid, 16.3 +/- 3.3 ..mu..g and 19.6 +/- 1.6 ..mu..g, respectively. There was no difference in liver copper due to dietary iron, but when dietary ascorbic acid was increased to 8 g per kg of diet, there was a significant decrease (from 22.8 +/- 8.1 ..mu..g to 10.5 +/- 4.8 ..mu..g) in liver copper. Excess dietary ascorbic acid decreased ovarian zinc significantly when increased to 8 g per kg of diet, 2929 +/- 919 ..mu..g vs 1661 +/- 471 ..mu..g, respectively, when compared to the control group.

  7. The Fate of Malathion on Copper and Iron Piping Within a Water Distribution System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    attributed to the atmospheric corrosive protective coating as shown in Equation 6. Reactions between nitrogen, oxygen and possibly sulfur commenced...Where Cu, copper; reacts with O, oxygen; to form the corrosive protective coat that advances in the presence of water (Schweitzer, 1987). N2(g...copper, when exposed to some medium [i.e. air or water] produces a blue-green protective coating against oxidation. It is highly possible that exposure

  8. Magnetic iron oxide and manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticles for the collection of alpha-emitting radionuclides from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, R. Shane

    2016-10-31

    Magnetic nanoparticles are well known to possess chemically active surfaces and high surface areas that can be employed to extract a range of ions from aqueous solutions. Additionally, their paramagnetic property provides a convenient means for bulk collection of the material from solution after the targeted ions have been adsorbed. Herein, two nanoscale amphoteric metal oxides, each possessing useful magnetic attributes, were evaluated for their ability to collect both naturally occurring radioactive isotopes (polonium (Po), radium (Ra), and uranium (U)) as well as the transuranic element americium (Am) from a suite of naturally occurring aqueous matrices. The nanomaterials include commercially available paramagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) and magnetite that was modified to incorporate manganese (Mn) into the crystal structure. The chemical stability of these nanomaterials was evaluated in Hanford Site, WA ground water between the natural pH (~8) and pH 1 (acidified with HCl). Whereas the magnetite was observed to have good stability over the pH range, the Mn-doped material was observed to leach Mn at low pH. The materials were evaluated in parallel to characterize their uptake performance of the aforementioned alpha-emitting radionuclide spikes from Hanford Site ground water across a range of pH (from ~8 down to 2). In addition, radiotracer uptake experiments were performed on Columbia River water, seawater, and human urine at their natural pH and at pH 2. Despite the observed leaching of Mn from the Mn-doped nanomaterial in the lower pH range, it exhibited generally superior analyte extraction performance compared to the magnetite, and analyte uptake was observed across a broader pH range. The uptake behavior of the various radiotracers on these two materials at different pH levels can generally be explained by the amphoteric nature of the nanoparticle surfaces. Finally, the rate of sorption of the radiotracers on the two materials in unacidified groundwater was

  9. Magnetic iron oxide and manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticles for the collection of alpha-emitting radionuclides from aqueous solutions

    DOE PAGES

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Cynthia L.; ...

    2016-10-31

    Magnetic nanoparticles are well known to possess chemically active surfaces and large surface areas that can be employed to extract a range of ions from aqueous solutions. In addition, their superparamagnetic properties provide a convenient means for bulk collection of the material from solution after the targeted ions have been adsorbed. We evaluated two nanoscale amphoteric metal oxides, each possessing useful magnetic attributes for their ability to collect trace levels of a chemically diverse range of alpha emitting radioactive isotopes (polonium (Po), radium (Ra), uranium (U), and americium (Am)) from a wide range of aqueous solutions. The nanomaterials include commerciallymore » available magnetite (Fe3O4) and magnetite modified to incorporate manganese (Mn) into the crystal structure. The chemical stability of these nanomaterials was evaluated in Hanford Site, WA ground water between the natural pH (~8) and pH 1. Whereas the magnetite was observed to have good stability over the pH range, the Mn-doped material was observed to leach Mn at low pH. The materials were evaluated in parallel to characterize their uptake performance of the alpha-emitting radionuclide spikes from ground water across a range of pH (from ~8 down to 2). In addition, radiotracer uptake experiments were performed on Columbia River water, seawater, and human urine at their natural pH and at pH 2. Despite the observed leaching of Mn from the Mn-doped nanomaterial in the lower pH range, it exhibited generally superior analyte extraction performance compared to the magnetite, and analyte uptake was observed across a broader pH range. We show that the uptake behavior of the various radiotracers on these two materials at different pH levels can generally be explained by the amphoteric nature of the nanoparticle surfaces. Finally, the rate of sorption of the radiotracers on the two materials in unacidified ground water was evaluated. The uptake curves generally indicate that equilibrium is

  10. Magnetic iron oxide and manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticles for the collection of alpha-emitting radionuclides from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, R. Shane

    2016-10-31

    Magnetic nanoparticles are well known to possess chemically active surfaces and large surface areas that can be employed to extract a range of ions from aqueous solutions. In addition, their superparamagnetic properties provide a convenient means for bulk collection of the material from solution after the targeted ions have been adsorbed. We evaluated two nanoscale amphoteric metal oxides, each possessing useful magnetic attributes for their ability to collect trace levels of a chemically diverse range of alpha emitting radioactive isotopes (polonium (Po), radium (Ra), uranium (U), and americium (Am)) from a wide range of aqueous solutions. The nanomaterials include commercially available magnetite (Fe3O4) and magnetite modified to incorporate manganese (Mn) into the crystal structure. The chemical stability of these nanomaterials was evaluated in Hanford Site, WA ground water between the natural pH (~8) and pH 1. Whereas the magnetite was observed to have good stability over the pH range, the Mn-doped material was observed to leach Mn at low pH. The materials were evaluated in parallel to characterize their uptake performance of the alpha-emitting radionuclide spikes from ground water across a range of pH (from ~8 down to 2). In addition, radiotracer uptake experiments were performed on Columbia River water, seawater, and human urine at their natural pH and at pH 2. Despite the observed leaching of Mn from the Mn-doped nanomaterial in the lower pH range, it exhibited generally superior analyte extraction performance compared to the magnetite, and analyte uptake was observed across a broader pH range. We show that the uptake behavior of the various radiotracers on these two materials at different pH levels can generally be explained by the amphoteric nature of the nanoparticle surfaces. Finally, the rate of sorption of the radiotracers on the two materials in unacidified ground water was evaluated. The uptake curves generally indicate that equilibrium is obtained

  11. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-03-15

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1{alpha} protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1{alpha} hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1{alpha} degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1{alpha} protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation.

  12. Evaluation of the Accumulation of Trace Metals (as, U, CR, CU, PB, Zn) on Iron-Manganese Coatings on in Situ Stream Pebbles and Emplaced Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, M. M.; Blake, J.; Crossey, L. J.; Ali, A.; Hansson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to trace metals (As, U, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn) has potential negative health effects on human populations and wildlife. Geothermal waters often have elevated concentrations of trace elements and understanding the geochemical cycling of these elements can be challenging. Previous studies have utilized in situ stream pebbles and glass or ceramic substrates with iron-manganese oxide coatings to understand contamination and or chemical cycling. This project's main focus is to develop an ideal tracing method using adsorption onto substrate surfaces and to define key parameters that are necessary for the phenomenon of adsorption between trace metals and these surface coatings to occur. Sampling locations include the Jemez River and Rio San Antonio in the Jemez mountains, northern New Mexico. Both streams have significant geothermal inputs. Pebbles and cobbles were gathered from the active stream channel and 6mm glass beads and 2 X1 in. ceramic plates were placed in streams for three weeks to allow for coating accumulation. Factors such as leachate type, water pH, substrate type, coating accumulation period and leach time were all considered in this experiment. It was found that of the three leachates (aqua regia, 10% aqua regia and hydroxylamine), hydroxylamine was the most effective at leaching coatings without dissolving substrates. Samples leached with aqua regia and 10% aqua regia were found to lose weight and mass over the following 5, 7, and 10 day measurements. Glass beads were determined to be more effective than in stream pebbles as an accumulation substrate: coatings were more easily controlled and monitored. Samples leached with hydroxylamine for 5 hours and 72 hours showed little difference in their leachate concentrations, suggesting that leach time has little impact on the concentration of leachate samples. This research aims to find the best method for trace metal accumulation in streams to aid in understanding geochemical cycling.

  13. A Holocene record of endogenic iron and manganese precipitation and vegetation history in a lake-fen complex in northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Doner, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Little Shingobee Lake and Fen are part of the extensive network of lakes and wetlands in the Shingobee River headwaters of northwestern Minnesota, designed to study the interactions between surface and ground waters. Prior to about 11. 2 cal. ka, most of these lakes and wetlands were interconnected to form glacial Lake Willobee, which apparently formed when a debris flow dammed the Shingobee River. Between 11. 2 and 8. 5 cal. ka, the level of Lake Willobee fell as a result of breaching of the dam, transforming the deep lake into the existing lakes and wetlands. Analyses of a 9-m core from Little Shingobee Lake (LSL-B), and lacustrine sediments under 3. 3 m of peat in a 17-m core from Little Shingobee Fen (LSF-10), show that the dominant components are allogenic clastic material, and endogenic CaCO3 and organic matter. In both cores almost all of the iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) are incorporated in endogenic minerals, presumed to be X-ray amorphous oxyhydroxide minerals, that occur in significant quantities throughout the cores; almost no Fe and Mn are contributed from detrital aluminosilicate minerals. This suggests that, for most of the Holocene, the allogenic watershed contributions to lake chemistry were minor compared to the dissolved mineral load. In addition, prior to 3. 5 cal. ka, pollen zone boundaries coincide with large changes in lake-sediment mineralogy, indicating that both landscape and climate processes were linked to early- and mid-Holocene lake chemistry. The pollen time series, with sequential domination by spruce, pine, sagebrush-oak, birch-oak and, finally, white pine is typical of the region and reflects the changing location of the prairie-forest transition zone over time. These changes in vegetation had some profound effects on the geochemistry of the lake waters. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  14. THE ROLE OF IRON IN Deinococcus radiodurans ENGINEERED FOR GROWTH ON TOLUENE AND THE ROLE OF MANGANESE IN THE EXTREME RADIATION RESISTANCE PHENOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan Brim; Elena K. Gaidamakova; Vera Y. Matrosova; Min Zhai; Amudhan Venkateswaran; Marina Omelchenko; Kira S. Makarova; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson; Michael J. Daly

    2004-03-17

    Toluene and other fuel hydrocarbons are commonly found in association with radionuclides at numerous Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently occurring together with Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. In this study, the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was engineered for complete toluene mineralization by cloned expression of tod and xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida. The recombinant Tod/Xyl strain showed significant incorporation of carbon from the toluene aromatic ring into cellular macromolecules and carbon dioxide, in the absence or presence of chronic radiation. We have shown that intracellular iron concentrations in wild-type D. radiodurans in minimal medium are exceptionally low and not sufficient to support growth on toluene using Fe-dependent oxygenases cloned from P. putida. Introducing the fur mutation into D. radiodurans increased intracellular Fe levels, and imparted on the engineered strain the ability to grow on meta-toluate as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism's native Cr(VI) reduction capabilities were facilitated by toluene when present as the sole carbon and energy source in natural sediment analogues of DOE contaminated environments. The engineered bacteria were able to oxidize toluene under both minimal and complex nutrient conditions, which is important since both conditions have environmental equivalents in the context of bioremediation processes. As such, the Tod/Xyl strain is providing a model for understanding the role of Fe and reduction of metals coupled to organic contaminant oxidation in aerobic radionuclide contaminated sediments. We have shown that D. radiodurans contains high intracellular manganese levels, and that Mn restriction sensitizes cells to irradiation. We propose that the unusually high Mn/Fe ratio of D. radiodurans facilitates survival by quenching oxidative stress during recovery.

  15. Characterization and identification of the sources of chromium, zinc, lead, cadmium, nickel, manganese and iron in PM10 particulates at the two sites of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Karar, Kakoli; Gupta, A K; Kumar, Animesh; Biswas, Arun Kanti

    2006-09-01

    Monitoring of ambient PM10 (particulate matter which passes through a size selective impactor inlet with a 50% efficiency cut-off at 10 microm aerodynamic diameter) has been done at residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) sites of an urban region of Kolkata during November 2003 to November 2004. These sites were selected depending on the dominant anthropogenic activities. Metal constituents of atmospheric PM10 deposited on glass fibre filter paper were estimated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) are the seven toxic trace metals quantified from the measured PM10 concentrations. The 24 h average concentrations of Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn and Fe from ninety PM10 particulate samples of Kolkata were found to be 6.9, 506.1, 79.1, 3.3, 7.4, 2.4 and 103.6 ng/m3, respectively. The 24 h average PM10 concentration exceeded national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) as specified by central pollution control board, India at both residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) areas with mean concentration of 140.1 and 196.6 microg/m3, respectively. A simultaneous meteorology study was performed to assess the influence of air masses by wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, relative humidity and temperature. The measured toxic trace metals generally showed inverse relationship with wind speed, relative humidity and temperature. Factor analysis, a receptor modeling technique has been used for identification of the possible sources contributing to the PM10. Varimax rotated factor analysis identified four possible sources of measured trace metals comprising solid waste dumping, vehicular traffic with the influence of road dust, road dust and soil dust at residential site (Kasba), while vehicular traffic with the influence of soil dust, road dust, galvanizing and electroplating industry, and tanning industry at industrial site (Cossipore).

  16. Steel dust in the New York City subway system as a source of manganese, chromium, and iron exposures for transit workers.

    PubMed

    Chillrud, Steven N; Grass, David; Ross, James M; Coulibaly, Drissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Epstein, David; Sax, Sonja N; Pederson, Dee; Johnson, David; Spengler, John D; Kinney, Patrick L; Simpson, H James; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 reflected increasing concern about potential effects of low-level airborne metal exposure on a wide array of illnesses. Here we summarize results demonstrating that the New York City (NYC) subway system provides an important microenvironment for metal exposures for NYC commuters and subway workers and also describe an ongoing pilot study of NYC transit workers' exposure to steel dust. Results from the TEACH (Toxic Exposure Assessment, a Columbia and Harvard) study in 1999 of 41 high-school students strongly suggest that elevated levels of iron, manganese, and chromium in personal air samples were due to exposure to steel dust in the NYC subway. Airborne concentrations of these three metals associated with fine particulate matter were observed to be more than 100 times greater in the subway environment than in home indoor or outdoor settings in NYC. While there are currently no known health effects at the airborne levels observed in the subway system, the primary aim of the ongoing pilot study is to ascertain whether the levels of these metals in the subway air affect concentrations of these metals or related metabolites in the blood or urine of exposed transit workers, who due to their job activities could plausibly have appreciably higher exposures than typical commuters. The study design involves recruitment of 40 transit workers representing a large range in expected exposures to steel dust, the collection of personal air samples of fine particulate matter, and the collection of blood and urine samples from each monitored transit worker.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of three-coordinate and related beta-diketiminate derivatives of manganese, iron, and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Panda, Arunashree; Stender, Matthias; Wright, Robert J; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Klavins, Peter; Power, Philip P

    2002-07-29

    Treatment of M[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (M = Mn, Fe, Co) with various bulky beta-diketimines afforded a variety of new three-coordinate complexes which were characterized by UV-vis, (1)H NMR and IR spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography. Reaction of the beta-diketimine H(Dipp)NC(Me)CHC(Me)N(Dipp) (Dipp(2)N(wedge)NH; Dipp = C(6)H(3)-2,6-Pr(i)(2)) with M[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (M = Mn or Co) gave Dipp(2)N(wedge)NMN(SiMe(3))(2) (M = Mn, 1; Co, 3) while the reaction of Fe[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) with Ar(2)N(wedge)NH (Ar = Dipp, C(6)F(5), Mes, C(6)H(3)-2,6-Me(2), or C(6)H(3)-2,6-Cl(2)) afforded the series of iron complexes Ar(2)N(wedge)NFe[N(SiMe(3))(2)] (Ar = Dipp, 2a; C(6)F(5), 2b; Mes, 2c; C(6)H(3)-2,6-Me(2), 2d; C(6)H(3)-2,6-Cl(2), 2e). This represents a new synthetic route to beta-diketiminate complexes of these metals. The four-coordinate bis-beta-diketiminate complex Fe[N(wedge)N(C(6)F(5))(2)](2), 4, was also isolated as a byproduct from the synthesis of 2b. Direct reaction of the Dipp(2)N(wedge)NLi with CoCl(2) gave the "ate" salt Dipp(2)N(wedge)NCoCl(2)Li(THF)(2), 5, in which the lithium chloride has formed a complex with Dipp(2)N(wedge)NCoCl through chloride bridging. The Fe(III) species Dipp(2)N(wedge)NFeCl(2), 6, was obtained cleanly from the reaction of FeCl(3) with Dipp(2)N(wedge)NLi. Magnetic measurements showed that all the complexes have a high spin configuration. The different substituents in the series of iron complexes 2a-e allowed assignment of their paramagnetically shifted (1)H NMR spectra. The X-ray crystal structures 1-2d and 3 showed that they have a distorted three-coordinate planar configuration at the metals whereas complexes 4-6 have highly distorted four-coordinate geometries.

  18. Dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II), trinuclear nickel(II), and pentanuclear copper(II) complexes with novel macrocyclic and acyclic Schiff-base ligands having enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamine components.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jue-Chao; Chu, Zhao-Lian; Huang, Wei; Wang, Gang; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2010-07-05

    Four novel [3 + 3] Schiff-base macrocyclic ligands I-IV condensed from 2,6-diformyl-4-substituted phenols (R = CH(3) or Cl) and enantiopure or racemic camphoric diamines have been synthesized and characterized. Metal-ion complexations of these enantiopure and racemic [3 + 3] macrocyclic ligands with different cadmium(II), zinc(II), manganese(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) salts lead to the cleavage of Schiff-base C horizontal lineN double bonds and subsequent ring contraction of the macrocyclic ligands due to the size effects and the spatial restrictions of the coordination geometry of the central metals, the steric hindrance of ligands, and the counterions used. As a result, five [2 + 2] and one [1 + 2] dinuclear cadmium(II) complexes (1-6), two [2 + 2] dinuclear zinc(II) (7 and 8), and two [2 + 2] dinuclear manganese(II) (9 and 10) complexes together with one [1 + 1] trinuclear nickel(II) complex (11) and one [1 + 2] pentanuclear copper(II) complex (12), bearing enantiopure or racemic ligands, different substituent groups in the phenyl rings, and different anionic ligands (Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(-), and SCN(-)), have been obtained in which the chiral carbon atoms in the camphoric backbones are arranged in different ways (RRSS for the enantiopure ligands in 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7-10 and RSRS for the racemic ligands in 3, 6, 11, and 12). The steric hindrance effects of the methyl group bonded to one of the chiral carbon atoms of camphoric diamine units are believed to play important roles in the formation of the acyclic [1 + 1] trinuclear complex 11 and [1 + 2] dinuclear and pentanuclear complexes 6 and 12. In dinuclear cadmium(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II) complexes 1-10, the sequence of separations between the metal centers is consistent with that of the ionic radii shortened from cadmium(II) to manganese(II) to zinc(II) ions. Furthermore, UV-vis, circular dichroism, (1)H NMR, and fluorescence spectra have been used to characterize and compare the structural

  19. The origin of manganese-rich metasediments and their relationship to iron formation and base metal deposits, western Georgia piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Wonder, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    Manganiferous metasediments (coticules), banded iron-formation, and tourmaline-quartz rocks (tourmalinites) are found in close spatial association to each other and to volcanogenic base metal sulfide and gold deposits in the Northern Piedmont of western Georgia. Coticules, which consist of up to 90% garnet and contain from 1 to 15 weight % MnO and 14 to 37 % Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, are often hosted by metabasalt. Tourmalinites occur as poorly-bedded aggregates or disseminations and are also found locally associated with metabasalt. Trace element analyses of coticules yield conflicting results. Cu + Co + Ni values and Zr/Cr ratios are low and indicate a hydrothermal origin. Alumina concentrations, Y/P/sub 2/O/sub 5/% ratios, and Th values indicate the probable presence of pelagic sediments in the protolith. Rare earth element patterns are enriched in the light elements and have slight negative Eu anomalies, resembling the patterns of pelagic clays most closely. The protolith of coticules was apparently a hydrothermal sediment with pelagic and/or terrigenous input. Tourmaline in tourmalinites is chemically similar to stratabound sulfide-related examples. Both coticules and tourmalinites are interpreted as metamorphosed seafloor exhalative sediments and thus indicate the potential for the presence of genetically related ore mineralization.

  20. Analysis of the world distribution of metal-rich subsea manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, Vincent Ellis; Wright, Nancy A.; Bowen, Roger W.

    1983-01-01

    Publicly available data on the composition of subsea manganese nodules extend previous reports of differences in average metal contents from ocean to ocean and of variations related to latitude and depth. Pacific Ocean nodules have the highest average manganese, nickel, and copper contents, and Atlantic Ocean nodules have the highest average iron content. The average manganese, nickel, and copper contents generally increase toward the equator in both hemispheres, and iron content generally decreases. The variation of metal content with water depth is not linear; instead, there appears to be a threshold depth of about 2,900 to 3,000 m, above which combined nickel and copper contents are generally less than 1 percent and below which cobalt content is generally less than about 0.6 percent. The composition of the nodules varies widely, but three rarely overlapping types that are of possible economic interest can be recognized. (1) Nodules containing more than about 1 percent combined nickel and copper only exceptionally contain more than 0.5 percent cobalt and 35 percent manganese. (2) Nodules containing more than 0.5 percent cobalt rarely contain more than 1 percent combined nickel and copper and 35 percent manganese. (3) Nodules containing more than 35 percent manganese only exceptionally contain more than 0.5 percent cobalt, although they average nearly 1.1 percent combined nickel and copper. Current economic interest in nodule mining is focused on the Clarion-Clipperton zone in the northeastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, the largest known area in which nodules average 1.8 percent or more combined nickel and copper. Several other areas in which nodules are rich in these metals are found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans and may be viewed as targets for exploration. Nearly 60 chemical elements have been found in manganese nodules, many in concentrations far exceeding their crustal abundances. The amounts in which many minor elements are present vary with the amounts of

  1. Geology of the Fishtie deposit, Central Province, Zambia: iron oxide and copper mineralization in Nguba Group metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Michael D.; Hitzman, Murray W.; Wood, David; Humphrey, John D.; Wendlandt, Richard F.

    2015-08-01

    The Fishtie copper deposit, located in the Central Province of Zambia, contains approximately 55 Mt of 1.04 % Cu at a 0.5 % Cu cut-off in oxide, sulfide, and mixed oxide-sulfide ores. The deposit is hosted in Neoproterozoic diamictites and siltstones of the Grand Conglomérat Formation and overlying Kakontwe Limestone Formation of the lower Nguba Group. The Grand Conglomérat Formation at Fishtie directly overlies basement schists and quartzites. Mineralized zones are located adjacent to high-angle normal faults that appear to control thickness variations in the Grand Conglomérat Formation suggesting synsedimentary fault movement. Iron-rich rocks consisting of nearly monomineralic bands of magnetite and ankerite occur within the Grand Conglomérat Formation. The absence of magnetite-rich clasts in overlying diamictites and the presence of disseminated magnetite, ankerite, and apatite in adjacent diamictites suggest this iron-rich rock formed by replacement of siltstone beds. These magnetite-rich rocks thicken towards normal faults suggesting the faults formed conduits for oxidized hydrothermal solutions. The magnetite-ankerite-quartz rock was overprinted by later hydrothermal alteration and sulfide mineralization. Copper sulfide precipitation was associated with growth of both muscovite and chlorite, together with weak silicification. Sulfides are zoned relative to normal faults with bornite more common in proximity to faults and ore stage pyrite most common in an outer zone with chalcopyrite. Copper sulfides display generally heavy sulfur isotopic values, suggesting sulfide derivation from thermochemical reduction of Neoproterozoic seawater sulfate. Copper mineralized zones in the Grand Conglomérat at Fishtie are megascopically similar to those observed in the newly discovered Kamoa deposit in the southern Democratic Republic of Congo. Alteration and mineralization at Fishtie display lateral zoning relative to normal faults unlike the broad vertical zonation

  2. Photochemical aerobic detoxification of aqueous phenol and chlorophenol solutions promoted by iron salts and iron, vanadium, and copper oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Nizova, G.V.; Bochkova, M.M.; Kozlova, N.B.; Shul`pin, G.B.

    1995-09-10

    Phenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol in air in the presence of soluble iron salts or insoluble V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CuO decompose in aqueous solution when irradiated by a luminescent lamp. The degree and the rate of decomposition are strongly influenced by the nature of the substrate and metal-containing promoter. As a result of decomposition, toxicity of solutions containing 2,4,5-trichlorophenol with respect to two types of living organisms - Protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis) and bacteria (Beneckea harveyi) - decreases significantly.

  3. In vivo detection of copper ions by magnetic resonance imaging using a prion-based contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Makino, Satoshi; Umemoto, Tomohiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yezdimer, Eric M; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Abnormal distributions of transition metals inside the body are potential diagnostic markers for several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, and cancer. In this article, we demonstrate that P57/Gd, a novel prion-based contrast agent, can selectively image tissues with excessive copper accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). P57/Gd selectivity binds copper(II) over other physiologically relevant cations such as zinc, iron, manganese, and calcium. To simulate a metabolic copper disorder, we treated mice with an intraperitoneal injection of a CuSO(4) solution to induce a renal copper overload. The MRI signal intensities from the renal cortex and medulla of copper spiked animals that were administered P57/Gd were found to correlate with the ex vivo copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  4. Predominant (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotube growth on a copper-promoted iron catalyst.

    PubMed

    He, Maoshuai; Chernov, Alexander I; Fedotov, Pavel V; Obraztsova, Elena D; Sainio, Jani; Rikkinen, Emma; Jiang, Hua; Zhu, Zhen; Tian, Ying; Kauppinen, Esko I; Niemelä, Marita; Krause, A Outi I

    2010-10-13

    We have developed a magnesia (MgO)-supported iron-copper (FeCu) catalyst to accomplish the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using carbon monoxide (CO) as the carbon source at ambient pressure. The FeCu catalyst system facilitates the growth of small-diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution. UV-vis-NIR optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) mapping were used to evaluate the relative quantities of the different (n,m) species. We have also demonstrated that the addition of Cu to the Fe catalyst can also cause a remarkable increase in the yield of SWNTs. Finally, a growth mechanism for the FeCu-catalyzed synthesis of SWNTs has been proposed.

  5. Insight into Bio-metal Interface Formation in vacuo: Interplay of S-layer Protein with Copper and Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, Anna A.; Grachova, Elena V.; Neudachina, Vera S.; Yashina, Lada V.; Blüher, Anja; Molodtsov, Serguei L.; Mertig, Michael; Ehrlich, Hermann; Adamchuk, Vera K.; Laubschat, Clemens; Vyalikh, Denis V.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms of interaction between inorganic matter and biomolecules, as well as properties of resulting hybrids, are receiving growing interest due to the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. The majority of potential applications for metal-biohybrid structures require stability of these systems under vacuum conditions, where their chemistry is elusive, and may differ dramatically from the interaction between biomolecules and metal ions in vivo. Here we report for the first time a photoemission and X-ray absorption study of the formation of a hybrid metal-protein system, tracing step-by-step the chemical interactions between the protein and metals (Cu and Fe) in vacuo. Our experiments reveal stabilization of the enol form of peptide bonds as the result of protein-metal interactions for both metals. The resulting complex with copper appears to be rather stable. In contrast, the system with iron decomposes to form inorganic species like oxide, carbide, nitride, and cyanide.

  6. Insight into Bio-metal Interface Formation in vacuo: Interplay of S-layer Protein with Copper and Iron

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Anna A.; Grachova, Elena V.; Neudachina, Vera S.; Yashina, Lada V.; Blüher, Anja; Molodtsov, Serguei L.; Mertig, Michael; Ehrlich, Hermann; Adamchuk, Vera K.; Laubschat, Clemens; Vyalikh, Denis V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of interaction between inorganic matter and biomolecules, as well as properties of resulting hybrids, are receiving growing interest due to the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. The majority of potential applications for metal-biohybrid structures require stability of these systems under vacuum conditions, where their chemistry is elusive, and may differ dramatically from the interaction between biomolecules and metal ions in vivo. Here we report for the first time a photoemission and X-ray absorption study of the formation of a hybrid metal-protein system, tracing step-by-step the chemical interactions between the protein and metals (Cu and Fe) in vacuo. Our experiments reveal stabilization of the enol form of peptide bonds as the result of protein-metal interactions for both metals. The resulting complex with copper appears to be rather stable. In contrast, the system with iron decomposes to form inorganic species like oxide, carbide, nitride, and cyanide. PMID:25736576

  7. Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasky, S.G.; Webber, B.N.

    1944-01-01

    .08 percent of phosphorus, 1.1 percent of barium, and minute quantities of copper, lead, and zinc. Although the manganese content of the sandstone and clay ore may change abruptly from bed to bed, the content within any individual bed changes gradually, and for any large volume of ore both the nanganese and iron content are remarkably uniform. Explorations to June 1941 consisted chiefly of 49 holes diamond-drilled in the upper zone on the Artillery Mountains side of the area. The district is estimated to contain an assured minimum of 200,000,000 tons of material having an average manganese content of 3 to 4 percent. About 20,000,000 tons of this total contains 5 percent or more of manganese, and 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 tons contains 10 percent or more. To what extent these deposits can be utilized is a metallurgical and economic problem. Although the clay and sandstone ores, as well as the 'hard' ore, are present in large tonnages, the 'hard' ore is the only kind that combines minable tonnage with promising grade. About 15,000,000 tons of 'hard' ore is present; about 500,000 tons of this contains 15 percent or more of manganese and averages 17 percent, and somewhat over 2,000,000 tons contains 10 percent or more and averages nearly 13 percent. Except for closer drilling to determine such things as the tonnage, grade, spacing, and form of the richer shoots with greater accuracy before beginning to mine them, further explorations are not recommended, for any new ore found is likely to be similar, both in grade and kind, to that already discovered.

  8. Molecular-level investigation into copper complexes on vermiculite: effect of reduction of structural iron on copper complexation.

    PubMed

    Furnare, Luca J; Vailionis, Arturas; Strawn, Daniel G

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we present results that describe the speciation of Cu sorbed to the clay mineral vermiculite, with special attention to the effects of reduction on Cu sorption complexes. Sorption complexes were studied using powdered extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, polarized EXAFS spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ionic strength (I), background ion, and clay reduction (structural iron) were varied in the sorption samples. At low I EXAFS results indicate that Cu was surrounded by up to six water molecules sorbed in the interlayer of reduced vermiculite. EXAFS results from Cu-equilibrated reduced vermiculite with high I Ca background electrolyte revealed that Cu was surrounded by 4 O atoms at 1.95 Angatroms and 8 second shell O atoms at 3.14 Angstroms. Angular dependence of the second shell O atoms interpreted from the polarized-EXAFS spectra indicated that the atoms are out of plane from the basal plane of the vermiculite (inclined approximately 25 degrees from the ab plane). The local atomic environment and angular dependence of the EXAFS spectra suggest that the Cu atoms are adsorbed above the hexagonal cavities of the reduced clay mineral and form a Cu dimer in the interlayer. This adsorption mechanism was not observed in the non-reduced vermiculite under identical equilibration conditions. Our results provide molecular level evidence that Cu sorption mechanisms on vermiculite are dependent on solution conditions, such as redox potential and background electrolyte. These results can be used to develop better models of Cu sorption mechanisms on clay mineral surfaces.

  9. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g.

  10. Interactions of free copper (II) ions alone or in complex with iron (III) ions with erythrocytes of marine fish Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Labieniec, Magdalena; Milowska, Katarzyna; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Rucinska, Agata; Sadowska, Magdalena; Jokiel, Marta; Brichon, Gerard; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2009-09-01

    As a consequence of human activity, various toxicants - especially metal ions - enter aquatic ecosystems and many fish are exposed to considerable levels. As the free ion and in some complexes, there is no doubt that copper promotes damage to cellular molecules and structures through radical formation. Therefore, we have investigated the influence of copper uptake by the red blood of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), and its oxidative action and effects on cells in the presence of complexed and uncomplexed Fe3+ ions. Erythrocytes were exposed to various concentrations of CuSO4, Fe(NO3)3, and K3Fe(CN)6 for up to 5h, and the effects of copper ions alone and in the combination with iron determined. The results show that inside the cells cupric ion interacts with hemoglobin, causing methemoglobin formation by direct electron transfer from heme Fe2+ to Cu2+. Potassium ferricyanide as a source of complexed iron decreases Met-Hb formation induced by copper ions unlike Fe(NO3)3. We also found that incubation of fish erythrocytes with copper increased hemolysis of cells. But complexed and uncomplexed iron protected the effect of copper. CuSO4 increased the level of lipid peroxidation and a protective effect on complexed iron was observed. Incubation of erythrocytes with copper ions resulted in the loss of a considerable part of thiol content at 10 and 20 microM. This effect was decreased by potassium ferricyanide and Fe(NO3)3 only after 1 and 3h of incubation. The level of nuclear DNA damage assayed by comet assay showed that 20 microM CuSO4 as well as 20 microM Fe(NO3)3 and 10 mM K3Fe(CN)6 induce single- and double-strand breaks. The lower changes were observed after the exposure of cells to K3Fe(CN)6. The data suggest that complexed iron can act protectively against copper ions in contrast to Fe(NO3)3.

  11. Regional framework and geology of iron oxide-apatite-rare earth element and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Mesoproterozoic St. Francois Mountains Terrane, southeast Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, Warren C.; Slack, John F.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Seeger, C